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Sample records for acromioclavicular joint disruption

  1. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment.

  2. Acromioclavicular Joint Separations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    non-surgical measures, high-grade inju- ries frequently warrant surgical intervention to minimize pain and maximize shoulder function. Factors such as...sports [1–3]. While most injuries can be managed non-operatively, high-grade separations may result in per- sistent pain or functional decline and...joint pathology (cross arm adduction and loading of the AC joint) can be helpful to localize shoulder pain to the AC joint. These tests are especial- ly

  3. Acromioclavicular and sternoclavicular joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Peter B; Lapointe, Pierre

    2008-10-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries are a frequent diagnosis following an acute shoulder injury. The literature on AC joint dislocation is extensive, reflecting the intense debate surrounding the topic. The choice of treatment is influenced by factors including the type of injury, the patient's occupation, the patient's past medical history, the acuity of the injury, and patient expectations. Sternoclavicular (SC) joint dislocation is an uncommon injury. The treatment of acute anterior SC joint dislocations is controversial. It is difficult to study with a well-designed prospective study because of the low frequency of this injury. Posterior dislocations are much less common than anterior dislocations. Posterior dislocations, however, are more serious; they are associated with significant complications and require prompt attention.

  4. Shoulder acromioclavicular joint reconstruction options and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Simon; Bedi, Asheesh

    2016-12-01

    Acromioclavicular joint separations are a common cause of shoulder pain in the young athletic population. In high-grade injuries, acromioclavicular joint reconstruction procedures may be indicated for functional improvement. There is currently no gold standard for the surgical management of these injuries. Multiple reconstructive options exist, including coracoclavicular screws, hook plates, endobutton coracoclavicular fixations, and anatomic ligament reconstructions with tendon grafts. This article aims to review pertinent acromioclavicular joint anatomy and biomechanics, radiographic evaluation, classification system, as well as reconstruction options, outcomes, and complications.

  5. Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint: an uncommon location.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Morillo, Melania; Mateo Soria, Lourdes; Riveros Frutos, Anne; Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Holgado Pérez, Susana; Olivé Marqués, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Septic pyogenic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint is a rare entity that occurs in immunosuppressed patients or those with discontinuity of defense barriers. There are only 15 cases described in the literature. The diagnosis is based on clinical features and the isolation of a microorganism in synovial fluid or blood cultures. The evidence of arthritis by imaging (MRI, ultrasound or scintigraphy) may be useful. Antibiotic treatment is the same as in septic arthritis in other locations. Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most frequently isolated. Our objective was to describe the clinical features, treatment and outcome of patients diagnosed with septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint at a Rheumatology Department. We developed a study with a retrospective design (1989-2012). The medical records of patients with septic arthritis were reviewed (101 patients). Those involving the acromioclavicular joint were selected (6 patients; 6%).

  6. Acromioclavicular joint pain in patients with adhesive capsulitis: a prospective outcome study.

    PubMed

    Anakwenze, Oke A; Hsu, Jason E; Kim, Jae S; Abboud, Joseph A

    2011-09-09

    Diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis is a clinical diagnosis based on history and physical examination. Afflicted patients exhibit active and passive loss of motion in all planes and a positive capsular stretch sign. The effect of adhesive capsulitis on acromioclavicular biomechanics leading to tenderness has not been documented in the literature. This study reports on the incidence of acromioclavicular tenderness in the presence of adhesive capsulitis. Furthermore, we note the natural history of such acromioclavicular joint pain in relation to that of adhesive capsulitis. Over a 2-year period (2005-2007), 84 patients undergoing initial evaluation for adhesive capsulitis were prospectively examined with the use of validated outcome measures and physical examination. Acromioclavicular joint tenderness results were compared and analyzed on initial evaluation and final follow-up of at least 1 year. Forty-eight patients (57%) with adhesive capsulitis had acromioclavicular joint pain on examination. At final follow-up, as range of motion improved, a significant increase in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons/Penn shoulder score and decrease in number of patients with acromioclavicular pain was noted with only 6 patients with residual pain (P<.05). In the presence of adhesive capsulitis, there is not only compensatory scapulothoracic motion but also acromioclavicular motion. This often results in transient symptoms at the acromioclavicular joint, which abate as the frozen shoulder resolves and glenohumeral motion improves. This is important to recognize to avoid unnecessary invasive treatment of the acromioclavicular joint when the patient presents with adhesive capsulitis.

  7. Arthroscopically Assisted Acromioclavicular and Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction for Chronic Acromioclavicular Joint Instability.

    PubMed

    Martetschläger, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Habermeyer, Peter; Hawi, Nael

    2016-12-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries are common injuries, especially in the young and active, male population. AC joint injuries account for 12% of all injuries of the shoulder girdle in the overall population. Although conservative treatment is recommended for Rockwood type I and type II injuries, there is controversial debate about optimal treatment for type III injuries. High-grade injuries are typically treated operatively to avoid painful sequelae. A vast number of different surgical methods have been described over the past few decades. Recent advances in arthroscopic surgery have enabled the shoulder surgeon to treat acute and chronic AC lesions arthroscopically assisted. Clinical studies have already shown good and reliable results. Although surgeons agree that a biological augmentation is required to minimize the risk of recurrent instability in chronic cases, a gold standard still needs to be defined. We present an arthroscopically assisted biological augmentation technique to reconstruct the AC and coracoclavicular ligaments, protected by a button-suture tape construct for chronic AC joint instability. The presented arthroscopic biological augmentation technique uses less and/or smaller drill holes in the clavicle and coracoid than previously described, thus reducing weakening of the bony structures. At the same time it enhances both horizontal and vertical stability.

  8. A Case Report of an Acromioclavicular Joint Ganglion Associated with a Rotator Cuff Tear.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Suguru; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Shirachi, Isao; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Shiba, Naoto

    2017-02-06

    We report a case of subcutaneous ganglion adjacent to the acromioclavicular joint with massive rotator cuff tear [1-7]. An 81-year-old woman presented with a ganglion adjacent to the acromioclavicular joint that had first been identified 9 months earlier. The ganglion had recurred after having been aspirated by her local physician, so she was referred to our hospital. The puncture fluid was yellowish, clear and viscous. Magnetic resonance imaging identified a massive rotator cuff tear with multi- lobular cystic lesions continuous to the acromioclavicular joint, presenting the "geyser sign". During arthroscopy, distal clavicular resection and excision of the ganglion were performed together with joint debridement. At present, the ganglion has not recurred and the patient has returned to normal daily activity. In this case, the ganglion may have developed subsequent to the concomitant massive cuff tear, due to subcutaneous fluid flow through the damaged acromioclavicular joint.

  9. All-Arthroscopic Technique for Reconstruction of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Cutbush, Kenneth; Hirpara, Kieran M.

    2015-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint dislocations are a common injury particularly among contact sports players. There has been an increasing trend toward arthroscopic management of these injuries. To date, these reconstructions have primarily addressed superoinferior instability by reconstructing the coracoclavicular ligaments. We describe an all-arthroscopic technique for reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments using Arthrex ABS TightRopes (Arthrex, Naples, FL), with additional stabilization of the superior acromioclavicular joint capsule using an anchor-based suture bridge to address anteroposterior instability. PMID:26697307

  10. Acromioclavicular joint dislocation with associated brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Charles Alexander; Blakeney, William; Zellweger, René

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 32-year-old female who sustained a left acromioclavicular (AC) joint type V injury and brachial plexus injury. The patient's AC joint injury was identified 6 days after she was involved in a motorbike accident where she sustained multiple other injuries. She required operative fixation of the AC joint using a locking compression medial proximal tibial plate. At 3 months post operatively, the patient was found to have a subluxed left shoulder as a result of an axonal injury to the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. In addition, the tibial plate had cut out. The plate was subsequently removed. At 8 months the glenohumeral articulation had been restored and the patient had clinically regained significant shoulder function. After 15 months the patient was pain free and could complete all her activities of daily living without impediment. She returned to playing competitive pool after 24 months. PMID:24855076

  11. Effect of subacromial decompression on laxity of the acromioclavicular joint: biomechanical testing in a cadaveric model.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Ashwin V; Perlmutter, Gary S; Zilberfarb, Jeffrey L; Wilson, David R

    2004-01-01

    Subacromial decompression is a well-accepted treatment for impingement syndrome when nonoperative therapies have failed. However, recent clinical data have raised concern that arthroscopic subacromial decompression may lead to laxity of the acromioclavicular joint and, potentially, predispose patients to late postoperative acromioclavicular joint pain. Our goal was to determine whether subacromial decompression with co-planing of the distal clavicle alters the laxity, or compliance, of the acromioclavicular joint in a cadaveric model. Eighteen cadaveric shoulders were dissected and tested in a specially designed rig, driven by a hydraulic materials testing machine. One hundred-Newton loads were applied to the distal clavicle in the superior, posterior, and anterior directions, while acromioclavicular joint motion was recorded with a 3-dimensional infrared optical measurement system. Acromioplasty was performed with a posterior-referenced cutting block technique and included co-planing of the distal clavicle in all specimens. Joint compliance before and after subacromial decompression was compared with the paired t test. Subacromial decompression increased anteroposterior compliance by 13%, from 8.8 +/- 2.9 mm (mean +/- SD) in the intact joint to 9.9 +/- 3.1 mm (P =.001). Subacromial decompression increased superior compliance by 32%, from 3.1 +/- 1.5 mm in the native specimen to 4.1 +/- 1.8 mm (P =.03). These observations may have implications for the technique of acromioplasty. Although the immediate result of acromioplasty with co-planing appears to be an increase in the compliance of the acromioclavicular joint, the clinical significance of these findings has yet to be determined.

  12. Shoulder tendinitis and osteoarthrosis of the acromioclavicular joint and their relation to sports.

    PubMed Central

    Stenlund, B

    1993-01-01

    A sample of 207 men from the construction industry was studied using an epidemiological technique of cross-sectional design to investigate if sport activities involving the arms increase the risk of developing shoulder tendinitis or osteoarthrosis of the acromioclavicular joint. The relative risk for shoulder tendinitis was estimated to be 9.5 on the right side, and 4.9 on the left side for a lifetime of sport activity exceeding 8399 h. Subjects who reported both extremely high physical load from work and from sports had an estimated relative risk for signs of shoulder tendinitis of 5.9 on the right side and 10.4 on the left side. High sport activity yielded relative risks of 4.6 on the right side and 2.8 on the left side for osteoarthrosis of the acromioclavicular joint. The combination of high activity in sports and high exposure to load lifted during work yielded relative risks for osteoarthrosis of the acromioclavicular joint of 12.5 on the right side and 6.7 on the left side. There seems to be an increased risk for shoulder tendinitis and acromioclavicular osteoarthrosis for subjects who have been extremely active in sports, and an even higher risk for those who have been extremely active in sports and also report a high exposure to load lifted during work. PMID:8358584

  13. ANATOMICAL RELATIONSHIP OF THE SUPRASCAPULAR NERVE TO THE CORACOID PROCESS, ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT AND ACROMION

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Gaspar, Eric Figueiredo; Siqueira, Karina Levy; Filho, Nivaldo Souza Cardozo; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish the anatomical relationship of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) located in the suprascapular notch, to the medial border of the base of the coracoid process, the acromial joint surface of the acromioclavicular joint and the anterolateral border of the acromion. Methods: We dissected 16 shoulders of 16 cadavers (9 males and 7 females). The distances from the suprascapular nerve (at its passage beneath the transverse ligament) to certain fixed points on the medial border of the base of the coracoid process, the acromial joint surface of the acromioclavicular joint, and the anterolateral border of the acromion were measured with the aid of calipers and correlated with age and sex. Cadavers with previous surgical interventions were excluded. Results: The mean measurements from the notch of the suprascapular nerve were: 3.9 cm to the medial border of the base of the coracoid process (ranging from 3.1 cm to 5.2 cm); 4.7 cm to the acromioclavicular joint (ranging from 3.9 cm to 5.2 cm); and 6.1 cm to the anterolateral border of the acromion (ranging from 5.7 cm to 6.8 cm). Conclusion: Accurate anatomical knowledge of the nerves of the anterior region of the shoulder is essential in order to avoid iatrogenic injuries and to achieve satisfactory results in surgical treatment for shoulder diseases, whether performed as open or arthroscopic procedures. PMID:27022551

  14. ISAKOS upper extremity committee consensus statement on the need for diversification of the Rockwood classification for acromioclavicular joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Beitzel, Knut; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Bak, Klaus; Itoi, Eiji; Kibler, William B; Mirzayan, Raffy; Imhoff, Andreas B; Calvo, Emilio; Arce, Guillermo; Shea, Kevin

    2014-02-01

    Optimal treatment for the unstable acromioclavicular (AC) joint remains a highly debated topic in the field of orthopaedic medicine. In particular, no consensus exists regarding treatment of grade III injuries, which are classified according to the Rockwood classification by disruption of both the coracoclavicular and AC ligaments. The ISAKOS Upper Extremity Committee has provided a more specific classification of shoulder pathologies to enhance the knowledge on and clinical approach to these injuries. We suggest the addition of grade IIIA and grade IIIB injuries to a modified Rockwood classification. Grade IIIA injuries would be defined by a stable AC joint without overriding of the clavicle on the cross-body adduction view and without significant scapular dysfunction. The unstable grade IIIB injury would be further defined by therapy-resistant scapular dysfunction and an overriding clavicle on the cross-body adduction view.

  15. Double-button Fixation System for Management of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Torkaman, Ali; Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Mokhatri, Tahmineh; Haghighi, Mohammad Hossein Shabanpour; Monshizadeh, Siamak; Taraz, Hamid; Hasanvand, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatments for acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation present with some complications. The present study was designed to evaluate the double-button fixation system in the management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Methods: This cross sectional study, done between February 2011 to June 2014, consisted of 28 patients who underwent surgical management by the double-button fixation system for acute AC joint dislocation. Age, sex, injury mechanism, dominant hand, side with injury, length of follow up, time before surgery, shoulder and hand (DASH), constant and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, and all complications of the cases during the follow up were recorded. Results: The mean age of patients was 33.23±6.7 years. Twenty four patients (85.71%) were male and four (14.28%) were female. The significant differences were observed between pre-operation VAS, constant shoulder scores and post-operation measurements. There were not any significant differences between right and left coracoclavicular, but two cases of heterotrophic ossifications were recorded. The mean follow-up time was 16.17±4.38 months. Conclusion: According to the results, the double-button fixation system for management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation has suitable results and minimal damage to the soft tissues surrounding the coracoclavicular ligaments. PMID:26894217

  16. Chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations treated by the GraftRope device

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Jonas S; Aagaard, Knut E; Lunsjö, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Surgical treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations is challenging, and no single procedure can be considered to be the gold standard. In 2010, the GraftRope method (Arthrex Inc., Naples, FL) was introduced in a case series of 10 patients, showing good clinical results and no complications. We wanted to evaluate the GraftRope method in a prospective consecutive series. Patients and methods 8 patients with chronic Rockwood type III–V acromioclavicular joint dislocations were treated surgically using the GraftRope method. The patients were clinically evaluated and a CT scan was performed to assess the integrity of the repair. Results and interpretation In 4 of the 8 patients, loss of reduction was seen within the first 6 weeks postoperatively. A coracoid fracture was the reason in 3 cases and graft failure was the reason in 1 case. In 3 of the 4 patients with intact repairs, the results were excellent with no subjective shoulder disability 12 months postoperatively. It was our intention to include 30 patients in this prospective treatment series, but due to the high rate of complications the study was discontinued prematurely. Based on our results and other recent reports, we cannot recommend the GraftRope method as a treatment option for chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocations. PMID:25323800

  17. Evaluation and management of adult shoulder pain: a focus on rotator cuff disorders, acromioclavicular joint arthritis, and glenohumeral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, April

    2014-07-01

    Shoulder pain is a common reason for a patient to see their primary care physician. This article focuses on the evaluation and management of 3 common shoulder disorders; rotator cuff disorders, acromioclavicular joint arthritis, and glenohumeral joint arthritis. The typical history and physical examination findings for each of these entities are highlighted, in addition to treatment options.

  18. Acute septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae: a rare causative origin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Myong-Joo; Kim, Yeon-Dong; Ham, Hyang-Do

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint is a rare entity with symptoms that include erythema, swelling, and tenderness over the AC joint, fever, and limitation of shoulder motion with pain. In previous reports, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species have been mentioned as common causative organisms. Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a normal inhabitant of the oral cavity, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract. However, it sometimes causes opportunistic infections leading to septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. AC joint infection associated with H.parainfluenzae is very rare, and only one case has been reported in the literature. Moreover, septic arthritis in immunocompetent patients is also very rare. Here, we report the case of a healthy patient with H. parainfluenzae-related septic arthritis of the AC joint.

  19. Complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation treated with reconstructed ligament by trapezius muscle fascia and observation of fascial metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chaoliang; Huang, Sufang; Wang, Yingzhen; Sun, Xuesheng; Zhu, Tao; Li, Qiang; Lin, Chu

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term clinical results of acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations treated by reconstruction of the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament using trapezius muscle fascia. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed using the clavicular hook plate in 12 patients with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation, and the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments were reconstructed using trapezius muscle fascia. Radiographic evaluations were conducted postoperatively. We evaluated the functional results with constant scoring system and radiological results at the final follow-up visit. The mean Constant score at the final follow-up visit was 91.67 (range, 81 to 100). The results were excellent in eight patients (66.7%) and good in four patients (33.3%). Three patients with scores from 80 to 90 had mild pain during activity, but this did not affect the range of motion of the shoulder. All patients have returned to their preoperative work without any limitations. Compared with the contralateral side, radiography showed anatomical reposition in the vertical plane in all cases. The hook-plate fixation with ligament reconstruction was successful in treating AC dislocations. The acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament were reconstructed by trapezius muscle fascia that keep the distal clavicle stable both vertically and horizontally after type III injuries. PMID:28352721

  20. Migration of a Broken Kirschner Wire after Surgical Treatment of Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Batın, Sabri; Gürbüz, Kaan; Uzun, Erdal; Kayalı, Cemil; Altay, Taşkın

    2016-01-01

    Kirschner wire (K-wire) is one of the commonly used implants in orthopaedics practice. Migration of the wire is one of the most frequently reported complications after fixation by the K-wire. In particular, it has been reported that a greater range of motion in the shoulder, negative intrathoracic pressure associated with respiration, gravitational force, and muscular activities may cause migration from the upper extremities. In general, thin and long foreign bodies with smooth surfaces that are localized within the tendon sheath and at an upper extremity can migrate more readily and can reach longer distances. Here, we present a patient with long-term migration of a broken K-wire who underwent fixation for acromioclavicular joint dislocation 5 years ago. PMID:28058127

  1. The MRI geyser sign: acromioclavicular joint cysts in the setting of a chronic rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H John; Milillo, Ralph; Klein, Devon A; DiFelice, Gregory S

    2011-06-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old man with a large acromioclavicular (AC) joint cyst successfully managed with surgical excision. AC joint cysts are soft tissue masses generally signifying underlying rotator cuff pathology. Traditionally, these cysts were identified with shoulder arthrography as a "geyser" of fluid escaping through the AC joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is today's preferred imaging modality; we describe the MRI equivalent of the "geyser sign," signifying synovial fluid escaping through the cuff defect, across the subacromial bursa, and decompressing superiorly through a degenerated AC joint. Surgical management is preferred for symptomatic cysts. Based on a review of limited retrospective case series, recommendations for management of these lesions are as follows. Repair of the rotator cuff is preferable whenever possible. In the case of an irreparable defect, good results can be achieved through excisional AC joint arthroplasty and resection of the cyst base. Aspiration of these cysts should not be attempted, due to the high recurrence rate and potential for a draining sinus. Hemiarthroplasty also may be effective in indirectly decompressing these cysts; but given the invasive nature of this procedure, it should be reserved for patients who are also symptomatic from cuff arthropathy.

  2. Modified Weaver-Dunn Procedure Versus The Use of Semitendinosus Autogenous Tendon Graft for Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hegazy, Galal; Safwat, Hesham; Seddik, Mahmoud; Al-shal, Ehab A.; Al-Sebai, Ibrahim; Negm, Mohame

    2016-01-01

    Background: The optimal operative method for acromioclavicular joint reconstruction remains controversial. The modified Weaver-Dunn method is one of the most popular methods. Anatomic reconstruction of coracoclavicular ligaments with autogenous tendon grafts, widely used in treating chronic acromioclavicular joint instability, reportedly diminishes pain, eliminates sequelae, and improves function as well as strength. Objective: To compare clinical and radiologic outcomes between a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure and an anatomic coracoclavicular ligaments reconstruction technique using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft. Methods: Twenty patients (mean age, 39 years) with painful, chronic Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocations were subjected to surgical reconstruction. In ten patients, a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure was performed, in the other ten patients; autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was used. The mean time between injury and the index procedure was 18 month (range from 9 – 28). Clinical evaluation was performed using the Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score after a mean follow-up time of 27.8 months. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs were compared. Results: In the Weaver-Dunn group the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±4 to 40±2 points. While the Nottingham Clavicle Score increased from 48±7 to 84±11. In semitendinosus tendon graft group, the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±3 points to 50±2 points and the Nottingham Clavicle Score from 48±8 points to 95±8, respectively. Conclusion: Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using the semitendinosus tendon graft achieved better Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score compared to the modified Weaver-Dunn procedure. PMID:27347245

  3. Administrative barriers reduce emergency physician ordering of nasal and acromioclavicular joint radiographs.

    PubMed

    Ripper, Jill R; Soltis, Robert M; Peredy, Tamas R; Powers, Robert D

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether administrative barriers to clinician ordering of nasal bone and acromioclavicular (AC) joint radiographs would result in a significant diminution in emergency department use of these films and in patient charges. This study involved a retrospective cohort or pre-post analysis of radiograph ordering by emergency care providers seeing adult patients with nasal area or shoulder injuries. Numbers of films ordered before and after enactment of a restrictive policy change were determined, as well as any charge reductions associated with diminished film use. For each radiograph type, there was a 1-year preintervention period, and 2 subsequent 12-month periods after the policy change. Nasal bone radiographs decreased from 166 in 1994 to 10 in 1995 and 4 in 1996 (P <.001, chi(2)). This resulted in potential annual charge savings of 33,176 dollars. AC joint radiographs decreased from 35 films in 1994 to 5 in 1995 and 8 in 1996 (P <.001, chi(2)), with potential annual charge savings of 6,578 dollars. Adoption of an interdepartmental policy that prohibits physicians from routinely ordering radiographs of limited clinical value can result in significant reduction of radiograph use. This drop in use can lead to considerable reductions in patient charges.

  4. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-02-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed.

  5. Axial-Plane Biomechanical Evaluation of 2 Suspensory Cortical Button Fixation Constructs for Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Struhl, Steven; Wolfson, Theodore S.; Kummer, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although numerous suture-button fixation techniques for acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction have been validated with biomechanical testing in the superior direction, clinical reports continue to demonstrate high rates of construct slippage and breakage. Purpose: To compare the stability of a novel closed-loop double Endobutton construct with a commercially available cortical button system in both the axial and superior directions. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Six matched pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric upper extremities were anatomically dissected and prepared to simulate a complete AC joint dislocation. One side of each pair was reconstructed with the double Endobutton (DE) construct and other side with the dog bone button (DB) construct. The specimens were then tested using a materials testing machine, determining initial superior and axial displacements with a preload, and then cyclically loaded in the axial direction with 70 N for 5000 cycles. Displacement was again measured with the same preloads at fixed cycle intervals. The specimens were then loaded superiorly to failure. Results: At 5000 cycles, the mean axial displacement was 1.7 mm for the DB group and 1.2 mm for the DE group (P = .19), and the mean superior displacement was 1.1 mm for the DB group and 0.7 mm for the DE group (P = .32). Load at failure was similar (558 N for DE, 552 N for DB; P = .96). There was no statistically significant difference in the modes of failure. Conclusion: Biomechanical testing of both constructs showed similar fixation stability after cyclical axial loading and similar loads to failure. Clinical Relevance: The strength of both constructs after cyclical loading in the axial plane and load-to-failure testing in the superior plane validate their continued clinical use for achieving stability in AC joint reconstruction procedures. PMID:28210644

  6. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION BY TIGHT ROPE TECHNIQUE (ARTHREX®)

    PubMed Central

    GÓmez Vieira, Luis Alfredo; Visco, Adalberto; Daneu Fernandes, Luis Filipe; GÓmez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Presenting the arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope - Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to evaluate results obtained with this procedure. Methods: Between August 2006 and May 2007, 10 shoulders of 10 patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation were submitted to arthroscopic repair using the Tight Rope - Arthrex® system. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 15 months. Age ranged from 26 to 42, mean 34 years. All patients were male. Radiology evaluation was made by trauma series x-ray. The patients were assisted in the first month weekly and after three months after the procedure. Clinical evaluation was based on the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: All patients were satisfied after the arthroscopic procedure and the mean UCLA score was 32,5. Conclusion: The arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope – Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation showed to be an efficient technique. PMID:26998453

  7. Arthroscopic-Assisted Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction Using the TightRope Device With Allograft Augmentation: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Trenhaile, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical management of acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations remains challenging, especially in the revision setting. Most commonly, Rockwood type I and II injuries are managed nonoperatively whereas type IV, V, and VI injuries are managed with surgery. Type III separations are more controversial, with evidence supporting both nonoperative and operative treatment options. Multiple different arthroscopic techniques have been described; however, there is no current gold standard. AC joint reconstruction with the TightRope device (Arthrex, Naples, FL) with the patient in the lateral decubitus position is a method of restoring joint stability that allows for a minimally invasive, low-profile fixation construct using a single drill hole through the clavicle. Allograft augmentation of this fixation construct helps to eliminate the stress risers potentially created by this device while increasing overall repair construct stability. The purpose of this article is to describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic AC joint reconstruction using a TightRope device with allograft augmentation. PMID:26759765

  8. Determining in vivo sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint centre locations from skin markers, CT-scans and intracortical pins: A comparison study.

    PubMed

    Michaud, B; Jackson, M; Arndt, A; Lundberg, A; Begon, M

    2016-03-01

    To describe shoulder motion the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint centres must be accurately located. Within the literature various methods to estimate joint centres of rotation location are proposed, with no agreement of the method best suited to the shoulder. The objective of this study was to determine the most reliable non-invasive method for locating joint centre locations of the shoulder complex. Functional methods using pin mounted markers were compared to anatomical methods, functional methods using skin mounted markers, imaging-based methods using CT-scan data, and regression equations. Three participants took part in the study, that involved insertion of intracortical pins into the clavicle, scapula and humerus, a CT-scan of the shoulder, and finally data collection using a motion analysis system. The various methods to estimate joint centre location did not all agree, however suggestions about the most reliable non-invasive methods could be made. For the sternoclavicular joint, the authors suggest the anatomical method using the most ventral landmark on the sternoclavicular joint, as recommended by the International Society of Biomechanics. For the acromioclavicular joint, the authors suggest the anatomical method using the landmark defined as the most dorsal point on the acromioclavicular joint, as proposed by van der Helm. For the glenohumeral joint, the simple regression equation of Rab is recommended.

  9. The relationship between chronic type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation and cervical spine pain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This study was aimed at evaluating whether or not patients with chronic type III acromioclavicular dislocation develop cervical spine pain and degenerative changes more frequently than normal subjects. Methods The cervical spine of 34 patients with chronic type III AC dislocation was radiographically evaluated. Osteophytosis presence was registered and the narrowing of the intervertebral disc and cervical lordosis were evaluated. Subjective cervical symptoms were investigated using the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). One-hundred healthy volunteers were recruited as a control group. Results The rate and distribution of osteophytosis and narrowed intervertebral disc were similar in both of the groups. Patients with chronic AC dislocation had a lower value of cervical lordosis. NPQ score was 17.3% in patients with AC separation (100% = the worst result) and 2.2% in the control group (p < 0.05). An inverse significant nonparametric correlation was found between the NPQ value and the lordosis degree in the AC dislocation group (p = 0.001) wheras results were not correlated (p = 0.27) in the control group. Conclusions Our study shows that chronic type III AC dislocation does not interfere with osteophytes formation or intervertebral disc narrowing, but that it may predispose cervical hypolordosis. The higher average NPQ values were observed in patients with chronic AC dislocation, especially in those that developed cervical hypolordosis. PMID:20015356

  10. The prevalence of chondrocalcinosis (CC) of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint on chest radiographs and correlation with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Parperis, Konstantinos; Carrera, Guillermo; Baynes, Keith; Mautz, Alan; Dubois, Melissa; Cerniglia, Ross; Ryan, Lawrence M

    2013-09-01

    Digital imaging combined with picture archiving and communication system (PACS) access allows detailed image retrieval and magnification. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals preferentially deposit in fibrocartilages, the cartilage of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint being one such structure. We sought to determine if examination of the AC joints on magnified PACS imaging of chest films would be useful in identifying chondrocalcinosis (CC). Retrospective radiographic readings and chart reviews involving 1,920 patients aged 50 or more who had routine outpatient chest radiographs over a 4-month period were performed. Knee radiographs were available for comparison in 489 patients. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographics, chest film reports, and diagnoses. AC joint CC was identified in 1.1 % (21/1,920) of consecutive chest films. Patients with AC joint CC were 75 years of age versus 65.4 in those without CC (p < 0.0002). Four hundred eighty-nine patients had knee films. Six of these patients had AC joint CC, and of these, five also had knee CC (83 %). Of the 483 without AC joint CC, 62 (12 %) had knee CC (p = 0.002). Patients with AC joint CC were more likely to have a recorded history of CPPD crystal deposition disease than those without AC joint CC (14 versus 1 %, p = 0.0017). The prevalence of AC joint CC increases with age and is associated with knee CC. A finding of AC joint CC should heighten suspicion of pseudogout or secondary osteoarthritis in appropriate clinical settings and, in a young patient, should alert the clinician to the possibility of an associated metabolic condition.

  11. Treatment of Chronic Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation in a Paraplegic Patient with the Weaver-Dunn Procedure and a Hook-Plate.

    PubMed

    Godry, Holger; Citak, Mustafa; Königshausen, Matthias; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Seybold, Dominik

    2016-06-27

    In case of patients with spinal cord injury and concomitant acromioclavicular (AC) joint-dislocation the treatment is challenging, as in this special patient group the function of the shoulder joint is critical because patients depend on the upper limb for mobilization and wheelchair-locomotion. Therefore the goal of this study was to examine, if the treatment of chronic AC-joint dislocation using the Weaver-Dunn procedure augmented with a hook-plate in patients with a spinal cord injury makes early postoperative wheelchair mobilization and the wheelchair transfer with full weight-bearing possible. In this case the Weaver-Dunn procedure with an additive hook-plate was performed in a 34-year-old male patient with a complete paraplegia and a posttraumatic chronic AC-joint dislocation. The patient was allowed to perform his wheelchair transfers with full weight bearing on the first post-operative day. The removal of the hook-plate was performed four months after implantation. At the time of follow-up the patient could use his operated shoulder with full range of motion without restrictions in his activities of daily living or his wheel-chair transfers.

  12. Reconstruction of displaced acromio-clavicular joint dislocations using a triple suture-cerclage: description of a safe and efficient surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In this retrospective study we investigated the clinical and radiological outcome after operative treatment of acute Rockwood III-V injuries of the AC-joint using two acromioclavicular (AC) cerclages and one coracoclavicular (CC) cerclage with resorbable sutures. Methods Between 2007 and 2009 a total of 39 patients fit the inclusion criteria after operative treatment of acute AC joint dislocation. All patients underwent open reduction and anatomic reconstruction of the AC and CC-ligaments using PDS® sutures (Polydioxane, Ethicon, Norderstedt, Germany). Thirty-three patients could be investigated at a mean follow up of 32±9 months (range 24–56 months). Results The mean Constant score was 94.3±7.1 (range 73–100) with an age and gender correlated score of 104.2%±6.9 (88-123%). The DASH score (mean 3.46±6.6 points), the ASES score (94.6±9.7points) and the Visual Analogue Scale (mean 0.5±0,6) revealed a good to excellent clinical outcome. The difference in the coracoclavicular distance compared to the contralateral side was <5 mm for 28 patients, between 5-10 mm for 4 patients, and more than 10 mm for another patient. In the axial view, the anterior border of the clavicle was within 1 cm (ventral-dorsal direction) of the anterior rim of the acromion in 28 patients (85%). Re-dislocations occured in three patients (9%). Conclusion Open AC joint reconstruction using AC and CC PDS cerclages provides good to excellent clinical results in the majority of cases. However, radiographically, the CC distance increased significantly at final follow up, but neither the amount of re-dislocation nor calcifications of the CC ligaments or osteoarthritis of the AC joint had significant influence on the outcome. Level of evidence Case series, Level IV PMID:23098339

  13. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using a tendon graft: a biomechanical study comparing a novel “sutured throughout” tendon graft to a standard tendon graft

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Qais; Williams, Nadine; Hayes, Westley; Kapadia, Bhaveen H.; Chatterjee, Dipal; Urban, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: With a recurrence rate of over 30%, techniques that offer stronger acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction through increased graft strength may provide longevity. The purpose of our study was to determine the biomechanical strength of a novel tendon graft sutured throughout compared to a native tendon graft in Grade 3 anatomical AC joint reconstruction. Methods: For this in vitro experiment, nine paired (n = 18) embalmed cadaveric AC joints of three males and six females (age 86 years, range 51–94 years) were harvested. Anatomic repair with fresh bovine Achilles tendon grafts without bone block was simulated. Specimens were divided into two groups; with group 1 using grafts with ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) suture ran throughout the entire length. In group 2, reconstruction with only native allografts was performed. The distal scapula and humerus were casted in epoxy compound and mounted on the mechanical testing machine. Tensile tests were performed using a mechanical testing machine at the rate of 50 mm/min. Maximum load and displacement to failure were collected. Results: The average load to failure was significantly higher for group 1 compared to group 2, with mean values of 437.5 N ± 160.7 N and 94.4 N ± 43.6 N, (p = 0.001). The average displacement to failure was not significantly different, with 29.7 mm ± 10.6 mm in group 1 and 25 mm ± 9.1 mm in group 2 (p = 0.25). Conclusion: We conclude that a UHMWPE suture reinforced graft can provide a 3.6 times stronger AC joint reconstruction compared to a native graft. PMID:27163106

  14. [Results of surgical treatment for acromioclavicular dislocation using a modified Mitchell method].

    PubMed

    Król, M; Jarco, K; Sleczkowski, M; Delimat, J; Szot, J

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of surgical treatment in acromioclavicular dislocation (grade III according to Tossy) in 53 patients. Joint reconstruction was performed using Mitchell's modified method--acromioclavicular reconstruction was achieved by applying a with Dallos poliester fiber prosthesis. Clinically in 90.5% of the cases a good or excellent result was achieved.

  15. BiPOD Arthroscopic Acromioclavicular Repair Restores Bidirectional Stability.

    PubMed

    De Beer, Joe; Schaer, Michael; Latendresse, Kim; Raniga, Sumit; Moor, Beat K; Zumstein, Matthias A

    2016-09-19

    Stabilizing the acromioclavicular joint in the vertical and horizontal planes is challenging, and most current techniques do not reliably achieve this goal. The BiPOD repair is an arthroscopically assisted procedure performed with image intensifier guidance that reconstructs the coracoclavicular ligaments as well as the acromioclavicular ligaments to achieve bidirectional stability. Repair is achieved with a combination of 2-mm FiberTape (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) and 20-mm Poly-Tape (Neoligaments, Leeds, England) to achieve rigid repair, prevent bone abrasion, and promote tissue ingrowth. This study is a prospective review of the first 6 patients treated for high-grade acute acromioclavicular injury with the BiPOD technique. The study included 6 men who were 21 to 36 years old (mean, 27 years). At 6-month follow-up, complications were recorded and radiographic analysis was used to determine the coracoclavicular distance for vertical reduction and the amount of acromioclavicular translation on the Alexander axillary view was used to determine horizontal reduction. One patient had a superficial infection over the tape knot. The difference in coracoclavicular distance between the operated side and the uninvolved side was 9±2 mm preoperatively and 0.3±2 mm at 6-month follow-up. On Alexander axillary view, all 6 patients showed stable reduction, which is defined as a clavicle that is in line with the acromion. The findings show that BiPOD acromioclavicular reconstruction restores bidirectional stability of the acromioclavicular joint at 6 months. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):exx-exx.].

  16. Acromioclavicular septic arthritis and sternoclavicular septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis.

    PubMed

    Corey, Sally A; Agger, William A; Saterbak, Andrew T

    2015-03-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) and sternoclavicular (SC) septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis are rare, especially in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of septic AC joint with pyomyositis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles and a separate case with septic SC joint with pyomysitis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Both patients had similar presentations of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and were successfully treated with surgical incision and drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic therapy.

  17. Acromioclavicular osteoarthritis: a common cause of shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Menge, Travis J; Boykin, Robert E; Bushnell, Brandon D; Byram, Ian R

    2014-05-01

    Osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint is a frequent cause of shoulder pain and can result in significant debilitation. It is the most common disorder of the acromioclavicular joint and may arise from a number of pathologic processes, including primary (degenerative), posttraumatic, inflammatory, and septic arthritis. Patients often present with nonspecific complaints of pain located in the neck, shoulder, and/or arm, further complicating the clinical picture. A thorough understanding of the pertinent anatomy, disease process, patient history, and physical examination is crucial to making the correct diagnosis and formulating a treatment plan. Initial nonoperative management is aimed at relieving pain and restoring function. Typical treatments include anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and injections. Patients who continue to exhibit symptoms after appropriate nonsurgical treatment may be candidates for operative resection of the distal clavicle through either open or arthroscopic techniques.

  18. Acromioclavicular and sternoclavicular injuries and clavicular, glenoid, and scapular fractures.

    PubMed

    Bahk, Michael S; Kuhn, John E; Galatz, Leesa M; Connor, Patrick M; Williams, Gerald R

    2010-01-01

    Injuries to the acromioclavicular joint and the sternoclavicular joint and fractures of the clavicle, glenoid, and scapula vary widely in incidence, treatment, and prognosis. The treatment for acromioclavicular joint and clavicle injuries, which are relatively common, has significantly evolved. Controversy exists regarding the ideal treatment of type III acromioclavicular separations, whereas significant research has shown many potential benefits for surgically treating significantly displaced midshaft clavicle fractures that had traditionally been treated nonsurgically. Sternoclavicular injuries and scapula fractures are less common but are associated with high-energy mechanisms of injury and are potentially life threatening. Most of these injuries can be treated conservatively, although some injuries will benefit from surgical fixation. Identifying floating shoulders or unstable glenoid neck fractures without bony or ligamentous stabilization requires an understanding of the multiple anatomic stabilizers of the glenoid. Floating shoulders, glenoid neck fractures with 1 cm or 40 degrees or more of displacement, and intra-articular glenoid fractures with associated glenohumeral instability or intra-articular displacement of 5 mm or more may require surgical repair.

  19. PREFERED SURGICAL TECHNIQUE USED BY ORTHOPEDISTS IN ACUTE ACROMIOCLAVICULAR DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    NISHIMI, ALEXANDRE YUKIO; ARBEX, DEMETRIO SIMÃO; MARTINS, DIOGO LUCAS CAMPOS; GUSMÃO, CARLOS VINICIUS BUARQUE DE; BONGIOVANNI, ROBERTO RANGEL; PASCARELLI, LUCIANO

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine whether training on shoulder and elbow surgery influences the orthopedist surgeons' preferred technique to address acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation (ACD). Methods: A survey was conducted with shoulder and elbow specialists and general orthopedists on their preferred technique to address acute ACD. Results: Thirty specialists and forty-five general orthopedists joined the study. Most specialists preferred the endobutton technique, while most general orthopedists preferred the modified Phemister procedure for coracoclavicular ligament repair using anchors. We found no difference between specialists and general orthopedists in the number of tunnels used to repair the coracoclavicular ligament; preferred method for wire insertion through the clavicular tunnels; buried versus unburied Kirschner wire insertion for acromioclavicular temporary fixation; and time for its removal; and regarding the suture thread used for deltotrapezoidal fascia closure. Conclusion: Training on shoulder and elbow surgery influences the surgeons' preferred technique to address acute ACD. Level of Evidence V, Expert Opinion. PMID:28149190

  20. Salvage procedure for chronic acromioclavicular dislocation subsequent to overzealous distal clavicle resection.

    PubMed

    Zvijac, John E; Popkin, Charles A; Botto-van Bemden, Angie

    2008-12-01

    This article presents our surgical technique for reestablishing acromioclavicular stability after overzealous distal clavicular resection. Two cases are presented in which the clavicle of the affected acromioclavicular joint was unstable, causing pain with range of motion (ROM). To address the pathology, reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament and reattachment of the trapezius and deltoid to the clavicle were required. We reconstructed the coracoclavicular ligaments using an Achilles tendon calcaneal allograft. The bony end of the Achilles tendon allograft was used as an extension to lengthen the clavicle and the tendinous portion to reconstruct the coracoacromial ligament, thus stabilizing the clavicle. Once allograft reconstruction and stability had been achieved, a 1.5-cm gap remained between the acromion and the new allograft end of the clavicle. There was no evidence of acromioclavicular impingement. Supplemental fixation was not required. The trapezius, pectoralis, and deltoids were all reefed over the clavicle using Vicryl sutures (Ethicon, Inc, West Somerville, New Jersey) to reinforce the reduction and restore the natural contour of the shoulder girdle. Fifteen months postoperatively, both patients had maintained a reduced acromioclavicular joint. They had no pain with ROM, and full muscular strength was evident in all planes. Radiographs of their shoulders revealed a completely incorporated graft and a reduced clavicle. We recommend this novel technique for reestablishing acromiclavicular stability, as it provides good functional and subjective results.

  1. Environmental disruption of circadian rhythm predisposes mice to osteoarthritis-like changes in knee joint.

    PubMed

    Kc, Ranjan; Li, Xin; Voigt, Robin M; Ellman, Michael B; Summa, Keith C; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Keshavarizian, Ali; Turek, Fred W; Meng, Qing-Jun; Stein, Gary S; van Wijnen, Andre J; Chen, Di; Forsyth, Christopher B; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-09-01

    Circadian rhythm dysfunction is linked to many diseases, yet pathophysiological roles in articular cartilage homeostasis and degenerative joint disease including osteoarthritis (OA) remains to be investigated in vivo. Here, we tested whether environmental or genetic disruption of circadian homeostasis predisposes to OA-like pathological changes. Male mice were examined for circadian locomotor activity upon changes in the light:dark (LD) cycle or genetic disruption of circadian rhythms. Wild-type (WT) mice were maintained on a constant 12 h:12 h LD cycle (12:12 LD) or exposed to weekly 12 h phase shifts. Alternatively, male circadian mutant mice (Clock(Δ19) or Csnk1e(tau) mutants) were compared with age-matched WT littermates that were maintained on a constant 12:12 LD cycle. Disruption of circadian rhythms promoted osteoarthritic changes by suppressing proteoglycan accumulation, upregulating matrix-degrading enzymes and downregulating anabolic mediators in the mouse knee joint. Mechanistically, these effects involved activation of the PKCδ-ERK-RUNX2/NFκB and β-catenin signaling pathways, stimulation of MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5, as well as suppression of the anabolic mediators SOX9 and TIMP-3 in articular chondrocytes of phase-shifted mice. Genetic disruption of circadian homeostasis does not predispose to OA-like pathological changes in joints. Our results, for the first time, provide compelling in vivo evidence that environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is a risk factor for the development of OA-like pathological changes in the mouse knee joint.

  2. Simultaneous Disruption of the Pubic Symphysis and Sacroiliac Joint during Vaginal Birth

    PubMed Central

    Çıçek, Hakan; Keskın, H. Levent; Tuhanıoğlu, Ümit; Kiliçarslan, Kasım; Oğur, Hasan Ulaş

    2015-01-01

    Background. Puerperal diastasis of the pubic symphysis is a rare intrapartum complication. This report presents the case of a woman who experienced synchronous pubic symphysis and sacroiliac joint separations induced by vaginal delivery. Case. A 32-year-old woman (gravida 2, parity 2) with an uncomplicated prenatal course developed acute-onset anterior pubic pain during vaginal delivery. The pain persisted postpartum and was exacerbated by leg movement. Physical and radiographic examinations showed a pubic symphyseal separation of 2.4 cm, accompanied by a 10 mm disruption of the left sacroiliac joint. The patient was treated conservatively with pain-relief medication; bed rest, mostly in the left lateral decubitus position; closed reduction and application of a pelvic binder; use of a walker; and physical therapy. Conclusion. The patient responded to conservative management. She was essentially pain-free and regained movement and ambulation by 12 weeks postpartum. PMID:26078900

  3. Limb-threatening ischemia secondary to a congenital acromioclavicular remnant.

    PubMed

    Enlow, Jonathan M; McGregor, Walter E

    2009-07-01

    Upper extremity vascular compromise from thoracic outlet syndrome is rare and is usually the result of a "cervical rib," anterior scalene muscle abnormality, or clavicular trauma. We report a case of acute axillary artery thrombosis secondary to a congenital acromioclavicular remnant in a 40-year-old woman.

  4. Joint Trajectories of Symptoms of Disruptive Behavior Problems and Depressive Symptoms during Early Adolescence and Adjustment Problems during Emerging Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Wendy M.; Eddy, J. Mark; Dishion, Thomas J.; Reid, John B.

    2012-01-01

    The joint, longitudinal trajectories of symptoms of disruptive behavior problems and of depression were examined in a community sample drawn from neighborhoods with elevated rates of delinquency. Growth mixture modeling was applied to a 6 year transition period from childhood to adolescence, age 10 to 16 years, to identify latent classes of…

  5. Targeted mutation of NOV/CCN3 in mice disrupts joint homeostasis and causes osteoarthritis-like disease

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, K.A.; Boulter, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective The matricellular protein NOV/CCN3, is implicated in osteoarthritis (OA) and targeted mutation of NOV in mice (Novdel3) leads to joint abnormalities. This investigation tested whether NOV is required for joint homeostasis and if its disruption causes joint degeneration. Method NOV expression in the adult mouse joint was characterized by immunohistochemistry. A detailed comparison of the joints of Novdel3−/− and Novdel3+/+ (wild-type) males and females at 2, 6 and 12 months of age was determined by X-ray, histology and immunohistochemistry. Results NOV protein was found in specific cells in articular cartilage, meniscus, synovium and ligament attachment sites in adult knees. Novdel3−/− males exhibited severe OA-like pathology at 12 months (OARSI score 5.0 ± 0.5, P < 0.001), affecting all tissues of the joint: erosion of the articular cartilage, meniscal enlargement, osteophytic outgrowths, ligament degeneration and expansion of fibrocartilage. Subchondral sclerosis and changes in extracellular matrix composition consistent with OA, were also seen. The density of articular cartilage cells in Novdel3+/+ knee joints is maintained at a constant level from 2 to 12 months of age whereas this is not the case in Novdel3−/− mice. Compared with age and sex-matched Novdel3+/+ mice, a significant increase in articular cartilage density was seen in Novdel3−/− males at 2 months, whereas a significant decrease was seen at 6 and 12 months in both Novdel3−/− males and females. Conclusion NOV is required for the maintenance of articular cartilage and for joint homeostasis, with disruption of NOV in ageing Novdel3−/− male mice causing OA-like disease. PMID:25541297

  6. Joint trajectories of symptoms of disruptive behavior problems and depressive symptoms during early adolescence and adjustment problems during emerging adulthood.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Wendy M; Eddy, J Mark; Dishion, Thomas J; Reid, John B

    2012-10-01

    The joint, longitudinal trajectories of symptoms of disruptive behavior problems and of depression were examined in a community sample drawn from neighborhoods with elevated rates of delinquency. Growth mixture modeling was applied to a 6 year transition period from childhood to adolescence, age 10 to 16 years, to identify latent classes of trajectories for each symptom type. Several classes emerged for the two types of symptoms, namely a group of youth with high levels of disruptive behavior, a group with increasing levels, and a group with low levels, as well as a group with increasing levels of depression, a group with high levels, a group with decreasing levels, and a group with low levels. Within each symptom type, membership in either the high or in the increasing classes was related to a variety of problematic outcomes during emerging adulthood. The co-occurrence of the disruptive behavior and depression classes was then evaluated using parallel process analysis. Youth exhibiting high depressive symptoms were at increased risk for disruptive behavior problems, and youth with increasing disruptive behavior problems were at risk for depressive symptoms. However, only a very small number of youth had both a high depression trajectory and a high disruptive behavior trajectory. Implications of the findings for the design of prevention and treatment programs are discussed.

  7. Motion of the shoulder complex in individuals with isolated acromioclavicular osteoarthritis and associated with rotator cuff dysfunction: part 1 - Three-dimensional shoulder kinematics.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Catarina de Oliveira; Camargo, Paula Rezende; Ribeiro, Ivana Leão; Reiff, Rodrigo Bezerra de Menezes; Michener, Lori Ann; Salvini, Tania Fátima

    2014-08-01

    This study described the three-dimensional shoulder motion during the arm elevation in individuals with isolated acromioclavicular osteoarthritis (ACO) and ACO associated with rotator cuff disease (RCD), as compared to controls. Seventy-four participants (ACO=23, ACO+RCD=25, Controls=26) took part of this study. Disability was assessed with the DASH, three-dimensional kinematics were collected during arm elevation in the sagittal and scapular planes, and pain was assessed with the 11-point numeric pain rating scale. For each kinematic variable and demographic variables, separate linear mixed-model 2-way ANOVAs were performed to compare groups. Both ACO groups had higher DASH and pain scores. At the scapulothoracic joint, the isolated ACO group had greater internal rotation than control, and the ACO+RCD group had greater upward rotation than both other groups. At the sternoclavicular joint, both groups with ACO had less retraction, and the isolated ACO group had less elevation and posterior rotation. At the acromioclavicular joint, the isolated ACO group had greater upward rotation, and both ACO groups had greater posterior tilting. Patients with ACO had altered shoulder kinematics, which may represent compensatory responses to reduce pain and facilitate arm motion during arm elevation and lowering.

  8. Osteoarthritis-like pathologic changes in the knee joint induced by environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is potentiated by a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Kc, Ranjan; Li, Xin; Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Summa, Keith C; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Tryniszewska, Beata; Keshavarzian, Ali; Turek, Fred W; Meng, Qing-Jun; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-11-20

    A variety of environmental factors contribute to progressive development of osteoarthritis (OA). Environmental factors that upset circadian rhythms have been linked to various diseases. Our recent work establishes chronic environmental circadian disruption - analogous to rotating shiftwork-associated disruption of circadian rhythms in humans - as a novel risk factor for the development of OA. Evidence suggests shift workers are prone to obesity and also show altered eating habits (i.e., increased preference for high-fat containing food). In the present study, we investigated the impact of chronic circadian rhythm disruption in combination with a high-fat diet (HFD) on progression of OA in a mouse model. Our study demonstrates that when mice with chronically circadian rhythms were fed a HFD, there was a significant proteoglycan (PG) loss and fibrillation in knee joint as well as increased activation of the expression of the catabolic mediators involved in cartilage homeostasis. Our results, for the first time, provide the evidence that environmental disruption of circadian rhythms plus HFD potentiate OA-like pathological changes in the mouse joints. Thus, our findings may open new perspectives on the interactions of chronic circadian rhythms disruption with diet in the development of OA and may have potential clinical implications.

  9. POSTEROSUPERIOR SURGICAL ACCESS ROUTE FOR TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR DISLOCATIONS: RESULTS FROM 84 SURGICAL CASES

    PubMed Central

    Dal Molin, Danilo Canesin; Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Filho, Rômulo Brasil; Filardi, Cantídio Salvador; Tenor, Antonio Carlos; Stipp, Willian Nandi; Petros, Rodrigo Souto Borges

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results from surgical treatment of 84 cases of acute acromioclavicular dislocation, using a posterosuperior access route. Methods: Eighty-four cases of acute acromioclavicular dislocation (grade III in the Allman-Tossy classification) operated between November 2002 and May 2010 were evaluated. The patients’ mean age was 34 years. The diagnoses were made using clinical and radiographic evaluations. The patients were operated by the same surgical team, within three weeks of the date of the trauma, using a posterosuperior approach to the shoulder to access the top of the base of the coracoid process for placement of two anchors, which were used in reducing the dislocation. The minimum follow-up was 12 months. The postoperative clinical-radiographic evaluation was done using the modified Karlsson criteria and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score. Results: 92.8% of the 84 patients treated presented good or excellent results, and 7.2% presented fair or poor results, using the UCLA assessment score. According to the modified Karlsson criteria, 76.2% were assessed as grade A, 17.9% as grade B and 5.9% as grade C. Conclusion: The posterosuperior access route to the shoulder is a new option for accessing the coracoid process and treating acromioclavicular dislocation, with clinical and radiographic results equivalent to those in the literature. PMID:27047866

  10. Safety screw fixation technique in a case of coracoid base fracture with acromioclavicular dislocation and coracoid base cross-sectional size data from a computed axial tomography study.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Yoshiteru; Hirano, Tetsuya; Miyatake, Katsutoshi; Fujii, Koji; Takeda, Yoshitsugu

    2014-07-01

    Coracoid base fracture accompanied by acromioclavicular joint dislocation with intact coracoclavicular ligaments is a rare injury. Generally, an open reduction with screw fixation is the first treatment choice, as it protects the important structures around the coracoid process. This report presents a new technique of screw fixation for coracoid base fracture and provides anatomic information on cross-sectional size of the coracoid base obtained by computed tomography (CT). An axial image of the coracoid base was visualized over the neck of the scapula, and a guidewire was inserted into this circle under fluoroscopic guidance. The wire was inserted easily into the neck of scapula across the coracoid base fracture with imaging in only 1 plane. In addition, 25 measurements of the coracoid base were made in 25 subjects on axial CT images. Average length of the long and short axes at the thinnest part of the coracoid base was 13.9 ± 2.0 mm (range 10.6-17.0) and 10.5 ± 2.2 mm (6.6-15.1), respectively. This new screw fixation technique and measurement data on the coracoid base may be beneficial for safety screw fixation of coracoid base fracture.

  11. Biomechanical model for evaluation of pediatric upper extremity joint dynamics during wheelchair mobility.

    PubMed

    Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Slavens, Brooke A; Wang, Mei; Vogel, Lawrence C; Smith, Peter A; Harris, Gerald F

    2014-01-03

    Pediatric manual wheelchair users (MWU) require high joint demands on their upper extremity (UE) during wheelchair mobility, leading them to be at risk of developing pain and pathology. Studies have examined UE biomechanics during wheelchair mobility in the adult population; however, current methods for evaluating UE joint dynamics of pediatric MWU are limited. An inverse dynamics model is proposed to characterize three-dimensional UE joint kinematics and kinetics during pediatric wheelchair mobility using a SmartWheel instrumented handrim system. The bilateral model comprises thorax, clavicle, scapula, upper arm, forearm, and hand segments and includes the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, glenohumeral, elbow and wrist joints. A single 17 year-old male with a C7 spinal cord injury (SCI) was evaluated while propelling his wheelchair across a 15-meter walkway. The subject exhibited wrist extension angles up to 60°, large elbow ranges of motion and peak glenohumeral joint forces up to 10% body weight. Statistically significant asymmetry of the wrist, elbow, glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints was detected by the model. As demonstrated, the custom bilateral UE pediatric model may provide considerable quantitative insight into UE joint dynamics to improve wheelchair prescription, training, rehabilitation and long-term care of children with orthopedic disabilities. Further research is warranted to evaluate pediatric wheelchair mobility in a larger population of children with SCI to investigate correlations to pain, function and transitional changes to adulthood.

  12. Disruptive Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This paper attempts to develop guidelines relating to the problem of disruptive pupils in the classroom. A disruptive student is defined as one who interferes with the learning process. He is often male, physically aggressive, verbally hostile, over-age and frequently absent. The study examines the overlap between disruptive behavior and emotional…

  13. Is conservative treatment still defensible in grade III acromioclavicular dislocation? Are there predictive factors of poor outcome?

    PubMed

    Rasmont, Quentin; Delloye, Christian; Bigare, Elisa; Van Isacker, Tom

    2015-03-01

    The optimal treatment of grade III acromioclavicular (AC) dislocation is still controversial. Recent studies recommend surgery at that stage whereas meta-analysis favours conservative management. The objective of the present investigation was to analyse a clinical series of non-operated grade III AC dislocations and to determine their functional status. Thirty-five patients treated conservatively with a grade III acromioclavicular dislocation were retrospectively reviewed. Simple shoulder test, Oxford shoulder and bilateral Constant shoulder score were used for assessment. Various predictive criteria of poor outcome, particularly scapular dyskinesis were taken into account for analysis. Overall mean and median Constant Score of the injured side were 92.9 and 94, whilst the contralateral shoulder values were respectively 94.9 and 95 (mean and median scores). Ten patients had scapular dyskinesis. Laterality, shoulder activity and scapular dyskinesis were not statistically related to worse outcome. Twenty-eight (80%) patients resumed normal activity within six months. All but two patients were subjectively very satisfied or satisfied. Conservative treatment provided satisfactory results whatever the shoulder activity. No risk factors were predictive of a poorer outcome. Conservative management should remain the first option to manage these injuries.

  14. Intrapartum Pubic Symphysis Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Pires, RES; Labronici, PJ; Giordano, V; Kojima, KE; Kfuri, M; Barbisan, M; Wajnsztejn, A; de Andrade, MAP

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, high progesterone and relaxin levels produce physiological ligament relaxation on the pelvis. Therefore, moderate pubic symphysis and sacroiliac joints relaxing provide birth canal widening, thereby facilitating vaginal delivery. Sometimes, functional pain or pelvic instability may occur during pregnancy or puerperium, which is defined as symptomatic pelvic girdle relaxation. In rare cases, a pubic symphysis disruption can occur during the labor, causing severe pain and functional limitations. The early recognition of this injury is crucial to prevent complications and improve clinical and functional outcomes. This study reports an acute symphyseal disruption resulting from childbirth in a primiparous patient who underwent open reduction and internal fixation with plate and screws. After a 6 months follow-up, the patient presented no pain and satisfactory functional recovery. PMID:27057391

  15. Disruptive Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David H., Ed.

    A committee was formed to explore ways of helping school districts develop more effective programs for disruptive students. Committee findings revealed the need for the development of local guidelines to satisfy each school district's needs and for reliable feedback. Therefore, this report reflects efforts to sample various local approaches to the…

  16. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family as ... these out-of-town trips. Spend as much time as it takes to explain where you are ... before and during your travels. You need to acknowledge and accept her feelings: " ...

  17. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  18. Motion of the shoulder complex in individuals with isolated acromioclavicular osteoarthritis and associated with rotator cuff dysfunction: part 2 - muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Catarina de Oliveira; Michener, Lori Ann; Ribeiro, Ivana Leão; Reiff, Rodrigo Bezerra de Menezes; Camargo, Paula Rezende; Salvini, Tania Fátima

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to compare muscle activity in individuals with isolated acromioclavicular osteoarthritis (ACO), ACO associated with rotator cuff disease (ACO+RCD), and controls. Seventy-four participants (23 isolated ACO, 25 ACO+RCD, 26 controls) took part in this study. Disability was assessed with the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and anterior deltoid (AD) was collected during arm elevation in the sagittal and scapular planes. Pain during motion was assessed with the numerical pain rating scale. Analysis of the DASH, pain and kinematics were reported in part 1 of this study. For each muscle, separate 2-way linear mixed-model ANOVAs were performed to compare groups. ACO+RCD group had more UT and AD activity than the the isolated ACO and control other groups, more AD activity than the isolated ACO group during the ascending phase, and more AD activity than the ACO and control groups during the descending phase in both planes. Isolated ACO group had less SA activity than the control group only in the sagittal plane. Alterations in shoulder muscle activity are present in individuals with isolated ACO and with ACO+RCD and should be considered in rehabilitation.

  19. Regenerative Medicine and Restoration of Joint Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    joint replacement are used to treat a joint with an intra-articular fracture or destroyed by a combat injury. Generation of personalized, anatomically...knee joint disrupted either by an intra-articular fracture or trauma. Being able to generate personalized implants is a critical feature given that...compression testing to determine tensile strength. Fracture cleavage surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The effects of the

  20. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be done include: CBC or blood differential C-reactive protein Joint x-ray Sedimentation rate ... chap 256. Schaible H-G. Joint pain: basic mechanisms. In: McMahon SB, Koltzenburg M, Tracey I, Turk ...

  1. Joint Interdiction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-09

    Purpose This publication has been prepared under the direction of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. It sets forth joint doctrine to govern the...governmental and nongovernmental organizations, multinational forces, and other interorganizational partners. It provides military guidance for the...exercise of authority by combatant commanders and other joint force commanders (JFCs), and prescribes joint doctrine for operations and training. It

  2. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  3. The ITPA disruption database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidietis, N. W.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Granetz, R. S.; Kawano, Y.; Lehnen, M.; Lister, J. B.; Pautasso, G.; Riccardo, V.; Tanna, R. L.; Thornton, A. J.; ITPA Disruption Database Participants, The

    2015-06-01

    A multi-device database of disruption characteristics has been developed under the auspices of the International Tokamak Physics Activity magneto-hydrodynamics topical group. The purpose of this ITPA disruption database (IDDB) is to find the commonalities between the disruption and disruption mitigation characteristics in a wide variety of tokamaks in order to elucidate the physics underlying tokamak disruptions and to extrapolate toward much larger devices, such as ITER and future burning plasma devices. In contrast to previous smaller disruption data collation efforts, the IDDB aims to provide significant context for each shot provided, allowing exploration of a wide array of relationships between pre-disruption and disruption parameters. The IDDB presently includes contributions from nine tokamaks, including both conventional aspect ratio and spherical tokamaks. An initial parametric analysis of the available data is presented. This analysis includes current quench rates, halo current fraction and peaking, and the effectiveness of massive impurity injection. The IDDB is publicly available, with instruction for access provided herein.

  4. Instituting a disruptive conduct policy for medical staff.

    PubMed

    Barnsteiner, J H; Madigan, C; Spray, T L

    2001-08-01

    A healthy work environment is one that promotes interaction and communication among all professionals, a positive and strong working relationship between the nurse manager and physician director, and activities such as joint patient care rounds, shared clinical protocols, and joint teaching of physicians and nurses. There are situations when a physician's unacceptable conduct leads to a disruptive environment for patients, staff, and fellow physicians. This article describes the steps taken in one institution to establish structures and systems to communicate behaviors that are unacceptable and a policy to be followed should disruptive behavior be encountered. Having systems and structures in place assists in promoting a healthy work environment.

  5. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  6. Jointly amplified basal and pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion and increased process irregularity in women with anorexia nervosa: indirect evidence for disruption of feedback regulation within the GH-insulin-like growth factor I axis.

    PubMed

    Støving, R K; Veldhuis, J D; Flyvbjerg, A; Vinten, J; Hangaard, J; Koldkjaer, O G; Kristiansen, J; Hagen, C

    1999-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with multiple endocrine alterations. In the majority of AN patients, basal and GHRH-stimulated serum GH levels are increased. The metabolic effects of GH are known to be related to its pulsatile secretory pattern. The present study was performed to examine GH pulsatility in AN using the techniques of deconvolution analysis and approximate entropy, which quantify secretory activity and serial irregularity of underlying hormone release not reflected in peak occurrence or amplitudes. To this end, 24-h GH profiles were obtained by continuous blood sampling aliquoted at 20-min intervals in 8 nonfasting patients with AN [body mass index (BMI), 14.2 +/- 0.8 kg/m2; mean +/- SEM) and in 11 age-matched healthy women (BMI, 20.3 +/- 0.5 kg/m2). The deconvolution-estimated half-life of GH was not altered in the AN patients. The pituitary GH secretory burst frequency, burst mass, and burst duration were each significantly increased in women with AN compared to those in normal weight women. A 4-fold increase in daily pulsatile GH secretion was accompanied by a 20-fold increase in basal (nonpulsatile) GH secretion. There were significant negative correlations between BMI and the basal as well as pulsatile GH secretion rates. Moreover, AN patients exhibited significantly greater GH approximate entropy scores than the controls, denoting marked irregularity of the GH release process. In contrast to previous reports in healthy fasting subjects, cortisol levels in AN patients were positively correlated to GH secretion rates. Leptin levels were significantly inversely correlated to the pulsatile, but not the basal, GH secretion rate. The present data demonstrate augmented basal as well as pulsatile GH secretion with disruption of the orderliness of the GH release process in AN. Accordingly, GH secretion in AN probably reflects altered neuroendocrine feedback regulation, e.g. associated with increased hypothalamic GHRH discharge superimposed on reduced

  7. Confronting the disruptive physician.

    PubMed

    Linney, B J

    1997-01-01

    Ignoring disruptive behavior is no longer an option in today's changing health care environment. Competition and managed care have caused more organizations to deal with the disruptive physician, rather than look the other way as many did in years past. But it's not an easy task, possibly the toughest of your management career. How should you confront a disruptive physician? By having clearly stated expectations for physician behavior and policies in place for dealing with problem physicians, organizations have a context from which to address the situation.

  8. Understanding disruptions in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Leonid

    2011-10-01

    Disruptions in tokamaks are known since 1963 but even now some aspects of them remain a mystery. This talk describes progress made recently in understanding disruptions. A major step forward occurred in 2007 when the importance of galvanic contact of the plasma with the wall in plasma dynamics was pointed out. The toroidal asymmetry of plasma current, observed in JET vertical disruptions, was explained by the theory of the wall touching kink mode. The currents shared by the plasma with the wall and responsible for the asymmetry were identified as generated by the kink mode. Such currents are referred to as Hiro currents. They have shown exceptional consistency with the entire JET disruption data base (more than 5500 cases) and ruled out the long lasting interpretation based on ``halo currents,'' which contradict experiments even in the sign of the measured asymmetry. Accordingly, the sideways forces are understood and their scaling from JET to ITER was justified. Hiro currents provide also a plausible explanation of the current spike at the beginning of the disruptions. The important role of the plasma edge and its interaction with the wall was revealed. Based on this new understanding of disruptions, dedicated experiments on the current spike (J-TEXT, Wuhan, China) and runaway prevention by the repetitive triggering of kink modes (T-10, AUG, Tore Supra) were motivated and are in progress. Accordingly, the need for new, adaptive grid approaches to numerical simulations of disruptions became evident. In addition to the core MHD, simulations of realistic wall geometry, disruption specific plasma edge physics, plasma-wall interaction, and energetic particles need be developed. The first results of simulations of the fast MHD regime, Hiro current generation, and slower plasma decay due to a wall touching kink mode made with the new DSC code are presented. This work is supported by US DoE contract No. DE-AC02-09-CH11466.

  9. Ceramic joints

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Bradley J.; Patten, Jr., Donald O.

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  10. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages. PMID:27683538

  11. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies.

    PubMed

    Kricka, Larry J

    2016-08-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages.

  12. The disruption management model.

    PubMed

    McAlister, James

    2011-10-01

    Within all organisations, business continuity disruptions present a set of dilemmas that managers may not have dealt with before in their normal daily duties. The disruption management model provides a simple but effective management tool to enable crisis management teams to stay focused on recovery in the midst of a business continuity incident. The model has four chronological primary headlines, which steer the team through a quick-time crisis decision-making process. The procedure facilitates timely, systematic, rationalised and justified decisions, which can withstand post-event scrutiny. The disruption management model has been thoroughly tested within an emergency services environment and is proven to significantly support clear and concise decision making in a business continuity context.

  13. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory.

  14. The disruptive radiologist.

    PubMed

    Ulreich, Sidney; Harris, Robert D; Sze, Gordon; Moriarity, Andrew K; Bluth, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Radiologists interact with many individuals during daily practice, including patients, technologists, and other physicians. Some interactions may potentially negatively affect patient care and are termed "disruptive" behaviors. These actions are not uncommon and may begin during training, long before a radiologist enters clinical practice. The causes of disruptive behavior are multifactorial, and it is important that educators and radiologists in practice alike be able to identify them and respond accordingly. An escalated approach for both trainees and practicing radiologists is recommended, with substantial penalties after each incident that can include termination of employment. Training programs and practices must have clearly defined methods for confronting this potentially time-consuming and difficult issue.

  15. Compliant joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor); Kerley, James J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A compliant joint is provided for prosthetic and robotic devices which permits rotation in three different planes. The joint provides for the controlled use of cable under motion. Perpendicular outer mounting frames are joined by swaged cables that interlock at a center block. Ball bearings allow for the free rotation of the second mounting frame relative to the first mounting frame within a predetermined angular rotation that is controlled by two stop devices. The cables allow for compliance at the stops and the cables allow for compliance in six degrees of freedom enabling the duplication or simulation of the rotational movement and flexibility of a natural hip or knee joint, as well as the simulation of a joint designed for a specific robotic component for predetermined design parameters.

  16. Joint Commission

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content The Joint Commission Log In | Request Guest Access Forgot password? | Log In Help Contact Us | Careers | JCR Web Store | Press Room Search Home Accreditation Accreditation Ambulatory Health ...

  17. Boomtowns and Lifeworld Disruption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, J. Lynn; Albrect, Stan

    Three intermountain communities in Colorado and Utah were studied to determine the impact of rapid development on residents of rural communities, especially on their views of the world and their personal well-being, and to assess the degree to which energy boomtowns experience the social disruption suggested in the classical boomtown studies. Two…

  18. [Xenoestrogens: endocrine disrupting compounds].

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Milena; Murias, Marek

    2008-11-01

    In recent years much attention has been paid to the issues of chemicals that disrupt the normal function of endocrine system, namely xenoestrogens. These chemicals can mimic the activity of endogenous estrogens, antagonize their interaction with estrogen receptors or disrupt the synthesis, metabolism and functions of endogenous female hormones. Due to the fact that they act thanks to many different mechanisms, it is very difficult to estimate their estrogenic activity by means of a simple tests. The important issue remains the fact that xenoestrogens may have a positive or negative influence on the function of the endocrine system. It seems to be very important that there are many sources of xenoestrogens, that is not only vegetables and fruit (phytoestrogens), but also metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb), dental appliances (alkilphenols), food containers or blood containers (PVC--polyvinyl chloride, DEHP--di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate), cosmetics (parabens) and pesticides (DDT--dichlor-diphenyl-trichlorethylane, endosulfane).

  19. Hypermobile joints

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Joint Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an ...

  20. Sentinel events, disruptive behavior, and medical staff codes of conduct.

    PubMed

    Leiker, Michelle

    2009-09-01

    Regardless of physician concerns, hospitals and other organizations accredited by the Joint Commission are required to comply with the new leadership standard and define acceptable, disruptive, and inappropriate behaviors in a code of conduct. The new standard also requires them to implement a process for managing disruptive and inappropriate behaviors. Rules and standards can be very effective ways to promote safety and quality, but at the same time may be subject to abuse if not properly monitored. As a result, physicians should continue to monitor how hospitals have implemented the new leadership standard and raise concerns about any vague definitions, encroachment on physician rights, and misuse of the code of conduct.

  1. Manuel's asteroid disruption technique.

    PubMed

    John, Manuel; Ipe, Abraham; Jacob, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    A seventy-year-old male presented with dense asteroid hyalosis in both eyes. He had undergone cataract extraction in one eye 3 years ago, and the other eye had immature cataract. Both the autorefractor and dilated streak retinoscopy did not give readings and subjective visual improvement could not be achieved. Immediately following YAG posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitreous asteroid disruption, the vision improved to 20/20 with recordable auto refractor and streak retinoscopy values. Our initial experience indicates that the treatment is simple, safe and effective but needs controlled and prospective studies to confirm its long-term safety.

  2. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  3. Joint Warrior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-04

    hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...reflect my own personal views and are not necessarily endorsed by the NWC or the Department of the Navy. 14. ABSTRACT The way we fight wars has been...evolving over thousands of years. Today, the U.S. Navy, finds itself in the post- modern area of war fighting . Joint warfare is the latest

  4. Enzymatic vitreous disruption.

    PubMed

    Gandorfer, A

    2008-10-01

    Enzymatic vitreous disruption refers to cleaving the vitreoretinal junction by enzymatic means, thereby inducing posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and liquefaction of the vitreous gel. Several enzymes have been proposed in this respect, including chondroitinase, hyaluronidase, dispase, and plasmin. In an experimental setting, chondroitinase induced PVD and was helpful in removing epiretinal membranes but no further data have been reported yet. Hyaluronidase liquefies the vitreous as demonstrated in a phase III trial in diabetic patients with vitreous haemorrhage. Dispase induces PVD but also causes inner retinal damage and is now used as an animal model of proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Plasmin has the capability of both PVD induction and liquefaction. However, plasmin is highly unstable and not available for clinical use. Microplasmin (ThromboGenics Ltd, Dublin, Ireland) is a truncated form of human plasmin sharing the same catalytic activity like plasmin. Recombinant microplasmin is under clinical investigation in patients with vitreomacular traction. This review article reports on the current knowledge of enzymatic vitreous disruption and discusses details of the enzyme candidates in basic and clinical research terms.

  5. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A.

    2012-12-01

    In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like) galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s-1 at peak), rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds) and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ˜ 2 - 5), created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  6. Cell disruption for microalgae biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Günerken, E; D'Hondt, E; Eppink, M H M; Garcia-Gonzalez, L; Elst, K; Wijffels, R H

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a potential source for various valuable chemicals for commercial applications ranging from nutraceuticals to fuels. Objective in a biorefinery is to utilize biomass ingredients efficiently similarly to petroleum refineries in which oil is fractionated in fuels and a variety of products with higher value. Downstream processes in microalgae biorefineries consist of different steps whereof cell disruption is the most crucial part. To maintain the functionality of algae biochemicals during cell disruption while obtaining high disruption yields is an important challenge. Despite this need, studies on mild disruption of microalgae cells are limited. This review article focuses on the evaluation of conventional and emerging cell disruption technologies, and a comparison thereof with respect to their potential for the future microalgae biorefineries. The discussed techniques are bead milling, high pressure homogenization, high speed homogenization, ultrasonication, microwave treatment, pulsed electric field treatment, non-mechanical cell disruption and some emerging technologies.

  7. Reader's theater: a teaching strategy to help students respond to disruptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Jane; Lux, Kathleen

    2011-05-01

    The seriousness of disruptive behavior among nurses has been documented by professional nursing organizations, nurse researchers, hospital administrators, and the Joint Commission. Disruptive behavior is any inappropriate behavior, confrontation, or conflict ranging from verbal abuse to physical and sexual harassment. Although the profession recommends development of nursing curricula to address disruptive behavior, the literature on this topic is scarce. Using reader's theater, an innovative teaching strategy, the 10 most common forms of disruptive behavior were introduced. The scripts were used in a senior-level baccalaureate nursing transition course to increase students' awareness of and ability to handle disruptive behaviors. Reader's theater is a scripted, formalized storytelling experience that provides an opportunity for self-reflection and group discussions. After the reader's theater learning activity, students reported an increased ability to recognize and handle disruptive behavior in the workplace.

  8. Endocrine disrupters as obesogens

    PubMed Central

    Grün, Felix; Blumberg, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The recent dramatic rise in obesity rates is an alarming global health trend that consumes an ever increasing portion of health care budgets in Western countries. The root cause of obesity is thought to be a prolonged positive energy balance. Hence, the major focus of preventative programs for obesity has been to target overeating and inadequate physical exercise. Recent research implicates environmental risk factors, including nutrient quality, stress, fetal environment and pharmaceutical or chemical exposure as relevant contributing influences. Evidence points to endocrine disrupting chemicals that interfere with the body's adipose tissue biology, endocrine hormone systems or central hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as suspects in derailing the homeostatic mechanisms important to weight control. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms of action for these compounds and areas of future research needed to evaluate the significance of their contribution to obesity. PMID:19433244

  9. Highly viscous sodium hyaluronate and joint lubrication.

    PubMed

    Mori, S; Naito, M; Moriyama, S

    2002-01-01

    We studied the natural lubrication mechanism of synovial joints. We determined the effect of sodium hyaluronate (HA) on lubricating joints without the normal lubrication mechanism. The coefficient of friction (CF) of fresh pig hip joints was measured with the cartilage intact, washed, scoured with gauze and finally with sandpaper, to model cartilage degradation. Three formulas of HA (8 x 10(5) daltons 1%, 20 x 10(5) daltons 1%, 20 x 10(5) daltons 1.5%) and physiologic saline were used as lubricants. We observed the cartilage using light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The latter showed that the most superficial layer observed in the washed joint was disrupted after gauze scouring. Compared with intact cartilage the CF did not increase with washing. CF increased more after scouring with sandpaper than with gauze. Each formula of HA decreased the CF of joints scoured with gauze, but only the two more viscous HA formulas decreased the CF of sandpaper-scoured joints. A negative correlation was found between the CF of the sandpaper-scoured joints and the logHA viscosity (r = -0.733, P = 0.0001), suggesting that HA with higher viscosity was more effective in lubricating the joints.

  10. The characteristics of railway service disruption: implications for disruption management.

    PubMed

    Golightly, D; Dadashi, N

    2017-03-01

    Rail disruption management is central to operational continuity and customer satisfaction. Disruption is not a unitary phenomenon - it varies by time, cause, location and complexity of coordination. Effective, user-centred technology for rail disruption must reflect this variety. A repertory grid study was conducted to elicit disruption characteristics. Construct elicitation with a group of experts (n = 7) captured 26 characteristics relevant to rail disruption. A larger group of operational staff (n = 28) rated 10 types of rail incident against the 26 characteristics. The results revealed distinctions such as business impact and public perception, and the importance of management of the disruption over initial detection. There were clear differences between those events that stop the traffic, as opposed to those that only slow the traffic. The results also demonstrate the utility of repertory grid for capturing the characteristics of complex work domains. Practitioner Summary: The aim of the paper is to understand how variety in rail disruption influences socio-technical design. It uses repertory grid to identify and prioritise 26 constructs, and group 10 disruption types, identifying critical factors such as whether an incident stops or merely slows the service, and business reputation.

  11. Disruptive Youth Programs in Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Peggy G.

    This document describes the work of the Pupil Services Branch of the Maryland State Department of Education in its efforts to assist school districts and individual schools in the state in examining the causes of student disruption and in developing programs that are aimed at impacting disruptive students and creating more effective schools. A…

  12. Adrenocortical endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal has been neglected in endocrine disruption regulatory testing strategy. The adrenal is a vital organ, adrenocortical insufficiency is recognised in life threatening "adrenal crises" and Addison's disease, and the consequences of off-target toxicological inhibition of adrenocortical steroidogenesis is well recognised in clinical medicine, where drugs such as aminoglutethimide and etomidate killed patients via unrecognised inhibition of adrenocortical steroidogenic enzymes (e.g. CYP11B1) along the cortisol and aldosterone pathways. The consequences of adrenocortical dysfunction during early development are also recognised in the congenital salt wasting and adrenogenital syndromes presenting neonatally, yet despite a remit to focus on developmental and reproductive toxicity mechanisms of endocrine disruption by many regulatory agencies (USEPA EDSTAC; REACH) the assessment of adrenocortical function has largely been ignored. Further, every step in the adrenocortical steroidogenic pathway (ACTH receptor, StAR, CYP's 11A1, 17, 21, 11B1, 11B2, and 3-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Δ4,5 isomerase) is known to be a potential target with multiple examples of chemicals inhibiting these targets. Many of these chemicals have been detected in human and wildlife tissues. This raises the question of whether exposure to low level environmental chemicals may be affecting adrenocortical function. This review examines the omission of adrenocortical testing in the current regulatory frameworks; the characteristics that make the adrenal cortex particularly vulnerable to toxic insult; chemicals and their toxicological targets within the adrenocortical steroidogenic pathways; the typical manifestations of adrenocortical toxicity (e.g. human iatrogenically induced pharmacotoxicological adrenal insufficiency, manifestations in typical mammalian regulatory general toxicology studies, manifestations in wildlife) and models of adrenocortical functional assessment. The utility of the

  13. Serratus anterior disruption: a complication of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meythaler, J M; Reddy, N M; Mitz, M

    1986-10-01

    Pathology influencing the serratus anterior muscle contributes to classical medial winging of the scapula. Serratus anterior weakness or injury interferes with regular shoulder movement as this muscle stabilizes the medial border of the scapula against the thorax and rotates the scapula upward and laterally with arm elevation. Traumatic injury to the serratus anterior muscle without electrodiagnostic evidence of neurogenic involvement has only been reported once previously. We report an unusual case of disruption of the serratus anterior as a complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Involvement of the long thoracic nerve was ruled out by electromyography and nerve conduction studies. The injury occurred during routine activities of daily living and was complicated by a recurring subscapular hematoma. Contributing factors of shoulder joint contractures and coagulation abnormalities were associated with the course and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Initial treatment was by joint immobilization and reversal of coagulation abnormalities. Later treatment was directed toward joint protection and gradually increasing range of motion exercises.

  14. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  15. Tidal disruption event demographics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    We survey the properties of stars destroyed in tidal disruption events (TDEs) as a function of black hole (BH) mass, stellar mass and evolutionary state, star formation history and redshift. For M_{BH} ≲ 10^7 M_{⊙}, the typical TDE is due to a M* ˜ 0.3 M⊙ M-dwarf, although the mass function is relatively flat for M_{ast } ≲ M_{⊙}. The contribution from older main-sequence stars and sub-giants is small but not negligible. From MBH ≃ 107.5-108.5 M⊙, the balance rapidly shifts to higher mass stars and a larger contribution from evolved stars, and is ultimately dominated by evolved stars at higher BH masses. The star formation history has little effect until the rates are dominated by evolved stars. TDE rates should decline very rapidly towards higher redshifts. The volumetric rate of TDEs is very high because the BH mass function diverges for low masses. However, any emission mechanism which is largely Eddington-limited for low BH masses suppresses this divergence in any observed sample and leads to TDE samples dominated by MBH ≃ 106.0-107.5 M⊙ BHs with roughly Eddington peak accretion rates. The typical fall-back time is relatively long, with 16 per cent having tfb < 10-1 yr (37 d), and 84 per cent having longer time-scales. Many residual rate discrepancies can be explained if surveys are biased against TDEs with these longer tfb, which seems very plausible if tfb has any relation to the transient rise time. For almost any BH mass function, systematic searches for fainter, faster time-scale TDEs in smaller galaxies, and longer time-scale TDEs in more massive galaxies are likely to be rewarded.

  16. Interception and disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    Given sufficient warning we might try to avert a collision with a comet or asteroid by using beamed energy or by using the kinetic energy of an interceptor rocket. If motivated by the opportunity to convert the object into a space asset, perhaps a microgravity mine for construction materials or spacecraft fuels, we might try a rendezvous to implant a propulsion system of some sort. But the most cost-effective means of disruption is a nuclear explosive. In this paper, I discuss optimal tactics for terminal intercept, which can be extended to remote-interdiction scenarios as well. I show that the optimal mass ratio of an interceptor rock carrying a nuclear explosive depends mainly on the ratio of the exhaust velocity to the assailant-object closing velocity. I compare the effectiveness of stand-off detonation, surface burst, and penetration, for both deflection and pulverization, concluding that a penetrator has no clear advantage over a surface-burst device for deflection, but is a distinctly more capable pulverizer. The advantage of a stand-off device is to distribute the impulse more evenly over the surface of the object and to prevent fracture, an event which would greatly complicate the intercept problem. Finally, I present some results of a model for gravitationally bound objects and obtain the maximum non-fracturing deflection speed for a variety of object sizes and structures. For a single engagement, I conclude that the non-fracturing deflection speed obtainable with a stand-off device is about four times the speed obtainable with a surface-burst device. Furthermore, the non-fracturing deflection speed is somewhat dependent on the number of competent components of the object, the speed for a 13 component object being about twice that for a 135 component object.

  17. Endocrine Effects of Circadian Disruption.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Nelson, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms, provoked by artificial lighting at night, inconsistent sleep-wake schedules, and transmeridian air travel, is increasingly prevalent in modern society. Desynchrony of biological rhythms from environmental light cycles has dramatic consequences for human health. In particular, disrupting homeostatic oscillations in endocrine tissues and the hormones that these tissues regulate can have cascading effects on physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic disruption of circadian organization of endocrine function may lead to metabolic, reproductive, sleep, and mood disorders. This review discusses circadian control of endocrine systems and the consequences of distorting rhythmicity of these systems.

  18. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  19. Spacesuit mobility joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Joints for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit which have low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are described. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics. Linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli are featured. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  20. Male reprotoxicity and endocrine disruption

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Sarah; Catlin, Natasha; Heger, Nicholas; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Pacheco, Sara E.; Saffarini, Camelia; Sandrof, Moses A.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian reproductive tract development is a tightly regulated process that can be disrupted following exposure to drugs, toxicants, endocrine disrupting chemicals or other compounds via alterations to gene and protein expression or epigenetic regulation. Indeed, the impacts of developmental exposure to certain toxicants may not be fully realized until puberty or adulthood when the reproductive tract becomes sexually mature and altered functionality is manifested. Exposures that occur later in life, once development is complete, can also disrupt the intricate hormonal and paracrine interactions responsible for adult functions, such as spermatogenesis. In this chapter, the biology and toxicology of the male reproductive tract is explored, proceeding through the various life stages including in utero development, puberty, adulthood and senescence. Special attention is given to the discussion of endocrine disrupting chemicals, chemical mixtures, low dose effects, transgenerational effects, and potential exposure-related causes of male reproductive tract cancers. PMID:22945574

  1. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  2. Tidal disruption of inviscid protoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.; Cameron, A. G. W.; Benz, W.

    1991-01-01

    Roche showed that equilibrium is impossible for a small fluid body synchronously orbiting a primary within a critical radius now termed the Roche limit. Tidal disruption of orbitally unbound bodies is a potentially important process for planetary formation through collisional accumulation, because the area of the Roche limit is considerably larger then the physical cross section of a protoplanet. Several previous studies were made of dynamical tidal disruption and different models of disruption were proposed. Because of the limitation of these analytical models, we have used a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code to model the tidal disruption process. The code is basically the same as the one used to model giant impacts; we simply choose impact parameters large enough to avoid collisions. The primary and secondary both have iron cores and silicate mantles, and are initially isothermal at a molten temperature. The conclusions based on the analytical and numerical models are summarized.

  3. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  4. Disruptive innovation: the demand side.

    PubMed

    Havighurst, Clark C

    2008-01-01

    The notion of disruptive innovation provides a welcome framework for considering the prospects for low-cost alternatives in American medicine. Such innovations as have been seen, however, are largely the result of demand by patients paying their own bills because they have high-deductible coverage or are uninsured. Many other cost-saving innovations are discouraged by financing systems that are themselves largely immune to competition from disruptive innovators.

  5. Messenger ribonucleic acid levels in disrupted human anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ian K Y; Marchuk, Linda; Hart, David A; Frank, Cyril B

    2003-02-01

    Thirty patients had anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction for ongoing instability. Two groups were defined according to gross morphologic features identified during reconstruction: anterior cruciate ligament disruptions with scars attached to a structure in the joint and disruptions without reattachments. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for a subset of extracellular matrix molecules, proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors was done on samples of scarred anterior cruciate ligament tissue removed during reconstructive surgery. Results of the nonattached scar group showed significantly increased mRNA levels for Type I collagen, and an increased Type I to Type III collagen ratio compared with that for the attached scar group. In the first year after injury, decorin mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group also were significantly higher than in the attached scar group. Biglycan mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group correlated closely with Type I collagen mRNA levels. These results suggest differences in cellular expression in torn anterior cruciate ligaments that attach to structures in the joint versus those which do not. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for these differences have not been delineated, different molecular signals may influence the gross morphologic features of anterior cruciate ligament disruptions or alternatively, differing gross morphologic features may be subject to different mechanical loads leading to altered molecular expression. However, the finding of endogenous cellular activity in injured anterior cruciate ligaments raises the possibility that this activity may be enhanced to improve outcomes.

  6. Optimized Bolted Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.; Bunin, B. L.; Watts, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Computer technique aids joint optimization. Load-sharing between fasteners in multirow bolted composite joints computed by nonlinear-analysis computer program. Input to analysis was load-deflection data from 180 specimens tested as part of program to develop technology of structural joints for advanced transport aircraft. Bolt design optimization technique applicable to major joints in composite materials for primary and secondary structures and generally applicable for metal joints as well.

  7. Online Education Cast as "Disruptive Innovation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Technology-based forces of "disruptive innovation" are gathering around public education and will overhaul the way K-12 students learn--with potentially dramatic consequences for established public schools, according to an upcoming book that draws parallels to disruptions in other industries. In his "Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation…

  8. A New ITPA Disruption Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, A. W.; Wesley, J. C.; Strait, E. J.; Schissel, D. P.

    2003-10-01

    A new multi-institutional database of tokamak disruption relevant information is being proposed. Its purpose is to allow a user at any participating institution access to a broad range of disruption and preceding equilibrium data of vetted discharges from each institution. The goal is a common set of data allowing scientific exploration and engineering extrapolation. The data for any given discharge can be in many forms. For example, each discharge may have identifying information (shot number, type of disruption, institution/device, etc.), equilibrium scalar parameters (β, I_p, B_tor, etc.), disruption scalar parameters (max dI/dt, thermal quench time, toroidal asymmetry, etc.), equilibrium radial profile data [j(r), p(r), v_rot(r), etc.], time sequenced data [I(t), β(t), precursor amplitude (t), etc.]. Scalar data will be stored in a SQL format and cross-linked with vector data stored in a MDSPLUS format. Institutions will populate and maintain their own disruption data. Data visualization and analysis tools will be developed. Data available to all is managed by a principal at each institution. Data structure, accessibility and security issues will be discussed, and participation solicited.

  9. Tidal disruption of inviscid planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Cameron, A. G. W.; Benz, W.

    1991-01-01

    In view of previous efforts' demonstration that strongly dissipative planetesimals are immune to tidal disruption, an examination is presently conducted of the complementary case of inviscid planetesimals arising from collisions that are sufficiently energetic to entirely melt the resulting planetesimal and debris. The tidal disruption is numerically simulated by means of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code of Cameron and Benz (1991), concentrating on the tidal disruption of 0.01 earth-mass planetesimals passing by the earth with variations in the impact parameter at perigee and velocity at infinity. The SPH models show that tidal forces during a close encounter can efficiently convert orbital angular momentum into spin angular momentum, thereby initiating equatorial mass-shedding to inviscid planetesimals that have been spun up beyond the limit of rotational stability.

  10. Endocrine disrupters and menopausal health.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip; Rumsby, Paul; Harrison, Paul T C

    2004-06-01

    Chemicals known to disrupt the endocrine system of animal models are assessed for their potential impact on the health of menopausal and postmenopausal women. These "endocrine disrupters" consist of two groups of compounds - man-made and naturally occurring. There is some evidence to suggest that the naturally occurring phytoestrogens, derived from plant material, may have some beneficial effects on menopausal symptoms and the risk of breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Further studies are required to confirm these possibilities. Some man-made environmental pollutants appear to increase the risk of breast cancer, although again the evidence is inconclusive. Mechanistic experiments indicate that these chemicals interact with oestrogen receptors and alter metabolism in a number of different ways, some of which may be important in postmenopausal women. Further investigation of the differences in mode of action between the man-made and the natural endocrine disrupters may lead to important insights into their effects on women's health.

  11. Tidal disruption of dissipative planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, H.; Boss, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    A self-consistent numerical model is developed for the tidal disruption of a solid planetesimal. The planetesimal is treated as a highly viscous, slightly compressible fluid whose disturbed parts are an inviscid, pressureless fluid undergoing distortion and disruption. The distortions were constrained to being symmetrical above and below the equatorial plane. The tidal potential is expanded in terms of Legendre polynomials, which eliminates the center of mass acceleration effects, permitting definition of equations of motion in a noninertial frame. Consideration is given to viscous dissipation and to characteristics of the solid-atmosphere boundary. The model is applied to sample cases in one, two and three dimensions.

  12. Tidal disruption of viscous bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, S.; Tremaine, S.

    1992-01-01

    Tidal disruptions are investigated in viscous-fluid planetesimals whose radius is small relative to the distance of closest (parabolic-orbit) approach to a planet. The planetesimal surface is in these conditions always ellipsoidal, facilitating treatment by coupled ODEs which are solvable with high accuracy. While the disrupted planetesimals evolve into needlelike ellipsoids, their density does not decrease. The validity of viscous fluid treatment holds for solid (ice or rock) planetesimals in cases where tidal stresses are greater than material strength, but integrity is maintained by self-gravity.

  13. Modeling of Human Joint Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Radial Lateral " epicondyle Olecranon Radius Ulna Figure 3. Lateral aspect of the right elbow joint. -17- Annular Ligament This strong band encircles... elbow joint, knee joint, human joints, shoulder joint, ankle joint, joint models, hip joint, ligaments. 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side If...ligaments. -A rather extended discussion of the articulations and anatomical descriptions of the elbow , shoulder, hip, knee and ankle joints are

  14. Alternative Programs for Disruptive Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. Angele, Ed.; And Others

    The book addresses issues in meeting the educational needs of disruptive students. In the introduction, R. Sarri examines the rise of alternative schools and discusses common elements in their design and operation. D. Sabatino follows with "Issues and Concerns: Problems with Alternative Schools," in which he examines the particular difficulties…

  15. The Convergence of Environmental Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Marshall I.

    1970-01-01

    Considers reasons for water, air, and land pollution in the Soviet Union, incentives to pollute under socialism and the advantages socialism has for environmental management. Concludes that industrialization, not private enterprise, causes environmental disruption, and that strongly centralized planned economics do not necessarily avoid…

  16. Disruptive Technologies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of "disruptive" innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally…

  17. Fisheries-induced disruptive selection.

    PubMed

    Landi, Pietro; Hui, Cang; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2015-01-21

    Commercial harvesting is recognized to induce adaptive responses of life-history traits in fish populations, in particular by shifting the age and size at maturation through directional selection. In addition to such evolution of a target stock, the corresponding fishery itself may adapt, in terms of fishing policy, technological progress, fleet dynamics, and adaptive harvest. The aim of this study is to assess how the interplay between natural and artificial selection, in the simplest setting in which a fishery and a target stock coevolve, can lead to disruptive selection, which in turn may cause trait diversification. To this end, we build an eco-evolutionary model for a size-structured population, in which both the stock׳s maturation schedule and the fishery׳s harvest rate are adaptive, while fishing may be subject to a selective policy based on fish size and/or maturity stage. Using numerical bifurcation analysis, we study how the potential for disruptive selection changes with fishing policy, fishing mortality, harvest specialization, life-history tradeoffs associated with early maturation, and other demographic and environmental parameters. We report the following findings. First, fisheries-induced disruptive selection is readily caused by commonly used fishing policies, and occurs even for policies that are not specific for fish size or maturity, provided that the harvest is sufficiently adaptive and large individuals are targeted intensively. Second, disruptive selection is more likely in stocks in which the selective pressure for early maturation is naturally strong, provided life-history tradeoffs are sufficiently consequential. Third, when a fish stock is overexploited, fisheries targeting only large individuals might slightly increase sustainable yield by causing trait diversification (even though the resultant yield always remains lower than the maximum sustainable yield that could be obtained under low fishing mortality, without causing disruptive

  18. Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... arthritis, or JRA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Lyme disease. Joint aspiration is diagnostic but it also can ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Living With Lupus Bones, Muscles, and Joints ...

  19. Culture - joint fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid culture ... fungi, or viruses grow. This is called a culture. If these germs are detected, other tests may ... is no special preparation needed for the lab culture. How to prepare for the removal of joint ...

  20. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  1. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002974.htm Knee joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee ...

  2. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  3. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007633.htm Hip joint injection To use the sharing features on this ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ...

  4. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  5. Joint Enrollment Report, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Iowa Department of Education collects information on joint enrollment in Iowa's 15 community colleges. Jointly enrolled students are high school students enrolled in community college credit coursework. Most jointly enrolled students enroll through Senior Year Plus (SYP) programs such as Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) and concurrent…

  6. Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis) KidsHealth > For Parents > Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis) Print A A A What's in ... español Aspiración articular (artrocentesis) What It Is A joint aspiration (arthrocentesis) is a test that involves withdrawing ( ...

  7. Bodily illusions disrupt tactile sensations.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Sarah; Pritchett, Lisa M; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-02-01

    To accurately interpret tactile information, the brain needs to have an accurate representation of the body to which to refer the sensations. Despite this, body representation has only recently been incorporated into the study of tactile perception. Here, we investigate whether distortions of body representation affect tactile sensations. We perceptually altered the length of the arm and the width of the waist using a tendon vibration illusion and measured spatial acuity and sensitivity. Surprisingly, we found reduction in both tactile acuity and sensitivity thresholds when the arm or waist was perceptually altered, which indicates a general disruption of low-level tactile processing. We postulate that the disruptive changes correspond to the preliminary stage as the body representation starts to change and may give new insights into sensory processing in people with long-term or sudden abnormal body representation such as are found in eating disorders or following amputation.

  8. Crucial conversations: the most potent force for eliminating disruptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Grenny, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Commission announced this year that rude language and hostile behavior pose serious threats to patient safety and quality of care. The Silence Kills study, conducted by VitalSmarts and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, reveals that more than three-fourths of caregivers regularly work with doctors or nurses who are condescending, insulting, or rude. Although such disruptive and disrespectful behavior can be hurtful, what prompted the Joint Commission to address them as a condition of accreditation is the mounting evidence that such behavior is also harmful. The study found that more than 20% of health professionals have seen actual harm come to patients as a result of such behavior. The most powerful force governing human behavior is social influence. People will do most anything to gain acceptance or avoid rejection. If health care leaders want to not only secure the well-being of patients but also increase employee retention and engagement, the most immediate and effective step they can take is change this culture of silence. Health care leaders who want to engage social influence to eliminate disruptive behavior must break the code of silence in 4 critical conversational areas.

  9. Crucial conversations: the most potent force for eliminating disruptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Grenny, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Commission announced this year that rude language and hostile behavior pose serious threats to patient safety and quality of care. And, for good reason. The Silence Kills study, conducted by VitalSmarts and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, reveals that more than three fourths of caregivers regularly work with doctors or nurses who are condescending, insulting, or rude.But while these disruptive and disrespectful behaviors can be hurtful, what prompted The Joint Commission to address them as a condition of accreditation is the mounting evidence that these behaviors are also harmful. The Silence Kills study found that more than 20% of healthcare professionals have seen actual harm come to patients as a result of such behavior.The most powerful force over human behavior is social influence. People will do almost anything to gain acceptance or avoid rejection. If healthcare leaders want to not only secure the well-being of patients but also increase employee retention and engagement, the most immediate and effective thing they can do is to change this culture of silence.Healthcare leaders who want to engage social influence to eliminate disruptive behavior will have to break the code of silence in 4 crucial conversations.

  10. Engineering analysis of TFTR disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers an engineering approach quantifying the currents, forces, and times, as well as plasma position, for the worst-case disruption based on engineerign circuit assumptions for the plasma. As the plasma moves toward the wall during the current-decay phase of disruption, the wall currents affect the rate of movement and, hence, the decay time. The calculated structure-induced currents differ considerably from those calculated using a presently available criterion, which specifies that the plasma remains stationary in the center of the torus while decaying in 10 ms. This report outlines the method and basis for the engineering calculation used to determine the current and forces as a function of the circuit characteristics. It provides specific calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with variations in parameters such as the thermal decay time, the torus resistance, and plasma temperature during the current decay. The study reviews possible ways to reduce the disruption damage of TFTR by reducing the magnitude of the plasma external field energy that is absorbed by the plasma during the current decay.

  11. Sideways Force Produced During Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, H. R.; Paccagnella, R.; Breslau, J.; Jardin, S.; Sugiyama, L.

    2012-10-01

    We extend previous studies [1] of vertical displacement events (VDE) which can produce disruptions. The emphasis is on the non axisymmetric ``sideways'' wall force Fx. Simulations are performed using the M3D [2] code. A VDE expels magnetic flux through the resistive wall until the last closed flux surface has q < 3. At this point the plasma is unstable to an (m,n) = (2,1) mode. A theory of sideways force produced by this mode in the presence of a VDE is presented. The wall force depends strongly on γτw, where γ is the mode growth rate and τw is the wall resistive penetration time. The force Fx is largest when γτw is a constant of order unity, which depends on the initial conditions. For large values of γτw, the wall force asymptotes to a relatively smaller value, well below the critical value ITER is designed to withstand. The principle of disruption mitigation by massive gas injection is to cause a disruption with large γτw. [4pt] [1] H. R. Strauss, R. Paccagnella, and J. Breslau,Phys. Plasmas 17, 082505 (2010) [2] W. Park, E.V. Belova, G.Y. Fu, X. Tang, H.R. Strauss, L.E. Sugiyama, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1796 (1999).

  12. Revision Hope: Writing Disruption in Composition Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Uses Roland Barthes's metaphor of the "punctum" to explore the transformative potential of disruptions. Argues that writing teachers have been trained to read disruption in texts and classrooms as "evidence of poor taste or failed pedagogy," but that disruptions delay closure and thereby create spaces wherein theories and…

  13. Disruption and Distinctiveness in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    "Disruption"--while an evocative word triggering feelings of anxiety and perhaps even fear--also signals renewal and growth. The Higher Education (HE) sector in England has experienced some profound disruption over the years, and yet has emerged stronger and renewed in many ways. The impact of recent disruptive forces, from fees to the…

  14. Dealing with Disruptive Behavior of Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobmeier, Robert; Moran, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The adult education literature on disruptive behavior of adult learners was reviewed and a survey on disruptive behavior of adult learners was conducted with adult educators. The findings are synthesized in a conceptual framework for understanding the types and causes of disruptive behavior, which fall into the categories of inattention,…

  15. On the magnetized disruption of inertially-confined plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Mario; Kuranz, Carolyn; Rasmus, Alexander; Klein, Sallee; MacDonald, Michael; Trantham, Matt; Fein, Jeff; Belancourt, Patrick; Young, Rachel; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R. Paul; Pollock, Brad; Park, Jaebum; Hazi, Andrew; Williams, Jackson; Chen, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The creation and disruption of inertially-collimated plasma flows is investigated through experiment, simulation, and analytical modeling. Laser-generated plasma-jets are shown to be disrupted by an applied 5T B-field along the jet axis. An analytical model of the system describes the disruption mechanism through the competing effects of B-field advection and diffusion. These results indicate that for Rem 10-100, the ratio of inertial to magnetic pressures plays an important role in determining whether a jet is formed, but at high enough Rem , axial B-field amplification prevents inertial collimation altogether. This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HED Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0001840 and in collaboration with LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Support for this work was provided by NASA, under contract NAS8-03060, through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship Grant Number PF3-140111. Software used in this work was developed in part by the DOE NNSA ASC- and DOE Office of Science ASCR-supported Flash Center.

  16. Preschool children's observed disruptive behavior: variations across sex, interactional context, and disruptive psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Gray, Sarah A O; Carter, Alice S; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J; Hill, Carri; Danis, Barbara; Keenan, Kate; Wakschlag, Lauren S

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in disruptive behavior and sensitivity to social context are documented, but the intersection between them is rarely examined empirically. This report focuses on sex differences in observed disruptive behavior across interactional contexts and diagnostic status. Preschoolers (n = 327) were classified as nondisruptive (51%), clinically at risk (26%), and disruptive (23%) using parent and teacher reports on developmentally validated measures of disruptive behavior and impairment. Observed disruptive behavior was measured with the Disruptive Behavior Diagnostic Observation Schedule, a developmentally sensitive observational paradigm characterizing variation in preschoolers' disruptive behavior across two interactional contexts (parent and examiner). Repeated measures analyses of variance revealed a three-way interaction of child sex by diagnostic status by interactional context (F = 9.81, p < .001). Disruptive boys were the only subgroup whose behavior was not sensitive to interactional context: They displayed comparable levels of disruptive behavior with parents and examiners. In contrast, disruptive girls demonstrated the strongest context effect of any group. Specifically, with the examiner, disruptive girls' behavior was comparable to nondisruptive boys (though still more elevated than nondisruptive girls). However, in interactions with their mothers, disruptive girls displayed the highest rates of disruptive behavior of any subgroup in any context, although the difference between disruptive boys and disruptive girls in this context was not statistically significant. Findings suggest the importance of sex-specific conceptualizations of disruptive behavior in young children that take patterns across social contexts into account.

  17. Changing perspectives in medical practice: disruptive innovation.

    PubMed

    Paterick, Zachary R; Pradhan, Sala R; Paterick, Timothy E; Waterhouse, Blake E

    2009-01-01

    Disruptive innovation represents a business model that identifies a market location and increases consumer options. Retail clinics may represent a disruptive healthcare innovation that identifies strategies to reduce the cost of healthcare at the primary care level. The future of healthcare demands disruptive innovation that will allow for the 50 million uninsured members of our society to receive medical care. Disruptive innovative solutions need to ensure access, quality, and reasonable cost. Retail clinics represent the tip of the iceberg in disruptive innovative thinking. The obstacles that retail clinics must solve will be lessons learned for those that identify future innovative techniques.

  18. Sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, Paul; Dreyer, Susan J; Cole, Andrew; Mayo, Keith

    2004-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint is a source of pain in the lower back and buttocks in approximately 15% of the population. Diagnosing sacroiliac joint-mediated pain is difficult because the presenting complaints are similar to those of other causes of back pain. Patients with sacroiliac joint-mediated pain rarely report pain above L5; most localize their pain to the area around the posterior superior iliac spine. Radiographic and laboratory tests primarily help exclude other sources of low back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and bone scans of the sacroiliac joint cannot reliably determine whether the joint is the source of the pain. Controlled analgesic injections of the sacroiliac joint are the most important tool in the diagnosis. Treatment modalities include medications, physical therapy, bracing, manual therapy, injections, radiofrequency denervation, and arthrodesis; however, no published prospective data compare the efficacy of these modalities.

  19. Joint Program Management Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    the Engieermg and Manufacuring Devopment Phase. Nfilestoae HI- Develommen Annros Devopment approval marks a significant step for any program, but it is...to review concept formulaton. Systems Engilneertn As with service programs, systems engineering in joint program management is an essential tool . I...MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK On=e wd Umawtaiutt As discussed in Chapter 7, systems analysis of relationships is a usef tool for joint program managers. The joint

  20. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, Jacob I.

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  1. Environmental disruption or environmental improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.L.

    1981-03-01

    Paul Ehrich's concern for environmental disruption (Social Sci. Quarterly, 62, No. 1, 1981) are challenged here by Simon as unsubstantiated scare rhetoric. The refutation focuses on whether Ehrlich disregards history and oversimplifies the relationship between ecology and the social sciences. Simon notes that although historical data is shown to contradict Ehrlich's past predictions, his style of using soft data and identifying with the lay reader finds a receptive audience among those seeking understandable and value-free answers. 24 references, 6 figures, 3 tables. (DCK)

  2. [Chronic knee joint discomfort].

    PubMed

    Wittke, R

    2005-06-23

    Chronic pain in the knee joint is frequently a sign of arthrosis in adults. This must be clearly differentiated from other knee problems. Patellofemoral stress syndrome (occurs mostly in young people) and arthritis with effusion in the knee joint after long and mostly unusual stress also allow only a reduced function of the knee joint. However, even when the knee joint is still fully functional, chronic problems could already exist: For example, for joggers, iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee) or after high unphysiological stress, patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee). These must be differentiated from pes anserinus syndrome and a plica mediopatellaris.

  3. Disruptive innovation for social change.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Clayton M; Baumann, Heiner; Ruggles, Rudy; Sadtler, Thomas M

    2006-12-01

    Countries, organizations, and individuals around the globe spend aggressively to solve social problems, but these efforts often fail to deliver. Misdirected investment is the primary reason for that failure. Most of the money earmarked for social initiatives goes to organizations that are structured to support specific groups of recipients, often with sophisticated solutions. Such organizations rarely reach the broader populations that could be served by simpler alternatives. There is, however, an effective way to get to those underserved populations. The authors call it "catalytic innovation." Based on Clayton Christensen's disruptive-innovation model, catalytic innovations challenge organizational incumbents by offering simpler, good-enough solutions aimed at underserved groups. Unlike disruptive innovations, though, catalytic innovations are focused on creating social change. Catalytic innovators are defined by five distinct qualities. First, they create social change through scaling and replication. Second, they meet a need that is either overserved (that is, the existing solution is more complex than necessary for many people) or not served at all. Third, the products and services they offer are simpler and cheaper than alternatives, but recipients view them as good enough. Fourth, they bring in resources in ways that initially seem unattractive to incumbents. And fifth, they are often ignored, put down, or even encouraged by existing organizations, which don't see the catalytic innovators' solutions as viable. As the authors show through examples in health care, education, and economic development, both nonprofit and for-profit groups are finding ways to create catalytic innovation that drives social change.

  4. Mechanics of Sheeting Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Physical breakdown of rock across a broad scale spectrum involves fracturing. In many areas large fractures develop near the topographic surface, with sheeting joints being among the most impressive. Sheeting joints share many geometric, textural, and kinematic features with other joints (opening-mode fractures) but differ in that they are (a) discernibly curved, (b) open near the topographic surface, and (c) form subparallel to the topographic surface. Where sheeting joints are geologically young, the surface-parallel compressive stresses are typically several MPa or greater. Sheeting joints are best developed beneath domes, ridges, and saddles; they also are reported, albeit rarely, beneath valleys or bowls. A mechanism that accounts for all these associations has been sought for more than a century: neither erosion of overburden nor high lateral compressive stresses alone suffices. Sheeting joints are not accounted for by Mohr-Coulomb shear failure criteria. Principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, together with the mechanical effect of a curved topographic surface, do provide a basis for understanding sheeting joint growth and the pattern sheeting joints form. Compressive stresses parallel to a singly or doubly convex topographic surface induce a tensile stress perpendicular to the surface at shallow depths; in some cases this alone could overcome the weight of overburden to open sheeting joints. If regional horizontal compressive stresses, augmented by thermal stresses, are an order of magnitude or so greater than a characteristic vertical stress that scales with topographic amplitude, then topographic stress perturbations can cause sheeting joints to open near the top of a ridge. This topographic effect can be augmented by pressure within sheeting joints arising from water, ice, or salt. Water pressure could be particularly important in helping drive sheeting joints downslope beneath valleys. Once sheeting joints have formed, the rock sheets between

  5. The disruptive orthopaedic surgeon: implications for patient safety and malpractice liability.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pranay; Robinson, Brooke S; Novicoff, Wendy M; Dunnington, Gary L; Brenner, Michael J; Saleh, Khaled J

    2011-11-02

    Disruptive physician behavior imperils patient safety, erodes the morale of other health care providers, and dramatically increases the risk of malpractice litigation. Increasing patient volume, decreasing physician reimbursement, malpractice litigation, elevated stress, and growing job dissatisfaction have been implicated in disruptive behavior, which has emerged as one of the major challenges in health care. Because the aging patient population relies increasingly on orthopaedic services to maintain quality of life, improving professionalism and eradicating disruptive behavior are urgent concerns in orthopaedic surgery. Although many steps have been taken by The Joint Commission to improve patient care and define disruptive behavior, there is further room for improvement by physicians. Barriers to eliminating disruptive behavior by orthopaedic surgeons include fear of retaliation, lack of awareness among the surgeon's peers, and financial factors. Surgeons have a duty to address patterns of negative peer behavior for the benefit of patient care. This manuscript addresses the causes and consequences of disruptive physician behavior as well as management strategies, especially in orthopaedic surgery.

  6. Joint Newspaper Operating Agreements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Marie

    The number of competing daily newspapers in American cities has dwindled until only about 50 cities boast two papers. Of the newspapers in those cities, 23 now maintain separate editorial operations but have joint printing, advertising, and circulation departments. The concept of joint operation is 50 years old, dating from the Depression years…

  7. Jointness, A Selected Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-02-01

    Joint warfare is team warfare. Joint Pub 1 purple- suiter -An officer assigned to duty on a staff where no particu- lar service predominates. This may...Force Quarterly, no. 5 (Summer 1994): 64-70. Winton, Harold R. "Partnership and Tension: The Army and Air Force Between Vietnam and Desert Shield

  8. Addressing the phenomenon of disruptive physician behavior.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2003-01-01

    This timely article provides current information on an age-old issue of disruptive physician behavior within the hospital setting. Documented in medical literature over 100 years ago, disruptive physician behavior has been an ongoing challenge to the hospital staff and the quality of patient care in the hospital. Covered in this article are the negative consequences of disruptive physician behavior and the call to respond. If allowed to go unchecked, a physician exhibiting disruptive behavior may threaten a hospital's image, staff morale, finance, and quality of care. Failure to respond undermines the leadership of the hospital and the trust of the community in the hospital's mission. Included in this article are suggestions obtained from the literature and from the author's experience in responding to disruptive physician behavior. Of emphasis is a methodology that includes supporting bylaws and policies to manage disruptive physician behavior.

  9. Jointness for the Rest of Us: Reforming Joint Professional Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    Vision 2020 (JV 2020 ) is the conceptual template established to guide the transformation of America’s Armed Forces. According to this template, the...of Staff. Joint Vision 2020 , (Washington DC. Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Electronic Library, February 2001):1. 2 Ibid...Staffs of Staff, 2011. __________. Joint Vision 2020 .Washington DC. Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Electronic Library

  10. Current Concepts in Neuroendocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  11. Catastrophic disruption experiments: Recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martelli, G.; Ryan, E. V.; Nakamura, A. M.; Giblin, I.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the progress in the field of catastrophic disruption experiments over the past 4 years, since the publication of the review paper by Fujiwara et al. (1989). We describe the development of new techniques to produce shattering impacts relevant to the study of the collisional evolution of the asteroids, and summarize the results from numerous experiments which have been performed to date, using a variety of materials for both the impactor and the targets. Some of these, such as ice-on-ice, loose aggregates and pressurized targets, are quite new and have provided novel and exciting results. Some of the gaps existing previously in the data on fragment ejection-angle distributions, as well as translational and rotational velocity fields (including fine fragments) have been filled, and these new results will be surveyed.

  12. Catastrophic Disruption of Comet ISON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Jacqueline V.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Coulson, Iain M.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer; Riesen, Timm-Emmanuel; Meech, Karen J.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-11-01

    We report submillimeter 450 and 850 μm dust continuum observations for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained at heliocentric distances 0.31-0.08 au prior to perihelion on 2013 November 28 (r h = 0.0125 au). These observations reveal a rapidly varying dust environment in which the dust emission was initially point-like. As ISON approached perihelion, the continuum emission became an elongated dust column spread out over as much as 60″ (>105 km) in the anti-solar direction. Deconvolution of the November 28.04 850 μm image reveals numerous distinct clumps consistent with the catastrophic disruption of comet ISON, producing ˜5.2 × 1010 kg of submillimeter-sized dust. Orbital computations suggest that the SCUBA-2 emission peak coincides with the comet's residual nucleus.

  13. Catastrophic Disruption of Comet ISON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keane, Jacqueline V.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Coulson, Iain M.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer; Riesen, Timm-Emmanuel; Meech, Karen J.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    We report submillimeter 450 and 850 microns dust continuum observations for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained at heliocentric distances 0.31-0.08 au prior to perihelion on 2013 November 28 (rh?=?0.0125 au). These observations reveal a rapidly varying dust environment in which the dust emission was initially point-like. As ISON approached perihelion, the continuum emission became an elongated dust column spread out over as much as 60? (greater than 10(exp 5) km in the anti-solar direction. Deconvolution of the November 28.04 850 microns image reveals numerous distinct clumps consistent with the catastrophic disruption of comet ISON, producing approximately 5.2?×?10(exp 10) kg of submillimeter-sized dust. Orbital computations suggest that the SCUBA-2 emission peak coincides with the comet's residual nucleus.

  14. Resistance to disruption in a classroom setting.

    PubMed

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E; Neal, Carrie M; Ahearn, William H; Wheeler, Emily E; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B; Dube, William V

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple variable-interval (VI) 7-s VI 30-s schedule for 6 participants with developmental disabilities. Resistance to disruption was measured by presenting a distracting item. Response rates in the disruption components were compared to within-session response rates in prior baseline components. Results were consistent with the predictions of behavioral momentum theory for 5 of 6 participants.

  15. Automatic location of disruption times in JET.

    PubMed

    Moreno, R; Vega, J; Murari, A

    2014-11-01

    The loss of stability and confinement in tokamak plasmas can induce critical events known as disruptions. Disruptions produce strong electromagnetic forces and thermal loads which can damage fundamental components of the devices. Determining the disruption time is extremely important for various disruption studies: theoretical models, physics-driven models, or disruption predictors. In JET, during the experimental campaigns with the JET-C (Carbon Fiber Composite) wall, a common criterion to determine the disruption time consisted of locating the time of the thermal quench. However, with the metallic ITER-like wall (JET-ILW), this criterion is usually not valid. Several thermal quenches may occur previous to the current quench but the temperature recovers. Therefore, a new criterion has to be defined. A possibility is to use the start of the current quench as disruption time. This work describes the implementation of an automatic data processing method to estimate the disruption time according to this new definition. This automatic determination allows both reducing human efforts to locate the disruption times and standardizing the estimates (with the benefit of being less vulnerable to human errors).

  16. Disruptive Colouration and Perceptual Grouping

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Irene; Cuthill, Innes C.

    2014-01-01

    Camouflage is the primary defence of many animals and includes multiple strategies that interfere with figure-ground segmentation and object recognition. While matching background colours and textures is widespread and conceptually straightforward, less well explored are the optical ‘tricks’, collectively called disruptive colouration, that exploit perceptual grouping mechanisms. Adjacent high contrast colours create false edges, but this is not sufficient for an object’s shape to be broken up; some colours must blend with the background. We test the novel hypothesis that this will be particularly effective when the colour patches on the animal appear to belong to, not merely different background colours, but different background objects. We used computer-based experiments where human participants had to find cryptic targets on artificial backgrounds. Creating what appeared to be bi-coloured foreground objects on bi-coloured backgrounds, we generated colour boundaries that had identical local contrast but either lay within or between (illusory) objects. As predicted, error rates for targets matching what appeared to be different background objects were higher than for targets which had otherwise identical local contrast to the background but appeared to belong to single background objects. This provides evidence for disruptive colouration interfering with higher-level feature integration in addition to previously demonstrated low-level effects involving contour detection. In addition, detection was impeded in treatments where targets were on or in close proximity to multiple background colour or tone boundaries. This is consistent with other studies which show a deleterious influence of visual ‘clutter’ or background complexity on search. PMID:24466337

  17. Disruptive colouration and perceptual grouping.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Irene; Cuthill, Innes C

    2014-01-01

    Camouflage is the primary defence of many animals and includes multiple strategies that interfere with figure-ground segmentation and object recognition. While matching background colours and textures is widespread and conceptually straightforward, less well explored are the optical 'tricks', collectively called disruptive colouration, that exploit perceptual grouping mechanisms. Adjacent high contrast colours create false edges, but this is not sufficient for an object's shape to be broken up; some colours must blend with the background. We test the novel hypothesis that this will be particularly effective when the colour patches on the animal appear to belong to, not merely different background colours, but different background objects. We used computer-based experiments where human participants had to find cryptic targets on artificial backgrounds. Creating what appeared to be bi-coloured foreground objects on bi-coloured backgrounds, we generated colour boundaries that had identical local contrast but either lay within or between (illusory) objects. As predicted, error rates for targets matching what appeared to be different background objects were higher than for targets which had otherwise identical local contrast to the background but appeared to belong to single background objects. This provides evidence for disruptive colouration interfering with higher-level feature integration in addition to previously demonstrated low-level effects involving contour detection. In addition, detection was impeded in treatments where targets were on or in close proximity to multiple background colour or tone boundaries. This is consistent with other studies which show a deleterious influence of visual 'clutter' or background complexity on search.

  18. Dipolarization front and current disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    2016-10-01

    The modification of current density on the dawn-dusk cross section of the magnetotail with the earthward approach of a dipolarization front (DF) is examined through the recently published results of a three-dimensional (3-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is found that the current density intensifies by 37% abruptly within 1.5 ion gyrotime as the DF approaches and shows localized regions with north-south extrusions. After reaching its peak value, it undergoes a drastic current reduction (DCR) by 65% within 2 ion gyrotime. Breakdown of the frozen-in condition occurs in the neutral sheet region in association with DCR, demonstrating the non-MHD behavior of the phenomenon. The evolution of current density from this 3-D PIC simulation bears several similarities to those observed for the current disruption (CD) phenomenon, such as explosive growth and disruption of the current density leading to a breakdown of the frozen-in condition. The evolution is also similar to those from a previous two-dimensional (2-D) PIC simulation specially designed to investigate the nonlinear evolution of the cross-field current instability for CD. One interpretation of these findings is that CD and substorm triggering can be associated with earthward intrusion of a DF into the near-Earth plasma sheet as indicated by previous Cluster and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations. An alternative interpretation is that both DF and CD are consequences of a global evolution from an ion-tearing-like instability of the magnetotail.

  19. The quality and economic impact of disruptive behaviors on clinical outcomes of patient care.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Alan H

    2011-01-01

    Disruptive behaviors have been shown to have a negative impact on work relationships, team collaboration, communication efficiency, and process flow, all of which can adversely affect patient safety and quality of care. Despite the growing recognition of the damage that can be done, there are still pockets of resistance to taking action to address the issue head-on. Given the new call to action from the Joint Commission accreditation standard and the growing public accountability for patient safety, organizations need to recognize the full impact of disruptive behaviors and implement appropriate policies, procedures, and educational programs to raise levels of awareness regarding the seriousness of the issue, hold individuals accountable for their behavior, and provide training and support not only to reduce the incidence and consequences of disruptive events but also to improve efficiency of communication and team collaboration in an effort to improve outcomes of care.

  20. Pressure vessel flex joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

  1. Compliant Joints For Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Compliant joints devised to accommodate misalignments of tools and/or workpieces with respect to robotic manipulators. Has characteristics and appearance of both universal-joint and cable-spring-type flexible shaft coupling. Compliance derived from elastic properties of short pieces of cable. Compliance of joint determined by lengths, distances between, relative orientations, thickness of strands, number of strands, material, amount of pretwist, and number of short pieces of cable. Worm-drive mechanism used to adjust lengths to vary compliance as needed during operation.

  2. Joint Robotics Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-23

    Åèìáëáíáçå= oÉëÉ~êÅÜ=póãéçëáìã= JOINT ROBOTICS PROGRAM Published: 23 April 2008 by Joel Brown and Paul Varian 5th Annual Acquisition Research...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Joint Robotics Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...ëóåÉêÖó=Ñçê=áåÑçêãÉÇ=ÅÜ~åÖÉ=======- 464 - = = Joint Robotics Program Presenter: Joel Brown, Defense Acquisition University Author: Paul Varian

  3. Total ankle joint replacement.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  4. Classic article: foot & ankle 1:15, 1980 traumatic dislocations of the first metatarsophalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Jahss, Melvin H

    2006-06-01

    The mechanics, anatomy, and pathomechanics of traumatic dorsal dislocation of the first metatarsophalangeal joint are discussed. There are two basic types of dislocations. In Type I, dislocation of the hallux with the sesamoids occurs without disrupting the sesamoid mass. Such cases are usually irreducible on closed reduction, the metatarsal head being incarcerated by the conjoined tendons with their intact sesamoids. In Type II, there is either associated disruption of the intersesamoid ligament (Type IIA) or a transverse fracture of one of the sesamoids (Type IIB). In Type II, the sesamoid disruption usually permits closed reduction.

  5. Bilateral sacroiliac joint dislocation (anterior and posterior) with triradiate cartilage injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Jeong, Woong-Kyo; Inna, Prashanth; Noh, Won; Lee, Dong-Ki; Lee, Soon-Hyuck

    2011-12-01

    Pediatric sacroiliac joint injuries are uncommon. Significant pelvis ring disruptions in children are rare, and their management is complicated by patient size, differences in bony architecture, and future growth and remodeling potential. We present a rare case of anterior sacroiliac joint dislocation associated with triradiate cartilage injury with a posterior sacroiliac dislocation on the contralateral side. This appears to be the first such case reported in the literature.

  6. Resistance to Disruption in a Classroom Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry-Cruwys, Diana E.; Neal, Carrie M.; Ahearn, William H.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Premchander, Raseeka; Loeb, Melissa B.; Dube, William V.

    2011-01-01

    Substantial experimental evidence indicates that behavior reinforced on a denser schedule is more resistant to disruption than is behavior reinforced on a thinner schedule. The present experiment studied resistance to disruption in a natural educational environment. Responding during familiar activities was reinforced on a multiple…

  7. Disrupting Reconsolidation: Pharmacological and Behavioral Manipulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soeter, Marieke; Kindt, Merel

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that disrupting reconsolidation by pharmacological manipulations "deleted" the emotional expression of a fear memory in humans. If we are to target reconsolidation in patients with anxiety disorders, the disruption of reconsolidation should produce content-limited modifications. At the same time, the fear-erasing effects…

  8. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... examination. This will assess shoulder motion, stability, and strength. joint. (Right) Osteoarthritis of the shoulder. Note the ... you can start moving sooner and get your strength back more quickly. Talk with your surgeon if ...

  9. Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie Bar, & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Tie Bar, & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Medora Bridge, Spanning East Fork of White River at State Route 235, Medora, Jackson County, IN

  10. Biofilm Disrupting Technology for Orthopedic Implants: What's on the Horizon?

    PubMed

    Connaughton, Alexander; Childs, Abby; Dylewski, Stefan; Sabesan, Vani J

    2014-01-01

    The use of orthopedic implants in joints has revolutionized the treatment of patients with many debilitating chronic musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the introduction of foreign material into the human body predisposes the body to infection. The treatment of these infections has become very complicated since the orthopedic implants serve as a surface for multiple species of bacteria to grow at a time into a resistant biofilm layer. This biofilm layer serves as a protectant for the bacterial colonies on the implant making them more resistant and difficult to eradicate when using standard antibiotic treatment. In some cases, the use of antibiotics alone has even made the bacteria more resistant to treatment. Thus, there has been surge in the creation of non-antibiotic anti-biofilm agents to help disrupt the biofilms on the orthopedic implants to help eliminate the infections. In this study, we discuss infections of orthopedic implants in the shoulder then we review the main categories of anti-biofilm agents that have been used for the treatment of infections on orthopedic implants. Then, we introduce some of the newer biofilm disrupting technology that has been studied in the past few years that may advance the treatment options for orthopedic implants in the future.

  11. Disruptive event analysis: Volcanism and igneous intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, B. M.

    1980-08-01

    An evaluation was made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions were considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity were the geometry of the magma repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Simplified probability calculations were attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  12. Plasma membrane disruption: repair, prevention, adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Steinhardt, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Many metazoan cells inhabit mechanically stressful environments and, consequently, their plasma membranes are frequently disrupted. Survival requires that the cell rapidly repair or reseal the disruption. Rapid resealing is an active and complex structural modification that employs endomembrane as its primary building block, and cytoskeletal and membrane fusion proteins as its catalysts. Endomembrane is delivered to the damaged plasma membrane through exocytosis, a ubiquitous Ca2+-triggered response to disruption. Tissue and cell level architecture prevent disruptions from occurring, either by shielding cells from damaging levels of force, or, when this is not possible, by promoting safe force transmission through the plasma membrane via protein-based cables and linkages. Prevention of disruption also can be a dynamic cell or tissue level adaptation triggered when a damaging level of mechanical stress is imposed. Disease results from failure of either the preventive or resealing mechanisms.

  13. Jointness: A Selected Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    JOINTNESS A Selected Bibliography U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE LIBRARY December 2010 Report Documentation Page Form...Lenore Garder 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army War College...of the U.S. Army War College. A revised and updated version of our earlier bibliographies on jointness, it focuses on aspects of United States

  14. Successfully Developing Joint Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-26

    least for the ROTC aspect of the Navy commissioning source, this is about to change at the University of South Florida (USF). In fact the “Joint...get their training over a six- month period at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. A Marine aviator will go through Pensacola Naval Air Station, Florida alongside...MCAS Beaufort, he served in Afghanistan as “Commanding Officer of Taskforce Panther , a joint coalition taskforce in support of OEF” (http

  15. Current sheet disruptions caused by explosive diamagnetic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincena, S. T.; Gekelman, W. N.; Pribyl, P.

    2012-12-01

    Rapid temporal changes in the magnetic field topology of current-carrying plasmas can enhance or disrupt these currents and trigger magnetic reconnection. A clear natural example of this can be found in the earth's magnetotail during magnetic substorms. In this laboratory study, preliminary results are presented of an effectively steady-state current sheet which is disrupted by the production of an impulsive diamagnetic cavity. The process is impulsive in that it occurs on a timescale less than the ion cyclotron period. The experiments are performed on UCLA's Large Plasma Device (LAPD). This is a linear device with L=17m, d=60cm, 300G< B0<2kG, ne=2×1012cm-3, Te=6eV,Ti≈1eV, and He, H, or Ar). The diamagnetic cavity is produced by a pulsed (8ns, 1J) Nd:YAG laser-solid target ablation. The current sheet is produced using a CeB6 cathode, embedded within the main plasma column,(h=10cm, w=1cm). In the current sheet, the plasma has higher density, n≈ 4× 1012cm-3, yielding scaled cross-field dimensions of h=0.9c/ω pi and w=3.8c/ω pe for a H plasma. The radius of the diamagnetic cavity r can be varied, but is here chosen to be w < r < h. Results will be presented which include fast camera imaging, magnetic field probe data, and the resulting time varying currents during the disruption. These experiments were conducted at UCLA's Basic Plasma Science Facility, which is jointly funded by the US DoE and the NSF.

  16. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  17. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  18. Allosteric Inhibition Through Core Disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, James R.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-05

    Although inhibitors typically bind pre-formed sites on proteins, it is theoretically possible to inhibit by disrupting the folded structure of a protein or, in the limit, to bind preferentially to the unfolded state. Equilibria defining how such molecules act are well understood, but structural models for such binding are unknown. Two novel inhibitors of {beta}-lactamase were found to destabilize the enzyme at high temperatures, but at lower temperatures showed no preference for destabilized mutant enzymes versus stabilized mutants. X-ray crystal structures showed that both inhibitors bound to a cryptic site in {beta}-lactamase, which the inhibitors themselves created by forcing apart helixes 11 and 12. This opened up a portion of the hydrophobic core of the protein, into which these two inhibitors bind. Although this binding site is 16 {angstrom} from the center of the active site, the conformational changes were transmitted through a sequence of linked motions to a key catalytic residue, Arg244, which in the complex adopts conformations very different from those in catalytically competent enzyme conformations. These structures offer a detailed view of what has heretofore been a theoretical construct, and suggest the possibility for further design against this novel site.

  19. Joint Doctrine for Civil Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Authorities ( MACA ), DODD 5525.5, DOD Cooperation with Civilian Law Enforcement Officials, and JP 3-07.7, Joint Doctrine for Civil Support. II-15 Civil Affairs...Joint Operation Planning and Execution System JP joint publication JTF joint task force LOAC law of armed conflict MACA military assistance to civil

  20. Joint Electromagnetic Spectrum Management Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-20

    synchronizing, and deconflicting JEMSMO actions (p. IV-7) Doctrine Update for JP 6-01, Joint Electromagnetic Spectrum Management Operations...communications system directorate of a joint staff (J-6), to support joint planning, coordination, and control of the spectrum for assigned forces. Executive...in the respective Service or joint publications. Interference Resolution To ensure critical frequencies and spectrum-dependent systems are

  1. Observation of the loss of pre-disruptive runaway electrons in KSTAR ohmic plasma disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Junghee; An, YoungHwa; Seo, Dongcheol; Kim, Hyunseok

    2016-12-01

    A newly-developed fast neutron detector revealed a close relationship between the loss of pre-disruptive runaway electrons and the plasma disruption in KSTAR ohmic plasmas. It is observed that a burst of photoneutrons is generated exactly before the start of thermal quenches, indicating a bunch of runaway electrons which had existed before the disruption impacts the first wall at the time. The loss of runaway electrons could be identified also as a decrease in the measured electron temperature, forming a typical two-stage thermal quench trace. From the MHD pattern in the neutron signal during a low-q disruption, it could be identified that pre-disruptive runaway electrons are localized in the plasma, especially on the q  =  2 drift surface. These new findings suggest the pre-disruptive runaway electrons might play an important role in the plasma disruption mechanism.

  2. Joint Replacement Surgery and the Innate Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Stuart; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Takagi, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Total joint replacement is a highly successful, cost-effective surgical procedure that relieves pain and improves function for patients with end-stage arthritis. The most commonly used materials for modern joint replacements include metal alloys such as cobalt chrome and titanium alloys, polymers including polymethylmethacrylate and polyethylene, and ceramics. Implantation of a joint prosthesis incites an acute inflammatory reaction that is regulated by the innate immune system, a preprogrammed non-antigen specific biological response composed of cells, proteins, and other factors. This “frontline” immune mechanism was originally designed to combat invading microorganisms, but now responds to both pathogen-associated molecular patterns or PAMPS (by-products from microorganisms), and damage associated molecular patterns or DAMPS (molecular by-products from cells), via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). In this way, potentially injurious stimuli that might disrupt the normal homeostatic regulatory mechanisms of the organism are efficiently dealt with, ensuring the survival of the host. Initial surgical implantation of the joint replacement, as well as ongoing generation of wear debris and byproducts during usage of the joint, activates the innate immune system. Understanding and potentially modulating these events may lead to improved function and increased longevity of joint replacements in the future. PMID:25747028

  3. Microalgal cell disruption via ultrasonic nozzle spraying.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Yuan, W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the effect of operating parameters, including ultrasound amplitude, spraying pressure, nozzle orifice diameter, and initial cell concentration on microalgal cell disruption and lipid extraction in an ultrasonic nozzle spraying system (UNSS). Two algal species including Scenedesmus dimorphus and Nannochloropsis oculata were evaluated. Experimental results demonstrated that the UNSS was effective in the disruption of microalgal cells indicated by significant changes in cell concentration and Nile red-stained lipid fluorescence density between all treatments and the control. It was found that increasing ultrasound amplitude generally enhanced cell disruption and lipid recovery although excessive input energy was not necessary for best results. The effect of spraying pressure and nozzle orifice diameter on cell disruption and lipid recovery was believed to be dependent on the competition between ultrasound-induced cavitation and spraying-generated shear forces. Optimal cell disruption was not always achieved at the highest spraying pressure or biggest nozzle orifice diameter; instead, they appeared at moderate levels depending on the algal strain and specific settings. Increasing initial algal cell concentration significantly reduced cell disruption efficiency. In all UNSS treatments, the effectiveness of cell disruption and lipid recovery was found to be dependent on the algal species treated.

  4. Disrupted Stars in Unusual Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDEs) occur when a star passes a little too close to a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy. Tidal forces from the black hole cause the passing star to be torn apart, resulting in a brief flare of radiation as the stars material accretes onto the black hole. A recent study asks the following question: do TDEs occur most frequently in an unusual type of galaxy?A Trend in DisruptionsSo far, we have data from eight candidate TDEs that peaked in optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. The spectra from these observations have shown an intriguing trend: many of these TDEs host galaxies exhibit weak line emission (indicating little or no current star-formation activity), and yet they show strong Balmer absorption lines (indicating star formation activity occurred within the last Gyr). These quiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies likely underwent a period of intense star formation that recently ended.To determine if TDEs are overrepresented in such galaxies, a team of scientists led by Decker French (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona) has quantified the fraction of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that exhibit similar properties to those of TDE hosts.Quantifying OverrepresentationSpectral characteristics of SDSS galaxies (gray) and TDE candidate host galaxies (colored points): line emission vs. Balmer absorption. The lower right-hand box identifies thequiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies which contain most TDE events, yet are uncommon among the galaxy sample as a whole. Click for a better look! [French et al. 2016]French and collaborators compare the optical spectra of the TDE host galaxies to those of nearly 600,000 SDSS galaxies, using two different cutoffs for the Balmer absorption the indicator of past star formation. Their strictest cut, filtering for very high Balmer absorption, selected only 0.2% of the SDSS galaxies, yet 38% of the TDEs are hosted in such galaxies. Using a more relaxed cutoff selects 2.3% of

  5. Disruption forecasting at JET using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannas, B.; Fanni, A.; Marongiu, E.; Sonato, P.

    2004-01-01

    Neural networks are trained to evaluate the risk of plasma disruptions in a tokamak experiment using several diagnostic signals as inputs. A saliency analysis confirms the goodness of the chosen inputs, all of which contribute to the network performance. Tests that were carried out refer to data collected from succesfully terminated and disruption terminated pulses performed during two years of JET tokamak experiments. Results show the possibility of developing a neural network predictor that intervenes well in advance in order to avoid plasma disruption or mitigate its effects.

  6. School-based interventions for disruptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Lee, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Youth disruptive behavior is a concern for youth, school personnel,families, and society. Early childhood disruptive behaviors negatively impact the classroom, and are associated with negative academic, social, behavioral, emotional, substance use, health, and justice system outcomes in adolescence and adulthood. Effective, comprehensive, multicomponent interventions targeting risk/protective factors and pathways associated with antisocial behavior reduce and/or mitigate these negative outcomes. Positive effects have been demonstrated for universal and indicated programs for participating youth and families in early childhood, and for high-risk youth in adolescence and young adulthood. These empirically supported programs inform the treatment of complex and difficult-to-treat disruptive behavior.

  7. System and method for disrupting suspect objects

    SciTech Connect

    Gladwell, T. Scott; Garretson, Justin R; Hobart, Clinton G; Monda, Mark J

    2013-07-09

    A system and method for disrupting at least one component of a suspect object is provided. The system includes a source for passing radiation through the suspect object, a screen for receiving the radiation passing through the suspect object and generating at least one image therefrom, a weapon having a discharge deployable therefrom, and a targeting unit. The targeting unit displays the image(s) of the suspect object and aims the weapon at a disruption point on the displayed image such that the weapon may be positioned to deploy the discharge at the disruption point whereby the suspect object is disabled.

  8. Periprosthetic Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Lucia L.; Oliveira, Priscila R.; Carvalho, Vladimir C.; Saconi, Eduardo S.; Cabrita, Henrique B.; Rodrigues, Marcelo B.

    2013-01-01

    Implantation of joint prostheses is becoming increasingly common, especially for the hip and knee. Infection is considered to be the most devastating of prosthesis-related complications, leading to prolonged hospitalization, repeated surgical intervention, and even definitive loss of the implant. The main risk factors to periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are advanced age, malnutrition, obesity, diabetes mellitus, HIV infection at an advanced stage, presence of distant infectious foci, and antecedents of arthroscopy or infection in previous arthroplasty. Joint prostheses can become infected through three different routes: direct implantation, hematogenic infection, and reactivation of latent infection. Gram-positive bacteria predominate in cases of PJI, mainly Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. PJIs present characteristic signs that can be divided into acute and chronic manifestations. The main imaging method used in diagnosing joint prosthesis infections is X-ray. Computed tomography (CT) scan may assist in distinguishing between septic and aseptic loosening. Three-phase bone scintigraphy using technetium has high sensitivity, but low specificity. Positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) presents very divergent results in the literature. Definitive diagnosis of infection should be made by isolating the microorganism through cultures on material obtained from joint fluid puncturing, surgical wound secretions, surgical debridement procedures, or sonication fluid. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic infections in arthroplasty cases. Treatment in a single procedure is appropriate in carefully selected cases. PMID:24023542

  9. Distal radioulnar joint injuries

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Binu P; Sreekanth, Raveendran

    2012-01-01

    Distal radioulnar joint is a trochoid joint relatively new in evolution. Along with proximal radioulnar joint, forearm bones and interosseous membrane, it allows pronosupination and load transmission across the wrist. Injuries around distal radioulnar joint are not uncommon, and are usually associated with distal radius fractures,fractures of the ulnar styloid and with the eponymous Galeazzi or Essex_Lopresti fractures. The injury can be purely involving the soft tissue especially the triangular fibrocartilage or the radioulnar ligaments. The patients usually present with ulnar sided wrist pain, features of instability, or restriction of rotation. Difficulty in carrying loads in the hand is a major constraint for these patients. Thorough clinical examination to localize point of tenderness and appropriate provocative tests help in diagnosis. Radiology and MRI are extremely useful, while arthroscopy is the gold standard for evaluation. The treatment protocols are continuously evolving and range from conservative, arthroscopic to open surgical methods. Isolated dislocation are uncommon. Basal fractures of the ulnar styloid tend to make the joint unstable and may require operative intervention. Chronic instability requires reconstruction of the stabilizing ligaments to avoid onset of arthritis. Prosthetic replacement in arthritis is gaining acceptance in the management of arthritis. PMID:23162140

  10. 13. Sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pascal; Szadek, Karolina; Cohen, Steven P; De Witte, Jan; Lataster, Arno; Patijn, Jacob; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten; Van Zundert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint accounts for approximately 16% to 30% of cases of chronic mechanical low back pain. Pain originating in the sacroiliac joint is predominantly perceived in the gluteal region, although pain is often referred into the lower and upper lumbar region, groin, abdomen, and/ or lower limb(s). Because sacroiliac joint pain is difficult to distinguish from other forms of low back pain based on history, different provocative maneuvers have been advocated. Individually, they have weak predictive value, but combined batteries of tests can help ascertain a diagnosis. Radiological imaging is important to exclude "red flags" but contributes little in the diagnosis. Diagnostic blocks are the diagnostic gold standard but must be interpreted with caution, because false-positive as well as false-negative results occur frequently. Treatment of sacroiliac joint pain is best performed in the context of a multidisciplinary approach. Conservative treatments address the underlying causes (posture and gait disturbances) and consist of exercise therapy and manipulation. Intra-articular sacroiliac joint infiltrations with local anesthetic and corticosteroids hold the highest evidence rating (1 B+). If the latter fail or produce only short-term effects, cooled radiofrequency treatment of the lateral branches of S1 to S3 (S4) is recommended (2 B+) if available. When this procedure cannot be used, (pulsed) radiofrequency procedures targeted at L5 dorsal ramus and lateral branches of S1 to S3 may be considered (2 C+).

  11. Temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Buescher, Jennifer J

    2007-11-15

    Temporomandibular joint disorders are common in adults; as many as one third of adults report having one or more symptoms, which include jaw or neck pain, headache, and clicking or grating within the joint. Most symptoms improve without treatment, but various noninvasive therapies may reduce pain for patients who have not experienced relief from self-care therapies. Physical therapy modalities (e.g., iontophoresis, phonophoresis), psychological therapies (e.g., cognitive behavior therapy), relaxation techniques, and complementary therapies (e.g., acupuncture, hypnosis) are all used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders; however, no therapies have been shown to be uniformly superior for the treatment of pain or oral dysfunction. Noninvasive therapies should be attempted before pursuing invasive, permanent, or semi-permanent treatments that have the potential to cause irreparable harm. Dental occlusion therapy (e.g., oral splinting) is a common treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders, but a recent systematic review found insufficient evidence for or against its use. Some patients with intractable temporomandibular joint disorders develop chronic pain syndrome and may benefit from treatment, including antidepressants or cognitive behavior therapy.

  12. Dissimilar metals joint evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, M. E.; Apodaca, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    Dissimilar metals tubular joints between 2219-T851 aluminum alloy and 304L stainless steel were fabricated and tested to evaluate bonding processes. Joints were fabricated by four processes: (1) inertia (friction) weldings, where the metals are spun and forced together to create the weld; (2) explosive welding, where the metals are impacted together at high velocity; (3) co-extrusion, where the metals are extruded in contact at high temperature to promote diffusion; and (4) swaging, where residual stresses in the metals after a stretching operation maintain forced contact in mutual shear areas. Fifteen joints of each type were prepared and evaluated in a 6.35 cm (2.50 in.) O.D. size, with 0.32 cm (0.13 in.) wall thickness, and 7.6 cm (3.0 in) total length. The joints were tested to evaluate their ability to withstand pressure cycle, thermal cycle, galvanic corrosion and burst tests. Leakage tests and other non-destructive test techniques were used to evaluate the behavior of the joints, and the microstructure of the bond areas was analyzed.

  13. Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Immunotherapy Treatment Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World Jun 16, 2014 This story is part of ... Research We Conduct Back To Top Imagine a world free from cancer. Help make it a reality. ...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING AND ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disruptors are a class of chemicals of growing interest to the environmental community. USEPA's Risk Assessment Forum defined an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) as "an exogenous agent that interferes with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action, or elim...

  15. Thyroid disrupting chemicals: Mechanisms and mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental contaminants are known to act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are xenobiotics that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis, or change circulating o...

  16. Endocrine-Disrupting Compounds in Aquatic Ecosystems.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are a ubiquitous issue of concern in our aquatic systems. Commonly detected EDCs include natural and synthetic hormones, surfactants, plasticizers, disinfectants, herbicides and metals. The potency of these chemicals varies substantially, as ...

  17. DOUBLE TIDAL DISRUPTIONS IN GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, Ilya; Levin, Yuri E-mail: yuri.levin@monash.edu

    2015-05-20

    A star on a nearly radial trajectory approaching a massive black hole (MBH) gets tidally disrupted if it comes sufficiently close to the MBH. Here we explore what happens to binary stars whose centers of mass approach the MBH on nearly radial orbits. The interaction with the MBH often leads to both stars being disrupted in sequence. We argue that such events could produce light curves that are substantially different from those of the single disruptions, with possible features such as two local maxima. Tidal forces from the MBH can also lead the binary components to collide; these merger products can form highly magnetized stars, whose subsequent tidal disruption may enable prompt jet formation.

  18. Structuring the Classroom to Prevent Disruptive Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stainback, William; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Specific suggestions to help teachers structure the classroom to prevent disruptive behaviors are offered in the areas of physical arrangement and "traffic rules" time management, assignments, grouping practices, classroom atmosphere, and professional demeanor. (DB)

  19. Passive runaway electron suppression in tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H. M.; Helander, P.

    2013-07-15

    Runaway electrons created in disruptions pose a serious problem for tokamaks with large current. It would be desirable to have a runaway electron suppression method which is passive, i.e., a method that does not rely on an uncertain disruption prediction system. One option is to let the large electric field inherent in the disruption drive helical currents in the wall. This would create ergodic regions in the plasma and increase the runaway losses. Whether these regions appear at a suitable time and place to affect the formation of the runaway beam depends on disruption parameters, such as electron temperature and density. We find that it is difficult to ergodize the central plasma before a beam of runaway current has formed. However, the ergodic outer region will make the Ohmic current profile contract, which can lead to instabilities that yield large runaway electron losses.

  20. Disruption mitigation studies in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Evans, T.E.

    1999-01-01

    Data on the discharge behavior, thermal loads, halo currents, and runaway electrons have been obtained in disruptions on the DIII-D tokamak. These experiments have also evaluated techniques to mitigate the disruptions while minimizing runaway electron production. Experiments injecting cryogenic impurity killer pellets of neon and argon and massive amounts of helium gas have successfully reduced these disruption effects. The halo current generation, scaling, and mitigation are understood and are in good agreement with predictions of a semianalytic model. Results from killer pellet injection have been used to benchmark theoretical models of the pellet ablation and energy loss. Runaway electrons are often generated by the pellets and new runaway generation mechanisms, modifications of the standard Dreicer process, have been found to explain the runaways. Experiments with the massive helium gas puff have also effectively mitigated disruptions without the formation of runaway electrons that can occur with killer pellets.

  1. [The temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Louryan, S

    1992-10-01

    With its discordant articular surfaces and complete division in two cavities separated by a disk, the temporomandibular joint appears as a complex anatomical and functional entity. Combined movements involving anteroposterior gliding between the disk and temporal bone in the upper cavity, anteroposterior condyle translation, hinge and rotation movements between the disk and mandibular condyle contribute to the different movements of the jaw. With dental occlusion, the masticatory apparatus therefore includes five functionally coordinated articular compartments. Various impairments of the normal static and dynamic features of the temporomandibular joint may lead to relatively frequent pathological conditions which can be easily diagnosed by modern imaging and arthroscopic methods.

  2. Joint for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craighead, N. D., II; Preliasco, R. J.; Hult, T. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A joint is described for connecting a pair of beams to pivot them between positions in alignment or beside one another, which is of light weight and which operates in a controlled manner. The joint includes a pair of fittings and at least one center link having opposite ends pivotally connected to opposite fittings and having axes that pass through centerplates of the fittings. A control link having opposite ends pivotally connected to the different fittings controls their relative orientations, and a toggle assemly holds the fittings in the deployed configuration wherein they are aligned. The fittings have stops that lie on one side of the centerplane opposite the toggle assembly.

  3. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  4. The role of joint innervation in the pathogenesis of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Recently, an expanding body of knowledge has documented the nature and functions of receptors in joint tissues and their potential importance in preserving the smooth normal functioning of the motor-skeletal system and in amplifying the inflammatory response to joint injuries and diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the anatomical and physiological substrates of these mechanisms. The distribution, morphologic and functional characteristics of joint receptors have been well described. In the past decade there has been a new appreciation of the major role played by sensory neurons in promoting regional inflammatory responses, and many of the specific neuronal mechanisms and molecules that mediate these reflexes have been identified. This knowledge promises to significantly improve the selectivity and effectiveness of pharmacologic approaches to pain, trauma and regional inflammatory disorders. Other investigations have revealed important contributions of joint receptors to motor function. These refer not to proprioception or the sense of limb position in space, but rather to a more sophisticated tailoring of muscle activity to increase joint stability and to protect joint structures from damaging loads. Whether a loss of these reflexes may play a role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis remains controversial. However, there is a growing consensus that a loss of these reflexes may contribute to the morbidity associated with disruption of the anterior cruciate ligament. Synovial joints are sites of major interactions between the musculoskeletal and the nervous systems. Understanding the mechanisms that activate and control these interactions will certainly offer the opportunity to develop new, more effective treatments for patients with joint disorders. PMID:10223069

  5. Disruptions, loads, and dynamic response of ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.; Riemer, B.; Sayer, R.; Strickler, D.; Barabaschi, P.; Ioki, K.; Johnson, G.; Shimizu, K.; Williamson, D.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma disruptions and the resulting electromagnetic loads are critical to the design of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This paper describes the status of plasma disruption simulations and related analysis, including the dynamic response of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components, stresses and deflections in the vacuum vessel, and reaction loads in the support structures.

  6. Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption with evisceration

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Ellen; Stawicki, Stanislaw PA; Bahner, David P

    2011-01-01

    Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruptions associated with evisceration are very rare. The authors describe a case of traumatic abdominal wall disruption with bowel evisceration that occurred after a middle-aged woman sustained direct focal blunt force impact to the lower abdomen. Abdominal exploration and surgical repair of the abdominal wall defect were performed, with good clinical outcome. A brief overview of literature pertinent to this rare trauma scenario is presented. PMID:22229144

  7. Anastomotic disruption after large bowel resection

    PubMed Central

    NasirKhan, Mohammad U; Abir, Farshad; Longo, Walter; Kozol, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic disruption is a feared and serious complication of colon surgery. Decades of research have identified factors favoring successful healing of anastomoses as well as risk factors for anastomotic disruption. However, some factors, such as the role of mechanical bowel preparation, remain controversial. Despite proper caution and excellent surgical technique, some anastomotic leaks are inevitable. The rapid identification of anastomotic leaks and the timely treatment in these cases are paramount. PMID:16688793

  8. Fast Time Response Electromagnetic Disruption Mitigation Concept

    DOE PAGES

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T.; Jernigan, Thomas C.; ...

    2015-09-28

    An important and urgent issue for ITER is predicting and controlling disruptions. Tokamaks and spherical tokamaks have the potential to disrupt. Methods to rapidly quench the discharge after an impending disruption is detected are essential to protect the vessel and internal components. The warning time for the onset of some disruptions in tokamaks could be <10 ms, which poses stringent requirements on the disruption mitigation system for reactor systems. In this proposed method, a cylindrical boron nitride projectile containing a radiative payload composed of boron, boron nitride, or beryllium particulate matter and weighing similar to 15 g is accelerated tomore » velocities on the order of 1 to 2 km/s in <2 ms in a linear rail gun accelerator. A partially fragmented capsule is then injected into the tokamak discharge in the 3- to 6-ms timescale, where the radiative payload is dispersed. The device referred to as an electromagnetic particle injector has the potential to meet the short warning timescales for which a reactor disruption mitigation system must be built. The system is fully electromagnetic, with no mechanical moving parts, which ensures high reliability after a period of long standby.« less

  9. Fast Time Response Electromagnetic Disruption Mitigation Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T.; Jernigan, Thomas C.; Menard, J.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Ono, M.; Baylor, Larry R.; Lay, W. S.

    2015-09-28

    An important and urgent issue for ITER is predicting and controlling disruptions. Tokamaks and spherical tokamaks have the potential to disrupt. Methods to rapidly quench the discharge after an impending disruption is detected are essential to protect the vessel and internal components. The warning time for the onset of some disruptions in tokamaks could be <10 ms, which poses stringent requirements on the disruption mitigation system for reactor systems. In this proposed method, a cylindrical boron nitride projectile containing a radiative payload composed of boron, boron nitride, or beryllium particulate matter and weighing similar to 15 g is accelerated to velocities on the order of 1 to 2 km/s in <2 ms in a linear rail gun accelerator. A partially fragmented capsule is then injected into the tokamak discharge in the 3- to 6-ms timescale, where the radiative payload is dispersed. The device referred to as an electromagnetic particle injector has the potential to meet the short warning timescales for which a reactor disruption mitigation system must be built. The system is fully electromagnetic, with no mechanical moving parts, which ensures high reliability after a period of long standby.

  10. New Joint Sealants. Criteria, Design and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    Contents include--(1) sealing concrete joints, (2) sealing glass and metal joints, (3) metal and glass joint sealants from a fabricator's viewpoint, (4) a theory of adhesion for joint sealants, (5) geometry of simple joint seals under strain, (6) joint sealant specifications from a manufacturer's viewpoint, (7) joint sealant requirements from an…

  11. Systems approach to address incivility and disruptive behaviors in health-care organizations.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Elizabeth; Kusy, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    In response to the growing evidence that disruptive behaviors within health-care teams constitute a major threat to the quality of care, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization (JCAHO; Joint Commission Resources, 2008) has a new leadership standard that addresses disruptive and inappropriate behaviors effective January 1, 2009. For professionals who work in human resources and organization development, these standards represent a clarion call to design and implement evidence-based interventions to create health-care communities of respectful engagement that have zero tolerance for disruptive, uncivil, and intimidating behaviors by any professional. In this chapter, we will build an evidence-based argument that sustainable change must include organizational, team, and individual strategies across all professionals in the organization. We will then describe an intervention model--Toxic Organization Change System--that has emerged from our own research on toxic behaviors in the workplace (Kusy & Holloway, 2009) and provide examples of specific strategies that we have used to prevent and ameliorate toxic cultures.

  12. Examining the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Monk, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Appropriate history taking and examination can ensure accurate diagnosis of common knee problems, and rapid and effective interventions or referral to orthopaedic specialists. This article describes the anatomy of the knee joint and discusses relevant history taking, the examination process, special tests and radiology, as well as common knee injuries and their management.

  13. Jointness: A Selected Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    Straus, Giroux, 2000. (UA23 .O94 2000) Perry, Mark. Four Stars. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1989. 412pp. (UA23.7 .P47 1989) 4 Quinn , Dennis J., ed...U.S. Naval Institute 131 (June 2005): 77-79. ProQuest 23 Strabbing, Timothy R., and Elliot L. Ackerman. "Preparing Lieutenants for the Joint

  14. Clad metal joint closure

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, O.W.

    1985-04-09

    A plasma arc spray overlay of cladding metals is used over joints between clad metal pieces to provide a continuous cladding metal surface. The technique permits applying an overlay of a high melting point cladding metal to a cladding metal surface without excessive heating of the backing metal.

  15. Joint Operation Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-26

    feasibility — only then does he issue an order.” General Mathew B. Ridgway The Korean War, 1967 SECTION A. JOINT STRATEGIC PLANNING — TYPES AND SCOPE 1...necessary. Meanwhile from the west would come the U.S. (sic) Army’s power punch. Looking at [Commander, XVIII Airborne Corps, Lieutenant General] Gary

  16. Steroid injections - tendon, bursa, joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/007678.htm Steroid injections - tendon, bursa, joint To use the sharing features on this page, ... often painful. It can be injected into a joint, tendon, or bursa. Description Your health care provider ...

  17. Shoulder Joint For Protective Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Smallcombe, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    Shoulder joint allows full range of natural motion: wearer senses little or no resisting force or torque. Developed for space suit, joint offers advantages in protective garments for underwater work, firefighting, or cleanup of hazardous materials.

  18. Determination of Parachute Joint Factors using Seam and Joint Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollmann, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This paper details the methodology for determining the joint factor for all parachute components. This method has been successfully implemented on the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) for the NASA Orion crew module for use in determining the margin of safety for each component under peak loads. Also discussed are concepts behind the joint factor and what drives the loss of material strength at joints. The joint factor is defined as a "loss in joint strength...relative to the basic material strength" that occurs when "textiles are connected to each other or to metals." During the CPAS engineering development phase, a conservative joint factor of 0.80 was assumed for each parachute component. In order to refine this factor and eliminate excess conservatism, a seam and joint testing program was implemented as part of the structural validation. This method split each of the parachute structural joints into discrete tensile tests designed to duplicate the loading of each joint. Breaking strength data collected from destructive pull testing was then used to calculate the joint factor in the form of an efficiency. Joint efficiency is the percentage of the base material strength that remains after degradation due to sewing or interaction with other components; it is used interchangeably with joint factor in this paper. Parachute materials vary in type-mainly cord, tape, webbing, and cloth -which require different test fixtures and joint sample construction methods. This paper defines guidelines for designing and testing samples based on materials and test goals. Using the test methodology and analysis approach detailed in this paper, the minimum joint factor for each parachute component can be formulated. The joint factors can then be used to calculate the design factor and margin of safety for that component, a critical part of the design verification process.

  19. Planning for Victory: Joint Synchronization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-22

    Desert Storm . . . .. 13 V A JOINT SYNCHRONIZATION MATRIX .. ........ .. 16 Proposed Synchronization Matrixes Joint Sync Matrix: D-day, 1944 . . .. 16...campaigns. I will offer two such proposals. Joint Sync Matrix: D-day, 1944 . Figure 2 is offered as one proposal of how a joint synchronization matrix...CHANNEL sweep CENTRAL CHANNEL commence sweep AfW ALLIED completeI CHERBOURG-LE HAVRE FLEET sweep UTAH OMAHA GOLD JUNO SWORD ASUW SWEEPS ALLIED

  20. Deficiencies in Indian Joint Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-26

    India’s Sri Lanka Fiasco: Peace Keepers at War (New Delhi: Vision Books, 1990), 137. 3...Joint Force 2020 (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 10 September 2012), 16; Indian Army Doctrine, Part II Conduct of Operations, 1st ed...the US principles of joint operations. 11 JP 3-0, I-1. 12 Capstone Concept for Joint Operations: Joint Force 2020 , 16. 13 Indian Army Doctrine, Part

  1. Modeling of Panchromatic Tidal Disruption Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    The disruption of stars by SMBHs has been linked to more than a dozen flares in the cores of galaxies out to redshift z ~ 0.4. At the time of this writing, PS1-10jh is the only claimed tidal disruption event that captures the rise, peak, and decay of the flare. By capturing all three phases, and with the addition of spectroscopic information, this event provides significantly more information on the underlying mechanisms than the small number of poorly sampled flares: * The spectrum of PS1-10jh is well-modeled by a single blackbody whose temperature evolves weakly in time, and whose size is tens of times larger than the tidal radius, hinting at the presence of a reprocessing region.* The light curve is consistent with the bolometric luminosity closely following the rate of mass fallback, which suggests that the returning material must circularize by the first epoch of observation. * The fact that HeII emission lines are observed, but hydrogen lines are not, is consistent with the fact that material at the distance of the photosphere would be fully ionized, as suggested by broad-line regions found about steadily-accreting active galactic nuclei. Our group has been leading the effort to determine the behavior and appearance of tidal disruption events by both focusing on the hydrodynamics of the disruptions themselves, and on the hydrodynamics of the formation of the disk arising from the fallback of the bound debris. By assuming that circularization is effective and invoking the presence of a simple reprocessing mechanism, we were able to find a convincing match between our model and the data. In this proposal, we aim to understand why the simple assumptions that we made to explain the behavior of PS1-10jh work so well, and whether these conditions are generally applicable to a large fraction of tidal disruption events. While our simulations provided unprecedented detail on the fallback of the debris and the resulting structure, it is still incomplete in that it does

  2. Phase 1 Program Joint Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nield, George C. (Editor); Vorobiev, Pavel Mikhailovich (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This report consists of inputs from each of the Phase I Program Joint Working Groups. The Working Groups were tasked to describe the organizational structure and work processes that they used during the program, joint accomplishments, lessons learned, and applications to the International Space Station Program. This report is a top-level joint reference document that contains information of interest to both countries.

  3. Signaling networks in joint development.

    PubMed

    Salva, Joanna E; Merrill, Amy E

    2017-04-01

    Here we review studies identifying regulatory networks responsible for synovial, cartilaginous, and fibrous joint development. Synovial joints, characterized by the fluid-filled synovial space between the bones, are found in high-mobility regions and are the most common type of joint. Cartilaginous joints such as the intervertebral disc unite adjacent bones through either a hyaline cartilage or a fibrocartilage intermediate. Fibrous joints, which include the cranial sutures, form a direct union between bones through fibrous connective tissue. We describe how the distinct morphologic and histogenic characteristics of these joint classes are established during embryonic development. Collectively, these studies reveal that despite the heterogeneity of joint strength and mobility, joint development throughout the skeleton utilizes common signaling networks via long-range morphogen gradients and direct cell-cell contact. This suggests that different joint types represent specialized variants of homologous developmental modules. Identifying the unifying aspects of the signaling networks between joint classes allows a more complete understanding of the signaling code for joint formation, which is critical to improving strategies for joint regeneration and repair. Developmental Dynamics 246:262-274, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Double slotted socket spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2001-05-22

    A new class of spherical joints is disclosed. These spherical joints are capable of extremely large angular displacements (full cone angles in excess of 270.degree.), while exhibiting no singularities or dead spots in their range of motion. These joints can improve or simplify a wide range of mechanical devices.

  5. Endocrine Disrupting Contaminants—Beyond the Dogma

    PubMed Central

    Guillette, Louis J.

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of endocrine disruption have largely been associated with wildlife and driven by observations documenting estrogenic, androgenic, antiandrogenic, and antithyroid actions. These actions, in response to exposure to ecologically relevant concentrations of various environmental contaminants, have now been established in numerous vertebrate species. However, many potential mechanisms and endocrine actions have not been studied. For example, the DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane] metabolite, p,p′-DDE [1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene] is known to disrupt prostaglandin synthesis in the uterus of birds, providing part of the explanation for DDT-induced egg shell thinning. Few studies have examined prostaglandin synthesis as a target for endocrine disruption, yet these hormones are active in reproduction, immune responses, and cardiovascular physiology. Future studies must broaden the basic science approach to endocrine disruption, thereby expanding the mechanisms and endocrine end points examined. This goal should be accomplished even if the primary influence and funding continue to emphasize a narrower approach based on regulatory needs. Without this broader approach, research into endocrine disruption will become dominated by a narrow dogma, focusing on a few end points and mechanisms. PMID:16818240

  6. Endocrine disrupting contaminants--beyond the dogma.

    PubMed

    Guillette, Louis J

    2006-04-01

    Descriptions of endocrine disruption have largely been associated with wildlife and driven by observations documenting estrogenic, androgenic, antiandrogenic, and antithyroid actions. These actions, in response to exposure to ecologically relevant concentrations of various environmental contaminants, have now been established in numerous vertebrate species. However, many potential mechanisms and endocrine actions have not been studied. For example, the DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane] metabolite, p,p -DDE [1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene] is known to disrupt prostaglandin synthesis in the uterus of birds, providing part of the explanation for DDT-induced egg shell thinning. Few studies have examined prostaglandin synthesis as a target for endocrine disruption, yet these hormones are active in reproduction, immune responses, and cardiovascular physiology. Future studies must broaden the basic science approach to endocrine disruption, thereby expanding the mechanisms and endocrine end points examined. This goal should be accomplished even if the primary influence and funding continue to emphasize a narrower approach based on regulatory needs. Without this broader approach, research into endocrine disruption will become dominated by a narrow dogma, focusing on a few end points and mechanisms.

  7. Preschool Children's Observed Disruptive Behavior: Variations across Sex, Interactional Context, and Disruptive Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Sarah A. O.; Carter, Alice S.; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Hill, Carri; Danis, Barbara; Keenan, Kate; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in disruptive behavior and sensitivity to social context are documented, but the intersection between them is rarely examined empirically. This report focuses on sex differences in observed disruptive behavior across interactional contexts and diagnostic status. Preschoolers (n = 327) were classified as nondisruptive (51%),…

  8. Achieving joint benefits from joint implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Moomaw, W.R.

    1995-11-01

    Joint Implementation (JI) appears to have been born with Applied Energy Services Guatemala project in 1988. That project, to plant 52 million trees, protect existing forests from cutting and fire, and enhance rural development, is being implemented by CARE Guatemala to offset 120 per cent of the emissions of a small coal burning power plant that has been built in Connecticut. Since that time, several utilities and governments have initiated additional projects. Not all of these necessarily consist of tree planting in other countries, but may consist of energy efficiency or energy conservation programs designed to reduce carbon emissions by at least as much as the additional releases from a new facility. All JI projects share the characteristic of linking the release of greenhouse gases in an industrial country with an offset that reduces or absorbs a comparable amount in another country. The emitter in the industrial country is willing to pay for the reduction elsewhere because costs are less than they would be at home.

  9. Formation of tough composite joints

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, M.K.

    1997-05-01

    Joints which exhibit tough fracture behavior were formed in a composite with a Si/SiC matrix reinforced with Textron SCS-6 fibers with either boron nitride or silicon nitride fiber coatings. In composites with BN coatings fibers were aligned uniaxially, while composites with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-coated fibers had a 0/90{degree} architecture. Lapped joints (joints with overlapping fingers) were necessary to obtain tough behavior. Geometrical requirements necessary to avoid brittle joint failure have been proposed. Joints with a simple overlap geometry (only a few fingers) would have to be very long in order to prevent brittle failure. Typical failure in these joints is caused by a crack propagating along the interfaces between the joint fingers. Joints of the same overall length, but with geometry changed to be symmetric about the joint centerline and with an extra shear surface exhibited tough fractures accompanied with extensive fiber pullout. The initial matrix cracking of these joints was relatively low because cracks propagated easily through the ends of the fingers. Joints with an optimized stepped sawtooth geometry produced composite-like failures with the stress/strain curves containing an elastic region followed by a region of rising stress with an increase of strain. Increasing the fiber/matrix interfacial strength from 9 to 25 MPa, by changing the fiber coating, increased matrix cracking and ultimate strength of the composite significantly. The best joints had matrix cracking stress and ultimate strength of 138 and 240 MPa, respectively. Joint failure was preceded by multiple matrix cracking in the entire composite. The high strength of the joints will permit building of structures containing joints with only a minor reduction of design stresses.

  10. The Effects of Cooperative Change Planning in a Reward and Response Cost Token System on the Disruptive Behavior of an Elementary EMH Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Faith; Feldman, David

    Joint teacher and student development of a contingency management plan to help control disruptive behavior was explored with a class of 13 mildly mentally retarded elementary school children after several less extensive teacher directed contingencies were unsuccessful. All students in the self contained classroom had extensive school histories of…

  11. Ocean acidification disrupts induced defences in the intertidal gastropod Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Bibby, Ruth; Cleall-Harding, Polly; Rundle, Simon; Widdicombe, Steve; Spicer, John

    2007-12-22

    Carbon dioxide-induced ocean acidification is predicted to have major implications for marine life, but the research focus to date has been on direct effects. We demonstrate that acidified seawater can have indirect biological effects by disrupting the capability of organisms to express induced defences, hence, increasing their vulnerability to predation. The intertidal gastropod Littorina littorea produced thicker shells in the presence of predation (crab) cues but this response was disrupted at low seawater pH. This response was accompanied by a marked depression in metabolic rate (hypometabolism) under the joint stress of high predation risk and reduced pH. However, snails in this treatment apparently compensated for a lack of morphological defence, by increasing their avoidance behaviour, which, in turn, could affect their interactions with other organisms. Together, these findings suggest that biological effects from ocean acidification may be complex and extend beyond simple direct effects.

  12. Arterial injury complicating knee disruption. Third place winner: Conrad Jobst award.

    PubMed

    Varnell, R M; Coldwell, D M; Sangeorzan, B J; Johansen, K H

    1989-12-01

    Because dislocation of the knee (DK) is accompanied by a substantial risk of popliteal artery injury, the importance of arteriography in ruling out occult arterial damage in such patients is well accepted. However, because antecedent DK cannot be ruled out in a trauma victim presenting only with severe knee ligamentous disruption (LD), we have routinely performed arteriography in all patients presenting with grossly unstable knees, whether or not DK is present. To evaluate this policy we reviewed the records of 30 patients with either DK (n = 19) or severe LD (n = 11). There was no significant difference between DK and LD in the frequency of major (22% vs 18%) or minor (38% vs 36%) vascular abnormalities. We also found that Doppler pressure measurements were highly predictive of major arterial trauma in patients in whom it was used. We conclude that arterial injury should be ruled out in all trauma victims with severe knee ligament disruption, whether or not actual joint dislocation is present.

  13. Mechanical algal disruption for efficient biodiesel extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, Joel David

    Biodiesel from algae provides several benefits over current biodiesel feedstocks, but the energy requirements of processing algae into a useable fuel are currently so high as to be prohibitive. One route to improving this is via disruption of the cells prior to lipid extraction, which can significantly increase energy recovery. Unfortunately, several obvious disruption techniques require more energy than can be gained. This dissertation examines the use of microbubbles to improve mechanical disruption of algal cells using experimental, theoretical, and computational methods. New laboratory experiments show that effective ultrasonic disruption of algae is achieved by adding microbubbles to an algal solution. The configuration studied flows the solution through a tube and insonifies a small section with a high-pressure ultrasound wave. Previous biomedical research has shown effective cell membrane damage on animal cells with similar methods, but the present research is the first to extend such study to algal cells. Results indicate that disruption increases with peak negative pressure between 1.90 and 3.07 MPa and with microbubble concentration up to 12.5 x 107 bubbles/ml. Energy estimates of this process suggest that it requires only one-fourth the currently most-efficient laboratory-scale disruption process. Estimates of the radius near each bubble that causes disruption (i.e. the disruption radius) suggest that it increases with peak negative pressure and is near 9--20 microm for all cases tested. It is anticipated that these procedures can be designed for better efficiency and efficacy, which will be facilitated by identifying the root mechanisms of the bubble-induced disruption. We therefore examine whether bubble expansion alone creates sufficient cell deformation for cell rupture. The spherically-symmetric Marmottant model for bubble dynamics allows estimation of the flow regime under experimental conditions. Bubble expansion is modeled as a point source of

  14. 78 FR 14620 - Joint Development: Proposed Circular

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Federal Transit Administration Joint Development: Proposed Circular AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration... the form of a circular, on joint development. This circular provides guidance to recipients of Federal... joint development. This circular: (1) Defines the term ``joint development''; ] (2) explains how...

  15. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for... accommodate expansion and contraction due to temperature variations. When no-slip, joint-to-rail...

  16. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for... accommodate expansion and contraction due to temperature variations. When no-slip, joint-to-rail...

  17. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for... accommodate expansion and contraction due to temperature variations. When no-slip, joint-to-rail...

  18. Joint Services Electronics Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    collisional decay rate expected on the basis of traditional collision-broadening- type experiments. Our experiment, per- formed in a well understood...with respect to) the observations. An unexpected outcome of this line inquiry is a new. and rat her compelling, argument for the use of edge information...Report No. 99 I_3A 0 __. _______$_A _______ 4. TITLE (,.e Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVC.ZD JOINT SERVICES ELECTRONICS PROGRAM Annual

  19. Optimized bolted joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.; Bunin, B. L.; Watts, D. J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method is disclosed for joining segments of the skin of an aircraft. The ends of the skin are positioned in close proximity or abutt each other. The skin is of constant thickness throughout the joint and is sandwiched between splice plates, which taper in thickness from the last to the first bolt rows in order to reduce the stiffness of the splice plate and thereby reduce the load transfer at the location where bypass loads are the highest.

  20. Australias Joint Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    School of Signals, Defence Force School of Music , Defence Intelligence Training Centre, Defence Police Training Centre and Army School of Health...been published including planning, joint exercises and training, maritime operations, intelligence and electronic warfare. The 1981 version of JSP (AS...in the white paper published in the same year. DCP 2009 also promised to provide an electronic update every six months, with a particular focus on

  1. Joint Services Electronics Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-30

    AeSTRACT ( Coat nu an rever s e f n cessry and Identify by block number) , An annual report of the JSEP (Joint Services Electronics Program) in Electro...solid state electals in the following areas: (1) Use of silicides and regrown silicon as materials for interconnects, gate electrodes, and/or active...the gate " electrode and for the interconnect between devices. Recent work in our laboratory has shown that silicides and regrown silicon are very

  2. Distal Radioulnar Joint Instability

    PubMed Central

    Mirghasemi, Ali R.; Lee, Daniel J.; Rahimi, Narges; Rashidinia, Shervin

    2015-01-01

    Distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability is a common clinical condition but a frequently missed diagnosis. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments are possible for chronic cases of DRUJ instability. Nonsurgical treatment can be considered as the primary therapy in less active patients, while surgery should be considered to recover bone and ligament injuries if nonsurgical treatment fails to restore forearm stability and function. The appropriate choice of treatment depends on the individual patient and specific derangement of the DRUJ PMID:26328241

  3. Joint Forces Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    for countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in space. The Space Operations Center ( SPOC ), USSPACECOM is the single point...of contact for assessing space capabilities. Combatant commanders, subordinate JFCs, and Services can access this information from the SPOC via the...special operations forces SPOC Space Operations Center SSBN fleet ballistic missile submarine SST space support team UJTL Universal Joint Task List UN

  4. Prosthetic elbow joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An artificial, manually positionable elbow joint for use in an upper extremity, above-elbow, prosthetic is described. The prosthesis provides a locking feature that is easily controlled by the wearer. The instant elbow joint is very strong and durable enough to withstand the repeated heavy loadings encountered by a wearer who works in an industrial, construction, farming, or similar environment. The elbow joint of the present invention comprises a turntable, a frame, a forearm, and a locking assembly. The frame generally includes a housing for the locking assembly and two protruding ears. The forearm includes an elongated beam having a cup-shaped cylindrical member at one end and a locking wheel having a plurality of holes along a circular arc on its other end with a central bore for pivotal attachment to the protruding ears of the frame. The locking assembly includes a collar having a central opening with a plurality of internal grooves, a plurality of internal cam members each having a chamfered surface at one end and a V-shaped slot at its other end; an elongated locking pin having a crown wheel with cam surfaces and locking lugs secured thereto; two coiled compression springs; and a flexible filament attached to one end of the elongated locking pin and extending from the locking assembly for extending and retracting the locking pin into the holes in the locking wheel to permit selective adjustment of the forearm relative to the frame. In use, the turntable is affixed to the upper arm part of the prosthetic in the conventional manner, and the cup-shaped cylindrical member on one end of the forearm is affixed to the forearm piece of the prosthetic in the conventional manner. The elbow joint is easily adjusted and locked between maximum flex and extended positions.

  5. Joint Services Electronics Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    Director Joint Services Electronics Program E.L . T*.. I * cumnent has been app- lvad JAN 141986;- f -I p-bli- ’ l.-tse and sale; it: di~ributionl is...fluctuations cause localized layers of varying composition that resulted in large PL line widths and apparently random PL emission wavelength. The presence of...vent and * growth lines . Steps are being taken to eliminate these imbalances. Studies of diffusion induced disordering of superlattices has been

  6. Mermaid syndrome with amniotic band disruption.

    PubMed

    Managoli, Sanjeev; Chaturvedi, Pushpa; Vilhekar, Krishna Y; Iyenger, Janaki

    2003-01-01

    An association of Amniotic Band Disruption Sequence and Mermaid Syndrome in a newborn having multiple congenital anomalies is being reported. The newborn had aberrant string like tissues attached to the amputed fingers and toes. Adhesions of amniotic bands had disrupted the fetal parts especially anteriorly in the midline, causing multiple anomalies. Apart from these features of Amniotic Band Disruption Sequence, the newborn had complete fusion of the lower limbs by cutaneous tissue, a characteristic of Mermaid Syndrome (Sirenomelia). Associated malformations were anal stenosis, rectal atresia, small horseshoe kidney, hypoplastic urinary bladder and a bicomuate uterus. The single umbilical artery had a high origin, arising directly from the aorta just distal to the celiac axis, which is unique to sirenomelia. Theories put forward regarding the etiopathogenesis of both the conditions are discussed.

  7. Complete Vesicourethral Anastomotic Disruption Following Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Christopher M.; Oberlin, Daniel; Han, Justin S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vesicourethral anastomotic (VUA) disruption with bladder displacement into the abdominal cavity following robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) is an exceedingly rare complication. There have been no cited case reports after robotic surgery but case reports after open radical prostatectomy have been noted. Other complications related to VUA include bleeding with or without pelvic hematoma, bladder neck contracture, or severe stress urinary incontinence. Following radical prostatectomy, studies estimate the rate of VUA leakage to be 1.4% and no exact rate of complete disruption is known given its rarity. However, the majority of these cases are managed conservatively and rarely require reoperation. To date, there are no published studies that describe complete VUA and bladder displacement secondary to a large pelvic hematoma following prostatectomy. We report a rare case of VUA disruption after RALP successfully managed with conservative treatment. PMID:27579438

  8. Disruption, beamstrahlung, and beamstrahlung pair creation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1988-12-01

    The two major effects from the interaction of e/sup /minus//e/sup +/ beams---beamstrahlung and disruption---are reviewed, with emphasis on flat beam collisions. For the disruption effects we discuss the luminosity enhancement factor, the maximum and rms disruption angles, and the ''kink instability''. All the results are obtained from computer simulations, and scaling laws based on these are deduced whenever possible. For the beamstrahlung effects, we concentrate only on the final electron energy spectrum and the deflection angle associated with low energy particles. In addition to the generic studies on the beam-beam effects, we also list the relevant beam-beam parameters obtained from simulations on two sample designs: the TLC and the ILC. As an addendum, the newly discovered phenomenon of coherent beamstrahlung pair creation, together with the incoherent process, are discussed. 18 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Maternal Characteristics Predicting Young Girls’ Disruptive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    van der Molen, Elsa; Hipwell, Alison E.; Vermeiren, Robert; Loeber, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the relative predictive utility of maternal characteristics and parenting skills on the development of girls’ disruptive behavior. The current study used five waves of parent and child-report data from the ongoing Pittsburgh Girls Study to examine these relationships in a sample of 1,942 girls from age 7 to 12 years. Multivariate Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) analyses indicated that European American race, mother’s prenatal nicotine use, maternal depression, maternal conduct problems prior to age 15, and low maternal warmth explained unique variance. Maladaptive parenting partly mediated the effects of maternal depression and maternal conduct problems. Both current and early maternal risk factors have an impact on young girls’ disruptive behavior, providing support for the timing and focus of the prevention of girls’ disruptive behavior. PMID:21391016

  10. Tokamak plasma current disruption infrared control system

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, Henry W.; Ulrickson, Michael

    1987-01-01

    In a magnetic plasma confinment device having an inner toroidal limiter mounted on an inner wall of a plasma containment vessel, an arrangement is provided for monitoring vertical temperature profiles of the limiter. The temperature profiles are taken at brief time intervals, in a time scan fashion. The time scans of the vertical temperature profile are continuously monitored to detect the presence of a peaked temperature excursion, which, according to the present invention, is a precursor of a subsequent major plasma disruption. A fast scan of the temperature profile is made so as to provide a time interval in real time prior to the major plasma disruption, such that corrective action can be taken to reduce the harmful effects of the plasma disruption.

  11. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-09

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression.

  12. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.

    1980-08-01

    An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  13. Measuring Hole Elongation in Bolted Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichorek, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement does not affect joint parameters. Verification of analytical and strength-prediction methods for bolted composite joints based generally on data obtained experimentally from double-lap-joint specimens. In mechanically fastened joints, stresses maximal at fastener holes. Ability to measure accurately hole elongations without affecting joint parameters provides better understanding of elastic and plastic behavior of joint material leading to failure mechanisms in mechanically fastened joints required for design of more-efficient, lightweight composite joints.

  14. Duct disruption, a new explanation of miliaria.

    PubMed

    Shuster, S

    1997-01-01

    From argument and a few personal observations, the hypothesis has crystallised that the miliaria commonly occurring in unacclimatised Caucasians visiting hot climates is caused by exposure to ultraviolet irradiation, by an effect on the cells of the upper epidermis, which eventually allows a split to develop between them and the new stratum corneum that grows up beneath, into which sweat from the disrupted ducts can collect as microcysts. This dehiscence is the probable explanation of sunburn peeling and photo-onycholysis. It is concluded that duct disruption, not blockage or dysfunction, is the immediate cause of the miliarias.

  15. Tidal disruption of stars by SMBHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komossa, S.

    2016-06-01

    The tidal disruption and subsequent accretion of stars by supermassive black holes produces spectacular flares in the X-ray sky. First found with ROSAT, ongoing and upcoming sky surveys will find these events in the 1000s. In X-rays, tidal disruption events (TDEs) provide us with powerful new probes of accretion physics under extreme conditions, of the formation of disk winds, of relativistic effects near the SMBH, and of the presence of supermassive binary black holes. This talk reviews the status of observations, and discusses future prospects. XMM-Newton will continue to play an important role in identifying new events and carry out spectroscopic follow-ups.

  16. Consequences of Circadian Disruption on Neurologic Health.

    PubMed

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    Circadian rhythms have a major role in physiology and behavior. Circadian disruption has negative consequences for physiologic homeostasis at molecular, cellular, organ-system, and whole-organism levels. The onset of many cerebrovascular insults shows circadian temporal trends. Impaired sleep-wake cycle, the most robust output rhythms of the circadian system, is significantly affected by neurodegenerative disorders, may precede them by decades, and may also affect their progression. Emerging evidence suggests that circadian disruption may be a risk factor for these neurologic disorders. This article discusses the implications of circadian rhythms in brain disorders, with an emphasis on cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Consequences of Circadian Disruption on Neurologic Health

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Phyllis C.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have a major role in physiology and behavior. Circadian disruption has negative consequences for physiological homeostasis at molecular, cellular, organ–system and whole-organism levels. The onset of many cerebrovascular insults exhibit circadian temporal trends. Impaired sleep-wake cycle, the most robust output rhythms of the circadian system is significantly affected by neurodegenerative disorders, may precede them by decades, and may also impact their progression. Emerging evidence suggest that circadian disruption may be a risk factor for these neurological disorders. In this review, we discuss the implications of circadian rhythms in brain disorders, with an emphasis on cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26568123

  18. Traditional facial tattoos disrupt face recognition processes.

    PubMed

    Buttle, Heather; East, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Factors that are important to successful face recognition, such as features, configuration, and pigmentation/reflectance, are all subject to change when a face has been engraved with ink markings. Here we show that the application of facial tattoos, in the form of spiral patterns (typically associated with the Maori tradition of a Moko), disrupts face recognition to a similar extent as face inversion, with recognition accuracy little better than chance performance (2AFC). These results indicate that facial tattoos can severely disrupt our ability to recognise a face that previously did not have the pattern.

  19. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  20. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  1. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  2. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  3. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  4. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  5. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  6. Erosion of a TiAl intermetallic alloy under conditions simulating plasma disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Yakushin, V. L.; Polsky, V. I.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Fedotov, V. T.; Sevryukov, O. N.; Golikov, M. Yu.; Zolotarev, M. V.

    2009-04-01

    Radiation erosion and thermal stability of TiAl-based intermetallic alloys produced by vacuum-arc melting, compacting of microcrystal powders with binder and impregnantion by melt, and their brazed joints with bronze have been investigated under irradiation by high-temperature pulsed hydrogen plasma flows (the flow energy density Q = 0.2-0.9 MJ/m 2, the pulse duration 15 μs, the number of pulses 1-21) which simulate the expected plasma disruptions in a fusion reactor. It has been found that the erosion coefficients and thermal stability of alloys are determined by the way of their fabrication, and compacted intermetallides have a higher thermal stability in comparison with the cast ones. The brazed joints of the intermetallic compound with bronze under irradiation by pulsed hydrogen plasma up to the energy density Q = 0.75 MJ/m 2 have a high thermal stability and formation of cracks was not observed.

  7. Empathy in Boys with Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wied, Minet; Goudena, Paul P.; Matthys, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Background: The present study examined empathy in 8- to 12-year-old clinically referred boys with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD) (n = 25) and age-matched normal controls (n = 24). Method: Situational empathy was assessed by children's emotional and cognitive responses to six empathy-inducing vignettes (displaying sadness, anger or happiness).…

  8. The Relative Ineffectiveness of Criminal Network Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duijn, Paul A. C.; Kashirin, Victor; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-02-01

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with unique criminal network intelligence data from the Dutch Police, we discovered, in contrast to common belief, that criminal networks might even become `stronger', after targeted attacks. On the other hand increased efficiency within criminal networks decreases its internal security, thus offering opportunities for law enforcement agencies to target these networks more deliberately. Our results emphasize the importance of criminal network interventions at an early stage, before the network gets a chance to (re-)organize to maximum resilience. In the end disruption strategies force criminal networks to become more exposed, which causes successful network disruption to become a long-term effort.

  9. E-Learning: Between Augmentation and Disruption?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilesen, Simon B.; Josephsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Based on a framework for analysis combining diffusion theory, content layer analysis and sense making, this paper discusses the theme of "e-learning as augmentation or disruption" from the point of view of technological innovation. Two cases of on-campus blended learning at Roskilde University, Denmark, are introduced to illustrate the…

  10. Natural and Professional Help during Marital Disruption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Paul A.; Zax, Melvin

    Although few people bring their psychological problems to mental health professionals, research in the area of 'natural' help is rudimentary. To investigate the process and effectiveness of natural professional groups in helping individuals experiencing marital disruption, 42 helpers (14 mental health professionals, 14 divorce lawyers, and 14…

  11. The Debris Streams from Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    When a star comes within a critical distance of a supermassive black hole, the tidal force exerted by the hole overcomes the stellar self-gravity. The star is subsequently torn apart, creating a stream of tidally-shredded debris that initially recedes from the hole, eventually returns to pericenter, forms an accretion disk and generates a highly luminous event that can sometimes be accompanied by the production of relativistic jets. This entire process is known as a tidal disruption event (TDE), and dozens of these events have already been observed. I will discuss my most recent work that has analyzed the tidal disruption process, and in particular I will focus on the results of numerical and analytical investigations that show that the streams of debris produced during TDEs can be gravitationally unstable. Specifically, I will describe how compressive motions augment the importance of self-gravity not long after the star is disrupted, resulting in the fragmentation of the debris stream into small-scale clumps. These findings will be discussed in the context of the observational signatures of tidal disruption events, and I will also relate these results to my past investigations concerning accretion disk formation and jet launching during TDEs.

  12. Managing Disruptive Behaviour in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deering, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Both faculty and students at many colleges and universities report numerous incidents of disruptive and uncivil behaviour. However, studies show that faculty are often reluctant to confront these situations, or they feel ill-equipped to intervene. If the behaviour escalates, a disproportionate amount of time and effort can be spent trying to…

  13. The Evolution and Disruption of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Planetary systems that encounter passing stars can experience severe orbital disruption, and the efficiency of this process is greatly enhanced when the impinging systems are binary pairs rather than single stars. Using a Monte Carlo approach, we have performed nearly half a million numerical experiments to examine the long term ramifications of planetary scattering on planetary systems. We have concluded that systems which form in dense environments such as Orion's Trapezium cluster have roughly a ten percent chance of being seriously disrupted. We have also used our programs to explore the long-term prospects for our own Solar system. Given the current interstellar environment, we have computed the odds that Earth will find its orbit seriously disrupted prior to the emergence of a runaway greenhouse effect driven by the Sun's increasing luminosity. This estimate includes both direct disruption events and scattering processes that seriously alter the orbits of the Jovian planets, which then force severe changes upon the Earth's orbit. We then explore the consequences of the Earth being thrown into deep space. The surface biosphere would rapidly shut down under conditions of zero insolation, but the Earth's radioactive heat is capable of maintaining life deep underground, and perhaps in hydrothermal vent communities, for some time to come. Although unlikely for the Earth, this scenario may be common throughout the universe, since many environments where liquid water could exist (e.g., Europa and Callisto) must derive their energy from internal (rather than external) heating.

  14. Disrupting the School-to-Prison Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahena, Sofía, Ed.; Cooc, North, Ed.; Currie-Rubin, Rachel, Ed.; Kuttner, Paul, Ed.; Ng, Monica, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    A trenchant and wide-ranging look at this alarming national trend, "Disrupting the School-to-Prison Pipeline" is unsparing in its account of the problem while pointing in the direction of meaningful and much-needed reforms. The "school-to-prison pipeline" has received much attention in the education world over the past few…

  15. Management of the Patient with Disruptive Vocalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloane, Philip D.; Davidson, Susan; Buckwalter, Kathleen; Lindsey, Anthony; Ayers, Susan; Lenker, Vonda; Burgio, Louis D.

    1997-01-01

    Reports the results of a consensus meeting convened to provide guidelines for clinicians and make recommendations for researchers regarding disruptive vocalization (DV). Suggests that DV arises largely in persons with cognitive impairment and generally reflects an underlying need or discomfort. Managing DV involves appropriate identification of…

  16. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake, and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. Both restricted feedi...

  17. THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION: FROM KINETICS TO DYNAMICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of chemicals with diverse structures act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are chemicals that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormones (THs), or change circulating or t...

  18. Is Online Learning a Disruptive Innovation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.

    2011-01-01

    In their desire to plan for the future, planners must assess the role of both internal and external influences on the institution. What then should people make of the idea that technology is disruptive? This perception fuels the views of Barone and Hagner (2001), who claimed that technology would "transform" higher education; Duderstadt (2000),…

  19. The Structure of Childhood Disruptive Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martel, Michelle M.; Gremillion, Monica; Roberts, Bethan; von Eye, Alexander; Nigg, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) frequently co-occur. Comorbidity of these 2 childhood disruptive behavior domains has not been satisfactorily explained at either a structural or etiological level. The current study evaluated a bifactor model, which allows for a "g" factor in addition to…

  20. Maternal Characteristics Predicting Young Girls' Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Molen, Elsa; Hipwell, Alison E.; Vermeiren, Robert; Loeber, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the relative predictive utility of maternal characteristics and parenting skills on the development of girls' disruptive behavior. The current study used five waves of parent- and child-report data from the ongoing Pittsburgh Girls Study to examine these relationships in a sample of 1,942 girls from age 7 to 12 years.…

  1. The Relative Ineffectiveness of Criminal Network Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Duijn, Paul A. C.; Kashirin, Victor; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with unique criminal network intelligence data from the Dutch Police, we discovered, in contrast to common belief, that criminal networks might even become ‘stronger’, after targeted attacks. On the other hand increased efficiency within criminal networks decreases its internal security, thus offering opportunities for law enforcement agencies to target these networks more deliberately. Our results emphasize the importance of criminal network interventions at an early stage, before the network gets a chance to (re-)organize to maximum resilience. In the end disruption strategies force criminal networks to become more exposed, which causes successful network disruption to become a long-term effort. PMID:24577374

  2. The relative ineffectiveness of criminal network disruption.

    PubMed

    Duijn, Paul A C; Kashirin, Victor; Sloot, Peter M A

    2014-02-28

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with unique criminal network intelligence data from the Dutch Police, we discovered, in contrast to common belief, that criminal networks might even become 'stronger', after targeted attacks. On the other hand increased efficiency within criminal networks decreases its internal security, thus offering opportunities for law enforcement agencies to target these networks more deliberately. Our results emphasize the importance of criminal network interventions at an early stage, before the network gets a chance to (re-)organize to maximum resilience. In the end disruption strategies force criminal networks to become more exposed, which causes successful network disruption to become a long-term effort.

  3. Endocrine disrupting chemicals and disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J

    2011-11-01

    Environmental chemicals have significant impacts on biological systems. Chemical exposures during early stages of development can disrupt normal patterns of development and thus dramatically alter disease susceptibility later in life. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the body's endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and immune effects in humans. A wide range of substances, both natural and man-made, are thought to cause endocrine disruption, including pharmaceuticals, dioxin and dioxin-like compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT and other pesticides, and components of plastics such as bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates. EDCs are found in many everyday products--including plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, flame retardants, food additives, toys, cosmetics, and pesticides. EDCs interfere with the synthesis, secretion, transport, activity, or elimination of natural hormones. This interference can block or mimic hormone action, causing a wide range of effects. This review focuses on the mechanisms and modes of action by which EDCs alter hormone signaling. It also includes brief overviews of select disease endpoints associated with endocrine disruption.

  4. Disruption mitigation studies in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Evans, T.E.; Gray, D.S.; Humphreys, D.A.; Hyatt, A.W.; Jernigan, T.C.; Lee, R.L.; Leuer, J.A.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Parks, P.B.; Schaffer, M.J.; Whyte, D.G.; Zhang, J.

    1999-05-01

    Data on the discharge behavior, thermal loads, halo currents, and runaway electrons have been obtained in disruptions on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. {bold 8}, 2A 441 (1985)]. These experiments have also evaluated techniques to mitigate the disruptions while minimizing runaway electron production. Experiments injecting cryogenic impurity {open_quotes}killer{close_quotes} pellets of neon and argon and massive amounts of helium gas have successfully reduced these disruption effects. The halo current generation, scaling, and mitigation are understood and are in good agreement with predictions of a semianalytic model. Results from {open_quotes}killer{close_quotes} pellet injection have been used to benchmark theoretical models of the pellet ablation and energy loss. Runaway electrons are often generated by the pellets and new runaway generation mechanisms, modifications of the standard Dreicer process, have been found to explain the runaways. Experiments with the massive helium gas puff have also effectively mitigated disruptions without the formation of runaway electrons that can occur with {open_quotes}killer{close_quotes} pellets. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Development of Disruptive Open Access Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Terry; McConkey, Brigette

    2009-01-01

    Open access (OA) publication has emerged, with disruptive effects, as a major outlet for scholarly publication. OA publication is usually associated with on-line distribution and provides access to scholarly publications to anyone, anywhere--regardless of their ability to pay subscription fees or their association with an educational institution.…

  6. Neuroendocrine Disruption: More than Hormones are Upset

    PubMed Central

    Waye, Andrew; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2011-01-01

    Only a small proportion of the published research on endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) directly examined effects on neuroendocrine processes. There is an expanding body of evidence that anthropogenic chemicals exert effects on neuroendocrine systems and that these changes might impact peripheral organ systems and physiological processes. Neuroendocrine disruption extends the concept of endocrine disruption to include the full breadth of integrative physiology (i.e., more than hormones are upset). Pollutants may also disrupt numerous other neurochemical pathways to affect an animal's capacity to reproduce, develop and grow, or deal with stress and other challenges. Several examples are presented in this review, from both vertebrates and invertebrates, illustrating that diverse environmental pollutants including pharmaceuticals, organochlorine pesticides, and industrial contaminants have the potential to disrupt neuroendocrine control mechanisms. While most investigations on EDC are carried out with vertebrate models, an attempt is also made to highlight the importance of research on invertebrate neuroendocrine disruption. The neurophysiology of many invertebrates is well described and many of their neurotransmitters are similar or identical to those in vertebrates; therefore, lessons learned from one group of organisms may help us understand potential adverse effects in others. This review argues for the adoption of systems biology and integrative physiology to address the effects of EDC. Effects of pulp and paper mill effluents on fish reproduction are a good example of where relatively narrow hypothesis testing strategies (e.g., whether or not pollutants are sex steroid mimics) have only partially solved a major problem in environmental biology. It is clear that a global, integrative physiological approach, including improved understanding of neuroendocrine control mechanisms, is warranted to fully understand the impacts of pulp and paper mill effluents

  7. Neuroendocrine disruption: more than hormones are upset.

    PubMed

    Waye, Andrew; Trudeau, Vance L

    2011-01-01

    Only a small proportion of the published research on endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) directly examined effects on neuroendocrine processes. There is an expanding body of evidence that anthropogenic chemicals exert effects on neuroendocrine systems and that these changes might impact peripheral organ systems and physiological processes. Neuroendocrine disruption extends the concept of endocrine disruption to include the full breadth of integrative physiology (i.e., more than hormones are upset). Pollutants may also disrupt numerous other neurochemical pathways to affect an animal's capacity to reproduce, develop and grow, or deal with stress and other challenges. Several examples are presented in this review, from both vertebrates and invertebrates, illustrating that diverse environmental pollutants including pharmaceuticals, organochlorine pesticides, and industrial contaminants have the potential to disrupt neuroendocrine control mechanisms. While most investigations on EDC are carried out with vertebrate models, an attempt is also made to highlight the importance of research on invertebrate neuroendocrine disruption. The neurophysiology of many invertebrates is well described and many of their neurotransmitters are similar or identical to those in vertebrates; therefore, lessons learned from one group of organisms may help us understand potential adverse effects in others. This review argues for the adoption of systems biology and integrative physiology to address the effects of EDC. Effects of pulp and paper mill effluents on fish reproduction are a good example of where relatively narrow hypothesis testing strategies (e.g., whether or not pollutants are sex steroid mimics) have only partially solved a major problem in environmental biology. It is clear that a global, integrative physiological approach, including improved understanding of neuroendocrine control mechanisms, is warranted to fully understand the impacts of pulp and paper mill effluents

  8. The culture of silence: disruptive and impaired physicians.

    PubMed

    Mustard, Lewis W

    2009-01-01

    An experienced hospital CEO examines the emergence of disruptive and impaired physicians as an overwhelming problem for hospital medical staff nurses, and administrators. The poor behavior ranges from aggressive acts of yelling, swearing, or pushing to passive ones of being chronically late or providing inadequate chart notes. The Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and the American Medical Association have standards and guidelines to minimize unprofessional behavior that negatively impacts hospital patient care. The hospital staff and employees fear retaliation and the stigma associated with "tattle telling," and demonstrate a reluctance to confront the physician or peer, resulting in a culture of silence. The healthcare industry has a "history of tolerance and indifference to intimidating and destructive behaviors." To combat this 'silent response," hospitals have created wellness committees composed of caregivers such as physicians, nurses, and therapists who are specifically trained by an outside entity skilled in hospital wellness committee response functioning. The culture of silence must be replaced with the culture of safety.

  9. The mass disruption of Jupiter Family comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.

    2015-01-01

    I show that the size-distribution of small scattered-disk trans-neptunian objects when derived from the observed size-distribution of Jupiter Family comets (JFCs) and other observational constraints implies that a large percentage (94-97%) of newly arrived active comets within a range of 0.2-15.4 km effective radius must physically disrupt, i.e., macroscopically disintegrate, within their median dynamical lifetime. Additional observational constraints include the numbers of dormant and active nuclei in the near-Earth object (NEO) population and the slope of their size distributions. I show that the cumulative power-law slope (-2.86 to -3.15) of the scattered-disk TNO hot population between 0.2 and 15.4 km effective radius is only weakly dependent on the size-dependence of the otherwise unknown disruption mechanism. Evidently, as JFC nuclei from the scattered disk evolve into the inner Solar System only a fraction achieve dormancy while the vast majority of small nuclei (e.g., primarily those with effective radius <2 km) break-up. The percentage disruption rate appears to be comparable with that of the dynamically distinct Oort cloud and Halley type comets (Levison, H.F., Morbidelli, A., Dones, L., Jedicke, R., Wiegert, P.A., Bottke Jr., W.F. [2002]. Science 296, 2212-2215) suggesting that all types of comet nuclei may have similar structural characteristics even though they may have different source regions and thermal histories. The typical disruption rate for a 1 km radius active nucleus is ∼5 × 10-5 disruptions/year and the dormancy rate is typically 3 times less. We also estimate that average fragmentation rates range from 0.01 to 0.04 events/year/comet, somewhat above the lower limit of 0.01 events/year/comet observed by Chen and Jewitt (Chen, J., Jewitt, D.C. [1994]. Icarus 108, 265-271).

  10. Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Kong, Ying-Yee; Michalewski, Henry J; Starr, Arnold

    2005-06-01

    Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity were systematically studied in 21 subjects who had been clinically diagnosed with auditory neuropathy (AN), a recently defined disorder characterized by normal outer hair cell function but disrupted auditory nerve function. Neurological and electrophysical evidence suggests that disrupted auditory nerve activity is due to desynchronized or reduced neural activity or both. Psychophysical measures showed that the disrupted neural activity has minimal effects on intensity-related perception, such as loudness discrimination, pitch discrimination at high frequencies, and sound localization using interaural level differences. In contrast, the disrupted neural activity significantly impairs timing related perception, such as pitch discrimination at low frequencies, temporal integration, gap detection, temporal modulation detection, backward and forward masking, signal detection in noise, binaural beats, and sound localization using interaural time differences. These perceptual consequences are the opposite of what is typically observed in cochlear-impaired subjects who have impaired intensity perception but relatively normal temporal processing after taking their impaired intensity perception into account. These differences in perceptual consequences between auditory neuropathy and cochlear damage suggest the use of different neural codes in auditory perception: a suboptimal spike count code for intensity processing, a synchronized spike code for temporal processing, and a duplex code for frequency processing. We also proposed two underlying physiological models based on desynchronized and reduced discharge in the auditory nerve to successfully account for the observed neurological and behavioral data. These methods and measures cannot differentiate between these two AN models, but future studies using electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant might. These results not only show the unique

  11. Joint Services Electronics Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-30

    O no~ On A’. JOINT SERVICES ELECTRONICS PROGRAM ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT (CONTRACT F49620-79-C-0178) 1 September 1979 - 31 August 1980 by D.J...dCis0ributUonEunlimiAed. If. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of ehl. Rbept) ie~ iSok2,I flr, o eo Apeprovedneticublid statae; electronuis: maiterasd dvcs unu It. AUST WRDS...nun- erical analysis endeavors. 1 The accuracy of the system has been shown to be reliable for cross-sections on the order of o /A 2 - 1. 2. Computation

  12. Posttraumatic Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, Helen E.; Quinn, Peter D.; Granquist, Eric; Chou, Joli C.

    2009-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has many essential functions. None of its components are exempt from injury. Facial asymmetry, malocclusion, disturbances in growth, osteoarthritis, and ankylosis can manifest as complications from trauma to the TMJ. The goals of initial treatment include achievement of pretraumatic function, restoration of facial symmetry, and resolution of pain. These same objectives hold true for late repairs and reconstruction of the TMJ apparatus. Treatment is demanding, and with opposing approaches. The following article explores various treatment options for problems presenting as a result of a history of trauma to the TMJ. PMID:22110802

  13. Joint Services Electronics Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    RAD-A158 731 JOINT SERVICES ELECTRONICS PROGRBM(U) C BERKELEY ELECTRONICS RESEARCH LAB W G OLDHAN 38 APR 85 UCBERL-85-1 AFOSR-TR-85-8669 F49620-84-C...RESEARCH LABORATORY College of Engineering * ’University of California, Berkeley , CA 94720 • .’, - .. +- -’-’. .’’ "+ ’ " - ,’? .( i.". - "" -. ) 7...ELECTRONICS RESEARCH LABORATORY College of Engineering University of California, Berkeley , CA 94720 .. 4 MTV.? CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Dioseed

  14. Reoperative temporomandibular joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Vega, Luis G; Gutta, Rajesh; Louis, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    TMJ surgeries are not always successful. Many potential pitfalls can occur during any phase of the treatment and can lead to complications, less than desirable results, and short- or long-term failures. Unsatisfactory results can occur for multiple reasons, including misdiagnosis of the original pathologic condition, incorrect selection of surgical technique, technical failures, complications, systemic disease, and unrealistic expectations. This article focuses on the reoperation of the TMJ primarily in cases of internal derangement and discusses TMJ arthrocentesis, arthroscopy, modified condylotomy, and open joint procedures.

  15. Joint hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fikree, Asma; Aziz, Qasim; Grahame, Rodney

    2013-05-01

    Although perceived as a rare condition, joint hypermobility syndrome is common. Its prevalence in rheumatology clinics is extremely high. Early estimates suggest that it may be the most common of all rheumatologic conditions. The problem lies in the general lack of awareness of the syndrome, its means of recognition, and the resultant failure to diagnose it correctly when present. It is a worldwide problem. This article provides an overview of hypermobility and hypermobility syndrome, stressing its multisystemic nature and the negative impact that it may have on quality of life, with particular reference to gastrointestinal involvement.

  16. Jointness: A Selected Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Research Report. Maxwell Air Force Base: US Air University, Air War College, 1989. 55pp. (UG635.3 .U5 RR-89 C54) Colley , Jackie W. CINCFOR...Command, 1973-1993, by John L. Romjue, Susan Canedy, and Anne W. Chapman. Fort Monroe: 1993. Pp. 65-73: "TRADOC in the Joint Service Arena." (U408.3...Proceedings - U.S. Naval Institute, Vol. 119, June 1993, pp. 64-65. Flores, Susan J. "Let’s Play Ball." Marine Corps Gazette, Vol. 74, October 1990, pp. 60-61

  17. On representations for joint moments using a joint coordinate system.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Oliver M; Sena, Mark P; Feeley, Brian T; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-01

    In studies of the biomechanics of joints, the representation of moments using the joint coordinate system has been discussed by several authors. The primary purpose of this technical brief is to emphasize that there are two distinct, albeit related, representations for moment vectors using the joint coordinate system. These distinct representations are illuminated by exploring connections between the Euler and dual Euler bases, the "nonorthogonal projections" presented in a recent paper by Desroches et al. (2010, "Expression of Joint Moment in the Joint Coordinate System," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132(11), p. 11450) and seminal works by Grood and Suntay (Grood and Suntay, 1983, "A Joint Coordinate System for the Clinical Description of Three-Dimensional Motions: Application to the Knee," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 105(2), pp. 136-144) and Fujie et al. (1996, "Forces and Moment in Six-DOF at the Human Knee Joint: Mathematical Description for Control," Journal of Biomechanics, 29(12), pp. 1577-1585) on the knee joint. It is also shown how the representation using the dual Euler basis leads to straightforward definition of joint stiffnesses.

  18. Strength of Welded Aircraft Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, W C

    1937-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of work started in 1928 and described in NACA-TR-348 which shows that the insertion of gusset plates was the most satisfactory way of strengthening a joint. Additional tests of the present series show that joints of this type could be improved by cutting out the portion of the plate between the intersecting tubes. T and lattice joints in thin-walled tubing 1 1/2 by 0.020 inch have somewhat lower strengths than joints in tubing of greater wall thickness because of failure by local buckling. In welding the thin-walled tubing, the recently developed "carburizing flux" process was found to be the only method capable of producing joints free from cracks. The "magnetic powder" inspection was used to detect cracks in the joints and flaws in the tubing.

  19. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  20. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, John V.; Novak, Robert F.; McBride, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  1. Phytomedicine in Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dragos, Dorin; Gilca, Marilena; Gaman, Laura; Vlad, Adelina; Iosif, Liviu; Stoian, Irina; Lupescu, Olivera

    2017-01-01

    Chronic joint inflammatory disorders such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis have in common an upsurge of inflammation, and oxidative stress, resulting in progressive histological alterations and disabling symptoms. Currently used conventional medication (ranging from pain-killers to biological agents) is potent, but frequently associated with serious, even life-threatening side effects. Used for millennia in traditional herbalism, medicinal plants are a promising alternative, with lower rate of adverse events and efficiency frequently comparable with that of conventional drugs. Nevertheless, their mechanism of action is in many cases elusive and/or uncertain. Even though many of them have been proven effective in studies done in vitro or on animal models, there is a scarcity of human clinical evidence. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available scientific information on the following joint-friendly medicinal plants, which have been tested in human studies: Arnica montana, Boswellia spp., Curcuma spp., Equisetum arvense, Harpagophytum procumbens, Salix spp., Sesamum indicum, Symphytum officinalis, Zingiber officinalis, Panax notoginseng, and Whitania somnifera. PMID:28275210

  2. Jointly Sponsored Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

    2009-03-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

  3. Joint collaborative technology experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, Michael; Ciccimaro, Donny; Yee, See; Denewiler, Thomas; Stroumtsos, Nicholas; Messamore, John; Brown, Rodney; Skibba, Brian; Clapp, Daniel; Wit, Jeff; Shirts, Randy J.; Dion, Gary N.; Anselmo, Gary S.

    2009-05-01

    Use of unmanned systems is rapidly growing within the military and civilian sectors in a variety of roles including reconnaissance, surveillance, explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), and force-protection and perimeter security. As utilization of these systems grows at an ever increasing rate, the need for unmanned systems teaming and inter-system collaboration becomes apparent. Collaboration provides a means of enhancing individual system capabilities through relevant data exchange that contributes to cooperative behaviors between systems and enables new capabilities not possible if the systems operate independently. A collaborative networked approach to development holds the promise of adding mission capability while simultaneously reducing the workload of system operators. The Joint Collaborative Technology Experiment (JCTE) joins individual technology development efforts within the Air Force, Navy, and Army to demonstrate the potential benefits of interoperable multiple system collaboration in a force-protection application. JCTE participants are the Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Airbase Technologies Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/RXQF); the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center Software Engineering Directorate (AMRDEC SED); and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - Pacific (SSC Pacific) Unmanned Systems Branch operating with funding provided by the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE). This paper will describe the efforts to date in system development by the three partner organizations, development of collaborative behaviors and experimentation in the force-protection application, results and lessons learned at a technical demonstration, simulation results, and a path forward for future work.

  4. Phytomedicine in Joint Disorders.

    PubMed

    Dragos, Dorin; Gilca, Marilena; Gaman, Laura; Vlad, Adelina; Iosif, Liviu; Stoian, Irina; Lupescu, Olivera

    2017-01-16

    Chronic joint inflammatory disorders such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis have in common an upsurge of inflammation, and oxidative stress, resulting in progressive histological alterations and disabling symptoms. Currently used conventional medication (ranging from pain-killers to biological agents) is potent, but frequently associated with serious, even life-threatening side effects. Used for millennia in traditional herbalism, medicinal plants are a promising alternative, with lower rate of adverse events and efficiency frequently comparable with that of conventional drugs. Nevertheless, their mechanism of action is in many cases elusive and/or uncertain. Even though many of them have been proven effective in studies done in vitro or on animal models, there is a scarcity of human clinical evidence. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available scientific information on the following joint-friendly medicinal plants, which have been tested in human studies: Arnica montana, Boswellia spp., Curcuma spp., Equisetum arvense, Harpagophytum procumbens, Salix spp., Sesamum indicum, Symphytum officinalis, Zingiber officinalis, Panax notoginseng, and Whitania somnifera.

  5. Ball-joint grounding ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aperlo, P. J. A.; Buck, P. A.; Weldon, V. A.

    1981-01-01

    In ball and socket joint where electrical insulator such as polytetrafluoroethylene is used as line to minimize friction, good electrical contact across joint may be needed for lightning protection or to prevent static-charge build-up. Electrical contact is maintained by ring of spring-loaded fingers mounted in socket. It may be useful in industry for cranes, trailers, and other applications requiring ball and socket joint.

  6. Anthropogenic tracers, endocrine disrupting chemicals, and endocrine disruption in Minnesota lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, J.H.; Barber, L.B.; Brown, G.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kiesling, R.L.; Ferrey, M.L.; Jahns, N.D.; Bartell, S.E.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals and endocrine disruption in fish were determined in 11 lakes across Minnesota that represent a range of trophic conditions and land uses (urban, agricultural, residential, and forested) and in which wastewater treatment plant discharges were absent. Water, sediment, and passive polar organic integrative samplers (POCIS) were analyzed for steroidal hormones, alkylphenols, bisphenol A, and other organic and inorganic molecular tracers to evaluate potential non-point source inputs into the lakes. Resident fish from the lakes were collected, and caged male fathead minnows were deployed to evaluate endocrine disruption, as indicated by the biological endpoints of plasma vitellogenin and gonadal histology. Endocrine disrupting chemicals, including bisphenol A, 17??-estradiol, estrone, and 4-nonylphenol were detected in 90% of the lakes at part per trillion concentrations. Endocrine disruption was observed in caged fathead minnows and resident fish in 90% of the lakes. The widespread but variable occurrence of anthropogenic chemicals in the lakes and endocrine disruption in fish indicates that potential sources are diverse, not limited to wastewater treatment plant discharges, and not entirely predictable based on trophic status and land use. ?? 2010.

  7. Anthropogenic tracers, endocrine disrupting chemicals, and endocrine disruption in Minnesota lakes.

    PubMed

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Barber, Larry B; Brown, Greg K; Taylor, Howard E; Kiesling, Richard L; Ferrey, Mark L; Jahns, Nathan D; Bartell, Steve E; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2010-12-01

    Concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals and endocrine disruption in fish were determined in 11 lakes across Minnesota that represent a range of trophic conditions and land uses (urban, agricultural, residential, and forested) and in which wastewater treatment plant discharges were absent. Water, sediment, and passive polar organic integrative samplers (POCIS) were analyzed for steroidal hormones, alkylphenols, bisphenol A, and other organic and inorganic molecular tracers to evaluate potential non-point source inputs into the lakes. Resident fish from the lakes were collected, and caged male fathead minnows were deployed to evaluate endocrine disruption, as indicated by the biological endpoints of plasma vitellogenin and gonadal histology. Endocrine disrupting chemicals, including bisphenol A, 17β-estradiol, estrone, and 4-nonylphenol were detected in 90% of the lakes at part per trillion concentrations. Endocrine disruption was observed in caged fathead minnows and resident fish in 90% of the lakes. The widespread but variable occurrence of anthropogenic chemicals in the lakes and endocrine disruption in fish indicates that potential sources are diverse, not limited to wastewater treatment plant discharges, and not entirely predictable based on trophic status and land use.

  8. Early Developments in Joint Action

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Joint action, critical to human social interaction and communication, has garnered increasing scholarly attention in many areas of inquiry, yet its development remains little explored. This paper reviews research on the growth of joint action over the first 2 years of life to show how children become progressively more able to engage deliberately, autonomously, and flexibly in joint action with adults and peers. It is suggested that a key mechanism underlying the dramatic changes in joint action over the second year of life is the ability to reflect consciously on oneself and one’s behavior and volition and correspondingly, on the behavior, goals, and intentions of others. PMID:23087769

  9. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction in athletes.

    PubMed

    Brolinson, P Gunnar; Kozar, Albert J; Cibor, Greg

    2003-02-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joint is a common source of low back pain in the general population. Because it is the link between the lower extremities and the spine, it sustains even higher loads during athletic activity, predisposing athletes to a greater probability of joint dysfunction and pain. The diagnosis and treatment of SI joint dysfunction remains controversial, due to complex anatomy and biomechanics, and a lack of universally accepted nomenclature and terminology, consistently reliable clinical tests and imaging studies, and consistently effective treatments. This article clarifies these issues by presenting a model of SI joint anatomy and function, a systematic approach to the diagnosis of dysfunction, and a comprehensive treatment plan.

  10. Disrupted Saccadic Corollary Discharge in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Schall, Jeffrey D.; Heckers, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions in corollary discharge (CD), motor signals that send information to sensory areas and allow for prediction of sensory states, are argued to underlie the perceived loss of agency in schizophrenia. Behavioral and neurophysiological evidence for CD in primates comes largely from the saccadic double-step task, which requires participants to make two visually triggered saccadic eye movements in brief succession. Healthy individuals use CD to anticipate the change in eye position resulting from the first saccade when preparing the second saccade. In the current study with human participants, schizophrenia patients and healthy controls of both sexes performed a modified double-step task. Most trials required a saccade to a single visual target (T1). On a subset of trials, a second target (T2) was flashed shortly following T1. Subjects were instructed to look directly at T2. Healthy individuals also use CD to make rapid, corrective responses following erroneous saccades to T1. To assess CD in schizophrenia, we examined the following on error trials: (1) frequency and latency of corrective saccades, and (2) mislocalization of the corrective (second) saccade in the direction predicted by a failure to use CD to account for the first eye movement. Consistent with disrupted CD, patients made fewer and slower error corrections. Importantly, the corrective saccade vector angle was biased in a manner consistent with disrupted CD. These results provide novel and clear evidence for dysfunctional CD in the oculomotor system in patients with schizophrenia. Based on neurophysiology work, these disturbances might have their basis in medial thalamus dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT According to the World Health Organization, acute schizophrenia carries more disability weight than any other disease, but its etiology remains unknown. One promising theory of schizophrenia highlights alterations in a sense of self, in which self-generated thoughts or actions are attributed

  11. CUMULATIVE DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTERS: SYNERGY OR ADDITIVITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to chemicals with hormonal activity during critical developmental periods can disrupt reproductive function and development. Within the last decade, several classes of pesticides and toxic substances have been shown to disrupt differentiation of the male rat reproductive...

  12. Bacterial biofilm disruption using laser generated shockwaves.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Zachary D; Navarro, Artemio; Kealey, Colin P; Beenhouwer, David; Haake, David A; Grundfest, Warren S; Gupta, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    A system was built to test the efficacy of bacterial biofilm disruption using laser generated shockwaves. The system is based on a Q-switched, ND:YAG pulsed laser operating at a rep rate of 10 Hz with 1500 mJ pulses centered at 1064 nm. The laser pulses were used to create shockwave pulses in Al coated polycarbonate substrates and a resulting peak stress of greater than 50 MPa was measured. These stress pulses were coupled to bacteria grown to confluence on agar plates and cell death as a result of shockwave stress was assessed. The results show a 55% reduction in the number living bacteria between shocked and control samples. This type of biofilm disruption method could prove useful in the treatment of infected wounds where standard treatment methods such as debridement and topical antibiotics have proven to be ineffectual or harmful.

  13. Neural net prediction of tokamak plasma disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, J. V.; Lin, Z.; Horton, W.; Vannucci, A.; McCool, S. C.

    1994-10-01

    The computation based on neural net algorithms in predicting minor and major disruptions in TEXT tokamak discharges has been performed. Future values of the fluctuating magnetic signal are predicted based on L past values of the magnetic fluctuation signal, measured by a single Mirnov coil. The time step used (= 0.04ms) corresponds to the experimental data sampling rate. Two kinds of approaches are adopted for the task, the contiguous future prediction and the multi-timescale prediction. Results are shown for comparison. Both networks are trained through the back-propagation algorithm with inertial terms. The degree of this success indicates that the magnetic fluctuations associated with tokamak disruptions may be characterized by a relatively low-dimensional dynamical system.

  14. The hexagon hypothesis: Six disruptive scenarios.

    PubMed

    Burtles, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to bring a simple but effective and comprehensive approach to the development, delivery and monitoring of business continuity solutions. To ensure that the arguments and principles apply across the board, the paper sticks to basic underlying concepts rather than sophisticated interpretations. First, the paper explores what exactly people are defending themselves against. Secondly, the paper looks at how defences should be set up. Disruptive events tend to unfold in phases, each of which invites a particular style of protection, ranging from risk management through to business continuity to insurance cover. Their impact upon any business operation will fall into one of six basic scenarios. The hexagon hypothesis suggests that everyone should be prepared to deal with each of these six disruptive scenarios and it provides them with a useful benchmark for business continuity.

  15. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and skin manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ju, Qiang; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2016-09-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous compounds that have the ability to disrupt the production and actions of hormones through direct or indirect interaction with hormone receptors, thus acting as agonists or antagonists. Human health is affected after either individual occupation or dietary and environmental exposure to EDCs. On the other hand, skin is one of the largest organs of the body and its main function is protection from noxious substances. EDCs perturb the endocrine system, and they are also carcinogenic, immunotoxic, and hepatotoxic to human skin. In addition, their effects on keratinocytes, melanocytes, sebocytes, inflammatory and immunological cells, and skin stem cells produce inflammatory and allergic skin diseases, chloracne, disorders of skin pigmentation, skin cancer, and skin aging. Mechanisms, which EDCs use to induce these skin disorders are complicated, and involve the interference of endogenous hormones and most importantly the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signal pathway. Further studies on EDCs and skin diseases are necessary to elucidate these mechanisms.

  16. Will disruptive innovations cure health care?

    PubMed

    Christensen, C M; Bohmer, R; Kenagy, J

    2000-01-01

    It's no secret that health care delivery is convoluted, expensive, and often deeply dissatisfying to consumers. But what is less obvious is that a way out of this crisis exists. Simpler alternatives to expensive care are already here--everything from $5 eyeglasses that people can use to correct their own vision to angioplasty instead of open-heart surgery. Just as the PC replaced the mainframe and the telephone replaced the telegraph operator, disruptive innovations are changing the landscape of health care. Nurse practitioners, general practitioners, and even patients can do things in less-expensive, decentralized settings that could once be performed only by expensive specialists in centralized, inconvenient locations. But established institutions--teaching hospitals, medical schools, insurance companies, and managed care facilities--are fighting these innovations tooth and nail. Instead of embracing change, they're turning the thumbscrews on their old processes--laying off workers, delaying payments, merging, and adding layers of overhead workers. Not only is this at the root of consumer dissatisfaction with the present system, it sows the seeds of its own destruction. The history of disruptive innovations tells us that incumbent institutions will be replaced with ones whose business models are appropriate to the new technologies and markets. Instead of working to preserve the existing systems, regulators, physicians, and pharmaceutical companies need to ask how they can enable more disruptive innovations to emerge. If the natural process of disruption is allowed to proceed, the result will be higher quality, lower cost, more convenient health care for everyone.

  17. Disruption studies in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, A.G.; Evans, T.E.; Cuthbertson, J.W.

    1996-09-01

    Characteristics of disruptions in the DIII-D tokamak including the current decay rate, halo current magnitude and toroidal asymmetry, and heat pulse to the divertor are described. Neon and argon pellet injection is shown to be an effective method for mitigating the halo currents and the heat pulse with a 50% reduction in both quantities achieved. The injection of these impurity pellets frequently gives rise to runaway electrons.

  18. Disruption Studies in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, A.G.; Cuthbertson, J.W.; Luckhardt, S.; Zhang, J.; Lee, R.L.; Leuer, J.A.; Humphreys, D.A.; Hyatt, A.W.; Jahns, G.L.; Wroblewski, D.; Jernigan, T.; Lasnier, C.J.; Scchaffer, M.J.; Taylor, P.L.; Whyte, D.G.

    1997-12-31

    Characteristics of disruptions in the DIII-D tokamak including the current decay rate, halo current magnitude and toroidal asymmetry. and heat pulse to the divertor are described. Neon and argon pellet injection is shown to be an effective method of mitigating the halo currents and the heat pulse with a 50% reduction in both quantities achieved. The injection of these impurity pellets frequently gives rise to runaway electrons.

  19. The Intersection of Neurotoxicology and Endocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disruption, the guiding theme of the 27th International Neurotoxicology Conference, merged into the neurotoxicology agenda largely because hormones help steer the process of brain development. Although the disruption motif first attracted public health attention because of reproductive anomalies in both wildlife and humans, the neurobehavioral implications had been planted decades earlier. They stemmed from the principle that sex differences in behavior are primarily the outcomes of differences in how the brain is sexually differentiated during early development by gonadal hormones (the Organizational Hypothesis). We also now understand that environmental chemicals are capable of altering these underlying events and processes. Among those chemicals, the group labeled as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) offers the clearest evidence of such selectivity, a consequence of their actions on the endogenous sex steroids, androgens and estrogens. Two EDCs in particular offer useful and intriguing examples. One is phthalate esters. The other is bisphenol A. Both agents are used extensively in plastics manufacture, and are pervasive in the environment. Both are produced in immense quantities. Both are found in almost all humans. Phthalates are considered to function in essence as anti-androgens, while bisphenol A is labeled as an estrogen. Their associations with brain sexual differentiation are reviewed and further questions noted. Both EDCs produce a wider spectrum of health effects, however, than would be extrapolated simply from their properties as anti-androgens and estrogens. Obesity is one example. Further complicating their assessment as health risks are questions about nonmonotonic dose-response functions and about transgenerational effects incurred via epigenetic mechanisms. All these facets of endocrine disruption are pieces of a puzzle that challenge neurotoxicologists for solutions. PMID:22659293

  20. DISRUPTION OF YEAST MEMBRANES BY METHYLPHENIDATE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Methylphenidate blocked sorbose uptake and loss by yeast spheroplasts and, at higher concentrations, disrupted spheroplasts. At high concentrations methylphenidate also ruptured the membranes of whole yeast cells; sorbose and 280 nm-absorbing materials were lost from the cells, and methylene blue stained them. Intracellular structures were extensively affected as shown by electron micrographs, and evidently were more sensitive to methylphenidate than the external membrane. N-ethylmaleimide and Ca(++) enhanced the rupture of external membranes by methylphenidate. (Author)

  1. Policy development for disruptive student behaviors.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cynthia M; Farnsworth, Judy; Springer, Pamela J

    2008-01-01

    Nursing students who demonstrate disruptive and at-risk behaviors in the classroom and clinical arena compromise the learning environment and are unable to provide safe, quality client care. They require early and swift identification, consultation, sanctions, or possible referral into treatment to protect themselves and public safety. The authors describe the evolution of a comprehensive policy for faculty intervention with at-risk students and provide an exemplar of a situation illustrating the use of the policy.

  2. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. Bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs with the pipe in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, minimize excavation, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct safe repair operations on live mains.

  3. A case for change: disruption in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Marc J; Maurer, Ralph; Wartman, Steven A; Sachs, Benjamin P

    2014-09-01

    Disruptive technologies allow less expensive and more efficient processes to eventually dominate a market sector. The academic health center's tripartite mission of education, clinical care, and research is threatened by decreasing revenues and increasing expenses and is, as a result, ripe for disruption. The authors describe current disruptive technologies that threaten traditional operations at academic health centers and provide a prescription not only to survive, but also to prosper, in the face of disruptive forces.

  4. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  5. Implications of Disruption to Natural Gas Deliverability

    SciTech Connect

    Science Applications International

    2008-09-30

    This project was sponsored by Department of Energy/Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. The primary purpose of the project was to analyze the capability of the natural gas production, transmission and supply systems to continue to provide service in the event of a major disruption in capacity of one or more natural gas transmission pipelines. The project was specifically designed to detail the ability of natural gas market to absorb facility losses and efficiently reallocate gas supplies during a significant pipeline capacity disruption in terms that allowed federal and state agencies and interests to develop effective policies and action plans to prioritize natural gas deliveries from a regional and national perspective. The analyses for each regional study were based on four primary considerations: (1) operating conditions (pipeline capacity, storage capacity, local production, power dispatch decision making and end user options); (2) weather; (3) magnitude and location of the disruption; and, (4) normal versus emergency situation. The detailed information contained in the region reports as generated from this project are Unclassified Controlled Information; and as such are subject to disclosure in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act. Therefore, this report defines the regions that were analyzed and the basic methodologies and assumptions used to completing the analysis.

  6. Disruptive communication: stealth signaling in the toadfish.

    PubMed

    Mensinger, Allen F

    2014-02-01

    Male oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau, produce long duration (250 to 650 ms) sexual advertisement calls or 'boatwhistles' during the breeding season. When males are in close proximity, the fishes alternate the production of boatwhistles with other males to avoid call overlap. However, males can also produce a number of different sounds, including a single, short duration pulse or 'grunt' (~100 ms). The vocalizations of competing males were recorded in situ with multiple hydrophones to examine intraspecific interactions. These short grunts were emitted almost exclusively during the boatwhistle of a conspecific male. The fundamental frequency (or pulse repetition rate) of the boatwhistles were modified by this disruptive grunt, 'jamming' the signal and decreasing its frequency. The disruptive grunt specifically targeted the second stage or tonal portion of the boatwhistle, believed to be the primary acoustic attractant for females, and its brevity and precision may allow its emitter to remain undetectable. While the acoustic repertoire of teleost fishes may be less diverse compared with terrestrial species, the disruptive grunts indicate fish have the capacity for complex acoustic interactions.

  7. Risk Evaluation of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Gioiosa, Laura; Palanza, Paola; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2015-01-01

    We review here our studies on early exposure to low doses of the estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA) on behavior and metabolism in CD-1 mice. Mice were exposed in utero from gestation day (GD) 11 to delivery (prenatal exposure) or via maternal milk from birth to postnatal day 7 (postnatal exposure) to 10 µg/kg body weight/d of BPA or no BPA (controls). Bisphenol A exposure resulted in long-term disruption of sexually dimorphic behaviors. Females exposed to BPA pre- and postnatally showed increased anxiety and behavioral profiles similar to control males. We also evaluated metabolic effects in prenatally exposed adult male offspring of dams fed (from GD 9 to 18) with BPA at doses ranging from 5 to 50 000 µg/kg/d. The males showed an age-related significant change in a number of metabolic indexes ranging from food intake to glucose regulation at BPA doses below the no observed adverse effect level (5000 µg/kg/d). Consistent with prior findings, low but not high BPA doses produced significant effects for many outcomes. These findings provide further evidence of the potential risks that developmental exposure to low doses of the endocrine disrupter BPA may pose to human health, with fetuses and infants being highly vulnerable. PMID:26740806

  8. Disruption of coronal magnetic field arcades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.

    1994-01-01

    The ideal and resistive properties of isolated large-scale coronal magnetic arcades are studied using axisymmetric solutions of the time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in spherical geometry. We examine how flares and coronal mass ejections may be initiated by sudden disruptions of the magnetic field. The evolution of coronal arcades in response to applied shearing photospheric flows indicates that disruptive behavior can occur beyond a critical shear. The disruption can be traced to ideal MHD magnetic nonequilibrium. The magnetic field expands outward in a process that opens the field lines and produces a tangential discontinuity in the magnetic field. In the presence of plasma resistivity, the resulting current sheet is the site of rapid reconnection, leading to an impulsive release of magnetic energy, fast flows, and the ejection of a plasmoid. We relate these results to previous studies of force-free fields and to the properties of the open-field configuration. We show that the field lines in an arcade are forced open when the magnetic energy approaches (but is still below) the open-field energy, creating a partially open field in which most of the field lines extend away from the solar surface. Preliminary application of this model to helmet streamers indicates that it is relevant to the initiation of coronal mass ejections.

  9. Endocrine disrupters and female reproductive health.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, John A; Simpson, Erica; Martin, Melvenia

    2006-03-01

    There is growing evidence of the impact of estrogenic contaminants in the environment. Studies have shown that male fish in detergent-contaminated water express female characteristics, turtles are sex-reversed by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), male frogs exposed to a common herbicide form multiple ovaries, pseudohermaphroditic offspring are produced by polar bears, and seals in contaminated water have an excess of uterine fibroids. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (those found in the external environment that can mimic or inhibit endogenous hormones) mostly exhibit estrogenic effects, but a few are anti-estrogenic or anti-androgenic. Many of these compounds are industrial contaminants, such as pesticides and plasticizers, and others are natural phytoestrogens found in plants such as soy and in herbal supplements. Recent work shows that human development can also be feminized by exposure to estrogenic chemicals. Estrogen is the key hormone in the initiation (puberty) and the end (menopause) of reproductive life in women and thus of considerable importance in women's health. The same chemicals that affect wildlife may affect breast growth and lactation, and could have a role in uterine diseases such as fibroids and endometriosis. New studies provide a mechanism of action for estrogenic chemicals and other endocrine disrupters at the molecular level (called epigenetics) that may help explain the long-term effects of endocrine disruption.

  10. Disruptive Innovation Can Prevent the Next Pandemic.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Affan T; Ferland, Lisa; Hood-Cree, Robert; Shaffer, Loren; McNabb, Scott J N

    2015-01-01

    Public health surveillance (PHS) is at a tipping point, where the application of novel processes, technologies, and tools promise to vastly improve efficiency and effectiveness. Yet twentieth century, entrenched ideology and lack of training results in slow uptake and resistance to change. The term disruptive innovation - used to describe advances in technology and processes that change existing markets - is useful to describe the transformation of PHS. Past disruptive innovations used in PHS, such as distance learning, the smart phone, and field-based laboratory testing have outpaced older services, practices, and technologies used in the traditional classroom, governmental offices, and personal communication, respectively. Arguably, the greatest of these is the Internet - an infrastructural innovation that continues to enable exponential benefits in seemingly limitless ways. Considering the Global Health Security Agenda and facing emerging and reemerging infectious disease threats, evolving environmental and behavioral risks, and ever changing epidemiologic trends, PHS must transform. Embracing disruptive innovation in the structures and processes of PHS can be unpredictable. However, it is necessary to strengthen and unlock the potential to prevent, detect, and respond.

  11. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  12. Physician disruptive behaviors: Five year progress report

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Disruptive behaviors in health care can have a significant adverse effect on staff interactions that can negatively impact staff satisfaction, staff performance, and patient outcomes of care. As referenced in a previously published article, the Obstetrics and Gynecology specialty is one of the service areas where these behaviors occur more frequently. Despite growing evidence of the ill effects of these types of behaviors many organizations are still having a difficult time in addressing these issues in an effective manner. Gaining a better understanding of the nature, causes, and impact of these behaviors is crucial to finding the right remedies for solution. Nobody intentionally starts the day planning to be disruptive, it’s just that things get in the way. A combination of deep seated factors related to age and gender preferences, culture and ethnicity, life experiences, and other events that help shape values, attitudes and personalities, and more external factors related to training, environmental pressures, stress and burnout, and other personal issues all contribute to the mix. Given the complexities of today’s health care environment, each person needs to recognize the importance of being held accountable for appropriate actions and behaviors that affect work relationships and care coordination that impact patient care. Early recognition, early intervention, and taking a pro-active supportive approach to improve individual behaviors will result in better relationships, less disruption, more satisfaction, and better outcomes of care. PMID:26601095

  13. Physician disruptive behaviors: Five year progress report.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Alan H

    2015-11-16

    Disruptive behaviors in health care can have a significant adverse effect on staff interactions that can negatively impact staff satisfaction, staff performance, and patient outcomes of care. As referenced in a previously published article, the Obstetrics and Gynecology specialty is one of the service areas where these behaviors occur more frequently. Despite growing evidence of the ill effects of these types of behaviors many organizations are still having a difficult time in addressing these issues in an effective manner. Gaining a better understanding of the nature, causes, and impact of these behaviors is crucial to finding the right remedies for solution. Nobody intentionally starts the day planning to be disruptive, it's just that things get in the way. A combination of deep seated factors related to age and gender preferences, culture and ethnicity, life experiences, and other events that help shape values, attitudes and personalities, and more external factors related to training, environmental pressures, stress and burnout, and other personal issues all contribute to the mix. Given the complexities of today's health care environment, each person needs to recognize the importance of being held accountable for appropriate actions and behaviors that affect work relationships and care coordination that impact patient care. Early recognition, early intervention, and taking a pro-active supportive approach to improve individual behaviors will result in better relationships, less disruption, more satisfaction, and better outcomes of care.

  14. Prenatal Testosterone and Preschool Disruptive Behavior Disorders.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Bethan A; Martel, Michelle M

    2013-11-01

    Disruptive Behaviors Disorders (DBD), including Oppositional-Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), are fairly common and highly impairing childhood behavior disorders that can be diagnosed as early as preschool. Prenatal exposure to testosterone may be particularly relevant to these early-emerging DBDs that exhibit a sex-biased prevalence rate favoring males. The current study examined associations between preschool DBD symptom domains and prenatal exposure to testosterone measured indirectly via right 2D:4D finger-length ratios. The study sample consisted of 109 preschool-age children between ages 3 and 6 (64% males;72% with DBD) and their primary caregivers. Primary caregivers completed a semi-structured interview (i.e., Kiddie Disruptive Behavior Disorder Schedule), as well as symptom questionnaires (i.e., Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale, Peer Conflict Scale); teachers and/or daycare providers completed symptom questionnaires and children provided measures of prenatal testosterone exposure, measured indirectly via finger-length ratios (i.e., right 2D:4D). Study results indicated a significant association of high prenatal testosterone (i.e., smaller right 2D:4D) with high hyperactive-impulsive ADHD symptoms in girls but not boys, suggesting that the effect may be driven by, or might only exist in, girls. The present study suggests that prenatal exposure to testosterone may increase risk for early ADHD, particularly hyperactivity-impulsivity, in preschool girls.

  15. Subluxation of the hip joint after internal fixation of a trochanteric fracture.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuo; Murotani, Rentaroh; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Okahara, Hitoshi; Ohbayashi, Osamu; Iwase, Hideaki; Fujita, Hidemine; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2004-02-01

    The authors report an unusual case of hip subluxation after internal fixation without associated sepsis. We report one recently treated case in which a 75-year-old female experienced subluxation of her hip joint after open reduction and internal fixation for a trochanteric fracture. In this paper, we describe a case of progressive, spontaneous subluxation of the hip joint over several weeks. Most previously reported cases are associated with cerebral palsy. This entity has not been reported previously. Our patient was treated by hemi-arthroplasty and repair of the disrupted capsule, and achieved a good long-term functional result. The cause of this particular condition is discussed.

  16. 20 CFR 410.645 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint hearings. 410.645 Section 410.645..., Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.645 Joint hearings. When two or more hearings... joint hearing, a joint hearing may not be held. Where joint hearings are held, a single record of...

  17. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  18. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  19. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  20. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  1. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  2. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions...

  3. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  4. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  5. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  6. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions...

  7. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  8. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  9. 37 CFR 1.45 - Joint inventors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Joint inventors. 1.45 Section... Patent § 1.45 Joint inventors. (a) Joint inventors must apply for a patent jointly and each must make the... joint application under 35 U.S.C. 116. If multiple inventors are named in a provisional...

  10. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  11. 37 CFR 1.45 - Joint inventors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Joint inventors. 1.45 Section... Patent § 1.45 Joint inventors. (a) Joint inventors must apply for a patent jointly and each must make the... joint application under 35 U.S.C. 116. If multiple inventors are named in a provisional...

  12. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  13. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  14. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  15. 20 CFR 410.645 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint hearings. 410.645 Section 410.645..., Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.645 Joint hearings. When two or more hearings... joint hearing, a joint hearing may not be held. Where joint hearings are held, a single record of...

  16. 37 CFR 1.45 - Joint inventors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Joint inventors. 1.45 Section... Patent § 1.45 Joint inventors. (a) Joint inventors must apply for a patent jointly and each must make the... joint application under 35 U.S.C. 116. If multiple inventors are named in a provisional...

  17. Lipid rafts are disrupted in mildly inflamed intestinal microenvironments without overt disruption of the epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Rachel V; Donatello, Simona; Lyes, Clíona; Owens, Mark B; Babina, Irina S; Hudson, Lance; Walsh, Shaun V; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P; Amu, Sylvie; Barry, Sean P; Fallon, Padraic G; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial barrier disruption is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but whether barrier disruption precedes or merely accompanies inflammation remains controversial. Tight junction (TJ) adhesion complexes control epithelial barrier integrity. Since some TJ proteins reside in cholesterol-enriched regions of the cell membrane termed lipid rafts, we sought to elucidate the relationship between rafts and intestinal epithelial barrier function. Lipid rafts were isolated from Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells primed with the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin as a positive control for raft disruption. Rafts were also isolated from the ilea of mice in which colitis had been induced in conjunction with in vivo intestinal permeability measurements, and lastly from intestinal biopsies of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with predominantly mild or quiescent disease. Raft distribution was analyzed by measuring activity of the raft-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase and by performing Western blot analysis for flotillin-1. Epithelial barrier integrity was estimated by measuring transepithelial resistance in cytokine-treated cells or in vivo permeability to fluorescent dextran in colitic mice. Raft and nonraft fractions were analyzed by Western blotting for the TJ proteins occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Our results revealed that lipid rafts were disrupted in IFN-γ-treated cells, in the ilea of mice with subclinical colitis, and in UC patients with quiescent inflammation. This was not associated with a clear pattern of occludin or ZO-1 relocalization from raft to nonraft fractions. Significantly, a time-course study in colitic mice revealed that disruption of lipid rafts preceded the onset of increased intestinal permeability. Our data suggest for the first time that lipid raft disruption occurs early in the inflammatory cascade in murine and human colitis and, we speculate, may contribute to

  18. Disruptive Behaviour of Students in Primary Education and Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esturgo-Deu, M. Estrella; Sala-Roca, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    This study analyses the relation between disruptive behaviours and the emotional abilities of children in primary education. To do this, disruptive behaviour and emotional abilities were evaluated in 1422 pupils aged between 6 and 12 years of age at 11 education centres using EQIjv. No relation was found between disruptive behaviours and age, but…

  19. The Impact of Marital Conflict and Disruption on Children's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houseknecht, Sharon K.; Hango, Darcy W.

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates the effect of inconsistency between parental marital conflict and disruption on children's health. Inconsistent situations arise when minimal marital conflict precedes disruption or when marital conflict is high but there is no disruption. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, two alternative…

  20. A CIT Investigation of Disruptive Faculty Behaviors: The Students' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, K. Douglas; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent focus on disruptive student behaviors in the classroom, little attention has been given to disruptive faculty behaviors. Utilizing theoretical concepts developed in the services-marketing literature, this study empirically explores student perceptions of disruptive faculty behaviors in the classroom. More specifically, this…

  1. Disrupting Ourselves: The Problem of Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Randy

    2012-01-01

    A growing appreciation for the porous boundaries between the classroom and life experience, along with the power of social learning, authentic audiences, and integrative contexts, has created not only promising changes in learning but also disruptive moments in teaching. Disruptive moments, the author means "disruption" in the way Clayton…

  2. Understanding Racial Differences in Marital Disruption: Recent Trends and Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Megan M.; Phillips, Julie A.

    2004-01-01

    We use data from the Current Population Survey to investigate racial differences in recent patterns of marital disruption. Although a leveling in the trend of disruption has occurred for White women since 1980, our results suggest less stabilization in rates of disruption among Black women. We also observe significant differences by race in the…

  3. Do Clinician Disruptive Behaviors Make an Unsafe Environment for Patients?

    PubMed

    Dang, Deborah; Bae, Sung-Heui; Karlowicz, Karen A; Kim, Miyong T

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of negative consequences of clinician disruptive behaviors on patients and clinicians was examined using data collected from 1559 clinicians working at an urban academic medical center in the United States. For the impact of disruptive behavior on patient safety, psychological aggression as caused by disruptive behavior or incivility increased the likelihood of patient harm as well as job dissatisfaction and physical symptoms.

  4. Teflon-packed flexible joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belmont, G. E.

    1969-01-01

    Teflon-packed flexible joint separates the movement of the shaker from the liquid nitrogen hose during the ground testing of cryogenic zero-g equipment. The joint allows the hose to lie on the floor in a stationary position as the shaker moves back and forth, thus, the hose is not subject to violent motion.

  5. Review of Rock Joint Models

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P

    2003-06-06

    This report discusses several constitutive models for joint behavior with emphasis upon the experimental data which motivates them. Particular emphasis is placed upon data available for granite. The LDEC joint model is presented in detail and LDEC simulations using this model are compared against data from constant normal stiffness and constant normal load tests.

  6. Improved Robot-Joint Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. Keith

    1988-01-01

    Modified Denavit-Hartenberg parameters better for locating successive joint-axis systems. Modification results from insistence that transverse vector between successive joint rotational axes be perpendicular to one of rotational axes instead of both axes. Useful in industrial calibration of robot arms.

  7. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  8. Robotic joint experiments under ultravacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrien, A.; Petitjean, L.

    1988-01-01

    First, various aspects of a robotic joint development program, including gearbox technology, electromechanical components, lubrication, and test results, are discussed. Secondly, a test prototype of the joint allowing simulation of robotic arm dynamic effects is presented. This prototype is tested under vacuum with different types of motors and sensors to characterize the functional parameters: angular position error, mechanical backlash, gearbox efficiency, and lifetime.

  9. [Effects of exercise on joints.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Hideki

    Joints are composed of several different tissues(cartilage, capsule, meniscus, and ligament), and articular cartilage plays an important role in maintaining mechanical competence during exercise. Weight-bearing exercise has several benefit, including improved blood and synovial fluid circulation in a given joint. Consistent moderate activities facilitate cycles of anabolism and catabolism. Mechanical stresses are crucial for the maintenance of the morphologic and functional integrity of articular cartilage. Healthy cartilage is exposed by hydrostatic pressure and tensile strain, when cartilage degeneration develops, abnormal cartilage is exposed by shear stress. Moderate(physiological)exercise is characterized by a range of equilibrium between matrix anabolic and catabolic processes, or anabolism beyond catabolism. Joints are susceptible to insufficient or excessive activities, leading to joint degeneration. Lack of exercise is known to induce joint contracture seen clinically as a consequence of disuse changes, and excess mechanical stresses induce joint destruction such as osteoarthritis. Joint diseases resulting from insufficient or excessive activities are new and major challenging issues with our aging population. Thus, it is highly desirable to have an effective and efficient treatment to improve and protect against these joint diseases, and thereby to solve these clearly unanswered issues.

  10. Disruption of the finger flexor pulley system in elite rock climbers.

    PubMed

    Gabl, M; Rangger, C; Lutz, M; Fink, C; Rudisch, A; Pechlaner, S

    1998-01-01

    We treated 13 elite rock climbers for isolated disruptions of the pulleys of the long fingers. Diagnosis and treatment were based on the clinical finding of bow-stringing, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients had bowstringing indicating incomplete disruption of the major pulley A2 and were treated nonoperatively (group A). Five patients showed bowstringing indicating complete disruption of the pulley A2. After failed nonoperative treatment, the pulleys were reconstructed (group B). The mechanism of injury and clinical and subjective results were evaluated. At a 31-month follow-up (range, 18 to 43 months), loss of extension in the proximal interphalangeal joint measured 5.6 degrees (range, 0 degree to 10 degrees) in group A and 4 degrees (range, 0 degree to 10 degrees) in group B. Circumference of the finger section was increased 4.2 mm in group A (range, 0 to 10 mm) and 4.8 mm in group B (range, 0 to 10 mm). Grip strength decreased 20 N in group A (range, 10 to 50 N) and 12 N in group B (range, 10 to 30 N). Four patients in group A and one in group B had bowstringing at clinical evaluation. On follow-up magnetic resonance images, bowstringing remained unchanged in group A but was reduced in all patients in group B. Good subjective results were seen in both groups.

  11. Space Station alpha joint bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everman, Michael R.; Jones, P. Alan; Spencer, Porter A.

    1987-01-01

    Perhaps the most critical structural system aboard the Space Station is the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint which helps align the power generation system with the sun. The joint must provide structural support and controlled rotation to the outboard transverse booms as well as power and data transfer across the joint. The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint is composed of two transition sections and an integral, large diameter bearing. Alpha joint bearing design presents a particularly interesting problem because of its large size and need for high reliability, stiffness, and on orbit maintability. The discrete roller bearing developed is a novel refinement to cam follower technology. It offers thermal compensation and ease of on-orbit maintenance that are not found in conventional rolling element bearings. How the bearing design evolved is summarized. Driving requirements are reviewed, alternative concepts assessed, and the selected design is described.

  12. Evaluation of composite bonded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, H.A.; Othieno, M.; Yin, S.W.

    1995-12-31

    The present investigation evaluates the influence of joining technique on the static and fatigue behavior of composite bonded joints. Specimens used in this investigation were LDF AS4/PEKK graphite/thermoplastic composites and IM6/3501-6 graphite/poxy composite laminates. Joints were made by either adhesive bonding or fusing bonding. For the adhesive bonded joints, in some cases specimens were bonded without any surface pretreatment while in other cases the surfaces were either grit blast or corona. treated prior to bonding. For the fusion bonded joints, joints were prepared by either induction welding or thermabonding. In addition, some specimens were conditioned in a wet environment for thirty days in order to observe the influence of moisture on the static strengths. During fatigue testing, the residual stiffness was continually monitored in order to assess the extent of fatigue damage development.

  13. Method of forming a joint

    DOEpatents

    Butt, Darryl Paul; Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Rynders, Steven Walton; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2006-08-22

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, including providing a first multicomponent metallic oxide having a perovskitic or fluorite crystal structure; providing a second sintered body including a second multicomponent metallic oxide having a crystal structure of the same type as the first; and providing at an interface a joint material containing at least one metal oxide containing at least one metal identically contained in at least one of the first and second multicomponent metallic oxides. The joint material is free of cations of Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, P and Te and has a melting point below the sintering temperatures of both sintered bodies. The joint material is heated to a temperature above the melting point of the metal oxide(s) and below the sintering temperatures of the sintered bodies to form the joint. Structures containing such joints are also disclosed.

  14. Disruptive coloration in woodland camouflage: evaluation of camouflage effectiveness due to minor disruptive patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selj, Gorm K.; Heinrich, Daniela H.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from an observer based photosimulation study of generic camouflage patterns, intended for military uniforms, where three near-identical patterns have been compared. All the patterns were prepared with similar effective color, but were different in how the individual pattern patches were distributed throughout the target. We did this in order to test if high contrast (black) patches along the outline of the target would enhance the survivability when exposed to human observers. In the recent years it has been shown that disruptive coloration in the form of high contrast patches are capable of disturbing an observer by creating false edges of the target and consequently enhance target survivability. This effect has been shown in different forms in the Animal Kingdom, but not to the same extent in camouflaged military targets. The three patterns in this study were i) with no disruptive preference, ii) with a disruptive patch along the outline of the head and iii) with a disruptive patch on the outline of one of the shoulders. We used a high number of human observers to assess the three targets in 16 natural (woodland) backgrounds by showing images of one of the targets at the time on a high definition pc screen. We found that the two patterns that were thought to have a minor disruptive preference to the remaining pattern were more difficult to detect in some (though not all) of the 16 scenes and were also better in overall performance when all the scenes were accounted for.

  15. barx1 represses joints and promotes cartilage in the craniofacial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Nichols, James T; Pan, Luyuan; Moens, Cecilia B; Kimmel, Charles B

    2013-07-01

    The evolution of joints, which afford skeletal mobility, was instrumental in vertebrate success. Here, we explore the molecular genetics and cell biology that govern jaw joint development. Genetic manipulation experiments in zebrafish demonstrate that functional loss, or gain, of the homeobox-containing gene barx1 produces gain, or loss, of joints, respectively. Ectopic joints in barx1 mutant animals are present in every pharyngeal segment, and are associated with disrupted attachment of bone, muscles and teeth. We find that ectopic joints develop at the expense of cartilage. Time-lapse experiments suggest that barx1 controls the skeletal precursor cell choice between differentiating into cartilage versus joint cells. We discovered that barx1 functions in this choice, in part, by regulating the transcription factor hand2. We further show that hand2 feeds back to negatively regulate barx1 expression. We consider the possibility that changes in barx1 function in early vertebrates were among the key innovations fostering the evolution of skeletal joints.

  16. An organizational assessment of disruptive clinician behavior: findings and implications.

    PubMed

    Walrath, Jo M; Dang, Deborah; Nyberg, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated registered nurses' (RNs) and physicians' (MD) experiences with disruptive behavior, triggers, responses, and impacts on clinicians, patients, and the organization. Using the Disruptive Clinician Behavior Survey for Hospital Settings, it was found that RNs experienced a significantly higher frequency of disruptive behaviors and triggers than MDs; MDs (45% of 295) and RNs (37% of 689) reported that their peer's disruptive behavior affected them most negatively. The most frequently occurring trigger was pressure from high census, volume, and patient flow; 189 incidences of harm to patients as a result of disruptive behavior were reported. Findings provide organizational leaders with evidence to customize interventions to strengthen the culture of safety.

  17. Disruption characteristics in PDX with limiter and divertor discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, P.; McGuire, K.

    1986-09-01

    A comparison has been made between the characteristics of disruptions with limiter and divertor configurations in PDX. A large data base on disruptions has been collected over four years of machine operation, and a total of 15,000 discharges are contained in the data file. It was found that divertor discharges have less disruptions during ramp up and flattop of the plasma current. However, for divertor discharges a large number of fast, low current disruptions take place during the current ramp down. These disruptions are probably caused by the deformation of the plasma shape.

  18. Triangular Titanium Implants for Minimally Invasive Sacroiliac Joint Fusion: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Duhon, Bradley S.; Cher, Daniel J.; Wine, Kathryn D.; Kovalsky, Don A.; Lockstadt, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective multicenter single-arm interventional clinical trial. Objective To determine the degree of improvement in sacroiliac (SI) joint pain, disability related to SI joint pain, and quality of life in patients with SI joint dysfunction who undergo minimally invasive SI joint fusion using triangular-shaped titanium implants. Methods Subjects (n = 172) underwent minimally invasive SI joint fusion between August 2012 and January 2014 and completed structured assessments preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, including a 100-mm SI joint and back pain visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), and EuroQOL-5D. Patient satisfaction with surgery was assessed at 6 and 12 months. Results Mean SI joint pain improved from 79.8 at baseline to 30.0 and 30.4 at 6 and 12 months, respectively (mean improvements of 49.9 and 49.1 points, p < 0.0001 each). Mean ODI improved from 55.2 at baseline to 32.5 and 31.4 at 6 and 12 months (improvements of 22.7 and 23.9 points, p < 0.0001 each). SF-36 physical component summary improved from 31.7 at baseline to 40.2 and 40.3 at 6 and 12 months (p < 0.0001). At 6 and 12 months, 93 and 87% of subjects, respectively, were somewhat or very satisfied and 92 and 91%, respectively, would have the procedure again. Conclusions Minimally invasive SI joint fusion resulted in improvement of pain, disability, and quality of life in patients with SI joint dysfunction due to degenerative sacroiliitis and SI joint disruption. PMID:27099817

  19. Triangular Titanium Implants for Minimally Invasive Sacroiliac Joint Fusion: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Duhon, Bradley S; Cher, Daniel J; Wine, Kathryn D; Kovalsky, Don A; Lockstadt, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Prospective multicenter single-arm interventional clinical trial. Objective To determine the degree of improvement in sacroiliac (SI) joint pain, disability related to SI joint pain, and quality of life in patients with SI joint dysfunction who undergo minimally invasive SI joint fusion using triangular-shaped titanium implants. Methods Subjects (n = 172) underwent minimally invasive SI joint fusion between August 2012 and January 2014 and completed structured assessments preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, including a 100-mm SI joint and back pain visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), and EuroQOL-5D. Patient satisfaction with surgery was assessed at 6 and 12 months. Results Mean SI joint pain improved from 79.8 at baseline to 30.0 and 30.4 at 6 and 12 months, respectively (mean improvements of 49.9 and 49.1 points, p < 0.0001 each). Mean ODI improved from 55.2 at baseline to 32.5 and 31.4 at 6 and 12 months (improvements of 22.7 and 23.9 points, p < 0.0001 each). SF-36 physical component summary improved from 31.7 at baseline to 40.2 and 40.3 at 6 and 12 months (p < 0.0001). At 6 and 12 months, 93 and 87% of subjects, respectively, were somewhat or very satisfied and 92 and 91%, respectively, would have the procedure again. Conclusions Minimally invasive SI joint fusion resulted in improvement of pain, disability, and quality of life in patients with SI joint dysfunction due to degenerative sacroiliitis and SI joint disruption.

  20. Application of the Disruption Predictor Feature Developer to developing a machine-portable disruption predictor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Matthew; Tang, William; Feibush, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    Plasma disruptions pose a major threat to the operation of tokamaks which confine a large amount of stored energy. In order to effectively mitigate this damage it is necessary to predict an oncoming disruption with sufficient warning time to take mitigative action. Machine learning approaches to this problem have shown promise but require further developments to address (1) the need for machine-portable predictors and (2) the availability of multi-dimensional signal inputs. Here we demonstrate progress in these two areas by applying the Disruption Predictor Feature Developer to data from JET and NSTX, and discuss topics of focus for ongoing work in support of ITER. The author is also supported under the Fulbright U.S. Student Program as a graduate student in the department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  1. Qualification of improved joint heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1989-01-01

    Qualification testing of the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor improved igniter-to-case joint and field joint heaters was conducted on the fired TEM-04 static test motor and was completed on 7 Sep. 1989. The purpose of the test was to certify the installation and performance of the improved joint heaters for use on flight motors. The changes incorporated in the improved heaters improve durability and should reduce handling damage. The igniter-to-case joint and field joint primary heater circuits were subjected to five 20-hr ON cycles. The heater redundant circuits were then subjected to one 20-hr ON cycle. Voltage, current, and temperature set point values were maintained within the specified limits for both heaters during each ON cycle. When testing was complete, both heaters were removed and inspected. No discolorations or any other anomalies were found on either of the heaters. Based on the successful completion of this test, it is recommended that the improved igniter-to-case joint and field joint heaters be used on future flight motors.

  2. Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imtiaz, Kauser

    2011-01-01

    Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool (comBAT) is an Excel/VB-based bolted joint analysis/optimization program that lays out a systematic foundation for an inexperienced or seasoned analyst to determine fastener size, material, and assembly torque for a given design. Analysts are able to perform numerous what-if scenarios within minutes to arrive at an optimal solution. The program evaluates input design parameters, performs joint assembly checks, and steps through numerous calculations to arrive at several key margins of safety for each member in a joint. It also checks for joint gapping, provides fatigue calculations, and generates joint diagrams for a visual reference. Optimum fastener size and material, as well as correct torque, can then be provided. Analysis methodology, equations, and guidelines are provided throughout the solution sequence so that this program does not become a "black box:" for the analyst. There are built-in databases that reduce the legwork required by the analyst. Each step is clearly identified and results are provided in number format, as well as color-coded spelled-out words to draw user attention. The three key features of the software are robust technical content, innovative and user friendly I/O, and a large database. The program addresses every aspect of bolted joint analysis and proves to be an instructional tool at the same time. It saves analysis time, has intelligent messaging features, and catches operator errors in real time.

  3. Estrogens Can Disrupt Amphibian Mating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Frauke; Kloas, Werner

    2012-01-01

    The main component of classical contraceptives, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), has high estrogenic activity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Although estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds are assumed to contribute to the worldwide decline of amphibian populations by adverse effects on sexual differentiation, evidence for EE2 affecting amphibian mating behaviour is lacking. In this study, we demonstrate that EE2 exposure at five different concentrations (0.296 ng/L, 2.96 ng/L, 29.64 ng/L, 2.96 µg/L and 296.4 µg/L) can disrupt the mating behavior of adult male Xenopus laevis. EE2 exposure at all concentrations lowered male sexual arousal, indicated by decreased proportions of advertisement calls and increased proportions of the call type rasping, which characterizes a sexually unaroused state of a male. Additionally, EE2 at all tested concentrations affected temporal and spectral parameters of the advertisement calls, respectively. The classical and highly sensitive biomarker vitellogenin, on the other hand, was only induced at concentrations equal or higher than 2.96 µg/L. If kept under control conditions after a 96 h EE2 exposure (2.96 µg/L), alterations of male advertisement calls vanish gradually within 6 weeks and result in a lower sexual attractiveness of EE2 exposed males toward females as demonstrated by female choice experiments. These findings indicate that exposure to environmentally relevant EE2 concentrations can directly disrupt male mate calling behavior of X. laevis and can indirectly affect the mating behavior of females. The results suggest the possibility that EE2 exposure could reduce the reproductive success of EE2 exposed animals and these effects might contribute to the global problem of amphibian decline. PMID:22355410

  4. A Dark Year for Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    Main-sequence disruptions of stars by supermassive black holes result in the production of an extended, geometrically thin debris stream winding repeatedly around the black hole. In the absence of black hole spin, in-plane relativistic precession causes this stream to intersect with itself after a single winding. In this paper we show that relativistic precessions arising from black hole spin can induce deflections out of the original orbital plane that prevent the stream from self-intersecting even after many windings. This naturally leads to a “dark period” in which the flare is not observable for some time, persisting for up to a dozen orbital periods of the most bound material, which translates to years for disruptions around black holes with masses ˜ {10}7{M}⊙ . When the stream eventually self-intersects, the distance from the black hole and the angle at which this collision occurs determine the rate of energy dissipation. We find that more-massive black holes ({M}{{h}}≳ {10}7{M}⊙ ) tend to have more violent stream self-intersections, resulting in prompt accretion. For these tidal disruption events (TDEs), the accretion rate onto the black hole should still closely follow the original fallback rate after a fixed delay time {t}{delay}, {\\dot{M}}{acc}(t+{t}{delay})={\\dot{M}}{fb}(t). For lower black hole masses ({M}{{h}}≲ {10}6), we find that flares are typically slowed down by about an order of magnitude, resulting in the majority of TDEs being sub-Eddington at peak. This also implies that current searches for TDEs are biased toward prompt flares, with slowed flares likely having been unidentified.

  5. Tidal Decay and Disruption of Gaseous Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian K.; Arras, Phil; Jensen, Emily; Peacock, Sarah; Marchant, Pablo; Penev, Kaloyan

    2015-11-01

    Many gaseous exoplanets in short-period orbits are on the verge of Roche-lobe overflow, and observations, along with orbital stability analysis, show tides probably drive significant orbital decay. Thus, the coupled processes of orbital evolution and tidal disruption likely shape the observed distribution of close-in exoplanets and may even be responsible for producing the shortest-period solid planets. However, the exact outcome for an overflowing planet depends on its internal response to mass loss and variable stellar insolation, and the accompanying orbital evolution can act to enhance or inhibit the disruption process. The final orbits of the denuded remnants of gas giants may be predictable from their mass-radius relationship, and so a distinctive mass-period relationship for some short-period solid planets may provide evidence for their origins as gaseous planets. In this presentation, we will discuss our work on tidal decay and disruption of close-in gaseous planets using a new model that accounts for the fact that short-period planets have hot, distended atmospheres, which can result in overflow even for planets that are not officially in Roche lobe contact. We will also point out that the orbital expansion that can accompany mass transfer may be less effective than previously realized because the resulting accretion disk may not return all of its angular momentum to the donor, as is usually assumed. Both of these effects have bee incorporated into the fully-featured and robust Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) suite.

  6. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Manning, L.M.; Stringer, L.D.; Cappadonna, J.; El-Sayed, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m2) to 1- and 4-m2 plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  7. The disruption of the Magellanic Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2009-03-01

    We present evidence that the accretion of warm gas onto the Galaxy today is at least as important as cold gas accretion. For more than a decade, the source of the bright Hα emission (up to 750 mR†) along the Magellanic Stream has remained a mystery. We present a hydrodynamical model that explains the known properties of the Hα emission and provides new insights on the lifetime of the Stream clouds. The upstream clouds are gradually disrupted due to their interaction with the hot halo gas. The clouds that follow plough into gas ablated from the upstream clouds, leading to shock ionisation at the leading edges of the downstream clouds. Since the following clouds also experience ablation, and weaker Hα (100-200 mR) is quite extensive, a disruptive cascade must be operating along much of the Stream. In order to light up much of the Stream as observed, it must have a small angle of attack (≈ 20°) to the halo, and this may already find support in new H i observations. Another prediction is that the Balmer ratio (Hα/Hβ) will be substantially enhanced due to the slow shock; this will soon be tested by upcoming WHAM observations in Chile. We find that the clouds are evolving on timescales of 100-200 Myr, such that the Stream must be replenished by the Magellanic Clouds at a fairly constant rate (≳ 0.1 M⊙ yr-1). The ablated material falls onto the Galaxy as a warm drizzle; diffuse ionized gas at 104 K is an important constituent of galactic accretion. The observed Hα emission provides a new constraint on the rate of disruption of the Stream and, consequently, the infall rate of metal-poor gas onto the Galaxy. When the ionized component of the infalling gas is accounted for, the rate of gas accretion is ≳ 0.4 M⊙ yr-1, roughly twice the rate deduced from H i observations alone.

  8. Abundance anomalies in tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    The ˜10 per cent of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than M* ≳ M⊙ should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ˜25 per cent on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high-density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main-sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle - stars with M* ≳ M⊙ quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low-mass stars evolve slowly and high-mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to ˜1-2 M⊙ stars disrupted on the main sequence. Like helium, portions of the debris will show still larger changes in C and N, and the anomalies decline as the star leaves the main sequence. The enhanced [N/C] abundance ratio of these TDEs provides the first natural explanation for the rare, nitrogen-rich quasars and may also explain the strong nitrogen emission seen in ultraviolet spectra of ASASSN-14li.

  9. Laser Microbial Killing and Biofilm Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krespi, Yosef P.; Kizhner, Victor

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: To analyze the ability of NIR lasers to reduce bacterial load and demonstrate the capability of fiber-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser disrupting biofilm. Study Design: NIR diode laser was tested in vitro and in vivo using pathogenic microorganisms (S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa). In addition biofilms were grown from clinical Pseudomonas isolates and placed in culture plates, screws, tympanostomy tubes and PET sutures. Methods: In the animal experiments acute rhinosinusitis model was created by packing the rabbit nose with bacteria soaked solution. The nasal pack was removed in two days and nose was exposed to laser irradiation. A 940 nm diode laser with fiber diffuser was used. Nasal cultures were obtained before and after the laser treatments. Animals were sacrificed fifteen days following laser treatment and bacteriologic/histologic results analyzed. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generated shockwave pulses were delivered on biofilm using special probes over culture plates, screws, tubes, and PET sutures for the biofilm experiments. Results: Average of two log bacteria reduction was achieved with NIR laser compared to controls. Histologic studies demonstrated preservation of tissue integrity without significant damage to mucosa. Biofilms were imaged before, during and after treatment using a confocal microscope. During laser-generated shockwave application, biofilm was initially seen to oscillate and eventually break off. Large and small pieces of biofilm were totally and instantly removed from the surface to which they were attached in seconds. Conclusions: Significant bacterial reduction was achieved with NIR laser therapy in this experimental in vitro and animal study. In addition we disrupted Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and special probes generating plasma and shockwave. This new and innovative method of bacteria killing and biofilm disruption without injuring host tissue may have clinical application in the

  10. Amphibians as model to study endocrine disrupters.

    PubMed

    Kloas, Werner; Lutz, Ilka

    2006-10-13

    Environmental compounds can interfere with endocrine systems of wildlife and humans. These so-called endocrine disrupters (ED) are known to affect reproductive biology and thyroid system. The classical model species for these endocrine systems are amphibians and therefore they can serve as sentinels for detection of the modes of action (MOAs) of ED. Recently, amphibians are being reviewed as suitable models to assess (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic MOAs influencing reproductive biology as well as (anti)thyroidal MOAs interfering with the thyroid system. The development of targeted bioassays in combination with adequate chemical analyses is the prerequisite for a concise risk assessment of ED.

  11. Moore's Law, disruptive technologies, and the clinician.

    PubMed

    Vosburgh, Kirby G; Newbower, Ronald S

    2002-01-01

    The advancement of technical power described by Moore's Law offers great potential for enabling more cost-effective medical devices and systems. However, progress has been slow. Many factors for this failure have been cited, including the anti-rational economic structure of healthcare and the complexity and long time scale of medical development. Christensen et al. suggest that "disruptive technologies" may circumvent some of these difficulties. "Disruptive Technologies" are defined as those that are established in one market, but then penetrate and overwhelm another market. These incursions are accelerated by economic factors, and capitalize on functionality, reliability, and advancements supported by the original market. Christensen has cited many examples from industrial and service businesses, but few examples can be found yet in healthcare. We argue that positive technology impacts in medicine occur most readily when innovators augment the skills of and collaborate with caregivers, rather than seeking to displace them. In the short term, a new approach may improve efficiency or quality. In the longer term, such approaches may obviate human tasks at lower-skill levels, and even permit task automation. One successful example has been the introduction of flexible monitoring for physiologic information. Systems for computer-aided diagnosis, which have failed to impact complex decision making, have succeeded in simpler specialty areas such as the interpretation of EKG's and mammograms, and may do the same with analysis of some pathology images. The next frontier may the operating room, and the adoption of such systemic technologies by caregivers in emergency medicine and general care may then have an even wider "disruptive" effect. Responding to time and cost pressures, and the desire to move care to the patient, other workers, such as radiologists, will drive the trend away from isolated, complex, large-scale devices, and toward integrated, modular, and simpler

  12. South Africa: a legacy of family disruption.

    PubMed

    Budlender, Debbie; Lund, Francie

    2011-01-01

    This article draws together unusual characteristics of the legacy of apartheid in South Africa: the state-orchestrated destruction of family life, high rates of unemployment and a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS. The disruption of family life has resulted in a situation in which many women have to fulfil the role of both breadwinner and care giver in a context of high unemployment and very limited economic opportunities. The question that follows is: given this crisis of care, to what extent can or will social protection and employment-related social policies provide the support women and children need?

  13. Functional MRI studies in disruptive behaviour disorders.

    PubMed

    Bellani, M; Garzitto, M; Brambilla, P

    2012-03-01

    Aggressive or antisocial behaviours with violations of social rules are the main features of disruptive behaviour disorders (DBDs), which are developmental diseases and include conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder. In the last decade, several efforts have been made to shed light on the biological underpinnings of DBDs. In this context, the main findings of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in DBD are reported here. There are indications of neural dysfunctions in response to affective stimuli, especially regarding medial and orbitofrontal prefrontal cortex and connected subcortical structures.

  14. Disruptive Innovation in Air Measurement Technology: Reality ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation is a big picture overview on the changing state of air measurement technology in the world, with a focus on the introduction of low-cost sensors into the market place. The presentation discusses how these new technologies may be a case study in disruptive innovation for the air pollution measurement field. The intended audience is primarily those with experience in air pollution measurement methods, but much of the talk is accessible to the general public. This is a keynote presentation on emerging air monitoring technology, to be provided at the AWMA measurements conference in March, 2016.

  15. Cancer genomics identifies disrupted epigenetic genes.

    PubMed

    Simó-Riudalbas, Laia; Esteller, Manel

    2014-06-01

    Latest advances in genome technologies have greatly advanced the discovery of epigenetic genes altered in cancer. The initial single candidate gene approaches have been coupled with newly developed epigenomic platforms to hasten the convergence of scientific discoveries and translational applications. Here, we present an overview of the evolution of cancer epigenomics and an updated catalog of disruptions in epigenetic pathways, whose misregulation can culminate in cancer. The creation of these basic mutational catalogs in cell lines and primary tumors will provide us with enough knowledge to move diagnostics and therapy from the laboratory bench to the bedside.

  16. Nomofungin: a new microfilament disrupting agent.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, A S; Yoshida, W Y; Mooberry, S L; Hemscheidt, T K

    2001-12-28

    A new alkaloid, nomofungin, has been isolated from the fermentation broth of an unidentified endophytic fungus obtained from the bark of Ficus microcarpa L. The structure of nomofungin was determined by application of spectroscopic methods. The absolute stereochemistry of nomofungin was assigned by using the exciton chirality method. Nomofungin disrupts microfilaments in cultured mammalian cells and is moderately cytotoxic with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 2 and 4.5 microg/mL against LoVo and KB cells, respectively. The ring system of nomofungin is unprecedented.

  17. The mass disruption of Oort cloud comets.

    PubMed

    Levison, Harold F; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Dones, Luke; Jedicke, Robert; Wiegert, Paul A; Bottke, William F

    2002-06-21

    We have calculated the number of dormant, nearly isotropic Oort cloud comets in the solar system by (i) combining orbital distribution models with statistical models of dormant comet discoveries by well-defined surveys and (ii) comparing the model results to observations of a population of dormant comets. Dynamical models that assume that comets are not destroyed predict that we should have discovered approximately 100 times more dormant nearly isotropic comets than are actually seen. Thus, as comets evolve inward from the Oort cloud, the majority of them must physically disrupt.

  18. Responding to disruptive patients. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-11-16

    This final rule amends the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulation that authorizes appropriate action when a patient engages in disruptive behavior at a VA medical facility. This amendment updates VA's current regulation to reflect modern medical care and ethical practices. The final rule authorizes VA to modify the time, place, and/or manner in which VA provides treatment to a patient, in order to ensure the safety of others at VA medical facilities, and to prevent any interference with the provision of medical care.

  19. Preoperative Sleep Disruption and Postoperative Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jacqueline M.; Sands, Laura P.; Newman, Stacey; Meckler, Gabriela; Xie, Yimeng; Gay, Caryl; Lee, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To describe preoperative and postoperative sleep disruption and its relationship to postoperative delirium. Design: Prospective cohort study with 6 time points (3 nights pre-hospitalization and 3 nights post-surgery). Setting: University medical center. Patients: The sample consisted of 50 English-speaking patients ≥ 40 years of age scheduled for major non-cardiac surgery, with an anticipated hospital stay ≥ 3 days. Interventions: None. Measurements and results: Sleep was measured before and after surgery for a total of 6 days using a wrist actigraph to quantify movement in a continuous fashion. Postoperative delirium was measured by a structured interview using the Confusion Assessment Method. Sleep variables for patients with (n = 7) and without (n = 43) postoperative delirium were compared using the unpaired Student t-tests or χ2 tests. Repeated measures analysis of variance for the 6 days was used to examine within-subject changes over time and between group differences. The mean age of the patients was 66 ± 11 years (range 43–91 years), and it was not associated with sleep variables or postoperative delirium. The incidence of postoperative delirium observed during any of the 3 postoperative days was 14%. For the 7 patients who subsequently developed postoperative delirium, wake after sleep onset (WASO) as a percentage of total sleep time was significantly higher (44% ± 22%) during the night before surgery compared to the patients who did not subsequently developed delirium (21% ± 20%, p = 0.012). This sleep disruption continued postoperatively, and to a greater extent, for the first 2 nights after surgery. Patients with WASO < 10% did not experience postoperative delirium. Self-reported sleep disturbance did not differ between patients with vs. without postoperative delirium. Conclusions: In this pilot study of adults over 40 years of age, sleep disruption was more severe before surgery in the patients who experienced postoperative

  20. Helical Disruptions in Small Loops of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamical stability of DNA minicircles is investigated by means of path integral techniques. Hydrogen bonds between base pairs on complementary strands can be broken by thermal fluctuations and temporary fluctuational openings along the double helix are essential to biological functions such as transcription and replication of the genetic information. Helix unwinding and bubble formation patterns are computed in circular sequences with variable radius in order to analyze the interplay between molecule size and appearance of helical disruptions. The latter are found in minicircles with < 100 base pairs and appear as a strategy to soften the stress due to the bending and torsion of the helix.

  1. Compliant Prosthetic Or Robotic Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J.; Eklund, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Rotation partly free and partly restrained by resilience and damping. Joint includes U-shaped x- and y-axis frames joined by cables that cross in at center piece. The y-axis frame rotates about y-axis on roller bearing within predetermined angular range. The y-axis frame rotates slightly farther when arm strikes stop, because cables can twist. This mimics compliant resistance of knee joint reaching limit of its forward or backward motion. Used in prosthetic device to replace diseased or damage human joint, or in robot linkage to limit movement and cushion overloads.

  2. Imaging of the patellofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephen; Rupiper, David; Stacy, G Scott

    2014-07-01

    The patellofemoral (PF) joint is a complex articulation, with interplay between the osseous and soft tissue structures to maintain the balance between knee mobility and stability. Disorders of the PF joint can be a source of anterior knee pain (AKP). In this article, radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging of the PF joint are reviewed, including normal anatomy, imaging techniques, and imaging-based measurements. Common imaging findings associated with AKP are reviewed, including symptomatic normal variants, tendinopathy, apophysitis, osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella, trochlear dysplasia, excessive lateralization of tibial tuberosity, patellar maltracking, patellar dislocation and fractures, anterior bursitis, Morel-Lavallée effusions, and fat pad edema.

  3. Questions and Answers About Shoulder Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dislocation using a traditional open surgery approach. Separation A shoulder separation occurs where the collarbone (clavicle) meets the shoulder ... acromioclavicular or AC joint) are signs that a separation may have occurred. Diagnosis. Doctors may diagnose a ...

  4. Shoulder separation - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Separated shoulder - aftercare; Acromioclavicular joint separation - aftercare; A/C separation - aftercare ... Most shoulder separation injuries are caused by falling onto the shoulder. This causes a tear in the tissue that connects the ...

  5. Characteristics of temporomandibular joint in patients with temporomandibular joint complaint

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanfeng; Guo, Xiaoqian; Sun, Xiaoxue; Wang, Ning; Xie, Min; Zhang, Jianqiang; Lv, Yuan; Han, Weili; Hu, Min; Liu, Hongchen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was to investigate whether there was statistical difference between the bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: TMJ CBCT images of 123 cases were used to preliminarily determine the indicators suitable for the measuring method. TMJ CBCT image reconstruction was performed and 19 indicators were measured. Thirty-six cases without TMJ complaint served as controls. The comparison of bilateral TMJs was analyzed by paired t-test to find out the indicators without statistical significance. Twenty-nine patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds who underwent CBCT at the hospital were enrolled for the comparative study. The measured values were analyzed by paired t-test to determine the indicators with statistical difference. Results: In the control group, only radius value of bilateral TMJ was different statistically (P < 0.05). In the TMJ complaint group, the vertical 60° joint space of the bilateral TMJ was statistically different (P < 0.05) and the rest of the measured values showed no statistical difference. Conclusions: In the patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, the vertical 60° joint space of the symptomatic side was significantly increased comparing with the asymptomatic side. PMID:26629112

  6. Sacroiliac Joint Fusion Using Triangular Titanium Implants vs. Non-Surgical Management: Six-Month Outcomes from a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Whang, Peter; Polly, David; Frank, Clay; Lockstadt, Harry; Glaser, John; Limoni, Robert; Sembrano, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain is a prevalent, underdiagnosed cause of lower back pain. SI joint fusion can relieve pain and improve quality of life in patients who have failed nonoperative care. To date, no study has concurrently compared surgical and non-surgical treatments for chronic SI joint dysfunction. Methods We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial of 148 subjects with SI joint dysfunction due to degenerative sacroiliitis or sacroiliac joint disruptions who were assigned to either minimally invasive SI joint fusion with triangular titanium implants (N=102) or non-surgical management (NSM, n=46). SI joint pain scores, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short-Form 36 (SF-36) and EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) were collected at baseline and at 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment commencement. Six-month success rates, defined as the proportion of treated subjects with a 20-mm improvement in SI joint pain in the absence of severe device-related or neurologic SI joint-related adverse events or surgical revision, were compared using Bayesian methods. Results Subjects (mean age 51, 70% women) were highly debilitated at baseline (mean SI joint VAS pain score 82, mean ODI score 62). Six-month follow-up was obtained in 97.3%. By 6 months, success rates were 81.4% in the surgical group vs. 23.9% in the NSM group (difference of 56.6%, 95% posterior credible interval 41.4-70.0%, posterior probability of superiority >0.999). Clinically important (≥15 point) ODI improvement at 6 months occurred in 75% of surgery subjects vs. 27.3% of NSM subjects. At six months, quality of life improved more in the surgery group and satisfaction rates were high. The mean number of adverse events in the first six months was slightly higher in the surgical group compared to the non-surgical group (1.3 vs. 1.0 events per subject, p=0.1857). Conclusions Six-month follow-up from this level 1 study showed that minimally invasive SI joint fusion using triangular titanium implants was more

  7. MISR JOINT_AS Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-10-31

    ... daily (D), monthly (M), quarterly (Q), and yearly (Y) time scales and regional maps associated with field campaigns at daily and monthly time scales. The Joint Aerosol product provides a monthly global statistical ...

  8. Campus/Industry Joint Ventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene J.

    1985-01-01

    Opportunities for joint economic ventures of colleges and industry are discussed, and a variety of ventures undertaken by Duke University are outlined, including a health club, hotel, and office building. Tax and financing considerations are noted. (MSE)

  9. Disruption of Groundwater System by Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.; Liao, X.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquakes can enhance permeability of groundwater systems at great distances. Here we use the tidal response of the water level in a deep well (~4 km) in the near field of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake, western China, to investigate how large earthquakes may disrupt groundwater systems in the near field. The well is located near the eastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau and 21 km from the ruptured fault of the Wenchuan earthquake, and is the only well we have found that is in the near field of a large earthquake and showed clear tidal signals before and after the earthquake. The well is open to a Triassic medium-grained sandstone aquifer confined by thick layers of shales on both sides. We show from tidal analysis of the water level in the well that large earthquakes can change not only the permeability but also the poroelastic properties of a groundwater system in an unexpected way. Using the lithologic well logs and experimental data for rock physical properties we interpret this change to reflect the breaching of aquitards of the groundwater system to depths of several km. Such disruption may connect previously isolated groundwater domains to impact groundwater supply, safety of underground waste repository, and hydrocarbon production. The method demonstrated here holds promise for monitoring the breaching of aquitards by hydraulic fracturing of shales during hydrocarbon production and deep injection of waste water.

  10. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sanchez

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).

  11. Partial triceps disruption: a case report.

    PubMed

    Foulk, David M; Galloway, Marc T

    2011-03-01

    Partial triceps tendon disruptions are a rare injury that can lead to debilitating outcomes if misdiagnosed or managed inappropriately. The clinician should have a high index of suspicion when the mechanism involves a fall onto an outstretched arm and there is resultant elbow extension weakness along with pain and swelling. The most common location of rupture is at the tendon-osseous junction. This case report illustrates a partial triceps tendon disruption with involvement of, primarily, the medial head and the superficial expansion. Physical examination displayed weakness with resisted elbow extension in a flexed position over 90°. Radiographs revealed a tiny fleck of bone proximal to the olecranon, but this drastically underestimated the extent of injury upon surgical exploration. Magnetic resonance imaging is essential to ascertain the percentage involvement of the tendon; it can be used for patient education and subsequently to determine treatment recommendations. Although excellent at finding associated pathology, it may misjudge the size of the tear. As such, physicians must consider associated comorbidities and patient characteristics when formulating treatment plans.

  12. Globally disruptive events show predictable timing patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillman, Michael P.; Erenler, Hilary E.

    2017-01-01

    Globally disruptive events include asteroid/comet impacts, large igneous provinces and glaciations, all of which have been considered as contributors to mass extinctions. Understanding the overall relationship between the timings of the largest extinctions and their potential proximal causes remains one of science's great unsolved mysteries. Cycles of about 60 Myr in both fossil diversity and environmental data suggest external drivers such as the passage of the Solar System through the galactic plane. While cyclic phenomena are recognized statistically, a lack of coherent mechanisms and a failure to link key events has hampered wider acceptance of multi-million year periodicity and its relevance to earth science and evolution. The generation of a robust predictive model of timings, with a clear plausible primary mechanism, would signal a paradigm shift. Here, we present a model of the timings of globally disruptive events and a possible explanation of their ultimate cause. The proposed model is a symmetrical pattern of 63 Myr sequences around a central value, interpreted as the occurrence of events along, and parallel to, the galactic midplane. The symmetry is consistent with multiple dark matter disks, aligned parallel to the midplane. One implication of the precise pattern of timings and the underlying physical model is the ability to predict future events, such as a major extinction in 1-2 Myr.

  13. Disruptive ecological selection on a mating cue

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Richard M.; Wallbank, Richard W. R.; Bull, Vanessa; Salazar, Patricio C. A.; Mallet, James; Stevens, Martin; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to divergent ecological niches can result in speciation. Traits subject to disruptive selection that also contribute to non-random mating will facilitate speciation with gene flow. Such ‘magic’ or ‘multiple-effect’ traits may be widespread and important for generating biodiversity, but strong empirical evidence is still lacking. Although there is evidence that putative ecological traits are indeed involved in assortative mating, evidence that these same traits are under divergent selection is considerably weaker. Heliconius butterfly wing patterns are subject to positive frequency-dependent selection by predators, owing to aposematism and Müllerian mimicry, and divergent colour patterns are used by closely related species to recognize potential mates. The amenability of colour patterns to experimental manipulation, independent of other traits, presents an excellent opportunity to test their role during speciation. We conducted field experiments with artificial butterflies, designed to match natural butterflies with respect to avian vision. These were complemented with enclosure trials with live birds and real butterflies. Our experiments showed that hybrid colour-pattern phenotypes are attacked more frequently than parental forms. For the first time, we demonstrate disruptive ecological selection on a trait that also acts as a mating cue. PMID:23075843

  14. Mutant Huntingtin Disrupts the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Grima, Jonathan C; Daigle, J Gavin; Arbez, Nicolas; Cunningham, Kathleen C; Zhang, Ke; Ochaba, Joseph; Geater, Charlene; Morozko, Eva; Stocksdale, Jennifer; Glatzer, Jenna C; Pham, Jacqueline T; Ahmed, Ishrat; Peng, Qi; Wadhwa, Harsh; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C; Duan, Wenzhen; Snyder, Solomon H; Ranum, Laura P W; Thompson, Leslie M; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ross, Christopher A; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2017-04-05

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. The mechanism(s) by which mutant HTT (mHTT) causes disease is unclear. Nucleocytoplasmic transport, the trafficking of macromolecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm, is tightly regulated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) made up of nucleoporins (NUPs). Previous studies offered clues that mHTT may disrupt nucleocytoplasmic transport and a mutation of an NUP can cause HD-like pathology. Therefore, we evaluated the NPC and nucleocytoplasmic transport in multiple models of HD, including mouse and fly models, neurons transfected with mHTT, HD iPSC-derived neurons, and human HD brain regions. These studies revealed severe mislocalization and aggregation of NUPs and defective nucleocytoplasmic transport. HD repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation proteins also disrupted nucleocytoplasmic transport. Additionally, overexpression of NUPs and treatment with drugs that prevent aberrant NUP biology also mitigated this transport defect and neurotoxicity, providing future novel therapy targets.

  15. Focal cerebral mantle disruption in fetal hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter; Muzumdar, Dattatraya P; Sly, Lloyd E; Michaud, Jean

    2007-04-01

    A variety of developmental brain anomalies have been described in individuals with fetal hydrocephalus, regardless of etiology. Examples include callosal dysgenesis, periventricular gray matter heterotopia, hippocampal and white matter hypoplasia, and cortical polygyration. The present report draws attention to another anomaly not reported in previous case series of fetal hydrocephalus: focal cerebral mantle disruption. Neonatal imaging findings (where available) and post-shunt, stable-state magnetic resonance imaging, or pathological findings were reviewed in 77 subjects with fetal hydrocephalus (55 myelomeningocele, 16 sporadic aqueductal stenosis, 6 miscellaneous). Of these, 12 subjects (15.6%) demonstrated a combination of absence of the septum pellucidum and severe thinning or absence of the posteromesial cerebral mantle. On axial sequences, this combination created the illusion of a common ventricle, as in lobar holoprosencephaly. All 12 subjects had massive hydrocephalus at birth, accompanied in 7 by posteromesial ventricular diverticula. Two subjects, and one other subject with distinct lateral ventricles, demonstrated unilateral or bilateral mantle clefts suggestive of schizencephaly. Close radiological (n = 2) or pathological (n = 1) inspection showed that the clefts were only partially lined with gray matter and contained a transverse gliotic membrane. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that massive early fetal hydrocephalus may completely disrupt cerebral mantle formation, particularly in the posteromesial hemispheres.

  16. Cool Core Disruption in Abell 1763

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Edmund; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Randall, Scott W.; Edwards, Louise O. V.; Sabry, Ziad

    2017-01-01

    We present the analysis of a 20 ksec Chandra archival observation of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1763. A model-subtracted image highlighting excess cluster emission reveals a large spiral structure winding outward from the core to a radius of ~950 kpc. We measure the gas of the inner spiral to have significantly lower entropy than non-spiral regions at the same radius. This is consistent with the structure resulting from merger-induced motion of the cluster’s cool core, a phenomenon seen in many systems. Atypical of spiral-hosting clusters, an intact cool core is not detected. Its absence suggests the system has experienced significant disruption since the initial dynamical encounter that set the sloshing core in motion. Along the major axis of the elongated ICM distribution we detect thermal features consistent with the merger event most likely responsible for cool core disruption. The merger-induced transition towards non-cool core status will be discussed. The interaction between the powerful (P1.4 ~ 1026 W Hz-1) cluster-center WAT radio source and its ICM environment will also be discussed.

  17. Phytoestrogen signaling and symbiotic gene activation are disrupted by endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer E; Starcevic, Marta; Jones, Phillip E; Burow, Matthew E; McLachlan, John A

    2004-01-01

    Some organochlorine pesticides and other synthetic chemicals mimic hormones in representatives of each vertebrate class, including mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and fish. These compounds are called endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Similarly, hormonelike signaling has also been observed when vertebrates are exposed to plant chemicals called phytoestrogens. Previous research has shown the mechanism of action for EDCs and phytoestrogens is as unintended ligands for the estrogen receptor (ER). Although pesticides have been synthesized to deter insects and weeds, plants produce phytoestrogens to deter herbivores, as attractant cues for insects, and as recruitment signals for symbiotic soil bacteria. Our data present the first evidence that some of the same organochlorine pesticides and EDCs known to disrupt endocrine signaling through ERs in exposed wildlife and humans also disrupt the phytoestrogen signaling that leguminous plants use to recruit Sinorhizobium meliloti soil bacteria for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Here we report that a variety of EDCs and pesticides commonly found in agricultural soils interfere with the symbiotic signaling necessary for nitrogen fixation, suggesting that the principles underlying endocrine disruption may have more widespread biological and ecological importance than had once been thought. PMID:15121509

  18. Disrupting Law School: How Disruptive Innovation Will Revolutionize the Legal World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistone, Michele R.; Horn, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Facing dramatic declines in enrollment, revenue, and student quality at the same time that their cost structure continues to rise and public support has waned, law schools are in crisis. A key driver of the crisis is shrinking employment opportunities for recent graduates, which stem in part from the disruption of the traditional business model…

  19. Disruptive Conduct: The Impact of Disruptive Technologies on Social Relations in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have invested significantly in digital technologies for learning and teaching. However, technologies provided by HEIs have not been universally successful in terms of adoption and usage. Meanwhile, both students and lecturers use disruptive technologies to support learning and teaching. This article examines…

  20. Phytoestrogen signaling and symbiotic gene activation are disrupted by endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jennifer E; Starcevic, Marta; Jones, Phillip E; Burow, Matthew E; McLachlan, John A

    2004-05-01

    Some organochlorine pesticides and other synthetic chemicals mimic hormones in representatives of each vertebrate class, including mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and fish. These compounds are called endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Similarly, hormonelike signaling has also been observed when vertebrates are exposed to plant chemicals called phytoestrogens. Previous research has shown the mechanism of action for EDCs and phytoestrogens is as unintended ligands for the estrogen receptor (ER). Although pesticides have been synthesized to deter insects and weeds, plants produce phytoestrogens to deter herbivores, as attractant cues for insects, and as recruitment signals for symbiotic soil bacteria. Our data present the first evidence that some of the same organochlorine pesticides and EDCs known to disrupt endocrine signaling through ERs in exposed wildlife and humans also disrupt the phytoestrogen signaling that leguminous plants use to recruit Sinorhizobium meliloti soil bacteria for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Here we report that a variety of EDCs and pesticides commonly found in agricultural soils interfere with the symbiotic signaling necessary for nitrogen fixation, suggesting that the principles underlying endocrine disruption may have more widespread biological and ecological importance than had once been thought.

  1. Circadian rhythm disruption in a mouse model of Rett syndrome circadian disruption in RTT.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Loh, Dawn H; Kudo, Takashi; Truong, Danny; Derakhshesh, Matthew; Kaswan, Zoë MacDowell; Ghiani, Cristina A; Tsoa, Rosemarie; Cheng, Yin; Sun, Yi E; Colwell, Christopher S

    2015-05-01

    Disturbances in the sleep/wake cycle are prevalent in patients with Rett syndrome (RTT). We sought to determine whether the circadian system is disrupted in a RTT model, Mecp2(-/y) mice. We found that MeCP2 mutants showed decreased strength and precision of daily rhythms of activity coupled with extremely fragmented sleep. The central circadian clock (suprachiasmatic nucleus) exhibited significant reduction in the number of neurons expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) as well as compromised spontaneous neural activity. The molecular clockwork was disrupted both centrally in the SCN and in peripheral organs, indicating a general disorganization of the circadian system. Disruption of the molecular clockwork was observed in fibroblasts of RTT patients. Finally, MeCP2 mutant mice were vulnerable to circadian disruption as chronic jet lag accelerated mortality. Our finds suggest an integral role of MeCP2 in the circadian timing system and provides a possible mechanistic explanation for the sleep/wake distrubances observed in RTT patients. The work raises the possibility that RTT patients may benefit from a temporally structured environment.

  2. Metatarsophalangeal joints of Australopithecus afarensis.

    PubMed

    Latimer, B; Lovejoy, C O

    1990-09-01

    Metatarsophalangeal joints from African pongids, modern humans, and Australopithecus afarensis are compared to investigate the anatomical and mechanical changes that accompanied the transition to terrestrial bipedality. Features analyzed include the shape and orientation of the metatarsal heads, excursion of the metatarsophalangeal joints, and orientation of the basal articular surface of the proximal phalanges. These features unequivocally segregate quadrupedal pongids and bipedal hominids and demonstrate a clear adaptation to terrestrial bipedality in the Hadar pedal skeleton.

  3. Continuum description for jointed media

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.K.

    1982-04-01

    A general three-dimensional continuum description is presented for a material containing regularly spaced and approximately parallel jointing planes within a representative elementary volume. Constitutive relationships are introduced for linear behavior of the base material and nonlinear normal and shear behavior across jointing planes. Furthermore, a fracture permeability tensor is calculated so that deformation induced alterations to the in-situ values can be measured. Examples for several strain-controlled loading paths are presented.

  4. [Injuries of the elbow joint].

    PubMed

    Lill, H; Voigt, C

    2004-10-01

    Injuries of the elbow joint increase along with increased athletic activity and life expectancy. Knowledge of anatomy and biomechanics is important for understanding injury patterns, specific diagnosis, and therapy. Here we classify the most frequent elbow injuries such as dislocation, ligamentous instability, and fracture of the radial head, processus coronoideus, olecranon, and distal humerus based on joint anatomy, biomechanics, clinical examination, and imaging. Specific therapies are described.

  5. Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    2005 FEB 2005 Selective Availability Anti- Spoofing Module (SAASM)/ GPS Anti-Jam Production Award N/A MAR 2005 SEP 2005 MAR 2005 Change Explanations...Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-503 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) As of FY 2015 President’s Budget...2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  6. Joint probabilities and quantum cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, J. Acacio

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the existence of joint probability distributions for quantumlike response computations in the brain. We do so by focusing on a contextual neural-oscillator model shown to reproduce the main features of behavioral stimulus-response theory. We then exhibit a simple example of contextual random variables not having a joint probability distribution, and describe how such variables can be obtained from neural oscillators, but not from a quantum observable algebra.

  7. Joint Command Decision Support System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Greenley et al. 2006) resulted in the identification of a set of overarching principles for the implementation of Joint Command Decision Support (Hales...and adjustment of resources, and longer term feasibility planning. As highlighted in the Joint Staff Front End Analysis report ( Greenley et al. 2006...Townsend (2006). The Federal Response to Hurricane Katrina Lessons Learned, Washington, D.C. February 2006. Greenley , A., Baker, K. & Cochran, L. (2006

  8. Joint Center for Robotics (JCR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-15

    Unclassified 1 Joint Center for Robotics (JCR) Dr. Jim Overholt 15 April 2008 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is...REPORT DATE APR 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Joint Center for Robotics (JCR) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ANSI Std Z39-18 Unclassified 2 TARDEC JCR Robotics CAST Projects & Cells “White Hat” Organization - Understand the needs of the user and create

  9. Blood-Induced Joint Damage

    PubMed Central

    Roosendaal, Goris; Jansen, Nathalie W.D.; Lafeber, Floris P.J.G.; Mastbergen, Simon C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Four days of blood exposure leads to irreversible cartilage damage in vitro. In contrast, intermittent intra-articular blood injections twice a week during 4 weeks (mimicking micro-bleeds) in a canine model resulted in transient damage only. In this study, it was evaluated whether acute joint bleeds are more harmful than micro-bleeds in a canine model of knee arthropathy. Design. Seven dogs received 4 sequential daily intra-articular blood injections twice in 2 weeks (mimicking 2 acute 4-day joint bleeds). Seven other dogs received the same blood load but in a total of 8 injections intermittently over the 4-week period with at least 1 day in between (mimicking micro-bleeds over the same timespan). Contralateral knees served as controls. Ten weeks after the last injection cartilage matrix turnover and synovial inflammation were evaluated. Results. Only after the acute joint bleeds the release of newly formed and total (resident) cartilage matrix glycosaminoglycans were increased (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01, respectively). Furthermore, in animals with the acute joint bleeds cartilage glycosaminoglycan content was decreased (P = 0.01) and not in animals with micro-bleeds. Mild synovial inflammation was observed in both groups (both P < 0.0001) but was not different between groups. Conclusions. In contrast to micro-bleeds, 2 acute joint bleeds lead to prolonged cartilage damage independent of the level of synovial inflammation. This model suggests that micro-bleeds are less devastating than acute joint bleeds with respect to joint damage, which might be of relevance to treatment of joint bleeds in clinical practice. PMID:26069675

  10. Experimental use of Evazote joint materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, J. O.

    1981-09-01

    The performance of Evazote joint material is discussed. Merits and shortcomings noted in evaluations are listed. This material is designed to be used in expansion joints in roadways, bridges, sidewalks, roofs and walls, as well as other areas requiring a waterproof filler. Evazote material has been placed in joints on one bridge and in a number of highly expansive joints in prestressed concrete pavement.

  11. Simplified procedures for designing composite bolted joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1988-01-01

    Simplified procedures are described to design and analyze single and multi-bolt composite joints. Numerical examples illustrate the use of these methods. Factors affecting composite bolted joints are summarized. References are cited where more detailed discussion is presented on specific aspects of composite bolted joints. Design variables associated with these joints are summarized in the appendix.

  12. Simplified procedures for designing composite bolted joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Simplified procedures are described to design and analyze single and multi-bolt composite joints. Numerical examples illustrate the use of these methods. Factors affecting composite bolted joints are summarized. References are cited where more detailed discussion is presented on specific aspects of composite bolted joints. Design variables associated with these joints are summarized in the appendix.

  13. 42 CFR 423.1040 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Joint hearings. 423.1040 Section 423.1040 Public... § 423.1040 Joint hearings. When two or more affected parties have requested hearings and the same or... the prehearing conference or hearing and conduct all proceedings jointly. If joint hearings are...

  14. 12 CFR 347.107 - Joint ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joint ventures. 347.107 Section 347.107 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.107 Joint ventures. (a) Joint ventures. If a bank, directly or indirectly, acquires or holds an equity interest in a foreign organization that is a joint venture, and the bank or...

  15. 12 CFR 347.107 - Joint ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint ventures. 347.107 Section 347.107 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.107 Joint ventures. (a) Joint ventures. If a bank, directly or indirectly, acquires or holds an equity interest in a foreign organization that is a joint venture, and the bank or...

  16. 47 CFR 76.912 - Joint certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Joint certification. 76.912 Section 76.912... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.912 Joint certification. (a) Franchising authorities may apply for joint certification and may engage in joint regulation, including, but not limited...

  17. 32 CFR 536.54 - Joint tortfeasors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Joint tortfeasors. 536.54 Section 536.54... AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.54 Joint tortfeasors. When joint... United States rather than pay the claim in full and then bring suit against the joint tortfeasor...

  18. 47 CFR 76.912 - Joint certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Joint certification. 76.912 Section 76.912... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.912 Joint certification. (a) Franchising authorities may apply for joint certification and may engage in joint regulation, including, but not limited...

  19. 42 CFR 422.1040 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Joint hearings. 422.1040 Section 422.1040 Public....1040 Joint hearings. When two or more affected parties have requested hearings and the same or... the prehearing conference or hearing and conduct all proceedings jointly. If joint hearings are...

  20. 49 CFR 234.233 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rail joints. 234.233 Section 234.233..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.233 Rail joints. Each non-insulated rail joint located... than joint bars and the bonds shall be maintained in such condition to ensure electrical conductivity....

  1. 47 CFR 76.912 - Joint certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Joint certification. 76.912 Section 76.912... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.912 Joint certification. (a) Franchising authorities may apply for joint certification and may engage in joint regulation, including, but not limited...

  2. 21 CFR 26.73 - Joint Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Joint Committee. 26.73 Section 26.73 Food and...Frameworkâ Provisions § 26.73 Joint Committee. (a) A Joint Committee consisting of representatives of the United States and the European Community (EC) will be established. The Joint Committee shall...

  3. 21 CFR 26.73 - Joint Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint Committee. 26.73 Section 26.73 Food and...Frameworkâ Provisions § 26.73 Joint Committee. (a) A Joint Committee consisting of representatives of the United States and the European Community (EC) will be established. The Joint Committee shall...

  4. 12 CFR 347.107 - Joint ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Joint ventures. 347.107 Section 347.107 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.107 Joint ventures. (a) Joint ventures. If a bank, directly or indirectly, acquires or holds an equity interest in a foreign organization that is a joint venture, and the bank or...

  5. 32 CFR 536.54 - Joint tortfeasors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Joint tortfeasors. 536.54 Section 536.54 National... UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.54 Joint tortfeasors. When joint tortfeasors... United States rather than pay the claim in full and then bring suit against the joint tortfeasor...

  6. 49 CFR 234.233 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rail joints. 234.233 Section 234.233... joints. Each non-insulated rail joint located within the limits of a highway-rail grade crossing train detection circuit shall be bonded by means other than joint bars and the bonds shall be maintained in...

  7. 12 CFR 347.107 - Joint ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Joint ventures. 347.107 Section 347.107 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.107 Joint ventures. (a) Joint ventures. If a bank, directly or indirectly, acquires or holds an equity interest in a foreign organization that is a joint venture, and the bank or...

  8. 42 CFR 422.1040 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Joint hearings. 422.1040 Section 422.1040 Public...) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Appeal procedures for Civil Money Penalties § 422.1040 Joint... conference or hearing and conduct all proceedings jointly. If joint hearings are held, a single record of...

  9. 42 CFR 422.1040 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Joint hearings. 422.1040 Section 422.1040 Public...) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Appeal procedures for Civil Money Penalties § 422.1040 Joint... conference or hearing and conduct all proceedings jointly. If joint hearings are held, a single record of...

  10. 49 CFR 234.233 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rail joints. 234.233 Section 234.233... joints. Each non-insulated rail joint located within the limits of a highway-rail grade crossing train detection circuit shall be bonded by means other than joint bars and the bonds shall be maintained in...

  11. 42 CFR 422.1040 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Joint hearings. 422.1040 Section 422.1040 Public....1040 Joint hearings. When two or more affected parties have requested hearings and the same or... the prehearing conference or hearing and conduct all proceedings jointly. If joint hearings are...

  12. 42 CFR 423.1040 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Joint hearings. 423.1040 Section 423.1040 Public... § 423.1040 Joint hearings. When two or more affected parties have requested hearings and the same or... the prehearing conference or hearing and conduct all proceedings jointly. If joint hearings are...

  13. 14 CFR 23.693 - Joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joints. 23.693 Section 23.693 Aeronautics... Systems § 23.693 Joints. Control system joints (in push-pull systems) that are subject to angular motion... factor may be reduced to 2.0 for joints in cable control systems. For ball or roller bearings,...

  14. 42 CFR 422.1040 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Joint hearings. 422.1040 Section 422.1040 Public....1040 Joint hearings. When two or more affected parties have requested hearings and the same or... the prehearing conference or hearing and conduct all proceedings jointly. If joint hearings are...

  15. 32 CFR 536.54 - Joint tortfeasors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Joint tortfeasors. 536.54 Section 536.54 National... UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.54 Joint tortfeasors. When joint tortfeasors... United States rather than pay the claim in full and then bring suit against the joint tortfeasor...

  16. 47 CFR 76.912 - Joint certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Joint certification. 76.912 Section 76.912... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.912 Joint certification. (a) Franchising authorities may apply for joint certification and may engage in joint regulation, including, but not limited...

  17. 32 CFR 536.54 - Joint tortfeasors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Joint tortfeasors. 536.54 Section 536.54... AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.54 Joint tortfeasors. When joint... United States rather than pay the claim in full and then bring suit against the joint tortfeasor...

  18. 47 CFR 76.912 - Joint certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Joint certification. 76.912 Section 76.912... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.912 Joint certification. (a) Franchising authorities may apply for joint certification and may engage in joint regulation, including, but not limited...

  19. 30 CFR 36.24 - Engine joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Engine joints. 36.24 Section 36.24 Mineral... Construction and Design Requirements § 36.24 Engine joints. (a) Cylinder head. The joint between the cylinder.... This joint shall provide an adequate flame barrier with the gasket in place. (b) Valve guides....

  20. 32 CFR 536.54 - Joint tortfeasors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Joint tortfeasors. 536.54 Section 536.54 National... UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.54 Joint tortfeasors. When joint tortfeasors... United States rather than pay the claim in full and then bring suit against the joint tortfeasor...

  1. 21 CFR 26.73 - Joint Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint Committee. 26.73 Section 26.73 Food and...Frameworkâ Provisions § 26.73 Joint Committee. (a) A Joint Committee consisting of representatives of the United States and the European Community (EC) will be established. The Joint Committee shall...

  2. 30 CFR 36.24 - Engine joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine joints. 36.24 Section 36.24 Mineral... Construction and Design Requirements § 36.24 Engine joints. (a) Cylinder head. The joint between the cylinder.... This joint shall provide an adequate flame barrier with the gasket in place. (b) Valve guides....

  3. 12 CFR 347.107 - Joint ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint ventures. 347.107 Section 347.107 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.107 Joint ventures. (a) Joint ventures. If a bank, directly or indirectly, acquires or holds an equity interest in a foreign organization that is a joint venture, and the bank or...

  4. 49 CFR 234.233 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rail joints. 234.233 Section 234.233... joints. Each non-insulated rail joint located within the limits of a highway-rail grade crossing train detection circuit shall be bonded by means other than joint bars and the bonds shall be maintained in...

  5. 30 CFR 36.24 - Engine joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine joints. 36.24 Section 36.24 Mineral... Construction and Design Requirements § 36.24 Engine joints. (a) Cylinder head. The joint between the cylinder.... This joint shall provide an adequate flame barrier with the gasket in place. (b) Valve guides....

  6. 38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The joints. 4.45 Section... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.45 The joints. As regards the joints the factors... (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.). (c)...

  7. 38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The joints. 4.45 Section... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.45 The joints. As regards the joints the factors... (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.). (c)...

  8. 38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The joints. 4.45 Section... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.45 The joints. As regards the joints the factors... (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.). (c)...

  9. 38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The joints. 4.45 Section... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.45 The joints. As regards the joints the factors... (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.). (c)...

  10. 38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The joints. 4.45 Section... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.45 The joints. As regards the joints the factors... (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.). (c)...

  11. Aggregate formation affects ultrasonic disruption of microalgal cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lee, Duu-Jong; Lai, Juin-Yih

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasonication is a cell disruption process of low energy efficiency. This study dosed K(+), Ca(2+) and Al(3+) to Chlorella vulgaris cultured in Bold's Basal Medium at 25°C and measured the degree of cell disruption under ultrasonication. Adding these metal ions yielded less negatively charged surfaces of cells, while with the latter two ions large and compact cell aggregates were formed. The degree of cell disruption followed: control=K(+)>Ca(2+)>Al(3+) samples. Surface charges of cells and microbubbles have minimal effects on the microbubble number in the proximity of the microalgal cells. Conversely, cell aggregates with large size and compact interior resist cell disruption under ultrasonication. Staining tests revealed high diffusional resistance of stains over the aggregate interior. Microbubbles may not be effective generated and collapsed inside the compact aggregates, hence leading to low cell disruption efficiencies. Effective coagulation/flocculation in cell harvesting may lead to adverse effect on subsequent cell disruption efficiency.

  12. Utility of Intraoperative Neuromonitoring during Minimally Invasive Fusion of the Sacroiliac Joint.

    PubMed

    Woods, Michael; Birkholz, Denise; MacBarb, Regina; Capobianco, Robyn; Woods, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Retrospective case series. Objective. To document the clinical utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion for patients diagnosed with sacroiliac joint dysfunction (as a direct result of sacroiliac joint disruptions or degenerative sacroiliitis) and determine stimulated electromyography thresholds reflective of favorable implant position. Summary of Background Data. Intraoperative neuromonitoring is a well-accepted adjunct to minimally invasive pedicle screw placement. The utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion using a series of triangular, titanium porous plasma coated implants has not been evaluated. Methods. A medical chart review of consecutive patients treated with minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion was undertaken at a single center. Baseline patient demographics and medical history, intraoperative electromyography thresholds, and perioperative adverse events were collected after obtaining IRB approval. Results. 111 implants were placed in 37 patients. Sensitivity of EMG was 80% and specificity was 97%. Intraoperative neuromonitoring potentially avoided neurologic sequelae as a result of improper positioning in 7% of implants. Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that intraoperative neuromonitoring may be a useful adjunct to minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion in avoiding nerve injury during implant placement.

  13. Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis in Mice Following Mechanical Injury to the Synovial Joint

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Muhammad Farooq; Duan, Xin; Quirk, James D.; Holguin, Nilsson; Schmidt, Eric J.; Chinzei, Nobuaki; Silva, Matthew J.; Sandell, Linda J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the spectrum of lesions characteristic of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) across the knee joint in response to mechanical injury. We hypothesized that alteration in knee joint stability in mice reproduces molecular and structural features of PTOA that would suggest potential therapeutic targets in humans. The right knees of eight-week old male mice from two recombinant inbred lines (LGXSM-6 and LGXSM-33) were subjected to axial tibial compression. Three separate loading magnitudes were applied: 6N, 9N, and 12N. Left knees served as non-loaded controls. Mice were sacrificed at 5, 9, 14, 28, and 56 days post-loading and whole knee joint changes were assessed by histology, immunostaining, micro-CT, and magnetic resonance imaging. We observed that tibial compression disrupted joint stability by rupturing the anterior cruciate ligament (except for 6N) and instigated a cascade of temporal and topographical features of PTOA. These features included cartilage extracellular matrix loss without proteoglycan replacement, chondrocyte apoptosis at day 5, synovitis present at day 14, osteophytes, ectopic calcification, and meniscus pathology. These findings provide a plausible model and a whole-joint approach for how joint injury in humans leads to PTOA. Chondrocyte apoptosis, synovitis, and ectopic calcification appear to be targets for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:28345597

  14. Utility of Intraoperative Neuromonitoring during Minimally Invasive Fusion of the Sacroiliac Joint

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Michael; Birkholz, Denise; MacBarb, Regina; Capobianco, Robyn; Woods, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Retrospective case series. Objective. To document the clinical utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion for patients diagnosed with sacroiliac joint dysfunction (as a direct result of sacroiliac joint disruptions or degenerative sacroiliitis) and determine stimulated electromyography thresholds reflective of favorable implant position. Summary of Background Data. Intraoperative neuromonitoring is a well-accepted adjunct to minimally invasive pedicle screw placement. The utility of intraoperative neuromonitoring during minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion using a series of triangular, titanium porous plasma coated implants has not been evaluated. Methods. A medical chart review of consecutive patients treated with minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion was undertaken at a single center. Baseline patient demographics and medical history, intraoperative electromyography thresholds, and perioperative adverse events were collected after obtaining IRB approval. Results. 111 implants were placed in 37 patients. Sensitivity of EMG was 80% and specificity was 97%. Intraoperative neuromonitoring potentially avoided neurologic sequelae as a result of improper positioning in 7% of implants. Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that intraoperative neuromonitoring may be a useful adjunct to minimally invasive surgical sacroiliac joint fusion in avoiding nerve injury during implant placement. PMID:25544898

  15. 210Po microsphere radiological design for tumor vascular disruption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of disrupting a tumor’s vascular structure using 210Po microspheres is investigated using standard ion and photon absorbed dose methodologies. Calculated absorbed dose profiles for 210Po alpha particles are sufficient to disrupt a tumor’s arteriole structure while minimizing the dose outside the blood vessel wall. 210Po photons contribute minimal dose to healthy tissue. The requisite activity of 210Po to facilitate vascular disruption is calculated. PMID:26290796

  16. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    PubMed Central

    Faniband, Moosa; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo AG

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends. PMID:24369128

  17. Workshop on Populations & Crowds: Dynamics, Disruptions and their Computational Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Aug-2012 9-Aug-2013 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Workshop on Populations & Crowds: Dynamics, Disruptions and... Disruptions , Social networks REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ARO 8. PERFORMING...Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Workshop on Populations & Crowds: Dynamics, Disruptions and their Computational

  18. Degenerative Joint Diseases and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Mariella; Skaper, Stephen D; Coaccioli, Stefano; Varrassi, Giustino; Paladini, Antonella

    2016-12-31

    Rheumatic and joint diseases, as exemplified by osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, are among the most widespread painful and disabling pathologies across the globe. Given the continuing rise in life expectancy, their prevalence is destined to grow. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is, in particular, on its way to becoming the fourth leading cause of disability worldwide by 2020, with the rising incidence of obesity in addition to age being important factors. It is estimated that 25% of osteoarthritic individuals are unable to perform daily activities. Accompanying osteoarthritis is rheumatoid arthritis, which is a chronic systemic disease that often causes pain and deformity. At least 50% of those affected are unable to remain gainfully employed within 10 years of disease onset. A growing body of evidence now points to inflammation, locally and more systemically, as a promoter of damage to joints and bones, as well as joint-related functional deficits. The pathogenesis underlying joint diseases remains unclear; however, it is currently believed that cross-talk between cartilage and subchondral bone-and loss of balance between these two structures in joint diseases-is a critical element. This view is amplified by the presence of mast cells, whose dysregulation is associated with alterations of junction structures (cartilage, bone, synovia, matrix, nerve endings, and blood vessels). In addition, persistent activation of mast cells facilitates the development of spinal neuroinflammation mediated through their interaction with microglia. Unfortunately, current treatment strategies for rheumatic and articular disease are symptomatic and do little to limit disease progression. Research now should be directed at therapeutic modalities that target osteoarticular structural elements and thereby delaying disease progression and joint replacement.

  19. Arthropod invasion disrupts Cycas micronesica seedling recruitment.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Terry, L Irene

    2011-11-01

    We recently described characteristics of reproductive effort for the cycad Cycas micronesica on the island of Guam. The data were serendipitously recorded just prior to the devastating invasion of the armored scale Aulacaspis yasumatsui. This invasion decimated the cycad population and after six years of infestation no recruitment is occurring among the survivors. We describe various underlying mechanisms that may explain how this homopteran insect has eliminated host recruitment among categories including plant-pollinator mutualism disruptions, direct damage to reproductive structures, population level responses to declining plant health, and failures of seedlings to establish. Our pre-invasion data on reproductive effort will serve as the benchmark for quantifying how this alien pest is endangering the endemic cycad.

  20. Exciting Developments in Tidal Disruption Event Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, Suvi

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been a steady rate of tidal disruption event (TDE) detections from wide-field surveys across the electromagnetic spectrum of a couple per year. I will highlight recent real-time TDE discoveries by optical time domain surveys that have enabled the detailed characterization of TDE light curves, broad-line emission, dust echoes, and outflows. In the next decade, ZTF and LSST will dramatically increase the survey capabilities in the optical time domain, potentially yielding tens to thousands of TDE detections per year. I will conclude with thoughts on how to achieve efficient and prompt classification of TDEs among the future deluge of optical transients, in order that they may be used as effective probes of supermassive black hole demographics and accretion physics.

  1. Membrane disruption mechanism of antimicrobial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka Yee

    2012-04-01

    Largely distributed among living organisms, antimicrobial peptides are a class of small (<100 residues) host defense peptides that induce selective membrane lytic activity against microbial pathogens. The permeabilizing behavior of these diverse peptides has been commonly attributed to the formation of pores, and such pore formation has been categorized as barrel-stave, toroidal, or carpet-like. With the continuing discovery of new peptide species, many are uncharacterized and the exact mechanism is unknown. Through the use of atomic force microscopy, the disruption of supported lipid bilayer patches by protegrin-1 is concentration-dependent. The intercalation of antimicrobial peptide into the bilayer results in structures beyond that of pore formation, but with the formation of worm-like micelles at high peptide concentration. Our results suggest that antimicrobial peptide acts to lower the interfacial energy of the bilayer in a way similar to detergents. Antimicrobial peptides with structural differences, magainin-1 and aurein 1.1, exhibit a mechanistic commonality.

  2. Minimally disruptive schedule repair for MCM missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molineaux, Matthew; Auslander, Bryan; Moore, Philip G.; Gupta, Kalyan M.

    2015-05-01

    Mine countermeasures (MCM) missions entail planning and operations in very dynamic and uncertain operating environments, which pose considerable risk to personnel and equipment. Frequent schedule repairs are needed that consider the latest operating conditions to keep mission on target. Presently no decision support tools are available for the challenging task of MCM mission rescheduling. To address this capability gap, we have developed the CARPE system to assist operation planners. CARPE constantly monitors the operational environment for changes and recommends alternative repaired schedules in response. It includes a novel schedule repair algorithm called Case-Based Local Schedule Repair (CLOSR) that automatically repairs broken schedules while satisfying the requirement of minimal operational disruption. It uses a case-based approach to represent repair strategies and apply them to new situations. Evaluation of CLOSR on simulated MCM operations demonstrates the effectiveness of case-based strategy. Schedule repairs are generated rapidly, ensure the elimination of all mines, and achieve required levels of clearance.

  3. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    SciTech Connect

    J. King

    2004-03-31

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.

  4. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

  5. Turbulent disruptions from the Strauss equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlburg, J. P.; Montgomery, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported from application of a three-dimensional spectral method model to the solution of the Strauss (1976) reduced MHD equations. The investigation was focused on describing MHD turbulence in a current-carrying bounded magnetofluid. A cylindrical geometry with a square cross-section was considered, with the walls being rigid perfect conductors with free-slip boundary conditions. A uniform magnetic field and the electric current density both point in the z-direction. Initial conditions are specified which feature small amounts of random noise expressed as Fourier modes. Linearized equations are defined for tracing the movement to equlibrium conditions or other temporal development. The model is further refined with nonlinear equations to examine the effects of the appearance of disruptions. Comparisons are drawn between solutions obtained with linear and nonlinear equations, with an eye to the associated physical realities.

  6. How to Spot a Disrupted Galactic Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Many satellites dwarf galaxies and globular clusters are thought to be orbiting our galaxy, but detecting them can be a tricky business. In particular, satellites can be disrupted by the galactic potential and spread out into streams, making them so diffuse that were unable to spot them in photometric observations.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by John Vickers (Chinese Academy of Sciences) has cleverly worked around this difficulty by searching for groups of stars that have clustered velocities and metallicities differing from the background field.Searching Through StarsRadial velocity and metallicity of LAMOST stars near the physical location of Lamost 1. Circles are stars within 1.5 of the target location, small dots are stars within 5. [Vickers et al. 2016]The team trawled the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) catalog, which contains spectroscopic information for 2.5 million stars. Vickers and collaborators first hunted for stars that shared an approximate physical location and had similar velocities (because the stars of a satellite will maintain similar velocities even after the satellite is disrupted). Next, they discarded any of these clumps that didnt also share a similar metallicity.Vickers and collaborators then compared the resulting set of 21 candidate streams to catalogs of known globular clusters, open clusters, and nearby galaxies. Three of the candidate clumps, clustered in a 3 area on the sky, do not correspond to any known objects. The authors postulate that these are all part of a disrupted satellite, which they dub Lamost 1.Characterizing a Former ClusterFitting the spectroscopic data for the member stars, the authors are able to estimate a number of characteristics of Lamost 1, with the best fit implying an age of 11 Gyr, a total mass of about 20,000 solar masses, and a distance from us of about 8,500 light-years.Based on the stellar motions, the authors believe that the clump is on an eccentric

  7. Metabolism disrupting chemicals and metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Heindel, Jerrold J; Blumberg, Bruce; Cave, Mathew; Machtinger, Ronit; Mantovani, Alberto; Mendez, Michelle A; Nadal, Angel; Palanza, Paola; Panzica, Giancarlo; Sargis, Robert; Vandenberg, Laura N; Vom Saal, Frederick

    2017-03-01

    The recent epidemics of metabolic diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes(T2D), liver lipid disorders and metabolic syndrome have largely been attributed to genetic background and changes in diet, exercise and aging. However, there is now considerable evidence that other environmental factors may contribute to the rapid increase in the incidence of these metabolic diseases. This review will examine changes to the incidence of obesity, T2D and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the contribution of genetics to these disorders and describe the role of the endocrine system in these metabolic disorders. It will then specifically focus on the role of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the etiology of obesity, T2D and NAFLD while finally integrating the information on EDCs on multiple metabolic disorders that could lead to metabolic syndrome. We will specifically examine evidence linking EDC exposures during critical periods of development with metabolic diseases that manifest later in life and across generations.

  8. Diagnostics modules for tokamak disruption experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nahm, M.L.; Buchanan, C.D.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1994-11-01

    Diagnostic modules equipped with various sensors can provide useful information on key parameters for disruption events, e.g. energy deposition, vapor shielding effect, plasma pressure and force distribution. The modules are, basically, DIMES samples (Divertor Materials Evaluation System) equipped with sensors, coupled to digitizing units and interfaced to a data acquisition system. The DIMES samples are part of the lower diverter diagnostics on the DIII-D tokamak. Three top-cap prototype diagnostics modules have been designed and fabricated. The initial testing and calibration have been performed using the SIRENS plasma gun at an energy deposition of 1 to 12 MJ/m{sup 2} over 0.1 to 1.0 ms, with a plasma pressure >100 MPa.

  9. Disruption of groundwater systems by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xin; Wang, Chi-Yuen; Liu, Chun-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Earthquakes are known to enhance permeability at great distances, and this phenomenon may also disrupt groundwater systems by breaching the barrier between different reservoirs. Here we analyze the tidal response of water level in a deep (~4 km) well before and after the 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan earthquake to show that the earthquake not only changed the permeability but also altered the poroelastic properties of the groundwater system. Based on lithologic well logs and experimental data for rock properties, we interpret the change to reflect a coseismic breaching of aquitards bounding the aquifer, due perhaps to clearing of preexisting cracks and creation of new cracks, to depths of several kilometers. This may cause mixing of groundwater from previously isolated reservoirs and impact the safety of groundwater supplies and underground waste repositories. The method demonstrated here may hold promise for monitoring aquitard breaching by both natural and anthropogenic processes.

  10. Social ties and adolescent sleep disruption.

    PubMed

    Maume, David J

    2013-01-01

    Teens tend go to bed later, get less sleep, and report more daytime sleepiness. Medical research emphasizes biological determinants of teens' disrupted sleep (i.e., the timing of puberty and resultant drops in melatonin), rarely or inadequately considering youths' social ties as a determinant of sleep behaviors. Sociologists recognize how social ties affect health behaviors but have generally neglected sleep, especially among teens. Drawing on a sample of 974 teens from the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, this study controls for developmental and social relational factors to predict changes in youths' sleep patterns between 12 and 15 years of age. In general, social relational factors outperform developmental factors in determining youths' sleep patterns, particularly pointing to the importance of parental, peer, and school ties in promoting healthy sleep behaviors. The implications of these findings for further research are briefly discussed.

  11. The practice doctorate: innovation or disruption?

    PubMed

    Chase, Susan K; Pruitt, Rosanne H

    2006-05-01

    Advanced practice nurses, particularly nurse practitioners, have been described as a disruptive innovation. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has proposed that by 2015 all advanced practice nurses be prepared with a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). This article uses critical reflection on published literature to examine the potential difficulties that mandating such a change may present to potential students, practicing advanced practice nurses, colleges of nursing, and doctoral education in general. After considering the pressures in the nursing profession to prepare nurse faculty and reviewing the success of current models of education for advanced practice, we explore in depth the unintended consequences of the AACN recommendation. Implications for academic nursing, curriculum, advanced practice nurses, doctoral education, titling and licensure, economic issues, and the lack of evaluation research are addressed. We recommend abandoning the 2015 deadline for implementation of advanced practice nurse preparation with the DNP.

  12. MILP model for resource disruption in parallel processor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Syarifah Zyurina; Caccetta, Louis

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the existence of disruption on unrelated parallel processor scheduling system. The disruption occurs due to a resource shortage where one of the parallel processors is facing breakdown problem during the task allocation, which give impact to the initial scheduling plan. Our objective is to reschedule the original unrelated parallel processor scheduling after the resource disruption that minimizes the makespan. A mixed integer linear programming model is presented for the recovery scheduling that considers the post-disruption policy. We conduct a computational experiment with different stopping time limit to see the performance of the model by using CPLEX 12.1 solver in AIMMS 3.10 software.

  13. Is your hospital safe? Disruptive behavior and workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F

    2008-01-01

    The author defines disruptive behavior; distinguishes among disruptive, impaired, and incompetent behavior; describes the prevalence of disruptive behavior; and identifies some recommendations to prevent and resolve disruptive behavior in hospitals. The proactive prevention and management of workplace bullying have implications on managing costs, quality, and satisfaction in hospitals among patients, families, staff, and physicians. The author describes an evidence-based framework and recommends that hospital administrators use it to design an organizational approach to promoting a work environment that is psychologically and physiologically safe and that enables staff to focus on delivering high-quality, cost-effective, and satisfying care.

  14. Biosensor discovery of thyroxine transport disrupting chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, Gerardo R. Meimaridou, Anastasia; Haasnoot, Willem; Meulenberg, Eline; Albertus, Faywell; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Irth, Hubertus; Murk, Albertinka J.

    2008-10-01

    Ubiquitous chemicals may interfere with the thyroid system that is essential in the development and physiology of vertebrates. We applied a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based screening method for the fast screening of chemicals with thyroxine (T4) transport disrupting activity. Two inhibition assays using the main thyroid hormone transport proteins, T4 binding globulin (TBG) and transthyretin (TTR), in combination with a T4-coated biosensor chip were optimized and automated for screening chemical libraries. The transport protein-based biosensor assays were rapid, high throughput and bioeffect-related. A library of 62 chemicals including the natural hormones, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) and metabolites, halogenated bisphenol A (BPA), halogenated phenols, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and other potential environmentally relevant chemicals was tested with the two assays. We discovered ten new active compounds with moderate to high affinity for TBG with the TBG assay. Strikingly, the most potent binding was observed with hydroxylated metabolites of the brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) BDE 47, BDE 49 and BDE 99, that are commonly found in human plasma. The TTR assay confirmed the activity of previously identified hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs and PBDEs, halogenated BPA and genistein. These results show that the hydroxylated metabolites of the ubiquitous PBDEs not only target the T4 transport at the TTR level, but also, and to a great extent, at the TBG level where most of the T4 in humans is circulating. The optimized SPR biosensor-based transport protein assay is a suitable method for high throughput screening of large libraries for potential thyroid hormone disrupting compounds.

  15. A bright year for tidal disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Stone, Nicholas C.

    2016-09-01

    When a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (SMBH), roughly half of its mass falls back to the SMBH at super-Eddington rates. As this gas is tenuously gravitationally bound and unable to cool radiatively, only a small fraction fin ≪ 1 may accrete, with the majority instead becoming unbound in an outflow of velocity ˜104 km s-1. The outflow spreads laterally as it expands to large radii, encasing the SMBH and blocking the inner disc's EUV/X-ray radiation, which becomes trapped in a radiation-dominated nebula. Ionizing nebular radiation heats the inner edge of the ejecta, converting the emission to optical/near-UV wavelengths where photons more readily escape due to the lower opacity. This can explain the unexpectedly low and temporally constant effective temperatures of optically discovered tidal disruption event (TDE) flares. For high-mass SMBHs, M• ≳ 107 M⊙, the ejecta can become fully ionized at an earlier stage, or for a wider range of viewing angles, producing a TDE flare accompanied by thermal X-ray emission. The peak optical luminosity is suppressed as the result of adiabatic losses in the inner disc wind when M• ≪ 107 M⊙, possibly contributing to the unexpected dearth of optical TDEs in galaxies with low-mass SMBHs. In the classical picture, where fin ≈ 1, TDEs de-spin supermassive SMBHs and cap their maximum spins well below theoretical accretion physics limits. This cap is relaxed in our model, and existing Fe Kα spin measurements provide preliminary evidence that fin < 1.

  16. Load transfer in composite bolted joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Perry, J. C.; Lightfoot, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    The study deals with composite bolted joints, specifically those required to transmit primary loads. Consideration is given to the ultimate load capacity of quasi-isotropic bolted joint specimens as a function of the width of the joint, the diameter of the bolt, the joint thickness, and the number of bolts. Emphasis is placed on the effect of adding a second bolt, in tandem, on the load capacity of the joint.

  17. Disruptive and toxic behaviors in healthcare: zero tolerance, the bottom line, and what to do about it.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Elizabeth L; Kusy, Mitchell E

    2010-01-01

    In this economic downturn, healthcare leaders must attend to both the human- and bottom-line. Unfortunately, one significant problem affecting both-disruptive behaviors-has long been under the radar screen in healthcare. People who habitually exhibit these behaviors have been referred to in many ways: toxic, uncivil, and intimidating, to name a few. This article provides the results of the authors' research study of over 400 leaders and mitigation strategies for dealing with toxic, uncivil behaviors. In particular, it presents a three-point systems approach for intervention--one that is both proactive and reactive, and aligned with the new Joint Commission standards.

  18. An analysis of a joint shear model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J.R.

    1991-10-01

    This report describes a joint shear model used in conjunction with a computational model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets. The joint shear model allows nonlinear behavior for both joint sets. Because nonlinear behavior is allowed for both joint sets, a great many cases must be considered to fully describe the joint shear behavior of the jointed medium. An extensive set of equations is required to describe the joint shear stress and slip displacements that can occur for all the various cases. This report examines possible methods for simplifying this set of equations so that the model can be implemented efficiently form a computational standpoint. The shear model must be examined carefully to obtain a computationally efficient implementation that does not lead to numerical problems. The application to fractures in rock is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Metabolic disruption in context: Clinical avenues for synergistic perturbations in energy homeostasis by endocrine disrupting chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Sargis, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The global epidemic of metabolic disease is a clear and present danger to both individual and societal health. Understanding the myriad factors contributing to obesity and diabetes is essential for curbing their decades-long expansion. Emerging data implicate environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The phenylsulfamide fungicide and anti-fouling agent tolylfluanid (TF) was recently added to the list of EDCs promoting metabolic dysfunction. Dietary exposure to this novel metabolic disruptor promoted weight gain, increased adiposity, and glucose intolerance as well as systemic and cellular insulin resistance. Interestingly, the increase in body weight and adipose mass was not a consequence of increased food consumption; rather, it may have resulted from disruptions in diurnal patterns of energy intake, raising the possibility that EDCs may promote metabolic dysfunction through alterations in circadian rhythms. While these studies provide further evidence that EDCs may promote the development of obesity and diabetes, many questions remain regarding the clinical factors that modulate patient-specific consequences of EDC exposure, including the impact of genetics, diet, lifestyle, underlying disease, pharmacological treatments, and clinical states of fat redistribution. Currently, little is known regarding the impact of these factors on an individual’s susceptibility to environmentally-mediated metabolic disruption. Advances in these areas will be critical for translating EDC science into the clinic to enable physicians to stratify an individual’s risk of developing EDC-induced metabolic disease and to provide direction for treating exposed patients. PMID:27011951

  20. Objective measures of joint stiffness.

    PubMed

    Roberson, L; Giurintano, D J

    1995-01-01

    Objective measures of joint stiffness allow for the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment modalities. Without this, the effectiveness of therapy is not quantifiable. Presently, joint stiffness can be quantified by either passive range of motion (PROM) measurement or torque range of motion (TqROM) measurement. PROM measurement does not control the force applied, nor does it require that the other joints in the kinematic chain be held fixed. Also, it demonstrates poor interrater reliability. An idealized device melding existing technologies of constant passive motion devices and computerized workstations is proposed to allow for easier measurement of TqROM angles for analysis data for the determination of the effectiveness of treatment modalities.