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Sample records for acrylic denture base

  1. Acrylic Resin Cytotoxicity for Denture Base--Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo C; Freitas, Emily; dos Santos, Daniela; de Medeiros, Rodrigo; Sonego, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Acrylic resin is a widely used material in clinical practice, and a satisfactory biocompatibility is essential. When the resin polymerization reaction is incomplete, residual monomers are released into the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate, through a literature review, the cytotoxicity caused by the denture base acrylic resin used, and its components. The selection of published studies was performed on the Pubmed database from January 2008 to July 2013. The keywords used were: "cytotoxicity and acrylic resins", "cytotoxicity and denture base resins" and "cytotoxicity and oral prosthesis". Inclusion criteria were: in vitro studies and literature reviews published in English that evaluated the acrylic resin cytotoxicity for denture base and its components. Studies with no reference to the search strategy were excluded. A total of 182 articles were found. Among these, only 13 were included for writing this review. The MTT test is the most common test used to evaluate acrylic resin cytotoxicity. Auto-polymerized resin is more cytotoxic than heat-polymerized resin because of its higher quantity of residual monomers which cause cell and tissue changes in the oral mucosa. However, more studies are necessary for the development of biocompatible materials.

  2. The creep behavior of acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Sadiku, E R; Biotidara, F O

    1996-01-01

    The creep behavior of acrylic dental base resins, at room temperature and at different loading conditions, has been examined. The behaviors of these resins are similar to that of "commercial perspex" at room temperature over a period of 1000 seconds. The pseudo-elastic moduli of the blends of PMMA VC show a significant increase compared with PMMA alone. The addition of the PVC powder to the heat-cured acrylic resin increased the time-dependent elastic modulus. This increase in elastic modulus is advantageous in the production of denture based resins of improv mechanical properties.

  3. Survival analysis of mandibular complete dentures with acrylic-based resilient liners.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Suguru; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Murakami, Hiroshi; Gunji, Atsuko; Ito, Nana; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this long-term randomised controlled trial was to compare the longevity of dentures constructed using a conventional acrylic resin (CAR) to that of dentures constructed using an acrylic-based resilient liner (ARL). The follow-up study was essentially carried out by annual telephone calls to each of the 67 participants. The Kaplan-Meier method and life-table analysis were used for univariate analyses. The Cox proportional-hazards test was used as a final model for statistically adjusting predictor variables such as sex, clinician type, mandibular denture type and age at denture delivery. The denture type was likely to affect the survival time of the dentures, while the sex and clinician type were not. The group using acrylic-based resilient denture liners had twice the risk of having shorter denture-survival times than those using conventional acrylic resin dentures. Younger participants were likely to have a reduced risk of having shorter denture-survival times than older participants. We conclude that mandibular complete dentures constructed using ARL are twice as likely as dentures constructed using CAR to have shorter denture survival times, mainly because of material deterioration. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Comparison of Candida Albicans Adherence to Conventional Acrylic Denture Base Materials and Injection Molding Acrylic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Aslanimehr, Masoomeh; Rezvani, Shirin; Mahmoudi, Ali; Moosavi, Najmeh

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Candida species are believed to play an important role in initiation and progression of denture stomatitis. The type of the denture material also influences the adhesion of candida and development of stomatitis. Purpose: The aim of this study was comparing the adherence of candida albicans to the conventional and injection molding acrylic denture base materials. Materials and Method: Twenty injection molding and 20 conventional pressure pack acrylic discs (10×10×2 mm) were prepared according to their manufacturer’s instructions. Immediately before the study, samples were placed in sterile water for 3 days to remove residual monomers. The samples were then sterilized using an ultraviolet light unit for 10 minutes. 1×108 Cfu/ml suspension of candida albicans ATCC-10231 was prepared from 48 h cultured organism on sabouraud dextrose agar plates incubated at 37oC. 100 μL of this suspension was placed on the surface of each disk. After being incubated at 37oC for 1 hour, the samples were washed with normal saline to remove non-adherent cells. Attached cells were counted using the colony count method after shaking at 3000 rmp for 20 seconds. Finally, each group was tested for 108 times and the data were statistically analyzed by t-test. Results: Quantitative analysis revealed that differences in colony count average of candida albicans adherence to conventional acrylic materials (8.3×103) comparing to injection molding acrylic resins (6×103) were statistically significant (p<0.001). Conclusion: Significant reduction of candida albicans adherence to the injection acrylic resin materials makes them valuable for patients with high risk of denture stomatitis. PMID:28280761

  5. Color difference threshold determination for acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiabao; Lin, Hong; Huang, Qingmei; Liang, Qifan; Zheng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to set evaluation indicators, i.e., perceptibility and acceptability color difference thresholds, of color stability for acrylic denture base resins for a spectrophotometric assessing method, which offered an alternative to the visual method described in ISO 20795-1:2013. A total of 291 disk specimens 50±1 mm in diameter and 0.5±0.1 mm thick were prepared (ISO 20795-1:2013) and processed through radiation tests in an accelerated aging chamber (ISO 7491:2000) for increasing times of 0 to 42 hours. Color alterations were measured with a spectrophotometer and evaluated using the CIE L*a*b* colorimetric system. Color differences were calculated through the CIEDE2000 color difference formula. Thirty-two dental professionals without color vision deficiencies completed perceptibility and acceptability assessments under controlled conditions in vitro. An S-curve fitting procedure was used to analyze the 50:50% perceptibility and acceptability thresholds. Furthermore, perceptibility and acceptability against the differences of the three color attributes, lightness, chroma, and hue, were also investigated. According to the S-curve fitting procedure, the 50:50% perceptibility threshold was 1.71ΔE00 (r(2)=0.88) and the 50:50% acceptability threshold was 4.00 ΔE00 (r(2)=0.89). Within the limitations of this study, 1.71/4.00 ΔE00 could be used as perceptibility/acceptability thresholds for acrylic denture base resins.

  6. Effect of potentially chromogenic beverages on shear bond strength of acrylic denture teeth to heat-polymerized denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini; de Oliveira, Denise Gusmão; Porto, Vinícius Carvalho; Almilhatti, Hercules Jorge; Campanha, Nara Hellen

    2016-01-01

    Detachment of denture acrylic resin artificial teeth from denture base resin is one of the most common problems presented by denture wearers. This study investigated the shear bond strength (SBS) and fracture type of bonding interface of two commercial acrylic teeth (Vipi Dent Plus e Biolux) to two denture base resins (Vipi Cril e Lucitone 550) after immersion in potentially chromogenic beverages (coffee, cola soft drink, and red wine) or control solution (distilled water). Maxillary central incisor acrylic teeth were placed at 45° to denture base resin and submitted to short polymerization cycle according to manufacturers. Specimens were divided according to the combination tooth/resin/solution (n = 8) and submitted to bond strength tests in a universal testing machine MTS-810 (0.5 mm/min). Subsequently, fracture area was analyzed by stereomicroscope at a magnification of ×10 and categorized into adhesive, cohesive, or mixed failure. The bond strength of teeth/denture base resins interface was not significantly affected by tested solutions (P > 0.087), except for Biolux teeth immersed in coffee (P < 0.01). In all conditions, the Vipi Dent Plus teeth showed higher bond strength to Lucitone and Vipi Cril resins when compared to Biolux teeth (P < 0.003). All specimens' failure modes were cohesive. The SBS of acrylic teeth to denture base resins was not generally influenced by immersion in the tested staining beverages.

  7. Effect of potentially chromogenic beverages on shear bond strength of acrylic denture teeth to heat-polymerized denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini; de Oliveira, Denise Gusmão; Porto, Vinícius Carvalho; Almilhatti, Hercules Jorge; Campanha, Nara Hellen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Detachment of denture acrylic resin artificial teeth from denture base resin is one of the most common problems presented by denture wearers. Purpose: This study investigated the shear bond strength (SBS) and fracture type of bonding interface of two commercial acrylic teeth (Vipi Dent Plus e Biolux) to two denture base resins (Vipi Cril e Lucitone 550) after immersion in potentially chromogenic beverages (coffee, cola soft drink, and red wine) or control solution (distilled water). Materials and Methods: Maxillary central incisor acrylic teeth were placed at 45° to denture base resin and submitted to short polymerization cycle according to manufacturers. Specimens were divided according to the combination tooth/resin/solution (n = 8) and submitted to bond strength tests in a universal testing machine MTS-810 (0.5 mm/min). Subsequently, fracture area was analyzed by stereomicroscope at a magnification of ×10 and categorized into adhesive, cohesive, or mixed failure. Results: The bond strength of teeth/denture base resins interface was not significantly affected by tested solutions (P > 0.087), except for Biolux teeth immersed in coffee (P < 0.01). In all conditions, the Vipi Dent Plus teeth showed higher bond strength to Lucitone and Vipi Cril resins when compared to Biolux teeth (P < 0.003). All specimens’ failure modes were cohesive. Conclusions: The SBS of acrylic teeth to denture base resins was not generally influenced by immersion in the tested staining beverages. PMID:27621547

  8. The influence of patient characteristics on acrylic-based resilient denture liners embedded in maxillary complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Akina; Kimoto, Suguru; Saeki, Hiroyuki; Ono, Masanori; Furuse, Nobuhiko; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2016-07-01

    A major complication associated with the use of resilient denture liners (RDLs) is a change in hardness over time. In vivo studies on the deterioration of RDLs over time are needed. We aimed to investigate the influence of patient characteristics on the hardness of acrylic-based RDLs (ARDLs) embedded in complete maxillary dentures. We hypothesized that 1 month after application of the ARDLs, the hardness would be influenced by age, saliva condition, occlusal force, smoking, drinking, denture wearing during sleeping, denture cleanser usage, and denture type. Thirty complete maxillary denture wearers were recruited after obtaining informed consent. One investigator measured the Shore D hardness of the commercially available ARDLs, Soften (SFT), FD Soft (FDS), and Bio Liner (BIO) using a Vesmeter(®). The salivary flow rates and pH values and the occlusal force were measured for all patients before initiation of the study. T-tests and Pearson's correlation coefficients were used for the statistical analyses. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Smoking, wearing dentures while sleeping, use of denture cleansers, and denture type were associated with an increase in the hardness of the RDLs. The resting saliva pH only influenced the hardness of the SFT ARDLs. Smoking, denture wearing while sleeping, denture cleanser usage, denture type, and resting saliva pH are important predictors of the deterioration of ARDLs over time. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Is the bond between acrylic resin denture teeth and denture base resin stronger if they are both made by the same manufacturer?

    PubMed

    Patil, Reshma; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R; Clark, Robert K F

    2010-03-01

    A previous study suggested that a stronger bond may be achieved between acrylic resin denture base material and acrylic denture teeth when both are made by the same manufacturer. Three denture base acrylic resins from three different manufacturers were bonded to three different acrylic resin denture teeth, one of which was manufactured by each of the manufacturers of the base material. In each group there was a trend that the bond strength achieved between the teeth and base material from the same manufacturer was higher than the unmatched pairs but statistical significance was not achieved.

  10. Assessment of clasp design and flexural properties of acrylic denture base materials for use in non-metal clasp dentures.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibilities of utilizing new acrylic denture base materials in resin clasps using three-point flexural tests and cantilever beam tests. Seven non-metal clasp denture (NMCD) materials and four acrylic denture base materials were used for three-point flexural tests and six NMCD materials and three acrylic denture base materials were used for cantilever beam tests. The flexural strength, elastic modulus, and 0.05% proof stress were measured by three-point flexural tests according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 20795-1. And load at 0.5mm deformation, elastic modulus were measured by Cantilever beam tests. For the three-point flexural tests, only materials that met the conditions for both flexural strength and elastic modulus were the polycarbonate Reigning N (REN) and the acrylics Acron (AC), Pro Impact (PI), Procast DSP (PC) and IvoBase High Impact (HI) which are required in ISO 20795-1, Type 3 denture base materials. And for cantilever beam tests there was no significant difference between PI and either EstheShot (ES), EstheShot Bright (ESB), REN or Acry Tone (ACT) in load at 0.5mm deformation, and no significant difference between PI and either Lucitone FRS (LTF), ES, ESB, REN or ACT in elastic modulus. The results thus suggested that some of the acrylic materials used as denture base materials may also be usable for NMCDs, and that the flexural properties of the acrylic material PI resemble those of ES, ESB and ACT, meaning that similar clasp designs may also be feasible. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of some curing methods on acrylic maxillary denture base fit.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Fazal; Kikuchi, Masahiko; Lynch, Christopher D; Watanabe, Makoto

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fit of acrylic maxillary denture bases processed by the methods of microwave, quick-wet-heat, slow-wet-heat, and self curing. Forty stone-casts were obtained using a mould of an undercut-free acrylic resin master cast of an edentulous maxilla. Standard acrylic replicas patterns sealed on casts and randomized to four groups (10 in each) were used to make denture bases using different processing methods for each of the four groups. The resultant discrepancy of fit between the denture base and the casts were measured using a silicone wafer. Varying fit discrepancies both within and between denture base groups was observed. The proportional fit-loss in the palatal region was significantly greater than the sulcular areas for all materials tested (p < 0.05). The fit-loss observed was greater in microwave-cured bases than for other materials examined. Careful selection of appropriate denture base materials and processing technique is important when providing complete dentures for edentulous patients.

  12. Silver nanoparticle incorporation effect on mechanical and thermal properties of denture base acrylic resins

    PubMed Central

    KÖROĞLU, Ayşegül; ŞAHİN, Onur; KÜRKÇÜOĞLU, Işın; DEDE, Doğu Ömür; ÖZDEMİR, Tonguç; HAZER, Baki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the mechanical and thermal characteristics of two denture base acrylic resins containing silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Material and Methods Two different acrylic denture base resins (heat-polymerized and microwave polymerized) containing 0.3, 0.8 and 1.6 wt% AgNPs were evaluated for flexural strength, elastic modulus and impact strength. The glass transition temperature (Tg) and relative heat capacity (Cp) of the samples were determined from the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) results. For statistical analysis, two-way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD tests were performed. Results Addition of 0.8% and 1.6% AgNPs in microwave-polymerized resin significantly decreased the transverse strength and elastic modulus. In terms of impact strength, the addition of AgNPs has no effect on both resin groups. Glass transition temperature (Tg) was decreased with the addition of AgNPs for both denture base resins. Conclusions The incorporation of AgNPs, generally used for antimicrobial efficiency, affected the transverse strength of the denture base acrylic resins depending on the concentration of nanoparticles. Tg was decreased with the addition of AgNPs for both denture base resins. PMID:28076464

  13. Effect of various chemicals on the bond strength of acrylic tooth and denture base -An Invitro comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, V Pridhvi; Premalatha, Averneni; Babu, P Jithendra; Raju, D Srinivasa; Kumar, M Praveen; Rao, D Bheemalingeswara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Debonding of acrylic teeth from the denture base is a common problem. Certain clinical conditions like ridge prominence leads to excess trimming of acrylic teeth and base, resulting in a weak interface. The denture base polymer debonds adhesively in the region of the highly cross –linked matrix of the teeth. To compare the effect of different chemical surface treatments on the bond between cross-linked acrylic teeth and different types of denture base material. Materials & Methods: A total of 180 wax specimens were fabricated and divided into 3 groups: Heat-cure, high impact heat-cure, flexible denture base material bonded to acrylic teeth. Each group was further subdivided into 6 subgroups with 10 specimens each according to the surface treatment ofthe ridge lap area: control, monomer, acetone 99%, chloroform 99%, acrylic adhesive cyanoacrylate, ethyl acetate 99%. After processing, specimens were tested for bond strength using a universal testing machine. The resulting bond strengths were recorded, statistically analyzed and compared. Results: Among all the 3types of denture base resins, highimpact heat-cure denture base resin gave highest bond strength. There was no bonding of teeth with flexible denture base material. Chemical surface treatment of acrylic teeth with ethyl acetate gave highest bond strength followed by control, chloroform, acetone and cyanoacrylate groups. Conclusion: Among all the 3types of denture base materials, high-impact heat-cure denture base resin gave highest bond strength with ethyl acetate surface treatment. Simple and quick tooth chemical surface treatment with ethylacetate could be an effective option in decreasing bonding failures and also avoid repeated denture repairs improving patient satisfaction. How to cite the article: Krishna VP, Premalatha A, Babu PJ, Raju DS, Kumar MP, Rao DB. Effect of various chemicals on the bond strength of acrylic tooth and denture base -An In-vitro comparative study. J Int Oral Health

  14. Allergic effects of the residual monomer used in denture base acrylic resins

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Vohra, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Denture base resins are extensively used in dentistry for a variety of purposes. These materials can be classified as chemical, heat, light, and microwave polymerization materials depending upon the factor which starts the polymerization reaction. Their applications include use during denture base construction, relining existing dentures, and for fabrication of orthodontic removable appliances. There have been increased concerns regarding the safe clinical application of these materials as their biodegradation in the oral environment leads to harmful effects. Along with local side effects, the materials have certain occupational hazards, and numerous studies can be found in the literature mentioning those. The purpose of this article is to outline the cytotoxic consequences of denture base acrylic resins and clinical recommendations for their use. PMID:26929705

  15. Allergic effects of the residual monomer used in denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Vohra, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Denture base resins are extensively used in dentistry for a variety of purposes. These materials can be classified as chemical, heat, light, and microwave polymerization materials depending upon the factor which starts the polymerization reaction. Their applications include use during denture base construction, relining existing dentures, and for fabrication of orthodontic removable appliances. There have been increased concerns regarding the safe clinical application of these materials as their biodegradation in the oral environment leads to harmful effects. Along with local side effects, the materials have certain occupational hazards, and numerous studies can be found in the literature mentioning those. The purpose of this article is to outline the cytotoxic consequences of denture base acrylic resins and clinical recommendations for their use.

  16. Effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on microhardness of acrylic resin denture base.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Baptista, Gabriella Trunckle; Moreno, Amália; Andreotti, Agda Marobo; Dekon, Stéfan Fiuza de Carvalho

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on the microhardness of acrylic resins denture base. Four different brands of acrylic resins were evaluated: Onda Cryl, QC 20, Classico and Lucitone. Each brand of acrylic resin was divided into four groups (n = 7) according to the disinfection method (microwave, Efferdent, 4% chlorhexidine and 1% hypochlorite). Samples were disinfected during 60 days. Before and after disinfection, samples were thermal cycled between 5-55 °C with 30-s dwell times for 1000 cycles. The microhardness was measured using a microhardener, at baseline (B), after first thermal cycling (T1), after disinfection (D) and after second thermal cycling (T2). The microhardness values of all groups reduced over time. QC-20 acrylic resin exhibited the lowest microhardness values. At B and T1 periods, the acrylic resins exhibited statistically greater microhardness values when compared to D and T2 periods. It can be concluded that the microhardness values of the acrylic resins denture base were affected by the thermal cycling and disinfection procedures. However, all microhardness values obtained herein are within acceptable clinical limits for the acrylic resins.

  17. Effect of intrinsic nanoparticle pigmentation on the color stability of denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Zuccolotti, Bruna Carolina Rossatti; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Moreno, Amália

    2013-08-01

    Intrinsic pigmentation is widely used to improve the esthetic features of denture base acrylic resins. However, acrylic resin may discolor over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of intrinsic nanoparticle pigmentation on the color stability of acrylic resins. The acrylic resins, Onda Cryl, QC 20, Classico, and Lucitone, were evaluated. Twenty-one disk-shaped specimens (3 × 30 mm) were fabricated from each acrylic resin. Seven were colored with 3% Poli-Cor intrinsic pigment used to color denture base, 7 were colored with 7% pigment, and 7 were not pigmented. In addition, 7 specimens were fabricated containing only pigment. The specimens were thermally cycled 2000 times between 5°C and 55°C with a 30-second dwell time at each temperature. The specimen colors were measured with a spectrophotometer and evaluated with the CIE L*a*b* system before (B) and after thermal cycling (T). The pigment morphology was analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. The results were analyzed with 2-way nested ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (α=.05). Classico acrylic resin with and without pigment underwent the least color change, followed in order by Lucitone, Onda Cryl, and QC-20. The presence of pigments reduced the color change of the acrylic resins significantly (P<.05) for the specimens containing 7% pigment (0.32 ±0.18 ΔE). Titanium was the sole metallic component present in the pigment, probably in the oxide form (TiO2). Nanoparticle pigments enhanced the color stability of denture base acrylic resins.

  18. Effect of microwave treatments on dimensional accuracy of maxillary acrylic resin denture base.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Sabrina; Arioli Filho, João Neudenir; Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Mollo, Francisco de Assis

    2005-01-01

    Microwave energy has been used as an alternative method for disinfection and sterilization of dental prostheses. This study evaluated the influence of microwave treatment on dimensional accuracy along the posterior palatal border of maxillary acrylic resin denture bases processed by water-bath curing. Thirty maxillary acrylic bases (3-mm-thick) were made on cast models with Clássico acrylic resin using routine technique. After polymerization and cooling, the sets were deflasked and the bases were stored in water for 30 days. Thereafter, the specimens were assigned to 3 groups (n=10), as follows: group I (control) was not submitted to any disinfection cycle; group II was submitted to microwave disinfection for 3 min at 500 W; and in group III microwaving was done for 10 min at 604 W. The acrylic bases were fixed on their respective casts with instant adhesive (Super Bonder) and the base/cast sets were sectioned transversally in the posterior palatal zone. The existence of gaps between the casts and acrylic bases was assessed using a profile projector at 5 points. No statistically significant differences were observed between the control group and group II. However, group III differed statistically from the others (p<0.05). Treatment in microwave oven at 604 W for 10 min produced the greatest discrepancies in the adaptation of maxillary acrylic resin denture bases to the stone casts.

  19. Effect of denture cleaning on abrasion resistance and surface topography of polymerized CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base

    PubMed Central

    Shinawi, Lana Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Background The application of computer-aided design computer-aided manufacturing (CAD CAM) technology in the fabrication of complete dentures, offers numerous advantages as it provides optimum fit and eliminates polymerization shrinkage of the acrylic base. Additionally, the porosity and surface roughness of CAD CAM resins is less compared to conventionally processed resins which leads to a decrease in the adhesion of bacteria on the denture base, which is associated with many conditions including halitosis and aspiration pneumonia in elderly denture wearers. Aim To evaluate the influence of tooth brushing with dentifrices on CAD CAM resin blocks in terms of abrasion resistance, surface roughness and scanning electron photomicrography. Methods This experimental study was carried out at the Faculty of Dentistry of King Abdulaziz University during 2016. A total of 40 rectangular shaped polymerized CAD CAM resin samples were subjected to 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes under a 200-gram vertical load simulating three years of tooth brushing strokes using commercially available denture cleaning dentifrice. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20, using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. Results ANOVA test revealed a statistical significant weight loss of CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base specimens following 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes as well as a statistical significant change (p=0.0.5) in the surface roughness following brushing. The CAD CAM resin samples SEM baseline imaging revealed a relatively smooth homogenous surface, but following 40,000 and 60,000 brushing strokes, imaging displayed the presence of small scratches on the surface. Conclusion CAD CAM resin displayed a homogenous surface initially with low surface roughness that was significantly affected following simulating three years of manual brushing, but despite the significant weight loss, the findings are within the clinically acceptable limits. PMID:28713496

  20. Effect of denture cleaning on abrasion resistance and surface topography of polymerized CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base.

    PubMed

    Shinawi, Lana Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    The application of computer-aided design computer-aided manufacturing (CAD CAM) technology in the fabrication of complete dentures, offers numerous advantages as it provides optimum fit and eliminates polymerization shrinkage of the acrylic base. Additionally, the porosity and surface roughness of CAD CAM resins is less compared to conventionally processed resins which leads to a decrease in the adhesion of bacteria on the denture base, which is associated with many conditions including halitosis and aspiration pneumonia in elderly denture wearers. To evaluate the influence of tooth brushing with dentifrices on CAD CAM resin blocks in terms of abrasion resistance, surface roughness and scanning electron photomicrography. This experimental study was carried out at the Faculty of Dentistry of King Abdulaziz University during 2016. A total of 40 rectangular shaped polymerized CAD CAM resin samples were subjected to 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes under a 200-gram vertical load simulating three years of tooth brushing strokes using commercially available denture cleaning dentifrice. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20, using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. ANOVA test revealed a statistical significant weight loss of CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base specimens following 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes as well as a statistical significant change (p=0.0.5) in the surface roughness following brushing. The CAD CAM resin samples SEM baseline imaging revealed a relatively smooth homogenous surface, but following 40,000 and 60,000 brushing strokes, imaging displayed the presence of small scratches on the surface. CAD CAM resin displayed a homogenous surface initially with low surface roughness that was significantly affected following simulating three years of manual brushing, but despite the significant weight loss, the findings are within the clinically acceptable limits.

  1. Bond of acrylic teeth to different denture base resins after various surface-conditioning methods.

    PubMed

    Lang, Reinhold; Kolbeck, Carola; Bergmann, Rainer; Handel, Gerhard; Rosentritt, Martin

    2012-02-01

    The study examined the bond between different denture base resins and highly cross-linked acrylic denture teeth with different base surface-conditioning methods. One hundred fifty highly cross-linked resin denture teeth (SR-Antaris, No. 11, Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL) were divided into five groups with different surface-conditioning methods of the base surfaces of the teeth (C = control, no surface conditioning, MM = application of methyl methacrylate monomer, SB = sand blasting, SBB = sand blasting + bonding agent, TSS = tribochemical silica coating + silanization). Teeth were bonded to either a cold-cured denture base resin (ProBase Cold, Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL) or heat-cured denture base resins (SR Ivocap Plus, Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL and Lucitone 199, Dentsply, USA). After 24 h of storage in distilled water, compressive load was applied at 90° on the palatal surface of each tooth until fracture. Median failure load ranged between 103 and 257 N for Probase Cold groups, 91 to 261 N for Lucitone 199, and 149 to 320 N for SR Ivocap Plus. For Probase Cold, significant highest failure loads resulted when teeth were treated with SB, SBB, or TSS. For Lucitone 199, significant highest failure loads has been found with MM and TSS treatment. For SR Ivocap Plus, highest failure loads resulted using SBB and TSS. Conditioning of the base surfaces of the teeth prior to denture base processing is highly recommended. Tooth bond is significantly affected by the surface-conditioning method and applied denture base resin. Tribochemical silica coating + silanization method can be recommended for pre-treatment of teeth applying either heat-cured or cold-cured denture base resin.

  2. Effect of storage duration on the hardness and tensile bond strength of silicone- and acrylic resin-based resilient denture liners to a processed denture base acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Mese, Ayse; Guzel, Kahraman G

    2008-02-01

    Two potential problems commonly identified with a denture base incorporating a resilient liner are a failure of the bond between the acrylic resin and resilient liner material and a loss of resiliency of the resilient liner material over time. This investigation evaluated the effect of storage duration on the tensile bond strength and hardness of acrylic resin- and silicone-based resilient liners that were either heat- or autopolymerized onto denture base acrylic resin. The denture liners investigated were a definitive acrylic resin-based heat-polymerized (Vertex Soft), interim acrylic resin-based autopolymerized (Coe-Soft), definitive silicone-based heat-polymerized (Molloplast-B), and definitive silicone-based autopolymerized (Mollosil Plus) resilient liner. The resilient liners were processed according to manufacturers' instructions. The resilient liner specimens for tensile bond strength testing (n=10) were 10 x 10 x 3 mm and were processed between 2 polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) (Meliodent) blocks (40 x 10 x 10 mm). The resilient liner specimens for hardness testing (n=10) were 20 mm in diameter and 12 mm in height. Specimen shape and liner thickness were standardized. Specimens were stored for 1 day, 1 week, or 1, 3, or 6 months in water at 37 degrees C. Tensile bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 20 mm/min, and hardness was measured using a Shore A durometer. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were used to analyze the data (alpha=.05). The results indicated that there were significant differences both in the hardness and bond strength values of resilient liner materials. The definitive silicone-based heat-polymerized (Molloplast-B) resilient liner had significantly higher bond strength and lower hardness values than the others. Prolonged exposure to water produced significantly higher hardness values and lower bond strength values. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, specimens of resilient liners

  3. Dimensional accuracy and stability of acrylic resin denture bases.

    PubMed

    Huggett, R; Zissis, A; Harrison, A; Dennis, A

    1992-10-01

    Proponents of injection molding systems have claimed a number of benefits over conventional press-pack dough molding systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate a recently developed injection (dry heat) procedure of processing compared with press-pack dough molding utilizing three curing cycles. The dimensional accuracy and stability of acrylic resin bases produced by the two molding procedures were compared. Dimensional changes were assessed over a period of 4 months using an optical comparator. The results demonstrate that baseplates produced by the injection molding procedure exhibit less shrinkage than those produced by the conventional press-pack procedures.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Acrylic-Based Photopolymer as a Candidate for Denture Base Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, S. T.; Rasyida; Ardhyananta, H.

    2017-05-01

    Denture base is a denture part that rests on the soft tissue covering the jawbone and becomes an anchor of a denture. The material that commonly used for this purpose is poly (methyl methacrylate). However, it lacks in mechanical properties due to high water absorption. The aim of this research was to improve the physical and mechanical properties of poly (methyl methacrylate) by making a copolymer with styrene via photopolymerization process. In this method was used the addition of styrene monomer at 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 wt% into the acrylic resin to form copolymer materials via photopolymerization process. The amount of 1.5 wt% Irgacure 784’s photoinitiator was added as a photoinitiator. The results showed that the addition of 40% by weight of styrene copolymer is the best performance compare to the addition styrene of 10, 20, 30, and 50%. The samples with an addition styrene of 40 wt% showed excellent properties such as high water absorption value of 2.405 μg/mm3, the solubility of 0.434 μg/mm3, the flexural strength of 69.336 MPa, a flexural modulus of 1.236 GPa, and a hardness value of 82.583 HD. Poly (methyl methacrylate-co-styrene) copolymer with the addition of styrene 40 wt% has the closest value to the requirements for a denture base material.

  5. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of soft denture lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base.

    PubMed

    Gundogdu, Mustafa; Yesil Duymus, Zeynep; Alkurt, Murat

    2014-10-01

    Adhesive failure between acrylic resin and resilient liner material is commonly encountered in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of 2 different resilient lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base. Ninety-six dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated from heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and 3 mm of the material was cut from the thin midsection. The specimens were divided into 6 groups according to their surface treatments: no surface treatment (control group), 36% phosphoric acid etching (acid group), erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (laser group), airborne-particle abrasion with 50-μm Al2O3 particles (abrasion group), an acid+laser group, and an abrasion+laser group. The specimens in each group were divided into 2 subgroups according to the resilient lining material used: heat-polymerized silicone based resilient liner (Molloplast B) and autopolymerized silicone-based resilient liner (Ufi Gel P). After all of the specimens had been polymerized, they were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 1 week. A tensile bond strength test was then performed. Data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA, and the Sidak multiple comparison test was used to identify significant differences (α=.05). The effects of the surface treatments and resilient lining materials on the surface of the denture base resin were examined with scanning electron microscopy. The tensile bond strength was significantly different between Molloplast B and Ufi Gel P (P<.001). The specimens of the acid group had the highest tensile bond strength, whereas those of the abrasion group had the lowest tensile bond strength. The scanning electron microscopy observations showed that the application of surface treatments modified the surface of the denture base resin. Molloplast B exhibited significantly higher bond strength than Ufi Gel P. Altering the surface of the acrylic resin denture base with 36

  6. The role of surface treatments on the bond between acrylic denture base and teeth.

    PubMed

    Bragaglia, Lauro Egídio; Prates, Luiz Henrique Maykot; Calvo, Maria Cristina Marino

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bond strength between acrylic denture base and teeth subjected to 6 surface treatments. Ninety-six specimens were made with poly(methylmethacrylate) teeth bonded to a microwave-polymerized acrylic denture base material. The specimens were distributed into 6 groups (n=16) according to surface treatments: CT - no treatment (control); MN - methylmethacrylate monomer etching; AO - 50-microm-particle aluminum oxide air abrasion; BR - glaze removal with a round bur; ST - surface grinding with an aluminum oxide abrasive stone; group CV - cavity preparation (diatorics). The control and surface-treated groups were subjected to a compressive load at 45 masculine angle to the long axis of the teeth. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by Scheffé's test (p<0.05). Bond strength means and (SD) in kgf for groups were: CT: 18.19 (7.14), MN: 18.34 (5.28), AO: 23.82 (5.40), BR: 23.30 (4.79), ST: 25.39 (7.80) and CV: 17.48 (7.17). There was statistically significant difference (p=0.037997) only between ST and CV. In conclusion, ridge lap surface grinding with an aluminum oxide abrasive stone provided the highest bond strength, though it differed significantly only when compared to diatorics. The other surface treatments provided similar bond between the acrylic denture base and teeth.

  7. Impact of Packing and Processing Technique on Mechanical Properties of Acrylic Denture Base Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nejatian, Touraj; Sefat, Farshid; Johnson, Tony

    2015-01-01

    The fracture resistance of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as the most popular denture base material is not satisfactory. Different factors can be involved in denture fracture. Among them, flexural fatigue and impact are the most common failure mechanisms of an acrylic denture base. It has been shown that there is a correlation between the static strength and fatigue life of composite resins. Therefore, the transverse strength of the denture base materials can be an important indicator of their service life. In order to improve the fracture resistance of PMMA, extensive studies have been carried out; however, only a few promising results were achieved, which are limited to some mechanical properties of PMMA at the cost of other properties. This study aimed at optimizing the packing and processing condition of heat-cured PMMA as a denture base resin in order to improve its biaxial flexural strength (BFS). The results showed that the plain type of resin with a powder/monomer ratio of 2.5:1 or less, packed conventionally and cured in a water bath for 2 h at 95 °C provides the highest BFS. Also, it was found that the performance of the dry heat processor is inconsistent with the number of flasks being loaded.

  8. The Influence of Chicken Egg Shell as Fillers on Biocomposite Acrylic Resin for Denture Based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, M.; Ginting, M. H. S.; Dalimunthe, N. F.; Hasibuan, D. M. T.; Sastrodihardjo, S.

    2017-03-01

    This research was conducted to discover the influence of the addition of chicken egg shells microparticle as filler on the mechanical properties such as modulus of elasticity, modulus of rapture and particle size analysis on biocomposite acrylic resin for denture based. The raw materials used in this research were acrylic resin, egg shell, cold mold seals, gypsum, Vaseline and wax. The process of making biocomposite acrylic resin for denture based with mix the acrylic resin in ratio 2:1 (w/w). Then added the microparticle filler 0,10,20,30 (%w) to mold and boil in 75°C for 90 minutes and increase the temperature to 90 °C for 30 minutes. Took the sample and let it dried. The results of research showed the increase of modulus elasticity and modulus of rapture. The modulus of elasticity showed a very significant increase by adding fillers 10% of 2.123 GPa, which was only 1.932 GPa without adding the filler of chicken egg shells. For modulus of rapture showed the increase by adding fillers 20% of 48,311MPa, which was only 46,865 GPa without adding the filler of chicken egg shells

  9. High-impact strength acrylic denture base material processed by autoclave.

    PubMed

    Abdulwahhab, Salwan Sami

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the effect of two different cycles of autoclave processing on the transverse strength, impact strength, surface hardness and the porosity of high-impact strength acrylic denture base material. High Impact Acryl was the heat-cured acrylic denture base material included in the study. A total of 120 specimens were prepared, the specimens were grouped into: control groups in which high-impact strength acrylic resins processed by conventional water-bath processing technique (74°C for 1.5 h then boil for 30 min) and experimental groups in which high-impact strength acrylic resins processed by autoclave at 121°C, 210 kPa .The experimental groups were divided into (fast) groups for 15 min, and (slow) groups for 30 min. To study the effect of the autoclave processing (Tuttnauer 2540EA), four tests were conducted transverse strength (Instron universal testing machine), impact strength (Charpy tester), surface hardness (shore D), and porosity test. The results were analyzed to ANOVA and LSD test. In ANOVA test, there were highly significant differences between the results of the processing techniques in transverse, impact, hardness, and porosity test. The LSD test showed a significant difference between control and fast groups in transverse and hardness tests and a non-significant difference in impact test and a highly significant difference in porosity test; while, there were a highly significant differences between control and slow groups in all examined tests; finally, there were a non-significant difference between fast and slow groups in transverse and porosity tests and a highly significant difference in impact and hardness tests. In the autoclave processing technique, the slow (long) curing cycle improved the tested physical and mechanical properties as compared with the fast (short) curing cycle. The autoclave processing technique improved the tested physical and mechanical properties of High Impact Acryl. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society

  10. Fatigue resistance of acrylic resin denture base material reinforced with E-glass fibres.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Ozlem; Dikbas, Idil; Unalan, Fatma

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of different forms and concentrations (2.5, 3, 4, 5% by volume) of glass fibres (chopped strand mat, continuous and woven) on fatigue resistance of acrylic denture base resin. The fatigue resistance was measured by applying repeated three-point bending deflection to the specimens, the cycle frequency of 1.05 g and magnitude of deflection of 2.0 mm. The number of loading cycles needed to cause a fracture in the test specimen was considered the fatigue resistance of the specimen. The results of this study revealed that the addition of three different glass fibre forms at all concentrations to acrylic resin did not produce a statistically significant increase in the fatigue resistance (p ≥ 0.05). This study also revealed that there were significant differences (p < 0.05) between glass fibres forms used concerning the effects on the fatigue resistance. This study showed that the woven glass fibres had a definite superiority over the chopped fibres and the continuous fibres in regard to the fatigue resistance of the acrylic denture base resin. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Effect of Nanosilver on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Acrylic Base Complete Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Hamedi-Rad, Fahimeh; Ghaffari, Tahereh; Rezaii, Farzad; Ramazani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), widely used as a prosthodontic base, has many disadvantages, including a high thermal expansion coefficient and low thermal conductivity, a low elasticity coefficient, low impact strength and low resistance to fatigue. This study aimed to make an in vitro comparison of the thermal conductivity, compressive strength, and tensile strength of the acrylic base of complete dentures with those of acrylic reinforced with nanosilver. Materials and Methods: For this study, 36 specimens were prepared. The specimens were divided into three groups of 12; which were further divided into two subgroups of control (unmodified PMMA) and test (PMMA mixed with 5 weight% nanosilver).The results were analysed by Independent t-test. Results: This study showed that the mean thermal conductivity and compressive strength of PMMA reinforced with nanosilver were significantly higher than the unmodified PMMA (P<0.05), while the tensile strength decreased significantly after the incorporation of nanosilver (P<0.05). Conclusion: Considering our results suggesting the favorable effect of silver nanoparticles on improving the thermal conductivity and compressive strength of PMMA, use of this material in the palatal area of maxillary acrylic resin dentures is recommended. PMID:25628675

  12. Dimensional Changes of Acrylic Resin Denture Bases: Conventional Versus Injection-Molding Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gharechahi, Jafar; Asadzadeh, Nafiseh; Shahabian, Foad; Gharechahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acrylic resin denture bases undergo dimensional changes during polymerization. Injection molding techniques are reported to reduce these changes and thereby improve physical properties of denture bases. The aim of this study was to compare dimensional changes of specimens processed by conventional and injection-molding techniques. Materials and Methods: SR-Ivocap Triplex Hot resin was used for conventional pressure-packed and SR-Ivocap High Impact was used for injection-molding techniques. After processing, all the specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature until measured. For dimensional accuracy evaluation, measurements were recorded at 24-hour, 48-hour and 12-day intervals using a digital caliper with an accuracy of 0.01 mm. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) using t-test and repeated-measures ANOVA. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results: After each water storage period, the acrylic specimens produced by injection exhibited less dimensional changes compared to those produced by the conventional technique. Curing shrinkage was compensated by water sorption with an increase in water storage time decreasing dimensional changes. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, dimensional changes of acrylic resin specimens were influenced by the molding technique used and SR-Ivocap injection procedure exhibited higher dimensional accuracy compared to conventional molding. PMID:25584050

  13. Polishing of denture base acrylic resin with chairside polishing kits: an SEM and surface roughness study.

    PubMed

    Chatzivasileiou, Konstantinos; Emmanouil, Ioannis; Kotsiomiti, Eleni; Pissiotis, Argirios

    2013-01-01

    Heat-cured acrylic resin specimens were polished using either conventional laboratory polishing, sandpaper, or three commercial chairside kits. The surface roughness of the polished specimens was measured with a contact profilometer. Scanning electron microscopy was used to obtain microphotographs of the polished surfaces. Laboratory polishing produced the smoothest surfaces in all cases, while sandpaper application produced the roughest. Use of the chairside polishing kits resulted in significantly rougher surfaces compared to those produced by laboratory polishing. Nonetheless, polishing of trimmed denture bases using chairside polishing kits is an effective alternative procedure for cases in which the laboratory procedure is not applicable.

  14. Influence of Surface Modifications of Acrylic Resin Teeth on Shear Bond Strength with Denture Base Resin-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Madhusudan; Krishnan, Chitra Shankar; Azhagarasan, N.S.; Sampathkumar, Jayakrishnakumar; Ramasubramanian, Hariharan

    2015-01-01

    Background Debonding of artificial teeth from the denture base is an important issue for edentulous patients rehabilitated with conventional or implant supported complete dentures. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate shear bond strength between denture base resin and acrylic resin denture teeth subjected to three different surface modifications on the ridge lap area as compared to unmodified denture teeth. Materials and Methods Forty acrylic resin central incisor denture teeth were selected and randomly divided into four test groups. The teeth in each group were subjected to one of the three different surface modifications, namely, chemical treatment, sandblasting and placement of retentive grooves on the ridge lap area respectively, prior to packing of the denture base resin. The group with unmodified teeth served as control. Forty acrylic resin test blocks thus obtained were tested for shear bond strength between acrylic resin teeth and denture base resin in Universal Testing Machine. Data obtained was statistically analysed using one-way ANOVA and Student- Newman- Keul’s test (p< 0.05). Results Analysis of shear bond strength revealed that retentive grooves on the ridge lap area showed highest bond strength values followed by sandblasting and both were statistically significant compared to the control and chemically treated groups. Unmodified surface of the resin teeth showed the least bond strength. Conclusion Within the limitations of this invitro study the placement of retentive grooves or sandblasting of the ridge lap area showed highly significant improvement in shear bond strength compared to the unmodified surface. Chemical treatment did not result in any significant improvement in the shear bond strength compared to the unmodified surface. PMID:26501005

  15. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Mayank; Amarnath, G S; Muddugangadhar, B C; Swetha, M U; Das, Kopal Anshuraj Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The condition of the denture bearing tissues may be adversely affected by high stress concentration during function. Chairside Denture (Hard and Soft) reliners are used to distribute forces applied to soft tissues during function. Tensile and shear bond strength has been shown to be dependent on their chemical composition. A weak bond could harbor bacteria, promote staining and delamination of the lining material. To investigate tensile and shear bond strength of 4 different commercially available denture relining materials to conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin. Materials & Methods: 4 mm sections in the middle of 160 Acrylic cylindrical specimens (20 mm x 8 mm) were removed, packed with test materials (Mollosil, G C Reline Soft, G C Reline Hard (Kooliner) and Ufi Gel Hard and polymerized. Specimens were divided into 8 groups of 20 each. Tensile and shear bond strength to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin were examined by Instron Universal Tensile Testing Machine using the equation F=N/A (F-maximum force exerted on the specimen (Newton) and A-bonding area= 50.24 mm2). One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Bonferroni Test and Hsu’s MCB for multiple pairwise comparisons to asses any significant differences between the groups. Results: The highest mean Tensile bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (6.49+0.08 MPa) and lowest for G C Reline Soft (0.52+0.01 MPa). The highest mean Shear bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (16.19+0.1 MPa) and lowest for Mollosil (0.59+0.05 MPa). The Benferroni test showed a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength and the mean shear bond strength when the two denture soft liners were compared as well as when the two denture hard liners were compared. Hsu’s MCB implied that Ufi gel hard is better than its other closest competitors. Conclusion: The Tensile and Shear bond strength values of denture soft reliners were

  16. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Mayank; Amarnath, G S; Muddugangadhar, B C; Swetha, M U; Das, Kopal Anshuraj Ashok Kumar

    2014-04-01

    The condition of the denture bearing tissues may be adversely affected by high stress concentration during function. Chairside Denture (Hard and Soft) reliners are used to distribute forces applied to soft tissues during function. Tensile and shear bond strength has been shown to be dependent on their chemical composition. A weak bond could harbor bacteria, promote staining and delamination of the lining material. To investigate tensile and shear bond strength of 4 different commercially available denture relining materials to conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin. 4 mm sections in the middle of 160 Acrylic cylindrical specimens (20 mm x 8 mm) were removed, packed with test materials (Mollosil, G C Reline Soft, G C Reline Hard (Kooliner) and Ufi Gel Hard and polymerized. Specimens were divided into 8 groups of 20 each. Tensile and shear bond strength to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin were examined by Instron Universal Tensile Testing Machine using the equation F=N/A (F-maximum force exerted on the specimen (Newton) and A-bonding area= 50.24 mm2). One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Bonferroni Test and Hsu's MCB for multiple pairwise comparisons to asses any significant differences between the groups. The highest mean Tensile bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (6.49+0.08 MPa) and lowest for G C Reline Soft (0.52+0.01 MPa). The highest mean Shear bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (16.19+0.1 MPa) and lowest for Mollosil (0.59+0.05 MPa). The Benferroni test showed a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength and the mean shear bond strength when the two denture soft liners were compared as well as when the two denture hard liners were compared. Hsu's MCB implied that Ufi gel hard is better than its other closest competitors. The Tensile and Shear bond strength values of denture soft reliners were significantly lower than denture hard reliners. How to cite the

  17. Effect of Beverages on the Hardness and Tensile Bond Strength of Temporary Acrylic Soft Liners to Acrylic Resin Denture Base

    PubMed Central

    Safari, A; Vojdani, M; Mogharrabi, S; Iraji Nasrabadi, N; Derafshi, R

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Two potential problems commonly identified with a denture base incorporating a resilient liner are failure of the bond between acrylic resin and soft liner material, and loss of resiliency of the soft liner over time. Since patients may drink different beverages, it is important to evaluate their effects on physical properties of soft lining materials. Purpose: The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different beverages on the hardness of two temporary acrylic-based soft lining materials and their bond strength to the denture base resin. Materials and Method: For the hardness test; a total of 80 rectangular specimens (40mm×10mm×3mm) were fabricated from a heat-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate. Two commercially auto-polymerized acrylic resin-based resilient liners; Coe-Soft and Visco-gel were prepared according to the manufacturers’ instructions and applied on the specimens. For the tensile test, 160 cylindrical specimens (30mm×10mm) were prepared. The liners were added between specimens with a thickness of 3 mm. The specimens of both soft liners were divided into 4 groups (n=10) and immersed in distilled water as the control group, Coca-Cola, 8% and 50% ethanol. All groups were stored in separate containers at 37oC for 12 days. All beverages were changed daily. The hardness was determined using a Shore A durometer and tensile bond strength was determined in a ZwickRoell testing machine at a cross-head speed of 5mm/min. The results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results: There was no significant interaction between the soft liners and the drinks for both hardness (p= 0.748) and bond strength (p= 0.902). There were statistically significant differences between all drinks for both hardness (p< 0.001) and bond strength (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it seems that drinking Coca-Cola and alcoholic beverages would not be potentially causing any problems for the temporary

  18. Effect of beverages on the hardness and tensile bond strength of temporary acrylic soft liners to acrylic resin denture base.

    PubMed

    Safari, A; Vojdani, M; Mogharrabi, S; Iraji Nasrabadi, N; Derafshi, R

    2013-12-01

    Two potential problems commonly identified with a denture base incorporating a resilient liner are failure of the bond between acrylic resin and soft liner material, and loss of resiliency of the soft liner over time. Since patients may drink different beverages, it is important to evaluate their effects on physical properties of soft lining materials. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different beverages on the hardness of two temporary acrylic-based soft lining materials and their bond strength to the denture base resin. For the hardness test; a total of 80 rectangular specimens (40mm×10mm×3mm) were fabricated from a heat-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate. Two commercially auto-polymerized acrylic resin-based resilient liners; Coe-Soft and Visco-gel were prepared according to the manufacturers' instructions and applied on the specimens. For the tensile test, 160 cylindrical specimens (30mm×10mm) were prepared. The liners were added between specimens with a thickness of 3 mm. The specimens of both soft liners were divided into 4 groups (n=10) and immersed in distilled water as the control group, Coca-Cola, 8% and 50% ethanol. All groups were stored in separate containers at 37(o)C for 12 days. All beverages were changed daily. The hardness was determined using a Shore A durometer and tensile bond strength was determined in a ZwickRoell testing machine at a cross-head speed of 5mm/min. The results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. There was no significant interaction between the soft liners and the drinks for both hardness (p= 0.748) and bond strength (p= 0.902). There were statistically significant differences between all drinks for both hardness (p< 0.001) and bond strength (p< 0.05). Within the limitations of this study, it seems that drinking Coca-Cola and alcoholic beverages would not be potentially causing any problems for the temporary acrylic soft liners.

  19. Effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on colour stability of denture base acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo C; Dos Santos, Daniela M; Baptista, Gabriella T; Moreno, Amália; Andreotti, Agda M; Bannwart, Lisiane C; Dekon, Stefan F C

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on the colour change of denture base acrylic resin. Four different brands of acrylic resins were evaluated (Onda Cryl, QC 20, Classico and Lucitone). All brands were divided into four groups (n = 7) determined according to the disinfection procedure (microwave, Efferdent, 4% chlorhexidine or 1% hypochlorite). The treatments were conducted three times a week for 60 days. All specimens were thermal cycled between 5 and 55°C with 30-s dwell times for 1000 cycles before and after disinfection. The specimens' colour was measured with a spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b* system. The evaluations were conducted at baseline (B), after first thermal cycling (T1 ), after disinfection (D) and after second thermal cycling (T2 ). Colour differences (ΔE) were calculated between T1 and B (T1 B), D and B (DB), and T2 and B (T2 B) time-points.   The samples submitted to disinfection by microwave and Efferdent exhibited the highest values of colour change. There were significant differences on colour change between the time-points, except for the Lucitone acrylic resin. The thermal cycling and disinfection procedures significantly affected the colour stability of the samples. However, all values obtained for the acrylic resins are within acceptable clinical parameters. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base.

    PubMed

    Gad, Mohammed; ArRejaie, Aws S; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers.

  1. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base

    PubMed Central

    ArRejaie, Aws S.; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers. PMID:27366150

  2. Color stability of denture teeth and acrylic base resin subjected daily to various consumer cleansers.

    PubMed

    Moon, Audrey; Powers, John M; Kiat-Amnuay, Sudarat

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated color stability of acrylic denture teeth and base resins after 48 weeks of commercial denture cleanser simulation. Two brands of denture teeth (Trubyte Portrait IPN, TP; SR Vivodent DCL, SR) in shades A1, B1, and C1 and three acrylic base resins (Lucitone, LU; Paragon, PA; Valplast, VA) prepared to manufacturer's specifications were exposed 10 hours daily to four cleansers (Clorox Bleach, CB; Polident 3 minute, PO3; Efferdent, EF; and Kleenite, KL) and distilled water control, approximating consumer overnight use. Color measurements used the standard Commision International de l'Eclairage (International Commission on Illumination, CIE L*a*b*) color space (0, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks.) Color differences (ΔE*) at 48 weeks were subjected to four-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Mean values were compared with Fisher's (protected least significant difference) intervals (0.05 significance level). Mean color differences (ΔE*) demonstrated color changes in each material. ANOVA-indicated color changes in teeth were significantly affected by both cleansers and teeth brand (p < 0.05), but not shade. Color changes in base resins were significantly affected by cleansers (p < 0.05), but not brand alone. Overall, KL produced the least color change while CB and PO3 produced the most for all materials. After 48 weeks of daily simulation, TP teeth were more color stable than SR in all cleansers except EF (p < 0.0001). Base resin VA was less color stable than LU and PA. Cleanser KL resulted in the lowest color changes. All tested materials yield clinically acceptable color changes (ΔE* < 3.5); all cleansing methods tested can be recommended, although Kleenite demonstrated the least change after 48 weeks. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. COLOR STABILITY OF DENTURE TEETH AND ACRYLIC BASE RESIN SUBJECTED DAILY TO VARIOUS CONSUMER CLEANSERS

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Audrey; Powers, John M.; Kiat-amnuay, Sudarat

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated color stability of acrylic denture teeth and base resins after 48 weeks of commercial denture cleanser simulation. Materials and Methods Two brands of denture teeth (Trubyte Portrait IPN, TP; SR Vivodent DCL, SR) in shades A1, B1, and C1 and three acrylic base resins (Lucitone, LU; Paragon, PA; Valplast, VA) prepared to manufacturer’s specifications, were exposed 10 hours daily to four cleansers (Clorox Bleach, CB; Polident 3-minute, PO3; Efferdent, EF; and Kleenite, KL) and distilled water (DW) control, approximating consumer overnight use. Color measurements used the CIE L*a*b* color space (0, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks.) Color differences (ΔE*) at 48-weeks were subjected to 4-way analysis-of-variance (ANOVA). Mean values were compared with Fisher’s PLSD intervals (0.05 significance level). Results Mean color differences (ΔE*) demonstrated color changes in each material. ANOVA indicated color changes in teeth were significantly affected by both cleansers and teeth brand (p<0.05), but not shade. Color changes in base resins were significantly affected by cleansers (p<0.05), but not brand alone. Overall, KL produced the least color change while CB and PO3 produced the most for all materials. Conclusions After 48 weeks of daily simulation, TP teeth were more color-stable than SR in all cleansers except EF (p<0.0001). Base resin VA was less color-stable than LU and PA. Cleanser KL resulted in the lowest color changes. Clinical Significance All tested materials yield clinically acceptable color changes (ΔE*<3.5); all cleansing methods tested can be recommended, though Kleenite demonstrated the least change after 48-weeks. PMID:24980803

  4. Comparative adaptation accuracy of acrylic denture bases evaluated by two different methods.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Jae; Bok, Sung-Bem; Bae, Ji-Young; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the adaptation accuracy of acrylic denture base processed using fluid-resin (PERform), injection-moldings (SR-Ivocap, Success, Mak Press), and two compression-molding techniques. The adaptation accuracy was measured primarily by the posterior border gaps at the mid-palatal area using a microscope and subsequently by weighing of the weight of the impression material between the denture base and master cast using hand-mixed and automixed silicone. The correlation between the data measured using these two test methods was examined. The PERform and Mak Press produced significantly smaller maximum palatal gap dimensions than the other groups (p<0.05). Mak Press also showed a significantly smaller weight of automixed silicone material than the other groups (p<0.05), while SR-Ivocap and Success showed similar adaptation accuracy to the compression-molding denture. The correlationship between the magnitude of the posterior border gap and the weight of the silicone impression materials was affected by either the material or mixing variables.

  5. Comparative Effect of Different Polymerization Techniques on the Flexural and Surface Properties of Acrylic Denture Bases.

    PubMed

    Gad, Mohammed M; Fouda, Shaimaa M; ArRejaie, Aws S; Al-Thobity, Ahmad M

    2017-05-22

    Polymerization techniques have been modified to improve physical and mechanical properties of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base, as have the laboratory procedures that facilitate denture construction techniques. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of autoclave polymerization on flexural strength, elastic modulus, surface roughness, and the hardness of PMMA denture base resins. Major Base and Vertex Implacryl heat-polymerized acrylic resins were used to fabricate 180 specimens. According to the polymerization technique, tested groups were divided into: group I (water-bath polymerization), group II (short autoclave polymerization cycle, 60°C for 30 minutes, then 130°C for 10 minutes), and group III (long autoclave polymerization cycle, 60°C for 30 minutes, then 130°C for 20 minutes). Each group was divided into two subgroups based on the materials used. Flexural strength and elastic modulus were determined by a three-point bending test. Surface roughness and hardness were evaluated with a profilometer and Vickers hardness (VH) test, respectively. One-way ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer multiple-comparison test were used for results analysis, which were statistically significant at p ≤ 0.05. Autoclave polymerization showed a significant increase in flexural strength and hardness of the two resins (p < 0.05). The elastic modulus showed a significant increase in the major base resin, while a significant decrease was seen for Vertex Implacryl in all groups (p < 0.05); however, there was no significant difference in surface roughness between autoclave polymerization and water-bath polymerization (p > 0.05). Autoclave polymerization significantly increased the flexural properties and hardness of PMMA denture bases, while the surface roughness was within acceptable clinical limits. For a long autoclave polymerization cycle, it could be used as an alternative to water-bath polymerization. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Dimensional stability of complete denture permanent acrylic resin denture bases; A comparison of dimensions before and after a second curing cycle.

    PubMed

    Fenlon, Michael Robert; Juszczyk, Andrzej Stanislaw; Rodriguez, Jose Mauricio; Curtis, Richard Victor

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure deformation of mandibular complete denture permanent bases after secondary curing. A cast of a flat mandibular edentulous ridge was duplicated ten times. A wax base was laid on the original cast, two wax sprues were attached and an overcast was made. The overcast was used to produce wax bases similar in outline and thickness on the duplicate casts. These were invested and following manufacturer's instructions ten similar acrylic resin bases were produced. The fitting surface of each denture base was scanned on a contacting scanner with an axis resolution of 1 microm and accurate to 25 microm. Denture teeth were waxed up on the base on the original master cast, an overcast was made to produce wax ups and tooth positions that were similar in outline and thickness to the original. These were processed, removed from the flasks and excess acrylic resin was removed. The denture bases were rescanned in an identical fashion to the first scanning procedure. Using commercially developed metrology software calibrated colour maps were generated for each denture base that illustrates measurements of differences between pairs of surfaces. Histograms showing distributions of distances between points were constructed. 50% of the points were separated by a mean 50 microm or less and that 90% of the points were separated by 160 microm or less. The maximum separation was of 380 microm. Complete denture permanent bases were not found to distort significantly as a result of being subjected to a second heat curing cycle as part of final processing of dentures.

  7. Effect of an acrylic resin-based resilient liner applied to mandibular complete dentures on satisfaction ratings among edentulous patients.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Suguru; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Murakami, Hiroshi; Atsuko, Gunji; Ogawa, Akina; Kawai, Yasuhkio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether an acrylic resin-based resilient liner (ARL) could improve the satisfaction ratings of complete denture wearers. The null hypothesis was that no difference exists between the satisfaction ratings of conventional acrylic resin denture (CARD) wearers and those of ARL denture (ARLD) wearers. From April 2004 to July 2006, a randomized controlled trial was conducted at two centers, including 74 edentulous patients. Of these, 37 patients were each randomly allocated to the ARLD and CARD groups. All of the patients rated their satisfaction with dentures, including general satisfaction and satisfaction with chewing ability, speaking, cleaning, stability, retention, comfort, and esthetics. These satisfaction ratings were measured by a 100-mm visual analog scale. Perceived chewing ability of different foods, divided into five grades, was measured using a questionnaire. The mastication index (MI) was calculated for each grade. General satisfaction, satisfaction with chewing, and satisfaction with speaking were significantly higher in the ARLD than in the CARD group (P = .049, .025, and .049, respectively). The chewing satisfaction with maxillary dentures in the ARLD group was significantly higher than that of the CARD group (P = .02). No significant difference existed between the MI of the ARLD (69.2 ± 17.0) and CARD groups (66.7 ± 18.7). Within its limitations, this study showed that the ARL improves a complete denture wearer's satisfaction ratings.

  8. Influence of a new denture cleaning technique based on photolysis of H(2)O(2) the mechanical properties and color change of acrylic denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Tatsuro; Harada, Akio; Yamada, Yasutomo; Odashima, Yu; Nakamura, Keisuke; Inagaki, Ryoichi; Kanno, Taro; Sasaki, Keiichi; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of a disinfection technique based on photolysis of H2O2 on the mechanical properties and color change of acrylic denture base resin. Resin specimens were immersed in 1 M H2O2 irradiated with light-emitting diode (LED) light at 400 nm for 1 week. The immersion duration of 1 week (168 h) corresponded to performing approximately 500 times of 20-min cleaning. Hydroxyl radicals are potent oxidants and they were generated via the photolysis of H2O2. Oxidative damage caused by these radicals included reduced flexural strength and altered color for the acrylic resin. Nonetheless, the degraded flexural strength and altered color of acrylic resin after 500 times of cleaning in the disinfection system would be within clinically acceptable levels.

  9. Effect of microwave disinfection on mechanical properties of denture base acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Ibrahim M; Ahmed, Sabry A

    2010-10-01

    The microwave oven was used for sterilizing dentures contaminated with Candida albicans and other communicable diseases instead of disinfectant solutions. This study was carried out to evaluate the flexural properties, toughness, and impact strength of heat-cured acrylic resin sterilized by microwave oven either immersed in water or non-immersed for 5 and 15 min at full power. The results indicated that the microwave oven sterilization technique resulted in reduction of the load necessary to fracture the specimens, deformation at fracture, transverse strength, modulus of elasticity except disinfection at 5 min dry condition, toughness, and impact strength. This study concluded that the microwave oven is not acceptable for sterilization of dentures because of its weakening effects on the dentures that prone for fracture during clinical use. This method of sterilization increased the brittleness of acrylic resin specimens. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of incorporation of fluoroalkyl methacrylates on roughness and flexural strength of a denture base acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Tatiana Ramirez; Regis, Romulo Rocha; Bonatti, Marília Rodrigues; de Souza, Raphael Freitas

    2009-01-01

    Fluorinated denture base acrylic resins can present more stable physical properties when compared with conventional polymers. This study evaluated the incorporation of a fluoroalkyl methacrylate (FMA) mixture in a denture base material and its effect on roughness and flexural strength. A swelling behavior assessment of acrylic resin specimens (n=3, per substance) after 12 h of FMA or methyl methacrylate (MMA) immersion was conducted to determine the solvent properties. Rectangular specimens (n=30) were allocated to three groups, according to the concentration of FMA substituted into the monomer component of a heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Lucitone 550), as follows: 0% (control), 10% and 20% (v/v). Acrylic resin mixed with concentrations of 25% or more did not reach the dough stage and was not viable. The surface roughness and flexural strength of the specimens were tested. Variables were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). Immersion in FMA produced negligible swelling, and MMA produced obvious swelling and dissolution of the specimens. Surface roughness at concentrations of 0%, 10% and 20% were: 0.25+/-0.04, 0.24+/-0.04, 0.22+/-0.03 microm (F=1.78; p=0.189, not significant). Significant differences were found for flexural strength (F=15.92; p<0.001) and modulus of elasticity (F=7.67; p=0.002), with the following results: 96+/-6, 82+/-5, 84+/-6 MPa, and 2,717+/-79, 2,558+/-128, 2574+/-87 MPa, respectively. The solvent properties of FMA against acrylic resin are weak, which would explain why concentrations over 20% were not viable. Surface changes were not detected after the incorporation of FMA in the denture base acrylic resin tested. The addition of FMA into denture base resin may lower the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity, regardless of the tested concentration.

  11. INFLUENCE OF INCORPORATION OF FLUOROALKYL METHACRYLATES ON ROUGHNESS AND FLEXURAL STRENGTH OF A DENTURE BASE ACRYLIC RESIN

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Tatiana Ramirez; Regis, Romulo Rocha; Bonatti, Marília Rodrigues; de Souza, Raphael Freitas

    2009-01-01

    Fluorinated denture base acrylic resins can present more stable physical properties when compared with conventional polymers. This study evaluated the incorporation of a fluoroalkyl methacrylate (FMA) mixture in a denture base material and its effect on roughness and flexural strength. A swelling behavior assessment of acrylic resin specimens (n=3, per substance) after 12 h of FMA or methyl methacrylate (MMA) immersion was conducted to determine the solvent properties. Rectangular specimens (n=30) were allocated to three groups, according to the concentration of FMA substituted into the monomer component of a heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Lucitone 550), as follows: 0% (control), 10% and 20% (v/v). Acrylic resin mixed with concentrations of 25% or more did not reach the dough stage and was not viable. The surface roughness and flexural strength of the specimens were tested. Variables were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Immersion in FMA produced negligible swelling, and MMA produced obvious swelling and dissolution of the specimens. Surface roughness at concentrations of 0%, 10% and 20% were: 0.25 ± 0.04, 0.24 ± 0.04, 0.22 ± 0.03 μm (F=1.78; p=0.189, not significant). Significant differences were found for flexural strength (F=15.92; p<0.001) and modulus of elasticity (F=7.67; p=0.002), with the following results: 96 ± 6, 82 ± 5, 84 ± 6 MPa, and 2,717 ± 79, 2,558 ± 128, 2574 ± 87 MPa, respectively. The solvent properties of FMA against acrylic resin are weak, which would explain why concentrations over 20% were not viable. Surface changes were not detected after the incorporation of FMA in the denture base acrylic resin tested. The addition of FMA into denture base resin may lower the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity, regardless of the tested concentration. PMID:19274394

  12. Microwave irradiation as an alternative method for disinfection of denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Silva, M; Consani, R; Sardi, J; Mesquita, M; Macêdo, A; Takahashi, J

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of microwave irradiation as an alternative method for disinfection of different types of denture base acrylic resins. Twenty-four samples for each conventional, microwaved and characterized heat-cured acrylic resin were made and subjected to sterilization with ethylene oxide for the groups: 1) irradiated samples; 2) non-irradiated samples; and 3) samples without yeast. Each group was subdivided according to inoculation with C. albicans, C. dubliniensis and C. tropicalis. The samples were inoculated with 100 µL of inoculum of each species of Candida and later placed in an incubator at 37 °C for 1 hr to perform the first adhesion. After this time, each well was supplemented with sterile media and the plate was once again taken to a stove for incubation at 37 °C for 6 hr. The samples were immersed in 100 mL of sterile water and irradiated with microwave at 650 W for 3 min. Control samples were considered as the non-irradiated group. After incubation for 48 hr, irradiated and non-irradiated samples were subjected to a digital colony counter. Control group (non-irradiated) showed microbial growth for resins and the means of ufc/mL were without statistically significant differences. Microwave irradiated samples (experimental group) promoted no viable colonies for all Candida species and types of acrylic resins. The means of ufc/mL were without statistically significant differences. Microwave irradiation was an effective method for disinfection of the acrylic resins inoculated with C. albicans, C. dubliniensis and C. tropicalis.

  13. Peel bond strength of soft lining materials with antifungal to a denture base acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Aliaga, Adelaida; Pellissari, Cláudia Viviane Guimarães; Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvão; Michél, Milton Domingos; Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the addition of nystatin, miconazole, ketoconazole, chlorhexidine, and itraconazole into the soft lining materials Softone and Trusoft on their peel bond strength to a denture base acrylic resin was evaluated. Specimens of soft lining materials (n=7) were made without (control) or with the incorporation of antifungals at their minimum inhibitory concentrations to the biofilm of C. albicans and bonded to the acrylic resin. Peel testing was performed after immersion in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h, 7 and 14 days. Data (MPa) were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA/Tukey-Kramer test (α=0.05) and the failure modes were classified. The addition of nystatin and ketoconazole did not affect the peel bond strength for up to 14 days. Most failures were predominantly cohesive within soft lining materials. With the exception of itraconazole, incorporating the antifungals into the soft lining materials did not result in values below those recommended for peel bond strength after 7 and 14 days of analysis.

  14. Influence of chemical and mechanical polishing on water sorption and solubility of denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Juliana Saab; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Nóbilo, Mauro Antonio Arruda

    2004-01-01

    Influence of polishing methods on water sorption and solubility of denture base acrylic resins was studied. Eighty samples were divided into groups: Classico (CL), and QC 20 (QC) - hot water bath cured; Acron MC (AC), and Onda Cryl (ON) - microwave cured; and submitted to mechanical polishing (MP) - pumice slurry, chalk powder, soft brush and felt cone in a bench vise; or chemical polishing (CP) - heated monomer fluid in a chemical polisher. The first desiccation process was followed by storage in distilled water at 37 +/- 1 degrees C for 1 h, 1 day, 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. Concluding each period, water sorption was measured. After the fourth week, a second desiccation process was done to calculate solubility. Data were submitted to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey test (pacrylic resins; initially, water sorption values were higher for chemically polished samples, however, after 4 weeks all groups were similar.

  15. Shade Guide for the Fabrication of Acrylic Denture Based on Mucosal Colour

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Godwin Clovis; Aras, Meena Ajay

    2017-01-01

    This article highlights the use of a simple and convenient shade guide system which not only helps in choosing the shade tab that matches with the colour of the mucosa, but, also helps in the fabrication of the precise shade of acrylic resin for making the denture. The shade guide is fabricated by mixing specified quantities of various colours of acrylic polymer in order to obtain various shade tabs. The method for fabrication of the shade guide and the clinical procedure has been discussed. PMID:28384988

  16. Comparative evaluation of shear compressive bond strength between cross-linked acrylic resin denture base and cross-linked acrylic resin teeth with different modifcations of their ridge lap surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sadar, Leena; Dhume, Swaroop; Maniar, Neena; Prakash Patil, Jeevan; Rane, Prasad; Gandhewar, Mahesh

    2013-09-01

    A major problem commonly observed in denture wearer is the detachment of artifcial tooth/teeth from acrylic denture base. The problem was grave when porcelain teeth used along with the then available denture base materials. The bond formed was purely mechanical and hence debonding of teeth from denture base was a frequent occurrence. Inspite of chemical union between acrylic resin teeth and acrylic denture base material, detachment of teeth particularly anterior teeth is a frequent observation. The objective of the study is to study the effect of change in the surface treatment and surface confguration of ridge lap surface of the teeth on retention of cross-linked acrylic teeth on cross-linked acrylic resin denture base. Sixty specimens were tested for the shear compressive bond strength using instron universal testing machine in KN. Statistical analysis is used. The fndings were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 't' test. Slight modifcation in the ridge lap surface of artifcial teeth alters the strength of the shear compressive bond. Sand papering of ridge lap surfaces improves the shear compressive bond then the one without any modifcation. Maximum shear compressive bond strength can be increased by application of monomer.

  17. The effect of the addition of different fibres on the transverse and impact strength of acrylic resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Rahamneh, A; Jagger, D C; Harrison, A

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the addition of different types of fibres on the transverse and impact strength of acrylic resin denture base material. The addition of glass fibres (strand) and polyethylene fibres produced a non significant increase in the modulus of elasticity, compared with the control of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin. The addition of glass fibres (woven and strand), polyethylene and carbon fibres to acrylic resin produced a non significant increase in the modulus of rupture. The addition of carbon, glass (strand) and polyethylene fibres produced a significant increase in the impact strength. Within the limitations of this study the addition of silk fibres did not produce an improvement in the mechanical properties.

  18. Factors affecting the bond strength of denture base and reline acrylic resins to base metal materials

    PubMed Central

    TANOUE, Naomi; MATSUDA, Yasuhiro; YANAGIDA, Hiroaki; MATSUMURA, Hideo; SAWASE, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective The shear bond strengths of two hard chairside reline resin materials and an auto-polymerizing denture base resin material to cast Ti and a Co-Cr alloy treated using four conditioning methods were investigated. Material and Methods Disk specimens (diameter 10 mm and thickness 2.5 mm) were cast from pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy. The specimens were wet-ground to a final surface finish of 600 grit, air-dried, and treated with the following bonding systems: 1) air-abraded with 50-70-µm grain alumina (CON); 2) 1) + conditioned with a primer, including an acidic phosphonoacetate monomer (MHPA); 3) 1) + conditioned with a primer including a diphosphate monomer (MDP); 4) treated with a tribochemical system. Three resin materials were applied to each metal specimen. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after 10,000 thermocycles. Results The strengths decreased after thermocycling for all combinations. Among the resin materials assessed, the denture base material showed significantly (p<0.05) greater shear bond strengths than the two reline materials, except for the CON condition. After 10,000 thermocycles, the bond strengths of two reline materials decreased to less than 10 MPa for both metals. The bond strengths of the denture base material with MDP were sufficient: 34.56 MPa for cast Ti and 38.30 for Co-Cr alloy. Conclusion Bonding of reline resin materials to metals assessed was clinically insufficient, regardless of metal type, surface treatment, and resin composition. For the relining of metal denture frameworks, a denture base material should be used. PMID:24037070

  19. Hydrophilic surface modification of acrylic denture base material by silica coating and its influence on Candida albicans adherence.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Akinobu; Akiba, Norihisa; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2012-03-13

    Silica coating modifies hydrophobic denture base materials to have a hydrophilic surface. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of silica coating to a denture base material on resistance to Candida albicans (C. albicans) adherence. Specimens were prepared by polymerizing an acrylic denture lining material and polished using silicon carbide paper up an abrasive grade of 1000. The specimens of a coated group were treated three times by a silica coating agent using a nonwoven cloth. The surface properties were evaluated by contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A C. albicans adherence assay was performed after 1.5, 6, and 24 h incubation. The mean contact angle of the coated group showed significantly lower than that of the non-coated group (p < 0.05). In the coated group, the surface roughness decreased in SEM images, and Si was continuously detected in EDS analysis. At 24 h incubation time, the colony forming unit of C. albicans on the coated group was significantly reduced compared to the non-coated group (p < 0.05). These results suggest that hydrophilic surface modification by the silica coating reduces C. albicans adherence and could contribute to daily denture care.

  20. Evaluation of Vickers hardness of different types of acrylic denture base resins with and without glass fibre reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Farina, Ana Paula; Cecchin, Doglas; Soares, Rodrigo Gonçalves; Botelho, André Luís; Takahashi, Jessica Mie Ferreira Koyama; Mazzetto, Marcelo Oliveira; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the Vickers hardness of different acrylic resins for denture bases with and without the addition of glass fibres. It has been suggested that different polymerisation methods, as well as the addition of glass fibre (FV) might improve the hardness of acrylic. Five types of acrylic resin were tested: Vipi Wave (VW), microwave polymerisation; Vipi Flash (VF), auto-polymerisation; Lucitone (LT), QC20 (QC) and Vipi Cril (VC), conventional heat-polymerisation, all with or without glass fibre reinforcement (GFR) and distributed into 10 groups (n = 12). Specimens were then submitted to Vickers hardness testing with a 25-g load for 30 s. All data were submitted to anova and Tukey's HSD test. A significant statistical difference was observed with regard to the polymerisation method and the GFR (p < 0.05). Without the GFR, the acrylic resin VC presented the highest hardness values, and VF and LT presented the lowest. In the presence of GFR, VC resin still presented the highest Vickers hardness values, and VF and QC presented the lowest. The acrylic resin VC and VW presented higher hardness values than VF and QC resins. Moreover, GFR increased the Vickers hardness of resins VW, VC and LT. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Adherence of Candida albicans to glow-discharge modified acrylic denture base polymers.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, M S; Hasanreisoglu, U; Hasirci, N; Sultan, N

    2005-07-01

    An important aetiologic factor in the pathogenesis of denture-induced stomatitis, is the presence of numerous yeasts, usually Candida albicans, on the fitting surfaces of dentures. In the present study, effect of glow-discharge plasma, a technique applied to increase surface wettability of acrylic resins, on candidial adherence was evaluated. The durability of glow-discharge modification with saliva coating was also evaluated. Samples including control and experimental groups were prepared by using heat compression mould technique. To create a hydrophobicity gradient, experimental groups were exposed to a radiofrequency glow discharge in an O2 atmosphere under different discharge powers. To characterize the wetting properties, an expression of surface hydrophobicity, contact angle measurements were performed by the sessile drop method. The organism used was C. albicans (ATTC10321). Acrylic samples were coated with unstimulated whole saliva collected from a healthy man. The fungal suspension was poured on saliva-inoculated samples and incubated at 37 degrees for 2 h. The samples were then fixed with glutaraldehyde and Gram stained. Adhered candidial cells were examined by light microscope. Diffuse Reflectance FTIR (DRIFT) and scanning electron-microscope examinations were also performed to evaluate the surface composition and roughness of the test groups. Glow-discharge plasma was found to be an effective means of increasing surface wettability even with salivary pellicle. Amounts of candida cells adhered were significantly higher in all the plasma treated surfaces than the unmodified control group (P < 0.001). It was concluded that improving the surface wettability of acrylic resins by glow-discharge plasma in O2 atmosphere increased the adherence of the C. albicans.

  2. Distortion behavior of heat-activated acrylic denture-base resin in conventional and long, low-temperature processing methods.

    PubMed

    Kawara, M; Komiyama, O; Kimoto, S; Kobayashi, N; Kobayashi, K; Nemoto, K

    1998-06-01

    There have been many reports on fatal distortion of heat-activated acrylic denture-base resin which is still widely used in the field of removable prosthodontics. However, these reports have failed to report quantitatively on polymerization and thermal shrinkage factors. In the present study, we attempted to verify that the shrinkage of heat-activated acrylic denture-base resin was caused mainly by thermal contraction after processing. Furthermore, we examined the degree of distortion resulting from long, low-temperature processing, and compared the results with that of the conventional method. The strain gauge and thermo-couple were embedded in a specimen at the time of resin packing. The measurement started from the beginning of processing and continued until the specimen was bench-cooled and immediately before and after it was de-flasked, as well as during seven-day immersion in water at 37 degrees C. The resin expanded when processed by the conventional method. Meanwhile, mild shrinkage, possibly polymerization shrinkage, was observed when the resin was processed by the low-temperature method. This suggested that polymerization shrinkage was compensated for by thermal expansion during processing by the conventional method. Moreover, the shrinkage strains in the period from the completion of processing to immediately after de-flasking, in both the conventional and low-temperature methods, were identical to the theoretical value of thermal shrinkage which we obtained by multiplying the linear coefficients of thermal expansion by temperature differences. The shrinkage strain in the specimen processed by the low-temperature method, measured from the end of processing to immediately after de-flasking, averaged 64% of that in the specimen processed by the conventional method. The results revealed quantitatively that the shrinkage of heat-activated acrylic denture-base resin was mainly thermal shrinkage, and demonstrated the advantage of the low-temperature method in

  3. Shear bond strength of a denture base acrylic resin and gingiva-colored indirect composite material to zirconia ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kubochi, Kei; Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Yagawa, Shogo; Mori, Serina; Matsumura, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strengths of two gingiva-colored materials (an indirect composite material and a denture base acrylic resin) to zirconia ceramics and determine the effects of surface treatment with various priming agents. A gingiva-colored indirect composite material (CER) or denture base acrylic resin (PAL) was bonded to zirconia disks with unpriming (UP) or one of seven priming agents (n=11 each), namely, Alloy Primer (ALP), Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB+Act), Metal Link (MEL), Meta Fast Bonding Liner (MFB), MR. bond (MRB), and V-Primer (VPR). Shear bond strength was determined before and after 5000 thermocycles. The data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and Steel-Dwass test. The mean pre-/post-thermalcycling bond strengths were 1.0-14.1MPa/0.1-12.1MPa for the CER specimen and 0.9-30.2MPa/0.1-11.1MPa for the PAL specimen. For the CER specimen, the ALP, CPB, and CPB+Act groups had significantly higher bond strengths among the eight groups, at both 0 and 5000 thermocycles. For the PAL specimen, shear bond strength was significantly lower after thermalcycling in all groups tested. After 5000 thermocycles, bond strengths were significantly higher in the CPB and CPB+Act groups than in the other groups. For the PAL specimens, bond strengths were significantly lower after thermalcycling in all groups tested. The MDP functional monomer improved bonding of a gingiva-colored indirect composite material and denture base acrylic resin to zirconia ceramics. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of experimental photopolymerized coatings on the hydrophobicity of a denture base acrylic resin and on Candida albicans adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lazarin, Andréa Azevedo; Machado, Ana Lucia; Zamperini, Camila Andrade; Wady, Amanda Fucci; Spolidorio, Denise Madalena Palomari; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of experimental photopolymerized coatings, containing zwitterionic or hydrophilic monomers, on the hydrophobicity of a denture base acrylic resin and on Candida albicans adhesion. Acrylic specimens were prepared with rough and smooth surfaces and were either left untreated (control) or coated with one of the following experimental coatings: 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HE); 3-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HP); and 2-trimethylammonium ethyl methacrylate chloride (T); and sulfobetaine methacrylate (S). The concentrations of these constituent monomers were 25%, 30% or 35%. Half of the specimens in each group (control and experimentals) were coated with saliva and the other half remained uncoated. The surface free energy of all specimens was measured, regardless of the experimental condition. C. albicans adhesion was evaluated for all specimens, both saliva conditioned and unconditioned. The adhesion test was performed by incubating specimens in C. albicans suspensions (1×10(7)cell/mL) at 37°C for 90min. The number of adhered yeasts were evaluated by XTT (2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-5-[{phenylamino}carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium-hydroxide) method. For rough surfaces, coatings S (30 or 35%) and HP (30%) resulted in lower absorbance values compared to control. These coatings exhibited more hydrophilic surfaces than the control group. Roughness increased the adhesion only in the control group, and saliva did not influence the adhesion. The photoelectron spectroscopy analysis (XPS) confirmed the chemical changes of the experimental specimens, particularly for HP and S coatings. S and HP coatings reduced significantly the adhesion of C. albicans to the acrylic resin and could be considered as a potential preventive treatment for denture stomatitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical effects of glazing denture acrylic resin bases using an ultraviolet curing method.

    PubMed

    Budtz-Jörgensen, E; Kaaber, S

    1986-12-01

    Control of denture plaque accumulation is essential to obtain and maintain a healthy oral mucosa in denture wearers. The present study was designed to study the effect on denture plaque accumulation and denture stomatitis of coating the fitting denture surface by a glaze. Twenty-one subjects wearing complete dentures participated in the study. Glazing of the denture surface was performed using a Perma Cure System. Plaque accumulation was studied clinically and using a semiquantitative microbiologic technique. Plaque accumulation on the glazed and the non-glazed halves of the fitting denture surface was compared after 1 wk. There was significantly less plaque on the glazed half of the denture (P less than 0.001), and the calculated number of CFU of bacteria/cm2 was significantly lower from the test area of the glazed half than from the test area of the non-glazed half of the denture (P less than 0.001). When the patients were re-examined 1 month after the entire fitting denture surface had been glazed plaque scores, yeast scores and number of CFU of bacteria/cm2 were not significantly different from those observed before glazing. There was a reduction of the erythema of the palatal mucosa in 14/19 patients with denture-induced stomatitis. The study indicates that coating of the fitting denture surface by a glaze may be a means to improve denture cleanliness; however, the present glazing system should be further developed to produce a more uniform glazing.

  6. On the clinical deformation of maxillary complete dentures. Influence of the processing techniques of acrylate-based polymers.

    PubMed

    el Ghazali, S; Glantz, P O; Randow, K

    1988-10-01

    This paper aims to study the functional deformation patterns of complete maxillary dentures constructed in three different types of denture base materials and with two techniques of processing of dentures. The patients' evaluation of the fit of the dentures was also recorded. Thirty strain-gauged duplicate dentures were made for this study of five test subjects. The functional loading tests included maximum biting and the chewing of three food test samples. The results showed that there was no correlation between the patients' evaluation and acceptance of the fit of the dentures and the actual straining magnitudes and deformation of their dentures. The results also suggest that dentures manufactured from toughened or co-polymerized poly(methyl methacrylate) and processed by the injection molding technique deform to a lesser extent than when processed by by the compression molding technique. Standard poly(methyl methacrylate) seems to be less sensitive to the processing technique.

  7. Color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasp denture.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae-Eun; Lee, Ji-Young; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Jang-Jae; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp dentures to those of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional heat-polymerized denture base resins. Three types of denture base resin, which are conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20), thermoplastic polyamide resin (Bio Tone), thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) were used as materials for this study. One hundred five specimens were fabricated. For the color stability test, specimens were immersed in the coffee and green tee for 1 and 8 weeks. Color change was measured by spectrometer. Water sorption was tested after 1 and 8 weeks immersion in the water. For the test of cytotoxicity, cell viability assay was measured and cell attachment was analyzed by FE-SEM. All types of denture base resin showed color changes after 1 and 8 weeks immersion. However, there was no significant difference between denture base resins. All specimens showed significant color changes in the coffee than green tee. In water sorption test, thermoplastic acrylic resin showed lower values than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin and thermoplastic polyamide resin. Three types of denture base showed low cytotoxicity in cell viability assay. Thermoplastic acrylic resin showed the similar cell attachment but more stable attachment than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin. Thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp denture showed acceptable color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity. To verify the long stability in the mouth, additional in vitro studies are needed.

  8. The influence of storage on dimensional changes in maxillary acrylic denture bases and the effect on tooth displacement.

    PubMed

    Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Monteiro, Vanessa Lopes; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Consani, Simonides

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the influence of both room temperature storage and water storage on tooth displacement in complete dentures. Thirty maxillary dentures were manufactured and processed using 3 different curing cycles; long, short conventional and microwaved. Distances between fixed points on teeth were measured and the dentures stored at room temperature for 24 weeks. After storage, the distances were measured again and the dentures then stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 weeks, when the distances were re-evaluated. Anteroposterior distances demonstrated contraction in all acrylic resins. Incisor-incisor (air = -8.5% and water = -7.0%) and molar-molar (room = -1.8% and water = -1.1%) distance changes were greater in the Onda-Cryl resin (p < 0.05), whereas the premolar-premolar (room = -2.2% and water = -1.7%) distance was higher in the QC-20 resin (p < 0.05).

  9. Peel bond strength of resilient liner modified by the addition of antimicrobial agents to denture base acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    ALCÂNTARA, Cristiane S.; de MACÊDO, Allana F.C.; GURGEL, Bruno C.V.; JORGE, Janaina H.; NEPPELENBROEK, Karin H.; URBAN, Vanessa M.

    2012-01-01

    In order to prolong the clinical longevity of resilient denture relining materials and reduce plaque accumulation, incorporation of antimicrobial agents into these materials has been proposed. However, this addition may affect their properties. Objective This study evaluated the effect of the addition of antimicrobial agents into one soft liner (Soft Confort, Dencril) on its peel bond strength to one denture base (QC 20, Dentsply). Material and Methods Acrylic specimens (n=9) were made (75x10x3 mm) and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 48 h. The drug powder concentrations (nystatin 500,000U - G2; nystatin 1,000,000U - G3; miconazole 125 mg - G4; miconazole 250 mg - G5; ketoconazole 100 mg - G6; ketoconazole 200 mg - G7; chlorhexidine diacetate 5% - G8; and 10% chlorhexidine diacetate - G9) were blended with the soft liner powder before the addition of the soft liner liquid. A group (G1) without any drug incorporation was used as control. Specimens (n=9) (75x10x6 mm) were plasticized according to the manufacturers' instructions and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h. Relined specimens were then submitted to a 180-degree peel test at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min. Data (MPa) were analyzed by analysis of variance (α=0.05) and the failure modes were visually classified. Results No significant difference was found among experimental groups (p=0.148). Cohesive failure located within the resilient material was predominantly observed in all tested groups. Conclusions Peel bond strength between the denture base and the modified soft liner was not affected by the addition of antimicrobial agents. PMID:23329241

  10. Color change in acrylic denture base resin reinforced with wire mesh and glass cloth.

    PubMed

    Kanie, Takahito; Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji

    2003-12-01

    In this study, the L*a*b* color system as a color system and light transmittance of the denture base resin reinforced with wire mesh and glass cloth were measured, and the color difference (deltaE*ab) was calculated using L*, a* and b* values which were measured both on a white calibration plate and on a null background. The thicknesses of test specimens, which were reinforced with wire mesh and glass cloth 0.5 and 1.0 mm below the surface, were 3 and 5 mm. L*, a* and b* values of wire mesh reinforcing specimens decreased in comparison with the non-reinforcing specimens (p<0.05). L* values of glass cloth-reinforcing specimens increased compared with the non-reinforcing specimens (p<0.05). The glass cloth is an effective reinforcing material and an aesthetically important property of denture base resin, since wire mesh makes the resin appear darker with the background condition greatly altering the color, while glass cloth makes the resin lighter.

  11. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of two different chairside soft liners to heat processed acrylic denture base resin: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Rajaganesh, N.; Sabarinathan, S.; Azhagarasan, N. S.; Shankar, Chitra; Krishnakumar, Jaya; Swathi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chairside softliners are used more frequently than is reported and studies regarding the bond strength of chairside softliners to heat-polymerized denture base resin are few and limited. Hence, this study was conducted to comparatively evaluate the shear bond strength of two chairside soft relining materials viz., autopolymerizing plasticized acrylic resin liner and a silicone-based liner bonded to heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate denture base resin and to analyze the mode of interfacial bond failure. Materials and Methods: Forty test specimens (n = 40) were prepared by bonding plasticized acrylic- and silicone-based soft liner to heat polymerized acrylic resin blocks. Twenty specimens, ten from each group, were subjected to thermal cycling and later to shear bond strength testing. The debonded specimens were then qualitatively analyzed for the mode of failure using scanning electron microscopy. The results obtained were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: The mean shear bond strength values obtained for acrylic-based soft liner before and after thermal cycling were 0.3365 ± 0.025 MPa and 0.3164 ± 0.04 MPa, respectively. The mean shear bond strength values obtained for silicone-based soft liner before and after thermal cycling were 0.4159 ± 0.025 MPa and 0.4335 ± 0.02 MPa, respectively. Silicone-based soft liner showed higher shear bond strength than the acrylic-based both before and after thermal cycling (P = 0.0001). Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed a predominantly mixed mode of failure with silicone-based liner and predominantly adhesive mode of failure with acrylic-based soft liner. Conclusion: The silicone-based soft liner showed higher shear bond strength to heat polymerized acrylic resin than acrylic-based soft liner both before and after thermal cycling. PMID:27829769

  12. Hardness and surface roughness of reline and denture base acrylic resins after repeated disinfection procedures.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ana Lucia; Breeding, Larry C; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; da Cruz Perez, Luciano Elias

    2009-08-01

    Microwave irradiation and immersion in chemical solutions have been recommended for denture disinfection. However, the effect of these procedures on the surface characteristics of denture base and reline resins has not been completely evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of microwave and chemical disinfection on the Vickers hardness (VHN) and surface roughness (Ra, microm) of 2 hard chairside reline resins (Kooliner, DuraLiner II), and 1 heat-polymerizing denture base resin (Lucitone 550). Specimens (12 x 12 x 3 mm) were divided into 2 control and 4 test groups (n=8). Hardness and roughness measurements were performed after: polymerization and immersion in water (37 degrees C) for 7 days (controls), or repeated exposure to disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate (50 degrees C/10 min) or microwave irradiation (650 W/6 min). Measurements of surface roughness (Ra, microm) and hardness (kg/mm(2)) were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (alpha=.05). Microwave and chemical disinfection increased the mean (SD) hardness of Kooliner (from 4.1 to 7.5 kg/mm(2)) and DuraLiner II (from 2.6 to 5.6 kg/mm(2)), whereas Lucitone 550 (14.4 kg/mm(2)) remained unaffected. Disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate increased the surface roughness of DuraLiner II (from 0.13 to 0.26 microm) and Kooliner (from 0.16 to 0.26 microm), regardless of the number of cycles. For Lucitone 550, an increase in roughness was observed after 2 cycles of chemical disinfection (from 0.12 to 0.26 microm). Two cycles of microwave disinfection increased the roughness of both reline resins (DuraLiner II: from 0.13 to 0.22 microm; Kooliner: from 0.16 to 0.24 microm), whereas repeated microwave disinfection increased the roughness of DuraLiner II (from 0.11 to 0.25 microm). Disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate or microwave irradiation did not adversely affect the hardness of all materials evaluated. The effect of both

  13. In vitro tensile bond strength of denture repair acrylic resins to primed base metal alloys using two different processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sarmistha; Engelmeier, Robert L; O'Keefe, Kathy L; Powers, John M

    2009-12-01

    Approximately 38% of removable partial denture (RPD) failures involve fracture at the alloy/acrylic interface. Autopolymerizing resin is commonly used to repair RPDs. Poor chemical bonding of repair acrylic to base metal alloys can lead to microleakage and failure of the bond. Therefore, ideal repair techniques should provide a strong, adhesive bond. This investigation compared the tensile bond strength between cobalt-chromium (Super Cast, Pentron Laboratory Technologies, Llc., Wallingford, CT) and nickel-chromium (Rexalloy, Pentron Laboratory Technologies, Llc.) alloys and autopolymerized acrylic resin (Dentsply Repair Material, Dentsply Int, Inc, York, Pa) using three primers containing different functional monomers [UBar (UB), Sun Medical Co., Ltd., Shiga, Japan: Alloy Primer (AP) Kuraray Medical Inc., Okayama, Japan; and MR Bond (MRB) Tokyuyama Dental Corp., Tokyo, Japan] and two processing techniques (bench cure and pressure-pot cure). One hundred and twenty eight base metal alloy ingots were polished, air abraded, and ultrasonically cleaned. The control group was not primed. Specimens in the test groups were primed with one of the three metal primers. Autopolymerized acrylic resin material was bonded to the metal surfaces. Half the specimens were bench cured, and the other half were cured in a pressure pot. All specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. The specimens were debonded under tension at a crosshead speed of 0.05 cm/min. The forces at which the bond failed were noted. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Fisher's PLSD post hoc test was used to determine significant differences (p < 0.05). Failure modes of each specimen were evaluated under a dissecting microscope. Significant differences in bond strength were observed between combinations of primers, curing methods, and alloys. Primed sandblasted specimens that were pressure-pot-cured had significantly higher bond strengths than primed sandblasted bench-cured specimens. The

  14. Causes and pattern of fracture of acrylic dentures among patients seen in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Ogunrinde, T J; Ajayi, D M; Dosumu, O O

    2007-12-01

    There is little information on the causes and pattern of fracture of acrylic dentures in Nigerian patients despite being the most frequently employed design in Nigeria. The aim of this study was to determine the average life span of acrylic dentures before fracture, the causes and pattern of fracture of acrylic dentures in a Nigerian population. All consecutive patients that presented with fractured acrylic dentures at the Dental Centre, University College Hospital, Ibadan between January and July 2006 and were willing to participate were recruited into the study. A structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to record data from the patients. The questionnaire focused on patients' demographic data, age of acrylic denture as at the time of fracture, causes and pattern of fractures. The data were analysed using SPSS Version 11. A total of sixty-two patients were included in the study. They presented with sixty-nine fractured dentures. Five were complete dentures while 64 were partial dentures. The average life span was 7.4 years +/- 6.6 (SD) years. Early fracture was seen in 9 (13.4%), intermediate fracture in 29 (42%), and late fracture in 31 (44.9%) cases. The commonest cause of fracture was mastication as seen in 30.4% of the cases while the least cause was fight (4.3%). The commonest site of fracture (34.8%) was the palatal plate around the crest of the edentulous ridge while fracture of wrought metal clasps was the least, occurring in 1.4% of cases. We recommend proper design with balanced articulation and more emphasis on compliance to post insertion instructions by patients to prevent early fracture of acrylic dentures. Also, reinforcing the acrylic denture base especially in stress bearing area may prolong the life span of these prostheses.

  15. Impact strength of denture base and reline acrylic resins: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bochio, Bruna C; Wady, Amanda F; Jorge, Janaina H; Canevarolo, Sebastião V; Vergani, Carlos E

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact strength of a denture base resin (Lucitone 550—L) and four reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II—T; Ufi Gel Hard—U; New Truliner—NT, and Kooliner—K), both intact and in a reline combination (L/L, L/T, L/U, L/NT, and L/K). For each group (n = 20), half of the specimens were thermocycled before testing. Charpy tests were performed, and the impact strengths were calculated. Data were analyzed by two-way analyses of variance and Tukey’s test (p = 0.05). For the intact groups, mean impact strength values for L (1.65 and 1.50) were significantly higher than those of the reline resins (0.38–1.17). For the relined groups, the highest mean impact strength values were produced by L/T (5.76 and 5.12), L/NT (6.20 and 6.03), and L/K (5.60 and 5.31) and the lowest by L/U (0.76 and 0.78). There were no significant differences between L and L/L. Thermocycling reduced the impact strength of T (from 0.73 to 0.38) and L/L (from 1.82 to 1.56). PMID:22977461

  16. Evaluation of the durability and antiadhesive action of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine grafting on an acrylic resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nana; Iwasa, Fuminori; Inoue, Yuuki; Morisaki, Hirobumi; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2014-08-01

    The polymer 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine is currently used on medical devices to prevent infection. Denture plaque-associated infection is regarded as a source of serious dental and medical complications in the elderly population, and denture hygiene, therefore, is an issue of considerable importance for denture wearers. Furthermore, because denture bases are exposed to mechanical stresses, for example, denture brushing, the durability of the coating is important for retaining the antiadhesive function of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine. The purpose of this study is to investigate the durability and antiadhesive activity of two 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer coating techniques: poly-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine grafting and poly-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate coating. It was revealed that 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer coating of the denture base resin polymethyl methacrylate decreases bacterial biofilm formation. Durability was examined by rhodamine staining and elemental surface analysis and by determining the wetting properties of the 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer-modified polymethyl methacrylate after a friction test that comprised 500 brushing cycles. Antiadhesive activity was examined by using a Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation assay. Poly-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-grafted polymethyl methacrylate retained 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine units and antiadhesive activity even after repetitive mechanical stress, whereas co-n-butyl methacrylate-coated polymethyl methacrylate did not. These results demonstrated that graft polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine on denture surfaces may contribute to the durability of the coating and prevent microbial retention. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A comparison of the fitting accuracy of thermoplastic denture base resins used in non-metal clasp dentures to a conventional heat-cured acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Wada, Junichiro; Fueki, Kenji; Yatabe, Masaru; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    To incorporate a metal framework into removable partial dentures, the dimensional accuracy of thermoplastic resins requires precision equivalent to conventional acrylic resins. This study aimed to evaluate the fitting accuracy of thermoplastic resins compared to heat-cured acrylic resin. Four thermoplastic resins (polyethylene terephthalate [EstheShot, ES; EstheShot Bright, ES-B], polyamide [Lucitone FRS, LF], polycarbonate [Reigning Resin N, RN] and a heat-curing acrylic resin [Acron, AC]) were used. The specimens were created on master casts constructed of high-strength stone that simulated a maxillary edentulous ridge. Additionally, high-expansion stone was used as the master cast for RN specimens. The ES-B, LF and RN specimens were prepared with and without annealing after injection molding. The gaps between the molded resin and the cast were measured. ES had the smallest gap and was significantly smaller than AC (p < 0.05). The gap sizes of ES-B, LF and RN (high-expansion stone) without annealing were similar to AC (p > 0.05), while the gap size of RN (high-strength stone) with and without annealing was significantly greater than AC (p < 0.001). The gap sizes of ES-B and LF with annealing were significantly less than AC (p < 0.05). Further, the gap sizes of ES-B, LF and RN with annealing were significantly smaller than the gaps without annealing (p < 0.05). The results suggested that ES, ES-B and LF have adequate fitting accuracy for incorporating metal framework into dentures and that annealing effectively improved the fitting accuracy of ES-B, LF and RN.

  18. Allergic contact stomatitis caused by acrylic monomer in a denture.

    PubMed

    Koutis, D; Freeman, S

    2001-08-01

    A 71-year-old edentulous man developed a severely painful red mouth at sites of contact with a new denture. Patch testing showed allergy to samples of the denture material and to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Patch testing to methyl methacrylate was negative. Prolonged boiling of the denture resulted in reversal of his symptoms and samples of this fully cured denture material produced negative patch tests. While allergy to acrylates is a rare cause of stomatitis, this possibility must be considered in patients presenting with oral symptoms. Material safety data sheets are unreliable in providing information regarding the type of acrylate present in the material. Hence, patch testing should be performed with a battery of acrylate allergens as well as with small samples of the denture material.

  19. Color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasp denture

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dae-Eun; Lee, Ji-Young; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Jang-Jae

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp dentures to those of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional heat-polymerized denture base resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three types of denture base resin, which are conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20), thermoplastic polyamide resin (Bio Tone), thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) were used as materials for this study. One hundred five specimens were fabricated. For the color stability test, specimens were immersed in the coffee and green tee for 1 and 8 weeks. Color change was measured by spectrometer. Water sorption was tested after 1 and 8 weeks immersion in the water. For the test of cytotoxicity, cell viability assay was measured and cell attachment was analyzed by FE-SEM. RESULTS All types of denture base resin showed color changes after 1 and 8 weeks immersion. However, there was no significant difference between denture base resins. All specimens showed significant color changes in the coffee than green tee. In water sorption test, thermoplastic acrylic resin showed lower values than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin and thermoplastic polyamide resin. Three types of denture base showed low cytotoxicity in cell viability assay. Thermoplastic acrylic resin showed the similar cell attachment but more stable attachment than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin. CONCLUSION Thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp denture showed acceptable color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity. To verify the long stability in the mouth, additional in vitro studies are needed. PMID:26330974

  20. The effect of mechanical and chemical polishing techniques on the surface roughness of heat-polymerized and visible light-polymerized acrylic denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kheraif, Abdul Aziz Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of mechanical polishing (MP) and chemical polishing (CP) on the average surface roughness (Ra) of heat-cured (HC) and light-cured (LC) denture base acrylic resins. Methods A total of 120 specimens (30 × 15 × 3 mm) were prepared from one HC and one LC acrylic resin. To remove nodules and gross surface irregularities, all specimens were finished with a lathe-mounted small acrylic bur and 360-grit sandpaper. Ten finished specimens of each acrylic resin were randomly assigned to each of six polishing techniques: Resilit High-luster Polishing Liquid (RHPL), Universal Polishing Paste, Abraso-star K50, pumice, Jet Seal Liquid, or Acrypoint. MP was performed with an automatic polishing machine for 2 min, under 50 rpm and 500 g of load. CP was performed by immersing the HC and LC specimens in preheated methyl methacrylate at 75 ± 1 °C for 10 s. The surface roughness of the acrylic resin specimens was measured with a contact profilometer. The Ra values were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance, post hoc Scheffe's test, and paired t-test (p ⩽ 0.05). Polished and tested acrylic resin surfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Results MP was more effective than CP. The smoothest surface was obtained with the use of the RHPL on the LC (0.05 ± 0.01 μm) or HC (0.07 ± 0.01 μm) acrylic resin. Two-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference between MP and CP. Conclusions MP produced the smoothest surface of denture base acrylic resin. The mean surface roughness values after MP and CP were not influenced by the type of acrylic resin. PMID:25408597

  1. Effect of a denture base acrylic resin containing silver nanoparticles on Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Sun, Jing; Lan, Jing; Qi, Qingguo

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of denture base resin containing silver nanoparticles (nano-silver) on Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation. Epidemiological studies report that approximately 70% of removable denture wearers suffer from denture stomatitis. Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation are regarded as essential prerequisites for denture stomatitis. The bioactivity and biomass of C. albicans biofilm, which was incubated in a series of twofold dilutions of nano-silver suspension at 37°C for 24 h, were determined using XTT reduction and crystal violet assays, respectively. The denture base resin specimens containing nano-silver were then used in C. albicans adhesion (37°C; 90 min; n = 9) and biofilm formation assays (37°C; 72 h; n = 9). Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to evaluate the architectural properties of average thickness and live/dead cell ratio in the different biofilm stages that developed on the specimens. The bioactivity and biomass of C. albicans biofilm successively decreased with increasing nano-silver solution concentration. Denture base resin containing nano-silver had no effect on adhesion at low concentrations, but it exhibited anti-adhesion activity at a high concentration (5%). For 72 h biofilm formed on the resin specimens, the thickness and live/dead cell ratio were successively reduced with increasing nano-silver concentrations. Nano-silver had antifungal activity and inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation. Antifungal activity and an inhibitory effect on adhesion and biofilm formation by denture base resin containing nano-silver were discovered, especially at a higher concentration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Influence of acrylamide monomer addition to the acrylic denture-base resins on mechanical and physical properties

    PubMed Central

    Aydogan Ayaz, Elif; Durkan, Rukiye

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of adding acrylamide monomer (AAm) on the characterization, flexural strength, flexural modulus and thermal degradation temperature of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) denture-base resins. Specimens (n=10) were fabricated from a conventional heat-activated QC-20 (Qc-) and a microwave heat-activated Acron MC (Ac-) PMMA resins. Powder/liquid ratio followed the manufacturer's instructions for the control groups (Qc-c and Ac-c) and for the copolymer groups, the resins were prepared with 5% (−5), 10% (−10), 15% (−15) and 20% (−20) acrylamide contents, according to the molecular weight ratio, respectively. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were measured by a three-point bending test. The data obtained were statistically analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis test (α=0.05) to determine significant differences between the groups. The chemical structures of the resins were characterized by the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Thermal stabilities were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with a heating rate of 10 °C⋅min−1 from 35 °C to 600 °C. Control groups from both acrylic resins showed the lowest flexural strength values. Qc-15 showed significant increase in the flexural strength when compared to Qc-c (P<0.01). Ac-10 and Ac-15 showed significance when compared to Ac-c (P<0.01). Acrylamide incorporation increased the elastic modulus in Qc-10, Qc-15 and Qc-20 when compared to Qc-c (P<0.01). Also significant increase was observed in Ac-10, Ac-15 and Ac-20 copolymer groups when compared to Ac-c (P<0.01). According to the 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results, acrylamide copolymerization was confirmed in the experimental groups. TGA results showed that the thermal stability of PMMA is increased by the insertion of AAm. PMID:24030556

  3. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Khalid A. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244). PMID:27143970

  4. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Khalid A O

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244).

  5. Clinical survey of acrylic resin removable denture repairs with glass-fiber reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Narva, K K; Vallittu, P K; Helenius, H; Yli-Urpo, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical usefulness and durability of continuous glass-fiber reinforcement in repair of acrylic resin removable dentures. Fractured removable dentures without reinforcement, with conventional metal-wire reinforcement, or with mesh reinforcement were collected from two dental schools in Finland. The total number of dentures was 51 and the number of patients was 48. During the repair, the dentures were reinforced with a polymer-preimpregnated E-glass fiber at the region of the fracture. The fibers were used as partial fiber reinforcement, i.e., only the weakest part of the denture was reinforced. Follow-up time varied from 4 months to 4.1 years. After the follow-up period, possible fractures and discoloring were visually inspected. Possible irritation of oral mucosa by glass fibers and the general shape of the denture were also evaluated. In 88% of the cases, there was no need for adjustment at the region of partial fiber reinforcement, and the clinical condition of the dentures was good. Glass fibers did not irritate the oral mucosa. In the case of refracture or hairline fracture, positioning of the partial fiber reinforcement was incorrect or the reinforcement had been used incorrectly (the wetting of the reinforcement with denture base resin was inadequate). Polymer-preimpregnated partial fiber reinforcement seems to be useful in eliminating fractures of acrylic resin removable dentures. However, this study emphasizes the importance of correct positioning and accurate laboratory technique when partial fiber reinforcement is used.

  6. Cytocompatible antifungal acrylic resin containing silver nanoparticles for dentures

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; Mendieta, Irasema; Nuñez-Anita, Rosa Elvira; Cajero-Juárez, Marcos; Castaño, Víctor M

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition of Candida albicans on denture resins could play a significant role in preventing the development of denture stomatitis. The safety of a new dental material with antifungal properties was analyzed in this work. Methods Poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] discs and PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs were formulated, with the commercial acrylic resin, Nature-CrylTM, used as a control. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dispersive Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antifungal effect was assessed using a luminescent microbial cell viability assay. Biocompatibility tests were carried out using NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a Jurkat human lymphocyte cell line. Cells were cultured for 24 or 72 hours in the presence or absence of the polymer formulations and analyzed using three different tests, ie, cellular viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cell proliferation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay BrdU, and genomic DNA damage (Comet assay). Finally, the samples were evaluated mechanically, and the polymer-bearing silver nanoparticles were analyzed microscopically to evaluate dispersion of the nanoparticles. Results The results show that PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs significantly reduce adherence of C. albicans and do not affect metabolism or proliferation. They also appear not to cause genotoxic damage to cells. Conclusion The present work has developed a new biocompatible antifungal PMMA denture base material. PMID:22969297

  7. Clinical effects of acrylic resilient denture liners applied to mandibular complete dentures on the alveolar ridge.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, S; Kimoto, K; Gunji, A; Kawai, Y; Murakami, H; Tanaka, K; Syu, K; Aoki, H; Toyoda, M; Kobayashi, K

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether resilient denture liners has the potential to decrease problems affecting the alveolar ridge mucosa during the first adjustment session following the initial fitting of the denture. Interventions were complete denture treatment with permanent acrylic resilient denture liner dentures (RLD) in mandibles and conventional heat-activated acrylic resin dentures (ARD) in mandibles. Maxillary dentures were fabricated with conventional heat-activated ARD. Seventy-four subjects were randomly allocated to the RLD and ARD groups by random permuted blocks within the strata method after obtaining written informed consent. A randomized controlled parallel clinical trial with two hospital centres was conducted from April 2004 to July 2006. The problems were comprehensively evaluated by three outcomes with subjective and objective factors as follows: (i) numbers of sore spots, (ii) duration of wearing dentures and (iii) pain perception with 100 mm Visual Analog Scale. The numbers of sore spots in the mandibular support and border areas for the RLD group were significantly less than those for the ARD groups (P < 0.05). The RLD wearers were able to wear their dentures an additional day longer than the ARD wearers (P < 0.05). The maxillary and mandibular pain ratings for the RLD group were significantly lower than those for the ARD group (P < 0.05). Application of resilient denture liners to mandibular complete dentures provided edentulous patients with fewer problems affecting the alveolar during the first adjustment session following the initial fitting of the denture when compared with conventional denture treatments.

  8. Comparative evaluation of antifungal action of tea tree oil, chlorhexidine gluconate and fluconazole on heat polymerized acrylic denture base resin - an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Dalwai, Sameen; Rodrigues, Shobha J; Baliga, Shrikala; Shenoy, Vidya K; Shetty, Thilak B; Pai, Umesh Y; Saldanha, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Candida albicans-associated denture stomatitis is the most common type of denture stomatitis seen in denture wearers. This study evaluates and compares the antifungal action of fluconazole, chlorhexidine gluconate and tea tree oil on heat-polymerised denture base resin, which has been previously contaminated with C. albicans grown in BHI broth. Seventy-five specimens were immersed in BHI broth previously inoculated with C. albicans and stored for 3 h at 37°C. They were divided into five groups (n = 15): G1: 2% chlorhexidine solution; G2: 100% pure pharmaceutical grade tea tree oil; G3: 65 μg/ml fluconazole solution; C1: specimens not disinfected; C2: specimens not contaminated with Candida. Each specimen was then transferred to individual tubes containing BHI broth and incubated for 24 h. Culture media turbidity was evaluated for absorbance over a period of 14 days using a microplate reader. It was observed that the lower the absorbance, the stronger the antimicrobial action. Statistical analysis was performed (two-way anova and Bonferroni test, p < 0.001). Chlorhexidine and tea tree oil inhibited Candida up to the 14th day, whereas antifungal effect of fluconazole was not significant after the 7th day. Tea tree oil and chlorhexidine gluconate are more effective than fluconazole in inhibiting C. albicans growth on heat-polymerised acrylic resin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Fabrication of interim acrylic resin removable partial dentures with clasps.

    PubMed

    Reitz, P V; Weiner, M G

    1978-12-01

    An orderly sequence of steps for construction of an interim acrylic resin partial denture has been presented. The technique allows the dentist to fabricate an effective restoration that has a definite path of insertion and removal that can be placed in the patient's mouth with little time spent on adjustment and correction. This technique may be used with heat- or cold-curing acrylic resin.

  10. Effect of leaching residual methyl methacrylate concentrations on in vitro cytotoxicity of heat polymerized denture base acrylic resin processed with different polymerization cycles

    PubMed Central

    BURAL, Canan; AKTAŞ, Esin; DENIZ, Günnur; ÜNLÜÇERÇI, Yeşim; BAYRAKTAR, Gülsen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) may leach from the acrylic resin denture bases and have adverse effects on the oral mucosa. This in vitro study evaluated and correlated the effect of the leaching residual MMA concentrations ([MMA]r) on in vitro cytotoxicity of L-929 fibroblasts. Material and Methods A total of 144 heat-polymerized acrylic resin specimens were fabricated using 4 different polymerization cycles: (1) at 74ºC for 9 h, (2) at 74ºC for 9 h and terminal boiling (at 100ºC) for 30 min, (3) at 74ºC for 9 h and terminal boiling for 3 h, (4) at 74ºC for 30 min and terminal boiling for 30 min. Specimens were eluted in a complete cell culture medium at 37ºC for 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. [MMA]r in eluates was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. In vitro cytotoxicity of eluates on L-929 fibroblasts was evaluated by means of cell proliferation using a tetrazolium salt XTT (sodium 3´-[1-phenyl-aminocarbonyl)-3,4-tetrazolium]bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzenesulphonic acid) assay. Differences in [MMA]r of eluates and cell proliferation values between polymerization cycles were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman and Dunn's multiple comparison tests. The correlation between [MMA]r of eluates and cell proliferation was analyzed by Pearson's correlation test (p<0.05). Results [MMA]r was significantly (p≤0.001) higher in eluates of specimens polymerized with cycle without terminal boiling after elution of 1 and 2 days. Cell proliferation values for all cycles were significantly (p<0.01) lower in eluates of 1 day than those of 2 days. The correlation between [MMA]r and cell proliferation values was negative after all elution periods, showing significance (p<0.05) for elution of 1 and 2 days. MMA continued to leach from acrylic resin throughout 7 days and leaching concentrations markedly reduced after elution of 1 and 2 days. Conclusion Due to reduction of leaching residual MMA concentrations, use of terminal boiling in the

  11. A Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Ceramic and Resin Denture Teeth on Different Acrylic Resin Bases

    PubMed Central

    Corsalini, Massimo; Venere, Daniela Di; Pettini, Francesco; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Catapano, Santo; Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Carossa, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of different resin bases and artificial teeth made of ceramic or acrylic resin materials and whether tooth-base interface may be treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting. Experimental measurements were carried on 80 specimens consisting of a cylinder of acrylic resin into which a single tooth is inserted. An ad hoc metallic frame was realized to measure the shear bond strength at the tooth-base interface. A complete factorial plan was designed and a three-way ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate if shear bond strength is affected by the following factors: (i) tooth material (ceramic or resin); (ii) base material (self-curing or thermal-curing resin); (iii) presence or absence of aluminium oxide sandblasting treatment at the tooth-base interface. Tukey post hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant difference between shear strength values measured for the dif-ferently prepared samples. It was found from ANOVA that the above mentioned factors all affect shear strength. Furthermore, post hoc analysis indi-cated that there are statistically significant differences (p-value=0.000) between measured shear strength values for: (i) teeth made of ceramic material vs. teeth made of acrylic resin material; (ii) bases made of self-curing resin vs. thermal-curing resin; (iii) specimens treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting vs. untreated specimens. Shear strength values measured for acryl-ic resin teeth were on average 70% higher than those measured for ceramic teeth. The shear bond strength was maximized by preparing samples with thermal-curing resin bases and resin teeth submitted to aluminium oxide sandblasting. PMID:25614770

  12. Tensile bond strength between auto-polymerized acrylic resin and acrylic denture teeth treated with MF-MA solution

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the effect of chemical surface treatment using methyl formate-methyl acetate (MF-MA) solution on the tensile bond strength between acrylic denture teeth and auto-polymerized acrylic resin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy maxillary central incisor acrylic denture teeth for each of three different brands (Yamahachi New Ace; Major Dent; Cosmo HXL) were embedded with incisal edge downwards in auto-polymerized resin in polyethylene pipes and ground with silicone carbide paper on their ridge lap surfaces. The teeth of each brand were divided into seven groups (n=10): no surface treatment (control group), MF-MA solution at a ratio of 25:75 (v/v) for 15 seconds, 30 seconds, 60 seconds, 120 seconds, 180 seconds, and MMA for 180 seconds. Auto-polymerized acrylic resin (Unifast Trad) was applied to the ground surface and polymerized in a pressure cooker. A tensile strength test was performed with a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Dunnett T3 test (α=.05). RESULTS The surface treatment groups had significantly higher mean tensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P<.05) when compared within the same brand. Among the surface treatment groups of each brand, there were no significantly different tensile bond strengths between the MF-MA groups and the MMA 180 second group (P>.05), except for the Yamahachi New Ace MF-MA 180-second group (P<.05). CONCLUSION 15-second MF-MA solution can be an alternative chemical surface treatment for repairing a denture base and rebonding acrylic denture teeth with auto-polymerized acrylic resin, for both conventional and cross-linked teeth. PMID:27555897

  13. Tensile bond strength between auto-polymerized acrylic resin and acrylic denture teeth treated with MF-MA solution.

    PubMed

    Thongrakard, Ticha; Wiwatwarrapan, Chairat

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of chemical surface treatment using methyl formate-methyl acetate (MF-MA) solution on the tensile bond strength between acrylic denture teeth and auto-polymerized acrylic resin. Seventy maxillary central incisor acrylic denture teeth for each of three different brands (Yamahachi New Ace; Major Dent; Cosmo HXL) were embedded with incisal edge downwards in auto-polymerized resin in polyethylene pipes and ground with silicone carbide paper on their ridge lap surfaces. The teeth of each brand were divided into seven groups (n=10): no surface treatment (control group), MF-MA solution at a ratio of 25:75 (v/v) for 15 seconds, 30 seconds, 60 seconds, 120 seconds, 180 seconds, and MMA for 180 seconds. Auto-polymerized acrylic resin (Unifast Trad) was applied to the ground surface and polymerized in a pressure cooker. A tensile strength test was performed with a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Dunnett T3 test (α=.05). The surface treatment groups had significantly higher mean tensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P<.05) when compared within the same brand. Among the surface treatment groups of each brand, there were no significantly different tensile bond strengths between the MF-MA groups and the MMA 180 second group (P>.05), except for the Yamahachi New Ace MF-MA 180-second group (P<.05). 15-second MF-MA solution can be an alternative chemical surface treatment for repairing a denture base and rebonding acrylic denture teeth with auto-polymerized acrylic resin, for both conventional and cross-linked teeth.

  14. Characterization and bacterial anti-adherent effect on modified PMMA denture acrylic resin containing platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki-Young

    2014-06-01

    This study characterized the synthesis of a modified PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate) denture acrylic loading platinum nanoparticles (PtN) and assessed its bacterial inhibitory efficacy to produce novel antimicrobial denture base material. Polymerized PMMA denture acrylic disc (20 mm × 2 mm) specimens containing 0 (control), 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of PtN were fabricated respectively. The obtained platinum-PMMA nanocomposite (PtNC) was characterized by TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), thermogravimetric and atomic absorption spectrophotometer analysis. In antimicrobial assay, specimens were placed on the cell culture plate, and 100 µL of microbial suspensions of S. mutans (Streptococcus mutans) and S. sobrinus (Streptococcus sobrinus) were inoculated then incubated at 37℃ for 24 hours. The bacterial attachment was tested by FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analysis after staining with fluorescent probe. PtN were successfully loaded and uniformly immobilized into PMMA denture acrylic with a proper thermal stability and similar surface morphology as compared to control. PtNC expressed significant bacterial anti-adherent effect rather than bactericidal effect above 50 mg/L PtN loaded when compared to pristine PMMA (P=.01) with no or extremely small amounts of Pt ion eluted. This is the first report on the synthesis and its antibacterial activity of Pt-PMMA nanocomposite. PMMA denture acrylic loading PtN could be a possible intrinsic antimicrobial denture material with proper mechanical characteristics, meeting those specified for denture bases. For clinical application, future studies including biocompatibility, color stability and warranting the long-term effect were still required.

  15. Characterization and bacterial anti-adherent effect on modified PMMA denture acrylic resin containing platinum nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study characterized the synthesis of a modified PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate) denture acrylic loading platinum nanoparticles (PtN) and assessed its bacterial inhibitory efficacy to produce novel antimicrobial denture base material. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polymerized PMMA denture acrylic disc (20 mm × 2 mm) specimens containing 0 (control), 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of PtN were fabricated respectively. The obtained platinum-PMMA nanocomposite (PtNC) was characterized by TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), thermogravimetric and atomic absorption spectrophotometer analysis. In antimicrobial assay, specimens were placed on the cell culture plate, and 100 µL of microbial suspensions of S. mutans (Streptococcus mutans) and S. sobrinus (Streptococcus sobrinus) were inoculated then incubated at 37℃ for 24 hours. The bacterial attachment was tested by FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analysis after staining with fluorescent probe. RESULTS PtN were successfully loaded and uniformly immobilized into PMMA denture acrylic with a proper thermal stability and similar surface morphology as compared to control. PtNC expressed significant bacterial anti-adherent effect rather than bactericidal effect above 50 mg/L PtN loaded when compared to pristine PMMA (P=.01) with no or extremely small amounts of Pt ion eluted. CONCLUSION This is the first report on the synthesis and its antibacterial activity of Pt-PMMA nanocomposite. PMMA denture acrylic loading PtN could be a possible intrinsic antimicrobial denture material with proper mechanical characteristics, meeting those specified for denture bases. For clinical application, future studies including biocompatibility, color stability and warranting the long-term effect were still required. PMID:25006385

  16. The adhesion of modern soft relining materials to acrylic dentures.

    PubMed

    Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz; Kasperski, Jacek; Więckiewicz, Mieszko; Miernik, Marta; Król, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Silicone-based liners are widespread materials in prosthetic dentistry. Their mechanical properties have to meet several key requirements such as adequate adhesion to denture base polymers in order to provide right function of masticatory system and oral hygiene. The aim of this paper was to evaluate and compare tensile and shear bond strengths values of three modern autopolimeryzed silicone relining materials bonded to acrylic plates. Three silicone-based soft relining materials were investigated in this study (A-Soft Line 30, Bosworth Dentusil and Elite Super Soft). A total of 78 specimens were prepared: 13 of each material (total: 39) for testing tensile bond strength and 13 of each material for testing shear bond strength (total: 39). The obtained data were analyzed statistically. The average tensile bond strength results were 0.86 MPa for Bosworth Dentusil, 1.00 MPa for Elite Super Soft and 1.25 MPa for A-Soft Line 30. The silicone-based relining materials had different average values of shear bond strength: 0.67 MPa Elite Super Soft; 1.32 MPa A-Soft Line 30 and 1.57 MPa Bosworth Dentusil. As the result of the study it can be concluded that all tested materials have acceptable adhesion values to acrylic resin. According to tensile and shear bond strengths tests the best adhesive properties has A-Soft Line 30.

  17. Transverse strength and fatigue of denture acrylic-glass fiber composite.

    PubMed

    Vallittu, P K; Lassila, V P; Lappalainen, R

    1994-03-01

    The aims of this experiment were: 1) to test the effect of a high concentration of continuous glass fibers on the transverse strength of test specimens made of heat-cured acrylic resin; and 2) to determine the fatigue weakening of both unreinforced and continuous glass fiber-reinforced specimens of heat-cured acrylic resin shaped into upper complete dentures. A three-point loading test was used to determine the transverse strength of test specimens (n = 30 per group). The fatigue test was the constant deflection test (n = 10 per group). The results revealed that, compared to unreinforced specimens, continuous glass fibers at a concentration of 58 wt% enhanced the transverse strength of the test specimens up to 146% (p < 0.001) and increased the fatigue resistance (p < 0.001) during 5 x 10(5) loading cycles. This study suggests that by incorporating glass fibers into PMMA denture bases, the strength of the denture can be increased.

  18. Acrylic strengthened casts for removable partial denture for occlusion equilibration.

    PubMed

    Oh, Won-Suk; Saglik, Berna

    2011-09-01

    A removable partial denture (RPD) remount cast must resist wear or breakage, present a rigid surface, and ensure a solid support for an accurate equilibration of the occlusion for a RPD. This article describes a procedure of processing a thin layer of tooth colored acrylic resin over the dental plaster to present wear- and fracture-resistant incisal/occlusal surfaces without involving a third material.

  19. A comparative evaluation of the dimensional accuracy of heat polymerized acrylic resin denture base clamped by the conventional method and by new-press technique and cured by long curing cycle: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Shankar, T; Gowd, Snigdha; Ahmed, Syed Tauqheer; Vinod, V; Goud, M Vikas; Rao, N Venugopal

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of heat polymerized acrylic resin denture base clamped by the conventional method and by new-press technique and cured by long curing cycle. In this study, a total of 60 standardized maxillary record bases were fabricated with seven reference points as follows: Point A: Incisive papilla, Point B and C: Canine region on either side Point E and G: Midpoint of tuberosities on either side Point F: Midpoint of the line joining the two tuberosities Point D: Midpoint between the line joining A and F. Ten maxillary record bases were fabricated by conventional clamping method and cured by long curing cycle. GROUP A': Ten maxillary record bases were fabricated by New Press or RS tension clamping method and cured by long curing cycle. The distances between the reference points, i.e. A-B, A-C, A-D, D-F, B-E, C-G, E-F, F-G, B-D, D-G, C-D, D-E of all three thermoplastic denture base plates were measured and recorded with the help of travelling microscope and were used for comparison with the measured and recorded readings of processed acrylic denture bases. The data obtained was analyzed by using the one-way analysis of variance and HSD Multiple Comparison Test. The overall results of the study indicate that among all the denture bases cured by the two clamping systems and the long curing cycle, group A' were the most dimensionally stable, followed by control group A. The study concluded that the denture bases fabricated by the New Press method using the long curing cycle would produce the most dimensionally stable denture bases.

  20. Location of the allergenic monomer in warm-polymerized acrylic dentures. Part II: Experiments aimed at establishing guidelines for production of acrylic dentures suited for patients allergic to acrylic monomer and complementary investigations.

    PubMed

    Fernström, A I; Oquist, G

    1980-01-01

    An account has been given of a patient with denture sore mouth caused by allergy to the denture material (Part I). In the continued investigation the residual monomer or part thereof was found to be the allergen. Patch testing of the skin with drillings from the upper and lower dentures made of a "warm-polymerized" methyl methacrylate resin was carried out with special reference to the topography of the distribution of the allergenic factor within the dentures. Only that surface of the upper denture that is in contact with the hard palate and the maxillary crista were allergenic. All other surfaces of the upper denture as well as the complete lower denture were non-allergenic. The resin was, in other words, inhomogeneous as regards the allergenic factor. An analysis of the test castings showed that the allergenic properties in the resin are located in the surface and that the resin was free from allergens below the "allergenic film" (Parts I and II). A non-allergenic, extraordinarily well-fitting denture was produced from the same make of acrylic as that used for the non-tolerated denture. It was made by a new technique, "directed polymerization," comprising initial application of heat centrally in the cuvette (a metal cup surrounding the gypsum), including tin-foiling of the palatal half of the mould. The production of the denture was based on experience from tests with test castings. A check-up 18 months later showed no stomatitis and the retention and stability of the denture were very satisfactory, and tests with the original model of the upper gum showed that it had an excellent fit.

  1. Glass fibre reinforced acrylic resin complete dentures: a 5-year clinical study.

    PubMed

    Goguţă, Luciana Maria; Bratu, Dorin; Jivănescu, Anca; Erimescu, Raluca; Mărcăuţeanu, Corina

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the wear resistance of the glass fiber reinforced complete dentures comparative to the traditional acrylic complete dentures. Complete new dentures were made to replace old fractured 'un'-reinforced acrylic dentures. The total number of dentures was 30 and woven E-glass fibre reinforcements were used in maxillary complete dentures. Unidirectional E-glass fibre reinforcements were used as partial fibre reinforcements in mandibular complete dentures. Ten complete acrylic un-reinforced dentures were used as control. The follow-up period was 5 years and the recalls were made at 6 months. After 5 years of wearing the new dentures, the control dentures suffered seven fractures. After 5 years all the mandibular reinforced dentures were in good shape. The maxillary complete reinforced dentures suffered four partial fractures. Fracture lines were restricted by the glass fibre net and the patients could still use their dentures. Pre-impregnated E-glass fibre nets and polymer pre-impregnated E-glass unidirectional fibres are useful in reinforcing acrylic resin complete dentures especially were heavy occlusal forces are involved. Glass fibre reinforcement will be applied on the tension side in both cases (total fibre reinforcement and partial fibre reinforcement). The reinforcement cannot replace the necessary linings and occlusal adjustments. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Ultrasonic evaluation of influence of hard acrylic resin denture on blood flow of mandibular denture supporting mucosa utilizing duplex color Doppler studies: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Binsu, S; Nair, K Chandrasekharan; Jhon, Bijoy; Nayar, Sanjna; Julian, Jose; Shahid, Muhammed

    2017-01-01

    To determine the influence of hard acrylic denture base materials on the blood flow of mandibular denture supporting mucosa over a period of six months time. Select fifteen edentulous patients of age 55-75 years. The blood flow of the mandibular denture supporting mucosa was measured bilaterally in the molar region and in the incisor region utilizing Ultrasound colour Doppler (2D and Duplex Imaging). Measurements were performed prior to denture insertion and later after the dentures were worn for 1 month, 2 months, 3 months, 4 months, 5 months and 6 months. Mean blood flow as measured by Ultrasound colour Doppler were tabulated significant changes if any at various time interval in comparison to baseline was assessed by Kruskalwallis ANOVA test followed by Wilkoxan sign rank test for pairwise comparison. (In the present study, P < 0.05 was considered as the level of significance). The denture supporting mucosa exhibited a progressive reduction in the blood flow both with hard denture. The blood flow change with hard denture was a reversible condition as the blood flow improved at the end of six months. Kruskalwallis ANOVA test revealed no significant change in the blood flow at any interval of time in comparison to base value (P = 0.133). Within the limitations of the study denture supporting mucosa exhibited a progressive reduction in the blood flow with hard denture which was reversible.

  3. Effect of human whole saliva on the in vitro adhesion of Candida albicans to a denture base acrylic resin: a focus on collection and preparation of saliva samples.

    PubMed

    Zamperini, Camila A; Schiavinato, Patricia C S; Pavarina, Ana C; Giampaolo, Eunice T; Vergani, Carlos E; Machado, Ana L

    2013-11-01

    In studies on Candida albicans adhesion to surfaces, diverse protocols have been used for collection and preparation of saliva samples. Thus, this study investigated whether variations in the centrifugation parameters and number of donors of saliva would influence the adhesion of C. albicans to a denture base resin. Resin acrylic samples (n = 72) were made and then divided into four groups: (a) control - specimens were left without preconditioning in saliva; (b) three experimental groups, in which the specimens were preconditioned with saliva collected from 15 volunteers and centrifuged at 12 000 g for 5 min (G1 ); from 15 volunteers and centrifuged at 18 000 g for 30 min (G2 ); and from one volunteer and centrifuged at 12 000 g for 5 min (G3 ). Candida adhesion was evaluated by both the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) reduction method and crystal violet staining. Data were analyzed by one-way analyses of variance (P = 0.05). For XTT reduction assay, groups G2 , G3 , and control were not significantly different, whereas group G1 showed significantly higher absorbance value than control. For crystal violet staining there were no significant differences among all groups. Variations in the centrifugation parameters and number of donors of saliva may influence C. albicans adhesion to denture base resins. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. The cast aluminum denture base. Part I: Rationale.

    PubMed

    Halperin, A R

    1980-06-01

    Experiments with various casting techniques have been done, and aluminum base dentures have been made for many patients. The subjective clinical response from patients wearing aluminum dentures has not been different from patients wearing acrylic resin dentures. However, Brudvik and Holt have stated that they have had marked clinical success in using aluminum bases. A literature review on using aluminum as a denture base material has been presented, and the rationale for its use has been discussed. In part II, a technique will be described that can be used for casting aluminum denture bases.

  5. The Effects of Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, and Ho:YAG Laser Surface Treatments to Acrylic Resin Denture Bases on the Tensile Bond Strength of Silicone-Based Resilient Liners.

    PubMed

    Gorler, Oguzhan; Dogan, Derya Ozdemir; Ulgey, Melih; Goze, Aysegul; Hubbezoğlu, Ihsan; Zan, Recai; Ozdemir, Ali Kemal

    2015-08-01

    The present study was to assess the effect of surface treatments of Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, and Ho:YAG lasers on the tensile bond strength of a silicone-based resilient liner to an acrylic denture in an in vitro setting. Experimental dumbbell-shaped specimens (75 mm) were produced by combining two acrylate pieces fabricated from heat-polymerized acrylic resin (36 mm) with 3 mm of Molloplast(®)-B filling between them. The specimens (n=200) were randomly divided in half for thermocycling, and each 100 specimen set was randomized into five groups (n=20) with different surface treatments: control (no surface treatment), sandblasting, Er:YAG laser, Nd:YAG laser, and Ho:YAG laser. A tensile bond strength test was performed. The effect of the laser surface treatments was examined with scanning electron microscopy. Only the Er:YAG laser increased the tensile bond strength compared with the other treatments. The other laser groups showed lower bond strengths. The Ho:YAG laser resulted in considerably reduced tensile bond strength. The scanning electron microscopy images showed that applying laser surface treatments modified the surface of the denture base resin. There was not an overall improvement with the use of the studied laser modalities in the adhesion quality of resilient denture liner to acrylic resin, although Er:YAG laser showed a potential to improve their adhesion. These laser modalities need to be subjected to further studies to determine optimal setup for use in prosthodontics.

  6. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin “Versacryl.” Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its lingual flanges made of flexible acrylic resin Versacryl. Digital force-meter was used to measure retention of mandibular dentures at delivery and at 2 weeks and 45 days following denture insertion. Results: The statistical analysis showed that at baseline and follow-up appointments, retention of mandibular complete dentures with flexible lingual flanges was significantly greater than retention of conventional mandibular dentures (P < 0.05). In both types of mandibular dentures, retention of dentures increased significantly over the follow-up period (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The use of flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges in the construction of mandibular complete dentures improved denture retention. PMID:26539387

  7. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    PubMed

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin "Versacryl." The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its lingual flanges made of flexible acrylic resin Versacryl. Digital force-meter was used to measure retention of mandibular dentures at delivery and at 2 weeks and 45 days following denture insertion. The statistical analysis showed that at baseline and follow-up appointments, retention of mandibular complete dentures with flexible lingual flanges was significantly greater than retention of conventional mandibular dentures (P < 0.05). In both types of mandibular dentures, retention of dentures increased significantly over the follow-up period (P < 0.05). The use of flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges in the construction of mandibular complete dentures improved denture retention.

  8. Effect of different palatal vault shapes on the dimensional stability of glass fiber-reinforced heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture base material

    PubMed Central

    Dalkiz, Mehmet; Arslan, Demet; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza; Bilgin, M.Selim; Aykul, Halil

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different palatal vault shapes on the dimensional stability of a glass fiber reinforced heat polymerized acrylic resin denture base material. Methods: Three edentulous maxilla with shallow, deep and medium shaped palatal vaults were selected and elastomeric impressions were obtained. A maxillary cast with four reference points (A, B, C, and D) was prepared to serve as control. Point (A) was marked in the anterior midline of the edentulous ridge in the incisive papillary region, points (B) and (C) were marked in the right and left posterior midlines of the edentulous ridge in the second molar regions, and point (D) was marked in the posterior palatal midline near the fovea palatina media (Figure 2). To determine linear dimensional changes, distances between four reference points (A–B, A–C, A–D and B–C) were initially measured with a metal gauge accurate within 0.1 mm under a binocular stereo light microscope and data (mm) were recorded. Results: No significant difference of interfacial distance was found in sagittal and frontal sections measured 24 h after polymerization and after 30 days of water storage in any of experimental groups (P>.05). Significant difference of linear dimension were found in all experimental groups (P<.01) between measurements made 24 h after polymerization of specimens and 30 days after water storage. Conclusion: Palatal vault shape and fiber impregnation into the acrylic resin bases did not affect the magnitude of interfacial gaps between the bases and the stone cast surfaces. PMID:22229010

  9. The effect of two fibre impregnation methods on the cytotoxicity of a glass and carbon fibre-reinforced acrylic resin denture base material on oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Cumhur; Ozen, Julide; Ural, A Ugur; Dalkiz, Mehmet; Beydemir, Bedri

    2006-09-01

    Acrylic resin dentures may have cytotoxic effects on oral soft tissues. However, there is sparse data about the cytotoxic effect of fibre-reinforced acrylic resin denture base materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of two fibre impregnation methods on the cytotoxicity of a glass and carbon fibre-reinforced heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture base material on oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts. One hundred acrylic resin discs were assigned to five experimental groups (n = 20). One of the groups did not include any fibre. Two groups consisted of silane and monomer treated glass fibres (Vetrolex) impregnated into acrylic resin (QC-20) discs. The other two groups consisted of silane and monomer treated carbon fibres (Type Tenox J, HTA). Untreated cell culture was used as positive control. The human oral epithelial cell line and buccal fibroblast cultures were exposed to test specimens. The cytotoxicity of the test materials was determined by succinic dehydrogenase activity (MTT method) after 24 and 72 h exposures. Data were analysed with a statistical software program (SPSSFW, 9.0). A one-way analysis of variance (anova) test and Bonferroni test were used for the comparisons between the groups. All statistical tests were performed at the 0.95 confidence level (P < 0.05). After 24 and 72 h incubation, cell viability percentages of all experimental groups showed significant decrease according to the positive control cell culture. Fibroblastic cell viability percentages of silane and monomer treated fibre-reinforced groups were lower than the unreinforced group. Cell viability of monomer-treated groups displayed the lowest percentages. Elapsed incubation time decreased epithelial cell viability in silane-treated groups. Fibroblastic cell viability was not influenced by elapsed time except the unreinforced group.

  10. Antifungal Effect of Henna against Candida albicans Adhered to Acrylic Resin as a Possible Method for Prevention of Denture Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nawasrah, Amal; AlNimr, Amani; Ali, Aiman A.

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting the oral mucosa of denture wearers. The aim of this study was to measure the antifungal effect of henna against Candida albicans adhered to acrylic resin as a possible method for prevention of denture stomatitis. One-hundred-eighty acrylic plates were prepared of heat-cured acrylic denture resin. The specimens were divided into six groups of 30 samples each. The first group was only polymer and monomer following the conventional manufacturer instruction for processing complete dentures. The other five groups were processed by adding different concentration of Yamani henna powder (Harazi) to the polymer in a concentration of henna: polymer 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%, respectively. Samples were incubated in artificial saliva rich with Candida albicans at 37 °C, and the effect of henna on Candida albicans was evaluated in two different methods: semi-quantitative slide count and a culture-based quantitative assay (quantitative). Variation in the number of live Candida was observed with the increase in the concentration of Yamani henna powder. It was observed that the variation in live Candida, between control group and group B (concentration of Yamani henna powder was 1%), was statistically significant with a p-value of 0.0001. Similarly, variations in live Candida were significant, when the concentration of powder was 7.5% or 10% in contrast with control group and p-values were 0.0001 and 0.001 respectively. Adding henna to acrylic resin denture could be effective in controlling Candida albicans proliferation on the denture surface; however, its effects on the physical properties of acrylic resin denture need further studies. PMID:27223294

  11. Antifungal Effect of Henna against Candida albicans Adhered to Acrylic Resin as a Possible Method for Prevention of Denture Stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Nawasrah, Amal; AlNimr, Amani; Ali, Aiman A

    2016-05-23

    Denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting the oral mucosa of denture wearers. The aim of this study was to measure the antifungal effect of henna against Candida albicans adhered to acrylic resin as a possible method for prevention of denture stomatitis. One-hundred-eighty acrylic plates were prepared of heat-cured acrylic denture resin. The specimens were divided into six groups of 30 samples each. The first group was only polymer and monomer following the conventional manufacturer instruction for processing complete dentures. The other five groups were processed by adding different concentration of Yamani henna powder (Harazi) to the polymer in a concentration of henna: polymer 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%, respectively. Samples were incubated in artificial saliva rich with Candida albicans at 37 °C, and the effect of henna on Candida albicans was evaluated in two different methods: semi-quantitative slide count and a culture-based quantitative assay (quantitative). Variation in the number of live Candida was observed with the increase in the concentration of Yamani henna powder. It was observed that the variation in live Candida, between control group and group B (concentration of Yamani henna powder was 1%), was statistically significant with a p-value of 0.0001. Similarly, variations in live Candida were significant, when the concentration of powder was 7.5% or 10% in contrast with control group and p-values were 0.0001 and 0.001 respectively. Adding henna to acrylic resin denture could be effective in controlling Candida albicans proliferation on the denture surface; however, its effects on the physical properties of acrylic resin denture need further studies.

  12. Effects of the peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite on the colour stability and surface roughness of the denture base acrylic resins polymerised by microwave and water bath methods.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Flavio H C N; Orsi, Iara A; Villabona, Camilo A

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness (Ra) and color stability of acrylic resin colors (Lucitone 550, QC-20 and Vipi-Wave) used for fabricating bases for complete, removable dentures, overdentures and prosthetic protocol after immersion in chemical disinfectants (1% sodium hypochlorite and 2% peracetic acid) for 30 and 60 minutes. Sixty specimens were made of each commercial brand of resin composite, and divided into 2 groups according to the chemical disinfectants. Specimens had undergone the finishing and polishing procedures, the initial color and roughness measurements were taken (t=0), and after this, ten test specimens of each commercial brand of resin composite were immersed in sodium hypochlorite and ten in peracetic acid, for 30 and 60 minutes, with measurements being taken after each immersion period. These data were submitted to statistical analysis. There was evidence of an increase in Ra after 30 minutes immersion in the disinfectants in all the resins, with QC-20 presenting the highest Ra values, and Vipi-Wave the lowest. After 60 minutes immersion in the disinfectants all the resins presented statistically significant color alteration. Disinfection with 1% sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid altered the properties of roughness and color of the resins. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. The effects of silane-SiO2 nanocomposite films on Candida albicans adhesion and the surface and physical properties of acrylic resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Yodmongkol, Sirasa; Chantarachindawong, Rojcharin; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Amornsakchai, Taweechai; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2014-12-01

    Polysiloxane has been used as a coupling material in restorative dental materials for several decades. However, few studies are available on the application of polysiloxane in other dental prosthesis functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of silane-SiO2 nanocomposite films on Candida albicans adhesion and the surface and physical properties of acrylic resin denture base materials. Specimens were separated into 2 groups, uncoated and coated. They were coated with a film by using the dip-coating method. Specimens were incubated with Candida albicans 10(7) cells/mL for 1 hour, and the adherent cells were counted under an optical microscope. The following surface properties were measured: surface chemical composition with Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, surface roughness with a surface profiler, surface energy with the sessile drop method, and surface hardness with a microhardness tester. The physical properties, including water sorption, water solubility, ultimate flexural strength, and flexural modulus, were evaluated according to International Organization for Standardization 20795-1 requirements. The adhesion of Candida albicans and the surface properties of the specimens were investigated after cleaning with effervescent tablets and brushing. An MTT assay was used to evaluate the coated specimens. The results were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). A significant reduction in Candida albicans adhesion (P=.002) was observed before cleaning. In addition, the surface energy was comparable (P=.100), the surface hardness increased significantly (P=.008), and the surface roughness remained unchanged (P=.310). After cleaning with effervescent tablets, a significant decrease in Candida albicans adhesion (P=.002) and in surface roughness (P=.008) was observed; however, similar surface energies were measured (P=.100). After cleaning with a toothbrush, the adhesion of Candida albicans was significantly higher on

  14. Comparative Study to Assess the Effectiveness of Various Disinfecta- nts on two Microorganisms and the effect of same on Flexural Strength of Acrylic Denture Base Resin - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, S; Gujjari, Anil Kumar; S, Shylesh Kumar B; B, Ravi M; S, Sowmya; S, Meenakshi

    2013-01-01

    Background: To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of various disinfectants on Candida albicans (C.albicans) and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph.aureus) inoculated on acrylic denture base resin and effect of disinfectants on flexural strength of denture base resin. Materials & Methods: A total of 130 acrylic denture base resin specimens were fabricated and processed according to manufacturer instructions. 82 sterile specimens were used for microbiological study. 2 specimens were cultured for organism growth to ensure sterility. 40 sterile specimens each were inoculated by immersing in Sabouraud & Nutrient broth containing microorganisms for 45 minutes each. Then the specimens were immersed in chlorhexidine, glutaraldehyde & distilled water (control) for 4 & 8 minutes. Then the specimens were neutralized. After neutralization the specimens were cultured onto Sabouraud’s broth for C.albicans and Nutrient broth for Staph.aureus incubated for 72 h and observed for turbidity. At the end of 72 h subculture were made onto Sabourads dextrose agar media for C.albicans, Blood agar media for Staph.aureus and incubated for 48 h to observe growth. For flexural strength testing, 8 specimens each was immersed in the above mentioned disinfectants and distilled water for 8 & 16 minutes. Each of which was then subjected to 3 point flexural load in Lloyd’s Universal testing machine. The peak load was recorded and flexural strength values were calculated. Results: The microbiological study revealed that both disinfectants were equally effective at 4 minutes against C.albicans & Staph.aureus microorganisms. Flexural strength test revealed no significant difference between test and control groups. Conclusion: Chlorhexdine and Glutaraldehyde disinfectans are equally effective against C.albicans and Staph.aureus microorganisms. Heat polymerized acrylic denture base resin did not demonstrate any significant change in flexural strength between control and test specimens. How to cite

  15. Measurement of interfacial porosity at the acrylic resin/denture tooth interface.

    PubMed

    Pero, Ana Carolina; Marra, Juliê; Paleari, André Gustavo; Pereira, Wellington Roberto Fagundes; Barbosa, Débora Barros; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Small pores of almost uniform shape and size are common in polymeric materials; however, significant porosity can weaken a denture base resin and promote staining, harboring of organisms such as Candida albicans, and bond failures between the artificial tooth and denture base resin. The aim of this study was to investigate the porosity at the interface of one artificial tooth acrylic resin (Trilux, copolymer of polymethyl methacrylate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, and color pigments) and three denture base resins: Acron MC (microwave-polymerized), Lucitone 550 (heat-polymerized), and QC-20 (heat-polymerized). Ten specimens of each denture base resin with artificial tooth were processed. After polymerization, specimens were polished and observed under a microscope at 80x magnification. The area of each pore present between artificial tooth and denture base resin was measured using computer software, and the total area of pores per surface was calculated in millimeter square. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to compare porosity data (alpha= 0.05). Porosity analysis revealed the average number of pores (n), area range (S, mm(2)), and diameter range (d, mum) for Acron MC (n = 23, S = 0.001 to 0.0056, d = 35 to 267), Lucitone 550 (n = 13, S = 0.001 to 0.005, d = 35 to 79), and QC-20 (n = 19, S = 0.001 to 0.014, d = 35 to 133). The analyses showed that there were no statistically significant differences among the groups (p= 0.7904). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it was concluded that the denture base resins evaluated did not affect porosity formation at the artificial tooth/denture base resin interface.

  16. Evaluation of the surface roughness of three heat-cured acrylic denture base resins with different conventional lathe polishing techniques: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Duggineni Chalapathi; Kalavathy, N; Mohammad, H S; Hariprasad, A; Kumar, C Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Surface roughness promotes adhesion and colonization of denture plaque. Therefore, it is important to know the effects of polishing and finishing on the surface roughness of various acrylic resin materials. To evaluate and compare the effects of different conventional lathe polishing techniques on heat cured acrylic resins in producing surface roughness. Three different commercially available heat-cured acrylic resin materials namely DPI, Meliodent and Trevalon Hi were selected. 30 Specimens of each acrylic material (30 x 3 = 90, 10 x 60 x 2mm) were prepared and divided into 5 groups, each group consisted of 6 Nos. of specimens per material(6x3=18) and were grouped as Group A(unfinished), Group B (finished), Group C (Polishing Paste), Group D (Polishing Cake) and Group E (Pumice and Gold rouge). The resulted surface roughness (μm) was measured using Perthometer and observed under Scanning Electron Microscope. The values obtained were subjected statistical analyses. Among the materials tested, better results were obtained with Trevalon Hi followed by Meliodent and DPI. Among the polishing methods used, superior results were obtained with universal polishing paste followed by polishing cake; Pumice and Gold rouge. Although Pumice and Gold rouge values produced greater roughness value, they were well within the threshold value of 0.2 mm.

  17. Evaluation of the surface roughness of three heat-cured acrylic denture base resins with different conventional lathe polishing techniques: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Duggineni Chalapathi; Kalavathy, N.; Mohammad, H. S.; Hariprasad, A.; Kumar, C. Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Surface roughness promotes adhesion and colonization of denture plaque. Therefore, it is important to know the effects of polishing and finishing on the surface roughness of various acrylic resin materials. Objectives: To evaluate and compare the effects of different conventional lathe polishing techniques on heat cured acrylic resins in producing surface roughness. Materials and Methods: Three different commercially available heat-cured acrylic resin materials namely DPI, Meliodent and Trevalon Hi were selected. 30 Specimens of each acrylic material (30 x 3 = 90, 10 x 60 x 2mm) were prepared and divided into 5 groups, each group consisted of 6 Nos. of specimens per material(6x3=18) and were grouped as Group A(unfinished), Group B (finished), Group C (Polishing Paste), Group D (Polishing Cake) and Group E (Pumice and Gold rouge). The resulted surface roughness (μm) was measured using Perthometer and observed under Scanning Electron Microscope. The values obtained were subjected statistical analyses. Results: Among the materials tested, better results were obtained with Trevalon Hi followed by Meliodent and DPI. Among the polishing methods used, superior results were obtained with universal polishing paste followed by polishing cake; Pumice and Gold rouge. Although Pumice and Gold rouge values produced greater roughness value, they were well within the threshold value of 0.2 mm. PMID:26929542

  18. Glass fiber reinforcement in repaired acrylic resin removable dentures: preliminary results of a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Vallittu, P K

    1997-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of continuous E-glass partial fiber reinforcement of acrylic resin removable dentures was evaluated an average 13 months after the insertion of the fibers. Twelve removable complete dentures and ten removable partial dentures with a history of recurrent fracture were selected for this study. The partial fiber reinforcement was incorporated into the denture at the time of repair. One complete denture and one removable partial denture fractured in the region of reinforcement during the examination period. These fractures were most likely caused by faulty placement of the fiber reinforcement in the denture in the dental laboratory. In six dentures, new fractures occurred in regions without partial fiber reinforcement. The results revealed the importance of both the correct positioning of the partial fiber reinforcement in the denture and the use of accurate laboratory techniques.

  19. Effect of Food Simulating Agents on the Hardness and Bond Strength of a Silicone Soft Liner to a Denture Base Acrylic Resin

    PubMed Central

    Khaledi, A.A.R.; Bahrani, M.; Shirzadi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Bonding failure between acrylic resin and soft liner material and also gradual loss of soft liner resiliency over time are two impending challenges frequently recognized with a denture base embraced with a resilient liner. Since patients drink various beverages, it is crucial to assess the influences of these beverages on physical characteristics of soft liners. Purpose: This in vitro study envisioned to assess the influence of food simulating agents (FSA) on the hardness of a silicone soft liner by employing a Shore A durometer test and also evaluate its bond strength to a denture base resin by using tensile bond strength test. Materials and Methods: To test the hardness of samples, 50 rectangular samples (40 mm × 10 mm × 3 mm) were prepared from a heat-polymerized polymethyl methacrylate (Meliodent). Mollosil, a commercially available silicone resilient liner, was provided and applied on the specimens following the manufacturer’s directions. In order to test tensile bond strength, 100 cylindrical specimens (30 mm × 10 mm) were fabricated. The liners were added between specimens with the thicknesses of 3 mm. The specimens were divided into 5 groups (n=10) and immersed in distilled water, heptane, citric acid, and 50% ethanol. For each test, we used 10 specimens as a baseline measurement; control group. All specimens were kept in dispersed containers at 37ºC for 12 days and all solutions were changed every day. The hardness was verified using a Shore A durometer and the tensile bond strength was examined by an Instron testing machine at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min. The records were analyzed employing one-way ANOVA, Tukey’s HSD, and LSD tests. Results: The mean tensile bond strength ± standard deviation (SD) for Mollosil was as follows for each group: 3.1 ± 0.4 (water), 1.8 ± 0.4 (citric acid), 3.0 ± 0.4 (heptane), 1.2 ± 0.3 (50% ethanol), and 3.8 ± 0.4 (control). The hardness values for each group were: 28.7 ± 2.11 (water

  20. Color degradation of acrylic resin denture teeth as a function of liquid diet: ultraviolet-visible reflection analysis.

    PubMed

    Hipólito, Ana Carolina; Barão, Valentim A; Faverani, Leonardo P; Ferreira, Mayara B; Assunção, Wirley G

    2013-10-01

    The effect of different beverages on acrylic resin denture teeth color degradation is evaluated. Ten acrylic resin denture teeth brands were evaluated: Art Plus (AP), Biolux (BX), Biotone IPN (BI), Magister (MG), Mondial 6 (MD), Premium 6 (PR), SR Vivodent PE (SR), Trilux (TR), Trubyte Biotone (TB), and Vipi Dent Plus (VP). Teeth were immersed in staining solutions (coffee, cola, and orange juice) or artificial saliva (control) (n=6) for 1, 7, 15, or 30 days. Specimen colors were evaluated spectrophotometrically based on the Commission Internationale d'Eclairage L*a*b* system. Color differences (ΔE) were calculated between the baseline and post-staining results. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance and Tukey test (α = 0.05). BI (1.82 ± 0.95) and TR (1.78 ± 0.72) teeth exhibited the greatest ΔE values, while BX (0.88 ± 0.43) and MD (1.09 ± 0.44) teeth were the lowest, regardless of solution and measurement period, and were different from BI and TR teeth (P < 0.05). Cola and coffee promoted higher denture teeth color alterations than orange juice and saliva (P < 0.05). Saliva generated the lowest denture teeth color alterations. Greater immersion times caused higher denture teeth color changes. The lifespan of removable dentures and the aesthetic satisfaction of several edentulous patients may be increased with the use of stain-resistant artificial denture teeth.

  1. Mycological Analysis of the Oral Cavity of Patients Using Acrylic Removable Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Loster, Bartłomiej W.; Loster, Jolanta; Wieczorek, Aneta; Ryniewicz, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Background. The problems of fungal infections in edentulous have been discussed in literature. Findings show that oral mycosis has an influence on the mycosis of oesophageal mucosa. Based on this we started to follow from 2007 in patients who wear dentures mycological examination, to evaluate changes of yeasts numbers, the sensitivity to antibiotics and determine the impact of types of prosthesis, time of using, gender and age of patients. 1230 patients who were wearing dentures participated in the retrospective study. The material for mycological examination was sampled as a smear from the palate. After the mycological identification of Candida species and assessment of growth, the susceptibility testing with Fluconazole and Nystatin was made. The number of 23 Candida species was diagnosed microbiologically in five years. C. albicans and C. glabrata were increasing in number—from 33,7% to 46,9% and 6,7% to 14,0%, respectively. There was a significant statistical difference between yeasts growth and gender (P = 0, 017 < 0.05). The conclusion is that a large percentage of persons wearing removable denture has been affected by Candida species and that could lead to the mycosis of farther gastrointestinal tract sections. The mycological examination before treatment, especially in patients using acrylic denture, appears to be necessary. PMID:22550480

  2. Bond Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Teeth Using Visible Light Cure Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Muhsin, Saja Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although bonding to denture teeth after surface treatment with chemical agents is desirable, there is little information on the use of Visible Light Cure composite resin (VLC) as bonding denture materials. Objectives: To determine the effect of various surface treatments on shear bond strength between Visible Light Cure composite resin and the acrylic denture teeth interface. Methods: Forty cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were implemented upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into four groups (n = 10). Light-cured composite resin (LC) was applied over all treated and untreated surfaces of tested groups. The shear bond was tested using a universal tensile testing apparatus with the knife-edge of a 0.8mm shear tester. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA performed at a confidence level of 95% and significant P-value of (P ≤ 0.05). Results: Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between treated and untreated teeth surfaces. The treated surfaces exhibited various levels of bond strength depending on the type of treatment. Conclusion: Application of VLC bonding agent with prior treatment of methylmethacrylate (MMA) on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin. PMID:28400865

  3. Bond Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Teeth Using Visible Light Cure Composite Resin.

    PubMed

    Muhsin, Saja Ali

    2017-01-01

    Although bonding to denture teeth after surface treatment with chemical agents is desirable, there is little information on the use of Visible Light Cure composite resin (VLC) as bonding denture materials. To determine the effect of various surface treatments on shear bond strength between Visible Light Cure composite resin and the acrylic denture teeth interface. Forty cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were implemented upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into four groups (n = 10). Light-cured composite resin (LC) was applied over all treated and untreated surfaces of tested groups. The shear bond was tested using a universal tensile testing apparatus with the knife-edge of a 0.8mm shear tester. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA performed at a confidence level of 95% and significant P-value of (P ≤ 0.05). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between treated and untreated teeth surfaces. The treated surfaces exhibited various levels of bond strength depending on the type of treatment. Application of VLC bonding agent with prior treatment of methylmethacrylate (MMA) on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  4. A Study on Effect of Surface Treatments on the Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Gupta, Tapas K; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-03-01

    Visible light-cured composite resins have become popular in prosthetic dentistry for the replacement of fractured/debonded denture teeth, making composite denture teeth on partial denture metal frameworks, esthetic modification of denture teeth to harmonize with the characteristics of adjacent natural teeth, remodelling of worn occlusal surfaces of posterior denture teeth etc. However, the researches published on the bond strength between VLC composite resins and acrylic resin denture teeth is very limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of five different methods of surface treatments on acrylic resin teeth on the shear bond strength between light activated composite resin and acrylic resin denture teeth. Ninety cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were done upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into six groups, containing 15 samples each. Over all the treated and untreated surfaces of all groups, light-cured composite resin was applied. The shear strengths were measured in a Universal Testing Machine using a knife-edge shear test. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mean values were compared by the F test. Application of bonding agent with prior treatment of methyl methacrylate on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  5. The Effect of Repeated Microwaving Disinfection on the Dimensional Stability of Acrylic Dentures.

    PubMed

    Polychronakis, Nick; Yannikakis, Stavros; Zissis, Alcibiades

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of repeated microwave disinfections on the dimensional stability of acrylic dentures. Three groups of dentures made of a heat polymerized acrylic resin were tested. I: dentures kept in water (control group). II: dentures microwaved daily while being immersed into water (wet disinfection). III: dentures microwaved daily without being immersed into water (dry disinfection).
Measurements were taken across three reference points, on two occasions: after curing and immersion in water for 24 hours, and one week later.
Data obtained were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's multiple range test. The results showed that the microwave disinfection provokes dimensional changes of the same pattern (shrinkage). The dentures which underwent wet disinfection exhibited the greatest shrinkage (p<0.05). Disinfection using microwave energy may cause dimensional changes (shrinkage) of complete dentures.
The microwave "dry disinfection" method can be safely applied in everyday practice since the dimensional changes which occurred seem to be of no clinical significance.

  6. Effect of the processing cycle on dimensional changes of heat-polymerized denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Savabi, Ghazal; Savabi, Omid; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: The second processing cycle for adding the artificial teeth to heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases may result in dimensional changes of the denture bases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dimensional changes of the heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases with one and two-cycle processing methods. Materials and Methods: A metal edentulous maxillary arch was used for making 40 stone casts. Maxillary complete dentures were made with heat-polymerized acrylic resins (Meliodent and Acropars) with one and two stage processing methods (n = 10 for each group). Linear dimensional changes in anteroposterior and mediolateral distances and vertical changes in the first molar region were measured following each processing cycle, using a digital caliper. Mean percentage of the dimensional changes were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Tukey honest significant difference tests (α = 0.05). Results: Postpolymerization contraction occurred in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions in all studied groups; however, the vertical dimension was increased. Acropars acrylic resin showed the highest dimensional changes and the second processing cycle significantly affected the measured distances (P < 0.05). Meliodent acrylic resin was not significantly influenced by the processing method. Conclusion: Reheating of the acrylic resin denture bases for the addition of denture teeth result in linear dimensional changes, which can be clinically significant based on the acrylic resin used. PMID:26288618

  7. Effect of microwave sterilization and water storage on the Vickers hardness of acrylic resin denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Campanha, Nara Hellen; Pavarina, Ana Claudia; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Machado, Ana Lucia

    2005-05-01

    Acrylic resin denture teeth soften upon immersion in water, and the heating generated during microwave sterilization may enhance this process. Six brands of acrylic resin denture teeth were investigated with respect to the effect of microwave sterilization and water immersion on Vickers hardness (VHN). The acrylic resin denture teeth (Dentron [D], Vipi Dent Plus [V], Postaris [P], Biolux [B], Trilux [T], and Artiplus [A]) were embedded in heat-polymerized acrylic resin within polyvinylchloride tubes. For each brand, the occlusal surfaces of 32 identical acrylic resin denture posterior teeth were ground flat with 1500-grit silicon carbide paper and polished on a wet polishing wheel with a slurry of tin oxide. Hardness tests were performed after polishing (control group, C), after polishing followed by 2 cycles of microwave sterilization at 650 W for 6 minutes (MwS group), after polishing followed by 90-day immersion in water (90-day Wim group), and after polishing followed by 90-day storage in water and 2 cycles of microwave sterilization (90-day Wim + MwS group). For each specimen, 8 hardness measurements were made and the mean was calculated. Data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance followed by the Bonferroni procedure to determine any significance between pairs of mean values (alpha=.01). Microwave sterilization of specimens significantly decreased (P <.001) the hardness of the acrylic resin denture tooth specimens P (17.8 to 16.6 VHN), V (18.3 to 15.8 VHN), T (17.4 to 15.3 VHN), B (16.8 to 15.7 VHN), and A (17.3 to 15.7 VHN). For all acrylic resin denture teeth, no significant differences in hardness were found between the groups MwS, 90-day Wim, and 90-day Wim + MwS, with the exception of the 90-day Wim + MwS tooth A specimens (14.4 VHN), which demonstrated significant lower mean values (P <.001) than the 90-day Wim (15.8 VHN) and MwS (15.7 VHN) specimens. For specimens immersed in water for 90 days, 2 cycles of microwave sterilization had no effect

  8. Denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Amy Yuntzu-Yen; Zirwas, Matthew J

    2007-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented for evaluation of an eruption localized to the area covered by her partial upper denture. Her medical history and physical examination were otherwise unremarkable. She originally had a metal upper partial denture, which she used for many years without difficulty. Four years before presentation, she developed a painful eruption affecting only the tissue covered by the upper partial denture. Contact dermatitis to metal was suspected, and a new upper partial denture constructed primarily of acrylates was fashioned. When she transitioned to the new denture, the inflammation in her oral mucosa persisted and perhaps worsened, despite an excellent fit. Examination revealed striking erythema and mild edema sharply localized to the areas where the partial upper denture contacted the gum ridge. Patch testing was performed and revealed allergies to multiple acrylates, including methyl methacrylate. A swab from the gums was sent for yeast culture. No Candida was detected. Based on suspected candidal overgrowth on the denture, the patient was advised to begin applying nystatin ointment between the gums and the denture, and to start soaking the dentures nightly in chlorhexidine 0.12% solution. In addition, because the relevance of the acrylate allergy was unclear, her dentist was contacted and it was recommended that the dentures be boiled to induce polymerization of any residual un-reacted methacrylate monomers. The patient had a 90% improvement in the clinical appearance and in symptoms at an 8-week follow-up appointment. Due to logistic issues, the dentures had not yet been boiled. The improvement, despite the dentures not having been boiled, was felt to demonstrate that the acrylate allergy was not relevant. The patient has continued to slowly show further improvement over 6 months of follow-up.

  9. Further observations on high impact strength denture-base materials.

    PubMed

    Rodford, R A; Braden, M

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that high impact strength can be conferred on denture-base poly(methyl methacrylate) polymers by modification with acrylic-terminated butadiene-styrene block copolymers, and that the acrylic end-group was necessary for effective reinforcement. It is now shown that, by solvent extraction studies, grafting of the copolymer occurs both with acrylic-terminated and non-terminated block copolymers. It is therefore concluded that the mode of grafting is different, and some possible mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Effect of biofilm formation, and biocorrosion on denture base fractures.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Cem; Ergin, Alper; Ayyildiz, Simel; Cosgun, Erdal; Uzun, Gulay

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the destructive effects of biofilm formation and/or biocorrosive activity of 6 different oral microorganisms. Three different heat polymerized acrylic resins (Ivocap Plus, Lucitone 550, QC 20) were used to prepare three different types of samples. Type "A" samples with "V" type notch was used to measure the fracture strength, "B" type to evaluate the surfaces with scanning electron microscopy and "C" type for quantitative biofilm assay. Development and calculation of biofilm covered surfaces on denture base materials were accomplished by SEM and quantitative biofilm assay. According to normality assumptions ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis was selected for statistical analysis (α=0.05). Significant differences were obtained among the adhesion potential of 6 different microorganisms and there were significant differences among their adhesion onto 3 different denture base materials. Compared to the control groups after contamination with the microorganisms, the three point bending test values of denture base materials decreased significantly (P<.05); microorganisms diffused at least 52% of the denture base surface. The highest median quantitative biofilm value within all the denture base materials was obtained with P. aeruginosa on Lucitone 550. The type of denture base material did not alter the diffusion potential of the microorganisms significantly (P>.05). All the tested microorganisms had destructive effect over the structure and composition of the denture base materials.

  11. Effect of biofilm formation, and biocorrosion on denture base fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ergin, Alper; Ayyildiz, Simel; Cosgun, Erdal; Uzun, Gulay

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate the destructive effects of biofilm formation and/or biocorrosive activity of 6 different oral microorganisms. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different heat polymerized acrylic resins (Ivocap Plus, Lucitone 550, QC 20) were used to prepare three different types of samples. Type "A" samples with "V" type notch was used to measure the fracture strength, "B" type to evaluate the surfaces with scanning electron microscopy and "C" type for quantitative biofilm assay. Development and calculation of biofilm covered surfaces on denture base materials were accomplished by SEM and quantitative biofilm assay. According to normality assumptions ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis was selected for statistical analysis (α=0.05). RESULTS Significant differences were obtained among the adhesion potential of 6 different microorganisms and there were significant differences among their adhesion onto 3 different denture base materials. Compared to the control groups after contamination with the microorganisms, the three point bending test values of denture base materials decreased significantly (P<.05); microorganisms diffused at least 52% of the denture base surface. The highest median quantitative biofilm value within all the denture base materials was obtained with P. aeruginosa on Lucitone 550. The type of denture base material did not alter the diffusion potential of the microorganisms significantly (P>.05). CONCLUSION All the tested microorganisms had destructive effect over the structure and composition of the denture base materials. PMID:23755339

  12. Polyamide as a Denture Base Material: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Giti, Rashin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the biocompatibility, physical, and mechanical properties of the polyamide denture base materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1990-2014 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley Inter Science engines using the search terms "nylon denture base" and "polyamide denture base". Searching the key words yielded a total of 82 articles. By application of inclusion criteria, the obtained results were further reduced to 24 citations recruited in this review. Several studies have evaluated various properties of polyamide (nylon) denture base materials. According to the results of the studies, currently, thermo-injectable, high impact, flexible or semi-flexible polyamide is thought to be an alternative to the conventional acrylic resins due to its esthetic and functional characteristics and physicochemical qualities. It would be justifiable to use this material for denture fabrication in some cases such as severe soft/ hard tissue undercuts, unexplained repeated fracture of denture, in aesthetic-concerned patients, those who have allergy to other denture base materials, and in patients with microstomia.  Although polyamide has some attractive advantages, they require modifications to produce consistently better properties than the current polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) materials. Moreover, since there is a very limited knowledge about their clinical performance, strict and careful follow-up evaluation of the patients rehabilitated with polyamide prosthesis is recommended.

  13. Polyamide as a Denture Base Material: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Giti, Rashin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the biocompatibility, physical, and mechanical properties of the polyamide denture base materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1990-2014 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley Inter Science engines using the search terms “nylon denture base” and “polyamide denture base”. Searching the key words yielded a total of 82 articles. By application of inclusion criteria, the obtained results were further reduced to 24 citations recruited in this review. Several studies have evaluated various properties of polyamide (nylon) denture base materials. According to the results of the studies, currently, thermo-injectable, high impact, flexible or semi-flexible polyamide is thought to be an alternative to the conventional acrylic resins due to its esthetic and functional characteristics and physicochemical qualities. It would be justifiable to use this material for denture fabrication in some cases such as severe soft/ hard tissue undercuts, unexplained repeated fracture of denture, in aesthetic-concerned patients, those who have allergy to other denture base materials, and in patients with microstomia.  Although polyamide has some attractive advantages, they require modifications to produce consistently better properties than the current polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) materials. Moreover, since there is a very limited knowledge about their clinical performance, strict and careful follow-up evaluation of the patients rehabilitated with polyamide prosthesis is recommended. PMID:26106628

  14. Reinforcement of poly(methyl methacrylate) denture base with glass flake.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Paul; Wood, David J; Bubb, Nigel L

    2005-04-01

    Since the introduction of poly(methyl methacrylate) as a denture base material, it has suffered from having relatively poor mechanical properties. Many methods of improving its strength and toughness have been investigated. Most of these have not been adopted due to: increased cost, the need for specialist processing equipment or increased laboratory time due to more complicated procedures. Glass flake has been used as a reinforcing agent in many industrial polymers, but is as yet untested with denture base acrylic materials. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of adding glass flake to denture base acrylic powder on the fracture toughness of the set material. Glass flake was added in 5, 10 or 20% w/w to Trevalon denture base powder. The material was mixed, flasked, packed and processed in a manner typical for a denture base material. Fracture toughness was determined using a double torsion test technique. The addition of glass flake gave up to a 69% increase in fracture toughness compared to plain Trevalon material. The addition of 5% glass flake lead to an improvement in fracture toughness that was statistically significant compared to both plain Trevalon and the 10 and 20% groups. The significant improvement in fracture toughness of a denture base acrylic material using glass flake is an extremely promising result. Other mechanical properties will require testing before glass flake can be recommended as a reinforcing agent for denture base acrylic materials.

  15. Effects of ageing and staining on color of acrylic resin denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Gregorius, Wendy C; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Goodacre, Charles J; Roggenkamp, Clyde L; Powers, John M; Paravina, Rade D

    2012-12-01

    To assess the color stability of high-strength acrylic resin denture teeth after exposure to red wine, coffee and artificial ageing. Four different shades of acrylic resin denture teeth were selected from three manufacturers. The teeth were evaluated in two phases: Phase I, upon staining for 7 days in distilled water (control Group A), red wine (experimental Group B) and coffee (experimental Group C), and Phase II, upon artificial ageing in a Weather-Ometer for a total exposure of 150 kJ/m(2) (control Group A; Phase I). Denture tooth positioning jigs were fabricated and color data recorded by means of an intra-oral spectrophotometer and expressed using the Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) L*a*b* color notation system. Means and standard deviations were determined. The staining data were analysed by three-way ANOVA, while the artificial ageing data were analysed by two-way ANOVA. Fisher's PLSD intervals were calculated at a significance level of P ≤ 0.05. In the staining experiment, the main effects of stains and denture teeth and the two-way and three-way interactions among stains, denture teeth and shades were significant (P ≤ 0.05). The same was true for the main effects of denture teeth and shades and their interactions in the ageing experiment. The smallest overall color change upon staining in red wine was recorded for Vita Physiodens denture teeth (ΔE*=0.9 ± 0.4), followed by SR Vivodent PE 1.2 (0.6) and Portrait IPN 2.4 (0.6). Corresponding values for staining in coffee were 2.0 (0.6), 1.7 (1.0) and 1.8 (0.8), while ageing-dependent changes in color were 1.7 (0.4), 2.4 (0.8) and 1.1 (0.4) for Portrait IPN, SR Vivodent PE and Vita Physiodens teeth, respectively. Although the null hypothesis has been partially rejected, because some statistically significant changes in color and color coordinates occurred upon staining and ageing, all evaluated denture teeth exhibited good color stability compared to the 50:50% acceptability threshold used in

  16. Biofilm development by blastospores and hyphae of Candida albicans on abraded denture acrylic resin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sarah; Coulthwaite, Lisa; Loewy, Zvi; Scallan, Anthony; Verran, Joanna

    2014-10-01

    Candida albicans is a known etiologic agent of denture stomatitis. Candida hyphae exhibit the ability to respond directionally to environmental stimuli. This characteristic is thought to be important in the penetration of substrata such as resilient denture liners and host epithelium. It has been suggested that hyphal production also enhances adhesion and survival of Candida on host and denture surfaces. Surface roughness, in addition, can enhance adhesion where stronger interactions occur between cells and surface features of similar dimensions. The purpose of this study was to assess the development of hyphal and blastospore biofilms on abraded denture acrylic resin specimens and measure the ease of removal of these biofilms. Biofilms were grown for 48 hours on abraded 1-cm² denture acrylic resin specimens from adhered hyphal phase C albicans or from adhered blastospores. Subsequently, all specimens were stained with Calcofluor White and examined with confocal scanning laser microscopy. Biofilms were removed by vortex mixing in sterile phosphate buffered saline solution. Removed cells were filtered (0.2-μm pore size). Filters were dried at 37°C for 24 hours for dry weight measurements. Any cells that remained on the acrylic resin specimens were stained with 0.03% acridine orange and examined with epifluorescence microscopy. Biofilms grown from both cell types contained all morphologic forms of C albicans. Although the underlying surface topography did not affect the amount of biofilm produced, biofilms grown from hyphal phase Candida were visibly thicker and had greater biomass (P<.05). These biofilms were less easily removed from the denture acrylic resin, especially in the case of rougher surfaces, evidenced by the higher numbers of retained cells (P≤.05). The presence of hyphae in early Candida biofilms increased biofilm mass and resistance to removal. Increased surface roughness enhances retention of hyphae and yeast cells, and, therefore, will

  17. The Biomechanical Effect of Different Denture Base Materials on the Articular Disc in Complete Denture Wearers: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    El-Zawahry, Mohamed M.; El-Ragi, Ahmed A.; El-Anwar, Mohamed I.; Ibraheem, Eman M.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different denture base materials on the stress distribution in TMJ articular disc (AD) in complete denture wearers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A three dimensional Finite Element (FEA) models of an individual temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was built on the basis CT scan. The FEA model consisted of four parts: the condyle, the articular disc, the denture base, and the articular eminence skull. Acrylic resin and chrome-cobalt denture base materials were studied. Static loading of 300N was vertically applied to the central fossa of the mandibular second premolar. Stress and strain were calculated to characterize the stress/strain patterns in the disc. RESULTS: The maximum tensile stresses were observed in the anterior and posterior bands of (AD) on load application with the two denture base materials. The superior boundaries of the glenoid fossa showed lower stress than those on the inferior boundaries facing the condyle. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of the present study it may be concluded that: The denture base material may have an effect in stress-strain pattern in TMJ articular disc. The stiffer denture base material, the better the distribution of the load to the underling mandibular supporting structures & reducing stresses induced in the articular disc. PMID:27275270

  18. Effect of surface treatment on the bonding of an autopolymerizing soft denture liner to a denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shiro; Ohashi, Hirohumi; Kurashige, Hisanori; Tanaka, Takuo

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effects of surface treatments and thermocycling on the bonding of autopolymerizing silicone soft denture liner (Sofreliner) to denture base resin. The bonding surfaces of denture base cylinders were polished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and pretreated with applications of Sofreliner Primer, Sofreliner Primer after air abrasion, Reline Primer, or Reline Primer after air abrasion. Failure loads and elongation at failure were measured after subjecting specimens to 0, 10,000, 20,000, and 30,000 thermocycles. Failure modes were assessed for all specimens. Seven specimens were fabricated for each of 16 groups, including four pretreatments and four thermocycle groups. Failure loads of the Sofreliner Primer group were significantly higher than those of the air-abrasion group up to 20,000 thermocycles; both groups showed cohesive failures of the soft denture liner. Failure loads of the Reline Primer group were significantly higher than with Reline Primer after air abrasion up to 10,000 thermocycles. Failure mode after 10,000 thermocycles was cohesive for the Reline Primer group and mixed cohesive/adhesive for Reline Primer after air abrasion. Failure loads of the Sofreliner Primer group were significantly higher than those of the Reline Primer group at each thermocycling interval. Elongation values decreased after 10,000 thermocycles for all groups. Air abrasion on the denture base resin surface was not effective in enhancing failure load. Cyclic thermal stress is one factor degrading the bond between soft denture liner and acrylic resin denture base.

  19. Evaluation of flexural strength and color stability of different denture base materials including flexible material after using different denture cleansers.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vrinda R; Shah, Darshana Nilesh; Chauhan, Chirag J; Doshi, Paras J; Kumar, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Present study aimed at evaluating the colour stability and flexural strength of flexible denture base materials (Valplast) and Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base material (Meliodent) processed by two different methods (Injection moulding and compression moulding) after immersing them in three different denture cleansers with acidic, basic and neutral PH. Total 120 specimens (65 × 10 × 3 mm3), 40 specimens of each material (Valplast, Meliodent compression moulding and injection moulding) were immersed in denture cleansers having different PH; Valclean (Acidic), Clinsodent (Basic) and Polident (Neutral) as well as Distilled Water. Color changes were measured with a spectrophotometer after 1 month, 3 months and 6 months of immersion cycle. A flexural 3-point bending test was carried out by using an Instron universal testing machine after 6 months of soaking. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Maximum effect on colour stability was noted with Clinsodent followed by Valclean. Least color changes were observed after immersion in Polident. Colour difference was increased significantly as the immersion time increased. For both Meliodent and Nylon resins, statistically significant change in flexural strength occurred with immersion in all denture cleansers. Clinsodent has greater effect as compared to Valclean and Polident. Polident and Valclean can be safely used as denture cleanser for both nylon and acrylic resin denture base materials as far as colour stability and flexural strength both are concerned.

  20. Sensitivity of Candida Albicans Biofilm Cells Grown on Denture Acrylic to Antifungal Proteins and Chlorhexidine

    PubMed Central

    Pusateri, Christopher R.; Monaco, Edward A.; Edgerton, Mira

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Candida albicans cells form biofilms on polymeric surfaces of dentures and other prostheses introduced into the oral cavity. Many biofilm microorganisms exhibit resistance to antimicrobial agents; C. albicans cells may also develop resistance to naturally-occurring antifungal peptides in human saliva including histatins (Hsts) and defensins (hBDs). Therefore, we evaluated Hst 5 activity on C. albicans biofilm cells compared to planktonic cells and measured whether surface treatment of denture acrylic with Hst 5, hBD-3, or chlorhexidine gluconate could inhibit in vitro biofilm development. Methods Acrylic disks were preconditioned with 500 μl saliva for 30 min, and inoculated with C. albicans cells (106 cells/ml) for 1 h, at 37 °C. Non-adherent cells were removed by washing and disks and were incubated in YPD growth medium for 24, 48, and 72 h at 37 °C. Candidacidal assays were performed on 48-hour-biofilms and on planktonically-grown cells using Hst 5 (15.5 μM, 31.25 μM, 62 μM). Cell adhesion was compared on disks pre-coated with 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, 50 μM Hst 5, or 0.6 μM hBD-3 after 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h growth. Results No significant difference was observed in sensitivity to Hst 5 of biofilm cells compared to planktonic cells (p > 0.05). Pre-coating disks with hBD-3 did not inhibit biofilm development; however, Hst 5 significantly inhibited biofilm development at 72 h, while 0.12% chlorhexidine significantly inhibited biofilm development at all time intervals (p < 0.05). Conclusions C. albicans biofilm cells grown on denture acrylic are sensitive to killing by Hst 5. Surface coating acrylic with chlorhexidine or Hst 5 effectively inhibits biofilm growth and has potential therapeutic application. PMID:19249746

  1. Comparative evaluation of different mechanical modifications of denture teeth on bond strength between high-impact acrylic resin and denture teeth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Phukela, Sumit Singh; Chintalapudi, Siddesh Kumar; Sachdeva, Harleen; Dhall, Rupinder Singh; Sharma, Neeraj; Prabhu, Allama

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objective: Acrylic teeth separates from the denture base and remains a major worry in day-to-day routine dental procedure. The present study was conducted to comparatively evaluate different mechanical modifications of acrylic teeth on bond strength between Lucitone 199 heat cure resin and cross-linked teeth. Materials and Methods: The test specimens, central incisors (21) were demarcated into four groups. Group 1 was the control group, whereas Group 2, Group 3, and Group 4 were experimental groups modified with round groove, vertical groove, and T-shaped groove, respectively. The preparation of masterpiece was done by aligning the long axis of the central incisor teeth at 45° to the base of a wax block (8 mm × 10 mm × 30 mm), with ridge lap surface contacting the base. These test specimen (21) was prepared by Lucitone 199 heat cure resin. Evaluation of bond strength of all the specimens was done using universal tester (materials testing machine). Shapiro–Wilk Test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Bonferroni test were done to do statistical investigation. Results: Group 1 specimens prepared by Lucitone 199 heat cure resin showed the lowest bond strength and Group 4 specimens prepared with T-shaped groove packed with Lucitone 199 exhibited the highest bond strength. Conclusion: The bond strength between Lucitone 199 heat cure resin and cross-linked teeth was increased when mechanical modifications was done on denture teeth. The specimens prepared with T-shaped groove packed with Lucitone 199 heat cure resin showed the highest bond strength followed by Group 3, Group 2, and lastly Group 1 prepared by Lucitone 199 heat cure resin. PMID:27114957

  2. Scratch test of thermoplastic denture base resins for non-metal clasp dentures.

    PubMed

    Kawara, Misao; Iwata, Yoshihiro; Iwasaki, Masatoshi; Komoda, Yoshihiro; Iida, Takashi; Asano, Takashi; Komiyama, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Several thermoplastic denture base resins have been introduced for the fabrication of non-metal clasp dentures. Although the surface of these materials is easily damaged, the surface roughness and characteristics of scratches created have not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness of thermoplastic resins using a scratch test for the development of future materials. Four thermoplastic (polyamide: Valplast(®); VLP and Lucitone FRS(®); FRS, polyethylene terephthalate: EstheShot(®); ES, and polyester: EstheShot Bright(®); ESB) and two conventional acrylic (Heat-polymerizing: Urban(®); HC, and Pour type auto-polymerizing: Pro-Cast DSP(®); PR) denture base resins were examined. Eight specimens, approximately 10mm×10mm×30mm in size, of each material were fabricated. Scratch test was performed by a scratch tester with a diamond indenter of 10-μm radius and cone angle 90°, applying a constant load of 500mN, and 2-mm-long scratches were made. The scratch marks were studied under 3D laser measuring microscope and cross-section profiles at approximately 0.5mm, 1.0mm, and 1.5mm from the starting point were extracted and measured with analysis software. Data from 24 cross-section profiles in each denture base material were analyzed. The maximum depths of ES, ESB and FRS were greater than VLP, PR and HC, and the scratch widths of ES, ESB, FRS and VPL were greater than PR and HC. The results showed that the surface of thermoplastic denture base resins was easily damaged compared to polymethyl methacrylate. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical performance of a light-cured denture base material compared to polymethylmethacrylate--a randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Gohlke-Wehrße, Hanna-Lena; Giese-Kraft, Katja; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term performance of a visible light-cured resin (VLCR) denture base material and to compare it to a well-established polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based denture acrylic in a randomized split-mouth clinical long-term study. One hundred removable partial dentures in 90 patients, with at least two saddles each, were investigated. One saddle was made of VLCR, while the other was made of PMMA at random. Plaque adhesion, tissue reaction, and technical parameters of the dentures were assessed 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Though VLCR showed higher plaque adhesion than PMMA after 6, 12, and 18 months (p < 0.001), there were no important differences with regard to tissue reaction. Concerning plaque adhesion, surface quality with regard to the lower side, interfaces between denture acrylic and metal and the boundary between denture acrylic and denture tooth PMMA was rated higher than VLCR. The surface quality of the upper side of the denture saddles showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). Neither VLCR nor PMMA showed discoloration at any point in time (p > 0.05). It can be concluded that VLCR is a viable alternative for the production of removable dentures. Especially in patients with hypersensitivities to PMMA, VLCR is particularly suitable for clinical use.

  4. An investigation of self-reinforced poly(methyl methacrylate) denture base acrylic resin using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jagger, D C; Harrison, A; Jandt, K D

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the interfacial region of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) reinforced with untreated and surface-treated PMMA fibers in both chopped and continuous form using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Acrylic resin specimens incorporating untreated and surface-treated (with butadiene styrene latex emulsion) PMMA fibers were examined using a scanning electron microscope and an atomic force microscope. There was evidence of random arrangement of untreated and surface-treated chopped fibers throughout specimens with areas of dense fiber aggregation and other areas containing few or no fibers. For the untreated and surface-treated fibers in continuous forms (a single and 2 unidirectional layers), there was evidence of fiber displacement and buckling, together with variation in interfiber spacing. For the specimens containing surface-treated continuous fibers in a cross-ply arrangement that had demonstrated a substantial improvement in the modulus of rupture, there was no evidence of fiber buckling, and the layer of butadiene styrene was consistently thin and even in comparison to weaker specimens. The thickness of the rubber layer and the fiber arrangement (in terms of fiber displacement and interfiber spacing) may be important factors in the success of the reinforcement.

  5. Comparative evaluation of the effect of denture cleansers on the surface topography of denture base materials: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jeyapalan, Karthigeyan; Kumar, Jaya Krishna; Azhagarasan, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to evaluate and compare the effects of three chemically different commercially available denture cleansing agents on the surface topography of two different denture base materials. Materials and Methods: Three chemically different denture cleansers (sodium perborate, 1% sodium hypochlorite, 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate) were used on two denture base materials (acrylic resin and chrome cobalt alloy) and the changes were evaluated at 3 times intervals (56 h, 120 h, 240 h). Changes from baseline for surface roughness were recorded using a surface profilometer and standard error of the mean (SEM) both quantitatively and qualitatively, respectively. Qualitative surface analyses for all groups were done by SEM. Statistical Analysis Used: The values obtained were analyzed statistically using one-way ANOVA and paired t-test. Results: All three denture cleanser solutions showed no statistically significant surface changes on the acrylic resin portions at 56 h, 120 h, and 240 h of immersion. However, on the alloy portion changes were significant at the end of 120 h and 240 h. Conclusion: Of the three denture cleansers used in the study, none produced significant changes on the two denture base materials for the short duration of immersion, whereas changes were seen as the immersion periods were increased. PMID:26538915

  6. Isolation of epithelial cells from acrylic removable dentures and gender identification by amplification of SRY gene using real time PCR.

    PubMed

    George, Renjith; Sriram, G; Saraswathi, Tr; Sivapathasundharam, B

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the usefulness of acrylic dentures as the source of DNA for forensic analysis. Thirty-eight samples (21 males and 17 females) were collected and stored for different time periods. The epithelial cells adhered to the dentures were retrieved and the genomic DNA was extracted. All the samples yielded sufficient amount of DNA for analysis irrespective of the storage time. Gender determination was done by amplification of the sex determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY) using real-time polymerase chain reaction with 100% accuracy, within minimal time. With this study, we conclude that saliva-stained acrylic dentures can act as a source of forensic DNA and co-amplification of SRY gene with other routine sex typing markers will give unambiguous gender identification.

  7. Bond strength and degree of infiltration between acrylic resin denture liner after immersion in effervescent denture cleanser.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Marina Xavier; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena; Malheiros-Segundo, Antônio de Luna; Macedo, Ana Paula; Paranhos, Helena Freitas Oliveira

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium perborate on the bond strength and degree of infiltration between acrylic resin/resilient denture liners. Three denture liners (Elite Soft, Mucopren Soft, Kooliner) were investigated. Twenty specimens (83 x 10 x 10 mm(3)) of each material were made by processing the denture liners against two polymerized PMMA blocks. Ten specimens for each material were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C (control group: TBS1), and the other ten specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C combined with sodium perborate (experimental group: TBS2). All specimens were placed under tension until failure in a Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min after 7 (T7) and 60 (T60) days (n = 5). Failure strength (MPa) was recorded, and mode of failure was characterized as cohesive, adhesive, or cohesive/adhesive. For the infiltration tests, ten circular specimens (14-mm diameter x 2-mm thick) of each material were stored in artificial saliva and 0.5% methylene blue at 37 degrees C (control group: I1), and ten specimens were stored in artificial saliva and 0.5% methylene blue at 37 degrees C combined with daily immersions for 5 minutes in an effervescent solution of sodium perborate (experimental group: I2). The degree of infiltration was obtained through photographs and using Software Image Tool after 120 days. For Kooliner, the statistical test did not show a significant difference in the bond strength due to the influence of the immersion period or to the use of sodium perborate. Elite Soft presented a significant increase in the average tension in T7 and in T60 in both TBS1 and TBS2. Inversely, the Mucopren suffered a significant decrease in the tension value in the same period as the TBS1 group as well as in the TBS2. The infiltration percentage was analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test (26.18; p < 0.05), which indicated significant differences between the compared averages for the

  8. Three dimensional deformation of dry-stored complete denture base at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there is any typical deformation pattern existing in complete denture when it was dried by using the 3D scanner and surface matching program. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 28 denture bases were fabricated with heat curing acrylic resin (each 14 upper and lower denture bases), and 14 denture bases (each 7 upper and lower denture bases) were stored in the water bottle (water stored), and another 14 denture bases were stored in the air (dry stored). Each specimen was scanned at 1st day after deflasking, 14th day after deflasking, and 28th day after deflasking, and digitalized. Three dimensional deformation patterns were acquired by comparison of the data within storage group using surface matching program. For evaluating differences between groups, these data were compared statisticallyusing Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney-U test (α=.05). RESULTS When evaluating 3D deformation of denture base, obvious deformations were not found in maxillary and mandibular water storage group. However, in dry stored group, typical deformation pattern was detected as storage time passes. It occurred mostly in first two weeks. Major deformations were found in the bilateral posterior area in both maxillary and mandibular group. In maxillary dry stored group, a statistical significance was found. CONCLUSION It was proved that in both upper and lower denture bases, dry storage caused more dimensional deformation than water storage with typical pattern. PMID:27555899

  9. Three dimensional deformation of dry-stored complete denture base at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seo-Ryeon; Lee, Joon-Seok

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there is any typical deformation pattern existing in complete denture when it was dried by using the 3D scanner and surface matching program. A total of 28 denture bases were fabricated with heat curing acrylic resin (each 14 upper and lower denture bases), and 14 denture bases (each 7 upper and lower denture bases) were stored in the water bottle (water stored), and another 14 denture bases were stored in the air (dry stored). Each specimen was scanned at 1(st) day after deflasking, 14(th) day after deflasking, and 28(th) day after deflasking, and digitalized. Three dimensional deformation patterns were acquired by comparison of the data within storage group using surface matching program. For evaluating differences between groups, these data were compared statisticallyusing Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney-U test (α=.05). When evaluating 3D deformation of denture base, obvious deformations were not found in maxillary and mandibular water storage group. However, in dry stored group, typical deformation pattern was detected as storage time passes. It occurred mostly in first two weeks. Major deformations were found in the bilateral posterior area in both maxillary and mandibular group. In maxillary dry stored group, a statistical significance was found. It was proved that in both upper and lower denture bases, dry storage caused more dimensional deformation than water storage with typical pattern.

  10. Evaluation of the effect of denture adhesives on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Mahmoud; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of four commercially available denture adhesives (DAs) on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base materials. Fifty specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate, and another fifty specimens of light-cured urethane dimethacrylate were divided into five groups (n = 10), each was immersed in four prepared DAs (Corega Super Cream, Corega Ultra Powder, Olivafix Cream, Protefix Cream) as well as distilled water (control group). The mean surface roughness (R a) of the polished and unpolished surfaces of the specimens was recorded using profilometer device. T-test for paired observation was used to indicate any changes in surface roughness between the baseline and after 30 days of immersion in the DA. Almost all the tested DAs had no significant effect on the roughness of polished and unpolished surfaces of both denture base materials. The Corega super cream DA produced significant increase in the roughness of the polished surfaces of both types of acrylic specimens (P < 0.05). The majority of the investigated DAs appears not to affect the surface roughness of denture base materials. Only Corega super cream DA produced detectable increase in the roughness of polished surfaces of denture base specimens.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of denture adhesives on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Mahmoud; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of four commercially available denture adhesives (DAs) on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base materials. Materials and Methods: Fifty specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate, and another fifty specimens of light-cured urethane dimethacrylate were divided into five groups (n = 10), each was immersed in four prepared DAs (Corega Super Cream, Corega Ultra Powder, Olivafix Cream, Protefix Cream) as well as distilled water (control group). The mean surface roughness (Ra) of the polished and unpolished surfaces of the specimens was recorded using profilometer device. T-test for paired observation was used to indicate any changes in surface roughness between the baseline and after 30 days of immersion in the DA. Results: Almost all the tested DAs had no significant effect on the roughness of polished and unpolished surfaces of both denture base materials. The Corega super cream DA produced significant increase in the roughness of the polished surfaces of both types of acrylic specimens (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The majority of the investigated DAs appears not to affect the surface roughness of denture base materials. Only Corega super cream DA produced detectable increase in the roughness of polished surfaces of denture base specimens. PMID:27403047

  12. Colour stability of acrylic resin denture teeth after immersion in different beverages.

    PubMed

    Arana-Correa, B E; Sepúlveda-Navarro, W F; Florez, F L E; Urban, V M; Jorge, J H; Campanha, N H

    2014-06-01

    The colour stability of acrylic resin denture teeth in beverages was investigated. A spectrophotometer measured the colour (CIE-L*a*b* system) of all specimens after storage in distilled water/for 24 h at 37 degrees C (T0). Specimens were then immersed in various beverages. After 15 days (T1) and 30 days (T2), for each material, the mean deltaE values were calculated and compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey intervals (alpha = 0.05). In the deltaT0T1 period, specimens stored in red wine were significantly discoloured, compared to distilled water (P = 0.003). There was no difference between immersion solutions in deltaET0T2 (P = 0.772) and in deltaET1T2 (P = 0.058), and no difference between materials in all immersion periods.

  13. Effect of denture cleansers on color stability, surface roughness, and hardness of different denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Porwal, Anand; Khandelwal, Meenakshi; Punia, Vikas; Sharma, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different denture cleansers on the color stability, surface hardness, and roughness of different denture base resins. Three denture base resin materials (conventional heat cure resin, high impact resin, and polyamide denture base resin) were immersed for 180 days in commercially available two denture cleansers (sodium perborate and sodium hypochlorite). Color, surface roughness, and hardness were measured for each sample before and after immersion procedure. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc honestly significant difference test were used to evaluate color, surface roughness, and hardness data before and after immersion in denture cleanser (α =0.05). All denture base resins tested exhibited a change in color, surface roughness, and hardness to some degree in both denture cleansers. Polyamides resin immersed in sodium perborate showed a maximum change in color after immersion for 180 days. Conventional heat cure resin immersed in sodium hypochlorite showed a maximum change in surface roughness and conventional heat cure immersed in sodium perborate showed a maximum change in hardness. Color changes of all denture base resins were within the clinically accepted range for color difference. Surface roughness change of conventional heat cure resin was not within the clinically accepted range of surface roughness. The choice of denture cleanser for different denture base resins should be based on the chemistry of resin and cleanser, denture cleanser concentration, and duration of immersion.

  14. [Changes in gingival blood circulation in patients with provisional fixed acrylic dentures].

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, A S; Rudakova, Iu A; Ivanova, S B; Nekrasov, A N

    2015-01-01

    The adhesion of oral microorganisms to the surface of teeth and dental restorative materials is often the starting point in the developments of caries and periodontal disease. Formation of biofilm on the surface provisional acrylic bridge is especially quickly and can potentially generate decay or periodontal disease on the teeth. Occlusion trauma and occlusion disorders effects on increasing of injure regional periodontal tissues. Using ultrasonic doppler diagnostics oral mucosal blood flow was measured in 79 patients with periodontitis of medium severity with different hygiene conditions before and during orthopedic treatment by provisional fixed dentures was model by different methods. According to the results of this study was stated optimization of oral mucosal blood flow after pre-prosthetic treatments and the supportive hygiene periodontal care during the treatment. Results was used for reduce of functional stress in the in periodontal tissues during the orthopedic alignment by the use of fixed dentures. Specific prosthodontic hygiene protocol and model by individual articulator must be used to treat patients with widespread chronic periodontitis by interim prostheses.

  15. The effect of glass fiber reinforcement on the residual monomer content of two denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Handan; Aydin, Cemal; Cağlar, Alper; Yaşar, Ahmet

    2003-02-01

    The amount of residual monomer is one of the principal factors affecting the properties of acrylic resin denture bases. In recent years, glass fibers have been used to strengthen denture base resins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of glass fiber reinforcement on the amount of residual methyl methacrylate released from two different denture base resins (heat cured and autopolymerized). Continuous unidirectional and woven preimpregnated glass fiber reinforcements (Stick and Stick Net) were used to reinforce heat-curing and autopolymerizing denture base resins. The release of residual methyl methacrylate from heat-cured and autopolymerized test specimens reinforced with glass fibers was significantly higher than that from unreinforced test specimens. Stick Net glass fiber reinforcement resulted in significantly higher residual monomer release than did Stick glass fiber reinforcement. Test specimens made from heat-cured denture polymethyl methacrylate released less residual methyl methacrylate than did specimens made from autopolymerized polymethyl methacrylate. Glass fiber reinforcement increases the residual monomer content of denture base resins. The level of residual monomer ranged from 0.11% to 0.37% in heat-cured resin and from 0.18% to 0.46% in autopolymerized denture base resin.

  16. Microwave disinfection of maxillary and mandibular denture bases contaminated with Candida Albican.

    PubMed

    Bamigboye, S A; Dosumu, O O; Ajayi, D M

    2015-09-01

    Oral environment is not sterile, and dentures worn by the patients can be infected and therefore needs disinfection. Solution disinfectants such as sodium hypochlorite and glutaraldehyde can be used but they have side effects. Microwave disinfection method is more recent, however, there are conflicting reports at the moment on the appropriate power and time regimen for disinfection of denture. To determine the power and time regimen at which the disinfection of dentures can be achieved using microwave. Forty-five acrylic denture bases were fabricated for each of the jaws and infected with solution of a stock Candida albicans and 30 infected bases were employed as control. These were placed in normal saline and then subjected to different microwave power and time regimen. Aliquots from these post-microwave solution were titrated against sabauraud agar which was subsequently incubated at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. The agar were examined for candida growth. The denture bases subjected to microwave disinfection at 350W showed Candida growth after microwave treatment irrespective of the time employed. Conversely, those microwaved at 650W and 690W for four and six minutes showed no microbial growth. The microwave regimen of 650W at 4 and 6 minutes completely disinfected the denture bases. Disinfection at higher microwave energy should be done with caution as distortion of the denture may occur.

  17. Evaluation of adhesion of reline resins to the thermoplastic denture base resin for non-metal clasp denture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Choe, Han Cheol; Son, Mee Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tensile and transverse bond strength of chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II, Mild Rebaron LC) to a thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) used for non metal clasp denture. The results were compared with those of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20) and a thermoplastic polyamide resin (Biotone). The failure sites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the mode of failure. As results, the bond strength of reline resins to a thermoplastic acrylic resin was similar to the value of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin. However, thermoplastic polyamide resin showed the lowest value. The results of this study indicated that a thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasps denture allows chairside reline and repair. It was also found that the light-polymerized reline resin had better bond strength than the autopolymerizing reline resin in relining for a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin and a thermoplastic acrylic resin.

  18. Effect of silica coating and silane surface treatment on the bond strength of soft denture liner to denture base material.

    PubMed

    Atsü, Saadet; Keskın, Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner to a denture base material after thermocycling. Fifty rectangular heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) specimens consisting of a set of 2 acrylic blocks were used in the tensile test. Specimens were divided into 5 test groups (n=10) according to the bonding surface treatment as follows: Group A, adhesive treatment (Ufi Gel P adhesive) (control); Group S, sandblasting using 50-µm Al2O3; Group SCSIL, silica coating using 30-µm Al2O3 modified by silica and silanized with silane agent (CoJet System); Group SCA, silica coating and adhesive application; Group SCSILA, silica coating, silane and adhesive treatment. The 2 PMMA blocks were placed into molds and the soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P) were packed into the space and polymerized. All specimens were thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before the tensile test. Bond strength data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR) analysis were used for the chemical analysis and a profilometer was used for the roughness of the sample surfaces. The highest bond strength test value was observed for Group A (1.35±0.13); the lowest value was for Group S (0.28±0.07) and Group SCSIL (0.34±0.03). Mixed and cohesive type failures were seen in Group A, SCA and SCSILA. Group S and SCSIL showed the least silicone integrations and the roughest surfaces. Sandblasting, silica coating and silane surface treatments of the denture base resin did not increase the bond strength of the silicone based soft liner. However, in this study, the chemical analysis and surface profilometer provided interesting insights about the bonding mechanism between the denture base resin and silicone soft liner.

  19. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis of Candida albicans isolates colonizing acrylic dentures before and after denture replacement.

    PubMed

    Choo, Khai How; Lee, Hee Ji; Knight, Nicholas J; Holmes, Ann R; Cannon, Richard D

    2017-08-01

    Yeast, in particular Candida albicans, are the principal fungal cause of denture stomatitis, and can also be present as a commensal in many individuals. Few studies, however, have examined oral retention of yeast strains over time. We analyzed the yeast present in saliva samples and from the dentures of 10 individuals colonized with yeast but with no signs of stomatitis, before new complete maxillary dentures were fitted and also at 1, 3, and 6 months after denture replacement. Yeast species were presumptively identified on selective agar plates and were present in nine individuals before denture replacement and in six at the 6-month time point. C. albicans was detected in seven individuals pre-replacement, and in three by 6 months post-replacement. Sixty-two isolates (up to five from each C. albicans-positive sample) were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) (33 from saliva and 29 from dentures). Six MLST allele profiles were identified that were common to several individuals. These profiles included three previously reported diploid sequence types (DSTs) and three novel DSTs. Two of the novel DSTs were closely related variants of a previously reported DST, and both showed loss of heterozygosity polymorphisms within one of the seven MLST gene sequences. For three individuals, at least one DST that was present before denture replacement was still detected in either saliva or on dentures at subsequent sampling times. Our results indicate that denture replacement reduces but does not remove, colonising yeast and confirm previous observations of C. albicans strain microevolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. [Materials and technologies for fabricating denture bases].

    PubMed

    Pietrokovski, Y; Pilo, R; Shmidt, A

    2010-10-01

    The materials and technologies for fabrication of denture bases have developed during the last 150 years. The requirements of the ideal material are versatile and include functional, physical and esthetical demands. The current manuscript classifies denture base materials according to their chemical characteristics into polymers, reinforced polymers and light cured polymers. Poly Methyl Metacrylate (PMMA) was developed 70 years ago, and is still the major material for fabrication of denture bases due to its esthetic characteristics, high processing and polishing abilities, relining and rebasing possibility and low cost. The main disadvantages of PMMA are its dimensional changes during polymerization, porosity and allergic/cytotoxic effects. PMMA may be reinforced by metal, polyethylene or glass fibers. Other materials used for fabrication of denture bases are Nylon and Urethane dimethacrylate. Their advantages are better esthetics, low modulus of elasticity and reduced cytotoxicity. This review presents the advances in materials and techniques used for denture bases, the different materials, their advantages and disadvantages, the chemical reactions associated with their production, and their allergic and cytotoxic side effects.

  1. Silver colloidal nanoparticle stability: influence on Candida biofilms formed on denture acrylic.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Douglas Roberto; Takamiya, Aline Satie; Feresin, Leonardo Perina; Gorup, Luiz Fernando; de Camargo, Emerson Rodrigues; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Henriques, Mariana; Barbosa, Debora Barros

    2014-08-01

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate how the chemical stability of silver nanoparticles (SNs) influences their efficacy against Candida albicans and C. glabrata biofilms. Several parameters of SN stability were tested, namely, temperature (50ºC, 70ºC, and 100ºC), pH (5.0 and 9.0), and time of contact (5 h and 24 h) with biofilms. The control was defined as SNs without temperature treatment, pH 7, and 24 h of contact. These colloidal suspensions at 54 mg/L were used to treat mature Candida biofilms (48 h) formed on acrylic. Their efficacy was determined by total biomass and colony-forming unit quantification. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and the Bonferroni post hoc test (α = 0.05). The temperature and pH variations of SNs did not affect their efficacy against the viable cells of Candida biofilms (P > 0.05). Moreover, the treatment periods were not decisive in terms of the susceptibility of Candida biofilms to SNs. These findings provide an important advantage of SNs that may be useful in the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

  2. Oral Health of Patients Treated with Acrylic Partial Dentures Using a Toothpaste Containing Bee Product.

    PubMed

    Wiatrak, Karolina; Morawiec, Tadeusz; Rój, Rafał; Mertas, Anna; Machorowska-Pieniążek, Agnieszka; Kownacki, Patryk; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Skucha-Nowak, Małgorzata; Baron, Stefan; Piekarz, Tomasz; Wrzoł, Maciej; Bogacz, Mateusz; Kasperski, Jacek; Niedzielska, Iwona

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the influence of a propolis and tee tree oil-containing hygienic agent on selected oral health parameters, oral microflora, and the condition of periodontal health. Thirty-seven patients who underwent oral rehabilitation with a removable acrylic denture were selected and randomly assigned into two groups: study group (A) which received a newly formulated propolis and tee tree oil-containing toothpaste or a control group (C) without an active ingredient. API, S-OHI, and mSBI were assessed in three subsequent stages. During each examination swabs were employed for microbiological inoculation: in the study group after 4 weeks use of the active toothpaste showed a decrease in the number of isolated microorganisms. In the control group, after 4 weeks use of the toothpaste without active ingredients resulted in increase in the number of the isolated microorganisms. Improvements in hygiene and the condition of periodontium were observed in patients using active toothpastes. In the study group the oral flora diversity was reduced by the decrease in the number of cultured microorganism species, while in the control group an increase in the number of cultured microorganisms and their species was observed.

  3. Oral Health of Patients Treated with Acrylic Partial Dentures Using a Toothpaste Containing Bee Product

    PubMed Central

    Kownacki, Patryk; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Piekarz, Tomasz; Bogacz, Mateusz; Kasperski, Jacek; Niedzielska, Iwona

    2017-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the influence of a propolis and tee tree oil-containing hygienic agent on selected oral health parameters, oral microflora, and the condition of periodontal health. Thirty-seven patients who underwent oral rehabilitation with a removable acrylic denture were selected and randomly assigned into two groups: study group (A) which received a newly formulated propolis and tee tree oil-containing toothpaste or a control group (C) without an active ingredient. API, S-OHI, and mSBI were assessed in three subsequent stages. During each examination swabs were employed for microbiological inoculation: in the study group after 4 weeks use of the active toothpaste showed a decrease in the number of isolated microorganisms. In the control group, after 4 weeks use of the toothpaste without active ingredients resulted in increase in the number of the isolated microorganisms. Improvements in hygiene and the condition of periodontium were observed in patients using active toothpastes. In the study group the oral flora diversity was reduced by the decrease in the number of cultured microorganism species, while in the control group an increase in the number of cultured microorganisms and their species was observed. PMID:28265291

  4. Reinforcement of Aluminum Oxide Filler on the Flexural Strength of Different Types of Denture Base Resins: An In vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Dhole, Rohit I; Srivatsa, G; Shetty, Rohit; Huddar, Dayanand; Sankeshwari, Banashree; Chopade, Swapnil

    2017-04-01

    Acrylic resins have been used extensively for the fabrication of denture bases because of their aesthetic qualities, ease of manipulation and repairability. Flexural fatigue of the denture base has been shown to be a factor in the clinical failure of polymethyl methacrylate resin dentures. Also, the fracture can result from impact, fatigue or degradation of the base material. Hence, there is a need to increase the strength of denture base resins. To evaluate the effect of reinforcing alumina oxide filler on the flexural strength of different acrylic resins. A total of 180 acrylic specimens were fabricated, which were divided into three groups self cure acrylic resin (SC), conventional heat cure resin (HC) and high strength heat cure resin (HI). Each group was divided into four subgroups i.e., control group and the specimens of the remaining three groups were reinforced with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) powder by 5%, 10% and 15% by weight. Specimens were stored in distilled water for one week; flexural strength was tested by universal testing machine. Results were analysed by one-way analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey paired group comparison tests. Flexural strength of SC increased by 9%, 13% and 19%, Flexural strength of HC increased by 8%, 15% and 19% and that of HI increased by 21%, 26% and 29% compared to control group by adding 5%,10% and 15% of alumina filler (p-value <0.001). Addition of 15% of alumina powder to SC showed high flexure strength compared to control group of HC (p-value <0.001). Addition of 10% and 15% of alumina powder to HC showed high flexural strength compared to control group of HI (p-value <0.001). Addition of alumina to self cure acrylic resin, conventional heat cure acrylic resin and high strength heat cure acrylic resin increased the flexural strength. Increasing the flexural strength of the acrylic resin base material could lead to more clinical success.

  5. PMMA denture base material enhancement: a review of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Mohammed M; Fouda, Shaimaa M; Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Näpänkangas, Ritva; Raustia, Aune

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews acrylic denture base resin enhancement during the past few decades. Specific attention is given to the effect of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) properties. The review is based on scientific reviews, papers, and abstracts, as well as studies concerning the effect of additives, fibers, fillers, and reinforcement materials on PMMA, published between 1974 and 2016. Many studies have reported improvement of PMMA denture base material with the addition of fillers, fibers, nanofiller, and hybrid reinforcement. However, most of the studies were limited to in vitro investigations without bioactivity and clinical implications. Considering the findings of the review, there is no ideal denture base material, but the properties of PMMA could be improved with some modifications, especially with silanized nanoparticle addition and a hybrid reinforcement system. PMID:28553115

  6. Pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of different thermoplastic resin denture base materials under impact load.

    PubMed

    Nasution, Hubban; Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2017-06-09

    The purposes of the present study were to examine the pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of thermoplastic resin denture base materials under an impact load, and to evaluate the modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of thermoplastic resin denture base. Three injection-molded thermoplastic resin denture base materials [polycarbonate (Basis PC), ethylene propylene (Duraflex), and polyamide (Valplast)] and one conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (PMMA, SR Triplex Hot) denture base, all with a mandibular first molar acrylic resin denture tooth set in were evaluated (n=6). Pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of the specimens under an impact load were observed by using pressure-sensitive sheets. The modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of each denture base (n=10) were measured on 15×15×15×3mm(3) specimen by using an ultramicroindentation system. The pressure transmission area, modulus of elasticity, and nanohardness data were statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, followed by Tamhane or Tukey HSD post hoc test (α=.05). The maximum pressure transmission data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis H test, followed by Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). Polymethyl methacrylate showed significantly larger pressure transmission area and higher maximum pressure transmission than the other groups (P<.001). Significant differences were found in modulus of elasticity and nanohardness among the four types of denture bases (P<.001). Pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission varied among the thermoplastic resin denture base materials. Differences in the modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of each type of denture base were demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Experimental basis of a new material for the manufacture of bases dentures].

    PubMed

    Shturminskiĭ, V G

    2013-10-01

    The author studied the problem of improving the quality of prosthetic removable prostheses through the development of new basic material based on polypropylene copolymer. To this end, we examined the physical and chemical structure and hygienic properties of the produced material. The studies found that the developed material of polypropylene optimal solution for the partial plate denture bases, without flaws acrylic prosthesis and improves the properties of the previously used polypropylene plastics.

  8. A Comparative Clinical Study of the Effect of Denture Cleansing on the Surface Roughness and Hardness of Two Denture Base Materials.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Amani Ramadan; Dehis, Wessam Mohamed; Elboraey, Asmaa Nabil; ElGabry, Hisham Samir

    2016-09-15

    This study aimed to verify the influence of oral environment and denture cleansers on the surface roughness and hardness of two different denture base materials. A total of sixteen identical removable disc specimens (RDS) were processed. Eight RDS were made from heat-cured acrylic resin (AR) and the other eight were fabricated from thermoplastic injection moulded resin (TR). Surface roughness and hardness of DRS were measured using ultrasonic profilometry and Universal testing machine respectively. Then the four RDS (two AR and two of TR) were fixed to each maxillary denture, after three months RDS were retrieved. Surface roughness and hardness of RDS have measured again. The surface roughness measurements revealed no significant difference (p >0.05) for both disc groups at baseline. However, both groups showed a significant increase in the surface roughness after three months with higher mean value for (TR) group. On the other hand, the (AR) group showed higher hardness mean value than (TR) group at baseline with no significant decrease in the hardness values (p >0.05) following three months follow-up period. Denture cleansers have an effect on the denture's surface roughness and hardness concurrently with an oral condition which will consequently influence the complete dentures' lifetime and patients' satisfaction.

  9. Wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Iwamoto, Misa; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2016-12-01

    Objective This study investigated the wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins using nanoindentation instrument. Materials and methods Six injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins (two polyamides, two polyesters, one polycarbonate, one polymethylmethacrylate [PMMA]) and a PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer control were tested. Elastic modulus, hardness, wear depth, and roughness were calculated using a nanoindentation instrument. Results Elastic modulus and hardness of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins were significantly lower than those of the PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer. Wear depth of polycarbonate and PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer were significantly higher than that of other injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. The roughness of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins was significantly more than that of PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer after testing. Conclusions Wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base was low compared to PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymers.

  10. Wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Iwamoto, Misa; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study investigated the wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins using nanoindentation instrument. Materials and methods Six injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins (two polyamides, two polyesters, one polycarbonate, one polymethylmethacrylate [PMMA]) and a PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer control were tested. Elastic modulus, hardness, wear depth, and roughness were calculated using a nanoindentation instrument. Results Elastic modulus and hardness of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins were significantly lower than those of the PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer. Wear depth of polycarbonate and PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer were significantly higher than that of other injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. The roughness of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins was significantly more than that of PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer after testing. Conclusions Wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base was low compared to PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymers. PMID:28642909

  11. Effectiveness of Different Cleaning Agents against the Colonization of Candida spp and the in Vitro Detection of the Adherence of These Yeast Cells to Denture Acrylic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kalkanci, Ayse; Filiz, Banu; Kustimur, Semra

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to examine the effect Klorhex and Fittydent, which are used as cleaning agents on the adhesion of Candida on the surfaces of acrylic denture and palatal mucosa. In addition, ability of yeasts to adhere to acrylic strips was evaluated after applying these agents in vitro. Materials and Methods Each group of 15 patients cleaned their dentures with either Klorhex or with Fittydent. The control group cleaned their dentures with water. Results It was found that 62.2% of the patients had colonies of Candida species on their palatal mucosa which was reduced to 51.1% after using these cleaning agents. The colonization rate with Candida spp on their dentures was reduces from 82.2% to 68.8% using these cleaning agents. The mean adhesion value of the Candida strains isolated from the acrylic strips were found to be 75 cell/strip prior to applying the Klorhex and Fittydent and 37.5 cell/strip and 15 cell/strip after applying these agents, respectively. Conclusion These results showed that Klorhex and Fittydent have a certain preventive effect on the colonization rate of Candida spp on the surface of these dentures, the palatal mucosa, as well as on the acrylic strips in vitro. PMID:18729309

  12. In-office fabrication of a definitive cast and duplication of an interim implant-supported fixed acrylic resin complete denture.

    PubMed

    Stumpel, Lambert J

    2017-01-11

    The information contained in an interim implant-supported fixed acrylic resin complete denture is a starting point for fabricating the definitive restoration. Duplicating this information in an expedient, precise, and sanitary fashion is desirable so that the interim restoration can be returned to the waiting patient. A technique is described to fabricate an accurate definitive polyvinyl siloxane cast with laboratory analogs bonded to a prepolymerized, dimensionally stable, composite resin baseplate. A screw-retained polyvinyl siloxane duplication of the interim denture is related to this cast. This combination allows for most of the relevant information of the interim denture to be communicated to the dental laboratory.

  13. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Surface Roughness of Different Denture Base Materials.

    PubMed

    Mahross, Hamada Zaki; Mohamed, Mahmoud Darwish; Hassan, Ahmed Mohammed; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-09-01

    Surface roughness is an important property of denture bases since denture bases are in contact with oral tissues and a rough surface may affect tissues health due to microorganism accumulation. Therefore, the effect of cigarette smoke on the surface roughness of two commercially available denture base materials was evaluated to emphasize which type has superior properties for clinical use. A total numbers of 40 specimens were constructed from two commercially available denture base materials; heat-cured PMMA and visible light cured UDMA resins (20 for each). The specimens for each type were randomly divided into: Group I: Heat cured resin control group; Group II: Heat cured acrylic resin specimens exposed to cigarette smoking; Group III: Light cured resin control group; Group IV: Light cured resin specimens exposed to cigarette smoking. The control groups used for immersion in distilled water and the smoke test groups used for exposure to cigarette smoking. The smoke test groups specimens were exposed to smoking in a custom made smoking chamber by using 20 cigarettes for each specimen. The surface roughness was measured by using Pocket SurfPS1 profilometer and the measurements considered as the difference between the initial and final roughness measured before and after smoking. The t-test for paired observation of test specimens after exposure to smoking was indicated significant change in surface roughness for Group II (p< 0.05) but has no significance with Group IV. Otherwise, there were no significant differences with control groups (Group I and III). The surface roughness of the dentures constructed from heat cured acrylic resin had been increased after exposure to cigarette smoke but had no impact on the dentures constructed from visible light cured resin.

  14. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Surface Roughness of Different Denture Base Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mahross, Hamada Zaki; Mohamed, Mahmoud Darwish; Hassan, Ahmed Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background Surface roughness is an important property of denture bases since denture bases are in contact with oral tissues and a rough surface may affect tissues health due to microorganism accumulation. Therefore, the effect of cigarette smoke on the surface roughness of two commercially available denture base materials was evaluated to emphasize which type has superior properties for clinical use. Materials and Methods A total numbers of 40 specimens were constructed from two commercially available denture base materials; heat-cured PMMA and visible light cured UDMA resins (20 for each). The specimens for each type were randomly divided into: Group I: Heat cured resin control group; Group II: Heat cured acrylic resin specimens exposed to cigarette smoking; Group III: Light cured resin control group; Group IV: Light cured resin specimens exposed to cigarette smoking. The control groups used for immersion in distilled water and the smoke test groups used for exposure to cigarette smoking. The smoke test groups specimens were exposed to smoking in a custom made smoking chamber by using 20 cigarettes for each specimen. The surface roughness was measured by using Pocket SurfPS1 profilometer and the measurements considered as the difference between the initial and final roughness measured before and after smoking. Results The t-test for paired observation of test specimens after exposure to smoking was indicated significant change in surface roughness for Group II (p< 0.05) but has no significance with Group IV. Otherwise, there were no significant differences with control groups (Group I and III). Conclusion The surface roughness of the dentures constructed from heat cured acrylic resin had been increased after exposure to cigarette smoke but had no impact on the dentures constructed from visible light cured resin. PMID:26501010

  15. The Effect of Microwave Disinfection on Denture Base Polymers, Liners and Teeth: A Basic Overview

    PubMed Central

    Katsimpali, Aspasia; Polyzois, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to overview the current scientific knowledge concerning the effect of microwave disinfection on denture related material properties. Cross-infection control in dentistry is a significant issue in everyday clinical practice due to the recent increase in some infectious diseases such as hepatitis B, C and AIDS and therefore numerous methods of disinfection have been used. The most widespread method of disinfection used in everyday practice is chemical, however, studies have suggested that chemical disinfectants alter the physical and mechanical properties of the acrylic resins and enable the growth and proliferation of certain bacteria. Therefore, microwaves were introduced as an easy to use-and-access, low cost, chemical free alternative. The question that arose was if and in what way the microwave irradiation affected the denture related material properties. Microwaving affects the denture resin bases, liners and teeth in different ways. The results showed that microwave disinfection could be a safe alternative for the disinfection of denture bases and liners compared to the chemical one, when the procedure is carried out in dry conditions, but could possibly cause dimensional changes of clinical significance on them when the irradiation takes place in wet environment. It also seems to have no detrimental effects of clinical importance on the flexural properties, impact strength and hardness of denture resins and the bond, flexural strength, porosity and hardness of denture liners. The effects of microwave disinfection on the hardness of denture teeth and teeth/denture bond strength are still controversial and no safe conclusions can be drawn. PMID:27688409

  16. Comparison of flexural strength in three types of denture base resins: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jaikumar, R. Arun; Karthigeyan, Suma; Ali, Syed Asharf; Naidu, N. Madhulika; Kumar, R. Pradeep; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the flexural strength of a commercially available, heat polymerized acrylic denture base material could be improved using reinforcements. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 specimens (65 mm × 10 mm × 3 mm) were fabricated; the specimens were divided into three groups with 10 specimens each. They were Group 1 - conventional denture base resins, Group 2 - high impact denture base resins, and Group 3 - glass reinforced denture base resins. The specimens were loaded until failure on a three-point bending test machine. An one-way analysis of variance was used to determine statistical differences among the flexural strength of three groups. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 21.0© (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA) and the results were obtained. Results: The flexural strength values showed statistically significant differences among experimental groups (P < 0.005). Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) reinforced with glass fibers showed the highest flexural strength values this was followed by PMMA reinforced with butadiene styrene, and the least strength was observed in the conventional denture base resins. PMID:26538898

  17. Electromyographic Evaluation of the Effect of Lined Dentures on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Edentulous Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shitij; Gaur, Abhishek; Dupare, Arun; Rastogi, Shiksha; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to examine changes in relative electromyographic (EMG) activities of temporal and masseter muscles after relining the dentures with silicone and acrylic-resin based denture liners. Materials and Methods Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 20 edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscle during maximum intercuspation was recorded. The dentures were then relined with a silicone denture liner and after an adaptation period of one month, were again subjected for electromyographic evaluation. Further, the dentures were relined with acrylic denture liner and subjected to electromyographic evaluation. Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA followed by post-hoc assessments using Tukey HSD test. Results Mean amplitude and duration with conventional dentures was found to be significantly lower as compared to silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures for all the comparisons. Statistically, no significant difference between silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures was observed for any of the comparisons. Conclusion Within the limitations of this experimental design, it was concluded that relining significantly increases electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Thus, resulting in an improved biting force, chewing efficiency and masticatory performance. There were no significant differences between silicone and acrylic based denture liners for both electromyographic variables. PMID:26436054

  18. Surface roughness of denture bases after immersion in fishcake vinegar solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodir, K.; Tanti, I.; Odang, R. W.

    2017-08-01

    Fishcake is a common food in Palembang city and is usually eaten with fishcake vinegar sauce. Fishcake vinegar solution contains acetic acid and chloride and fluoride ions, all of which cause surface roughness on the denture base material. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of fishcake vinegar solution on the surface roughness of heat-cured acrylic resin, thermoplastic nylon, and cobalt-chromium alloy denture bases. This laboratory-based experimental study was performed on heat-cured acrylic resins, thermoplastic nylon specimen plates formed in 15 × 10 × 1 mm shapes, and cobalt-chromium alloy specimens in cylinder forms with a 7.7 mm diameter and 17.5-mm height. Each group consisted of 10 pieces. Each specimen was immersed in a fishcake vinegar solution at 37 °C for 4 days. The surface roughness was measured using a profilometer before and after immersion. Statistical analyses showed significant (p < 0.05) changes in heat-cured acrylic resin, thermoplastic nylon, and the cobalt chromium alloy plates after immersion in a fishcake vinegar solution for 4 days. Fishcake vinegar solution affects the surface roughness of heat-cured acrylic resin, thermoplastic nylon, and cobalt-chromium alloy plates after a 4-day immersion period. The greatest surface roughness change occurred in the thermoplastic nylon plate, while the lowest change occurred in the cobalt-chromium alloy.

  19. Morphology and properties of denture acrylic resins cured by microwave energy and conventional water bath.

    PubMed

    Lai, C-P; Tsai, M-H; Chen, M; Chang, H-S; Tay, H-H

    2004-02-01

    This study examined the influence of microwave energy levels on the morphology and properties of an impact resistant denture material poly(methyl methacrylate) with a thickness of 10 mm. A microwave flask containing two resin blocks was processed at 80, 160, 240, and 560 W for 15, 10, 7, and 2 min, separately. Each Flask was then turned over, and cured for an additional 2 min at 560 W. The process using conventional methods was carried out at 70 degrees C for 9 h. The blocks were tested for hardness, porosity, flexural properties, solubility, and molecular weight. The morphology of the specimens after staining with osmium tetroxide was examined by transmission electron microscope. The changes in temperature with time were recorded during microwave heating at 80, 160, and 240 W, respectively. A significantly large difference in the curing temperature was observed when comparing these two processing methods. There was little difference in the mean values of surface hardness and the weight percent of the insoluble parts. The mean domain size and the volume fraction of the rubber phase favor of the water-bath method. However, the porosity in the water-bath-cured specimens was much less than that in the microwave-cured specimens. Thus, the conventionally cured specimens showed better flexural strength and flexural modulus than the microwave-cured specimens. This study has shown that microwave energy can efficiently polymerize denture base polymer. Highly statistical differences in morphology and flexural properties favor of the water-bath method. Choice of a suitable microwave power and polymerization time is important in order to reduce porosity to a minimum level and increase the domain size and volume of the rubber phase.

  20. Effect of silica coating and silane surface treatment on the bond strength of soft denture liner to denture base material

    PubMed Central

    ATSÜ, Saadet; KESKİN, Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner to a denture base material after thermocycling. Material and Methods Fifty rectangular heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) specimens consisting of a set of 2 acrylic blocks were used in the tensile test. Specimens were divided into 5 test groups (n=10) according to the bonding surface treatment as follows: Group A, adhesive treatment (Ufi Gel P adhesive) (control); Group S, sandblasting using 50-µm Al2O3; Group SCSIL, silica coating using 30-µm Al2O3 modified by silica and silanized with silane agent (CoJet System); Group SCA, silica coating and adhesive application; Group SCSILA, silica coating, silane and adhesive treatment. The 2 PMMA blocks were placed into molds and the soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P) were packed into the space and polymerized. All specimens were thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before the tensile test. Bond strength data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR) analysis were used for the chemical analysis and a profilometer was used for the roughness of the sample surfaces. Results The highest bond strength test value was observed for Group A (1.35±0.13); the lowest value was for Group S (0.28±0.07) and Group SCSIL (0.34±0.03). Mixed and cohesive type failures were seen in Group A, SCA and SCSILA. Group S and SCSIL showed the least silicone integrations and the roughest surfaces. Conclusion Sandblasting, silica coating and silane surface treatments of the denture base resin did not increase the bond strength of the silicone based soft liner. However, in this study, the chemical analysis and surface profilometer provided interesting insights about the bonding mechanism between the denture base resin and silicone soft liner

  1. The effects of surface roughness and type of denture acrylic on biofilm formation by Streptococcus oralis in a constant depth film fermentor.

    PubMed

    Morgan, T D; Wilson, M

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the effects of surface roughness and type of denture acrylic on the early development of a Streptococcus oralis biofilm in a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF). Streptococcus oralis was incubated with acrylic of known surface roughness in the CDFF. Adherent Strep. oralis were enumerated by viable counting. Cold-cure acrylic was rougher (P < 0.01) than heat-cure acrylic after polishing with abrasive paper of any given grit-grade. Heat-cure acrylic was colonized by fewer (P < 0.001) bacteria than cold-cure acrylic at any given surface roughness. The number of bacteria adhering to heat-cure and cold-cure acrylic increased linearly with mean surface roughness after 2 h incubation, the increase being greater (P < 0.001) for the cold-cure compared with the heat-cure acrylic. However, after 4 h incubation, surface roughness appeared to have no effect on the number of adherent bacteria. The type of acrylic used, and its roughness, affect the early stages of biofilm formation by Strep. oralis. Choosing an appropriate type of smooth acrylic could lead to reduced biofilm formation in vivo.

  2. Electron beam irradiation of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Behr, M; Rosentritt, M; Faltermeier, A; Handel, G

    2005-02-01

    Electron beam irradiation can be used to influence the properties of polymers. It was the aim of this study to investigate whether PMMA denture base materials can benefit from irradiation in order to have increased fracture toughness, work of fracture or hardness. Rectangular specimens of heat-and auto-curing denture base materials were electron beam irradiated (post-cured) with 25, 100 and 200 kGy using an electron acceleration of 10 MeV or 4.5 MeV respectively. Fracture toughness, work of fracture, Vickers hardness and colour changes were measured and compared with not-irradiated specimens. The toughness, work of fracture and hardness increased using 10 MeV with a dose of 25 kGy and with 100 kGy using 4.5 MeV. However, the clinical use may not benefit from the observed small changes. Higher dosage (200 kGy) decreased the values significantly. The colour changes reached a level which was found to be not clinically acceptable. PMMA denture base materials do not benefit from post-curing with electron beam irradiation.

  3. On the clinical deformation of maxillary complete dentures. Influence of denture-base design and shape of denture-bearing tissue.

    PubMed

    el Ghazali, S; Glantz, P O; Strandman, E; Randow, K

    1989-04-01

    This paper aimed to study the influence of denture base design and the shape of the denture-supporting area on the functional deformation of maxillary complete dentures. Six strain-gauged duplicate maxillary dentures were made for the study of two test subjects with different shapes of the palatal vault. Each subject was supplied with two polymethyl methacrylate dentures, one with a 1-mm-thick palatal base and the other 2 mm thick. A third denture was constructed with a cobalt-chromium base. The functional loading tests included maximum biting and the chewing of the food test samples. An analysis based on chewing time and total number of chewing cycles per test piece was also made. The results showed that surface straining is highly complex at the anterior part of the maxillary dentures constructed from polymethyl methacrylate and that increasing the denture thickness per se might not be accompanied by a reduction of strain. The results also suggest that high thrust to the supporting tissue is produced with high palatal vault dentures made in polymethyl methacrylate. The study proposes that cobalt-chromium bases may be used in maxillary dentures to reduce functional deformation and thrust to the supporting tissues at the anterior part of the maxilla.

  4. Inhibitory effect of zirconium oxide nanoparticles on Candida albicans adhesion to repaired polymethyl methacrylate denture bases and interim removable prostheses: a new approach for denture stomatitis prevention.

    PubMed

    Gad, Mohammed M; Al-Thobity, Ahmad M; Shahin, Suliman Y; Alsaqer, Badar T; Ali, Aiman A

    2017-01-01

    of zirconia nanoparticles to cold-cured acrylic resin is an effective method for reducing Candida adhesion to repaired polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture bases and cold-cured removable prosthesis. Based on the results of the current study, zirconia nanoparticles have an antifungal effect, which could be incorporated in the repair material for repairing denture bases and in PMMA removable prostheses as a possible approach for denture stomatitis prevention.

  5. Biological properties of denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Eick, J D

    1977-04-01

    The biocompatibility and clinical efficacy of dental materials have been and continue to be a major concern of the dental profession. There are some cases of dental materials that have demonstrated problems with biocompatibility, for example, silicone soft liners. Although rare, allergic stomatitis caused by denture base resin is another example. High purity, very large polymer size, and nonoccurrence in nature significantly contribute to the acceptance of polymers used as biomaterials. New Federal Food and Drug Administration law and requirements of the specification and testing program of the American Dental Association will control the biocompatibility and clinical efficacy of dental biomaterials presently available to the dental profession.

  6. Immediate maxillary denture base extension for posterior palatal seal.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Hosokawa, R; Tsuga, K; Yoshida, M

    2000-03-01

    A procedure for extension of the maxillary denture base for development of a posterior palatal seal is described. The technique involves provisional extension with paraffin wax and adding direct relining resin supported by a silicone putty core. This simple, quick procedure achieves immediate recovery of retention for underextended maxillary dentures without additional laboratory procedures.

  7. An innovative metal base denture design for a 55-year-old menopausal woman

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Vishwas; Bhatia, Garima; Jain, Nitul; Jadon, Ashwani Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a normal developmental stage in a woman's life, marking the permanent cessation of menstruation resulting from irreversible changes in the hormonal and reproductive functions of the ovaries and is associated with a large number of symptoms ranging from physical to psychological. Some of the common oral manifestations are oral burning sensation with associated mucosal infections, pain, altered taste perception, and alveolar bone loss. These symptoms may unfavorably affect oral health and treatment needs requiring dentists to devise newer methods that would add along to the treatment modalities advised by gynecologists in relieving menopausal women from above symptoms. The present case report describes an innovative method of fabricating a metal base denture in an edentulous female that would help perimenopausal/menopausal/post-menopausal edentulous women feel hot/cold sensations of food/liquids, thereby giving them relief from pain, better taste perception, and relief from associated allergic and candidal infections that are common with conventional acrylic base dentures. PMID:24082754

  8. A Comparative Clinical Study of the Effect of Denture Cleansing on the Surface Roughness and Hardness of Two Denture Base Materials

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Amani Ramadan; Dehis, Wessam Mohamed; Elboraey, Asmaa Nabil; ElGabry, Hisham Samir

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to verify the influence of oral environment and denture cleansers on the surface roughness and hardness of two different denture base materials. METHODS: A total of sixteen identical removable disc specimens (RDS) were processed. Eight RDS were made from heat-cured acrylic resin (AR) and the other eight were fabricated from thermoplastic injection moulded resin (TR). Surface roughness and hardness of DRS were measured using ultrasonic profilometry and Universal testing machine respectively. Then the four RDS (two AR and two of TR) were fixed to each maxillary denture, after three months RDS were retrieved. Surface roughness and hardness of RDS have measured again. RESULTS: The surface roughness measurements revealed no significant difference (p >0.05) for both disc groups at baseline. However, both groups showed a significant increase in the surface roughness after three months with higher mean value for (TR) group. On the other hand, the (AR) group showed higher hardness mean value than (TR) group at baseline with no significant decrease in the hardness values (p >0.05) following three months follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: Denture cleansers have an effect on the denture’s surface roughness and hardness concurrently with an oral condition which will consequently influence the complete dentures’ lifetime and patients’ satisfaction. PMID:27703578

  9. Effects of Laboratory Disinfecting Agents on Dimensional Stability of Three Commercially Available Heat-Cured Denture Acrylic Resins in India: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jujare, Ravikanth Haridas; Varghese, Rana Kalappattil; Singh, Vishwa Deepak; Gaurav, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental professionals are exposed to a wide variety of microorganisms which calls for use of effective infection control procedures in the dental office and laboratories that can prevent cross-contamination that could extend to dentists, dental office staff, dental technicians as well as patients. This concern has led to a renewed interest in denture sterilization and disinfection. Heat polymerized dentures exhibit dimensional change during disinfection procedure. Aim The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different types of widely used laboratory disinfecting agents on the dimensional stability of heat-cured denture acrylic resins and to compare the dimensional stability of three commercially available heat-cured denture acrylic resins in India. Materials and Methods Twelve specimens of uniform dimension each of three different brands namely Stellon, Trevalon and Acralyn-H were prepared using circular metal disc. Chemical disinfectants namely 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde, 1% povidone-iodine, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite and water as control group were used. Diameter of each specimen was measured before immersion and after immersion with time interval of 1 hour and 12 hours. The data was evaluated statistically using one way analysis of variance. Results All the specimens in three disinfectants and in water exhibited very small amount of linear expansion. Among three disinfectants, specimens in 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde exhibited least(0.005mm) and water showed highest (0.009mm) amount of dimensional change. Among resins, Trevalon showed least (0.067mm) and Acralyn-H exhibited highest (0.110mm) amount of dimensional change. Conclusion Although, all the specimens of three different brands of heat-cured denture acrylic resins exhibited increase in linear dimensional change in all the disinfectants and water, they were found to be statistically insignificant. PMID:27134996

  10. The Jugaad Technique for Jaw Reconstruction: Denture Based Inverse Planning.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay V; Jacob, P C; Kekatpure, Vikram; Hedne, Naveen; Koch, Felix P; Kuriakose, Moni A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this clinical paper is to introduce a technique to plan for functional maxillofacial reconstructions. Preoperative dental casts were made of the patient and mock surgery performed on the casts. A fibula analogue was then placed in an ideal functional reconstruction position. New dentures were fabricated on the fibula analogue and drill holes for the placement of implants were placed through the denture. This denture formed as a guide to position the fibula transplant during surgery. This technique was useful in producing functional and rehabilitative outcomes in cases of both maxillary and mandibular reconstructive surgeries. The Jugaad technique-denture based inverse planning-is a cost effective method for planning and executing maxillofacial reconstructions using mock surgery on casts and interim dentures.

  11. Bonding strength between a hard chairside reline resin and a denture base material as influenced by surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Leles, C R; Machado, A L; Vergani, C E; Giampaolo, E T; Pavarina, A C

    2001-12-01

    Direct relining of dentures made with hard chairside reline resins is faster than laboratory-processed reline systems and the patient is not without the prosthesis for the time necessary to perform the laboratory procedures. However, a weak bond between the autopolymerizing acrylic reline resins and the denture base material has been observed. This study evaluated the effect of six different surface treatments on the bond strength between a hard chairside reline acrylic resin and a heat-cured acrylic resin. Specimens of the heat-cured acrylic resin were divided into seven groups. One of these groups remained intact. In the other groups, a 10-mm square section was removed from the centre of each specimen. The bonding surfaces were then treated with (i) methyl methacrylate monomer, (ii) isobutyl methacrylate monomer, (iii) chloroform, (iv) acetone, (v) experimental adhesive and (vi) no surface treatment -- control group. Kooliner acrylic resin was packed into the square sections and polymerized. The bonding strength was evaluated by a three-point loading test. The results were submitted to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by a Tukey multiple range test at a 5% level of significance. No significant difference was found between the surface treatment with Lucitone 550 monomer or chloroform, but both were stronger than the majority of the other groups. The bond strength provided by all the surface treatments was lower than that of the intact heat-cured resin.

  12. Comparative evaluation of the tensile bond strength of two silicone based denture liners with denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Manish; Anil Kumar, S; Sandhu, H S; Iyer, Satish R; Ahuja, Ratandeep S

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate and compare tensile bond strength of two silicone based liners with heat cure and heat cure high impact denture base resin at baseline and after storage in artificial saliva for 30 and 60 days. Heat cure conventional and high impact acrylic blocks (120 blocks each) prepared with final test specimen of two blocks of each resin with a liner. The baseline samples and those tested after 30 and 60 days interval stored in artificial saliva in thermal incubator, all were pulled apart in UTM at 20 mm/min. The tensile bond strength and mode of failure (adhesive/cohesive) were assessed. Mean, SD determined and analysis using one way ANOVA and paired 't' test. The highest mean tensile bond strength (1.028 MPa) and the least i.e. 0.289 MPa was observed with Permaflex silicone liner against heat cure PMMA after storage in artificial saliva at 37 ± 1 °C. The study rejected the null hypothesis because storage time in artificial saliva affected the bond strength of the resilient liners examined. The results revealed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) of artificial saliva storage on the bond strength of both the liners. After storage in artificial saliva for 30 days and 60 days at 37 ± 1 °C, all the specimens showed a significant reduction in the tensile bond strength.

  13. Prosthetic rehabilitation with collapsible hybrid acrylic resin and permanent silicone soft liner complete denture of a patient with scleroderma-induced microstomia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi; Gupta, Ridhimaa; Abrahm, Dex

    2014-07-01

    Scleroderma is an autoimmune multisystem rheumatic condition characterized by fibrosis of connective tissues of the body, resulting in hardening and impairment of the function of different organs. Deposition of collagen fibers in peri-oral tissues causes loss of elasticity and increased tissue stiffness, resulting in restricted mouth opening. A maximal oral opening smaller than the size of a complete denture can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Patients with microstomia who must wear removable dental prostheses (RDPs) often face the difficulty of being unable to insert or remove a conventional RDP. A sectional-collapsible denture is indicated for the prosthetic management of these patients, but reduced manual dexterity often makes intraoral manipulation of the prosthesis difficult. A single collapsible complete denture is a better choice for functional rehabilitation of these patients. This clinical report describes in detail the prosthodontic management of a maxillary edentulous patient with restricted mouth opening induced by scleroderma with a single collapsible removable complete denture fabricated with heat-polymerized silicone soft liner and heat-cured acrylic resin. The preliminary and secondary impressions were made with moldable aluminum trays by using putty and light-body poly(vinyl siloxane) elastomeric impression material. The collapsed denture can be easily inserted and removed by the patient and also provides adequate function in the mouth. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. Flexural Strength of Cold and Heat Cure Acrylic Resins Reinforced with Different Materials.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Bijan; Firouz, Farnaz; Izadi, Alireza; Ahmadvand, Shahbaz; Radan, Pegah

    2015-05-01

    Heat-polymerized acrylic resin has been the most commonly used denture base material for over 60 years. However, the mechanical strength of acrylic resin is not adequate for long-term clinical performance of dentures. Consequently, fracture is a common clinical occurrence, which often develops in the midline of the denture base. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of cold-cure and heat-cure acrylic resins, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire for denture base repair. Ninety specimens were prepared and allocated to nine groups. Ten specimens were considered as controls, and 80 were divided into 8 experimental groups. In the experimental groups, the specimens were sectioned into two halves from the middle, and were then divided into two main groups: one group was repaired with heat cure acrylic resin, and the other with cold cure acrylic resin. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups: unreinforced, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire. All specimens were subjected to a 3-point bending test, and the flexural strength was calculated. The group repaired with heat cure acrylic resin and reinforced with glass fiber showed the highest flexural strength; however, the group repaired with cold cure acrylic resin and reinforced with polyethylene fibers had the lowest flexural strength. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with heat cure and cold cure acrylic resins without reinforcement. Repairing denture base with heat cure acrylic resin, reinforced with glass fibers increases the flexural strength of denture base.

  15. Hardness and surface roughness of enamel and base layers of resin denture teeth after long-term repeated chemical disinfection.

    PubMed

    Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Kurokawa, Luciana Ayumi; Procópio, Andréa Lemos Falcão; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Hotta, Juliana; Mello Lima, Jozely Francisca; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of successive cycles of disinfection in different denture cleansers on the surface roughness and the Vickers hardness of two layers of acrylic resin (base-BL and enamel-EL) of two commercial cross-linked artificial teeth. The occlusal surfaces of 60 acrylic resin denture posterior teeth (Trilux-TLX and SR Orthosit PE-SRO) embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin were ground fat with 1200-grit silicon carbide paper. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C and then submitted to the microhardness (VHN) and roughness (μm) tests. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 90 days and submitted to 720 disinfection cycles in sodium hypochlorite at 0.5%, 30% vinegar solution or distilled water (control). Afterward, micro-hardness and roughness tests were again performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Hypochlorite immersion decreased the hardness of BL and EL of SRO teeth, with an average reduction of 10.11% (p<0.008). TLX teeth demonstrated a hardness reduction of 28.96% of both layers for all solutions including water (p<0.0000). The roughness of both teeth was not affected by denture cleansers (p>0.37). Hypochlorite promoted deleterious effects on the hardness of both layers of the artificial teeth tested. Immersion in vinegar and water also resulted in reduction of hardness of TLX teeth. The surface hardness of the different layers of cross-linked artificial teeth can be altered by daily disinfection in denture cleansers commonly indicated for removable dentures.

  16. Evaluating the efficiency of humic acid to remove micro-organisms from denture base material.

    PubMed

    Meriç, Gökçe; Güvenir, Meryem; Süer, Kaya

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of humic acid substances on removing micro-organisms from denture base materials. Old denture wearer needs effective, easy-use and safe denture-cleaning material. Square-shaped, heat-polymerised acrylic resin specimens (n = 550) were prepared and divided into five groups (n = 110 for each) corresponding to the microbial contamination (Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Contaminated specimens were randomly assigned to the application of five different denture-cleaning agents as follows (n = 20 for each): Kloroben, Corsodyl, Steradent, Corega, experimental solution with humic acid. Ten specimens were assessed as an experimental control carried out simultaneously for the treatment groups for each micro-organism. It was divided into two groups: negative control and positive control (n = 5 for each). All acrylic specimens were incubated 37°C for 24 h (for bacterial strains) and 37°C for 48 h (for yeast strains). After incubation period, all brain-heart infusion broths (BHI) which contain disinfectant acrylic specimens were cultured on 5% sheep blood agar (for bacteria) and Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) for yeast using loop. The numbers of colony-forming units per millilitre (CFU/ml) were calculated. The results were analysed by Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis tests (p = 0.05). Corsodyl and Kloroben completely eliminated the adherence of all investigated micro-organisms (100%) and showed the highest removal activity compared with other cleaning agents (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between Corsodyl and Kloroben (p ≥ 0.05), and there was no statistically significant difference between Corega, Steradent and experimental solution (p ≥ 0.05). Humic acid could be used as an alternative 'natural' solution for denture-cleaning agent. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley

  17. In vitro evaluation of the flexural properties of All-on-Four provisional fixed denture base resin partially reinforced with fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei Bei; Xu, Jia Bin; Cui, Hong Yan; Lin, Ye; Di, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of partial carbon or glass fiber reinforcement on the flexural properties of All-on-Four provisional fixed denture base resin. The carbon or glass fibers were woven (3% by weight) together in three strands and twisted and tightened between the two abutments in a figure-of-"8" pattern. Four types of specimens were fabricated for the three-point loading test. The interface between the denture base resin and fibers was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Reinforcement with carbon or glass fibers between two abutments significantly increased the flexural strength and flexural modulus. SEM revealed relatively continuous contact between the fibers and acrylic resin. The addition of carbon or glass fibers between two abutments placed on All-on-Four provisional fixed denture base resin may be clinically effective in preventing All-on-Four denture fracture and can provide several advantages for clinical use.

  18. Effect of denture cleansers on metal ion release and surface roughness of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Davi, Letícia Resende; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Lovato-Silva, Cláudia Helena; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Chemical disinfectants are usually associated with mechanical methods to remove stains and reduce biofilm formation. This study evaluated the effect of disinfectants on release of metal ions and surface roughness of commercially pure titanium, metal alloys, and heat-polymerized acrylic resin, simulating 180 immersion trials. Disk-shaped specimens were fabricated with commercially pure titanium (Tritan), nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium (Vi-Star), nickel-chromium (Fit Cast-SB Plus), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Fit Cast-V) alloys. Each cast disk was invested in the flasks, incorporating the metal disk to the heat-polymerized acrylic resin. The specimens (n=5) were immersed in these solutions: sodium hypochlorite 0.05%, Periogard, Cepacol, Corega Tabs, Medical Interporous, and Polident. Deionized water was used as a control. The quantitative analysis of metal ion release was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ELAN DRC II). A surface analyzer (Surftest SJ-201P) was used to measure the surface roughness (µm). Data were recorded before and after the immersions and evaluated by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The nickel release proved most significant with the Vi-Star and Fit Cast-V alloys after immersion in Medical Interporous. There was a significant difference in surface roughness of the resin (p=0.011) after immersion. Cepacol caused significantly higher resin roughness. The immersion products had no influence on metal roughness (p=0.388). It could be concluded that the tested alloys can be considered safe for removable denture fabrication, but disinfectant solutions as Cepacol and Medical Interporous tablet for daily denture immersion should be used with caution because it caused greater resin surface roughness and greater ion release, respectively.

  19. Color stability, surface roughness and flexural strength of an acrylic resin submitted to simulated overnight immersion in denture cleansers.

    PubMed

    Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; Peracini, Amanda; Pisani, Marina Xavier; Oliveira, Viviane de Cássia; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated color stability, surface roughness and flexural strength of acrylic resin specimens after immersion in alkaline peroxide and alkaline hypochlorite, simulating a period of one and a half year of use of overnight immersion. Sixty disc-shaped (16x4 mm) and 80 rectangular specimens (65x10x3.3 mm) were prepared from heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Lucitone 550) and distributed into 4 groups (n=20): C1: without immersion, C2: 8 h immersion in distilled water; AP: 8 h immersion in alkaline peroxide effervescent tablet; SH: 8 h immersion in 0.5% NaOCl solution. Properties were evaluated at baseline and after the immersion. Color data were also calculated according the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). Results were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). AP (2.34 ± 0.41) caused color alteration significantly higher than C2 (0.39 ± 0.30) and SH (1.73 ± 0.52). The mean ΔE values were classified as indicial for C2 (0.36 ± 0.29) and noticeable for AP (2.12 ± 0.39) and SH (1.59 ± 0.48). SH (0.0195 ± 0.0150) caused significantly higher ΔRa (p=0.000) than the C2 (0.0005 ± 0.0115) and PA (0.0005 ± 0.0157) groups. There was no statistically significant difference (p=0.063) among the solutions for flexural strength (C1: 105.43 ± 14.93, C2: 100.30 ± 12.43, PA: 97.61 ± 11.09, SH: 95.23 ± 10.18). In conclusion, overnight immersion in denture cleansing solutions simulating a year and a half of use did not alter the flexural strength of acrylic resin but caused noticeable color alterations, higher for alkaline peroxide. The 0.5% NaOCl solution caused increase in surface roughness.

  20. Comparison of the in vitro fatigue resistance of an acrylic resin removable partial denture reinforced with continuous glass fibers or metal wires.

    PubMed

    Vallittu, P K

    1996-06-01

    The fatigue resistance of heat-polymerized acrylic resin test specimens reinforced with continuous glass fibers or metal wire was investigated. Test specimens in the shape of maxillary removable partial dentures were reinforced with one of the following: (1) circular steel wire (cross-sectional diameter, 1.0 mm); (2) semicircular steel wire (cross-sectional diameter, 1.0 x 2.0 mm); or (3) continuous unidirectional E-glass fibers. Ten specimens were fabricated for each test group. The specimens were tested by a constant force flexural fatigue test at a force of 180 N while immersed in 37 degrees C water. The number of loading cycles required to generate a fatigue fracture and the position of the fracture were measured. Results showed that the test specimens, which were either unreinforced or reinforced with metal wires, fractured after 13,197 to 39,237 loading cycles. For the glass fiber-reinforced test specimens, the fracture did not coincide with the region of the strengthener but with the opposite side of the test specimen after 1,239,298 loading cycles. The position of the fracture showed a statistically significant variation between the test groups (P < .001). This study suggests that the fatigue resistance of acrylic resin removable partial dentures reinforced with glass fibers are superior to those removable partial dentures reinforced with conventional metal wire.

  1. Effect of location of glass fiber-reinforced composite reinforcement on the flexural properties of a maxillary complete denture in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Yoshida, Kaneyoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of the location of glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) reinforcement on the flexural load at the proportional limit (FL-PL) and the flexural deflection of a maxillary acrylic resin complete denture. Material and methods. Maxillary acrylic resin complete dentures strengthened with and without FRC reinforcement were tested. The polymerized FRC was embedded in the denture base resin in the doughy state and placed (1) under the ridge lap region, (2) in the anterior region, (3) in the middle region or (4) in the anterior and posterior regions. The FL-PL and flexural deflection value at the 100-N loading point of the reinforced maxillary denture specimens were tested. Results. All of the reinforced dentures had a higher FL-PL than the denture without reinforcement but the FL-PL values of all the dentures were not significantly different from each other. The efficiency of the FRC reinforcement compared to the unreinforced denture was 1.54-1.75 times greater. All of the reinforced dentures showed significantly lower deflection compared to the unreinforced denture, but the flexural deflections of all the dentures were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions. The location of the FRC reinforcement did not affect the fracture resistance of the maxillary acrylic resin complete denture. All of the reinforced dentures had higher FL-PL and lower flexural deflection than the denture without reinforcement.

  2. Effect of experimental Ricinus communis solution for denture cleaning on the properties of acrylic resin teeth.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Marina Xavier; Macedo, Ana Paula; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; Silva, Cláudia Helena Lovato da

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated Knoop hardness, surface roughness and color alteration of artificial teeth for dentures after immersion in water, 1% sodium hypochlorite and an experimental solution of 2% Ricinus communis (RC). Thirty specimens of Vipi, Biolux and Trilux were analyzed. Tests of Knoop hardness, surface roughness and color alteration were conducted immediately after specimen preparation (T0) and after two immersion protocols for 15 days (ΔT(15)) and 183 days (ΔT(183)). Data variation (ΔT) were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05). At ΔT(15), Vipi presented hardness increase and Biolux presented the highest variation (p=0.01). RC caused the highest increase in hardness (p=0) and the lowest increase (p=0.005) in roughness. Biolux presented the lowest color alteration (p =0). At ΔT(183), Trilux underwent the highest hardness variation (p=0). Biolux presented an increase in roughness (p=0). There was no significant differences in color alteration among the artificial teeth (p=0.06) and among solutions (p=0.08) after 183 days of immersion. All solutions (distilled water, 1% sodium hypochlorite and 2% RC) caused alterations on the analyzed properties. Both immersion protocols caused alterations on the analyzed properties.

  3. Evaluation and comparison of transverse and impact strength of different high strength denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhinav; Tewari, R K

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate and compare the impact strength and transverse strength of the high-impact denture base materials. A conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin was used as a control. The entire experiment was divided into four main groups with twenty specimens each according to denture base material selected Trevalon, Trevalon Hi, DPI Tuff and Metrocryl Hi. These groups were further subgrouped into the two parameters selected, impact strength and flexural strength with ten specimens each. These specimens were then subjected to transverse bend tests with the help of Lloyds instrument using a three point bend principle. Impact tests were undertaken using an Izod-Charpy digital impact tester. This study was analyzed with one-way analysis of variance using Fisher f-test and Bonferroni t-test. There was a significant improvement in the impact strength of high-impact denture base resins as compared to control (Trevalon). However, in terms of transverse bend tests, only DPI Tuff showed higher transverse strength in comparison to control. Trevalon Hi and Metrocryl Hi showed a decrease in transverse strength. Within the limits of this in vitro study, (1) There is a definite increase in impact strength due to the incorporation of butadiene styrene rubber in this high strength denture base materials as compared to Trevalon used as a control. (2) Further investigations are required to prevent the unduly decrease of transverse strength. (3) It was the limitation of the study that the exact composition of the high-impact resins was not disclosed by the manufacturer that would have helped in better understanding of their behavior.

  4. The effect of cleaning substances on the surface of denture base material

    PubMed Central

    Žilinskas, Juozas; Junevičius, Jonas; Česaitis, Kęstutis; Junevičiūtė, Gabrielė

    2013-01-01

    Bakcground The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of substances used for hygienic cleaning of dentures on the surface of the denture base material. Material/Methods Meliodent Heat Cure (Heraeus-Kulzer, Germany) heat-polymerized acrylic resin was used to produce plates with all the characteristics of removable denture bases (subsequently, “plates”). Oral-B Complete toothbrushes of various brush head types were fixed to a device that imitated tooth brushing movements; table salt and baking soda (frequently used by patients to improve tooth brushing results), toothpaste (“Colgate Total”), and water were also applied. Changes in plate surfaces were monitored by measuring surface reflection alterations on spectrometry. Measurements were conducted before the cleaning and at 2 and 6 hours after cleaning. Results No statistically significant differences were found between the 3 test series. All 3 plates used in the study underwent statistically significant (p<0.05changed) – the reflection became poorer. The plates were most affected by the medium-bristle toothbrush with baking soda – the total reflection reduction was 4.82±0.1%; among toothbrushes with toothpaste, the hard-type toothbrush had the greatest reflection-reducing effect – 4.6±0.05%, while the toothbrush with table salt inflicted the least damage (3.5 ± 0.16%) due to the presence of rounded crystals between the bristles and the resin surface. Toothbrushes with water had a uniform negative effect on the plate surface – 3.89±0.07%. Conclusions All substances used by the patients caused surface abrasion of the denture base material, which reduced the reflection; a hard toothbrush with toothpaste had the greatest abrasive effect, while soft toothbrushes inflicted the least damage. PMID:24326781

  5. Technique for fabricating individualized dentures with a gingiva-shade composite resin.

    PubMed

    Park, Beom-Woo; Kim, Nam-Jin; Lee, Jonghyuk; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2016-05-01

    More natural dental esthetics have been sought by patients who wear conventional complete or partial dentures. Recently, gingiva-shade composite resins (GSCRs) have become available for replicating soft tissue for both fixed and removable prostheses. The technique presented is for fabricating individualized complete dentures. First the acrylic resin is mixed with a coloring agent and processed to modify the base shade of the denture. GSCRs are light polymerized onto a prepared space on the buccal surfaces of denture base to replicate the appearance of gingival tissues including blood vessels. The technique provides an outstanding natural, gingiva-like, appearance and allows complete dentures to harmonize with the individual patient's surrounding oral tissues.

  6. Effect of Cast Modification on Denture Base Adaptation Following Maxillary Complete Denture Processing.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Mohammed E; Porwal, Amit; Ehrenberg, David; Weiner, Saul

    2017-01-19

    To investigate the effect of cast modifications on denture base adaptation in coronal and sagittal projections following maxillary complete denture processing. A total of 60 edentulous maxillary casts (n = 10) were distributed among six groups. Group 1 was the control group with no modification, groups 2 through 6 included a butterfly postdam preparation, groups 3 and 4 also included a 10-mm wide/4-mm deep box with addition of four round holes in group 4, and groups 5 and 6 also included a 20-mm wide/4-mm deep box with addition of four round holes in group 6. The boxes were prepared at the mid-heel area of the casts. Two layers of baseplate wax (1 mm each) were used to standardize denture base thickness across the groups. A standard technique was used to replicate the denture tooth set-up, and standardized processing was done for all the groups. Following deflasking, casts with the dentures were sectioned in the coronal and sagittal directions. Microscopic pictures were taken at preselected points. Data were organized in tables, and statistical analyses were performed using repeated measure ANOVA, Tukey post hoc tests, and post hoc comparison tests set at 5% level of significance. Maximum gaps were measured at the mid-palatal area followed by nearby areas and the areas near ridge crests in both coronal and sagittal projections. The analyses revealed significant differences between the groups in coronal projection (1/2, 3/4, 5/6) and sagittal projection (1, 2, 3/4, 5/6) without significant differences within the pairs. The groups were ranked from the highest group 1 to the lowest group 6 relative to the gap means. Post hoc comparisons showed that points 1C and 2A had the highest gap means across the study groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be extrapolated that the denture base adaptation can be effectively increased with the box preparation at the mid-heel aspect of the casts. Significant reduction of gaps was seen when the box size increased from

  7. Effect of oxygen plasma treatment on the bonding of a soft liner to an acrylic resin denture material.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaiqin; Fang, Jianglin; Hu, Zheng; Ma, Junchi; Han, Yi; Bian, Jie

    2010-08-01

    Mechanical roughening reportedly had a weakening effect on bond strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an alternative surface roughening method, namely oxygen plasma treatment, on the tensile bond strength between denture base resin and soft liner. The soft liner used in this study was Soft Reverse, whilst the denture base material was Zi Ran. Three groups of specimens were prepared, comprising untreated specimens and oxygen plasma-treated specimens with exposure to air for 1 day and 2 days. All specimens were subjected to surface composition analysis and tensile bond strength testing. All data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, and their mean values were compared using Tukey's HSD test (p<0.01). Highest tensile bond strength was observed in the 1-day exposure group (5.2 MPa), whilst the lowest in the control group of untreated specimens (2.8 MPa). Hence, results of this study clearly indicated that oxygen plasma treatment was effective in enhancing tensile bond strength.

  8. Flexible thermoplastic denture base materials for aesthetical removable partial denture framework.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Aeran, Himanshu; Kumar, Narender; Gupta, Nidhi

    2013-10-01

    Conventional fixed partial dentures, implant supported Fixed Partial Dentures (FDPs) and removable partial dentures are the most common treatment modalities for the aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of partially edentulous patients. Although implants and FDP have certain advantages over removable partial dentures, in some cases, removable partial dentures may be the only choice which is available. Removable cast partial dentures are used as definitive removable prostheses when indicated, but location of clasps may affect aesthetics. So, when patient is concerned about aesthetics, flexible partial dentures which is aesthetically superior to flipper and cast partial dentures, may be considered. But for the success of flexible removable partial denture, proper diagnosis, treatment planning and insertion technique of this prosthesis is very important, which have been thoroughly described in this article.

  9. Effect of chemical and microwave disinfection on the surface microhardness of acrylic resin denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ligia Regina; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of simulated disinfections (2% glutaraldehyde, 1% sodium hypochlorite, and microwave energy) on the surface hardness of Trilux, Biocler, Biotone, New Ace, and Magister commercial artificial teeth. Specimens (n = 10) were made with the teeth included individually in circular blocks of acrylic resin, leaving the labial surface exposed. Cycles of simulated chemical disinfection were accomplished with the specimens immersed in the solutions at room temperature for 10 minutes, followed by tap water washing for 30 seconds and storage in distilled water at room temperature for 7 days until the next disinfection. Simulated disinfection by microwave energy was carried out in a domestic oven with 1300 W at a potency of 50% for 3 minutes with the specimens individually immersed in 150 ml of distilled water. Control (no disinfection) and the experimental groups (first and third disinfection cycles) were submitted to Knoop hardness measurements with indentations at the center of the labial tooth surface. Data were submitted to repeated measure two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Biocler, Magister, and Trilux showed lower surface microhardness when submitted to microwave. Lower microhardness for Biotone was promoted by hypochlorite, while no significant difference was shown for New Ace. The third disinfection cycle significantly decreased the tooth surface hardness only for microwave. Different disinfection methods promoted different effects on the microhardness of different types of artificial teeth. Surface microhardness of the teeth was less affected by the simulated chemical disinfections when compared to microwaved specimens. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Evaluation of heat-cured resin bases following the addition of denture teeth using a second heat cure.

    PubMed

    Polukoshko, K M; Brudvik, J S; Nicholls, J I; Smith, D E

    1992-04-01

    This study compared heat-cured acrylic resin denture baseplate distortions following a second heat cure used to add the denture teeth. The second heat cure was done with three different water-bath curing temperatures. The distortions were evaluated in three planes by use of a measuring microscope. Recorded distortions were not clinically significant.

  11. Evaluate the Effect of Commercially Available Denture Cleansers on Surface Hardness and Roughness of Denture Liners at Various Time Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Hilal S.; Singh, Sumeet; Hari, Prasad A.; Amarnath, G. S.; Kundapur, Vinaya; Pasha, Naveed; Anand, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: Chemical cleansing by denture cleansers is first choice for denture plaque control. The most common problems while using denture cleansers are hardening, porosity, odor sorption, water sorption, solubility, and colour change, bacterial and fungal growth. Chemical cleansing procedures have been found to have an effect on the physical and mechanical properties of denture liners. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of commercially available denture cleansers on surface hardness and roughness of acrylic and silicon based denture liners at various time interval. Method: Two autopolymerising denture liners Kooliner (acrylic) and GC reline soft (silicon) were tested with two commercially available denture cleansers, polident and efferdent plus. Total of 120 specimens were prepared and all the specimens were divided into six groups based on the relining materials and denture cleansers used. Surface hardness and surface roughness was tested using Shore A durometer and profilometer respectively at the end of day 1, day 7, day 30 and day 90. All the specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Cleanser solution was prepared daily by adding Polident and Efferdent plus denture cleanser tablet into 250ml of enough very warm (not hot) water. Acrylic and silicon liner groups were cleansed in a solution of denture cleanser and water for 15 minutes daily, rinsed with water and stored in artificial saliva at room temperature. The data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and independent t-test. Result: The acrylic soft lining showed gradual hardening and increase in surface roughness after immersion in denture cleanser and also with time. Acrylic liner material showed maximum hardness and roughness with Polident followed by Efferdent plus and water (control group). Silicone lining material showed a slight difference in hardness and roughness between the test group and control group. There was a slight increase in hardness in

  12. Evaluate the Effect of Commercially Available Denture Cleansers on Surface Hardness and Roughness of Denture Liners at Various Time Intervals.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Hilal S; Singh, Sumeet; Hari, Prasad A; Amarnath, G S; Kundapur, Vinaya; Pasha, Naveed; Anand, M

    2016-12-01

    Chemical cleansing by denture cleansers is first choice for denture plaque control. The most common problems while using denture cleansers are hardening, porosity, odor sorption, water sorption, solubility, and colour change, bacterial and fungal growth. Chemical cleansing procedures have been found to have an effect on the physical and mechanical properties of denture liners. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of commercially available denture cleansers on surface hardness and roughness of acrylic and silicon based denture liners at various time interval. Two autopolymerising denture liners Kooliner (acrylic) and GC reline soft (silicon) were tested with two commercially available denture cleansers, polident and efferdent plus. Total of 120 specimens were prepared and all the specimens were divided into six groups based on the relining materials and denture cleansers used. Surface hardness and surface roughness was tested using Shore A durometer and profilometer respectively at the end of day 1, day 7, day 30 and day 90. All the specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Cleanser solution was prepared daily by adding Polident and Efferdent plus denture cleanser tablet into 250ml of enough very warm (not hot) water. Acrylic and silicon liner groups were cleansed in a solution of denture cleanser and water for 15 minutes daily, rinsed with water and stored in artificial saliva at room temperature. The data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and independent t-test. The acrylic soft lining showed gradual hardening and increase in surface roughness after immersion in denture cleanser and also with time. Acrylic liner material showed maximum hardness and roughness with Polident followed by Efferdent plus and water (control group). Silicone lining material showed a slight difference in hardness and roughness between the test group and control group. There was a slight increase in hardness in all the groups with time. Very slight

  13. A qualitative analysis to compare the effects of surface machining of conventional denture base resin and two soft liners: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Santoshi V; Taruna, M; Chittaranjan, B; Reddy, Sushendhar M; Reddy, Kranti Kiran E; Kulkarni, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    The denture base acrylic resins require adjustments for various reasons. During this process there is an alteration in the surface characteristics of the denture base. Rough surfaces promote the bacterial adhesion and plaque accumulation; therefore it is important to know the character of the surface left by instrumentation on denture base materials. This study evaluated the surface characteristics of the machined surfaces of heat-cured acrylic denture base resin, GC supersoft and Permasoft softliners. Thirty 15×15×1.5mm acrylic resin specimens were fabricated with each of three acrylic resins: Lucitone 199 denture base resin (Group I), GC supersoft (Group II) and Permasoft (Group III) softliners. They were further divided into three sub Groups A, B and C, in which Sub Group A was control group that is smooth produced against the glass. Sub Group B was produced by machining with the tungsten carbide bur and Sub group C is machined with the stone bur. Each surface was evaluated by a Scanning electron microscope and data were analyzed by analysis of variance followed by Tukey's HSD test. Stone bur produced smoother surface (Ra 3.6681μm± 0.254) on Lucitone199 than the tungsten carbide bur (Ra 5.3881μm ± 0.3373). Carbide bur produced a smoother surface on the GC super soft (Ra 1.617097μm ± 0.191767) and Permasoft softliners (Ra 2.237419μm ± 0.354259). Whereas stone bur produced rougher surface on GC supersoft(Ra 2.6μm) and Permasoft (Ra 4.184839μm ± 0.409869) softliners. The present study shows each type of rotary instrument produces its own characteristic surface on each type of denture base materials and that care is needed when selecting the most appropriate instrument to adjust denture base materials. These results can have a significant clinical implication. While using Lucitone 199 stone bur can be used for chair side adjustments. Tungsten carbide bur can be used for GC supersoft and Permasoft softliners to achieve smoother surface.

  14. A Qualitative Analysis to Compare the Effects of Surface Machining of Conventional Denture Base Resin and Two Soft Liners: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Taruna, M.; Chittaranjan, B.; Reddy, Sushendhar M.; Reddy, Kranti Kiran E.; Kulkarni, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The denture base acrylic resins require adjustments for various reasons. During this process there is an alteration in the surface characteristics of the denture base. Rough surfaces promote the bacterial adhesion and plaque accumulation; therefore it is important to know the character of the surface left by instrumentation on denture base materials. This study evaluated the surface characteristics of the machined surfaces of heat-cured acrylic denture base resin, GC supersoft and Permasoft softliners. Materials and Methods: Thirty 15×15×1.5mm acrylic resin specimens were fabricated with each of three acrylic resins: Lucitone 199 denture base resin (Group I), GC supersoft (Group II) and Permasoft (Group III) softliners. They were further divided into three sub Groups A, B and C, in which Sub Group A was control group that is smooth produced against the glass. Sub Group B was produced by machining with the tungsten carbide bur and Sub group C is machined with the stone bur. Each surface was evaluated by a Scanning electron microscope and data were analyzed by analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s HSD test. Results: Stone bur produced smoother surface (Ra 3.6681μm± 0.254) on Lucitone199 than the tungsten carbide bur (Ra 5.3881μm ± 0.3373). Carbide bur produced a smoother surface on the GC super soft (Ra 1.617097μm ± 0.191767) and Permasoft softliners (Ra 2.237419μm ± 0.354259). Whereas stone bur produced rougher surface on GC supersoft(Ra 2.6μm) and Permasoft (Ra 4.184839μm ± 0.409869) softliners. Conclusion: The present study shows each type of rotary instrument produces its own characteristic surface on each type of denture base materials and that care is needed when selecting the most appropriate instrument to adjust denture base materials. These results can have a significant clinical implication. While using Lucitone 199 stone bur can be used for chair side adjustments. Tungsten carbide bur can be used for GC supersoft and

  15. Effect of Reinforcement Using Stainless Steel Mesh, Glass Fibers, and Polyethylene on the Impact Strength of Heat Cure Denture Base Resin - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, H B Mallikarjuna; Shaik, Sharaz; Sachdeva, Harleen; Khare, Sumit; Haralur, Satheesh B; Roopa, K T

    2015-01-01

    Background: The impact strength of denture base resin is of great concern and many approaches have been made to strengthen acrylic resin dentures. The objective of this study was to compare the impact strength of the denture base resin with and without reinforcement and to evaluate the impact strength of denture base resin when reinforced with stainless steel mesh, glass fiber, and polyethylene fibers in the woven form. Materials and Methods: The specimens (maxillary denture bases) were fabricated using a standard polyvinylsiloxane mold with conventional heat cured polymethyl methacrylate resin. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10). Group I specimens or control group were not reinforced. Group II specimens were reinforced with stainless steel mesh and Group III and Group IV specimens were reinforced with three percent by weight of glass fibers and polyethylene fibers in weave form respectively. All the specimens were immersed in water for 1-week before testing. The impact strength was measured with falling weight impact testing machine. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Highest impact strength values were exhibited by the specimens reinforced with polyethylene fibers followed by glass fibers, stainless steel mesh, and control group. Conclusions: Reinforcement of maxillary complete dentures showed a significant increase in impact strength when compared to unreinforced dentures. Polyethylene fibers exhibit better impact strength followed by glass fibers and stainless steel mesh. By using pre-impregnated glass and polyethylene fibers in woven form (prepregs) the impact strength of the denture bases can be increased effectively. PMID:26124604

  16. EFFECT OF THERMOCYCLING ON THE TENSILE AND SHEAR BOND STRENGTHS OF THREE SOFT LINERS TO A DENTURE BASE RESIN

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Carlos Nelson; Henriques, Flavio Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    Statement of problem In clinical practice, loss of adhesion between the silicone-based denture liner and the denture base resin is always an undesirable event that might cause loss of material softness, water sorption, bacterial colonization and functional failure of the prosthesis. Purpose This study evaluated the effect of thermocycling on tensile and shear bond strengths of three soft liner materials to a denture base acrylic resin. Material and methods Three resilient liners (Mucopren-Soft, Mollosil-Plus and Dentusil) and a heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) were processed according to manufacturers’ directions. Sixty specimens (14 x 14 mm cross-sectional area) per bond strength test (20 for each liner) were fabricated and either stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours (control groups; n=10) or thermocycled 3,000 times in water between 5°C and 55°C (test groups; n=10). The specimens were tested in tensile and shear strength in a universal testing machine until fracture. Bond strength means were compared between water-stored and thermocycled groups for each material, as well as among materials for each treatment (water storage or thermocycling). Failure mode (adhesive, cohesive and mixed) after debonding was assessed. Data were analyzed statistically by paired Student’s t-test and ANOVA at 5% significance level. Results The water-stored groups had statistically significant higher bond strengths than the thermocycled groups (p<0.05). Without thermocycling, Mucopren-Soft (2.83 ± 0.48 MPa) had higher bond strength than Mollosil-Plus (1.04 ± 0.26 MPa) and Dentusil (1.14 ± 0.51 MPa). After thermocycling, Mucopren-Soft (1.63 ± 0.48 MPa) had the highest bond strength (p<0.05). Conclusion The bond strength of the three soft denture liners tested in this study changed with their chemical composition and all of them exhibited higher bond strengths than those usually reported as clinically acceptable. Clinical Implications All soft lining materials tested in

  17. Shear force bond analysis between acrylic resin bases and retention framework (open- and mesh-type)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royhan, A.; Indrasari, M.; Masulili, C.

    2017-08-01

    Occlusions between teeth and the activity of the muscles around an artificial tooth during mastication create a force on dentures. This force causes friction between acrylic resin bases and retention frameworks that can lead to the complete loss of the acrylic resin base from the framework. The purpose of this study was to analyze the design of retention frameworks and determine which ones have a better resistance to shear forces in order to prevent the loss of heat cured acrylic resin base (HCARB). Six samples each of open-and mesh-type retention frameworks, both types made of Co-Cr material, and HCARB, were shear tested by means of a universal testing machine. The average shear force required to release the HCARB for mesh-type retention frameworks was 28.84 kgf, and the average for the open-type was 26.52 kgf. There was no significant difference between the shear forces required to remove HCARB from open- and mesh-type retention frameworks.

  18. Effect of different housing retaining materials on the flexural strength of an acrylic resin overdenture base.

    PubMed

    Ozkir, Serhat Emre; Yilmaz, Burak

    2017-04-03

    from the PMMA. The tested retaining materials significantly reduced the flexural strength of PMMA denture base. The flexural strength of the resin base with housing was significantly higher when PMMA-based retaining materials were used than when acrylic resin-based hard reline materials were used. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Flexible, stretchable electroadhesives based on acrylic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duduta, Mihai; Wood, Robert J.; Clarke, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Controllable adhesion is a requirement for a wide variety of applications including robotic manipulation, as well as locomotion including walking, crawling and perching. Electroadhesives have several advantages such as reversibility, low power consumption and controllability based on applied voltage. Most demonstrations of electroadhesive devices rely on fairly rigid materials, which cannot be stretched reversibly, as needed in some applications. We have developed a fast and reliable method for building soft, stretchable electroadhesive pads based on acrylic elastomers and electrodes made of carbon nanotubes. The devices produced were tested pre-deformation and in a stretched configuration. The adhesive force was determined to be in the 0.1 - 3.0 N/cm2 range, depending on the adhering surface. The electroadhesive devices were integrated with pre-stretched dielectric elastomer actuators to create a device in which the adhesion force could be tuned by changes in either the applied voltage or total area.

  20. Synthesis, Antifungal Activity, and Biocompatibility of Novel 1,4-Diazabicyclo[2.2.2]Octane (DABCO) Compounds and DABCO-Containing Denture Base Resins

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Jenny L.; Wang, Yapin; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Lallier, Thomas E.; Peters, Brian M.; Hamdan, Suleiman; Xu, Xiaoming; Fidel, Paul L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes a variety of oral infections, including denture stomatitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. While antifungal treatment reduces symptoms, infections are often recurrent. One strategy to address this problem is to incorporate compounds with fungicidal activities into denture materials to prevent colonization. Our laboratory synthesized novel derivatives of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO), which is an organic compound typically used as a catalyst in polymerization reactions. DABCO derivatives with different aliphatic chain lengths (DC16, DC16F, DC18, and C6DC16), as well as methacrylate monomers conjugated to DABCO compounds (DC11MAF and C2DC11MAF), were synthesized and tested for antimicrobial activity. All the compounds exhibited fungicidal activity against several Candida species at concentrations ranging between 2 and 4 μg/ml. Moreover, acrylic denture base resins fabricated to contain 1, 2, or 4 wt% DABCO compounds inhibited surface C. albicans biofilm formation, as well as fungal growth, in disc diffusion assays. Remarkably, discs (4 wt%) aged for 2 months also exhibited approximately 100% growth-inhibitory activity. While some DABCO compounds exerted intermediate to high cytotoxicity against mammalian oral cell types, DC11MAF and denture base resin discs containing 2 or 4 wt% C2DC11MAF exhibited relatively low cytotoxicity against periodontal ligament (PDL) cell and gingival fibroblast (GF) lines, as well as primary oral epithelial cells. These studies demonstrate that DABCO derivatives can be incorporated into denture materials and exert fungicidal activity with minimal cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. DC11MAF and C2DC11MAF are considered strong candidates as therapeutic or preventive alternatives against Candida-associated denture stomatitis. PMID:28115357

  1. Synthesis, Antifungal Activity, and Biocompatibility of Novel 1,4-Diazabicyclo[2.2.2]Octane (DABCO) Compounds and DABCO-Containing Denture Base Resins.

    PubMed

    Herman, Jenny L; Wang, Yapin; Lilly, Elizabeth A; Lallier, Thomas E; Peters, Brian M; Hamdan, Suleiman; Xu, Xiaoming; Fidel, Paul L; Noverr, Mairi C

    2017-04-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes a variety of oral infections, including denture stomatitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. While antifungal treatment reduces symptoms, infections are often recurrent. One strategy to address this problem is to incorporate compounds with fungicidal activities into denture materials to prevent colonization. Our laboratory synthesized novel derivatives of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO), which is an organic compound typically used as a catalyst in polymerization reactions. DABCO derivatives with different aliphatic chain lengths (DC16, DC16F, DC18, and C6DC16), as well as methacrylate monomers conjugated to DABCO compounds (DC11MAF and C2DC11MAF), were synthesized and tested for antimicrobial activity. All the compounds exhibited fungicidal activity against several Candida species at concentrations ranging between 2 and 4 μg/ml. Moreover, acrylic denture base resins fabricated to contain 1, 2, or 4 wt% DABCO compounds inhibited surface C. albicans biofilm formation, as well as fungal growth, in disc diffusion assays. Remarkably, discs (4 wt%) aged for 2 months also exhibited approximately 100% growth-inhibitory activity. While some DABCO compounds exerted intermediate to high cytotoxicity against mammalian oral cell types, DC11MAF and denture base resin discs containing 2 or 4 wt% C2DC11MAF exhibited relatively low cytotoxicity against periodontal ligament (PDL) cell and gingival fibroblast (GF) lines, as well as primary oral epithelial cells. These studies demonstrate that DABCO derivatives can be incorporated into denture materials and exert fungicidal activity with minimal cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. DC11MAF and C2DC11MAF are considered strong candidates as therapeutic or preventive alternatives against Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

  2. Effect of composition of experimental fluorinated soft lining materials on bond strength to denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoshihito; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Akiba, Norihisa; Hibino, Yasushi; Nagasawa, Yuko; Sumi, Yasunori; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of the composition of experimental fluorinated soft lining materials on bond strength to denture base resin. Vinylidene fluoride/hexafluoro propylene copolymer (2-6F), tridecafluorooctyl methacrylate (13FMA), methoxy diethylene glycol methacrylate (MDGMA), and silica (as filler) were used for fabrication of the experimental soft lining materials. Nine experimental soft lining materials having various compositions of 2-6F, 13FMA, and MDGMA were prepared. Shear and tensile bond strength tests were performed before and after immersion in water. The water sorption for the materials was also measured. An increase in the content of acrylic monomer, MDGMA, in the experimental materials increased the bond strength before immersion in water but reduced the bond strength after immersion in water as compared to that before immersion in water. The inclusion of fluorinated monomer (13FMA) in the materials appeared to affect water sorption.

  3. In vitro comparison of two different materials for the repair of urethan dimethacrylate denture bases

    PubMed Central

    Cilingir, Altug; Bilhan, Hakan; Sulun, Tonguc; Bozdag, Ergun; Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the flexural properties of a recently introduced urethane dimethacrylate denture base material (Eclipse) after being repaired with two different materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two repair groups and a control group consisting of 10 specimens each were generated. The ES group was repaired with auto-polymerizing polymer. The EE group was repaired with the Eclipse. The E group was left intact as a control group. A 3-point bending test device which was set to travel at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min was used. Specimens were loaded until fracture occurred and the mean displacement, maximum load, flexural modulus and flexural strength values and standard deviations were calculated for each group and the data were statistically analyzed. The results were assessed at a significance level of P<.05. RESULTS The mean "displacement", "maximum load before fracture", "flexural strength" and "flexural modulus" rates of Group E were statistically significant higher than those of Groups ES and EE, but no significant difference (P>.05) was found between the mean values of Group ES and EE. There was a statistically significant positive relation (P<.01) between the displacement and maximum load of Group ES (99.5%), Group EE (94.3%) and Group E (84.4%). CONCLUSION The more economic and commonly used self-curing acrylic resin can be recommended as an alternative repair material for Eclipse denture bases. PMID:24353876

  4. In vitro comparison of the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture bases.

    PubMed

    Kore, Doris R; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Hall, Dan B; Bahjri, Khaled

    2013-12-01

    With several denture adhesives available, it is important for dentists to make appropriate patient recommendations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture base materials at time intervals of up to 24 hours. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, Effergrip, and SeaBond denture adhesives were tested with 3 denture base materials: 2 heat-polymerized (Lucitone 199 and SR Ivocap) and 1 visible-light-polymerized (shade-stable Eclipse). Artificial saliva with mucin was used as a control. Tensile bond strength was tested in accordance with American Dental Association specifications at 5 minutes, 3 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after applying the adhesive. Maximum forces before failure were recorded in megapascals (MPa), and the data were subjected to a 2-way analysis of variance (α=.05). All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond had higher tensile bond strength values than Effergrip. All adhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength at 5 minutes and the least at 24 hours. The 3 denture bases produced significantly different results with each adhesive (P<.001). Lucitone 199 with the adhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength, followed by Ivocap and Eclipse. All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control, and all 4 adhesives were strongest at the 5-minute interval. On all 3 types of denture bases, Effergrip produced significantly lower tensile bond strength, and Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond produced significantly higher tensile bond strength. At 24 hours, the adhesive-base combinations with the highest tensile bond strength were Fixodent on Lucitone 199, Fixodent on Eclipse, Fixodent on Ivocap, and Super Poligrip on Ivocap. Copyright © 2013 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Temperature of denture base resin under different protocols of microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sesma, Newton; Gil, Carlos; Kolikauskas, William Antunes; Silva, Rafael Andrade; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the temperature of dentures after different microwave irradiation protocols. Two complete dentures (one maxillary and one mandibular denture) were irradiated separately 4 times for each of the following 5 protocols: dentures immersed in water (G1- 6 min, G2- 3 min); dentures kept dry (G3- 6 min); dentures placed in the steam sterilizer (G4- 6 min, G5- 3 min). The final temperature of the dentures was gauged in a thin and in a thick area of each denture with an infrared thermometer. All groups presented an increase in the resin base temperature. The thin areas of the dentures underwent greater heating than the thick areas. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the final mean temperatures of dentures immersed in water for 6 (G1) and 3 min (G2). However, the final mean temperatures recorded in G1 and G2 exceeded 71°C and were significantly higher (<0.001) than the final mean temperatures recorded in the other groups. It may be concluded that denture base resins subjected to microwave irradiation immersed in water may be exposed to deleterious temperatures.

  6. Poly(meth)acrylate-based coatings.

    PubMed

    Nollenberger, Kathrin; Albers, Jessica

    2013-12-05

    Poly(meth)acrylate coatings for pharmaceutical applications were introduced in 1955 with the launch of EUDRAGIT(®) L and EUDRAGIT(®) S, two types of anionic polymers. Since then, by introducing various monomers into their polymer chains and thus altering their properties, diverse forms with specific characteristics have become available. Today, poly(meth)acrylates function in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract and/or release the drug in a time-controlled manner. This article reviews the properties of various poly(meth)acrylates and discusses formulation issues as well as application possibilities.

  7. Efficacy of denture cleaners on the surface roughness and Candida albicans adherence of sealant agent coupled denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Köroğlu, Ayşegül; Şahin, Onur; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Deniz, Şule Tuğba; Karacan Sever, Nurdan; Özkan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of denture cleansers on the surface roughness and Candida albicans adherence of surface sealant agent coupled denture base resins. One hundred and twenty specimens were fabricated from 2 polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) (Meliodent; Acron MC) and 1 polyamide (Deflex) denture base materials, coated with a sealant agent (Palaseal) and divided into 4 groups (n=10) according to overnight cleaning procedures: distilled water (control), 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and two different sodium perborate (Corega; Rapident). The surface roughness values were measured with a profilometer before (Ra0) and after 90 days immersion in denture cleaners (Ra1). Specimens were incubated with Candida albicans suspension and Candida colony- forming units (CFU) (Cfu/mm) were counted. Significant differences were found, between the Ra0 and Ra1 values of 5% NaOCl applied Acron MC, Deflex and also Rapident applied Deflex groups (p<0.05). Denture cleaning procedures had no significant effects on the quantitiy of Candida albicans.

  8. Effect of maleic anhydride pretreatment on tensile bond strength of a silicone soft liner to a denture base polymer.

    PubMed

    Demir, Hakan; Soygun, Koray; Dogan, Arife; Keskin, Selda; Dogan, Orhan Murat; Bolayir, Giray

    2011-10-01

    To determine the effect of resin surface treatment with dissolved maleic anhydride in butanone added into primer on the tensile bond strength between an acrylic denture base resin and a silicone soft liner. To test tensile bond strength, standard dumbbell-shaped acrylic specimens were prepared. Five experimental groups, including the control, were tested (n = 5). Maleic anhydride solutions prepared in butanone at concentrations of 1%, 5%, 10% or 20% were then mixed with 1 ml of Primo adhesive and the mixtures were applied onto the resin bonding surfaces. Silicone liner material was applied to resin surfaces in the conventional manner. Tensile bond strength of the specimens was measured in a universal testing machine. Fractured surfaces were observed under the scanning electron microscope, and resulting chemical changes with the solutions used were analyzed spectroscopically. The highest bond strength value was obtained for the group treated with 5% maleic anhydride (2.53 ± 0.48 MPa); the lowest value was for the group treated with 20% maleic anhydride (1.59 ± 0.29 MPa). Mixed failure was the dominant type seen in the experimental groups. Spectroscopic analysis showed the interaction of the anhydride carbonyl groups with the Primo primer. The treatment of resin surfaces with maleic anhydride added to Primo adhesive effectively increased bond strength between silicone soft liner and denture base resin.

  9. Impact of Denture Cleansing Solution Immersion on Some Properties of Different Denture Base Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Al-Thobity, Ahmad M; Gad, Mohammed; ArRejaie, Aws; Alnassar, Talal; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa S

    2017-06-09

    To evaluate the effect of several denture cleansing solutions on the color stability, surface roughness, and flexural strength of three denture base materials. Twenty-seven specimens were prepared using heat-polymerized (HP) denture base material, 27 using autopolymerized (AP) denture base material, and 27 using visible-light-polymerized (VLP) denture base, creating a total of 81 specimens. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 27): the distilled water group (DWG), Corega group (CG), and Renew group (RG). Color changes (ΔE), surface roughness (Ra, nm), and flexural strength (MPa) of each specimen were measured using a spectrophotometer, an optical profilometer, and a universal testing machine, respectively. The results were statistically analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The only statistically significant color change detected was in the VLP resin treated with Corega and Renew. There was a significant increase in the surface roughness of all denture resin groups after immersion in Corega. Immersion in Renew significantly increased surface roughness only in the HP and AP specimens. The only significant reduction in flexural strength was detected in the HP resin after immersion in Corega (p < 0.05). Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that Corega has a significantly greater negative impact than distilled water on the flexural strength of HP resin base materials. Renew significantly increased the surface roughness of AP and HP, while Corega increased the surface roughness of all resin materials. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Evaluation of tensile bond strength of heat cure and autopolymerizing silicone-based resilient denture liners before and after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Madan, Nishtha; Datta, Kusum

    2012-01-01

    To assess the effect of simulated mouth conditions reproduced with thermocycling on the tensile bond strength of two silicone based resilient denture liners with acrylic resin bases. Two silicone-based soft denture liners (Mollosil - Chairside autopolymerization and Molloplast B - Heat polymerization) were tested. For each liner, 30 specimens with a cross-sectional area of 10 Χ 10 mm and thickness 3 mm were processed between two acrylic blocks (Trevalon). Specimens were divided into a control group that was stored for 24 hours in water at 37°C and a test group that was thermocycled (2500 cycles) between baths of 5° and 55°C. Tensile bond strength (kg/cm²) was determined in a universal testing machine using crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. The student t-test was used to determine the significance of the difference in bond strength between the two liners. The mean tensile bond strength for control and thermocycled specimens of the two liners were: Mollosil (6.82 kg/cm² and 8.41 kg/cm²) and Molloplast-B (16.30 kg/cm² and 13.67 kg/cm²), respectively. Comparison of bond strength of control specimens with thermocycled specimens of the liners indicated a significant difference for both Mollosil (P=0.045) and Molloplast-B (P=0.027). Comparison between control specimens of both liners and thermocycled specimens of both liners indicated a highly significant difference (P<0.001). Heat polymerized resilient denture liner Molloplast-B had higher tensile bond strength than autopolymerizing liner Mollosil regardless of thermocycling. The bond strength of Mollosil increased after thermocycling while that of Molloplast-B decreased after thermocycling. Although heat-polymerized denture liners require more processing time than autopolymerizing liners, but they display much better adhesion properties to denture base resin and should thus be preferred when soft liner has to be used for a longer duration of time.

  11. Esophageal impacted dentures.

    PubMed Central

    Nwaorgu, Onyekwere G.; Onakoya, Paul A.; Sogebi, Olusola A.; Kokong, Daniel D.; Dosumu, Oluwole O.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to highlight the problems associated with impacted acrylic dentures and proffers advice to check them. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of all cases of impacted acrylic dentures over a 16-year period. RESULTS: Twenty-two adults had impacted esophageal acrylic dentures of which 16 (72.7%) and six (27.3%) were males and females, respectively (M:F ratio = 2.7:1) with age range 23-77 years. Fourteen patients (63.6%) had worn their dentures for more than 10 years without check-up, and 54.5% presented within 48 hours of impaction. The common symptoms in all the patients were difficulty with swallowing, throat pain and discomfort, followed by tenderness in the neck in 15 (68.2%). Dentures were extracted through esophagoscopy (17 cases) and cervical (three cases) esophagotomy, respectively. Observed complications included pulmonary edema in one and esophageal perforation in five patients. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic extraction of dentures carries a high risk of perforation. Extraction of an impacted denture via esophagoscopy can be undertaken under direct vision and in an ideal situation with judicious use of the Shears forceps. In the absence of these, the safest option is an esophagotomy. Proper treatment planning in the fabrication of dentures with incorporation of radiopaque materials in the dental resins and adequate postdenture delivery instructions are necessary as preventive measures. PMID:15540888

  12. Comparison of efficacy of sodium hypochlorite with sodium perborate in removal of stains from heat-cured clear acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Joseph Robin; Sholapurkar, Amar A; Raghu, Aparna; Shenoy, Revathi P; Mallya, H Madhukar; Pai, Keerthilatha M; D'Souza, Mariette

    2011-01-01

    Acrylic resin bases of removable dentures attract stains and odor-producing organic and inorganic deposits. The use of chemical denture cleanser soaks is the most popular method of denture cleansing. This study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of two different denture cleansers--sodium perborate (Clinsodent) and sodium hypochlorite (VI-Clean)--in removing tea, coffee, turmeric and tobacco (paan) stains from heat-cured clear acrylic resins. Distilled water was used as a control. Both Clinsodent and VI-Clean were found to be the least effective in removing coffee stains and best for removing turmeric stain. It is necessary that the dental professional be aware of these results to ensure that denture wearers know how to select the appropriate denture cleanser.

  13. Oral health-related quality of life of edentulous patients after complete dentures relining.

    PubMed

    Krunić, Nebojsa; Kostić, Milena; Petrović, Milica; Igić, Marko

    2015-04-01

    Tooth loss affects oral health-related life quality. More than a third of edentulous patients are not fully satisfied with their complete dentures and mainly complain of insufficient stability, retention, and pain during mastication. Solving the problem may include relining by materials that are based on silicone or acrylic. The aim of this study was to determine the level of patients' satisfaction before and after relining upper dentures with soft and rigid liners. The patients (n=24) were divided into two study groups. Maxillary denture relining of the first group of patients was performed with hard acrylic based resins while in the second group of patients complete denture was relined with a silicone-based soft liner. They were asked the questions from the specifically adapted the Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire for edentulous patients before and three months after relining dentures. After relining the patients showed a higher degree of satisfaction with their dentures in all the tested domains (masticatory function, psychological discomfort, social disability and retention and hygiene). The padents with soft denture relines were more satisfied. Refining of maxillary complete dentures significantly positively impacts the quality of life of patients in all the tested domains (masticatory function, psychological discomfort, social disability, pain and oral hygiene). Better results were achieved using a silicone-based soft liner, which recommends it as the material of choice for relining dentures.

  14. Comparative evaluation of sodium hypochlorite and microwave disinfection on dimensional stability of denture bases.

    PubMed

    Nirale, Rutuja Madhukarrao; Thombre, Ram; Kubasad, Girish

    2012-02-01

    To compare the effect of sodium hypochlorite and microwave disinfection on the dimensional stability of denture bases without and with relining. A brass die was prepared by simulating an edentulous maxillary arch. It was used to fabricate 1.5 mm and 3 mm of thickness denture bases (n = 40). The 1.5 mm of thickness-specimens (n = 20) were relined with 1.5 mm of autopolymerizing relining resin. Five holes were prepared over crest of ridge of brass die with intimately fitting stainless steel pins which were transferred to the intaglio surface of specimens during fabrication of denture bases. For calculation of dimensional changes in denture bases, differences between the baseline area before and after disinfection of the specimens were used. The denture bases without and with relining were divided into 2 groups (each n = 20). Data were analyzed using student paired 't' and unpaired 't' test. Microwave disinfection produces significant shrinkage in both denture bases without relining (t = 17.16; P<.001) and with relining (t = 14.9; P<.001). Denture bases without relining showed more shrinkage when compared with relined denture bases after microwave disinfection (t = 6.09; P<.001). The changes in dimensional stability after sodium hypochlorite disinfection were not significant for both denture bases without relining (t = 2.19; P=.056) and denture bases with relining (t = 2.17; P=.058). Microwave disinfection leads to increased shrinkage of denture bases without and with relining. Chemical disinfection with sodium hypochlorite seems to be a safer method of disinfection with regards to physical properties such as changes in dimensional stability.

  15. Comparative evaluation of sodium hypochlorite and microwave disinfection on dimensional stability of denture bases

    PubMed Central

    Thombre, Ram; Kubasad, Girish

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the effect of sodium hypochlorite and microwave disinfection on the dimensional stability of denture bases without and with relining. MATERIALS AND METHODS A brass die was prepared by simulating an edentulous maxillary arch. It was used to fabricate 1.5 mm and 3 mm of thickness denture bases (n = 40). The 1.5 mm of thickness-specimens (n = 20) were relined with 1.5 mm of autopolymerizing relining resin. Five holes were prepared over crest of ridge of brass die with intimately fitting stainless steel pins which were transferred to the intaglio surface of specimens during fabrication of denture bases. For calculation of dimensional changes in denture bases, differences between the baseline area before and after disinfection of the specimens were used. The denture bases without and with relining were divided into 2 groups (each n = 20). Data were analyzed using student paired 't' and unpaired 't' test. RESULTS Microwave disinfection produces significant shrinkage in both denture bases without relining (t = 17.16; P<.001) and with relining (t = 14.9; P<.001). Denture bases without relining showed more shrinkage when compared with relined denture bases after microwave disinfection (t = 6.09; P<.001). The changes in dimensional stability after sodium hypochlorite disinfection were not significant for both denture bases without relining (t = 2.19; P=.056) and denture bases with relining (t = 2.17; P=.058). CONCLUSION Microwave disinfection leads to increased shrinkage of denture bases without and with relining. Chemical disinfection with sodium hypochlorite seems to be a safer method of disinfection with regards to physical properties such as changes in dimensional stability. PMID:22439097

  16. Effect of phosphate group addition on the properties of denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Gaurav; Berzins, David W.; Dhuru, Virendra B.; Raj, Periathamby A.; Rambhia, Sameer K.; Dhir, Gunjan; Dentino, Andrew R.

    2009-01-01

    Statement of problem Acrylic resins are prone to microbial adherence, especially by Candida albicans. Surface-charged resins alter the ionic interaction between the denture resin and Candida hyphae, and these resins are being developed as a means to reduce microbial colonization on the denture surface. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the physical and mechanical properties of phosphate-containing polymethyl methacrylate resins for their suitability as a denture material. Material and methods Using PMMA with cross-linker (Lucitone 199) as a control, 4 experimental groups containing various levels of phosphate with and without cross-linker were generated. The properties examined were impact strength, fracture toughness, wettability (contact angle), and resin bonding ability to denture teeth. Impact strength was tested in the Izod configuration (n=16), and fracture toughness (n=13) was measured using the single-edge notched bend test. Wettability was determined by calculating the contact angle of water on the material surface (n=12), while ISO 1567 was used for bonding ability (n=12). The data were analyzed by 1- and 2-way ANOVA (α=.05). Results A trend of increased hydrophilicity, as indicated by lower contact angle, was observed with increased concentrations of phosphate. With regard to the other properties, no significant differences were found when compared with the control acrylic resin. Conclusions No adverse physical effect due to the addition of a phosphate-containing monomer was found in the acrylic denture resins. Additional mechanical and physical properties, biocompatibility, and clinical efficacy studies are needed to confirm the in vivo anti-Candida activity of these novel resins. PMID:18922259

  17. Internal adaptation and some physical properties of methacrylate-based denture base resins polymerized by different techniques.

    PubMed

    Ganzarolli, Solimar M; de Mello, José A Nunes; Shinkai, Rosemary S; Del Bel Cury, Altair A

    2007-07-01

    This study evaluated the internal adaptation, porosity, transverse and impact strength of three denture base polymers: (1) conventional heat-polymerized, (2) microwave-polymerized, and (3) injection-molded resins. Internal adaptation was measured by weighing a vinyl polysiloxane film reproducing the gap between the denture base and the metallic master model of an edentulous maxilla. The measurements were performed immediately after finishing and after 30-day storage in water. Porosity was evaluated by weighing each specimen in air and in water using an analytical scale balance. Transverse strength test (three-point bending test) was performed using a universal machine under axial load, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Impact strength test (Charpy's test) was performed with a 40 kJ/cm load. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). Internal adaptation, porosity, transverse and impact strength varied according to the type of acrylic resin and the processing technique. The injection-molded resin showed better internal adaptation compared with the conventional heat-polymerized and the microwave-polymerized resins, particularly after 30 days, but there was no relevant improvement of porosity, transverse and impact strength. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Does wearing dentures change sensory nerve responses under the denture base?

    PubMed

    Ito, Nana; Kimoto, Suguru; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2014-03-01

    The standard textbook on complete dentures suggests the necessity of relief for the incisive and posterior palatine foramina of denture wearers to prevent the impingement of the nerves and vessels passing through these foramina. However, concrete evidence of the effect of dentures on the sensory function of the nerves underlying dentures is lacking. The study aim was to investigate the influence of denture-induced compression on sensory nerve responses to stimulations. Only partially edentulous patients of maxillary Kennedy class II who wear dentures (WD) or who never wear dentures (ND) were recruited as participants. The WD and ND groups had 15 participants with a mean age of 66.9 years and 22 participants with a mean age of 60.2 years, respectively. Current perception thresholds (CPTs) at 2000, 250 and 5 Hz, corresponding to A-beta, A-delta and C fibres, respectively, were measured by the Neurometer(®) NS3000 device and compared between groups. The data were analysed by the t-test, the paired t-test and analysis of covariance adjusted for age, sex and thickness of the mucosa. The CPTs showed large differences at 2000 Hz but no differences at the other frequencies when the WD and ND groups were compared. Only the CPT of the edentulous side at 2000 Hz was significantly different between groups. Wearing removable partial dentures contributes to changes of responses to stimulations in the large fibre of the sensory nerve underlying the maxillary alveolar ridge. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of shear bond strength of three different types of artificial teeth to heat cure denture base resin: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chittaranjan, B; Taruna, M; Sudheer, N; Patil, Nagesh S

    2013-01-01

    Bonding of artificial teeth and denture base material remained a significant problem for successful prosthetic treatment. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate shear bond strength of three different artificial teeth with heat cure denture base material after various surface conditioning methods and thermocycling. Ninety mandibular first molar denture teeth were selected. They were divided into three groups, Group I: Nanocomposite resin (Veracia), Group II: Composite teeth (Endura), and Group III: Cross-linked acrylic denture teeth (Acry rock). All groups were further subdivided into subgroups based on surface conditioning methods. Subgroup A: No surface conditioning (control group), Subgroup B: Surface conditioning with methyl methacrylate-based bonding agent (Vitacoll), and Subgroup C: Air abrasion with 50 μm aluminum oxide powder particles plus silane-coupling agent (Monobond-S) and Vitacoll bonding agent. Evaluation of shear bond strength of all the specimens was done using universal testing machine. Mean shear bond strength of Group I, Subgroup B (6.87 ± 0.934) showed higher value when compared with Group II, Subgroup B (6.76 ± 1.84) and Group III, Subgroup B (5.66 ± 2.18). The control group (untreated surface) of all three types of artificial teeth used in this study showed significantly lower shear bond strength values than experimental groups (surface conditioning methods; P < 0.05). The results of this study suggest that there were significant differences in shear bond strength among control group and surface treatment groups of denture teeth bonded to heat cure denture base resin.

  20. The effect of denture design and fixatives on the retention of mandibular complete dentures tested on a novel in-vitro edentulous model.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A; Al-Kaisy, N; Miller, C A; Martin, N

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the design (extension and adaptation) of a mandibular complete acrylic denture and the use of denture adhesives using a novel in-vitro edentulous model. The model is a highly anatomically accurate replica based on a moderately resorbed human mandibular edentulous arch. The model has been designed and fabricated by means of an elaborate clinical and technical process that employs synthetic elastomeric materials with properties that attempts to reproduce in-vitro characteristics of the soft tissues overlying the ridges and immediate reflected tissues. This model was used to measure and compare the retention of mandibular dentures ofvarying designs (well-fitting, over- and under-extended) with and without the aid of denture fixatives. Retention tests were conducted with different volumes of artificial saliva at a cross head speed of 50 mm/min with 4 equidistant holding points on the denture occlusal surface, using a universal tensile testing machine in an axial pull direction. The effect of three denture adhesives on denture retention was also tested on the same denture types at different times over a period of 5 hours and beyond. The in-vitro model presented can be effectively used to test the retention of mandibular complete dentures. The speed of dislodgement force and amount of saliva are important variables in mandibular denture retention. The retention of well-fitting dentures was statistically higher than that of ill-fitting dentures. A significantly higher retention force was needed to dislodge mandibular dentures (well and ill-fitting dentures) when using a denture adhesive.

  1. Processing dentures using a microwave technique.

    PubMed

    Ilbay, S G; Güvener, S; Alkumru, H N

    1994-01-01

    In this research the technique of curing denture base acrylic resins by microwave energy was investigated with respect to polymerization method, hardness, mechanical and physical properties. Twenty-one different polymerization methods were used by varying radiation power and curing time. The Vickers hardness test was applied to the samples which were polymerized. The average value was found to be 22.46 VHN (Vicker hardness number), that is, almost the same as conventionally cured acrylic. The recommended polymerization method of curing acrylic was 3 min at 550 W in a microwave oven. Mechanical and physical tests were applied to the samples which were cured by the recommended polymerization method. The average transverse load to fracture value was found to be 7.6 kg, and the transverse deflection value was 1.5 mm at 3500 g, and 2.9 mm at 5000 g. Water sorption of acrylic resin cured by microwave energy was 0.72 mg cm-2 and the solubility rate in water was 0.038 mg cm-2. Results conformed with the ADA specification. The findings showed that acrylic resin cured by microwave energy is more resistant to mechanical failure than conventionally cured acrylic and this technique can safely be applied to the production of denture bases.

  2. Randomized clinical evaluation of a light-cured base material for complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Bömicke, Wolfgang; Hassel, Alexander J; Rammelsberg, Peter; Stober, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare plaque adhesion, tissue reaction, and technical complications for complete dentures based on visible light-cured resin (VLCR) or on conventional poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). A stratified randomized cohort study was designed with 52 patients treated with a complete denture in the maxilla (n = 28), the mandible (n = 2), or both (n = 22). Seventy-four dentures were manufactured, 38 of PMMA and 36 of VLCR. Investigators and patients were unaware of the nature of the denture base material. Plaque adhesion, tissue reaction, and technical complications were investigated 4 weeks after denture insertion (baseline). Recall investigations were performed after 6, 12, and 24 months. After 6, 12, and 24 months, plaque adhesion was significantly higher for VLCR dentures than for PMMA dentures. Tissue reaction was comparable for both groups, however. After 6, 12, and 24 months, need for repair was significantly greater for VLCR prostheses. The mean number of additional aftercare sessions per patient after 24 months was 50 % higher for VLCR than for PMMA. Good oral hygiene must be established by patients treated with VLCR dentures, to remove biofilm from these dentures. Increased aftercare must also be taken into account when this material is used. VLCR might be a viable alternative to PMMA for patients with allergic reactions to residual monomer or benzoyl peroxide.

  3. Retention of denture bases fabricated by three different processing techniques – An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Chalapathi Kumar, V. H.; Surapaneni, Hemchand; Ravikiran, V.; Chandra, B. Sarat; Balusu, Srilatha; Reddy, V. Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Distortion due to Polymerization shrinkage compromises the retention. To evaluate the amount of retention of denture bases fabricated by conventional, anchorized, and injection molding polymerization techniques. Materials and Methods: Ten completely edentulous patients were selected, impressions were made, and master cast obtained was duplicated to fabricate denture bases by three polymerization techniques. Loop was attached to the finished denture bases to estimate the force required to dislodge them by retention apparatus. Readings were subjected to nonparametric Friedman two-way analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni correction methods and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Results: Denture bases fabricated by injection molding (3740 g), anchorized techniques (2913 g) recorded greater retention values than conventional technique (2468 g). Significant difference was seen between these techniques. Conclusions: Denture bases obtained by injection molding polymerization technique exhibited maximum retention, followed by anchorized technique, and least retention was seen in conventional molding technique. PMID:27382542

  4. Influence of water sorption on mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Iwamoto, Misa; Lassila, Lippo; Vallittu, Pekka; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the influence of water sorption on certain mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Six thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, two polyesters, one polycarbonate, one polymethylmethacrylate) and a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer, selected as a control, were tested. Specimens of each denture base material were fabricated according to ISO 1567 specifications and were either dry or water-immersed for 30 days (n = 10). The ultimate flexural strength, the flexural strength at the proportional limit and the elastic modulus of the denture base materials were calculated. Water sorption significantly decreased the ultimate flexural strength, the flexural strength at the proportional limit and the elastic modulus of one of the polyamides and the PMMAs. It also significantly increased the ultimate flexural strength of the polycarbonate. The mechanical properties of some injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins changed after water sorption.

  5. The Evaluation of 3 Dimensional Polymerization Changes of a Denture Resin Utilizing Injection Molding with Water Bath Polymerization and Microwave Polymerization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    The Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Polymerization Changes of a Denture Resin Utilizing Injection Molding with Water Bath Polymerization and Microwave...methacrylate denture resin . Materials and Methods: The study used a randomized observational design. Thirty SLA master dies, in the form of a...groups and sequencing numbers for each group were recorded in a log (see 6.3.4). From the SLA master dies, 30 acrylic resin denture bases were

  6. The use of existing denture-satisfaction ratings for a diagnostic test to indicate prognosis with newly delivered complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yasuhiko; Matsumaru, Yuichi; Kanno, Kyoko; Kawase, Mitsuaki; Kawase, Mitsuo; Shu, Kazuyoshi; Izawa, Takeshi; Gunji, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Kihei

    2009-10-01

    The study investigated the relation between subjective satisfaction ratings of existing dentures and outcomes of newly delivered dentures, and the ability of the diagnostic test, using existing ratings, to indicate prognosis with newly delivered dentures. Consecutive 165 edentulous patients were recruited from November 2001 to August 2006 at a university-affiliated hospital. Dentures were fabricated with an acrylic base with full-balanced occlusion using hard resin artificial teeth by multiple prosthodontists. At the baseline and 3-month after delivery, patients rate their overall, maxillary, and mandibular satisfaction for existing and replaced dentures on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). The association between baseline ratings and newly delivered dentures was analyzed by regression analysis. The test's performance was measured by constructing a two-by-two table; patients with the following cutoff values on the VAS (overall: dentures. Relative validity of the diagnostic tests was assessed by means of sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios. Mandibular dentures showed a significant association between baseline and new dentures (coefficient=0.27, p=0.01). Results of test measures for overall, maxillary, and mandibular existing dentures were 71%, 38%, and 87% (sensitivity); 62%, 66%, and 49% (specificity); and 1.1, 1.9, and 1.7 (positive likelihood), and 0.5, 1.0, and 0.2 (negative likelihood). Test performance indicates that the negative (satisfied) result for mandibular existing dentures may be useful to rule out the unsatisfied patients with new mandibular dentures.

  7. A Comparative Evaluation of the Linear Dimensional Changes of Two Different Commercially Available Heat Cure Acrylic Resins during Three Different Cooling Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vandita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Close mucosal adaptation of denture base to the underlying mucosa is of prime importance for denture stability. This however can be affected by various temperature changes which the denture base undergoes during processing and also to its material properties. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare linear dimensional change of heat cure acrylic resin with three different cooling regimens on two different commercially available acrylic denture base resins. Materials and Methods Six groups of acrylic specimens with 10 samples each were prepared using either PYRAX or DPI acrylic resin, with a standard processing technique. Three different cooling methods were used for both the commercially available heat cure acrylic denture base resins. Linear dimensional changes were measured between three pre-determined points on the specimens of all the groups using a travelling microscope after removing the sample from the flask. One way ANOVA and unpaired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results Linear dimensional change was more in quenching followed by air and water bath method of cooling respectively. Amongst the materials, linear dimensional changes were more in PYRAX than in DPI acrylic. Conclusion Slow cooling by methods described should be advocated for better mucosal adaptation of the denture base. PMID:28050504

  8. Total CAD/CAM Supported Method for Manufacturing Removable Complete Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Furtado de Mendonça, Mario; White, George Shelby; Sara, Georges; Littlefair, Darren

    2016-01-01

    The incorporation of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology into complete denture fabrication brings about several advantages to the fabrication process, providing better predictability of the desired outcomes and high accuracy of denture fit, mainly because the milling of prepolymerized acrylic resin eliminates the shrinkage of the acrylic base. Also, there is a decrease in the porosity when compared to a conventionally processed denture, and consequently there is a decrease in the retention of Candida albicans on the denture base. The presented workflow for complete denture fabrication presents a totally wax-free manufacturing process, combining rapid prototyping (RP) and rapid milling. With the presented technique, the maxillomandibular relation (MMR) and the ideal setup of the tooth arrangement are developed by using occlusion rims and trial setup made with RP. For the definitive final denture, the denture base and the basal surfaces of the conventional denture teeth were milled according to the individual clinical situation. Posteriorly, the teeth were adapted and bonded into the milled sockets of the milled base. PMID:27974977

  9. Evaluation of chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Song, Rong; Zhong, Zhaohua; Lin, Lexun

    2016-04-01

    Chitosan quaternary ammonium salt displays good antioxidant and antibacterial characteristics and it shows appreciable solubility in water. When added to the traditional denture material to form a resin base, it could promote good oral health by improving the oral environment. In this study, chitosan quaternary ammonium salt was added to the denture material following two different methods. After three months of immersion in artificial saliva, the specimens were tested for tensile strength and were scanned by electron microscope. The murine fibroblast cytotoxicity and antibacterial properties were also tested. The result showed no significant differences in the tensile strength and in the proliferation of murine L929 fibroblast cells. The two structures of chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified denture material had different degrees of corrosion resistance and antimicrobial properties. These results indicate that chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified resin denture base material has the potential to become a new generation oral denture composite material.

  10. Effect of Water Storage on the Flexural Strength of Heat-cured Denture Base Resin Reinforced with Stick (s) Glass Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Galav, Ankit; Deogade, Suryakant C.; Mantri, Sneha; Sumathi, K.; Galav, Sneha

    2017-01-01

    Background: Flexural strength (FS) of denture base resins (DBRs) had been improved by reinforcing it with different glass fibers. However, a limited data are available on the effect of glass fiber reinforcement with conventional heat-cured resin after prolonged water storage. Aims and Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the reinforcing effect of novel S-glass and nylon fibers on the FS of acrylic DBRs. It also aimed to evaluate the effect of glass fiber reinforcement on the FS of acrylic DBRs after a prolonged storage in water. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty identical specimens were fabricated in specially designed molds according to the manufacturer's instructions. The three experimental groups were prepared consisting of conventional (unreinforced) acrylic resin, novel S-glass fiber-reinforced and nylon fiber-reinforced acrylic resin. The specimens were fabricated in a standardized fashion for each experimental group. Each group was further subdivided into two groups on the basis of storage conditions (dry and wet). FS was tested using a three-point universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Glass fiber-reinforced group was further tested after prolonged storage in distilled water. Entered data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and least significant difference post hoc test. Results: In this study, statistically significant differences were noted in the FS of all the groups. S-glass fiber-reinforced group had highest FS compared to the other two groups (P < 0.001). Nylon fiber-reinforced group had lowest FS. All the groups stored in distilled water revealed a decrease in strength compared to those stored in dry atmosphere. Among wet specimens, those stored for 3 weeks had a significantly higher FS than those stored at one and 2 weeks (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this investigation, the FS of heat-cured acrylic DBR was improved after reinforcement with glass fibers. It can be recommended to

  11. Development of complete dentures based on digital intraoral impressions-Case report.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing-Huan; An, Xueyin; Jeong, Seung-Mi; Choi, Byung-Ho

    2017-06-15

    A 60-year-old man presented for refabrication of his maxillary complete denture. In this case, a digital process was chosen to replace the ill-fitted complete maxillary denture. A specialized scan retractor was used to retract the mobile tissues of the lips, cheeks and vestibule while taking a digital impression. The interocclusal record obtained in the patient's mouth was scanned in order to digitally register the occlusal vertical dimension. The denture base and teeth were designed on virtual models that were mounted at the occlusal vertical dimension, and were made using CAD/CAM technology. Unlike conventional impression techniques, intraoral scanning is not able to be performed while the tissue is moving. This case report used a scan retractor that facilitated stretching and fixation of the vestibular area. It also helped to retract the lips and cheeks. This report also demonstrates that virtual models at OVD can be obtained without the use of conventional stone models, flasking or processing techniques. One of the main shortcomings in the existing CAD/CAM denture fabrication technology is that it is not able to produce customized denture teeth. The present article demonstrates that the digital denture fabrication workflow can provide customized denture teeth to optimize occlusion. This case demonstrated how digital complete dentures can be made without requiring conventional stone models or mounting the models in an articulator. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Mechanical analysis of the denture bases using the photoelastic-coating method. 2. Upper complete denture bases under uniform bending moment load].

    PubMed

    Takayama, Y; Takakuda, K; Miyairi, H

    1989-11-01

    Deformation of the anterior teeth and palatal regions on upper complete dentures was investigated using the photoelastic coating method and strain gages. In this experiment, an uniform-moment bending load method was employed to simulate the occlusal situation, and the distribution of strain in epoxy resin, stainless swaged and Co-Cr alloy cast dentures were measured and analyzed. The 030-series reflection polariscope is compact and lightweight with its main components consisting of two polarizer/quarter-wave-plate assemblies attached to a common frame. The highest level of strain was seen in the anterior region of the palate and the low strain was observed in other regions. Differences in strain magnitude of the three dentures were not observed with test at the same point. But, when denture base materials with high flexural rigidity and bending strength were used on the palatal region of the denture base, strain was decreased in the anterior and other regions of the palate. Therefore, dentures using those materials could be effectively reinforced.

  13. Preparation and characterization of ZnO-PMMA resin nanocomposites for denture bases.

    PubMed

    Cierech, Mariusz; Wojnarowicz, Jacek; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Bączkowski, Bohdan; Grudniak, Anna Maria; Wolska, Krystyna Izabela; Łojkowski, Witold; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to investigate the antifungal activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) against Candida albicans. Some attempts have been made to find out the best way to introduce ZnONPs into polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin material and to determine some parameters of a newly formed composite. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were manufactured and their basic physical parameters were determined (average particle size, density, specific surface area). Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ZnONPs was determined for the Candida albicans standard strain. The average size of ZnO conglomerates in the monomer solution of PMMA resin was measured using a dynamic light scattering instrument. PMMA resin samples with incorporated ZnONPs were produced. The morphology of nanopowder and the newly formed composite was examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition, the roughness parameter of PMMA resin material was investigated before and after ZnONPs modification. Nanopowder with the average particle size of 30 nm, density of 5.24 g/cm3 and surface area of 39 m2/g was obtained. MIC was determined at the level of 0.75 mg/mL. The average size of ZnO conglomerates in the monomer solution of acrylic resin dropped by 11 times after ultrasound activation. SEM examination of a newly formed composite showed a successful introduction of ZnONPs confirmed by the energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. There were no statistically significant differences in the biomaterial roughness before and after the modification of ZnONPs. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into acrylic resin used for the production of denture bases. The presence of nanoparticles with sizes below 100 nm was confirmed. Nevertheless a newly created composite needs to be further investigated to improve its homogeneity, and to check its microbiological properties, strength and biocompatibility prior to its possible clinical use.

  14. Biofilm formation and Candida albicans morphology on the surface of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Susewind, Sabine; Lang, Reinhold; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Fungal biofilms may contribute to the occurrence of denture stomatitis. The objective of the study was to investigate the biofilm formation and morphology of Candida albicans in biofilms on the surface of denture base materials. Specimens were prepared from different denture base materials. After determination of surface properties and salivary pellicle formation, mono- and multispecies biofilm formation including Candida albicans ATCC 10231 was initiated. Relative amounts of adherent cells were determined after 20, 44, 68 and 188 h; C. albicans morphology was analysed employing selective fluorescence microscopic analysis. Significant differences were identified in the relative amount of cells adherent to the denture base materials. Highest blastospore/hyphae index suggesting an increased percentage of hyphae was observed in mono- and multispecies biofilms on the soft denture liner, which did not necessarily respond to the highest relative amount of adherent cells. For both biofilm models, lowest relative amount of adherent cells was identified on the methacrylate-based denture base material, which did not necessarily relate to a significantly lower blastospore/hyphae index. The results indicate that there are significant differences in both biofilm formation as well as the morphology of C. albicans cells in biofilms on the surface of different denture base materials.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Tensile Bond Strength between Silicon Soft Liners and Processed Denture Base Resin Conditioned by Three Modes of Surface Treatment: An Invitro Study.

    PubMed

    Surapaneni, Hemchand; Ariga, Padma; Haribabu, R; Ravi Shankar, Y; Kumar, V H C; Attili, Sirisha

    2013-09-01

    Soft denture liners act as a cushion for the denture bearing mucosa through even distribution of functional load, avoiding local stress concentrations and improving retention of dentures there by providing comfort to the patient. The objective of the present study was to compare and evaluate the tensile bond strengths of silicone-based soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P and GC Reline soft) with different surface pre treatments of heat cure PMMA denture base acrylic resin. Stainless steel dies measuring 40 mm in length; 10 mm in width and 10 mm in height (40 × 10 × 10) were machined to prepare standardized for the polymethyl methacrylate resin blocks. Stainless steel dies (spacer for resilient liner) measuring 3 mm thick; 10 mm long and 10 mm wide were prepared as spacers to ensure uniformity of the soft liner being tested. Two types of Addition silicone-based soft lining materials (room temperature polymerised soft lining materials (RTPSLM): Ufi Gel P and GC Reline soft) were selected. Ufi Gel P (VOCO, Germany), GC Reline soft (GC America) are resilient, chairside vinyl polysiloxane denture reliners of two different manufacturers. A total of 80 test samples were prepared of which 40 specimens were prepared for Group A (Ufi Gel P) and 40 specimens for Group B (GC Reline soft). In these groups, based on Pre-treatment of acrylic resin specimens each group was subdivided into four sub groups of 10 samples each. Sub-group I-without any surface treatment. Sub-group II-sand blasted Sub-group III-treated with Methyl Methacrylate monomer Sub-group IV-treated with chemical etchant Acetone. The results were statistically analysed by Kruscal Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Independent t test. The specimens treated with MMA monomer wetting showed superior and significant bond strength than those obtained by other surface treatments. The samples belonging to subgroups of GC Reline soft exhibit superior tensile bond strength than subgroups of Ufi Gel P. The modes

  16. Effect of direct relining on stresses at the denture base and the metal frame of removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghannam, N A; Fahmi, F M

    2005-02-15

    The Kennedy Class I removable partial denture (RPD) can cause stress to supporting hard and soft tissues and may lead to harmful effects. The purpose of this study is to investigate the pattern of these stresses in three different positions before and following a relining procedure. Ten patients, five males and five females, with a lower distal extension RPD and an opposing upper class III type RPD were selected for this study. Strain gauges together with a strain gauge indicator were used to study the pattern of stresses in three selected positions. Some changes were significantly different at the site of the denture base and at the metal frame near the direct retainer. After relining, the stresses were shared partially by the abutments and partially by the tissues. Maximum stresses were reported during swallowing. No significant difference was noticed between males and females.

  17. Comparison of the Effect of two Denture Cleansers on Tensile bond Strength of a Denture Liner.

    PubMed

    Farzin, M; Bahrani, F; Adelpour, E

    2013-09-01

    One of the most clinical challenging issues in prosthodontics is debonding of soft liners from the denture base. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare tensile bond strength between soft liner and heat-cured acrylic resin when immersed in two different types of denture cleanser and distilled water, at different period of times. In this experimental in vivo study, 238 heat-cured acrylic blocks were made. A soft liner was embedded between the acrylic blocks. Samples were divided into four groups: 17 samples were in the control group and were not soaked in any solution .The remaining samples were divided into 3 groups (Distilled water, Calgon and Fittydent). Each group was then subdivided into two subcategories, regarding the immersion time variable; 15 and 45 minutes. All samples were placed in tension force and tensile bond strength was recorded with the testing machine. One- way ANOVA and Tucky HSD post-hoc test were adopted to analyze the yielded data (α> 0.05). Specimens which were immersed in two denture cleansers (Fittydent and Calgon) and in distilled water showed significant difference (p= 0.001) in bonding strength when compared to the control group. The subjects immersed in denture cleanser solutions and distilled water did not reveal any significant difference (p= 0.90). For all groups; most of the bonding failures (72%) were cohesive type. The effect of the denture cleansers and distilled water on the bond strength was not statistically different; however, the difference was significant between the immersed groups with the non-immersed group. Moreover, type of the denture cleanser did not show any effect on the tensile strength. The tensile strength increases with time of immersion.

  18. Comparison of the Effect of two Denture Cleansers on Tensile bond Strength of a Denture Liner

    PubMed Central

    Farzin, M; Bahrani, F; Adelpour, E

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: One of the most clinical challenging issues in prosthodontics is debonding of soft liners from the denture base. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare tensile bond strength between soft liner and heat-cured acrylic resin when immersed in two different types of denture cleanser and distilled water, at different period of times. Materials and Method: In this experimental in vivo study, 238 heat-cured acrylic blocks were made. A soft liner was embedded between the acrylic blocks. Samples were divided into four groups: 17 samples were in the control group and were not soaked in any solution .The remaining samples were divided into 3 groups (Distilled water, Calgon and Fittydent). Each group was then subdivided into two subcategories, regarding the immersion time variable; 15 and 45 minutes. All samples were placed in tension force and tensile bond strength was recorded with the testing machine. One- way ANOVA and Tucky HSD post-hoc test were adopted to analyze the yielded data (α> 0.05). Results: Specimens which were immersed in two denture cleansers (Fittydent and Calgon) and in distilled water showed significant difference (p= 0.001) in bonding strength when compared to the control group. The subjects immersed in denture cleanser solutions and distilled water did not reveal any significant difference (p= 0.90). For all groups; most of the bonding failures (72%) were cohesive type. Conclusion: The effect of the denture cleansers and distilled water on the bond strength was not statistically different; however, the difference was significant between the immersed groups with the non-immersed group. Moreover, type of the denture cleanser did not show any effect on the tensile strength. The tensile strength increases with time of immersion. PMID:24724134

  19. Effect of polymerization cycles on flexural strengths and microhardness of different denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Hasan; Gundogdu, Mustafa; Alkurt, Murat; Yesil Duymus, Zeynep

    2017-01-13

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different polymerization cycles on the flexural strengths and microhardness of two denture base materials (Meliodent and Paladent). Heat-polymerized acrylic resin specimens (65.0 mm long×10.0 mm wide×2.5 mm in height) were prepared using different short and long polymerization cycles. After the specimens had been polymerized, they were stored in distilled water at 37±1°C for 24 h. Flexural strength test was performed at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min and Vickers microhardness was measured. Data were analyzed with a 1-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey test, and Student t-test (α=0.05). The flexural strengths and microhardness were significantly different between Meliodent and Paladent (p<0.05). Significant differences were found among the polymerization cycles in terms of flexural strengths and microhardness (p<0.05). Polymerization with G cycle may be suggested for Meliodent and H cycle may be suggested for Paladent.

  20. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626) is...

  3. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626) is...

  4. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626) is...

  5. Zirconia-based fixed partial dentures: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Bachhav, Vinay Chila; Aras, Meena Ajay

    2011-02-01

    Ceramics have a long history in fixed prosthodontics of achieving optimal esthetics. Yttrium tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP)-based systems are a recent addition to the high-strength, all-ceramic systems used for crowns and fixed partial dentures. CAD/CAM-produced, Y-TZP-based systems are in considerable demand in esthetic and stress-bearing regions. The highly esthetic nature of zirconia coupled with its superior physical properties and biocompatibility have resulted in restorative systems that meet the demands of today's patients. Undoubtedly, these systems are considered to be prospective replacements for metal-ceramic restorations. This article reviews relevant contemporary literature regarding all-ceramic materials and systems and discusses their material properties, biocompatibility, advances in cementation, and more with special emphasis on clinical survival. The article also aims to provide recommendations for their use.

  6. Attachment of swing-lock labial bar to an existing removable partial denture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R B; Wilson, W G; Caponigro, C V

    1988-10-01

    Although the swing-lock buccal or labial bar is often used as a periodontal splint for mobile teeth, it may also function as an orthodontic retainer to inhibit tooth migration of poorly aligned teeth. The labial bar may be added to an existing removable partial denture if there is sufficient bulk of acrylic resin in the denture bases to accommodate the hinge and latch.

  7. [Denture stomatitis - definition, etiology, classification and treatment].

    PubMed

    Cubera, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Denture stomatitis pertains to a number of pathological symptoms in the oral cavity caused by wearing acrylic dentures. Etiological factors include: mucosal trauma, fungal infection and accumulation of denture plaque. All of these factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces. Antifungal treatment can eradicate C. albicans contamination and relieve stomatitis symptoms. Early diagnosis of the lesion is essential to assure rational therapy.

  8. Automatic, computer-based speech assessment on edentulous patients with and without complete dentures - preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Stelzle, F; Ugrinovic, B; Knipfer, C; Bocklet, T; Nöth, E; Schuster, M; Eitner, S; Seiss, M; Nkenke, E

    2010-03-01

    Dental rehabilitation of edentulous patients with complete dentures includes not only aesthetics and mastication of food, but also speech quality. It was the aim of this study to introduce and validate a computer-based speech recognition system (ASR) for automatic speech assessment in edentulous patients after dental rehabilitation with complete dentures. To examine the impact of dentures on speech production, the speech outcome of edentulous patients with and without complete dentures was compared. Twenty-eight patients reading a standardized text were recorded twice - with and without their complete dentures in situ. A control group of 40 healthy subjects with natural dentition was recorded under the same conditions. Speech quality was evaluated by means of a polyphone-based ASR according to the percentage of the word accuracy (WA). Speech acceptability assessment by expert listeners and the automatic rating of the WA by the ASR showed a high correlation (corr = 0.71). Word accuracy was significantly reduced in edentulous speakers (55.42 +/- 13.1) compared to the control group's WA (69.79 +/- 10.6). On the other hand, wearing complete dentures significantly increased the WA of the edentulous patients (60.00 +/- 15.6). Speech production quality is significantly reduced after complete loss of teeth. Reconstitution of speech production quality is an important part of dental rehabilitation and can be improved for edentulous patients by means of complete dentures. The ASR has proven to be a useful and easily applicable tool for automatic speech assessment in a standardized way.

  9. Maxillary Complete Denture Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Patient-Based Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Ghadeer; McGraw, Kate; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to report on the current knowledge regarding patient satisfaction as a primary outcome for maxillary complete denture therapy. We asked, "For the maxillary edentulous patient treated using maxillary dentures, what are the patient-based outcomes regarding quality of life and treatment satisfaction." An electronic search of publications up to March 2014 was established using four databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase. To meet the ultimate goal of establishing clinical guidelines based on available information, prospective comparative studies, cohort prospective studies, and retrospective studies on more than 10 subjects were included. The electronic search identified 4,530 articles that were evaluated at the title, abstract, and article level to include 31 articles of interest. The patient-based outcomes and satisfaction data included were examined and reported. The studies included 5,485 participants. Of these, 2,685 were identified as wearing maxillary complete dentures. Reported mean ages ranged from 59.7 to 73.6 years. A systematic review indicated that the provision of new maxillary complete dentures for edentulous patients results in improved self-reported satisfaction and oral health-related quality of life. The included reports, while providing evidence that complete denture satisfaction of participants and new dentures improve self-reported outcomes, did not include variables that influence these positive outcomes. A broad range of evidence supports the use of complete dentures for rehabilitation of the edentulous maxilla. When considering treatment of the edentulous maxilla, the expectations of patients for esthetic and phonetic (social) rehabilitation are high and can be met using maxillary complete dentures as the mode of prosthetic rehabilitation. Patients dissatisfied with new complete dentures may be referred for dental implant therapies involving fixed or removable prostheses.

  10. Adaptation of complete denture bases submitted to chemical polishing.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Márcia; Broilo, Josué Ricardo; Walber, Luiz Fernando; Maccari, Paulo César Armani; Shinkai, Rosemary Sadami Arai

    2004-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of chemical polishing on the internal adaptation of complete denture bases fabricated with Veracril® resin and polymerized by either the conventional (C) or microwave (M) techniques. Six groups (n=6/group) were tested: 1) C + no polishing (CO); 2) C + chemical polishing (CQ); 3) C + immersion in hot water at 75ºC (CW); 4) M + no polishing (MO); 5) M + chemical polishing (MQ); and 6) M + immersion in hot water at 75ºC (MW). Internal adaptation immediately after the polishing treatment and after 30 days of storage in water at 37ºC was evaluated by weighing a vinyl polysiloxane film reproducing the gap between resin base and metallic master model, using a precision scale. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test and paired Student's t test, at a significance level of 0.05. No significant difference in immediate adaptation was found as a function of technique, polishing treatment, or interaction of technique/polishing. After 30 days, adaptation means (g) were: CO=2.46±0.32 a; CQ=3.40±0.23 d; CW=3.14±0.22 c; MO=3.23±0.37 c, d; MQ=3.41±0.47 d; MW=2.81±0.33 b (means followed by different letters are statistically different at alpha=0.05). All groups but group CO had significant increase of misfit over the tested period. The present results suggest that Veracril® resin denture bases submitted to chemical polishing had decrease of internal adaptation in 30 days, although immediate adaptation was not affected.

  11. On denture marking.

    PubMed

    Borrman, H I; DiZinno, J A; Wasén, J; René, N

    1999-06-01

    During the last decades in Sweden dentures have been permanently marked with a stainless steel metal band incorporated into the acrylic and containing the patient's birth date, a special number, and "S" for Sweden. The last recommendation issued by the National Board of Health and Welfare states that "the patients shall always be offered denture marking and be informed about the benefit thereof. Denture marking is not permitted if the patient refuses it". Requirements for denture markers have been that they should be biologically inert (when incorporated into the denture), not be expensive, be easy to inscribe, be possible to retrieve after an accident, and survive elevated temperatures for a reasonable time under normal circumstances. Although the frequency of edentulousness has decreased in recent years due to the improvement in oral health there remains a need to address the issue of marking of complete dentures, because there is a large variation in the oral status of populations in different countries. Given that only one marked denture can reveal the identity of a deceased person when all other methods fail to do so, makes it worthwhile. Furthermore, denture marking is important in long-term care facilities. We have investigated the issue of denture marking in Europe and in the United States. The results from the European survey show that denture marking is, to our knowledge regulated by law only in Sweden and Iceland. In the US denture marking is so far mandatory in 21 states while New York State requires dentures to be marked if the patient requests it and several other states impose the obligation to mark dentures on long-term care facilities. Since there is no international consensus regarding the issue of denture marking it is important to address it. A survey from the Nordic countries has shown that if denture marking was in general use, the contribution to the establishment of identity by forensic odontology in cases of fire would increase by about 10

  12. Reactive dentures: a novel approach to decrease residual ridge resorption

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kesava K; Prasanna, Renuka G S; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    The need for reduction of traumatic forces transmitted through the prosthesis has long been recognised and studies have shown that either a soft acrylic resin/silicone rubber can serve as a stress distributor and absorb some of the forces applied to the teeth. These dentures permit reaction to impacting forces which allows independent movement of one or more teeth in function unlike the conventional dentures. A completely edentulous patient with adequate inter-ridge distance was selected for the case, the dentures with soft liner placed between the patient's teeth and denture base were fabricated. This report presents a completely new technique to reduce the ridge resorption and facilitate patient comfort. PMID:23576651

  13. Fibres reinforced dentures investigated with en-face optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Goguta, Luciana; Rominu, Mihai; Negru, Radu; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    The complete dentures are currently made using different technologies. In order to avoid deficiencies of the prostheses made using the classical technique, several alternative procedures have been devised. In order to enhance the mechanical strength, complete denture bases are reinforced with fibres. Their material and structure vary wildly, which makes the investigation difficult. In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is evaluated as a possible non-invasive technique to assess the biomechanical behaviour of the reinforcing fibres. OCT images demonstrate structural defects between fibres and the acrylic material in all dentures bases investigated. We conclude that OCT can successfully be used as a noninvasive analysis method.

  14. A follow-up study on removable partial dentures in undergraduate program: part I. participants and denture use by telephone survey.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Eiko; Fueki, Kenji; Igarashi, Yoshimasa

    2011-07-04

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical outcome of removable partial dentures (RPDs) designed to minimize denture mobility during function. Using archived files of the undergraduate program between 2003 and 2005 at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, a list of 169 patients treated with 184 RPDs was created. The RPDs had either an acrylic resin-base or a cobalt-chrome framework-base. Two examiners telephoned all the listed patients and interviewed 118 patients (70%) regarding the use of their RPDs. Of 118 patients, 42 (36%) had stopped using, mainly due to problems with abutment teeth in resin-based dentures, and replacement in cobalt-chrome-based dentures. There was no significant difference in mean age, gender distribution, mean number of remaining/abutment teeth, distribution of denture arch, and Kennedy classification between denture use and nonuse groups (p>0.05). The nonuse group showed a significantly higher percentage of resin-base compared to the use group (p = 0.006). Logistic regression analysis indicated that resin-base was a significant risk factor for nonuse (p = 0.008). The present findings suggest that abutment teeth should be selected carefully, especially in this type of resin-based RPDs, and that the denture base material may be a critical factor which determines denture use.

  15. Clinical and antimicrobial efficacy of NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets in complete denture wearers

    PubMed Central

    SILVA-LOVATO, Cláudia Helena; DE WEVER, Bart; ADRIAENS, Els; PARANHOS, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; WATANABE, Evandro; PISANI, Maria Xavier; de SOUZA, Rafael Freitas; ITO, Isabel Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets for complete denture, in terms of denture biofilm removal and antimicrobial action. Material and methods Forty complete denture wearers (14 men and 26 women) with a mean age of 62.3±9.0 years were randomly assigned to two groups and were instructed to clean their dentures according to two methods: brushing (control) - 3 times a day with denture brush and tap water following meals; brushing and immersion (experimental) - brushing the denture 3 times a day with denture brush and tap water following meals and immersion of the denture in NitrAdineTM-based denture tablets (Medical InterporousTM). Each method was used for 21 days. Denture biofilm was disclosed by a 1% neutral red solution and quantified by means of digital photos taken from the internal surface before and after the use of the product. Microbiological assessment was conducted to quantify Candida sp. Results An independent t-test revealed a significant lower biofilm percentage for the experimental group (4.7, 95% CI 2.4 to 7.9) in comparison with the control group (mean 37.5, 95% CI 28.2 to 48.1) (t38=7.996, p<0.001). A significant reduction of yeast colony forming units could be found after treatment with Medical InterporousTM denture tablets as compared to the control group (Mann-Whitney test, Z=1.90; p<0.05). Conclusion The present findings suggest that NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets are efficient in removal of denture biofilm. In addition, a clear antimicrobial action was demonstrated. Therefore, they should be recommended as a routine denture maintenance method for the prevention of the development of microbial biofilm-induced denture stomatitis. PMID:21308285

  16. A comparison of the dimensional accuracy of microwave and conventionally polymerized denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A; Huggett, R; Zissis, A; Vowles, R W

    1993-01-01

    This study compares the dimensional changes of microwave and conventionally polymerized denture bases and also establishes the degree of monomer conversion using gas-liquid chromatography. Dimensional changes of three denture base materials were assessed using an optical comparator and the results showed no significant differences between the materials employed or the curing method used. Efficient monomer conversion was demonstrated with levels of residual monomer of less than 1% for all materials.

  17. Water sorption and solubility of polyamide denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Long G; Kopperud, Hilde M; Øilo, Marit

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Some patients experience adverse reactions to poly(methyl methacrylate)-based (PMMA) dentures. Polyamide (PA) as an alternative to PMMA has, however, not been well documented with regard to water sorption and water solubility. The aim of this in vitro study was to measure water sorption and water solubility of two PA materials compared with PMMA, and to evaluate the major components released from the PA materials and the effect on hardness of the materials. Methods: Ten discs (40.0 mm diameter, 2.0 mm thick) of each material (PA: Valplast and Breflex; PMMA: SR Ivocap HIP) were prepared according to manufacturers' recommendations. The specimens were tested for water sorption and water solubility, according to a modification of ISO 20795-1:2008. Released substances were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Results: There were statistically significant differences among the materials regarding water sorption, water solubility and time to water saturation. Breflex had the highest water sorption (30.4 μg/mm(3)), followed by PMMA-material (25.8 μg/mm(3)) and Valplast (13.6 μg/mm(3)). Both PA materials had statistically significant lower water solubility than the PMMA. Both PA had a net increase in weight. Analysis by GC/MS identified release of the compound 12-aminododecanolactam from the material Valplast. No release was found from the Breflex material. Conclusions: The PA denture materials show differences in water sorption and solubility, but within the limits of the standard requirements. The PA showed a net increase in weight after long-term water sorption. The clinical implications of the findings are not elucidated.

  18. Influence of incorporation of ZrO2 nanoparticles on the repair strength of polymethyl methacrylate denture bases.

    PubMed

    Gad, Mohammed M; Rahoma, Ahmed; Al-Thobity, Ahmad M; ArRejaie, Aws S

    Repeated fracture of the denture base is a common problem in prosthodontics, and it represents a nuisance and a time sink for the clinician. Therefore, the possibility of increasing repair strength using new reinforcement materials is of great interest to prosthodontists. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of incorporation of zirconia nanoparticles (nano-ZrO2) on the flexural strength and impact strength of repaired polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture bases. One hundred eighty specimens of heat-polymerized acrylic resin were fabricated (90 for each test) and divided into three main groups: one control group (intact specimens) and two groups divided according to surface design (45° bevels and butt joints), in which specimens were prepared in pairs to create 2.5 mm gaps. Nano-ZrO2 was added to repair resin in 2.5 wt%, 5 wt%, and 7.5 wt% concentrations of acrylic powder. A three-point bending test was used to measure flexural strength, and a Charpy-type test was used to measure impact strength. Scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the fracture surfaces and nano-ZrO2 distribution. The results were analyzed with a paired sample t-test and an unpaired t-test, with a P-value of ≤0.05 being significant. Incorporation of nano-ZrO2 into the repair resin significantly increased flexural strength (P<0.05). The highest value was found in the bevel group reinforced with 7.5% nano-ZrO2, whereas the lowest value was found in the butt group reinforced with 2.5% nano-ZrO2. The impact strength values of all repaired groups were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.05). Among repaired groups, the higher impact strength value was seen in the butt group reinforced with 2.5% nano-ZrO2. The bevel joint demonstrated mainly cohesive failure, whereas the butt joint demonstrated mainly adhesive failure. Incorporation of nano-ZrO2 into the repair resin improved the flexural strength of repaired denture bases, whereas it decreased impact strength

  19. Influence of incorporation of ZrO2 nanoparticles on the repair strength of polymethyl methacrylate denture bases

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Mohammed M; Rahoma, Ahmed; Al-Thobity, Ahmad M; ArRejaie, Aws S

    2016-01-01

    Background Repeated fracture of the denture base is a common problem in prosthodontics, and it represents a nuisance and a time sink for the clinician. Therefore, the possibility of increasing repair strength using new reinforcement materials is of great interest to prosthodontists. Aim of the study This study aimed to evaluate the effects of incorporation of zirconia nanoparticles (nano-ZrO2) on the flexural strength and impact strength of repaired polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture bases. Materials and methods One hundred eighty specimens of heat-polymerized acrylic resin were fabricated (90 for each test) and divided into three main groups: one control group (intact specimens) and two groups divided according to surface design (45° bevels and butt joints), in which specimens were prepared in pairs to create 2.5 mm gaps. Nano-ZrO2 was added to repair resin in 2.5 wt%, 5 wt%, and 7.5 wt% concentrations of acrylic powder. A three-point bending test was used to measure flexural strength, and a Charpy-type test was used to measure impact strength. Scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the fracture surfaces and nano-ZrO2 distribution. The results were analyzed with a paired sample t-test and an unpaired t-test, with a P-value of ≤0.05 being significant. Results Incorporation of nano-ZrO2 into the repair resin significantly increased flexural strength (P<0.05). The highest value was found in the bevel group reinforced with 7.5% nano-ZrO2, whereas the lowest value was found in the butt group reinforced with 2.5% nano-ZrO2. The impact strength values of all repaired groups were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.05). Among repaired groups, the higher impact strength value was seen in the butt group reinforced with 2.5% nano-ZrO2. The bevel joint demonstrated mainly cohesive failure, whereas the butt joint demonstrated mainly adhesive failure. Conclusion Incorporation of nano-ZrO2 into the repair resin improved the flexural strength

  20. Effect of polyimide addition on mechanical properties of PMMA-based denture material.

    PubMed

    Yang, An; Zhao, Dan; Wu, Yaqin; Xu, Chun

    2017-09-26

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of modifying polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base material with polyimide (PI) on its flexural property and biocompatibility. Low molecular weight (1,500 g/mol) PI was synthesized and small amount of PI (0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 wt%) was dispersed into the PMMA matrix. Three-point bending tests, scanning electron microscopy and thermal cycling were used to measure the mechanical properties, while MTT assay was used to evaluate the biocompatibility of the denture base material. The results showed that 0.6% addition of PI significantly increased flexural strength of PMMA denture base material by 13.5%, compared with the control group (p<0.05). Even after 5,000 hydrothermal cycling the reinforce effect still existed. However, when the PI content further increased, flexural strength of the denture base material decreased due to particle agglomeration. The MTT assay confirmed that the addition of PI did not change the biocompatibility of the PMMA denture base material. The present study suggested that blending polyimide in the proper proportion can be a potential method to strengthen the PMMA-based denture base material.

  1. Effect of denture cleansers on surface hardness of resilient denture liners at various time intervals- an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pahuja, Rasleen Kaur; Garg, Sandeep; Bansal, Sanjay; Dang, Rajat Harvinder

    2013-08-01

    This study was aimed to determine the effect of two chemically distinct denture cleansers and water on the surface hardness of acrylic and silicone based soft denture liners at various time intervals. Two commonly used commercial resilient liner material were selected based on their chemical composition (silicone- and acrylic-based soft liners) for this investigation. 120 cylindrical specimens were made of 15 mm × 10 mm dimensions (according to ASTM: D-2240-64T) in a custom made metal mold. All specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Forty specimens were cleansed daily in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution; forty were cleansed in sodium perborate and remaining forty specimens were daily rinsed in water. Testing was done at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months for surface hardness using a Shore A Durometer. A mean of 3 reading for each sample was subjected to one-way ANOVA, Post Hoc test and pair-t test for statistical analysis. P values of less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. Surface hardness of all the samples was significantly higher after a period of 6 months irrespective of the cleansing treatment. Minor changes were observed between control, sodium hypochlorite and sodium perborate groups with time. Greater change was observed in surface hardness of acrylic-based soft denture liners as compared to silicone-based soft liners for all groups, as time progressed. Silicone-based soft denture liners performed significantly better in all cleansing treatments than acrylic-based soft denture liners.

  2. Effect of denture cleansers on surface hardness of resilient denture liners at various time intervals- an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pahuja, Rasleen Kaur; Bansal, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was aimed to determine the effect of two chemically distinct denture cleansers and water on the surface hardness of acrylic and silicone based soft denture liners at various time intervals. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two commonly used commercial resilient liner material were selected based on their chemical composition (silicone- and acrylic-based soft liners) for this investigation. 120 cylindrical specimens were made of 15 mm × 10 mm dimensions (according to ASTM: D-2240-64T) in a custom made metal mold. All specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Forty specimens were cleansed daily in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution; forty were cleansed in sodium perborate and remaining forty specimens were daily rinsed in water. Testing was done at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months for surface hardness using a Shore A Durometer. A mean of 3 reading for each sample was subjected to one-way ANOVA, Post Hoc test and pair-t test for statistical analysis. P values of less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. RESULTS Surface hardness of all the samples was significantly higher after a period of 6 months irrespective of the cleansing treatment. Minor changes were observed between control, sodium hypochlorite and sodium perborate groups with time. Greater change was observed in surface hardness of acrylic-based soft denture liners as compared to silicone-based soft liners for all groups, as time progressed. CONCLUSION Silicone-based soft denture liners performed significantly better in all cleansing treatments than acrylic-based soft denture liners. PMID:24049568

  3. Characteristics of denture thermoplastic resins for non-metal clasp dentures.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Yota

    2010-08-01

    Six thermoplastic resins and conventional acrylic resin were examined to characterize their mechanical and physical properties, water sorption, solubility, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength and color stability. Thermoplastic resins for non-metal clasp dentures exhibiting low water sorption and solubility offer hygienic advantages. Since they have a low modulus of elasticity and are easily manipulated, these materials make it possible for larger undercuts to be used for retention compared to acrylic resin. Not all of the thermoplastic resins tested fractured after the bending test in contrast to the conventional denture base resin, which fractured when tested beyond its proportional limit. It was also found that clinically noticeable staining may occur on the polyamide resins and polyethylene terephtalate resins.

  4. Candida albicans adherence to denture base material: chemical disinfection and the effect of acquired salivary pellicle formation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Acosta, Emilio José T; da Silva, Paulo Mauricio Batista; Jacobina, Matheus; Lara, Vanessa Soares; Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Porto, Vinicius Carvalho

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 1% sodium hypochlorite (H1%) and 4% chlorhexidine gluconate (CG4%) on the adhesion of Candida albicans to denture base acrylic resins, as well as to verify the effect of the acquired salivary pellicle (ASP) formation on this process. A total of 300 acrylic specimens were immersed in distilled water (control) (n = 100), H1% (n = 100), or CG4% (n = 100) for 30 days. Twenty specimens were used in each experimental period (0, 1, 7, 15, 30 days). At the end of disinfection testing periods, 10 specimens of each group were exposed to human whole saliva to simulate ASP formation, and then all specimens were incubated with C. albicans ATTC 90028. Microorganism adhesion was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy, after staining with Acridine orange. In the 30(th) disinfection cycle in relation to baseline, the H1% or CG4%, without ASP formation, reduced the C. albicans adhesion by approximately 80%; however, with ASP, this reduction after disinfection with H1% was higher (88%). The presence of ASP resulted in higher reduction of adhered fungal cells in comparison to resin without ASP, at the 1(st) H1% or CG4% disinfection cycle, as well as at 30(th) H1% disinfection cycles. Our results suggest that the presence of saliva might influence the adhesion of C. albicans and improve the effectiveness of methods to reduce fungal adhesion. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Comparison of denture base adaptation between CAD-CAM and conventional fabrication techniques.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, Brian J; Goodacre, Charles J; Baba, Nadim Z; Kattadiyil, Mathew T

    2016-08-01

    Currently no data comparing the denture base adaptation of CAD-CAM and conventional denture processing techniques have been reported. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the denture base adaptation of pack and press, pour, injection, and CAD-CAM techniques for fabricating dentures to determine which process produces the most accurate and reproducible adaptation. A definitive cast was duplicated to create 40 gypsum casts that were laser scanned before any fabrication procedures were initiated. A master denture was made using the CAD-CAM process and was then used to create a putty mold for the fabrication of 30 standardized wax festooned dentures, 10 for each of the conventional processing techniques (pack and press, pour, injection). Scan files from 10 casts were sent to Global Dental Science, LLC for fabrication of the CAD-CAM test specimens. After specimens for each of the 4 techniques had been fabricated, they were hydrated for 24 hours and the intaglio surface laser scanned. The scan file of each denture was superimposed on the scan file of the corresponding preprocessing cast using surface matching software. Measurements were made at 60 locations, providing evaluation of fit discrepancies at the following areas: apex of the denture border, 6 mm from the denture border, crest of the ridge, palate, and posterior palatal seal. The use of median and interquartile range was used to assess accuracy and reproducibility. The Levine and Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance was used to evaluate differences between processing techniques at the 5 specified locations (α=.05). The ranking of results based on median and interquartile range determined that the accuracy and reproducibility of the CAD-CAM technique was more consistently localized around zero at 3 of the 5 locations. Therefore, the CAD-CAM technique showed the best combination of accuracy and reproducibility among the tested fabrication techniques. The pack and press technique was more accurate at

  6. Effect of different periods of preconditioning with saliva on Candida albicans adhesion to a denture base resin by crystal violet staining and XTT assay.

    PubMed

    Zamperini, Camila Andrade; Schiavinato, Patrícia Cristiane dos Santos; Machado, Ana Lucia; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Pavarina, Ana Claudia; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    The role of saliva on Candida adhesion to biomaterials has not been clearly defined. The present study investigates whether different periods of preconditioning with saliva would influence the adhesion of Candida albicans to a denture base resin. Ninety samples of acrylic resin with smooth surfaces were made and then divided into five groups: one control without saliva, and four experimental groups conditioned in saliva for periods of 30 min, 1, 3, or 12 h. Candida adhesion was evaluated by crystal violet staining and 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-([phenylamino] carbonyl)-2H-tetrazolium-hydroxide assay. The one-way analysis of variance revealed that there were no significant differences among the mean number of adherent cells or among the mean absorbance for all groups. No significant correlation was found between the two methods used for assessing Candida albicans adhesion. The different periods of preconditioning with saliva had no significant influence on the adhesion of Candida albicans to the denture base acrylic resin. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Creep and stress relaxation behavior of two soft denture liners.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2014-03-01

    Numerous investigators stated the indications of soft denture lining materials; but no one determined the indications of these materials according to their chemical structure. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of acrylic and silicon lining materials. This study investigated and compared viscoelastic properties of two resilient denture lining materials. Tested materials were laboratory processed; one of them was silicone-based liner product (Molloplast-B), and the other was plasticized acrylic resin (Vertex™ Soft). Twenty cylindrical specimens (10-20 mm in length, 11.55 mm in diameter) were fabricated in an aluminum mold from each material for creep and stress relaxation testing (the study of viscoelastic properties). Tests were performed by using the universal testing machine DY-34. Collected data were analyzed with t test statistics for statistically significant differences at the 95 % confidence level. There was a clear difference in creep and stress relaxation behavior between acrylic and silicone liners. Statistical study of Young's moduli illustrated that Vertex™ Soft was softer than Molloplast-B. On the other hand, the results explained that the recovery of silicone material was better than of acrylic one. The creep test revealed that the plasticized acrylic resin lining material exhibited considerable creep, whereas silicone-based liner exhibited elastic behavior. Besides, the stress relaxation test showed that relaxation of the plasticized acrylic resin material was bigger than of the silicone-based liner.

  8. A feasibility study on laser rapid forming of a complete titanium denture base plate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Gao, Bo; Tan, Hua; Chen, Jing; Tang, Chak-Yin; Tsui, Chi-Pong

    2010-05-01

    This work attempted to integrate the technologies of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) and laser rapid forming (LRF) for the fabrication of the titanium plate of a complete denture. By the combination of laser scan and reverse engineering software, the standard triangulation language (STL)-formatted denture base plate was finally designed and sliced into a sequence of numerical controlled codes. The titanium (Ti) complete denture plate was finally built, layer-by-layer, on the LRF system. To evaluate the quality of fit, a virtual adaptation test that measured and compared the profiles of the laser free formed denture plate and those of the edentulous plaster cast had been conducted, and the mean deviation was found to be 0.34 mm. After traditional dental finishing techniques, a complete denture with a Ti base plate was then made and judged to be acceptable. The CAD/CAM/LRF system is a potential candidate and a new platform for the design and manufacture of custom-made Ti denture plates and restorations.

  9. Investigation of bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liner immersed in isobutyl methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Tugut, Faik; Mutaf, Burcu; Guney, Umit

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liners immersed in isobutyl methacrylate (iBMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) for various lengths of time. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) test specimens were fabricated (75 mm in length, 12 mm in diameter at the thickest section, and 7 mm at the thinnest section) and then randomly assigned to five groups (n=15); untreated (Group 1), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 1 minute (Group 2), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 3 minutes (Group 3), resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 1 minute (Group 4), and resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 3 minutes (Group 5). The resilient liner specimens were processed between 2 PMMA blocks. Bonding strength of the liners to PMMA was compared by tensile test with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were evaluated by 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α=0.05). RESULTS The highest mean value of force was observed in Group 3 specimens. The differences between groups were statistically significant (P<.05), except between Group 1 and Group 4 (P=.063). CONCLUSION Immersion of silicone-based soft denture liners in iBMA for 3 minutes doubled the tensile bond strength between the silicone soft liner and PMMA denture base materials compared to the control group. PMID:24843397

  10. Full mouth rehabilitation of a patient with mandibular implant screw retained Fp-3 prosthesis opposing maxillary acrylic removable over-denture.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish R; Nallaswamy, Deepak; Ariga, Padma; Philip, Jacob Mathew

    2013-04-01

    A hybrid denture is one that is fabricated over a metal framework and retained by screws threaded into the implant abutments. The anterior part of a mandibular hybrid denture is fixed on implants while the posterior part of the denture is extended and cantilevered from implants. This article presents the fabrication of a maxillary over-denture opposing mandibular implant retained hybrid prosthesis. A total of four implants were placed in the mandibular arch. Castable abutments were used to produce the optimal angulations. Framework was waxed, cast recovered, and the fit was refined until the framework seated passively on the master cast. The mandibular denture teeth were waxed to the hybrid framework, and a final wax try-in was performed to verify and correct maxillomandibular relations before processing. The prosthesis was inserted after verification of occlusion, retention, and stability. The rehabilitation of edentulous patients with hybrid dentures has been observed to achieve greater masticatory function and psychological satisfaction than with conventional over-dentures. Producing a passive-fitting substructure for a fixed removable screw retained hybrid prosthesis is arguably one of the most technically complex tasks in implant dentistry. The technique presented may not initially produce a perfectly passive framework, but use of disclosing media and adjusting the internal aspect of the casting can result in non-binding, fully seated prostheses.

  11. Electron-beam irradiation of experimental denture base polymers.

    PubMed

    Faltermeier, Andreas; Behr, Michael; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard

    2007-06-01

    Since the properties of polymers can be influenced using electron-beam irradiation, the aim of this study was to investigate whether electron-beam post-curing can improve the mechanical properties of experimental denture base polymers. Rectangular specimens of different experimental polymeric blends were electron-beam irradiated (post-cured) with 25 kGy and 200 kGy using an electron accelerator of 4.5 MeV. Fracture toughness, work of fracture, Vickers hardness and colour changes were measured and compared in non-irradiated specimens. The mechanical properties of all the investigated polymers seemed to benefit from low-energy electron-beam irradiation (25 kGy). Using an energy dose of 200 kGy, all blends showed deteriorated mechanical properties resulting from chain breakage. Nevertheless, all investigated polymers had undesirable colour changes after electron-beam irradiation. Mechanical properties of experimental polymethyl-methacrylate could be changed using electron-beam irradiation. Because of discolorations caused by the irradiation levels investigated, these levels cannot be recommended for practical applications.

  12. Wettability of denture relining materials under water storage over time

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Na-Young; Lee, Ho-Rim; Lee, Heesu

    2009-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM Poor wettability of denture relining materials may lead to retention problems and patient discomfort. PURPOSE Purpose of this study is to compare and evaluate wettability of nine denture relining materials using contact angle measurements under air and water storage over time. MATERIAL AND METHODS Nine denture relining materials were investigated in this study. Two heat-curing polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) denture base materials: Vertex RS, Lang, one self-curing polyethyl-methacrylate (PEMA) chairside reline resin: Rebase II, six silicone relining materials: Mucopren soft, Mucosoft, Mollosil® plus, Sofreliner Touch, GC Reline™ Ultrasoft, Silagum automix comfort were used in this experiment. Contact angles were measured using high-resolution drop shape analysis system (DSA 10-MK2, KRUESS, Germany) under three conditions (in air after setting, 1 hour water storage, and 24 hours water storage). Nine materials were classified into three groups according to material composition (Group 1: PMMA, Group 2: PEMA, Group 3: Silicone). Mean values of contact angles were compared using independent samples t-test and one-way ANOVA, followed by a Scheffe's post hoc analysis (α= 0.01). RESULTS Contact angles of materials tested after air and water storage increased in the following order: Group 1 (PMMA), Group 2 (PEMA), Group 3 (Silicone). Heat-cured acrylic denture base resins had more wettability than silicone relining materials. Lang had the highest wettability after 24 hours of water storage. Silicone relining materials had lower wettability due to their hydrophobicity. Wettability of all denture relining materials, except Rebase II and Mollosil® plus, increased after 24 hours of water storage. CONCLUSIONS Conventional heat-cured resin showed the highest wettability, therefore, it can be suggested that heat-cured acrylic resin is material of choice for denture relining materials. PMID:21165247

  13. Effect of Reinforcement on the Flexural Properties of Injection-Molded Thermoplastic Denture Base Resins.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hirono; Hamanaka, Ippei; Takahashi, Yutaka; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of reinforcement on the flexural properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Three injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins (polyamide, polyester, polycarbonate) were selected for this study, and a conventional heat-polymerized denture base resin (PMMA) was used as a control. Continuous unidirectional glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) and metal wire were used for reinforcement. Reinforced bar-shaped specimens (65 mm long, 10 mm wide, 3.3 mm high) were fabricated (n = 10). The flexural strength at the proportional limit (FS-PL) and the elastic modulus were measured using a three-point bending test. All the denture base material specimens reinforced with FRC possessed a significantly higher FS-PL compared to those without reinforcement. The FS-PL of the polycarbonate specimens reinforced with metal wire was significantly higher than that without reinforcement, and there was no significant difference in the FS-PL between the polycarbonate specimens reinforced with FRC and those with metal wire. The order of the elastic modulus according to the denture base material, arranged in terms of statistical significance, was as follows: PMMA (3.46 ± 0.53 GPa) > polycarbonate (2.69 ± 0.48 GPa) > polyester (2.00 ± 0.39 GPa) > polyamide (1.14 ± 0.35 GPa). The order of the elastic modulus according to the reinforcement, arranged in terms of statistical significance, was as follows: metal wire (2.74 ± 0.96 GPa) > FRC (2.40 ± 0.89 GPa) > no reinforcement (1.82 ± 0.83 GPa). Continuous unidirectional glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) reinforcement had a satisfactory reinforcing effect for the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. Composite veneering of metal based fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Rosentritt, M; Behr, M; Brückner, H; Handel, G

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the thermal mechanical properties of veneering composites after polymerization with the appropriate polymerization device. Fracture tests were performed to investigate the effect on fixed partial dentures (FPDs). Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was used to determine the temperature-dependent mechanical properties. To approximate the clinical situation, the fracture resistance of three-unit metal-based FPDs with different composite veneering was investigated after a simulated 5-year oral wearing period. The restorations were made of a high gold alloy and veneered with three different composites. To determine the influence of fabrication, one composite was used in a light-polymerizing and a heat/pressure-curing version and, in addition, a newly developed heat protection paste was used. After a 5-year simulation period, the fracture resistance was determined. The storage modulus varied between 14268 N mm(-2) (Belleglass) and 6616 N mm(-2) (Sinfony). Adoro showed no significant differences between light curing (9155 N mm(-2)) and heat curing (8184 N mm(-2)) variations. The Adoro-veneering with the heat protection paste showed the highest median fracture strength (1700 N), followed by Adoro LC (1555 N), Belleglass (1051 N), Adoro HP (1150 N) and Sinfony (909 N). The most common failure type occurring in all FPDs was a cracking of the composite, exposing the metal framework. All FPDs showed stress cracking of the composite. The heat protection paste seemed to reduce the crack formation after fabrication and increased the fracture resistance of the composite veneering. Stress cracking after thermal cycling and mechanical loading affected all composites, but all veneered three-unit alloy FPDs showed a fracture resistance sufficient for posterior application.

  15. Complete denture base assessments using holograms: dimensional alterations after different activation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dughir, Ciprian; Popovschi, Ana Maria; Cojocariu, Andreea Codruta; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; de Sabata, Aldo; Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2016-03-01

    Holography is a well-developed method with a large range of applications, including dentistry. This study uses holographic methods for the study of total dental prosthesis. The issue is that the transformation of wax denture base in polymethylacrylate causes dimensional alterations and retractions in the final dental constructs. These could cause the failure of the stability of the complete denture in the oral cavity. Thus, the aim of this study is to determine and to compare using holography, total prosthesis obtained using three different manufacturing methods: pressing, injection, and polymerization. Each of the three types of dentures thus produced were recorded over the previously wax complete base holographic plates. The dimensional alterations that appear after using the different activation methods were thus determined. The most significant modification was remarked in the custom press technology, while the smallest variations were detected in the injection alternative.

  16. Comparative Analysis of the Water Sorption and Cytotoxicity of Two different Denture Base Systems: An in vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Prashanth; Chhapdia, Lokesh; Verma, Pranav; Sahu, Anshul; Kushwaha, Narendra S; Chaturvedi, Rahul; Manna, Suvashri

    2017-09-01

    Different biomaterials and techniques have been introduced in the field of prosthetic dentistry with the purpose of replacement and rehabilitation of the edentulous areas. Due to their shorter setting time, the light-activated restorative and prosthetic materials have the capability of releasing few amount of cytotoxic materials in the oral cavity. Polymer materials [urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and bis-acryl] are assumed to have high mechanical properties. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) offers numerous advantages of being highly esthetic in nature and at the same time being cost-effective. Hence, this study aimed to assess and compare the water sorption and cytotoxicity of light-activated UDMA denture base resin and conventional heat-activated PMMA resin. This study included assessment and comparison of water sorption and cytotoxicity of heat-activated PMMA resin and light-activated UDMA denture base system. Fabrication of heat-activated PMMA resin and UDMA specimens was done by investing the wax patterns in stone molds using manufacturer's instructions. Contraction of the specimens was done for assessment of cytotoxicity and water resorption of the UDMA and PMMA resin samples. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software version 18.0. Chi-square test and one-way analysis of variance tests were used for the assessment of the level of significance; p < 0.05 was taken as significant. Mean lysis score observed in the PMMA and UDMA groups was 0.4 and 0.3 respectively. While observing at the 3 months time, the mean water resorption in the PMMA and UDMA groups was found to be 37.9 and 40.2 respectively. Significant difference in relation to water resorption was observed between the two study groups only at 3 months time. Both materials used in this study are nontoxic. Furthermore, UDMA resin materials exhibited lower water resorption after more than 1 month of time of storage. Water resorption is similar for different denture

  17. Effect of Antimicrobial Denture Base Resin on Multi-Species Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keke; Ren, Biao; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K; Chen, Yu; Han, Qi; Li, Bolei; Weir, Michael D; Li, Mingyun; Feng, Mingye; Cheng, Lei

    2016-06-29

    Our aims of the research were to study the antimicrobial effect of dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) modified denture base resin on multi-species biofilms and the biocompatibility of this modified dental material. Candida albicans (C. albicans), Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), as well as Actinomyces naeslundii (A. naeslundii) were used for biofilm formation on denture base resin. Colony forming unit (CFU) counts, microbial viability staining, and 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) array were used to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of DMADDM. C. albicans staining and Real-time PCR were used to analyze the morphology and expression of virulence genes of C. albicans in biofilm. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) array and Real-time PCR were conducted to examine the results after biofilm co-cultured with epithelial cell. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining followed by histological evaluation were used to study the biocompatibility of this modified material. We found that DMADDM containing groups reduced both biomass and metabolic activity of the biofilm significantly. DMADDM can also inhibit the virulence of C. albicans by means of inhibiting the hyphal development and downregulation of two virulence related genes. DMADDM significantly reduced the cell damage caused by multi-species biofilm according to the LDH activity and reduced the expression of IL-18 gene of the cells simultaneously. The in vivo histological evaluation proved that the addition of DMADDM less than 6.6% in denture material did not increase the inflammatory response (p > 0.05). Therefore, we proposed that the novel denture base resin containing DMADDM may be considered as a new promising therapeutic system against problems caused by microbes on denture base such as denture stomatitis.

  18. Effect of Antimicrobial Denture Base Resin on Multi-Species Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keke; Ren, Biao; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Chen, Yu; Han, Qi; Li, Bolei; Weir, Michael D.; Li, Mingyun; Feng, Mingye; Cheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Our aims of the research were to study the antimicrobial effect of dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) modified denture base resin on multi-species biofilms and the biocompatibility of this modified dental material. Candida albicans (C. albicans), Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), as well as Actinomyces naeslundii (A. naeslundii) were used for biofilm formation on denture base resin. Colony forming unit (CFU) counts, microbial viability staining, and 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) array were used to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of DMADDM. C. albicans staining and Real-time PCR were used to analyze the morphology and expression of virulence genes of C. albicans in biofilm. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) array and Real-time PCR were conducted to examine the results after biofilm co-cultured with epithelial cell. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining followed by histological evaluation were used to study the biocompatibility of this modified material. We found that DMADDM containing groups reduced both biomass and metabolic activity of the biofilm significantly. DMADDM can also inhibit the virulence of C. albicans by means of inhibiting the hyphal development and downregulation of two virulence related genes. DMADDM significantly reduced the cell damage caused by multi-species biofilm according to the LDH activity and reduced the expression of IL-18 gene of the cells simultaneously. The in vivo histological evaluation proved that the addition of DMADDM less than 6.6% in denture material did not increase the inflammatory response (p > 0.05). Therefore, we proposed that the novel denture base resin containing DMADDM may be considered as a new promising therapeutic system against problems caused by microbes on denture base such as denture stomatitis. PMID:27367683

  19. Tensile Bond Strength between Soft Liners and Two Chemically Different Denture Base Materials: Effect of Thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Tugut, Faik; Coskun, Mehmet Emre; Dogan, Derya Ozdemir; Kirmali, Omer; Akin, Hakan

    2016-06-01

    The bond strength of soft denture liner to a recently introduced denture base resin after thermocycling has not been compared to traditional denture base materials. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of thermocycling on the tensile bond strength of soft denture liners to two chemically different denture base resins, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA). A total of 48 PMMA and UDMA tensile test specimens were fabricated by attaching two different soft denture liners (Molloplast-B, Permaflex) according to the manufacturers' instructions and assigned to two groups. Half of the specimens for each group were stored in water for 1 week, and the other half were thermocycled (5000 cycles) between baths of 5°C and 55°C. Specimens were mounted on a universal testing machine with a 5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α = 0.05). The highest bond strength was measured in the specimens from the UDMA/Molloplast groups, and the lowest was seen in the PMMA/Permaflex group. No significant difference in bond strength was detected in PMMA/Permaflex groups after thermocycling (p = 0.082), whereas other groups exhibited significant differences after thermocycling (p < 0.05). Thermocycling decreased the bond strength values in both the PMMA and UDMA groups. Regardless of types of soft liners, PMMA specimens presented lower bond strength values than UDMA specimens, both before and after thermocycling. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. Do CAD/CAM dentures really release less monomer than conventional dentures?

    PubMed

    Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca; Wiedemair, Verena; Huck, Christian; Klaunzer, Florian; Steinmassl, Otto; Grunert, Ingrid; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) dentures are assumed to have more favourable material properties than conventionally fabricated dentures, among them a lower methacrylate monomer release. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. CAD/CAM dentures were generated from ten different master casts by using four different CAD/CAM systems. Conventional, heat-polymerised dentures served as control group. Denture weight and volume were measured; the density was calculated, and the denture surface area was assessed digitally. The monomer release after 7 days of water storage was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Whole You Nexteeth and Wieland Digital Dentures had significantly lower mean volume and weight than conventional dentures. Baltic Denture System and Whole You Nexteeth had a significantly increased density. Baltic Denture System had a significantly smaller surface area. None of the CAD/CAM dentures released significantly less monomer than the control group. All tested dentures released very low amounts of methacrylate monomer, but not significantly less than conventional dentures. A statistically significant difference might nevertheless exist in comparison to other, less recommendable denture base materials, such as the frequently used autopolymerising resins. CAD/CAM denture fabrication has numerous advantages. It enables the fabrication of dentures with lower resin volume and lower denture weight. Both could increase the patient comfort. Dentures with higher density might exhibit more favourable mechanical properties. The hypothesis that CAD/CAM dentures release less monomer than conventional dentures could, however, not be verified.

  1. Novel denture-cleaning system based on hydroxyl radical disinfection.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Taro; Nakamura, Keisuke; Ikai, Hiroyo; Hayashi, Eisei; Shirato, Midori; Mokudai, Takayuki; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new denture-cleaning device using hydroxyl radicals generated from photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Electron spin resonance analysis demonstrated that the yield of hydroxyl radicals increased with the concentration of H2O2 and light irradiation time. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and methicillin-resistant S aureus were killed within 10 minutes with a > 5-log reduction when treated with photolysis of 500 mM H2O2; Candida albicans was killed within 30 minutes with a > 4-log reduction with photolysis of 1,000 mM H2O2. The clinical test demonstrated that the device could effectively reduce microorganisms in denture plaque by approximately 7-log order within 20 minutes.

  2. An aspect of denture base retention: direct measurement of force due to surface tension.

    PubMed

    Murray, M D; Darvell, B W

    1991-01-01

    A fixed-volume drop of liquid between a pair of parallel surfaces has been a common model for the denture-mucosa system. The reported one-term equation for the model, the derivation of which is suspect, implies that the acting force is inversely proportional to the square of the separation. Direct measurement of the force, however, showed that a better approximation is given by a two-term equation, with force varying as the inverse of the separation. The need for rigorous theoretical derivation is thereby emphasized. The experimental data suggest that a maximum retention force might occur for denture bases at separations of about 15 microns.

  3. Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajau, Rida; Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat; Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik

    2014-02-01

    The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

  4. Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application

    SciTech Connect

    Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik; Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat; Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd

    2014-02-12

    The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

  5. Complete-denture esthetics.

    PubMed

    Engelmeier, R L

    1996-01-01

    This review of complete denture esthetics addresses the process of tooth selection, tooth arrangement, and characterization of the denture bases. The guidelines discussed in this article are all gleaned from the classic prosthodontic literature. These principles, which were developed over the past century, coupled with state-of-the-art materials are artificial teeth enable contemporary dentists to fabricate complete dentures with a level of esthetics never before possible.

  6. Hader bar and clip attachment retained mandibular complete denture

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi; Kapoor, Vikram; Gupta, Ridhimaa

    2013-01-01

    Bar and clip attachments significantly improve the level of satisfaction of denture-wearing patients by enhancing the retention and stability of the prosthesis. These attachments have been most commonly used for connecting the prosthesis to implants, but they can be effectively used to retain tooth-supported prosthesis as well. The primary functions of bar attachments are splinting the abutments together, even distribution of forces to the abutments and supporting areas, guiding the prosthesis into place, improving the retention, stability, support and comfort of the patient. The primary requirement for the use of bar attachments is the availability of sufficient vertical and buccolingual space for the proper placement of the bar, sleeves, teeth arrangement and sufficient thickness of acrylic denture base to minimise incidence of denture fracture in the area of bar assembly. PMID:24145505

  7. Reinforcing effect of glass fiber-reinforced composite reinforcement on flexural strength at proportional limit of a repaired denture base resin

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kaneyoshi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hamanaka, Ippei; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Hirono; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the reinforcing effect of glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) reinforcement on flexural strength at the proportional limit (FS-PL) of a repaired denture base resin. Materials and methods: Repaired denture base resins reinforced with metal and with FRC reinforcement, and that without reinforcement were tested. The ultimate flexural strength, the FS-PL and the elastic modulus of repaired denture base resins were tested. The joint efficiency (times) of the repaired denture base resins on the intact denture base resin was evaluated. Results: The repaired denture base resins reinforced with metal reinforcement and with FRC reinforcement had significantly higher ultimate flexural strength than the repaired denture base resin without reinforcement (p < 0.05) and were not significantly different from each other (p > 0.05). The FS-PL of a repaired denture base resin reinforced with the FRC reinforcement was similar to that with the metal reinforcement (p > 0.05), and these were significantly higher than the FS-PL of a repaired denture base resin without reinforcement (p < 0.05). The elastic modulus of the repaired denture base resin reinforced with the FRC reinforcement was significantly lower than that with metal reinforcement (p < 0.05) and was significantly higher than that without reinforcement (p < 0.05). The joint efficiency of the FRC reinforced specimen was 0.98. Conclusion: The FRC reinforcement had a reinforcing effect on the FS-PL of a repaired denture base resin. PMID:28642906

  8. The Effect of Different Chemical Surface Treatments of Denture Teeth on Shear Bond Strength: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Palekar, Umesh; Awinashe, Vaibav; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Kawadkar, Abhishek; Rahangdale, Tripti

    2014-01-01

    Background: The development of better cross linked acrylic resin teeth has solved the problems related to wearing and discoloration of acrylic teeth. The same cross linking at ridge lap region acts as a double edge sword as it weakens the bond between denture base and tooth. Aim of Study: The purpose of study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment on the bond strength of resin teeth to denture base resin using monomethyl methacrylate monomer and dichloromethane with no surface treatment acting as control. Settings and Design:Denture base cylinder samples in wax (n=180) were made with maxillary central incisor attached at 450 (JIST 6506). These samples were randomly and equally divided into three groups of 60 each. These specimens were then flasked, dewaxed as per the standard protocol. Materials and Methods: Before acrylization, ridge lap area was treated as follows: Group A- no surface treatment act as control, Group B treated with monomethyl methacrylate monomer, Group C treated with dichloromethane. Digitally controlled acryliser was used for acrylization as per manufacturer’s instructions and shear bond strength was tested on Universal Testing Machine (Servo Hydraulic, 50kN High Strain, BISS Research). Statistical Analysis used: Result was statistically analyzed with One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Post-hoc ANOVA Tukey’s HSD test at 5% level of significance. Results: The application of dichloromethane showed increased bond strength between cross linked acrylic resin teeth and heat cure denture base resin followed by monomethyl methacrylate monomer and control group. Conclusion: The application of dichloromethane on the ridge lap surface of the resin teeth before packing of the dough into the mold significantly increased the bond strength between cross linked acrylic resin teeth and heat cure denture base resin. PMID:25121057

  9. Survival of microorganisms on complete dentures following ultrasonic cleaning combined with immersion in peroxide-based cleanser solution.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Yasuhiro; Seto, Katsura; Kamashita, Yuji; Kaji, Akihito; Kurono, Asutsugu; Nagaoka, Eiichi

    2014-09-01

    To compare ultrasonic cleaning combined with immersion in a commercially available peroxide-based cleanser solution (Polident(®) ) with other denture cleaning methods, we examined the quantity of micro-organisms that survived on dentures before and after various cleaning methods. One hundred complete dentures belonging to 50 nursing home residents (mean age, 84.6 years) were randomly assigned to five groups according to the cleaning method employed: (A) immersion in Polident(®) solution alone, (B) brushing with water, (C) ultrasonic cleaning with water, (D) method (A) followed by method (B) and (E) ultrasonic cleaning combined with immersion in Polident(®) solution. Before and after the dentures had been cleaned, denture biofilm was collected from the mucosal surface of each lateral half of the examined dentures. The collected micro-organisms were cultured, presumptively identified by standard methods and quantified. Comparisons between the five cleaning methods were carried out using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's multiple comparisons test. The denture cleaning methods involving the use of Polident(®) solution (methods A, D and E) were significantly more effective at denture disinfection than the other methods (p < 0.05); in particular, the quantity of Candida spp. was lowest after method E (median, 0.00; significantly lower than those observed after methods A, B and C; p < 0.05). It was concluded that ultrasonic cleaning combined with immersion in a peroxide-based cleanser solution effectively reduces the quantity of micro-organisms surviving on dentures and is a suitable method for elderly individuals who find brushing their dentures difficult. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Use of Candida-specific chicken egg yolk antibodies to inhibit the adhering of Candida to denture base materials: prevention of denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Yoshiaki; Fujisaki, Junichi; Nagayama, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Kiyotsugu; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Hamada, Tomofumi; Sakamoto, Ryoich; Mukai, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Kazumasa

    2016-09-01

    Polyclonal anti-Candida chicken egg yolk antibodies (anti-IgY) were used to investigate the prevention of adherence of Candida species to denture base material in vitro. Candida is a potential virulence factor that can cause systemic infection and even death in immunocompromised individuals. Because long-term antifungal treatment may lead to the emergence of drug-resistant strains, it is necessary to develop novel preventive measures and treatments for candidiasis. Three types of chicken egg yolk antibodies were used in this study: non-specific antibody (control IgY), Candida albicans-specific antibody (anti-C.a.IgY) and Candida glabrata-specific antibody (anti-C.g.IgY). A mixture of different dilutions of each antibody with a suspension of Candida species and denture base material was incubated for 3 h, and then the colony-forming units of Candida on the denture base material were counted. Compared with control IgY, anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY significantly inhibited the adherence of C. albicans, but anti-C.a.IgY tended to be more potent than anti-C.g.IgY. The adherence of C. glabrata was also inhibited significantly by anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY with almost equivalent potency, indicating that their actions against C. glabrata were comparable. This study revealed the inhibitory effects of anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY against the adherence of C. albicans and C. glabrata to denture base material. This finding indicates the possibility of a beneficial effect of IgYs for the prevention of denture stomatitis and candidiasis in clinical settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of antibacterial coating on monomer exudation and the mechanical properties of denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dan; Gong, Haihuan; Zhang, Jiahui; Guo, Xiaowei; Yan, Min; Zhu, Song

    2017-01-01

    Denture base resin may be exposed to different conditions for long periods, resulting in the loss of monomer by exudation and a decrease in mechanical properties. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate monomer loss by exudation from denture base resins doped with antibacterial coatings and their mechanical properties after long-term water immersion. Four kinds of dental base resin materials were used as experimental materials. The specimens of each resin were divided into an experimental group (coated) and a control group (uncoated). Monomer exudation was tested at 7 and 28 days by gas chromatography after materials were immersed in distilled water or a solution of 75% alcohol/distilled water. Flexural strength and elastic modulus were tested with a universal testing machine after immersion for 2 and 180 days. The surface morphology was characterized with atomic force microscopy. The data were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey-Kramer honest significant difference test (α=.05). In both of the immersion media, each of the 3 factors (materials, coating, and immersion time) significantly affected the monomer exudation (P<.05). In addition, the interaction between any 2 of those factors or among the 3 factors had a significant interaction effect on the monomer exudation of the denture base (P<.05). The mechanical properties of the tested materials were different, and the immersion time had a significant effect on the flexural properties (P<.05). For flexural strength, a significant interaction effect occurred among the 3 factors (material, coating, and immersion time) (P<.05). The coating has a significant effect on the elastic modulus of denture base resin (P<.05) and on the interaction between the material and immersion time (P<.05). The silver-loaded mesoporous silica antibacterial coating can effectively reduce monomer exudation and enhance the flexural properties of denture base resin after immersion. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council

  12. Reduction of Candida biofilm adhesion by incorporation of prereacted glass ionomer filler in denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Chiaki; Takakuda, Kazuo; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of surface reaction-type prereacted glass ionomer (S-PRG) fillers on Candida albicans adhesion on denture base resin. Discs were prepared by incorporating the S-PRG filler into the polymer powder of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based, heat-polymerizing resin at 0 (control), 5%, 10%, and 20% (w/w). The surface roughness of all disc surfaces was measured. Elemental analysis of released Na(+), Sr(2+), SiO3(2-), Al(3-), BO3(3-), and F(-) was performed after water immersion. Each disc was placed in a well with artificial saliva to form acquired pellicle, incubated, washed with phosphate-buffered saline, and immersed in a C. albicans (JCM2085) cell suspension standardized at 10(4) cells/ml. After aerobic incubation at 37 °C for 24 h, the metabolic mitochondrial activity, total biofilm biomass, and biofilm thickness were evaluated. The morphogenetic transition of C. albicans in the early culture stage (1 and 3 h) was observed. There was a slight but significant increase in the surface roughness with an increase in the filler content. The metabolic activity and total biomass volume were significantly lower in all filler groups than in the control group, although there were no significant differences among the filler groups. Groups with at least 5% filler content exhibited a thinner biofilm compared with the control group. All filler groups showed hyphal forms at 3 h, with the length of the hyphae being lesser than those in the control group. Although the incorporation of S-PRG filler slightly increases the surface roughness of denture base resin, it reduces the adhesion of C. albicans. The S-PRG filler has the potential to reduce Candida albicans adhesion on denture base resin and may lower the risk of denture stomatitis. However, filler incorporation can increase the surface roughness of heat-polymerizing denture base resin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro comparison of the cytotoxicity and water sorption of two different denture base systems.

    PubMed

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Polat, Zubeyde Akin

    2015-02-01

    Denture base resins have the potential to cause cytotoxicity in vivo, and the mechanical properties of resins are affected by water sorption. There is a correlation between residual monomer and water sorption. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate water sorption and cytotoxicity of light-activated urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) denture base resin compared to a conventional heat-activated polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin. Two denture base resins, heat-activated PMMA (Meliodent) and light-activated UDMA (Eclipse), were used in this study. Cytotoxicity (5 × 1 mm(2) ) and water sorption (1 × 1 mm(2) ) specimens were made following the manufacturers' instructions (n = 10). Cytotoxicity tests of denture base resins were performed according to ISO10993-5:1999, and water sorption was evaluated according to ISO 1567:1997. ANOVA tests were employed for evaluating data (α = 0.05). There was no cytotoxic effect in either the PMMA or UDMA group. In addition, contrary to short-term water storage, a significantly lower water sorption value was shown for UDMA resins compared to PMMA resins in both 3- and 6-month storage periods (p = 0.043 and p = 0.002, respectively). The tested denture base materials adhered to the ISO standards for both cytotoxicity and water sorption. The cytotoxicity of the light-activated UDMA resin tested was statistically similar to that of the heat-activated PMMA resin; however, the UDMA resin exhibited decreased water sorption in long-term water storage. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. Effectiveness of disinfectants on the adherence of Candida albicans to denture base resins with different surface textures.

    PubMed

    Karakis, Duygu; Akay, Canan; Oncul, Burcin; Rad, Abbas Y; Dogan, Arife

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of some disinfectants, including ethanol extract of propolis (EEP), on the adhesion of Candida albicans to denture base resins. Seventy-two acrylic resin samples were prepared, half of which was polished and the other half was roughened. C. albicans strain ATCC 10231 was incubated on Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) at 37°C for 48 h. The adhesion period was completed by keeping the cells in this suspension for 90 min at 37°C. Specimens were then immersed in the following solutions: 1%, 2%, and 5% sodium hypochlorite; 4% chlorhexidine gluconate; and 10% EEP. Quantification of the antifungal activity of the chemical solutions was performed using the colorimetric MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay test. One-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of chemical agents. Polished and roughened surfaces were compared using independent sample t-test. The mean surface roughness value was 0.35 (±0.04) µm for the polished group and 1.2 (±0.2) µm for the roughened group. The contact angles of both surfaces showed statistically significant difference, and 10% EEP solution exhibited significantly less removal of adherent viable C. albicans cells in both groups. All forms of sodium hypochlorite solutions yielded higher efficiency than 4% chlorhexidine gluconate and EEP solutions (P < 0.05). (J Oral Sci 58, 431-437, 2016).

  15. In Vitro Evaluation of the Inhibitory Activity of Thymoquinone in Combatting Candida albicans in Denture Stomatitis Prevention.

    PubMed

    Al-Thobity, Ahmad M; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa S; Gad, Mohammed M; Al-Hariri, Mohammed; Ali, Aiman A; Alnassar, Talal

    2017-07-08

    Candida albicans adhesion and proliferation on denture bases may lead to denture stomatitis, which is a common and recurrent problem in denture wearers. The goal of this study was to assess the inhibitory effect of thymoquinone incorporated in the polymethyl methacrylate denture base material against Candida albicans. Eighty acrylic resin specimens were fabricated and divided into eight groups (n = 10) according to thymoquinone concentrations of 0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, 2%, 2.5%, 3%, and 5% of acrylic powder. Two methods were used to evaluate the effect of thymoquinone on Candida albicans: the slide count and the serial dilution test. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and the post-hoc Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test were performed to compare the difference of means between the observations taken at various intervals with baseline. The p value was statistically significant at ≤0.05. According to the slide count and the serial dilution test, the mean number of adhered Candida albicans in the control group was 5436.9 ± 266 and 4691.4 ± 176.8; however, this number dramatically decreased to 0 ± 0 and 32.4 ± 1.7 in group 8 (concentration 5%). These results suggest that the incorporation of thymoquinone into the acrylic resin denture base material might be effective in preventing Candida albicans adhesion.

  16. Synthesis of Radiation Curable Palm Oil-Based Epoxy Acrylate: NMR and FTIR Spectroscopic Investigations.

    PubMed

    Salih, Ashraf M; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2015-08-04

    Over the past few decades, there has been an increasing demand for bio-based polymers and resins in industrial applications, due to their potential lower cost and environmental impact compared with petroleum-based counterparts. The present research concerns the synthesis of epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) from an epoxidized palm oil product (EPOP) as environmentally friendly material. EPOP was acrylated by acrylic acid via a ring opening reaction. The kinetics of the acrylation reaction were monitored throughout the reaction course and the acid value of the reaction mixture reached 10 mg KOH/g after 16 h, indicating the consumption of the acrylic acid. The obtained epoxy acrylate was investigated intensively by means of FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, and the results revealed that the ring opening reaction was completed successfully with an acrylation yield about 82%. The UV free radical polymerization of EPOLA was carried out using two types of photoinitiators. The radiation curing behavior was determined by following the conversion of the acrylate groups. The cross-linking density and the hardness of the cured EPOLA films were measured to evaluate the effect of the photoinitiator on the solid film characteristics, besides, the thermal and mechanical properties were also evaluated.

  17. Effects of ethanol on the surface and bulk properties of a microwave-processed PMMA denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Regis, Rômulo Rocha; Soriani, Natércia Carreira; Azevedo, Alessandra Miranda; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena; Paranhos, Helena Freitas Oliveira; de Souza, Raphael Freitas

    2009-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different concentrations of ethanol on hardness, roughness, flexural strength, and color stability of a denture base material using a microwave-processed acrylic resin as a model system. Sixty circular (14 x 4 mm) and 60 rectangular microwave-polymerized acrylic resin specimens (65 x 10 x 3 mm(3)) were employed in this study. The sample was divided into six groups according to the ethanol concentrations used in the immersion solution, as follows: 0% (water), 4.5%, 10%, 19%, 42%, and 100%. The specimens remained immersed for 30 days at 37 degrees C. The hardness test was performed by a hardness tester equipped with a Vickers diamond penetrator, and a surface roughness tester was used to measure the surface roughness of the specimens. Flexural strength testing was carried out on a universal testing machine. Color alterations (DeltaE) were measured by a portable spectrophotometer after 12 and 30 days. Variables were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey's test (alpha= 0.05). For the range of ethanol-water solutions for immersion (water only, 4.5%, 10%, 19.5%, 42%, and 100%), the following results were obtained for hardness (13.9 +/- 2.0, 12.1 +/- 0.7, 12.9 +/- 0.9, 11.2 +/- 1.5, 5.7 +/- 0.3, 2.7 +/- 0.5 VHN), roughness (0.13 +/- 0.01, 0.15 +/- 0.07, 0.13 +/- 0.05, 0.13 +/- 0.02, 0.23 +/- 0.05, 0.41 +/- 0.19 mum), flexural strength (90 +/- 12, 103 +/- 18, 107 +/- 16, 90 +/- 25, 86 +/- 22, 8 +/- 2 MPa), and color (0.8 +/- 0.6, 0.8 +/- 0.3, 0.7 +/- 0.4, 0.9 +/- 0.3, 1.3 +/- 0.3, 3.9 +/- 1.5 DeltaE) after 30 days. The findings of this study showed that the ethanol concentrations of tested drinks affect the physical properties of the investigated acrylic resin. An obvious plasticizing effect was found, which could lead to a lower in vivo durability associated with alcohol consumption.

  18. Gel polymer electrolytes based on nanofibrous polyacrylonitrile–acrylate for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dul-Sun; Woo, Jang Chang; Youk, Ji Ho; Manuel, James; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanofibrous polyacrylonitrile–acrylate membranes were prepared by electrospinning. • Trimethylolpropane triacrylate was used as a crosslinking agent of fibers. • The GPE based on PAN–acrylate (1/0.5) showed good electrochemical properties. - Abstract: Nanofibrous membranes for gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) were prepared by electrospinning a mixture of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) at weight ratios of 1/0.5 and 1/1. TMPTA is used to achieve crosslinking of fibers thereby improving mechanical strength. The average fiber diameters increased with increasing TMPTA concentration and the mechanical strength was also improved due to the enhanced crosslinking of fibers. GPEs based on electrospun membranes were prepared by soaking them in a liquid electrolyte of 1 M LiPF{sub 6} in ethylene carbonate (EC)/dimethyl carbonate (DMC) (1:1, v/v). The electrolyte uptake and ionic conductivity of GPEs based on PAN and PAN–acrylate (weight ratio; 1/1 and 1/0.5) were investigated. Ionic conductivity of GPEs based on PAN–acrylate was the highest for PAN/acrylate (1/0.5) due to the proper swelling of fibers and good affinity with liquid electrolyte. Both GPEs based on PAN and PAN–acrylate membranes show good oxidation stability, >5.0 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Cells with GPEs based on PAN–acrylate (1/0.5) showed remarkable cycle performance with high initial discharge capacity and low capacity fading.

  19. Flexural strength,water sorption and solubility of a methylmethacrylate-free denture base polymer reinforced with glass fibre reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Mutluay, M M; Tezvergil-Mutluay, A; Vallittu, P; Lassila, L

    2013-12-01

    A methylmethacrylate-free denture base polymer (Eclipse) in comparison to a conventional denture base polymer (Palapress vario) was evaluated after water saturation and Stick glass fibre reinforcement. The data were analysed with ANOVA at a = 0.05. Water-storage caused a decrease in the flexural strength and stiffness of the materials (p > 0.05). Conventional denture base material with fibre reinforcement gave highest flexural strength (201.1 MPa) compared to fibre reinforced Eclipse (79.1 MPa) (p < 0.05). Water sorption after 76 days was 2.08% (Palapress vario) and 1.55% (Eclipse). Fibre-reinforcement of methylmethacrylate-free material was not as successful as conventional denture base and needs to be further optimized.

  20. The effect of cycling deflection on the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Iwamoto, Misa; Lassila, Lippo Vj; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cycling deflection on the flexural behavior of injection-molded thermoplastic resins. Six injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, two polyesters, one polycarbonate, one polymethyl methacrylate) and, as a control, a conventional heat-polymerized denture based polymer of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) were used in this study. The cyclic constant magnitude (1.0 mm) of 5000 cycles was applied using a universal testing machine to demonstrate plasticization of the polymer. Loading was carried out in water at 23ºC with eight specimens per group (n = 8). Cycling load (N) and deformation (mm) were measured. Force required to deflect the specimens during the first loading cycle and final loading cycle was statistically significantly different (p < 0.05) with one polyamide based polymer (Valplast) and PMMA based polymers (Acrytone and Acron). The other polyamide based polymer (LucitoneFRS), polyester based polymers (EstheShot and EstheShotBright) and polycarbonate based polymer (ReigningN) did not show significant differences (p > 0.05). None of the materials fractured during the loading test. One polyamide based polymer (Valplast) displayed the highest deformation and PMMA based polymers (Acrytone and Acron) exhibited the second highest deformation among the denture base materials. It can be concluded that there were considerable differences in the flexural behavior of denture base polymers. This may contribute to the fatigue resistance of the materials.

  1. Interim dentures and treatment dentures.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E

    1984-04-01

    Improvement in the interim denture procedure in the past decade has been one of the significant advancements in prosthodontic practice. The interim denture approach is only slightly more time-consuming and expensive than the conventional immediate denture approach, yet it has many advantages. Among those advantages are the following: (1) allows rapid results; (2) results in a higher quality definitive denture; (3) allows the surgical treatment to be performed during one appointment; (4) permits duplication of the natural tooth position; and (5) provides the patient with a spare denture after the definitive denture is completed. An interim denture technique was described that utilized a flexible layered silicone mold to form the replaced teeth. The interim denture procedure is flexible and lends itself to many variations in technique to meet unusual clinical situations. An interim removable partial denture technique was described that involves block-out of undesirable undercuts and duplication of the master cast for fabrication of the partial denture. This technique results in an interim partial denture that can be placed with little or no adjustment and that will provide better service for those who require it. Three simple procedures for fabricating treatment dentures were described and the indications for each were discussed. Although treatment dentures are not often used, they are essential for the dentist who is treating difficult patients who require complete dentures.

  2. The effect of different polishing techniques on the surface roughness of acrylic resin materials.

    PubMed

    Sofou, A; Emmanouil, J; Peutzfeldt, A; Owall, B

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated three methods of surface polishing on acrylic denture base materials. Specimens of three commercial heat-cured acrylic resin materials were finished using burs, sandpaper discs and rubber wheels, and polished with polishing soap, paste, or by application of a UV-light-activated resin sealant. The resulting surface roughness was examined by scanning electron microscopy as well as measured by means of a stylus profile Perthometer. Surface roughness was reduced by polishing. Polishing paste and UV-light-activated resin sealant were more, and equally, effective in reducing surface roughness compared to polishing soap. Polishing paste or UV-light-activated resin sealant may be used to create a smoother surface on acrylic dentures.

  3. Effect of two microwave disinfection protocols on adaptation of poly (methyl methacrylate) denture bases.

    PubMed

    Fleck, G; Ferneda, F; Ferreira da Silva, D F; Mota, E G; Shinkai, R S

    2007-03-01

    A few protocols of microwave irradiation have been proposed for disinfection of dental prostheses, but their effect on dimensional alteration still is unknown. This study evaluated the effect of 2 protocols of microwave disinfection on adaptation of resin denture bases polymerised by conventional hot water bath or by microwave energy. Thirty-six resin bases were obtained from stone casts duplicated from a metallic master model of an edentulous maxilla and polymerised by either conventional hot water bath or microwave energy. Experimental disinfection treatments were: 1) control (no disinfection); 2) protocol 1 (690 W/6 min); 3) protocol 2 (345 W/6 min). Disinfection procedures were performed 3 times (T1, T2, T3) with a 7-day interval. Adaptation was measured by weighing a vinyl polysiloxane film reproducing the gap between resin base and master model. Data were analysed by ANOVA for repeated measures and Bonferroni test (a=0.05). In T1 and T2, all groups polymerised by microwave energy had higher mean values than the groups polymerised by conventional technique. In T3, denture resin bases polymerised by microwave energy had increased poor adaptation when submitted to microwave disinfection at 690 W for 6 min. No significant changes were found for bases submitted to microwave disinfection at 345 W for 6 min (P>0.05). Adaptation of denture bases varied as a function of polymerisation technique and protocol of microwave disinfection (power and time) over time. Microwave disinfection at 690 W for 6 min proved harmful to denture bases after repeated disinfection procedures.

  4. Long-Term Soft Denture Lining Materials

    PubMed Central

    Chladek, Grzegorz; Żmudzki, Jarosław; Kasperski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Long-term soft denture lining (LTSDL) materials are used to alleviate the trauma associated with wearing complete dentures. Despite their established clinical efficacy, the use of LTSDLs has been limited due to the unfavorable effects of the oral environment on some of their mechanical and performance characteristics. The unresolved issue of LTSDL colonization by Candida albicans is particularly problematic. Silicone-based LTSDL (SLTSDL) materials, which are characterized by more stable hardness, sorption and solubility than acrylic-based LTSDLs (ALTSDLs), are currently the most commonly used LTSDLs. However, SLTSDLs are more prone to debonding from the denture base. Moreover, due to their limitations, the available methods for determining bond strength do not fully reflect the actual stability of these materials under clinical conditions. SLTSDL materials exhibit favorable viscoelastic properties compared with ALTSDLs. Furthermore, all of the lining materials exhibit an aging solution-specific tendency toward discoloration, and the available cleansers are not fully effective and can alter the mechanical properties of LTSDLs. Future studies are needed to improve the microbiological resistance of LTSDLs, as well as some of their performance characteristics. PMID:28788163

  5. A modified indirect method for fabricating silicone soft-lined complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Oki, Meiko; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2016-12-01

    A method is described of polymerizing silicone soft lining materials with a hard acrylic resin base by using a photoactivated spacer. The use of a photoactivated spacer is convenient because of the ease in determining the correct location covering the attached mucosa but not extending to the border margins. By using this method, the optimum shape and thickness of the spacer can also be ensured. Thus, the long-term durability of soft lining dentures is achieved without invasion by microorganisms or peeling away from the denture margin.

  6. In vitro comparison of autoclave polymerization on the transverse strength of denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Durkan, Rukiye; Ozel, Mehmet Birol; Bağiş, Bora; Usanmaz, Ali

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of autoclave polymerization on the transverse strength of denture base polymers. To this end, 30 rectangular test specimens were fabricated of two heat-polymerized denture base polymers. The test groups were: (I) control, i.e., conventional water bath to polymerize resins by heat at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes; (II) autoclave polymerization at 60 degrees C for 30 minutes followed by 130 degrees C for 10 minutes; and (III) autoclave polymerization at 60 degrees C for 30 minutes followed by 130 degrees C for 20 minutes. The specimens were tested with three-point bending test at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. It was revealed that the transverse strength of specimens increased with statistical significance when the autoclave was used for polymerization.

  7. A comparative evaluation of the dimensional accuracy of heat polymerised PMMA denture base cured by different curing cycles and clamped by R S technique and conventional method – An In-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Mandava Ramesh; Rao, C Satyanageswar; Ahmed, Syed Tauqheer; Bharat, J S V; Rao, N Venugopal; Vinod, V

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of heat polymerized PMMA denture base clamped by the conventional method and by R.S technique and cured by a different curing cycle. Materials & Methods: In this study, a total of 40 standardized maxillary record bases were fabricated with seven reference points: Point A - Incisive papilla, Point B & C - Canine region on either side, Point E & G - Midpoint of tuberosities on either side, Point F- Midpoint of the line joining the two tuberosities, Point D- Midpoint between the line joining A and F. Group A: Ten maxillary record bases were fabricated by conventional clamping method and cured by long curing cycle. Group A1: Ten maxillary record bases were fabricated by R.S tension clamping method and cured by long curing cycle. Group B: Ten maxillary record bases were fabricated by conventional clamping method and cured by short curing cycle. Group B1: Ten maxillary record bases were fabricated by R.S tension clamping method and cured by short curing cycle. The distances between the reference points i.e. A-B, A-C, A-D, D-F, B-E, C-G, E-F, F-G, B-D, D-G, CD, D-E of all three thermoplastic denture base plates were measured and recorded with the help of a travelling microscope and were used for comparison with the measured and recorded readings of processed acrylic denture bases. The data obtained was analyzed by using the One Way Analysis of Variance. Results: The overall results of the in vitro study indicate that among all the PMMA bases cured by the two clamping systems and the different curing cycle, group A` was the most dimensionally stable, followed by control group A, then followed by B` and B was most unstable. Conclusion: The study concluded that the denture bases fabricated by the R.S Technique using the long curing cycle would produce the most dimensionally stable PMMA denture bases. How to cite the article: Babu MR, Rao CS, Ahmed ST, Bharat JS, Rao NV, Vinod V. A comparative

  8. Facile Fabrication of Gradient Surface Based on (meth)acrylate Copolymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Yang, H.; Wen, X.-F.; Cheng, J.; Xiong, J.

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a simple and economic approach for fabrication of surface wettability gradient on poly(butyl acrylate - methyl methacrylate) [P (BA-MMA)] and poly(butyl acrylate - methyl methacrylate - 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [P (BA-MMA-HEMA)] films. The (meth)acrylate copolymer [including P (BA-MMA) and P (BA-MMA-HEMA)] films are hydrolyzed in an aqueous solution of NaOH and the transformation of surface chemical composition is achieved by hydrolysis in NaOH solution. The gradient wetting properties are generated based on different functional groups on the P (BA-MMA) and P (BA-MMA-HEMA) films. The effects of both the surface chemical and surface topography on wetting of the (meth)acrylate copolymer film are discussed. Surface chemical composition along the materials length is determined by XPS, and surface topography properties of the obtained gradient surfaces are analyzed by FESEM and AFM. Water contact angle system (WCAs) results show that the P (BA-MMA-HEMA) films provide a larger slope of the gradient wetting than P (BA-MMA). Moreover, this work demonstrates that the gradient concentration of chemical composition on the poly(meth) acrylate films is owing to the hydrolysis processes of ester group, and the hydrolysis reactions that have negligible influence on the surface morphology of the poly(meth) acrylate films coated on the glass slide. The gradient wettability surfaces may find broad applications in the field of polymer coating due to the compatibility of (meth) acrylate polymer.

  9. Bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four kinds of injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, a polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and a polycarbonate) and PMMA, as a control, were tested. The eight types of surface treatment: ((1) no treatment, (2) air abrasion, (3) dichloromethane, (4) ethyl acetate, (5) 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (6) air abrasion and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (7) tribochemical silica coating, and (8) tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin) were applied to each specimen. The chairside autopolymerizing reline resins were bonded to disks of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. All of the specimens were immersed in water for 4 months and then thermocycled for 10,000 cycles in water between 5 and 55°C. The shear bond strengths were determined. The shear bond strengths of the two polyamides treated using air abrasion, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate and no treatment were exceedingly low. The greatest bond strength was recorded for the polyethylene terephthalate copolymer specimens treated with tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (22.5MPa). The bond strengths of the other injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins increased using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin were the most effective surface treatments among all denture base resins tested. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of surface sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Onur; Koroglu, Aysegül; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-10-01

    The effects of surface sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of denture base materials are unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of different polishing methods on the surface roughness and color stability of denture base materials. A total of 120 specimens were fabricated from 2 poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and 1 polyamide denture base materials and divided into 4 groups (n=10 in each group) according to the applied surface treatment procedure: conventional polishing (control) and 3 surface sealant coupling methods. Surface roughness average (Ra) values were measured using a profilometer. Color parameters were measured using a spectrophotometer before and after being stained with coffee. Color differences (CIEDE 2000 [ΔE00]) were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey honest significant difference test (α=.05). No statistically significant difference were found between surface roughness values of the control and those of the specimens treated using a surface sealant agent (P>.05). The highest color difference was calculated for the polyamide control group. Statistically significant differences were found between the control group and the group treated with the polyamide surface sealant agent (P<.05). All specimens had a surface roughness value higher than the plaque accumulation threshold (0.20 μm). The color changes observed were clinically unacceptable, except for conventionally polished and one type of surface sealant applied microwave polymerized PMMA denture base material. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of glass fiber reinforcement on the flexural strength of different denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Cemal; Yilmaz, Handan; Cağlar, Alper

    2002-06-01

    Different types of fibers have been added to polymer materials to improve their mechanical properties. Glass fibers have been used in either continuous or woven form as a strengthening material. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a new glass fiber reinforcement system on the flexural strength of three different denture base resins (heat polymerized, autopolymerized, and photopolymerized). Ninety specimens were formed in a specially designed mold to produce identical specimens in accordance with each manufacturer's recommendations. The fibers of Stick and Stick Net were well impregnated with the resin of polymer matrix. Stick and Stick Net reinforcement significantly enhanced the flexural strength of the tested specimens. In all groups, specimens reinforced with Stick glass fibers exhibited the highest flexural strength, followed by Stick Net glass fibers. The control group specimens without fiber exhibited the lowest values. The process of reinforcement of denture base resins with glass fiber may be a useful means of strengthening denture bases beyond their normal limits.

  12. Effect of Denture Cleansers on Surface Roughness and Flexural Strength of Heat Cure Denture Base Resin-An In vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabal; Garg, Sandeep; Kalra, Nidhi Mangtani

    2017-08-01

    Denture cleansing is essential for maintaining the prosthesis and oral health, so choosing an appropriate cleanser which is not only efficient but also not adversely affects the properties of denture base resin itself with prolonged use is important. Hence, the present study was undertaken. To evaluate the effect of different chemical cleansers on surface roughness and flexural strength of heat cure denture base resin when used daily for three months. A total of 40 rectangular specimens (65 mm x 10 mm x 2.5 mm) and 32 disc shaped specimens (10 mm x 2 mm) were fabricated from heat cure denture base resin (DPI Heat Cure) for evaluation of flexural strength and surface roughness respectively. The specimens not subjected to cleansing served as control whereas other specimens were subjected to daily cleansing with one of the three cleansers (1% sodium hypochlorite, fittydent tablets, 100% vinegar) daily and stored in distilled water for three months. Surface analyser (Surftest SJ-210, Mitutoyo, USA) was used to evaluate change in surface roughness of the specimens (ΔRa) before and after cleansing. Also, flexural strength (S) of specimens after cleansing was evaluated by subjecting the specimens to load of 50 kgf at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min in universal testing machine (INSTRON). Data obtained by testing was compiled and analysed using statistical software SPSS version 17.5. ANOVA and Post-hoc Tukey's tests were used and p-value <0.05 was considered significant in all tests. Results showed that the surface roughness of the specimens was significantly increased and flexural strength significantly decreased after immersion in 1% sodium hypochlorite solution for three months (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference were observed in flexural strength and surface roughness of the specimens cleaned with fittydent and 100% vinegar for three months (p>0.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it was concluded that immersion in 1% sodium hypochlorite

  13. Development of a patient-based questionnaire about emotional and social issues related to eating with dentures.

    PubMed

    Kelly, S A M; Hyland, R M; Ellis, J S; Thomason, J M; Moynihan, P J

    2012-08-01

    In order to fully assess the impact of prosthetic rehabilitation and to formulate appropriate dietary advice, in-depth information about patients' experiences of eating with dentures is needed. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a questionnaire that accurately reflected the real concerns of patients with dental prostheses about the aspects of their life related to eating, using detailed information derived from qualitative interviews with patients. Themes around factors related to eating with dentures were derived from interviews with patients (n=66) with either implant-supported mandibular over-dentures or conventional dentures. The themes were used to design a self-completed questionnaire with questions scored on a visual analogue scale and additionally questions answered using free text. The content and face validity of the questionnaire was tested on a different group of patients (n=10) with implant-supported mandibular over-dentures ('implant-supported') or conventional dentures. Test-retest reliability analysis was conducted on a further group of 30 patients (n=15 implant-supported; n=15 conventional dentures). A questionnaire has been developed with 33 questions scored on a visual analogue scale and 31 open questions designed to collect further information as free text. Themes identified were around social, emotional and practical issues about eating. The instrument has good internal reliability with a Cronbach alpha values of 0.86-0.95 and good test-retest reliability with intra-class correlation coefficients 0.87-0.92 across the domains. A patient-based instrument has been developed to measure emotional and social issues related to eating with dentures (ESIRE questionnaire). The questionnaire will be a useful tool in future trials of prosthetic rehabilitation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Flexural properties of glass fibre reinforced acrylic resin polymers.

    PubMed

    Tacir, I H; Kama, J D; Zortuk, M; Eskimez, S

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, glass fibres have been used to strengthen denture base resins. A major difficulty in using reinforcing fibres with multiphase acrylic resins, such as powder liquid resins, is inadequate impregnation of the fibres with the resin. This investigation examined the reinforcing effect of glass fibres on the fracture resistance and flexural strength of acrylic denture base resins. Eighty identical specimens were formed in specially designed moulds in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. The four experimental groups were prepared and these consisted of conventional acrylic resin and the same resin reinforced with glass fibres. Ten specimens were fabricated in a standardized fashion for each experimental group. Flexural strength was tested using a 3-point universal testing machine. In this study, statistically significant differences were found in the flexural strength of the specimens (P < 0.05). The injection-moulded, fibre-reinforced group had significantly lower flexural strength than the injection-moulded group (P < 0.001), strength than the microwave-moulded, fibre-reinforced group (P < 0.001), and the microwave-moulded, fibre-reinforced group had lower flexural strength than the microwave-moulded group. The fracture resistance was significantly higher in the injection-moulded, fibre-reinforced group than in the injection-moulded group (P < 0.05), and the fracture resistance was significantly higher in the microwave-moulded, fibre-reinforced group than in the microwave-moulded group. Within the limitations of this study, the flexural strength of heat-polymerized PMMA denture resin was improved after reinforcement with glass fibres. It may be possible to apply these results to distal extension partial and complete denture bases.

  15. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of different resin teeth to complete denture base material.

    PubMed

    Meloto, Carolina B; Silva-Concílio, Laís R; Rodrigues-Garciai, Renata C M; Canales, Giancarlo T; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M

    2013-01-01

    Although different commercial brands of artificial teeth are available in the market, debonding from the denture base is still an issue when rehabilitating edentulous patients with conventional or implant-supported complete dentures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of four artificial teeth brands to a denture base material polymerized by microwave energy. Forty anterior artificial teeth of each brand (Biolux, Trilux, Biotone IPN, and Vipi Dent Plus) were bonded to denture base material (VipiWave). Before processing, groups often specimens of each brand received surface treatment: control, monomer application (MA), air abrasion (AA) or diatoric cavity (DC). After processing, a blinded examiner conducted the bond test by applying load to the specimens (0.5 mm/min, to 45 degrees). Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). Biolux teeth have stronger bonding to denture base than Trilux (p < 0.05) in control group; higher bond values than Biotone IPN (p < 0.05) in MA group; and higher bond strength than Vipi Dent Plus and Trilux (p < 0.01) in DC group; AA had no differential effect for any of the brands. With regard to the effect of the surface treatments on bond strength within groups of commercial brand, statistical analysis revealed no difference among them. According to results in general, Biolux teeth had the strongest bonding to the denture base material polymerized by microwave energy. Results may assist dentists in selecting denture teeth from the standpoint of shear bond strength.

  16. Comparative effect of different polymerization techniques on residual monomer and hardness properties of PMMA-based denture resins.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Elif Aydogan; Durkan, Rukiye; Koroglu, Ayşegul; Bagis, Bora

    2014-12-30

    The aim of this study was to compare the residual monomer and microhardness of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based denture resins processed by using autoclave and conventional water bath techniques. To determine the amount of residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer, disk-shaped specimens (n=5) were prepared from 3 different acrylic resins (Meliodent, Paladent and Qc-20). Control groups were polymerized in water bath for 30 minutes at 100°C. The study groups were prepared in an autoclave device for 60°C/30 min followed 130°C/10 min and the other group for 60°C/30 min followed by 130°C/20 min. According to standard calibration curves, ultraviolet spectrophotometry at 230 nm was used to determine the residual monomer. For the Vickers hardness measurements, disk-shaped specimens (n=5) were prepared for each test group. Hardness measurements were performed with a Vickers hardness tester under a 4.91-N press load for a 30 seconds, after immersion in distilled water at 37ºC for 48 hours. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (p<0.05). Autoclave polymerization produced a significant decrease in the amount of residual monomers for all resin groups (p<0.05). This procedure also showed a significant increase in hardness for all resin groups (p<0.05). For the 3 resin groups, no significant differences were found between autoclave polymerization for 10 minutes and for 20 minutes (p>0.05). The autoclave polymerization technique exhibited significantly lower residual monomer content and greater hardness than conventional heat polymerization.

  17. The conversion partial denture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, Michael P; Brudvik, James S

    2004-04-01

    The treatment alternative described maximizes the benefit of remaining teeth while allowing simplified alteration of the prosthesis if abutments are lost during the life span of the removable partial denture (RPD). A conversion partial is an RPD whose tooth-frame assembly components are individually fabricated and then joined with an acrylic resin major connector. The conversion RPD optimizes retention and stabilization of a terminal dentition and can be easily converted to an immediate complete denture.

  18. Acrylic microspheres-based optosensor for visual detection of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Noor, Nur Syarmim Mohamed; Tan, Ling Ling; Heng, Lee Yook; Chong, Kwok Feng; Tajuddin, Saiful Nizam

    2016-09-15

    A new optosensor for visual quantitation of nitrite (NO2(-)) ion has been fabricated by physically immobilizing Safranine O (SO) reagent onto a self-adhesive poly(n-butyl acrylate) [poly(nBA)] microspheres matrix, which was synthesized via facile microemulsion UV lithography technique. Evaluation and optimization of the optical NO2(-) ion sensor was performed with a fiber optic reflectance spectrophotometer. Scanning electron micrograph showed well-shaped and smooth spherical morphology of the poly(nBA) microspheres with a narrow particles size distribution from 0.6 μm up to 1.8 μm. The uniform size distribution of the acrylic microspheres promoted homogeneity of the immobilized SO reagent molecules on the microspheres' surfaces, thereby enhanced the sensing response reproducibility (<5% RSD) with a linear range obtained from 10 to 100 ppm NO2(-) ion. The micro-sized acrylic immobilization matrix demonstrated no significant barrier for diffusion of reactant and product, and served as a good solid state ion transport medium for reflectometric nitrite determination in food samples.

  19. Peel strength of denture liner to PMMA and polyamide: laser versus air-abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Bagis, Bora; Özcan, Mutlu; Durkan, Rukiye; Turgut, Sedanur; Ates, Sabit Melih

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study investigated the effect of laser parameters and air-abrasion on the peel strength of silicon-based soft denture liner to different denture resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS Specimens (N=180) were prepared out of three different denture base resins (Rodex, cross-linked denture base acrylic resin; Paladent, heat-cured acrylic resin; Deflex, Polyamide resin) (75 mm × 25 mm × 3 mm). A silicon-based soft denture liner (Molloplast B) was applied to the denture resins after the following conditioning methods: a) Air-abrasion (50 µm), b) Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Waterlase MD Turbo, Biolase Technology) at 2 W-20 Hz, c) Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 2 W-30 Hz, d) Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 3 W-20 Hz, e) Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 3 W-30 Hz. Non-conditioned group acted as the control group. Peel test was performed in a universal testing machine. Failure modes were evaluated visually. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=.05). RESULTS Denture liner tested showed increased peel strength after laser treatment with different parameters (3.9±0.4 - 5.58±0.6 MPa) compared to the control (3.64±0.5 - 4.58±0.5 MPa) and air-abraded groups (3.1±0.6 - 4.46±0.3 MPa), but the results were not statistically significant except for Paladent, with the pretreatment of Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 3 W-20 Hz. Polyamide resin after air-abrasion showed significantly lower peel strength than those of other groups (3.1±0.6 MPa). CONCLUSION Heat-cured acrylic resin, PMMA, may benefit from Er,Cr:YSGG laser treatment at 3 W-20 Hz irradiation. Air-abrasion of polyamide resins should be avoided not to impair their peel bond strengths to silicon-based soft denture liners. PMID:24049570

  20. Reestablishment of Occlusal Vertical Dimension in Complete Denture Wearing in Two Stages

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The assessment and reestablishment of the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) are considered important factors in the treatment of complete denture wearers. The long-time use of a complete denture can result in jaw displacement due to abrasion of the artificial teeth and residual ridge resorption, causing esthetic complications. Most patients with old dentures and incorrect OVD accept reestablishment of the OVD with new complete dentures, even if they were used to their old dentures. The present clinical report describes a method of gradual reestablishment of OVD using a diagnostic acrylic splint on artificial teeth in old complete dentures before the manufacture of new complete dentures. Clinical Significance. The use of a reversible treatment for reestablishment of the OVD in old complete dentures with a diagnostic occlusal acrylic splint allows for the reestablishment of the intermaxillary relationship, providing physiological conditions of masticatory performance associated with the recovery of facial esthetics in edentulous patients. PMID:26587296

  1. The effects of remelting on the mechanical properties of a nickel base partial denture casting alloy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-04-01

    Three series of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel base partial denture casting alloy. For the first series induction heating was employed, for the second a resistance crucible, and for the third, an oxy-acetylene torch. In each series the same metal was cast sequentially a number of times and all test pieces so produced were subjected to mechanical testing. The mechanical properties were found to vary according to both the number of times the alloy was cast and the method of heating used to render the alloy molten.

  2. Effect of three investing materials on tooth movement during flasking procedure for complete denture construction

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Alaa’a M.

    2015-01-01

    Problem statement Tooth movement has been shown to occur during and after the processing of complete dentures. An understanding of this phenomenon may permit one to construct functional complete dentures that require less occlusal adjustment in the articulator and in the patient’s mouth. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three different investing methods on tooth movement occurring during the processing of simulated maxillary complete dentures. Material and methods Forty-five similar maxillary dentures were made using heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and assigned randomly to three experimental groups (n = 15 each) according to investing method: plaster–plaster–plaster (P–P–P), plaster–stone–stone (P-S-S), and plaster–mix (P–M). Specimens in all experimental groups were compression molded with denture base resin. Transverse interincisor (I–I) and intermolar (M–M) distances, and anteroposterior incisor–molar (LI–LM and RI–RM) distances, were measured with digital calipers at the wax denture stage (pre-polymerization) and after denture decasting (post-polymerization). Analysis of variance and Tukey’s test were used to compare the results. Results M–M, LI–LM, and RI–RM movement was significantly greater in the P–P–P group than in the P–S–S and P–M groups; no significant difference in I–I movement was observed among groups. Transverse movement along M–M and I–I was significantly greater than anteroposterior movement in the P–P–P group; no significant difference among measurements was observed in the other two groups. Conclusion The study results indicate that the use of dental stone or a 50:50 mixture of plaster and stone for investing of dentures is an important factor in efforts to control the magnitude of tooth movement. PMID:26792971

  3. Effect of three investing materials on tooth movement during flasking procedure for complete denture construction.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2016-01-01

    Tooth movement has been shown to occur during and after the processing of complete dentures. An understanding of this phenomenon may permit one to construct functional complete dentures that require less occlusal adjustment in the articulator and in the patient's mouth. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three different investing methods on tooth movement occurring during the processing of simulated maxillary complete dentures. Forty-five similar maxillary dentures were made using heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and assigned randomly to three experimental groups (n = 15 each) according to investing method: plaster-plaster-plaster (P-P-P), plaster-stone-stone (P-S-S), and plaster-mix (P-M). Specimens in all experimental groups were compression molded with denture base resin. Transverse interincisor (I-I) and intermolar (M-M) distances, and anteroposterior incisor-molar (LI-LM and RI-RM) distances, were measured with digital calipers at the wax denture stage (pre-polymerization) and after denture decasting (post-polymerization). Analysis of variance and Tukey's test were used to compare the results. M-M, LI-LM, and RI-RM movement was significantly greater in the P-P-P group than in the P-S-S and P-M groups; no significant difference in I-I movement was observed among groups. Transverse movement along M-M and I-I was significantly greater than anteroposterior movement in the P-P-P group; no significant difference among measurements was observed in the other two groups. The study results indicate that the use of dental stone or a 50:50 mixture of plaster and stone for investing of dentures is an important factor in efforts to control the magnitude of tooth movement.

  4. Effect of microwave disinfection on denture base adaptation and resin surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Evandro Afonso; Schmidt, Caroline Bom; Walber, Luiz Fernando; Shinkai, Rosemary Sadami Arai

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of disinfection methods [chemical disinfection (immersion in 100 ppm chloride solution) or microwave disinfection (690 W for 6 min)] on the internal adaptation of denture bases and resin surface roughness. For the adaptation test, 18 maxillary denture bases were obtained from stone casts duplicated from a metallic master model and submitted to the following treatments: 1) control (no disinfection), 2) chemical disinfection or 3) microwave disinfection. Disinfection procedures were performed twice (T1, T2) with a 7-day interval between them. Internal adaptation was measured at baseline (T0) and after T1 and T2 by weighing a vinyl polysiloxane film reproducing the gap between the resin base and the master model. For surface roughness measurement, 60 rectangular (5x10x40 mm) resin specimens were either mechanically or chemically polished and then submitted to the disinfection treatments. Surface roughness (Ra) was recorded after polishing (T0) and after T1 and T2. Data were analyzed by ANOVA GLM for repeated measures and Bonferroni correction at 5% significance level. Bases submitted to microwave disinfection had gradual increase of misfit, while bases immersed in chloride solution did not differ from the control group. Surface roughness increased in the mechanical polishing groups with microwave disinfection and decreased in the chemical polishing groups.

  5. Hybrid thiol-ene network nanocomposites based on multi(meth)acrylate POSS.

    PubMed

    Li, Liguo; Liang, Rendong; Li, Yajie; Liu, Hongzhi; Feng, Shengyu

    2013-09-15

    First, multi(meth)acrylate functionalized POSS monomers were synthesized in this paper. Secondly, FTIR was used to evaluate the homopolymerization behaviors of multi(meth)acrylate POSS and their copolymerization behaviors in the thiol-ene reactions with octa(3-mercaptopropyl) POSS in the presence of photoinitiator. Results showed that the photopolymerization rate of multimethacrylate POSS was faster than that of multiacrylate POSS. The FTIR results also showed that the copolymerizations were dominant in the thiol-ene reactions with octa(3-mercaptopropyl) POSS, different from traditional (meth)acrylate-thiol system, in which homopolymerizations were predominant. Finally, the resulted hybrid networks based on POSS were characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, DSC, and TGA. The characterization results showed that hybrid networks based on POSS were homogeneous and exhibited high thermal stability.

  6. Acrylic Resin Molding Based Head Fixation Technique in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Roh, Mootaek; Lee, Kyungmin; Jang, Il-Sung; Suk, Kyoungho; Lee, Maan-Gee

    2016-01-12

    Head fixation is a technique of immobilizing animal's head by attaching a head-post on the skull for rigid clamping. Traditional head fixation requires surgical attachment of metallic frames on the skull. The attached frames are then clamped to a stationary platform resulting in immobilization of the head. However, metallic frames for head fixation have been technically difficult to design and implement in general laboratory environment. In this study, we provide a novel head fixation method. Using a custom-made head fixation bar, head mounter is constructed during implantation surgery. After the application of acrylic resin for affixing implants such as electrodes and cannula on the skull, additional resins applied on top of that to build a mold matching to the port of the fixation bar. The molded head mounter serves as a guide rails, investigators conveniently fixate the animal's head by inserting the head mounter into the port of the fixation bar. This method could be easily applicable if implantation surgery using dental acrylics is necessary and might be useful for laboratories that cannot easily fabricate CNC machined metal head-posts.

  7. Effects of short-term immersion and brushing with different denture cleansers on the roughness, hardness, and color of two types of acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Panariello, Beatriz Helena Dias; Izumida, Fernanda Emiko; Moffa, Eduardo Buozi; Pavarina, Ana Claudia; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the cumulative effects of brushing (B) or immersion (I), using different cleansing agents, on the surface roughness, hardness and color stability of a heat-polymerized denture resin, Lucitone 550 (L), and a hard chairside reline resin, Tokuyama Rebase Fast II (T). A total of 316 specimens (10 x 2 mm) were fabricated. The specimens (n = 9) were divided into brushing or immersion groups according to the following agents: dentifrice/distilled water (D), 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), Corega Tabs (Pb), 1% chlorhexidine gluconate (Chx), and 0.2% peracetic acid (Ac). Brushing and immersion were tested independently. Assays were performed after 1, 3, 21, 45 and 90 brushing cycles or immersion of 10 seconds each. Data were evaluated statistically by repeated measures ANOVA. Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) post-hoc test was used to determine differences between means (α = 0.05). For L there was no statistically significant difference in roughness, except a significant decrease in roughness by brushing with D. T showed a significant effect on the roughness after 90 immersions with Ac. Hardness values decreased for L when specimens were immersed or brushed in NaOCl and Pb. The hardness of T decreased with increases in the repetitions (immersion or brushing), regardless of the cleaning method. Values of color stability for L resin showed significant color change after brushing with and immersion in Ac and Pb. Brushing with D exhibited a higher incidence of color change. For T there were no significant differences between cleaning agents and repetitions in immersion. A color change was noted after three brushings with the Ac, Chx, and D. Brushing with dentifrice decreased roughness of L. Immersion in or brushing with NaOCl and Pb decreased the hardness of L. For T, hardness decreased with increases in immersions or brushing. Color changes after the immersion in or brushing with cleaning agents were clinically acceptable according to National

  8. In Vitro Antifungal Evaluation of Seven Different Disinfectants on Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim-Bicer, A. Z.; Peker, I.; Akca, G.; Celik, I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate alternative methods for the disinfection of denture-based materials. Material and Methods. Two different denture-based materials were included in the study. Before microbial test, the surface roughness of the acrylic resins was evaluated. Then, the specimens were divided into 8 experimental groups (n = 10), according to microorganism considered and disinfection methods used. The specimens were contaminated in vitro by standardized suspensions of Candida albicans ATCC#90028 and Candida albicans oral isolate. The following test agents were tested: sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl 1%), microwave (MW) energy, ultraviolet (UV) light, mouthwash containing propolis (MCP), Corega Tabs, 50% and 100% white vinegar. After the disinfection procedure, the number of remaining microbial cells was evaluated in CFU/mL. Kruskal-Wallis, ANOVA, and Dunn's test were used for multiple comparisons. Mann Whitney U test was used to compare the surface roughness. Results. Statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) was found between autopolymerised and heat-cured acrylic resins. The autopolymerised acrylic resin surfaces were rougher than surfaces of heat-cured acrylic resin. The most effective disinfection method was 100% white vinegar for tested microorganisms and both acrylic resins. Conclusion. This study showed that white vinegar 100% was the most effective method for tested microorganisms. This agent is cost-effective and easy to access and thus may be appropriate for household use. PMID:24995305

  9. Spectrogram Analysis of Complete Dentures with Different Thickness and Palatal Rugae Materials on Speech Production

    PubMed Central

    Zaki Mahross, Hamada; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of reproduction of different thickness and palatal rugae materials on complete dentures speech using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL) (spectrogram). Materials and Methods. Three completely edentulous male patients (aged 50–60 years) were selected for reading a paragraph. Twelve upper dentures were constructed, four for each patient. The patients' speech groups were divided into five groups, Group I: patients without dentures; Group II: patients rehabilitated with conventional acrylic dentures; Group III: patients with conventional acrylic dentures with rugae reproduction; Group IV: patients with dentures with metallic framework of minimal thickness and direct ragged metallic palatal surface at rugae area; Group V: patients with dentures with palatal rugae constructed from resilient acrylic resin material with thickness less than conventional denture. Speech samples were recorded after insertion of each denture for groups using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL) (spectrogram). The sounds selected were lingopalatal /s/z/sh/t/d/ and /l/. Results. Group III produced high mean significant difference with /sh/t/ sound. For Group IV, the difference was noticed with /s/z/sh/t/ and /d/ sounds, while for Group V the difference was shown with /z/l/ sound (P < 0.05). Conclusion. It is recommended to reproduce the rugae area in complete denture because the phonetic quality of complete denture with rugae is superior to the conventional denture. PMID:25883655

  10. Evaluation of use of acrylic resin-based surgical guide in the function and quality of life provided by mandibular prostheses with microvascular free fibula flap: A four-year, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Thais Bianca; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; Prado Ribeiro, Ana Carolina; Gebrim, Eloisa Maria Mello Santiago; Bodard, Anne-Gaëlle; da Silva, Dorival Pedroso; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Ishida, Luiz Carlos; Dias, Reinaldo Brito

    2016-09-01

    The correct positioning of the microvascular-free fibula flap (MFFF) is essential for satisfactory mandibular reconstruction. However, the effect of acrylic resin-based surgical guides on prosthetic rehabilitations has not yet been properly investigated. The purpose of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate whether intraoral and extraoral acrylic resin-based surgical guides improve anatomic, functional, esthetic, and quality of life (QoL) results for dental prosthetic rehabilitation with MFFF. Participants subjected to mandibular reconstruction with MFFF were selected and randomly distributed into 2 groups, control (Co; using conventional surgery) and acrylic resin-based surgical guides (Sg). Functional parameters related to prosthetic rehabilitation and QoL were evaluated by interviews and an oral health impact profile (OHIP)-14 questionnaire. Functional parameters and questionnaire scores were subjected to statistical analysis: the likelihood ratio and the Fisher exact and Mann-Whitney U tests (α=.05). Of 40 participants, 18 were rehabilitated, 10 with tooth-tissue-supported partial removable dentures and 8 with implant prostheses. In Sg, the study measured an enhancement in functional parameters and revealed a significant improvement in QoL (P=.020). The guides proposed directly improved mandibular reconstruction. Functional aspects may be improved by allowing good intermaxillary relationships and posterior dental rehabilitation. Functional success is directly dependent on soft tissue status and the quality of its reconstruction. Soft tissue evaluation is important before dental rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of denture cleanser associated with microwave disinfection and brushing of complete dentures: in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sesma, Newton; Rocha, Alessandra Lima; Laganá, Dalva Cruz; Costa, Bruno; Morimoto, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Complete dentures acts as a reservoir for microbial colonization, which may lead to systemic infections. Microwave irradiation has been used as an efficient method of denture disinfection. Even though current methods eliminate denture-base microorganisms, a recurrence rate of denture stomatitis (DS) is still observed among denture-wearing patients. It was hypothesized that microwave disinfection kills microorganisms but do not remove dead bacteria from the denture surface. To test this hypothesis, the biofilm found in the dentures of 10 patients with DS was evaluated. In addition, the effects of microwave irradiation plus brushing (MW+B) on the denture biofilm and the combination of denture cleanser with microwave irradiation and brushing (MW+DC+B) for the removal of denture-accumulating microorganisms were investigated. Microbiological data were analyzed statistically by nonparametric analysis (Friedman/Wilcoxon, α=0.05). MW+B and MW+DC+B were effective in reducing the rate of microorganisms (99.2% and 99.5% respectively), but without significant difference between them (p=0.553). However, it was observed that the complete removal of microorganisms from denture surface was only possible when all regimens were combined (MW+DC+B). Microwave irradiation in combination with soaking in denture cleanser and brushing effectively disinfected the dentures and removed denture biofilm.

  12. Corrosion considerations in the brazing repair of cobalt-based partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Luthy, H; Marinello, C P; Reclaru, L; Scharer, P

    1996-05-01

    Cobalt-based alloys (Co-Cr-Mo) are usually used in dentistry as frameworks for removable partial dentures. In their basic form these structures function successfully. However, modifications or repairs of the frameworks may reduce their resistance to corrosion and, as a consequence, may provoke biologic reactions in the soft tissues. These reactions may be the result of different types of alloys that contact each other and, in the presence of saliva (based on potential differences), produce a galvanic cell. In this study, a clinical situation after repair of a removable partial denture was examined. The metallographic study of the prosthesis revealed a brazed zone where a gold braze was joining the Co-Cr-Mo framework with a Co-Cr-Ni type alloy (without Mo). The latter revealed signs of corrosion. Various electrochemical parameters (Ecorr, Ecouple, icorr, icouple) of these alloys were analyzed in the laboratory. The Co-Cr-Ni alloy had the lowest nobility and underwent galvanic corrosion in a galvanic couple with gold braze.

  13. In vivo biofilm formation on a soft denture liner in elderly patients with controlled diabetes.

    PubMed

    Faccio, Daniela R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano S; Demarco, Flávio F; Moraes, Rafael R; Boscato, Noéli

    2012-06-01

    This in vivo study evaluated the influence of controlled diabetes on biofilm formation on a soft denture liner in elderly patients. Soft denture lining materials are more susceptible to microbial colonisation than denture base acrylic resins. Especially in the elderly, several predisposing factors may accumulate leading to an increased probability of biofilm development that may result in candidiasis, a significant clinical oral disease. Volunteers wearing complete dentures were divided into two groups (n = 20): diabetic patients with controlled glycaemia, and healthy patients. In both groups, a silicone-based soft liner was placed in a recess created at the base of the maxillary dentures. Subjects cleaned the prosthesis three times a day. Biofilm formed on the liner was quantified at various time points (baseline, two, four and six weeks). Data were analysed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). There was no statistical difference in biofilm formation for any of the time points between controlled diabetes patients and healthy patients. The results suggest that the control of diabetes in elderly patients provides the same levels of biofilm formation when compared to healthy individuals. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. [Comparative evaluation of physical-mechanical properties and surface morphology of the samples of base self cured acrylic resin "Redont-kolir" polymerized in the silicone and alginate matrixes].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Determination of advantages of using silicone or alginate impression material as a matrix is decisive for quality of immediate and transitional dentures manufactured by the direct method using self-cured acrylic resins. The aim of this study was a comparative evaluation of physical-mechanical properties and surface morphology of the samples of base self-cured acrylic resin "Redont-kolir" polymerized in the silicone and alginate matrix. The samples were polymerized in the C-silicone - "Zeta plus-putty" ("Zhermack", Italy) and alginate -"Ypeen" ("Spofa Dental", Czech Republic) matrixes under different regimes: 1) in the pneumopolymerizer "Averon" at an air pressure of 3 atm., a temperature of 450C for 15 minutes, and 2) polymerization in water at 450C for 15 minutes. We determined the following physical and mechanical properties: bending load, toughness, bending stress at break, hardness by Heppler, conical point of fluidity and water absorption. Electron microscopy studies of the samples have been conducted on electronic raster microscope JSM-840 ("Jeol", Japan). As a result of studies, it was found that the optimum regime of polymerization for acrylate "Redont-kolir" is in the pneumopolymerizer "Averon" at an air pressure of 3 atm., a temperature of 450 C for 15 minutes. By the results of studying the surface morphology of the samples we can draw a conclusion that the use of an alginate impression material as matrix allows to obtain a qualitatively better surface of denture. But taking into account the technological properties of the alginate impression materials, namely an expressed shrinkage, their use for this purpose must be limited by the time during which the impression matrix remain stable in size, which is specified by manufacturer's recommendations.

  15. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J.; Anuradha, R.; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R.; Senthileagappan, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure. PMID:26538876

  16. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J; Anuradha, R; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R; Senthileagappan, A R

    2015-08-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure.

  17. Reinforcing effects of different fibers on denture base resin based on the fiber type, concentration, and combination.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sang-Hui; Lee, Yoon; Oh, Seunghan; Cho, Hye-Won; Oda, Yutaka; Bae, Ji-Myung

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reinforcing effects of three types of fibers at various concentrations and in different combinations on flexural properties of denture base resin. Glass (GL), polyaromatic polyamide (PA) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (PE) fibers were added to heat-polymerized denture base resin with volume concentrations of 2.6%, 5.3%, and 7.9%, respectively. In addition, hybrid fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) combined with either two or three types of fibers were fabricated. The flexural strength, modulus and toughness of each group were measured with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. In the single fiber-reinforced composite groups, the 5.3% GL and 7.9% GL had the highest flexural strength and modulus; 5.3% PE was had the highest toughness. Hybrid FRC such as GL/PE, which showed the highest toughness and the flexural strength, was considered to be useful in preventing denture fractures clinically.

  18. A study to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of resilient liners with heat cure denture base resins, with and without the effect of saliva: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rao, C Satyanageshwar; Reddy, S Sreedhar; Prasad, G Maruthi; Reddy, K Srinivas; Rao, N Venugopal; Naik, Madhukeshwara S

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of resilient liners with heat cure denture base resins in the presence or absence of saliva. Two commercially available heat polymerized acrylics and three commercially available denture liners were immersed in artificial saliva for 7 days and 14 days, respectively. A total of 180 (Acralyn-H, No.90 and Lucitone - 199, No.90) specimens were prepared. Total of 90 overlapping joint specimens were prepared, 45 of them using Acralyn H (AGroup) and rest 45 using Lucitone-199 (L-Group). The specimens were tested for flexural strength with a 3-point bending test on an Instron universal testing machine. The results were analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The mean difference in shear bond strength (SBS) at different time intervals was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Lucitone-199 recorded a significantly higher mean SBS compared to Acralyn H (p < 0.001). Further, significant differences between GC and Densply, GC and Aswin liners, and between Dentsply and Aswin were noted (p < 0.001). Difference between baseline and 7 days time interval, as well as, between baseline and 14 days time interval with respect to the mean SBS of these materials were significant (p < 0.001). Also, the mean difference in SBS between 7 days time interval and 14 days time interval was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Among the three different liners, GC yielded a higher mean SBS compared to Aswin and Dentsply at all the three time intervals. The mean SBS recorded in Dentsply and Aswin was almost same at 14 days time interval, but at baseline and 7 days, it was higher in Aswin compared to Dentsply. Lucitone-199 recorded a higher mean SBS compared to Acralyn H. As the time interval increases, the mean SBS recorded in both the denture base materials decrease. Among the three different liners, GC yields a higher mean SBS compared to Aswin and Dentsply at all the three time intervals. The most common reason for

  19. Wetting properties of saliva substitutes on acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Aydin, A K; Terzioğlu, H; Ulubayram, K; Hasirci, N

    1997-01-01

    The good wetting of the acrylic resin by saliva substitutes is of clinical importance in xerostomic patients. This study evaluated the wetting properties of different artificial saliva formulations that were mucin-based, carboxymethylcellulose-based, and concentrated ion-based on poly(methyl methacrylate) denture base resin, and compared these properties with natural saliva. The wetting properties of the test materials were examined by contact angle measurements. Ninety-six samples that measured 30 x 30 x 3 mm were examined. The wetting properties of mucin-containing and carboxymethylcellulose-containing substitutes on poly(methyl methacrylate) were significantly better than those of human saliva. Mucin-containing artificial salivas had the best wetting properties on the acrylic resin for the materials tested.

  20. Evidence-based guidelines for the care and maintenance of complete dentures: a publication of the American College of Prosthodontists.

    PubMed

    Felton, David; Cooper, Lyndon; Duqum, Ibrahim; Minsley, Glenn; Guckes, Albert; Haug, Steven; Meredith, Patricia; Solie, Caryn; Avery, David; Deal Chandler, Nancy

    2011-02-01

    The current rates of edentulism have been estimated to be between 7% and 69% of the adult population internationally. In the United States, while the incidence of edentulism continues to decline, rapid population growth coupled with current economic conditions suggest that edentulism and conventional denture use will continue at current or higher numbers. Unfortunately, evidence-based guidelines for the care and maintenance of removable complete denture prostheses do not exist. In 2009, the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) formed a task force to establish evidence-based guidelines for the care and maintenance of complete dentures. The task force comprised members of the ACP, the Academy of General Dentistry, American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs, the American Dental Hygienists' Association, the National Association of Dental Laboratories, and representatives from GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare. The review process included the assessment of over 300 abstracts and selection of over 100 articles meeting inclusion criteria of this review. The task force reviewed synopses of the literature and formulated 15 evidence-based guidelines for denture care and maintenance. These guidelines were reviewed by clinical experts from the participating organizations and were published in February 2011 issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association for widespread distribution to the dental community. These guidelines reflect the views of the task force.

  1. Denture Adhesives

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone and give temporary relief from loosening dentures. Zinc and Potential Risk Zinc is a mineral that is an essential ingredient ... in some dietary supplements. However, an excess of zinc in the body can lead to health problems ...

  2. New hybrid latexes from a soybean oil-based waterborne polyurethane and acrylics via emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongshang; Larock, Richard C

    2007-10-01

    A series of new waterborne polyurethane (PU)/acrylic hybrid latexes have been successfully synthesized by the emulsion polymerization of acrylic monomers (butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate) in the presence of a soybean oil-based waterborne PU dispersion using potassium persulfate as an initiator. The waterborne PU dispersion has been synthesized by a polyaddition reaction of toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and a soybean oil-based polyol (SOL). The resulting hybrid latexes, containing 15-60 wt % SOL as a renewable resource, are very stable and exhibit uniform particle sizes of 125 +/- 20 nm as determined by transmittance electronic microscopy. The structure, thermal, and mechanical properties of the resulting hybrid latex films have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis, extraction, and mechanical testing. Grafting copolymerization of the acrylic monomers onto the PU network occurs during the emulsion polymerization, leading to a significant increase in the thermal and mechanical properties of the resulting hybrid latexes. This work provides a new way of utilizing renewable resources to prepare environmentally friendly hybrid latexes with high performance for coating applications.

  3. Comparative analysis of the retention of maxillary denture base with and without border molding using zinc oxide eugenol impression paste.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simrat; Datta, Kusum; Gupta, S K; Suman, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of border molding on the retention of the maxillary denture base. Two special trays, one with full extensions to the periphery and one 2 mm short from the borders were made on the cast obtained from the preliminary impression. Border molding was done on the tray which was short from borders. On both trays, the final impression was made with zinc oxide eugenol impression paste. Heat cure denture bases were fabricated on the prepared casts and retention was measured using specially designed instrument. Mean force with border molding (2765.0 g) was larger than mean force without border molding (1805.0 g) at P < 0.01 level. In terms of percentage, too, the mean improvement (59.4%) in force of dislodgement was statistically highly significant (i.e. P < 0.01). The results of the present study suggest that the dentures made with border molding will provide better retentive force than the dentures made without border molding.

  4. Comparative analysis of the retention of maxillary denture base with and without border molding using zinc oxide eugenol impression paste

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Simrat; Datta, Kusum; Gupta, S. K.; Suman, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of border molding on the retention of the maxillary denture base. Materials and Methods: Two special trays, one with full extensions to the periphery and one 2 mm short from the borders were made on the cast obtained from the preliminary impression. Border molding was done on the tray which was short from borders. On both trays, the final impression was made with zinc oxide eugenol impression paste. Heat cure denture bases were fabricated on the prepared casts and retention was measured using specially designed instrument. Observations and Results: Mean force with border molding (2765.0 g) was larger than mean force without border molding (1805.0 g) at P < 0.01 level. In terms of percentage, too, the mean improvement (59.4%) in force of dislodgement was statistically highly significant (i.e. P < 0.01). Clinical Significance: The results of the present study suggest that the dentures made with border molding will provide better retentive force than the dentures made without border molding. PMID:27134447

  5. Preparation and properties of the nanocomposites based on poly(methyl methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate) and multiwalled carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung-Hun; Lee, Dai-Soo

    2008-09-01

    Nanocomposites, based on multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and various acrylic copolymers of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate)s, were prepared and the effects of the copolymer compositions on the electrical and the dynamic mechanical properties of the nanocomposites investigated. Latices of the acrylic copolymer were prepared by emulsion polymerization, and then mixed with MWCNT dispersed in N-methylpyrrolidone to prepare the nanocomposites. The electrical resistivities of the nanocomposites showed threshold decreases with increasing MWCNT content, due to percolation. The critical MWCNT content (Pc) in the nanocomposites for percolation showed minimum with increasing butyl acrylate content within the poly(methyl methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate). Specifically, the nanocomposites of the acrylic copolymer with a butyl acrylate content of 20-40 wt% showed the lowest Pc value of all the nanocomposites investigated. The nanocomposites showed large increases in the storage moduli in the rubbery plateau region. A decrease in the glass transition temperature (Tg) was observed with the nanocomposites and attributed to the characteristics of the nanocomposites, where the large surface area of MWCNT makes the matrix polymers similar to those of free stand thin film polymers.

  6. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer

    PubMed Central

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. MATERIALS AND METHODS 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (P<.001 for both). However, statistically significant difference was not observed between group A and group S. According to the independent Student's t-test, the shear bond strength values of AT were significantly higher than those of AG (P<.001). CONCLUSION The surface treatment of polyamide denture base materials with acetic acid may be an efficient and cost-effective method for increasing the shear bond strength to auto-polymerized reline resin. PMID:28018569

  7. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer.

    PubMed

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Hafezeqoran, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (P<.001 for both). However, statistically significant difference was not observed between group A and group S. According to the independent Student's t-test, the shear bond strength values of AT were significantly higher than those of AG (P<.001). The surface treatment of polyamide denture base materials with acetic acid may be an efficient and cost-effective method for increasing the shear bond strength to auto-polymerized reline resin.

  8. Modified functional impression technique for complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Malachias, Alexandre; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; da Silva, Cláudia Helena Lovato; Muglia, Valdir Antônio; Moreto, Carla

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the use of a removable acrylic resin tray handle that can be easily attached to custom impression trays to produce an improved peripheral sealing zone. This device can be indicated to develop functional impressions for complete dentures using the patient-conducted muscular motion technique. In upper trays, the handle is fixed in the midline with acrylic resin, while in lower trays the centrally positioned handle is removed before border molding. This removable handle allows patient's suction and free tongue movements. Final impression is carried out in two stages: peripheral sealing (low fusion compound) and recording of the main supporting region of the denture (zinc oxide and eugenol paste). All border records are obtained from the patient's own movements (handle suction and tongue motion). The removable handle is simple to use, is reusable, can be adapted to any individual acrylic resin trays and allows accurate registration of the peripheral sealing zone (border tissues).

  9. Removable dentures with eclipse-repairing and relining.

    PubMed

    Bundevska, Jadranka; Panchevska, Sanja; Kovacevska, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    While utilizing removable dentures, regardless of whether the dentures are acrylic or fabricated of eclipse resin, the need for their filling-relining or their repair frequently arises. The purpose of this study is to display the technicalities of the procedure for rebasing and relining of removable light curing eclipse denture resin. This study presents cases of relining and repairing of removable dentures fabricated from light curing ECLIPSE resin on patients at the Department for Removable Prosthodontics at the University Dental Clinic Centre in Skopje. One of the most significant features of this method of fabrication of removable eclipse dentures and their relining and repairing is the shortened duration of work in the dental laboratory. The displayed mode of rebasing also allows us to maintain one of the advantages of this type of dentures--the absence of allergy stomatitis symptoms.

  10. Influence of various metal oxides on mechanical and physical properties of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Albayrak, Hamdi; Korkmaz, Turan; Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effect of various metal oxides on impact strength (IS), fracture toughness (FT), water sorption (WSP) and solubility (WSL) of heat-cured acrylic resin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty acrylic resin specimens were fabricated for each test and divided into five groups. Group 1 was the control group and Group 2, 3, 4 and 5 (test groups) included a mixture of 1% TiO2 and 1% ZrO2, 2% Al2O3, 2% TiO2, and 2% ZrO2 by volume, respectively. Rectangular unnotched specimens (50 mm × 6.0 mm × 4.0 mm) were fabricated and droptower impact testing machine was used to determine IS. For FT, compact test specimens were fabricated and tests were done with a universal testing machine with a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min. For WSP and WSL, discshaped specimens were fabricated and tests were performed in accordance to ISO 1567. ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for statistical analyses. RESULTS IS and FT values were significantly higher and WSP and WSL values were significantly lower in test groups than in control group (P<.05). Group 5 had significantly higher IS and FT values and significantly lower WSP values than other groups (P<.05) and provided 40% and 30% increase in IS and FT, respectively, compared to control group. Significantly lower WSL values were detected for Group 2 and 5 (P<.05). CONCLUSION Modification of heat-cured acrylic resin with metal oxides, especially with ZrO2, may be useful in preventing denture fractures and undesirable physical changes resulting from oral fluids clinically. PMID:24049564

  11. A simplified numerical simulation method of bending properties for glass fiber cloth reinforced denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Nishiwaki, Tsuyoshi; Nishiyama, Norihiro; Nemoto, Kimiya; Maekawa, Zen-ichiro

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a new numerical modeling of the glass fiber cloth reinforced denture base resin (GFRP). The proposed model is constructed with an isotropic shell, beam and orthotropic shell elements representing the outmost resin, interlaminar resin and glass fiber cloth, respectively. The proposed model was applied to the failure progress analysis under three-point bending conditions, the validity of the numerical model was checked through comparisons with experimental results. The failure progress behaviors involving the local failures, such as interlaminar delamination and resin failure, could be simulated using the numerical model for analyzing the failure progress of GFRP. It is concluded that the model was effective for the failure progress analysis of GFRP.

  12. Effect of palatal form on movement of teeth during processing of complete denture prosthesis: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Sumanth; Manjunath, Shaurya; Vajawat, Mayuri

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in-vitro study was to assess the influence of shallow and deep palatal forms on the movement of teeth during the processing of complete denture prosthesis. Materials and Methods: Maxillary casts with shallow and deep palatal forms were selected and duplicated to make 10 casts of each palatal form. Base plates were constructed and teeth were arranged in their anatomic positions. Metal pins with true apex were placed on the central groove of the right and left first molars and one on the incisive papilla area as a reference point. Casts were scanned using i-CAT Vision Q 1.9 (i-CAT cone beam 3D dental imaging system by Imaging Sciences International, PA, USA), which has 360° rotational tomography. The distances between the apices of metallic pin inserts on the teeth and fitted point of reference were recorded in buccopalatal axes at waxed up stage, after deflasking, and after finishing and polishing. Results: Results showed a statistically significant movement of teeth in shallow and deep palatal forms during all stages of complete denture processing. In shallow palatal form dentures, there was a significant tooth movement in palatal direction between Stages 1 and 2 (P ≤ 0.05) and buccal movement between Stages 2 and 3. In deep palatal form dentures, teeth showed a statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05) movement in buccal direction during all stages of denture processing. Conclusion: Teeth showed significant movement during processing of acrylic resin dentures. Overall, the movement of teeth in shallow palatal form dentures was in palatal direction, whereas in deep palatal form dentures, the movement of teeth was in buccal direction. PMID:27041898

  13. Flexural properties of acrylic resin polymers reinforced with unidirectional and woven glass fibers.

    PubMed

    Vallittu, P K

    1999-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced plastics for dental applications have been under development for some time. A major difficulty in using reinforcing fibers with multiphase acrylic resins, such as powderliquid resins, has been improper impregnation of fibers with the resin. The aim of this study was to describe and test a novel system to use polymer-preimpregnated reinforcing fibers with commonly used multiphase acrylic resins. Continuous unidirectional and woven preimpregnated glass fiber reinforcements (Stick and Stick Net) were used to reinforce heat-curing denture base and autopolymerizing denture base polymers. A temporary fixed partial denture polymer was also reinforced with Stick reinforcement material. Five test specimens were fabricated for unreinforced control groups and for Stick- and Stick Net-reinforced groups. A 3-point loading test was used to measure transverse strength and flexural modulus of the materials and ultimate strain at fracture was calculated. Cross-sections of test specimens were examined with a SEM to evaluate degree of impregnation of fibers with polymer matrix. Quantity of fibers in test specimens was determined by combustion analysis. Transverse strength of heat-curing denture base polymer was 76 MPa, Stick reinforcement increased it to 341 MPa, and flexural modulus increased from 2550 to 19086 MPa. Stick Net reinforcement increased transverse strength of heat-curing denture base polymer to 99 MPa and flexural modulus to 3530 MPa. Transverse strength of autopolymerizing denture base polymer was 71 MPa; Stick increased it to 466 MPa; and flexural modulus increased from 2418 to 16749 MPa. Stick Net increased the transverse strength of autopolymerizing denture base polymer to 96 MPa and flexural modulus to 3573 MPa. Transverse strength of temporary fixed partial denture polymer increased from 58 to 241 MPa and flexural modulus from 1711 to 7227 MPa. ANOVA showed that reinforcement type and polymer brand affected transverse strength and modulus (P <.001

  14. [MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF RAT MUCOUS MEMBRANE OF THE TONGUE EARLY AFFECTED BY ACRYLIC RESIN MONOMER].

    PubMed

    Davydenko, V; Nidzelskiy, M; Starchenko, I; Davydenko, A; Kuznetsov, V

    2016-03-01

    Base materials, made on the basis of various derivatives of acrylic and methacrylic acids, have been widely used in prosthetic dentistry. Free monomer, affecting the tissues of prosthetic bed and the whole body, is always found in dentures. Therefore, study of the effect of acrylic resins' monomer on mucous membrane of the tongue is crucial. Rat tongue is very similar to human tongue, and this fact has become the basis for selecting these animals to be involved into the experiment. The paper presents the findings related to the effect of "Ftoraks" base acrylic resin monomer on the state of rat mucous membrane of the tongue and its regeneration. The microscopy has found that the greatest changes in the mucous membrane of the tongue occur on day 3 and 7 day after applying the monomer and are of erosive and inflammatory nature. Regeneration of tongue epithelium slows down.

  15. 21 CFR 872.3450 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to the base of a denture before the denture is inserted in a patient's mouth to improve denture... the mouth. The device is intended to be discarded following 1 day's use. The class I device is exempt...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3450 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to the base of a denture before the denture is inserted in a patient's mouth to improve denture... the mouth. The device is intended to be discarded following 1 day's use. The class I device is exempt...

  17. Effect of Aging on Bond Strength of Two Soft Lining Materials to a Denture Base Polymer.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was evaluation the effect of immersion in distilled water and inorganic artificial saliva on the shear bond strength of a heat-polymerized and an auto-polymerized silicone-based denture lining materials. The denture liners investigated were Molloplast-B (heat-polymerized), and Mollosil plus (auto-polymerized). The soft liner specimens were 10 × 10 × 2.5 mm and were processed between two poly(methylmethacrylate) plates. Thirty shear specimens for each type of test lining material were prepared. Specimens were divided equally into three groups for each test lining material: first group, specimens were tested after 48 h of preparation without immersion; second group, specimens were tested following immersion in distilled water at 37 °C for 12 months; and third group, specimens were tested following immersion in inorganic artificial saliva at 37 °C for 12 months. Shear bond strength was measured using an universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 40 mm/min and failure mode (adhesive, cohesive and mixed) after debonding was assessed. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (α = 0.05). ANOVA was followed by Bonferroni post hoc tests for pairwise comparisons. A significant difference in shear bond strength was detected between Molloplast-B and Mollosil plus following immersion in distilled water and artificial saliva. Molloplast-B demonstrated considerably higher shear strength than Mollosil plus after immersion. Shear strengths of the lining materials investigated reduced significantly after immersion in both solutions. Visual examination after separation revealed that the soft materials tested exhibited mostly adhesive failure. The effect of immersion in distilled water and inorganic artificial saliva on bond strength of test lining materials was perceivable; however, both of them had acceptable bond strength and might be proper for long-term use.

  18. An ontology-driven, case-based clinical decision support model for removable partial denture design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qingxiao; Wu, Ji; Li, Shusen; Lyu, Peijun; Wang, Yong; Li, Miao

    2016-06-01

    We present the initial work toward developing a clinical decision support model for specific design of removable partial dentures (RPDs) in dentistry. We developed an ontological paradigm to represent knowledge of a patient’s oral conditions and denture component parts. During the case-based reasoning process, a cosine similarity algorithm was applied to calculate similarity values between input patients and standard ontology cases. A group of designs from the most similar cases were output as the final results. To evaluate this model, the output designs of RPDs for 104 randomly selected patients were compared with those selected by professionals. An area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (AUC-ROC) was created by plotting true-positive rates against the false-positive rate at various threshold settings. The precision at position 5 of the retrieved cases was 0.67 and at the top of the curve it was 0.96, both of which are very high. The mean average of precision (MAP) was 0.61 and the normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG) was 0.74 both of which confirmed the efficient performance of our model. All the metrics demonstrated the efficiency of our model. This methodology merits further research development to match clinical applications for designing RPDs. This paper is organized as follows. After the introduction and description of the basis for the paper, the evaluation and results are presented in Section 2. Section 3 provides a discussion of the methodology and results. Section 4 describes the details of the ontology, similarity algorithm, and application.

  19. Mechanical and thermal properties of polyamide versus reinforced PMMA denture base materials

    PubMed Central

    Bolayir, Giray; Boztug, Ali

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This in vitro study intended to investigate the mechanical and thermal characteristics of Valplast, and of polymethyl methacrylate denture base resin in which different esthetic fibers (E-glass, nylon 6 or nylon 6.6) were added. MATERIALS AND METHODS Five groups were formed: control (PMMA), PMMA-E glass, PMMA-nylon 6, PMMA-nylon 6.6 and Valplast resin. For the transverse strength test the specimens were prepared in accordance with ANSI/ADA specification No.12, and for the impact test ASTM D-256 standard were used. With the intent to evaluate the properties of transverse strength, the three-point bending (n=7) test instrument (Lloyd NK5, Lloyd Instruments Ltd, Fareham Hampshire, UK) was used at 5 mm/min. A Dynatup 9250 HV (Instron, UK) device was employed for the impact strength (n=7). All of the resin samples were tested by using thermo-mechanical analysis (Shimadzu TMA 50, Shimadzu, Japan). The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Tukey tests for pairwise comparisons of the groups at the 0.05 level of significance. RESULTS In all mechanical tests, the highest values were observed in Valplast group (transverse strength: 117.22 ± 37.80 MPa, maximum deflection: 27.55 ± 1.48 mm, impact strength: 0.76 ± 0.03 kN). Upon examining the thermo-mechanical analysis data, it was seen that the E value of the control sample was 8.08 MPa, higher than that of the all other samples. CONCLUSION Although Valplast denture material has good mechanical strength, its elastic modulus is not high enough to meet the standard of PMMA materials. PMID:23755341

  20. Double-bond-containing polyallene-based triblock copolymers via phenoxyallene and (meth)acrylate

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Aishun; Lu, Guolin; Guo, Hao; Huang, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    A series of ABA triblock copolymers, consisting of double-bond-containing poly(phenoxyallene) (PPOA), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), or poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) segments, were synthesized by sequential free radical polymerization and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A new bifunctional initiator bearing azo and halogen-containing ATRP initiating groups was first prepared followed by initiating conventional free radical homopolymerization of phenoxyallene with cumulated double bond to give a PPOA-based macroinitiator with ATRP initiating groups at both ends. Next, PMMA-b-PPOA-b-PMMA and PBA-b-PPOA-b-PBA triblock copolymers were synthesized by ATRP of methyl methacrylate and n-butyl acrylate initiated by the PPOA-based macroinitiator through the site transformation strategy. These double-bond-containing triblock copolymers are stable under UV irradiation and free radical circumstances. PMID:28252049

  1. Double-bond-containing polyallene-based triblock copolymers via phenoxyallene and (meth)acrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aishun; Lu, Guolin; Guo, Hao; Huang, Xiaoyu

    2017-03-01

    A series of ABA triblock copolymers, consisting of double-bond-containing poly(phenoxyallene) (PPOA), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), or poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) segments, were synthesized by sequential free radical polymerization and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A new bifunctional initiator bearing azo and halogen-containing ATRP initiating groups was first prepared followed by initiating conventional free radical homopolymerization of phenoxyallene with cumulated double bond to give a PPOA-based macroinitiator with ATRP initiating groups at both ends. Next, PMMA-b-PPOA-b-PMMA and PBA-b-PPOA-b-PBA triblock copolymers were synthesized by ATRP of methyl methacrylate and n-butyl acrylate initiated by the PPOA-based macroinitiator through the site transformation strategy. These double-bond-containing triblock copolymers are stable under UV irradiation and free radical circumstances.

  2. Double-bond-containing polyallene-based triblock copolymers via phenoxyallene and (meth)acrylate.

    PubMed

    Ding, Aishun; Lu, Guolin; Guo, Hao; Huang, Xiaoyu

    2017-03-02

    A series of ABA triblock copolymers, consisting of double-bond-containing poly(phenoxyallene) (PPOA), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), or poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) segments, were synthesized by sequential free radical polymerization and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A new bifunctional initiator bearing azo and halogen-containing ATRP initiating groups was first prepared followed by initiating conventional free radical homopolymerization of phenoxyallene with cumulated double bond to give a PPOA-based macroinitiator with ATRP initiating groups at both ends. Next, PMMA-b-PPOA-b-PMMA and PBA-b-PPOA-b-PBA triblock copolymers were synthesized by ATRP of methyl methacrylate and n-butyl acrylate initiated by the PPOA-based macroinitiator through the site transformation strategy. These double-bond-containing triblock copolymers are stable under UV irradiation and free radical circumstances.

  3. Changes in roughness of denture base and reline materials by chemical disinfection or microwave irradiation. Surface roughness of denture base and reline materials

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Ana Lucia; GIAMPAOLO, Eunice Teresinha; VERGANI, Carlos Eduardo; de SOUZA, Juliana Feltrin; JORGE, Janaina Habib

    2011-01-01

    Objective The effect of disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate solution and microwave irradiation on surface roughness of one denture base resin (Lucitone 550 -L), 3 hard chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II-TR, New Truliner-NT, Ufi Gel hard-UH) and 3 resilient reline materials (Trusoft-T; Sofreliner-S, Dentusil-D) was evaluated. Material and methods Thirty specimens of each material were made and divided into 3 groups: Control - not disinfected; P - daily disinfection by immersing in sodium perborate solution (3.8%); MW - microwave disinfection (6 min/650 W). Roughness measurements were made after polymerization (baseline) and after 1, 3 and 28 days. Roughness differences relative to the baseline readings were analyzed by Student's t-test (P=0.05). Results At baseline, Trusoft showed the highest (P<0.001) mean surface roughness (3.54 µm), and its surface roughness was significantly reduced after 28 days of disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate (P=0.013). Roughness measurements of material Trusoft were not performed after microwave disinfection due to the severe alterations on the surface. In the 3 groups evaluated, changes in roughness were significant for materials Ufi Gel hard (from 0.11 to 0.26 µm; P≤0.041) and New Truliner (0.19 to 0.76 µm; P≤0.019). The roughness of materials Lucitone 550 (0.37 µm), Tokuyama Rebase II (0.37 µm), Sofreliner (0.49 µm) and Dentusil (0.38 µm) remained unaffected (P>0.05). Conclusions The roughness of the hard reline materials Ufi Gel hard and New Truliner was adversely affected by microwave disinfection, immersion in water or in sodium perborate. Microwave disinfection caused severe alterations on the surface of the resilient liner Trusoft. PMID:21986658

  4. Changes in roughness of denture base and reline materials by chemical disinfection or microwave irradiation: surface roughness of denture base and reline materials.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ana Lucia; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Souza, Juliana Feltrin de; Jorge, Janaina Habib

    2011-10-01

    The effect of disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate solution and microwave irradiation on surface roughness of one denture base resin (Lucitone 550 -L), 3 hard chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II-TR, New Truliner-NT, Ufi Gel hard-UH) and 3 resilient reline materials (Trusoft-T; Sofreliner-S, Dentusil-D) was evaluated. Thirty specimens of each material were made and divided into 3 groups: Control - not disinfected; P - daily disinfection by immersing in sodium perborate solution (3.8%); MW - microwave disinfection (6 min/650 W). Roughness measurements were made after polymerization (baseline) and after 1, 3 and 28 days. Roughness differences relative to the baseline readings were analyzed by Student's t-test (P=0.05). At baseline, Trusoft showed the highest (P<0.001) mean surface roughness (3.54 µm), and its surface roughness was significantly reduced after 28 days of disinfection by immersion in sodium perborate (P=0.013). Roughness measurements of material Trusoft were not performed after microwave disinfection due to the severe alterations on the surface. In the 3 groups evaluated, changes in roughness were significant for materials Ufi Gel hard (from 0.11 to 0.26 µm; P<0.041) and New Truliner (0.19 to 0.76 µm; P<0.019). The roughness of materials Lucitone 550 (0.37 µm), Tokuyama Rebase II (0.37 µm), Sofreliner (0.49 µm) and Dentusil (0.38 µm) remained unaffected (P>0.05). The roughness of the hard reline materials Ufi Gel hard and New Truliner was adversely affected by microwave disinfection, immersion in water or in sodium perborate. Microwave disinfection caused severe alterations on the surface of the resilient liner Trusoft.

  5. Effect of Repeated Simulated Disinfections by Microwave Energy on the Complete Denture Base Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Consani, Rafael L.X.; Iwasaki, Rose Y; Mesquita, Marcelo F; Mendes, Wilson B; Consani, Simonides

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of repeated microwave disinfections on the adaptation of the maxillar denture base using 2 different flask closure methods. Twenty stone cast-wax base sets were prepared for flasking by traditional cramp or RS system methods. Five bases for each method were submitted to 5 repeated simulated disinfections in a microwave oven with 650W for 3 minutes. Control bases were not disinfected. Three transverse cuts were made through each stone cast-resin base set, corresponding to canine, first molar, and posterior region. Measurements were made using an optical micrometer at 5 points for each cut to determine base adaptation: left and right marginal limits of the flanges, left and right ridge crests, and midline. Results for base adaptation performed by the flask closure methods were: traditional cramp (non-disinfected = 0.21 ± 0.05mm and disinfected = 0.22 ± 0.05mm), and RS system (non-disinfected = 0.16 ± 0.05 and disinfected = 0.17 ± 0.04mm). Collected data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey test (α=.05). Repeated simulated disinfections by microwave energy did not cause deleterious effect on the base adaptation, when the traditional cramp and RS system flask closure methods were compared. PMID:19088884

  6. Synthesis of hollow hybrid hydroxyapatite microspheres based on chitosan-poly(acrylic acid) microparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibin; Zhou, Kechao; Li, Zhiyou; Huang, Suping

    2009-06-01

    Core-template-free hybrid hydroxyapatite (HA) hollow microspheres based on a chitosan-poly acrylic acid (CS-PAA) complex were prepared. The amine groups on chitosan can interact with the carboxyl groups of poly(acrylic acid) to form hollow microspheres. The hollow HA microspheres of about 1.0 microm are obtained by heterogeneous nucleation of HA on CS-PAA hollow spheres. Gelatin (Gel), acting as a novel cross-link agent, is introduced to bind the spheres of CS-PAA and HA. The forming mechanism of hollow spheres and the influencing factors on the size of microspheres are investigated. In addition, the role of Gel is elucidated in the forming process of the hollow hybrid sphere.

  7. Synthesis evaluation and adsorption studies of anionic copolymeric surfactants based on fatty acrylate ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dougdoug, W. I. A.; El-Mossalamy, E. H.

    2006-12-01

    A series of anionic copolymeric surfactants based on n-dodecylacrylate ester (M 1) as hydrophobe, and oxypropylated acrylate ester (MA 4,6) as hydrophiles, were prepared by copolymerization of n-dodecylacrylate (M 1) and oxypropylated acrylate ester (MA 4,6) with molar ratio's (0.3:0.7, 0.4:0.6 and 0.5:0.5, respectively) in presence of benzoyl peroxide as initiator followed by sulfation and neutralization to afforded [(PAS 4), and (PAS 6)] a-c, as anionic copolymeric surfactant in suitable yield. These derivatives were purified and characterized by IR and 1H NMR spectral studies. Surface activity, and biodegradability were evaluated. Adsorption of some copolymeric surfactant on salary sand was investigated to assess possibility of treating waste water streams for removal of Pb 2+ and Hg 2+ toxic minerals. The effect of several factors governing the adsorption such as initial concentration, temperature, pH, have been studied.

  8. A randomized controlled trial comparing interim acrylic prostheses with and without cast metal base for immediate loading of dental implants in the edentulous mandible.

    PubMed

    Thomé, Eloana; Lee, Hyung Joo; Sartori, Ivete Aparecida de Mattias; Trevisan, Roseli Latenek; Luiz, Jaques; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    This randomized controlled trial used resonance frequency analysis (RFA) to assess the effects of the presence or absence of a cast rigid bar splinting multiple implants in the stability of immediately loaded implants. Twenty-nine edentulous patients were randomly divided into two groups: G1 with full-arch implant-fixed prostheses and G2 with multiple implant splinting via acrylic resin denture bases. All implants were immediately loaded. RFA measurements assessed implant stability at three different times (T0--at baseline, T1--4 months, and T2--8 months. Wilcoxon and Friedman tests and a multivariate model with repeated measures for longitudinal data were used for statistical comparison (α = 0.05). Twenty-nine patients were assessed (G1 = 15 and G2 = 14). Implant and prostheses survival rates were 100% for both groups after the 8-month observation period and no significant differences in the mean ISQ values were found at the different implant stability assessment times (P > 0.05). The different splinting protocols did not appear to affect implant stability during the 8-month observation period. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A Potentiometric Formaldehyde Biosensor Based on Immobilization of Alcohol Oxidase on Acryloxysuccinimide-modified Acrylic Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Yew Pei; Heng, Lee Yook

    2010-01-01

    A new alcohol oxidase (AOX) enzyme-based formaldehyde biosensor based on acrylic microspheres has been developed. Hydrophobic poly(n-butyl acrylate-N-acryloxy-succinimide) [poly(nBA-NAS)] microspheres, an enzyme immobilization matrix, was synthesized using photopolymerization in an emulsion form. AOX-poly(nBA-NAS) microspheres were deposited on a pH transducer made from a layer of photocured and self-plasticized polyacrylate membrane with an entrapped pH ionophore coated on a Ag/AgCl screen printed electrode (SPE). Oxidation of formaldehyde by the immobilized AOX resulted in the production of protons, which can be determined via the pH transducer. Effects of buffer concentrations, pH and different amount of immobilization matrix towards the biosensor’s analytical performance were investigated. The formaldehyde biosensor exhibited a dynamic linear response range to formaldehyde from 0.3–316.2 mM and a sensitivity of 59.41 ± 0.66 mV/decade (R2 = 0.9776, n = 3). The lower detection limit of the biosensor was 0.3 mM, while reproducibility and repeatability were 3.16% RSD (relative standard deviation) and 1.11% RSD, respectively (n = 3). The use of acrylic microspheres in the potentiometric formaldehyde biosensor improved the biosensor’s performance in terms of response time, linear response range and long term stability when compared with thick film immobilization methods. PMID:22163450

  10. A potentiometric formaldehyde biosensor based on immobilization of alcohol oxidase on acryloxysuccinimide-modified acrylic microspheres.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yew Pei; Heng, Lee Yook

    2010-01-01

    A new alcohol oxidase (AOX) enzyme-based formaldehyde biosensor based on acrylic microspheres has been developed. Hydrophobic poly(n-butyl acrylate-N-acryloxy-succinimide) [poly(nBA-NAS)] microspheres, an enzyme immobilization matrix, was synthesized using photopolymerization in an emulsion form. AOX-poly(nBA-NAS) microspheres were deposited on a pH transducer made from a layer of photocured and self-plasticized polyacrylate membrane with an entrapped pH ionophore coated on a Ag/AgCl screen printed electrode (SPE). Oxidation of formaldehyde by the immobilized AOX resulted in the production of protons, which can be determined via the pH transducer. Effects of buffer concentrations, pH and different amount of immobilization matrix towards the biosensor's analytical performance were investigated. The formaldehyde biosensor exhibited a dynamic linear response range to formaldehyde from 0.3-316.2 mM and a sensitivity of 59.41 ± 0.66 mV/decade (R(2) = 0.9776, n = 3). The lower detection limit of the biosensor was 0.3 mM, while reproducibility and repeatability were 3.16% RSD (relative standard deviation) and 1.11% RSD, respectively (n = 3). The use of acrylic microspheres in the potentiometric formaldehyde biosensor improved the biosensor's performance in terms of response time, linear response range and long term stability when compared with thick film immobilization methods.

  11. The impact of frenulum height on strains in maxillary denture bases

    PubMed Central

    Bilhan, Hakan; Baysal, Gokhan; Sunbuloglu, Emin; Bozdag, Ergun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The midline fracture of maxillary complete dentures is a frequently encountered complication. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of frenulum height on midline strains of maxillary complete dentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS A removable maxillary complete denture was fabricated and duplicated seven times. Four different labial frenulum heights were tested for stresses occurring on the palatal cameo surface. The strains were measured with strain gauges placed on 5 different locations and the stresses were calculated. To mimic occlusal forces bilaterally 100 N of load was applied from the premolar and molar region. RESULTS A statistically significant association between the height of the labial frenulum and the calculated stresses and strains was shown (P<.05) predominantly on the midline and especially on the incisive papilla. The results showed that stress on the anterior midline of the maxillary complete denture increases with a higher labial frenulum. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that the stress on the anterior midline of the maxillary complete denture increases with a higher labial frenulum. Surgical or mechanical precautions should be taken to prevent short-term failure of maxillary complete dentures due to stress concentration and low cycle fatigue tendency at the labial frenulum region. PMID:24353878

  12. Changes in the composition of a nickel-base partial denture casting alloy upon fusion and casting.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-02-01

    Three series of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel-base partial denture casting alloy. For the first series induction heating was employed for melting the alloy, for the second a resistance crucible, and for the third an oxy-acetylene torch. In each series the same metal was cast sequentially five times, following which samples of the alloy were subjected to a ten element quantitative analysis to ascertain compositional changes associated with the three methods of fusion.

  13. A technique to stabilize record bases for Gothic arch tracings in patients with implant-retained complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Raigrodski, A J; Sadan, A; Carruth, P L

    1998-12-01

    Clinicians have long expressed concern about the accuracy of the Gothic arch tracing for recording centric relation in edentulous patients. With the use of dental implants to assist in retaining complete dentures, the problem of inaccurate recordings, made for patients without natural teeth, can be significantly reduced. This article presents a technique that uses healing abutments to stabilize the record bases so that an accurate Gothic arch tracing can be made.

  14. An Electrochemical DNA Microbiosensor Based on Succinimide-Modified Acrylic Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Ulianas, Alizar; Heng, Lee Yook; Hanifah, Sharina Abu; Ling, Tan Ling

    2012-01-01

    An electrochemical microbiosensor for DNA has been fabricated based on new acrylic microspheres modified with reactive N-acryloxysuccinimide (NAS) functional groups. Hydrophobic poly(n-butylacrylate-N-acryloxysuccinimide) microspheres were synthesized in an emulsion form with a simple one-step photopolymerization technique. Aminated DNA probe was attached to the succinimde functional group of the acrylic microspheres via covalent bonding. The hybridization of the immobilized DNA probe with the complementary DNA was studied by differential pulse voltametry using anthraquninone-2-sulfonic acid monohydrate sodium salt (AQMS) as the electroactive hybridization label. The influences of many factors such as duration of DNA probe immobilization and hybridization, pH, type of ions, buffer concentrations, ionic strength, operational temperature and non-complementary DNA on the biosensor performance were evaluated. Under optimized conditions, the DNA microbiosensor demonstrated a linear response range to target DNA over a wide concentration range of 1.0 × 10−16 and 1.0 × 10−8 M with a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 9.46 × 10−17 M (R2 = 0.97). This DNA microbiosensor showed good reproducibility with 2.84% RSD (relative standard deviation) (n = 3). Application of the NAS-modified acrylic microspheres in the construction of DNA microbiosensor had improved the overall analytical performance of the resultant DNA microbiosensor when compared with other reported DNA biosensors using other nano-materials for membranes and microspheres as DNA immobilization matrices. PMID:22778594

  15. Water sorption and dimensional changes of denture base polymer reinforced with glass fibers in continuous unidirectional and woven form.

    PubMed

    Cal, N E; Hersek, N; Sahin, E

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dimensional accuracy and water sorption of a denture base polymer that was reinforced with glass fibers in continuous unidirectional and woven form in different weight fractions. Ten rhombic brass plates were prepared with reference points, and 70 heat-cured denture base polymer specimens were produced using these brass models. Ten of 70 were used for controls, and 60 were reinforced with glass fibers in continuous parallel and woven form. The dimensional changes of polymer and fiber-reinforced composite specimens after processing, drying for 4 days at 37 degrees C, and storage in 37 degrees C water for 90 days were calculated by the change of the distance vector. The measurements were made between the reference points on the specimens and were compared with those on the brass model at 4 different stages. The water sorption calculations were made at 10 different time intervals on 70 specimens, which were immersed in a 37 degrees C distilled water bath and weighed. The polymerization shrinkage and water sorption of denture base polymers is lower when the specimens are reinforced with glass fibers in continuous unidirectional and woven form. The highest fiber content showed the smallest dimensional change (0.069 mm, or 0.25%), and the unreinforced group showed the largest change (0.139 mm, or 0.54%). Water sorption occurred mainly during the first 14 days. As the fiber content increases, the dimensional change and water sorption decrease.

  16. Colour Stability of Heat and Cold Cure Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, P R; Reddy, Madan Mohan; Ebenezar, A.V. Rajesh; Sivakumar, G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the colour stability of heat and cold cure acrylic resins under simulated oral conditions with different colorants. Materials and Methods: Three different brands of heat cure acrylic resin and two rapid cure auto polymerizing acrylic resin of commercial products such as Trevelon Heat Cure (THC), DPI Heat cure (DHC), Pyrax Heat Cure (PHC), DPI Cold cure (DCC) and Acralyn-R-Cold cure (ACC) have been evaluated for discoloration and colour variation on subjecting it to three different, commonly employed food colorants such as Erythrosine, Tartarizine and Sunset yellow. In order to simulate the oral condition the food colorants were diluted with artificial saliva to the samples taken up for the study. These were further kept in an incubator at 37°C ± 1°C. The UV-visible spectrophotometer has been utilized to evaluate the study on the basis of CIE L* a* b* system. The prepared samples for standard evaluation have been grouped as control group, which has been tested with a white as standard, which is applicable for testing the colour variants. Results: The least colour changes was found to be with Sunset Yellow showing AE* value of 3.55 with heat cure acrylic resin branded as PHC material and the highest colour absorption with Tartarizine showing AE* value of 12.43 in rapid cure autopolymerzing acrylic resin material branded as ACC material. Conclusion: ACC which is a self cure acrylic resin shows a higher colour variation to the tartarizine food coloration. There were not much of discoloration values shown on the denture base resins as the food colorants are of organic azodyes. PMID:25738078

  17. Technique for fabrication of the mandibular denture over the staple bone implant using a permanent heat-cured base.

    PubMed

    Goll, G E; Smith, D E

    1985-06-01

    A technique that uses processed bases to which the semiprecision attachments are attached intraorally has been described. The teeth are cured in heat-cured resin directly to the base. Advantages of using heat-cured processed bases are that (1) the base is accurately related to the attachments; (2) there is direct access to the attachments for joining them to the base; (3) extension, retention, and stability can be evaluated prior to completion of the dentures; and (4) accurate jaw relation recordings can be made due to the accuracy of the fit of the bases.

  18. Comparative evaluation of impact and flexural strength of four commercially available flexible denture base materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Abhay, Pande Neelam; Karishma, Shori

    2013-12-01

    Poly-methyl methacrylate is a rigid material. It is generally observed that the impact and flexural strength of this material is not satisfactory and that is reflected in the continuous efforts to improve these mechanical properties. Hence there was a serious need to make another material which could overcome the limitations of the existing materials and could have better properties, like thermoplastic materials. The study was aimed to evaluate and compare the impact strength and the flexural strength of four different flexible denture base materials (thermoplastic denture base resins) with the conventional denture base material (high impact polymethyl-methacrylate). Two, machine made master moulds of metal blocks according to the size of sample holder of the equipment were prepared to test the impact and flexural strength. Total 40 samples, 10 for each group of flexible denture base materials namely: De-flex (Deflex, United Kingdom), Lucitone FRS (Densply, Germany), Valplast (Novoblast, USA), and Bre-flex (Bredent, Germany) in specially designed flask by injection molded process. For different flexible materials, the time, temperature and pressure for injecting the materials were followed as per the manufacturer's instructions. Total 20 samples for control (Trevelon denture base materials) were prepared by compression moulded process, for each test. ANOVA test was applied to calculate p value. Unpaired t test was applied to calculate t-value. Tukey-Kramer multiple test was provided for comparison between the groups for flexural and impact strength. From the statistical analysis, it was found that, the impact strength of Group III (Valplast) was found to be the highest than all other groups and nearer to the control group. Whereas Group IV (Bre-flex) had the maximum flexural strength. The flexural strength of Group I (De-flex) was lowest than all other groups and nearer to control group. The values were found to be statistically significant but clinically non

  19. Denture adhesive use in complete dentures: clinical recommendations and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Duqum, Ibrahim; Powers, Kendall Ann; Cooper, Lyndon; Felton, David

    2012-01-01

    This literature review sought to determine the advantages and disadvantages of denture adhesive use among complete denture patients. Manuscripts were obtained by searching the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database, Cochrane Collaboration Library, ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry website, and EMBASE database. A total of 85 abstracts were reviewed, and 38 articles that met the inclusion criteria for this review were selected. The inclusion criteria included clinical trials and case series in which 10 or more patients were treated, as well as Cochrane collaboration reviews and in vitro studies where clinical relevance could be determined. The selected manuscripts were reviewed using a standardized manuscript review matrix. Although denture adhesives improve the retention and function of complete dentures, standardized guidelines are needed for the proper use, application, and removal of denture adhesives. Additionally, long-term studies are warranted on the biologic effects of denture adhesives. There is a need to establish a regular recall program for complete denture patients.

  20. Influence of methylmercaptan on the bonding strength of autopolymerizing reline resins to a heat-polymerized denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Takuya; Oizumi, Makoto; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2009-07-01

    Effects of methylmercaptan solution (MS), a volatile sulfur compound produced by gram-negative oral microorganisms, on the adhesion of reline denture resins were investigated. For this purpose, a total of 120 disk-shaped specimens prepared from a heat-polymerized denture base resin (Acron) immersed in MS of different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mol) as well as in purified water as a control at 37 degrees C for 4 weeks. Each of three commercial autopolymerizing reline resins (Rebaron, Mild Rebaron, and Tokuyama Rebase II) was bonded to a specimen. The shear bond strength tests were conducted for the specimens, with and without the application of a primer. The bond strength with 1.0 mol MS was significantly lower than those with other solutions (p < 0.05). The primer application had a significant positive effect on the bond strength. The debonded Acron surfaces showed evidence of incomplete polymerization. The results suggested a potential adhesion-inhibiting effect of the MS on relined dentures.

  1. [Comparison of adaptation and microstructure of titanium upper complete denture base fabricated by selecting laser melting and electron beam melting].

    PubMed

    Ye, Y; Xiong, Y Y; Zhu, J R; Sun, J

    2017-06-09

    Objective: To fabricate Ti alloy frameworks for a maxillary complete denture with three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique, such as selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM), and to evaluate the microstructure of these frameworks and their adaptation to the die stone models. Methods: Thirty pairs of edentulous casts were divided into 3 groups randomly and equally. In each group, one of the three techniques (SLM, EBM, conventional technique) was used to fabricate Ti alloy frameworks. The base-cast sets were transversally sectioned into 3 sections at the distal of canines, mesial of first molars, and the posterior palatal zone. The gap between the metal base and cast was measured in the 3 sections. Stereoscopic microscope was used to measure the gap. Three pieces of specimens of 5 mm diameter were fabricated with Ti alloy by SLM, EBM and the traditional casting technology (as mentioned above). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to evaluate the differences of microstructure among these specimens. Results: The gaps between the metal base and cast were (99.4±17.0), (98.2±26.1), and (99.6± 16.1) μm in conventional method; (99.4 ± 22.8), (83.1 ± 19.3), and (103.3 ± 13.8) μm in SLM technique; (248.3±70.3), (279.1±71.9), and (189.1±31.6) μm in EBM technique. There was no statistical difference in the value of gaps between SLM Ti alloy and conventional method Ti alloy group (P>0.05). There was statistical difference among EBM Ti alloy, conventional method Ti alloy and SLM Ti alloy group (P<0.05). The SLM Ti alloy showed more uniform and compact microstructure than the cast Ti alloy and EBM Ti alloy did. Conclusions: SLM technique showed initial feasibility to manufacture the dental base of complete denture. The mechanical properties and microstructure of the denture frameworks prepared by SLM indicate that these dentures are appropriate for clinical use. EBM technique is inadequate to make a complete denture now.

  2. [Use of a retainer bar in lower full dentures].

    PubMed

    Rignon-Bret, J M; Pompignoli, M

    1989-12-01

    In subtotal mandibular edentations, the roots of remaining anterior teeth might be used to enhance the retention of a full denture in building a contramucosal retention bar. Based on a case-report, the authors present the fabrication in five clinical and laboratory sequences, of a maxillary full denture combined with a lower full denture and a retainer bar joining two cuspids. First sequence: Clinical. It mainly concerns: 1) Preparation and impression of the two cuspids for receiving the two posts on which the retention bar will be fixed. 2) The primary plaster impression of the soft tissues. In the laboratory, the coping are directly cast with gold without a core, topped with resin. The individual mandibular impression tray (IIT) presents two windows opposite the two preparations through which the tops of the two copings are showing. Second sequence: Clinical. If the maxillary impression is a classical one, the mandibular impression is peculiar and original. Overall, this provides a reliable working model on which the dental technician will be able to build, the entire prosthesis, not only the retainer bar but also the full denture. This is done in two stages: 1) Secondary impression of the soft tissues with copings in place. 2) Indexing of the copings to the impression tray with acrylic resin, pressing firmly on the rims of the IIT and simultaneously, on the tops of the copings to take into account the different depression of the tissues. In the laboratory, both impressions are boxed and cast, with in place.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. [Oral mucosa reaction in patients adapting to removable dentures].

    PubMed

    Iordanishvili, A K; Soldatova, L N; Pikhur, O L; Mikhailova, E S; Peremyshlenko, A S; Soldatov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosa reaction of prosthetic bed to the removable acrylic dentures was evaluated in 43 patients (12 male and 31 female) aged 56-69 years with partial and full teeth loss in one or both jaws. Patients of the first (control) group (17 patients) were not using additional tools improving fixation of the removable dentures during adaptation period, while patients of the second (main) group (26 patients) used Corega cream for dentures fixation for 30 days follow-up. Oral mucosa assessment was carried out on 3-4 and 28-30 day of dentures use by 3 end points: pain syndrome, moisture level, inflammation of a prosthetic bed. The results proved Corega cream to improve prosthetic bed mucosa condition reducing inflammatory response to polymeric materials of removable dentures basis.

  4. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A partially fabricated denture kit is a device composed of connected preformed teeth that is... with the oral tissues. After the denture base is constructed, the connected preformed teeth...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A partially fabricated denture kit is a device composed of connected preformed teeth that is... with the oral tissues. After the denture base is constructed, the connected preformed teeth...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A partially fabricated denture kit is a device composed of connected preformed teeth that is... with the oral tissues. After the denture base is constructed, the connected preformed teeth...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3600 Partially fabricated denture kit. (a... mold, by partially polymerizing the resin denture base materials while the materials are in contact...

  8. Reinforcement of denture base PMMA with ZrO(2) nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Wang, Xixin; Tang, Qingguo; Guo, Mei; Zhao, Jianling

    2014-04-01

    In the research described, ZrO2 nanotubes were prepared by anodization. The morphologies, crystal structure, etc. were characterised by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). ZrO2 nanotubes were pre-stirred with the denture base PMMA powder by a mechanical blender and mixed with MMA liquid to fabricate reinforced composites. The composites were tested by an electromechanical universal testing machine to study the influences of contents and surface-treatment effect on the reinforcement. The ZrO2 nanoparticles were also investigated for comparative purposes. Results indicated that ZrO2 nanotubes had a better reinforcement effect than ZrO2 nanoparticles, and surface-treatment would lower the reinforcement effect of the ZrO2 nanotubes which itself was significantly different from that of the ZrO2 nanoparticles. The flexural strength of the composite was maximised when 2.0wt% untreated ZrO2 nanotubes were added.

  9. Partial denture-- an ENT surgeon's nightmare.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, M; Sagesh, M

    2012-11-01

    Foreign body oesophagus is one among the common otorhinolaryngology emergencies that we come across. Artificial partial denture impaction in the oesophagus is often an ENT surgeon's nightmare. This study was done in the department of otorhinolaryngology, Government Medical College Kozhikode for a period of 2 years. All patients presented with history of accidental swallowing of partial denture followed by dysphagia. Radiological evaluation was done and subsequently oesophagoscopy and removal of the denture was done. In failed cases exploration and removal of foreign body was required. Complications were found in partial denture with metal wire clasps. It is better to avoid using malfitting dentures with small base, those with metal wire clasps and be cautious of using dentures in alcoholics and unconscious patients.

  10. Chemical Methods for Cleaning Conventional Dentures: What is the Best Antimicrobial Option? An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Pires, Carine W; Fraga, Sara; Beck, Aline C O; Braun, Kátia O; Peres, Paulo E C

    To investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of different chemical agents used for denture cleaning. Biofilm samples collected from 10 removable dentures were subjected to 10 disinfection protocols: distilled water for 30 min (negative control); 1% sodium hypochlorite for 10 min (positive control); diluted sodium hypochlorite for 10 min; vinegar for 20 min; 0.2% peracetic acid for 5 min; alkaline peroxide solution for 5 min; alkaline peroxide solution for 30 min; 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate for 10 min; 0.05% sodium salicylate solution for 10 min; and enzymatic detergent for 2 min. Each of the samples was plated on petri dishes with Mueller-Hinton agar. The numbers of microbial colonies after 48 h at 37°C were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests (α = 0.05). Diluted sodium hypochlorite, vinegar, and chlorhexidine digluconate inhibited bacterial growth, with an effect similar to that of 1% sodium hypochlorite. The 0.2% peracetic acid and 0.05% sodium salicylate solutions were ineffective against bacterial growth, while enzymatic detergent and alkaline peroxide achieved an intermediate effect. Diluted sodium hypochlorite, vinegar, and chlorhexidine digluconate can be considered adequate products for cleaning dentures due to their potential for inhibiting bacterial growth, similar to 1% sodium hypochlorite. However, the effect of these chemical agents on acrylic resin (polymethylmethacrylate) denture base materials needs to be examined to provide complete information about their clinical indication.

  11. Effect of immersion cleansing in color stability and hardness of soft denture reliners.

    PubMed

    Niarchou, Artemis; Ntala, Polyxeni; Pantopoulos, Antonis; Polyzois, Gregory; Frangou, Mary

    2012-03-01

    Hygienic care of removable prostheses is important, and denture cleansers selected must be efficient and maintain the physicomechanical properties of soft reliners. Microwave energy has been reported to increase the sanitation effectiveness of denture cleansers. The purpose of the study was to evaluate hardness and color stability of some visible light polymerized and autopolymerized soft reliners after exposure in different denture-cleansing treatments. Six soft denture reliners (2 autopolymerized silicones, 1 autopolymerized acrylic, and 3 visible light polymerized ones) were exposed to 4 cleansing treatments (Corega Whitening, Polident 5-Minute, Corega Whitening + microwaving, Polident 5-Minute + microwaving). Hardness was measured with a Shore A durometer, and color changes were evaluated by a tristimulus colorimeter. The results were subjected to 2-way analysis of variance and Scheffé test for post hoc comparisons at a confidence level of α = 0.05. Sofreliner showed the smallest hardness change, and LightLiner the greatest. Versasoft and Sofreliner seem to have the lowest color change for every cleansing treatment examined, whereas LightLiner and Eversoft presented the greatest. Silicone-based materials demonstrated the smallest changes in both hardness and color, either when using water or with any of the other cleansing treatments.

  12. What Are Dentures?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know About Puberty Train Your Temper What Are Dentures? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Are Dentures? Print A A A en español ¿Qué son ... to be pulled — an older person might need dentures (say: DEN-churs). Dentures are a set of ...

  13. Cumulative effect of microwave sterilization on the physical properties of microwave polymerized and conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    Shafeeq, S. Mohammed; Karthikeyan, S.; Reddy, Subash M.; Karthigeyan, Suma; Manikandan, R.; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate and compare the flexural strength and impact strength of conventional and microwave cured denture base resins before and after repeated sterilization using microwave energy to consider microwave curing as an alternative to the conventional method of sterilization. Materials and Methods: The conventional heat cure acrylic resin (DPI heat cure material) Group A and microwave-polymerized acrylic resin (Vipi Wave Acrylic resin) Group B were used to fabricate 100 acrylic resins samples using a standard metal die of (86 mm × 11 mm × 3 mm) dimensions. The criterion was flexural strength and impact strength testing which had Group A and Group B samples; 50 samples for flexural strength and 50 samples for impact strength measurement. For each criterion, five control samples were taken for Group A and Group B. The samples were stored in water before experimenting. The test samples were subject to four cycles of microwave sterilization; followed by flexural strength testing with a 3-point flexural test in universal testing machine (UNITEK 94100) and impact strength testing with impact testing machine (ENKAY Pr09/E1/16). Results: The physical properties had significant changes for conventionally cured denture base resins, whereas no changes found for microwave-cured resins after repeated sterilization cycles. PMID:27829757

  14. Double-Layer Surface Modification of Polyamide Denture Base Material by Functionalized Sol-Gel Based Silica for Adhesion Improvement.

    PubMed

    Hafezeqoran, Ali; Koodaryan, Roodabeh

    2017-09-21

    Limited surface treatments have been proposed to improve the bond strength between autopolymerizing resin and polyamide denture base materials. Still, the bond strength of autopolymerizing resins to nylon polymer is not strong enough to repair the fractured denture effectively. This study aimed to introduce a novel method to improve the adhesion of autopolymerizing resin to polyamide polymer by a double layer deposition of sol-gel silica and N-2-(aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AE-APTMS). The silica sol was synthesized by acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as silica precursors. Polyamide specimens were dipped in TEOS-derived sol (TS group, n = 28), and exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light under O2 flow for 30 minutes. UV-treated specimens were immersed in AE-APTMS solution and left for 24 hours at room temperature. The other specimens were either immersed in AE-APTMS solution (AP group, n = 28) or left untreated (NT group, n = 28). Surface characterization was investigated by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two autopolymerizing resins (subgroups G and T, n = 14) were bonded to the specimens, thermocycled, and then tested for shear bond strength with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD (α = 0.05). FTIR spectra of treated surfaces confirmed the chemical modification and appearance of functional groups on the polymer. One-way ANOVA revealed significant differences in shear bond strength among the study groups. Tukey's HSD showed that TST and TSG groups had significantly higher shear bond strength than control groups (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Moreover, bond strength values of APT were statistically significant compared to controls (p = 0.017). Amino functionalized TEOS-derived silica coating is a simple and cost-effective method for improving the bond strength between the autopolymerizing resin and polyamide denture

  15. Precision synthesis of bio-based acrylic thermoplastic elastomer by RAFT polymerization of itaconic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kotaro; Lee, Dong-Hyung; Nagai, Kanji; Kamigaito, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Bio-based polymer materials from renewable resources have recently become a growing research focus. Herein, a novel thermoplastic elastomer is developed via controlled/living radical polymerization of plant-derived itaconic acid derivatives, which are some of the most abundant renewable acrylic monomers obtained via the fermentation of starch. The reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerizations of itaconic acid imides, such as N-phenylitaconimide and N-(p-tolyl)itaconimide, and itaconic acid esters, such as di-n-butyl itaconate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) itaconate, are examined using a series of RAFT agents to afford well-defined polymers. The number-average molecular weights of these polymers increase with the monomer conversion while retaining relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. Based on the successful controlled/living polymerization, sequential block copolymerization is subsequently investigated using mono- and di-functional RAFT agents to produce block copolymers with soft poly(itaconate) and hard poly(itaconimide) segments. The properties of the obtained triblock copolymer are evaluated as bio-based acrylic thermoplastic elastomers. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Matrix normalized MALDI-TOF quantification of a fluorotelomer-based acrylate polymer.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Keegan; Mabury, Scott A

    2015-05-19

    The degradation of fluorotelomer-based acrylate polymers (FTACPs) has been hypothesized to serve as a source of the environmental contaminants, perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs). Studies have relied on indirect measurement of presumed degradation products to evaluate the environmental fate of FTACPs; however, this approach leaves a degree of uncertainty. The present study describes the development of a quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry method as the first direct analysis method for FTACPs. The model FTACP used in this study was poly(8:2 FTAC-co-HDA), a copolymer of 8:2 fluorotelomer acrylate (8:2 FTAC) and hexadecyl acrylate (HDA). Instead of relying on an internal standard polymer, the intensities of 40 poly(8:2 FTAC-co-HDA) signals (911-4612 Da) were normalized to the signal intensity of a matrix-sodium cluster (659 Da). We termed this value the normalized polymer response (P(N)). By using the same dithranol solution for the sample preparation of poly(8:2 FTAC-co-HDA) standards, calibration curves with coefficient of determinations (R(2)) typically >0.98 were produced. When poly(8:2 FTAC-co-HDA) samples were prepared with the same dithranol solution as the poly(8:2 FTAC-co-HDA) standards, quantification to within 25% of the theoretical concentration was achieved. This approach minimized the sample-to-sample variability that typically plagues MALDI-TOF, and is the first method developed to directly quantify FTACPs.

  17. Clinical performance and failures of zirconia-based fixed partial dentures: a review literature

    PubMed Central

    Triwatana, Premwara; Nagaviroj, Noppavan

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Zirconia has been used in clinical dentistry for approximately a decade, and there have been several reports regarding the clinical performance and survival rates of zirconia-based restorations. The aim of this article was to review the literatures published from 2000 to 2010 regarding the clinical performance and the causes of failure of zirconia fixed partial dentures (FPDs). MATERIALS AND METHODS An electronic search of English peer-reviewed dental literatures was performed through PubMed to obtain all the clinical studies focused on the performance of the zirconia FPDs. The electronic search was supplemented by manual searching through the references of the selected articles for possible inclusion of some articles. Randomized controlled clinical trials, longitudinal prospective and retrospective cohort studies were the focuses of this review. Articles that did not focus on the restoration of teeth using zirconia-based restorations were excluded from this review. RESULTS There have been three studies for the study of zirconia single crowns. The clinical outcome was satisfactory (acceptable) according to the CDA evaluation. There have been 14 studies for the study of zirconia FPDs. The survival rates of zirconia anterior and posterior FPDs ranged between 73.9% - 100% after 2 - 5 years. The causes of failure were veneer fracture, ceramic core fracture, abutment tooth fracture, secondary caries, and restoration dislodgment. CONCLUSION The overall performance of zirconia FPDs was satisfactory according to either USPHS criteria or CDA evaluations. Fracture resistance of core and veneering ceramics, bonding between core and veneering materials, and marginal discrepancy of zirconia-based restorations were discussed as the causes of failure. Because of its repeated occurrence in many studies, future researches are essentially required to clarify this problem and to reduce the fracture incident. PMID:22737311

  18. Water Sorption and Flexural Strength of Thermoplastic and Conventional Heat-Polymerized Acrylic Resins.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Mohammad Ali; Vafaee, Fariborz; Allahbakhshi, Hanif

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare the water sorption and flexural strength of thermoplastic and conventional acrylic resins. Water sorption and flexural strength were compared between a thermoplastic modified polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin (group A) and a heat-polymerized PMMA acrylic resin (group B) as the control group (n=10). A three-point bending test was carried out for flexural strength testing. For water sorption test, 10 disc-shaped samples were prepared. After desiccating, the samples were weighed and immersed in distilled water for seven days. Then, they were weighed again, and desiccated for the second and third times. Differences between the mean values in the two groups were analyzed using Student's t-test. The mean value of water sorption was 14.74±1.36 μg/mm(3) in group A, and 19.11±0.90 μg/mm(3) in group B; this difference was statistically significant (P< 0.001). The mean value of flexural strength was 88.21±8.63 MPa in group A and 77.77±9.49 MPa in group B. A significant difference was observed between the two groups (P= 0.019). Flexural strength of group A was significantly higher than that of group B, and its water sorption was significantly lower. Thus, thermoplastic resins can be a suitable alternative to conventional PMMA acrylic resins as denture base materials.

  19. Effect of deep-freezing on some properties of acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Isik, Gul; Harrison, Alan

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of freezing the acrylic resin polymer/monomer dough mix on a range of properties of the polymerized denture base material. Powder and liquid of acrylic resin were mixed and at the dough stage transferred to a deep freezer and frozen for periods of 24 h, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. At the end of the storage time, sufficient dough was removed, thawed, packed, and polymerized, and specimens were prepared from the polymerized plates. A control series was prepared from dough which had followed conventional mixing and packing procedures without freezing. The strength properties, hardness, and flash thickness were examined. Statistical analysis was carried out using ANOVA (one-way and two-way) with multiple range tests. The flexural strength was significantly (p=0.03) increased and the impact strength, hardness, and flash thickness were not affected by freezing the material during the dough stage. The flexural modulus was significantly (p=0.0001) reduced when the storage time in the freezer was increased to 3 months. Six months' frozen material proved to be unpackable. It was concluded that the acrylic resin polymer/monomer dough mix can be stored in the freezer for up to 1 month without any statistically significant effect on the properties of the polymerized denture base material.

  20. Comparative evaluation of tensile bond strength of silicone-based denture liners after thermocycling and surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harsimran; Datta, Kusum

    2015-01-01

    To examine, evaluate, and compare the tensile bond strength of two silicone-based liners; one autopolymerizing and one heat cured, when treated with different chemical etchants to improve their adhesion with denture base resin. Hundred and sixty test specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) were fabricated; out of which 80 specimens were tested for tensile bond strength after bonding it to autopolymerizing resilient liner (Ufigel P) and rest 80 to heat-cured resilient liner (Molloplast B). Each main group was further divided into four subgroups of 20 specimens each, one to act as a control and three were subjected to surface treatment with different chemical etchants namely dichloromethane, MMA monomer, and chloroform. The two silicone-based denture liners were processed between 2 PMMA specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 40 mm) in the space provided by a spacer of 3 mm, thermocycled (5-55°C) for 500 cycles, and then their tensile strength measurements were done in the universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA technique showed a highly significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength values for all the groups. The Student's t-test computed values of statistics for the compared groups were greater than the critical values both at 5% and at 1% levels. Surface treatment of denture base resin with chemical etchants prior to the application of silicone-based liner (Ufigel P and Molloplast-B) increased the tensile bond strength. The increase was the highest with specimens subjected to 180 s of MMA surface treatment and the lowest with control group specimens.

  1. The effect of acrylic latex-based polymer on cow blood adhesive resins for wood composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Lin, H. L.; Feng, G. Z.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, alkali-modified cow blood adhesive (BA) and blood adhesive/acrylic latex-based adhesive (BA/ALB) were prepared. The physicochemical and adhesion properties of cow blood adhesive such as UV- visible spectra, particle size, viscosity were evaluated; share strength, water resistance were tested. UV- visible spectra indicates that the strong bonding strength of BA/ALB appeared after incorporating; the particle size of adhesive decreased with the increase of ALB concentration, by mixing ALB and BA, hydrophilic polymer tends locate or extand the protein chains and provide stability of the particles; viscosity decreased as shear rate increased in concordance with a pseudoplastic behavior; both at dry and soak conditions, BA and ALB/BA show significant difference changes when mass fraction of ALB in blend adhesive was over 30% (p < 0.05). ALB/ BA (ALB30%) is not significant different than that of phenol formaldehyde which was used as control. A combination of cow blood and acrylic latex-based adhesive significantly increased the strength and water resistance of the resulting wood.

  2. A Biosensor for Urea from Succinimide-Modified Acrylic Microspheres Based on Reflectance Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Ulianas, Alizar; Heng, Lee Yook; Ahmad, Musa

    2011-01-01

    New acrylic microspheres were synthesised by photopolymerisation where the succinimide functional group was incorporated during the microsphere preparation. An optical biosensor for urea based on reflectance transduction with a large linear response range to urea was successfully developed using this material. The biosensor utilized succinimide-modified acrylic microspheres immobilized with a Nile blue chromoionophore (ETH 5294) for optical detection and urease enzyme was immobilized on the surface of the microspheres via the succinimide groups. No leaching of the enzyme or chromoionophore was observed. Hydrolysis of the urea by urease changes the pH and leads to a color change of the immobilized chromoionophore. When the color change was monitored by reflectance spectrophotometry, the linear response range of the biosensor to urea was from 0.01 to 1,000 mM (R2 = 0.97) with a limit of detection of 9.97 μM. The biosensor response showed good reproducibility (relative standard deviation = 1.43%, n = 5) with no interference by major cations such as Na+, K+, NH4+ and Mg2+. The use of reflectance as a transduction method led to a large linear response range that is better than that of many urea biosensors based on other optical transduction methods. PMID:22164078

  3. A biosensor for urea from succinimide-modified acrylic microspheres based on reflectance transduction.

    PubMed

    Ulianas, Alizar; Heng, Lee Yook; Ahmad, Musa

    2011-01-01

    New acrylic microspheres were synthesised by photopolymerisation where the succinimide functional group was incorporated during the microsphere preparation. An optical biosensor for urea based on reflectance transduction with a large linear response range to urea was successfully developed using this material. The biosensor utilized succinimide-modified acrylic microspheres immobilized with a Nile blue chromoionophore (ETH 5294) for optical detection and urease enzyme was immobilized on the surface of the microspheres via the succinimide groups. No leaching of the enzyme or chromoionophore was observed. Hydrolysis of the urea by urease changes the pH and leads to a color change of the immobilized chromoionophore. When the color change was monitored by reflectance spectrophotometry, the linear response range of the biosensor to urea was from 0.01 to 1,000 mM (R2 = 0.97) with a limit of detection of 9.97 μM. The biosensor response showed good reproducibility (relative standard deviation = 1.43%, n = 5) with no interference by major cations such as Na+, K+, NH4+ and Mg2+. The use of reflectance as a transduction method led to a large linear response range that is better than that of many urea biosensors based on other optical transduction methods.

  4. Ionic Liquids as Catalysts for the Radical Acrylate Polymerization Co-initiated by Imine Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polenz, I.; Spange, S.

    2014-08-01

    The catalysis of the imine base acrylate (IBA) polymerization by Ionic Liquids (ILs) is reported. Addition of IL traces (~10-50 mM) to an imine base / acrylate mixture leads to both a significant decrease of the activation temperature (40 °C) required for the IBA polymerization process and an increase in the polymerization rate by a factor of 5-40 depending on the IL species. The radical character of the polymerization is proved by copolymerization experiments using methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylonitrile (MAN) and comparison with literature known values of copolymerization parameters rMMA and rMAN of these co-monomers. The influence of the IL on the polymerization kinetics is quantified by the polymerization rate law; the order referring to the IL is 1 indicating its crucial impact on the monomer activation. The IBA activation properties are strongly dependent on the IL interaction strengths with the IBA components verified by the KAMELT-TAFT hydrogen bond donating ability α. The stronger the interaction (higher α) is, the less the IBA polymerization activation. The temperature dependence of four different IL catalysed IBA polymerization is investigated, allows a classification and anomalous non-ARRHENIUS regimes are discussed. Activation energies EA,P span over 20 and 50 kJ·mol-1, which is between the values of thermal- (~80 kJ·mol-1) and photo-initiation (~20 kJ·mol-1).

  5. Survey on use of titanium dentures in Tsurumi University Dental Hospital for 11 years.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yasuko; Takishin, Norio; Tsuchida, Fujio; Hosoi, Toshio

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the production of titanium dentures in Tsurumi University Dental Hospital and to study the actual use of titanium dentures in our university. The survey was based on the metal base dentures produced at Tsurumi University Dental Hospital during an 11-year period between April 1995 and March 2006, with relation to the types of metals used in the dentures, types of dentures, dental condition, and the number of artificial teeth. 1871 metal base dentures were produced in the study period. The dentures consisted of 1290 cobalt-chromium alloy dentures (68.9%), 350 titanium dentures (18.7%) and 231 platinum-added gold alloy dentures (12.3%). Within the titanium denture groups, 132 were complete dentures (37.7%), 55 were complete overdentures (15.7%) and 163 were removable partial dentures (46.6%). JIS type 3 pure titanium was used in the titanium base of 252 dentures (72.0%). The average number of artificial teeth was 10.9, which was the highest among the three types of metal bases, exhibiting significant differences (P<0.01). Approximately 32 titanium dentures per year on average were delivered at our university and they were applied to almost edentulous arch compared with the other metal base dentures.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3540 - OTC denture cushion or pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false OTC denture cushion or pad. 872.3540 Section 872.3540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... patient applies to the base or inner surface of a denture before inserting the denture into the mouth....

  7. Reinforcement of a mandibular complete denture with internal metal framework.

    PubMed

    Balch, J Heath; Smith, Pamela D; Marin, Mark A; Cagna, David R

    2013-03-01

    Metal framework reinforcement is used in complete dentures to improve the fracture resistance, dimensional stability, accuracy, weight, and retention of a definitive prosthesis. A novel technique for suspending a metal framework within the denture base of mandibular complete dentures is described.

  8. The effect of bur preparation on the surface roughness and reline bond strength of urethane dimethacrylate denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza Rustum; Ariff, Fazrina T M; Yunus, Norsiah

    2011-01-01

    The clinical success of relining depends on the ability of reline resin to bond to denture base. Surface preparations may influence reline bond strength of urethane-based dimethacrylate denture base resin. To investigate the effect of bur preparation on the surface roughness (R a ) of eclipse denture base resin and its shear bond strength (SBS) to an intra-oral self-curing reline material. The mode of reline bonding failure was also examined. Twenty-four cylindrical Eclipse™ specimens were prepared and separated into three groups of eight specimens each. Two groups were subjected to mechanical preparation using standard and fine tungsten carbide (TC) burs and the third group (control) was left unprepared. The R a of all specimens was measured using a contact stylus profilometer. Subsequently, relining was done on the prepared surface and SBS testing was carried out a day later using a universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA revealed significant differences (P<0.05) in R a and SBS values for all the groups. Post-hoc Tukey's HSD test showed significant differences (P<0.05) between all the groups in the R a values. For SBS also there were significant differences (P<0.05), except between standard bur and control. 1) There was a statistically significant difference in the R a of Eclipse™ specimens prepared using different carbide burs (P<0.05). 2) There was a statistically significant difference in the relined SBS (P<0.05) when prepared using different burs, but the difference between the standard bur and the control group was not statistically significant.

  9. Soft denture liners' effect on the masticatory function in patients wearing complete dentures: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Palla, Eleni Sotiria; Karaoglani, Eleni; Naka, Olga; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki

    2015-12-01

    To explore the effect of soft denture liners on the masticatory performance and muscle activity of edentulous patients wearing complete dentures, as determined by using objective measurement methods. Randomized controlled clinical trials and Cross-over studies that evaluated the masticatory capacity and muscle activity in denture wearers with and without soft denture liners were included in this systematic review. A comprehensive literature search was performed via electronic databases using the appropriate key words. The last search took place in September 2014. The potentially appropriate articles were identified and evaluated for eligibility through a predefined review process conducted by two examiners. Six out of the 176 identified records were included for quality and systematic assessment. The observed clinical and methodological diversity determined the narrative approach for the pooling of the findings. According to the studies brought together for the current systematic review, soft denture liners provided denture wearers with increased masticatory function compared to conventional denture base materials. Specifically, the use of long-term silicone liners significantly improved the mastication parameters. The observed intervention effects suggest further studies of higher quality to allow reliable conclusions to be drawn and to strengthen the clinical significance of these materials to patient's functionality. Soft denture lining materials have been suggested to address functional problems arising during complete denture function. This study was designed to systematically review the impact of soft liners' use on the masticatory efficiency in denture wearers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bond strength of poly(methyl methacrylate) denture base material to cast titanium and cobalt-chromium alloy.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Yanagida, Hiroaki; Ide, Takako; Matsumura, Hideo; Tanoue, Naomi

    2010-06-01

    The shear bond strength of an auto-polymerizing poly(methyl methacrylate) denture base resin material to cast titanium and cobalt-chromium alloy treated with six conditioning methods was investigated. Disk specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in thickness) were cast from pure titanium and cobalt-chromium alloy. The specimens were wet ground to a final surface finish of 600 grit, air dried, and treated with the following bonding systems: 1) air abraded with 50-70-microm-grain alumina (SAN); 2) air abraded with 50-70-microm-grain alumina + conditioned with Alloy Primer (ALP); 3) air abraded with 50-70-microm-grain alumina + conditioned with AZ Primer (AZP); 4) air abraded with 50-70-microm-grain alumina + conditioned with Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP); 5) air abraded with 50-70-microm-grain alumina + conditioned with Metal Link Primer (MLP), and 6) treated with ROCATEC system (ROC). A denture base material (Palapress Vario) was then applied to each metal specimen. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after 10,000 thermocycles. The strengths decreased after thermocycling in all combinations. Among the treatment methods assessed, groups 2 and 4 showed significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced shear bond strengths for both metals. In group 4, the strength in MPa (n = 7) after thermocycling for cobalt-chromium alloy was 38.3, which was statistically (p < 0.05) higher than that for cast titanium (34.7). Air abrasion followed by the application of two primers containing a hydrophobic phosphate monomer (MDP) effectively improved the strength of the bond of denture base material to cast titanium and cobalt-chromium alloy.

  11. The effect of poly(methyl methacrylate) surface treatments on the adhesion of silicone-based resilient denture liners.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Bertolini, Martinna Mendonça; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel; da Silva, Wander José

    2014-12-01

    Different surface treatment protocols of poly(methyl methacrylate) have been proposed to improve the adhesion of silicone-based resilient denture liners to poly(methyl methacrylate) surfaces. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different poly(methyl methacrylate) surface treatments on the adhesion of silicone-based resilient denture liners. Poly(methyl methacrylate) specimens were prepared and divided into 4 treatment groups: no treatment (control), methyl methacrylate for 180 seconds, acetone for 30 seconds, and ethyl acetate for 60 seconds. Poly(methyl methacrylate) disks (30.0 × 5.0 mm; n = 10) were evaluated regarding surface roughness and surface free energy. To evaluate tensile bond strength, the resilient material was applied between 2 treated poly(methyl methacrylate) bars (60.0 × 5.0 × 5.0 mm; n = 20 for each group) to form a 2-mm-thick layer. Data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the Tukey honestly significant difference tests (α = .05). A Pearson correlation test verified the influence of surface properties on tensile bond strength. Failure type was assessed, and the poly(methyl methacrylate) surface treatment modifications were visualized with scanning electron microscopy. The surface roughness was increased (P < .05) by methyl methacrylate treatment. For the acetone and ethyl acetate groups, the surface free energy decreased (P < .05). The tensile bond strength was higher for the methyl methacrylate and ethyl acetate groups (P < .05). No correlation was found regarding surface properties and tensile bond strength. Specimens treated with acetone and methyl methacrylate presented a cleaner surface, whereas the ethyl acetate treatment produced a porous topography. The methyl methacrylate and ethyl acetate surface treatment protocols improved the adhesion of a silicone-based resilient denture liner to poly(methyl methacrylate). Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc