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Sample records for acrylic dielectric elastomer

  1. Inhibiting electro-thermal breakdown of acrylic dielectric elastomer actuators by dielectric gel coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Thanh-Giang; Lau, Gih-Keong

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) is very localized; a spark and a pinhole (puncture) in dielectric ends up with short-circuit. This letter shows that prevention of electrothermal breakdown helps defer failure of DEAs even with conductive-grease electrodes. Dielectric gel encapsulation or coating (Dow Corning 3-4170) helps protect acrylic elastomer (VHB 4905), making it thermally more stable and delaying its thermal oxidation (burn) from 218 °C to 300 °C. Dielectric-gel-coated acrylic DEAs can withstand higher local leak-induced heating and thus achieve higher dielectric strengths than non-coated DEAs do.

  2. Stronger multilayer acrylic dielectric elastomer actuators with silicone gel coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Gih-Keong; La, Thanh-Giang; Sheng-Wei Foong, Ervin; Shrestha, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Multilayer dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) perform worst off than single-layer DEAs due to higher susceptibility to electro-thermal breakdown. This paper presents a hot-spot model to predict the electro-thermal breakdown field of DEAs and its dependence on thermal insulation. To inhibit the electrothermal breakdown, silicone gel coating was applied as barrier coating to multilayer acrylic DEA. The gel coating helps suppress the electro-thermally induced puncturing of DEA membrane at the hot spot. As a result, the gel-coated DEAs, in either a single layer or a multilayer stack, can produce 30% more isometric stress change as compared to those none-coated. These gel-coated acrylic DEAs show great potential to make stronger artificial muscles.

  3. Dissipation factor of acrylic dielectric elastomer--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Raj Kumar; Pramanik, Bipul; Patra, Karali; Bhaumik, Shovan; Pandey, Arvind Kumar; Setua, Dipak Kumar

    2014-10-01

    This paper studies the effects of frequency, pre-strain and electrode types on the dielectric property of a commercially available and most widely used acrylic elastomer, VHB 4910. The acrylic VHB film is pre-stretched in biaxial directions with the help of an in-house developed biaxial stretching device. The stretched film has been sandwiched between two card board frames to prepare samples of different pre-stretch values. Three different types of electrodes namely copper tape, silver grease and carbon grease have been pasted on the both sides of prestretched samples. Dissipation factor of pre-stretched and electrode adhered VHB sample has been experimentally determined at different frequency (upto 1 MHz) of input voltage using a LCR meter. Experimental results on the variation of dissipation factor with pre-straining, frequency (low to high) and electrode types are reported. The dissipation factor value is further used to estimate electrical efficiency at different biaxial pre-straining, frequency and electrode types.

  4. Enhanced dielectric strength and actuation of acrylic elastomer with silicone gel encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Thanh-Giang; Lau, Gih-Keong

    2016-04-01

    Use of dielectric gel encapsulation is reported to make acrylic elastomer (VHB 4905) electrically stronger. Acrylic dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) with silicone gel encapsulation can sustain an electrical breakdown field of up to 532MV/m, higher than 315MV/m of non-coated ones. Hence, its ultimate areal strain of 228% is larger than 189% of latter. This enhanced dielectric strength and actuation is attributed to the delayed electrothermal breakdown of VHB with silicone gel encapsulant that bars oxygen supply in air.

  5. Synthesis and electromechanical characterization of a new acrylic dielectric elastomer with high actuation strain and dielectric strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wei; Niu, Xiaofan; Yang, Xinguo; Zhang, Naifang; Pei, Qibing

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomers (DEs) can be actuated under high electric field to produce large strains. Most high-performing DE materials such as the 3M™ VHB™ membranes are commercial products designed for industrial pressure-sensitive adhesives. The limited knowledge of the exact chemical structures of these commercial materials has made it difficult to understand the relationship between molecular structures and electromechanical properties. In this work, new acrylic elastomers based on n-butyl acrylate and acrylic acid were synthesized from monomer solutions by UV-initiated bulk polymerization. The new acrylic copolymers have a potential to obtain high dielectric constant, actuation strain, dielectric strength, and a high energy density. Silicone and ester oligomer diacrylates were also added onto the copolymer structures to suppress crystallization and to crosslink the polymer chains. Four acrylic formulations were developed with different amounts of acrylic acid. This gives a tunable stiffness, while the dielectric constant is varied from 4.3 to 7.1. The figure-of-merit performance of the best formulation is 186 % area strain, 222 MV/m of dielectric strength, and 2.7 MJ/m3 of energy density. To overcome electromechanical instability, different prestrain ratios were investigated, and under the optimized prestrain, the material has a lifetime of thousands of cycles at 120 % area strain.

  6. Measurement of insulating and dielectric properties of acrylic elastomer membranes at high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lillo, L.; Schmidt, A.; Carnelli, D. A.; Ermanni, P.; Kovacs, G.; Mazza, E.; Bergamini, A.

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on the investigation of VHB 4910 acrylic elastomer insulating and dielectric properties. This material is widely exploited for the realization of actuators with large deformations, dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA), and belongs to the group of so-called electroactive polymers (EAP). Extensive investigations concerning its mechanical properties are available in literature while its electric behavior at working conditions has not received the same level of attention. In this work, the relative permittivity and the volume resistivity have been measured on VHB 4910 membranes under different fixed stretch conditions (λ1, λ2 = 3, 3.6, 4, 5) using circular gold electrodes sputtered onto both sides of the specimens. The measured values of relative permittivity are in fairly good agreement with the results previously published by other groups. The volume resistivity, at field values close to the operational ones, has shown a field-dependent behavior revealing dissipative properties that should be considered in real applications. Further, measurements on circular actuators verify these findings. Consequences for modeling of VHB 4910 are drawn and new material model parameters proposed to account for the value of relative permittivity at high electric fields.

  7. Flexible, stretchable electroadhesives based on acrylic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duduta, Mihai; Wood, Robert J.; Clarke, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Controllable adhesion is a requirement for a wide variety of applications including robotic manipulation, as well as locomotion including walking, crawling and perching. Electroadhesives have several advantages such as reversibility, low power consumption and controllability based on applied voltage. Most demonstrations of electroadhesive devices rely on fairly rigid materials, which cannot be stretched reversibly, as needed in some applications. We have developed a fast and reliable method for building soft, stretchable electroadhesive pads based on acrylic elastomers and electrodes made of carbon nanotubes. The devices produced were tested pre-deformation and in a stretched configuration. The adhesive force was determined to be in the 0.1 - 3.0 N/cm2 range, depending on the adhering surface. The electroadhesive devices were integrated with pre-stretched dielectric elastomer actuators to create a device in which the adhesion force could be tuned by changes in either the applied voltage or total area.

  8. Performance of dielectric elastomer actuators and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Kofod, Guggi; Shridhar, M. H.; Benslimane, Mohammed; Gravesen, Peter

    2002-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators performance depends on their construction and the way they are driven. We describe the governing equations for the dynamic performance of actuators and show examples of their use. Both the properties of the base elastomer material and the compliant electrodes influence the actuators performance. The mechanical and electrical properties of elastomers are discussed with a focus on an acrylate pressure sensitive adhesive from 3M, which is used by a number of groups. The influence of these properties on the actuator properties is analyzed.

  9. Model of dissipative dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang Foo, Choon; Cai, Shengqiang; Jin Adrian Koh, Soo; Bauer, Siegfried; Suo, Zhigang

    2012-02-01

    The dynamic performance of dielectric elastomer transducers and their capability of electromechanical energy conversion are affected by dissipative processes, such as viscoelasticity, dielectric relaxation, and current leakage. This paper describes a method to construct a model of dissipative dielectric elastomers on the basis of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. We characterize the state of the dielectric elastomer with kinematic variables through which external loads do work, and internal variables that measure the progress of the dissipative processes. The method is illustrated with examples motivated by existing experiments of polyacrylate very-high-bond dielectric elastomers. This model predicts the dynamic response of the dielectric elastomer and the leakage current behavior. We show that current leakage can be significant under large deformation and for long durations. Furthermore, current leakage can result in significant hysteresis for dielectric elastomers under cyclic voltage.

  10. Artificial muscles based on synthetic dielectric elastomers.

    PubMed

    Pei, Qibing

    2009-01-01

    Acrylic copolymers, silicone, and thermoplastic block copolymers have been investigated as artificial muscles. These dielectric elastomers exhibit high actuation strain, pressure, and specific energy density when a high driving voltage is applied across the thin polymer films. I will discuss the chemical and processing aspects that are critical to achieving high actuation performance. One successful example is the highly prestrained acrylic elastomer. We have developed interpenetrating polymer networks (IPN) in which the acrylic network is under high tension balanced by the compression of an additive network were investigated to further enhanced actuation performance. The IPN films at zero or nominal prestrain showed up to 300% actuation strain. The calculated values of maximum actuation energy density and electromechanical coupling factor are 3.5 J/g and 93.7%, respectively. Important actuators enabled by the IPN films and prestrained acrylic films will also be presented.

  11. Folded dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Salaris, Claudio; DeRossi, Danilo

    2007-04-01

    Polymer-based linear actuators with contractile ability are currently demanded for several types of applications. Within the class of dielectric elastomer actuators, two basic configurations are available today for such a purpose: the multi-layer stack and the helical structure. The first consists of several layers of elementary planar actuators stacked in series mechanically and parallel electrically. The second configuration relies on a couple of helical compliant electrodes alternated with a couple of helical dielectrics. The fabrication of both these configurations presents some specific drawbacks today, arising from the peculiarity of each structure. Accordingly, the availability of simpler solutions may boost the short-term use of contractile actuators in practical applications. For this purpose, a new configuration is here described. It consists of a monolithic structure made of an electroded sheet, which is folded up and compacted. The resulting device is functionally equivalent to a multi-layer stack with interdigitated electrodes. However, with respect to a stack the new configuration is advantageously not discontinuous and can be manufactured in one single phase, avoiding layer-by-layer multi-step procedures. The development and preliminary testing of prototype samples of this new actuator made of a silicone elastomer are presented here.

  12. Asymmetric Dielectric Elastomer Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a dielectric elastomer composite material comprising a plurality of elastomer-coated electrodes arranged in an assembly. Embodiments of the invention provide improved force output over prior DEs by producing thinner spacing between electrode surfaces. This is accomplished by coating electrodes directly with uncured elastomer in liquid form and then assembling a finished component (which may be termed an actuator) from coated electrode components.

  13. Elastomer dielectric for pulse power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradely, L. P.; Orham, E. L.; Stowers, I. F.; Braucht, J. R.

    1980-05-01

    Selected elastomer dielectrics are characterized as high voltage insulators for use in pulse power systems. Silicone, ethylene propylene rubber and polyurethene were tested, but most of the data is for silicone. The particular power system developed uses a formed silicone insulator 76 cm in dia. and 3 mm thick as the major insulator between capacitors, railgap switches, load, and return conductor. The capacitor array is dc charged to 50 kv. The use of an elastomer dielectric made possible the construction of a pulser one order of magnitude smaller than previously constructed pulsers having the same current characteristics. Also, use of the elastomer dielectrics in pulse powr systems leads to improved production techniques and system reliability.

  14. Dielectric elastomer actuators with granular coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; Nanni, Massimo; De Rossi, Danilo

    2011-04-01

    So-called 'hydrostatically coupled' dielectric elastomer actuators (HC-DEAs) have recently been shown to offer new opportunities for actuation devices made of electrically responsive elastomeric insulators. HC-DEAs include an incompressible fluid that mechanically couples a dielectric elastomer based active part to a passive part interfaced to the load, so as to enable hydrostatic transmission. Drawing inspiration from that concept, this paper presents a new kind of actuators, analogous to HC-DEAs, except for the fact that the fluid is replaced by fine powder. The related technology, here referred to as 'granularly coupled' DEAs (GC-DEAs), relies entirely on solid-state materials. This permits to avoid drawbacks (such as handling and leakage) inherent to usage of fluids, especially those in liquid phase. The paper presents functionality and actuation performance of bubble-like GC-DEAs, in direct comparison with HC-DEAs. For this purpose, prototype actuators made of two pre-stretched membranes of acrylic elastomer, coupled via talcum powder (for GC-DEA) or silicone grease (for HC-DEA), were manufactured and comparatively tested. As compared to HC-DEAs, GC-DEAs showed a higher maximum stress, the same maximum relative displacement, and nearly the same bandwidth. The paper presents characterization results and discusses advantages and drawbacks of GC-DEAs, in comparison with HC-DEAs.

  15. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  16. Extending applications of dielectric elastomer artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Seiki; Waki, Mikio; Kornbluh, Roy; Pelrine, Ron

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers have demonstrated high energy density and high strains as well as high electromechanical efficiency and fast speeds of response. These properties, combined with their projected low cost make them attractive for a variety of actuator applications including linear actuators, diaphragm pumps, rotary motors, and haptic displays. Dielectric elastomers have also been shown to offer high energy density, high efficiency, and large strains when operated as generators. Dielectric elastomers have reached a stage of development where standardized products can be applied to new applications. In some cases, dielectric elastomer devices are improvements over existing devices. In other cases, however, dielectric elastomers can enable new types of devices that cannot be made with existing technologies, such as new types of loudspeakers and power generating devices. A new dipole loudspeaker system was developed using a commercially available push-pull diaphragm configuration. This same transducer configuration was used to develop a new power generating system. This generator system enables a power generation of 0.06 to 0.12 W by manually displacing the device by 5 to 6 mm once a second. By introducing a voltage step-down conversion circuit, the device was able to power wireless communications, allowing the control of devices separated by a distance of a few meters. These two devices are examples of the new applications that are enabled as the dielectric elastomer technology commercially emerges. Future improvements to dielectric elastomers could enable new capabilities in clean electrical power generation from ocean waves, for example.

  17. The dielectric breakdown limit of silicone dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Davide; Haus, Henry; Matysek, Marc; Frohnapfel, Bettina; Tropea, Cameron; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2014-02-01

    Soft silicone elastomers are used in a generation of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) with improved actuation speed and durability compared to the commonly used, highly viscoelastic polyacrylate 3M VHB™ films. The maximum voltage-induced stretch of DEAs is ultimately limited by their dielectric breakdown field strength. We measure the dependence of dielectric breakdown field strength on thickness and stretch for a silicone elastomer, when voltage-induced deformation is prevented. The experimental results are combined with an analytic model of equi-biaxial actuation to show that accounting for variable dielectric field strength results in different values of optimal pre-stretch and thickness that maximize the DEA actuation.

  18. Standards for dielectric elastomer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Anderson, Iain; Bauer, Siegfried; Frediani, Gabriele; Gallone, Giuseppe; Gei, Massimiliano; Graaf, Christian; Jean-Mistral, Claire; Kaal, William; Kofod, Guggi; Kollosche, Matthias; Kornbluh, Roy; Lassen, Benny; Matysek, Marc; Michel, Silvain; Nowak, Stephan; O'Brien, Benjamin; Pei, Qibing; Pelrine, Ron; Rechenbach, Björn; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2015-10-01

    Dielectric elastomer transducers consist of thin electrically insulating elastomeric membranes coated on both sides with compliant electrodes. They are a promising electromechanically active polymer technology that may be used for actuators, strain sensors, and electrical generators that harvest mechanical energy. The rapid development of this field calls for the first standards, collecting guidelines on how to assess and compare the performance of materials and devices. This paper addresses this need, presenting standardized methods for material characterisation, device testing and performance measurement. These proposed standards are intended to have a general scope and a broad applicability to different material types and device configurations. Nevertheless, they also intentionally exclude some aspects where knowledge and/or consensus in the literature were deemed to be insufficient. This is a sign of a young and vital field, whose research development is expected to benefit from this effort towards standardisation.

  19. A self-healing dielectric elastomer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Stacy; McKay, Thomas G.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators that can provide muscle-like actuation are unable to self-heal like real muscle tissue. This severely limits dielectric elastomer reliability and robustness. This paper describes a way to instill self-healing into the DE by using a two-phase dielectric consisting of an open-cell silicone sponge saturated with silicone oil. When the dielectric is breached, the oil is able to flow back into any void, re-establishing the dielectric structure. The sponge holds the oil in place and provides dimensional stability, while the oil ensures the integrity of the dielectric layer. The operation of this has been demonstrated in a prototype DE actuator that continued to function despite being perforated multiple times with a sharp object.

  20. Dielectric elastomer actuators for facial expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuzhe; Zhu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators have the advantage of mimicking the salient feature of life: movements in response to stimuli. In this paper we explore application of dielectric elastomer actuators to artificial muscles. These artificial muscles can mimic natural masseter to control jaw movements, which are key components in facial expressions especially during talking and singing activities. This paper investigates optimal design of the dielectric elastomer actuator. It is found that the actuator with embedded plastic fibers can avert electromechanical instability and can greatly improve its actuation. Two actuators are then installed in a robotic skull to drive jaw movements, mimicking the masseters in a human jaw. Experiments show that the maximum vertical displacement of the robotic jaw, driven by artificial muscles, is comparable to that of the natural human jaw during speech activities. Theoretical simulations are conducted to analyze the performance of the actuator, which is quantitatively consistent with the experimental observations.

  1. Novel dielectric elastomer structure of soft robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chi; Xie, Yuhan; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Junjie; Jin, Yongbin; Li, Tiefeng

    2015-04-01

    Inspired from the natural invertebrates like worms and starfish, we propose a novel elastomeric smart structure. The smart structure can function as a soft robot. The soft robot is made from a flexible elastomer as the body and driven by dielectric elastomer as the muscle. Finite element simulations based on nonlinear field theory are conducted to investigate the working condition of the structure, and guide the design of the smart structure. The effects of the prestretch, structural stiffness and voltage on the performance of the smart structure are investigated. This work can guide the design of soft robot.

  2. Dielectric Elastomers for Fluidic and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoul, David James

    Dielectric elastomers have demonstrated tremendous potential as high-strain electromechanical transducers for a myriad of novel applications across all engineering disciplines. Because their soft, viscoelastic mechanical properties are similar to those of living tissues, dielectric elastomers have garnered a strong foothold in a plethora of biomedical and biomimetic applications. Dielectric elastomers consist of a sheet of stretched rubber, or elastomer, coated on both sides with compliant electrode materials; application of a voltage generates an electrostatic pressure that deforms the elastomer. They can function as soft generators, sensors, or actuators, and this last function is the focus of this dissertation. Many design configurations are possible, such as stacks, minimum energy structures, interpenetrating polymer networks, shape memory dielectric elastomers, and others; dielectric elastomers are already being applied to many fields of biomedicine. The first part of the original research presented in this dissertation details a PDMS microfluidic system paired with a dielectric elastomer stack actuator of anisotropically prestrained VHB(TM) 4910 (3M(TM)) and single-walled carbon nanotubes. These electroactive microfluidic devices demonstrated active increases in microchannel width when 3 and 4 kV were applied. Fluorescence microscopy also indicated an accompanying increase in channel depth with actuation. The cross-sectional area strains at 3 and 4 kV were approximately 2.9% and 7.4%, respectively. The device was then interfaced with a syringe pump, and the pressure was measured upstream. Linear pressure-flow plots were developed, which showed decreasing fluidic resistance with actuation, from 0.192 psi/(microL/min) at 0 kV, to 0.160 and 0.157 psi/(microL/min) at 3 and 4 kV, respectively. This corresponds to an ~18% drop in fluidic resistance at 4 kV. Active de-clogging was tested in situ with the device by introducing ~50 microm diameter PDMS microbeads and

  3. JKR studies of adhesion with model acrylic elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, K.R.; Ahn, D.

    1996-12-31

    Acrylic elastomers are widely used in coating applications because of their inherent thermal stability, oil resistance and adhesive properties. These same features make acrylic elastomers attractive for fundamental studies of polymer adhesion. This endeavor has been simplified recently by the development of techniques for producing monodisperse acrylic homopolymers and block copolymers from anionically synthesized parent polyacrylates, thus allowing precise microstructural control of adhering surfaces. In terms of the adhesion measurement itself, an adhesion test based upon the theory of Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR), henceforth referred to as the JKR technique, is well suited for probing the molecular origins of adhesion in elastomeric systems. This technique is quite practical, and minimizes the sample volume to reduce bulk viscoelastic losses. Further, the JKR technique permits testing at very low crack velocities, where interfacial effects are unobscured by bulk effects. In this paper, the authors report the results of JKR adhesion tests between poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PNBA) elastomers and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The latter is employed as a control substrate because its inertness and low surface energy (relative to metallic or silicon based surfaces) are conducive to the creation of reproducible solid surfaces.

  4. Experimental study on the dielectric properties of polyacrylate dielectric elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Junhua; Chen, Hualing; Li, Bo

    2012-02-01

    The dielectric constant of elastomeric dielectric material is an essential physical parameter, whose value may affect the electromechanical deformation of a dielectric elastomer actuator. Since the dielectric constant is influenced by several external factors as reported before, and no certain value has been confirmed to our knowledge, in the present paper, on the basis of systematical comparison of recent past literature, we conducted extensive works on the measurement of dielectric properties of VHB films, involving five influencing factors: prestretch (both equal and unequal biaxial), electrical frequency, electrode material, stress relaxation time and temperature. Experimental results directly show that the dielectric response changes according to these factors, based on which we investigate the significance of each factor, especially the interaction of two external conditions on the dielectric constant of deformable dielectric, by presenting a physical picture of the mechanism of polarization.

  5. Fabrication Process of Silicone-based Dielectric Elastomer Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Rosset, Samuel; Araromi, Oluwaseun A.; Schlatter, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution demonstrates the fabrication process of dielectric elastomer transducers (DETs). DETs are stretchable capacitors consisting of an elastomeric dielectric membrane sandwiched between two compliant electrodes. The large actuation strains of these transducers when used as actuators (over 300% area strain) and their soft and compliant nature has been exploited for a wide range of applications, including electrically tunable optics, haptic feedback devices, wave-energy harvesting, deformable cell-culture devices, compliant grippers, and propulsion of a bio-inspired fish-like airship. In most cases, DETs are made with a commercial proprietary acrylic elastomer and with hand-applied electrodes of carbon powder or carbon grease. This combination leads to non-reproducible and slow actuators exhibiting viscoelastic creep and a short lifetime. We present here a complete process flow for the reproducible fabrication of DETs based on thin elastomeric silicone films, including casting of thin silicone membranes, membrane release and prestretching, patterning of robust compliant electrodes, assembly and testing. The membranes are cast on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates coated with a water-soluble sacrificial layer for ease of release. The electrodes consist of carbon black particles dispersed into a silicone matrix and patterned using a stamping technique, which leads to precisely-defined compliant electrodes that present a high adhesion to the dielectric membrane on which they are applied. PMID:26863283

  6. Fabrication Process of Silicone-based Dielectric Elastomer Actuators.

    PubMed

    Rosset, Samuel; Araromi, Oluwaseun A; Schlatter, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R

    2016-02-01

    This contribution demonstrates the fabrication process of dielectric elastomer transducers (DETs). DETs are stretchable capacitors consisting of an elastomeric dielectric membrane sandwiched between two compliant electrodes. The large actuation strains of these transducers when used as actuators (over 300% area strain) and their soft and compliant nature has been exploited for a wide range of applications, including electrically tunable optics, haptic feedback devices, wave-energy harvesting, deformable cell-culture devices, compliant grippers, and propulsion of a bio-inspired fish-like airship. In most cases, DETs are made with a commercial proprietary acrylic elastomer and with hand-applied electrodes of carbon powder or carbon grease. This combination leads to non-reproducible and slow actuators exhibiting viscoelastic creep and a short lifetime. We present here a complete process flow for the reproducible fabrication of DETs based on thin elastomeric silicone films, including casting of thin silicone membranes, membrane release and prestretching, patterning of robust compliant electrodes, assembly and testing. The membranes are cast on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates coated with a water-soluble sacrificial layer for ease of release. The electrodes consist of carbon black particles dispersed into a silicone matrix and patterned using a stamping technique, which leads to precisely-defined compliant electrodes that present a high adhesion to the dielectric membrane on which they are applied.

  7. High stress actuation by dielectric elastomer with oil capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Thanh-Giang; Lau, Gih-Keong; Shiau, Li-Lynn; Tan, Adrian W. Y.

    2014-03-01

    Though capable of generating a large strain, dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) generate only a moderate actuation stress not more than 200kPa, which seriously limits its use as artificial muscles for robotic arm. Enhancement of dielectric strength (greater than 500MV/m) by dielectric oil immersion could possibly enable it a larger force generation. Previously, the immersion was done in an oil bath, which limits portability together with DEAs. In this study, we developed portable capsules to enclose oil over the DEA substrate (VHB 4905). The capsules is made of a thinner soft acrylic membrane and they seals dielectric liquid oil (Dow Corning Fluid 200 50cSt). The DEA substrate is a graphiteclad VHB membrane, which is pre-stretched with pure-shear boundary condition for axial actuation. When activated under isotonic condition, the oil-capsule DEA can sustain a very high dielectric field up to 903 MV/m and does not fail; whereas, the dry DEA breaks down at a lower electric field at 570 MV/m. Furthermore, the oil-capsule DEA can produces higher isometric stress change up to 1.05MPa, which is 70% more than the maximum produced by the dry DEA. This study confirmed that oil capping helps DEA achieve very high dielectric strength and generate more stress change for work.

  8. Dielectric silicone elastomers with mixed ceramic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Stiubianu, George; Bele, Adrian; Cazacu, Maria; Racles, Carmen; Vlad, Stelian; Ignat, Mircea

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Composite ceramics nanoparticles (MCN) with zirconium dioxide and lead zirconate. • Dielectric elastomer films wDith PDMS matrix and MCN as dielectric filler. • Hydrophobic character—water resistant and good flexibility specific to siloxanes. • Increased value of dielectric constant with the content of MCN in dielectric films. • Increased energy output from uniaxial deformation of the dielectric elastomer films. - Abstract: A ceramic material consisting in a zirconium dioxide-lead zirconate mixture has been obtained by precipitation method, its composition being proved by wide angle X-ray powder diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The average diameter of the ceramic particles ranged between 50 and 100 nm, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy images. These were surface treated and used as filler for a high molecular mass polydimethylsiloxane-α,ω-diol (Mn = 450,000) prepared in laboratory, the resulted composites being further processed as films and crosslinked. A condensation procedure, unusual for polydimethylsiloxane having such high molecular mass, with a trifunctional silane was approached for the crosslinking. The effect of filler content on electrical and mechanical properties of the resulted materials was studied and it was found that the dielectric permittivity of nanocomposites increased in line with the concentration of ceramic nanoparticles.

  9. Bistable dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianwen; Wang, Shu; McCoul, David; Xing, Zhiguang; Huang, Bo; Liu, Liwu; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures (DEMES) can realize large angular deformations by small voltage-induced strains, which make them an attractive candidate for use as soft actuators. If the task only needs binary action, the bistable structure will be an efficient solution and can save energy because it requires only a very short duration of voltage to switch its state. To obtain bistable DEMES, a method to realize the two stable states of traditional DEMES is provided in this paper. Based on this, a type of symmetrical bistable DEMES is proposed, and the required actuation pulse duration is shorter than 0.1 s. When a suitable mass is attached to end of the DEMES, or two layers of dielectric elastomer are affixed to both sides of the primary frame, the DEMES can realize two stable states and can be switched by a suitable pulse duration. To calculate the required minimum pulse duration, a mathematical model is provided and validated by experiment.

  10. Dynamic analysis of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bai-Xiang; Mueller, Ralf; Theis, Anika; Klassen, Markus; Gross, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    An analytical model is proposed for the dynamic analysis of a homogeneously deformed dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) with a standard sandwich structure. The equation of motion for the DEA is obtained by the Euler-Lagrange equation. Numerical results of the model are presented to show the vibration and oscillation behaviour of the system. Resonance phenomenon and damping effects are investigated. Results are discussed in comparison with those of the related topics in the literature.

  11. Dielectric elastomer generators that stack up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, T. G.; Rosset, S.; Anderson, I. A.; Shea, H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and testing of a soft dielectric elastomer power generator with a volume of less than 1 cm3. The generator is well suited to harvest energy from ambient and from human body motion as it can harvest from low frequency (sub-Hz) motions, and is compact and lightweight. Dielectric elastomers are highly stretchable variable capacitors. Electrical energy is produced when the deformation of a stretched, charged dielectric elastomer is relaxed; like-charges are compressed together and opposite-charges are pushed apart, resulting in an increased voltage. This technology provides an opportunity to produce soft, high energy density generators with unparalleled robustness. Two major issues block this goal: current configurations require rigid frames that maintain the dielectric elastomer in a prestretched state, and high energy densities have come at the expense of short lifetime. This paper presents a self-supporting stacked generator configuration which does not require rigid frames. The generator consists of 48 generator films stacked on top of each other, resulting in a structure that fits within an 11 mm diameter footprint while containing enough active material to produce useful power. To ensure sustainable power production, we also present a mathematical model for designing the electronic control of the generator which optimizes energy production while limiting the electrical stress on the generator below failure limits. When cyclically compressed at 1.6 Hz, our generator produced 1.8 mW of power, which is sufficient for many low-power wireless sensor nodes. This performance compares favorably with similarly scaled electromagnetic, piezoelectric, and electrostatic generators. The generator’s small form factor and ability to harvest useful energy from low frequency motions such as tree swaying or shoe impact provides an opportunity to deliver power to remote wireless sensor nodes or to distributed points in the human body

  12. Catastrophic Thinning of Dielectric Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurlo, G.; Destrade, M.; DeTommasi, D.; Puglisi, G.

    2017-02-01

    We provide an energetic insight into the catastrophic nature of thinning instability in soft electroactive elastomers. This phenomenon is a major obstacle to the development of giant actuators, yet it is neither completely understood nor modeled accurately. In excellent agreement with experiments, we give a simple formula to predict the critical voltages for instability patterns; we model their shape and show that reversible (elastic) equilibrium is impossible beyond their onset. Our derivation is fully analytical, does not require finite element simulations, and can be extended to include prestretch and various material models.

  13. Silicone dielectric elastomers filled with carbon nanotubes and actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Liwu; Deng, Gang; Sun, Shouhua; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2009-03-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) are one particular type of electroactive polymers. The excellent features of merit possessed by dielectric elastomers make them the most performing materials which can be applied in many domains: biomimetics, aerospace, mechanics, medicals, etc. In order to maximize actuator performance, the dielectric elastomer actuators should have a high dielectric constant and high dielectric breakdown strength. In this paper, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) is used to develop a particulate composite based on silicone elastomer matrix, with dielectric permittivity improved. And the composite is designed to a new configuration of dielectric elastomer actuator to show electrically activated linear contractions. Prototype samples of this folded actuator, along with the fabrication and analysis is discussed here.

  14. Open-access dielectric elastomer material database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertechy, R.; Fontana, M.; Stiubianu, G.; Cazacu, M.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric Elastomer Transducers (DETs) are deformable capacitors that can be used as sensors, actuators and generators. The design of effective and optimized DETs requires the knowledge of a set of relevant properties of the employed Dielectric Elastomer (DE) material, which make it possible to accurately predict their electromechanical dynamic behavior. In this context, an open-access database for DE materials has been created with the aim of providing the practicing engineer with the essential information for the design and optimization of new kinds of DET. Among the electrical properties, dielectric susceptibility, dielectric strength and conductivity are considered along with their dependence on mechanical strain. As regards mechanical behavior, experimental stress-strain curves are provided to predict hyperelasticity, plasticity, viscosity, Mullins effect and mechanical rupture. Properties of commercial elastomeric membranes have been entered in the database and made available to the research community. This paper describes the instrumentations, experimental setups and procedures that have been employed for the characterization of the considered DE materials. To provide an example, the experimental data acquired for a commercially available natural rubber membrane (OPPO Band Red 8012) are presented.

  15. Electromechanical response of silicone dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cârlescu, V.; Prisăcaru, G.; Olaru, D.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental technique to investigate the electromechanical properties of silicone dielectric elastomers actuated with high DC electric fields. A non-contact measurement technique is used to capture and monitor the thickness strain (contraction) of a circular film placed between two metallic disks electrodes. Two active fillers such as silica (10, 15 and 30 wt%) and barium titanate (5 and 15 wt%) were incorporated in order to increase the actuation performance. Thickness strain was measured at HV stimuli up to 4.5 kV and showed a quadratic dependence against applied electric field indicating that the induced strain is triggered by the Maxwell effect and/or electrostriction phenomenon as reported in literature. The actuation process evidences a rapid contraction upon HV activation and a slowly relaxation when the electrodes are short-circuit due to visco-elastic nature of elastomers. A maximum of 1.22 % thickness strain was obtained at low actuating field intensity (1.5 V/pm) comparable with those reported in literature for similar dielectric elastomer materials.

  16. Tunable lenses using transparent dielectric elastomer actuators.

    PubMed

    Shian, Samuel; Diebold, Roger M; Clarke, David R

    2013-04-08

    Focus tunable, adaptive lenses provide several advantages over traditional lens assemblies in terms of compactness, cost, efficiency, and flexibility. To further improve the simplicity and compact nature of adaptive lenses, we present an elastomer-liquid lens system which makes use of an inline, transparent electroactive polymer actuator. The lens requires only a minimal number of components: a frame, a passive membrane, a dielectric elastomer actuator membrane, and a clear liquid. The focal length variation was recorded to be greater than 100% with this system, responding in less than one second. Through the analysis of membrane deformation within geometrical constraints, it is shown that by selecting appropriate lens dimensions, even larger focusing dynamic ranges can be achieved.

  17. Modeling of dielectric elastomer as electromechanical resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bo Liu, Lei; Chen, Hualing; Jia, Shuhai; Zhang, Junshi; Li, Dichen

    2014-09-28

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) feature nonlinear dynamics resulting from an electromechanical coupling. Under alternating voltage, the DE resonates with tunable performances. We present an analysis of the nonlinear dynamics of a DE as electromechanical resonator (DEER) configured as a pure shear actuator. A theoretical model is developed to characterize the complex performance under different boundary conditions. Physical mechanisms are presented and discussed. Chaotic behavior is also predicted, illustrating instabilities in the dynamics. The results provide a guide to the design and application of DEER in haptic devices.

  18. Modeling of dielectric elastomer as electromechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Junshi; Liu, Lei; Chen, Hualing; Jia, Shuhai; Li, Dichen

    2014-09-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) feature nonlinear dynamics resulting from an electromechanical coupling. Under alternating voltage, the DE resonates with tunable performances. We present an analysis of the nonlinear dynamics of a DE as electromechanical resonator (DEER) configured as a pure shear actuator. A theoretical model is developed to characterize the complex performance under different boundary conditions. Physical mechanisms are presented and discussed. Chaotic behavior is also predicted, illustrating instabilities in the dynamics. The results provide a guide to the design and application of DEER in haptic devices.

  19. The Current State of Silicone-Based Dielectric Elastomer Transducers.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Frederikke B; Daugaard, Anders E; Hvilsted, Søren; Skov, Anne L

    2016-03-01

    Silicone elastomers are promising materials for dielectric elastomer transducers (DETs) due to their superior properties such as high efficiency, reliability and fast response times. DETs consist of thin elastomer films sandwiched between compliant electrodes, and they constitute an interesting class of transducer due to their inherent lightweight and potentially large strains. For the field to progress towards industrial implementation, a leap in material development is required, specifically targeting longer lifetime and higher energy densities to provide more efficient transduction at lower driving voltages. In this review, the current state of silicone elastomers for DETs is summarised and critically discussed, including commercial elastomers, composites, polymer blends, grafted elastomers and complex network structures. For future developments in the field it is essential that all aspects of the elastomer are taken into account, namely dielectric losses, lifetime and the very often ignored polymer network integrity and stability.

  20. Microfabrication of stacked dielectric elastomer actuator fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbaci, Mert; Walter, Wayne; Lamkin-Kennard, Kathleen

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are one of the best candidate materials for next generation of robotic actuators, soft sensors and artificial muscles due to their fast response, mechanical robustness and compliance. However, high voltage requirements of DEAs have impeded their potential to become widely used in such applications. In this study, we propose a method for fabrication of silicon based multilayer DEA fibers composed of microlevel dielectric layers to improve the actuation ratios of DEAs at lower voltages. A multi-walled carbon nanotube - polydimethylsiloxane (MWCNT/PDMS) composite was used to fabricate mechanically compliant, conductive parallel plates and electrode connections for the DEA actuators. Active surface area and layer thickness were varied to study the effects of these parameters on actuation ratio as a function of applied voltage. Different structures were fabricated to assess the flexibility of the fabrication method for specific user-end applications.

  1. The electrical breakdown of thin dielectric elastomers: thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Shamsul; Morshuis, Peter H. F.; Benslimane, Mohamed Y.; Gernaey, Krist V.; Skov, Anne L.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomers are being developed for use in actuators, sensors and generators to be used in various applications, such as artificial eye lids, pressure sensors and human motion energy generators. In order to obtain maximum efficiency, the devices are operated at high electrical fields. This increases the likelihood for electrical breakdown significantly. Hence, for many applications the performance of the dielectric elastomers is limited by this risk of failure, which is triggered by several factors. Amongst others thermal effects may strongly influence the electrical breakdown strength. In this study, we model the electrothermal breakdown in thin PDMS based dielectric elastomers in order to evaluate the thermal mechanisms behind the electrical failures. The objective is to predict the operation range of PDMS based dielectric elastomers with respect to the temperature at given electric field. We performed numerical analysis with a quasi-steady state approximation to predict thermal runaway of dielectric elastomer films. We also studied experimentally the effect of temperature on dielectric properties of different PDMS dielectric elastomers. Different films with different percentages of silica and permittivity enhancing filler were selected for the measurements. From the modeling based on the fitting of experimental data, it is found that the electrothermal breakdown of the materials is strongly influenced by the increase in both dielectric permittivity and conductivity.

  2. Super soft silicone elastomers with high dielectric permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Frederikke B.; Yu, Liyun; Hvilsted, Søren; Skov, Anne L.

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have many favourable properties. The obstacle of high driving voltages, however, limits the commercial viability of the technology at present. Driving voltage can be lowered by decreasing the Young's modulus and increasing the dielectric permittivity of silicone elastomers. A decrease in Young's modulus, however, is often accompanied by the loss of mechanical stability and thereby the lifetime of the DE. New soft elastomer matrices with high dielectric permittivity and low Young's modulus, with no loss of mechanical stability, were prepared by two different approaches using chloropropyl-functional silicone polymers. The first approach was based on synthesised chloropropyl-functional copolymers that were cross-linkable and thereby formed the basis of new silicone networks with high dielectric permittivity (e.g. a 43% increase). These networks were soft without compromising other important properties of DEs such as viscous and dielectric losses as well as electrical breakdown strength. The second approach was based on the addition of commercially available chloropropyl-functional silicone oil to commercial LSR silicone elastomer. Two-fold increase in permittivity was obtained by this method and the silicone oil decreased the Young's modulus significantly. The viscous losses, however, also increased with increasing content of silicone oil. Cross-linkable chloropropyl-functional copolymers offer a new silicone elastomer matrix that could form the basis of dielectric elastomers of the future, whereas the chloropropyl silicone oil approach is an easy tool for improvement of the properties of existing commercial silicone elastomers.

  3. Maximizing strain in miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosset, Samuel; Araromi, Oluwaseun; Shea, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical model to optimise the unidirectional motion of a rigid object bonded to a miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), a configuration found for example in AMI's haptic feedback devices, or in our tuneable RF phase shifter. Recent work has shown that unidirectional motion is maximized when the membrane is both anistropically prestretched and subjected to a dead load in the direction of actuation. However, the use of dead weights for miniaturized devices is clearly highly impractical. Consequently smaller devices use the membrane itself to generate the opposing force. Since the membrane covers the entire frame, one has the same prestretch condition in the active (actuated) and passive zones. Because the passive zone contracts when the active zone expands, it does not provide a constant restoring force, reducing the maximum achievable actuation strain. We have determined the optimal ratio between the size of the electrode (active zone) and the passive zone, as well as the optimal prestretch in both in-plane directions, in order to maximize the absolute displacement of the rigid object placed at the active/passive border. Our model and experiments show that the ideal active ratio is 50%, with a displacement twice smaller than what can be obtained with a dead load. We expand our fabrication process to also show how DEAs can be laser-post-processed to remove carefully chosen regions of the passive elastomer membrane, thereby increasing the actuation strain of the device.

  4. Tactile display with dielectric multilayer elastomer actuatorsq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysek, Marc; Lotz, Peter; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2009-03-01

    Tactile perception is the human sensation of surface textures through the vibrations generated by stroking a finger over the surface. The skin responds to several distributed physical quantities. Perhaps the most important are high-frequency vibrations, pressure distributions (static shape) and thermal properties. The integration of tactile displays in man-machine interfaces promises a more intuitive handling. For this reason many tactile displays are developed using different technologies. We present several state-of-the-art tactile displays based on different types of dielectric elastomer actuators to clarify the advantages of our matrix display based on multilayer technology. Using this technology perpendicular and hexagonal arrays of actuator elements (tactile stimulators) can be integrated into a PDMS substrate. Element diameters down to 1 mm allow stimuli at the range of the human two-point-discrimination threshold. Driving the elements by column and row addressing enables various stimulation patterns with a reduced number of feeding lines. The transient analysis determines charging times of the capacitive actuators depending on actuator geometry and material parameters. This is very important to ensure an adequate dynamic characteristic of the actuators to stimulate the human skin by vibrations. The suitability of multilayer dielectric elastomer actuators for actuation in tactile displays has been determined. Beside the realization of a static tactile display - where multilayer DEA are integrated as drives for movable contact pins - we focus on the direct use of DEA as a vibrotactile display. Finally, we present the scenario and achieved results of a recognition threshold test. Even relative low voltages in the range of 800 V generate vibrations with 100% recognition ratio within the group of participants. Furthermore, the frequency dependent characteristic of the determined recognition threshold confirms with established literature.

  5. Modeling and control of a dielectric elastomer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ujjaval; Gu, Guo-Ying; Zhu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    The emerging field of soft robotics offers the prospect of applying soft actuators as artificial muscles in the robots, replacing traditional actuators based on hard materials, such as electric motors, piezoceramic actuators, etc. Dielectric elastomers are one class of soft actuators, which can deform in response to voltage and can resemble biological muscles in the aspects of large deformation, high energy density and fast response. Recent research into dielectric elastomers has mainly focused on issues regarding mechanics, physics, material designs and mechanical designs, whereas less importance is given to the control of these soft actuators. Strong nonlinearities due to large deformation and electromechanical coupling make control of the dielectric elastomer actuators challenging. This paper investigates feed-forward control of a dielectric elastomer actuator by using a nonlinear dynamic model. The material and physical parameters in the model are identified by quasi-static and dynamic experiments. A feed-forward controller is developed based on this nonlinear dynamic model. Experimental evidence shows that this controller can control the soft actuator to track the desired trajectories effectively. The present study confirms that dielectric elastomer actuators are capable of being precisely controlled with the nonlinear dynamic model despite the presence of material nonlinearity and electromechanical coupling. It is expected that the reported results can promote the applications of dielectric elastomer actuators to soft robots or biomimetic robots.

  6. Dielectric Elastomer Actuated Systems and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The system of the present invention includes an actuator having at least two electrodes, an elastomeric dielectric film disposed between the two electrodes, and a frame attached to the elastomeric dielectric film. The frame provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The displacement range is preferably the stroke of the actuator. The displacement range can be about 5 mm and greater. Further, the frame can include a plurality of configurations, for example, at least a rigid members coupled to a flexible member wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. In preferred embodiments, the rigid member can be, but is not limited to, curved beams, parallel beams, rods and plates. In a preferred embodiment the actuator can further include a passive element disposed between two flexible members such as, for example, links to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. Further, the actuator can include a plurality of layers of the elastomeric dielectric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of different materials such as, for example, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  7. A simple method for reducing inevitable dielectric loss in high-permittivity dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, F. B.; Yu, L.; Mazurek, P.; Skov, A. L.

    2016-07-01

    Commercial viability of dielectric elastomers (DEs) is currently limited by a few obstacles, including high driving voltages (in the kV range). Driving voltage can be lowered by either decreasing the Young’s modulus or increasing the dielectric permittivity of silicone elastomers, or a combination thereof. A decrease in the Young’s modulus, however, is often accompanied by a loss in mechanical stability, whereas increases in dielectric permittivity are usually followed by a large increase in dielectric loss followed by a decrease in breakdown strength and thereby the lifetime of the DE. A new soft elastomer matrix, with high dielectric permittivity and a low Young’s modulus, aligned with no loss of mechanical stability, was prepared through the use of commercially available chloropropyl-functional silicone oil mixed into a tough commercial liquid silicone rubber silicone elastomer. The addition of chloropropyl-functional silicone oil in concentrations up to 30 phr was found to improve the properties of the silicone elastomer significantly, as dielectric permittivity increased to 4.4, dielectric breakdown increased up to 25% and dielectric losses were reduced. The chloropropyl-functional silicone oil also decreased the dielectric losses of an elastomer containing dielectric permittivity-enhancing TiO2 fillers. Commercially available chloropropyl-functional silicone oil thus constitutes a facile method for improved silicone DEs, with very low dielectric losses.

  8. Modeling shape-memory behavior of dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Rui

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we present a constitutive model to couple the shape memory and dielectric behaviors of polymers. The model adopted multiple relaxation processes and temperature-dependent relaxation time to describe the glass transition behaviors. The model was applied to simulate the thermal-mechanical-electrical behaviors of the dielectric elastomer VHB 4905. We investigated the influence of deformation temperature, voltage rate, relaxation time on the electromechanical and shape-memory behavior of dielectric elastomers. This work provides a method for combining the shape-memory properties and electroactive polymers, which can expand the applications of these soft active materials.

  9. Printing low-voltage dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Alexandre; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of fully printed thin dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs), reducing the operation voltage below 300 V while keeping good actuation strain. DEAs are soft actuators capable of strains greater than 100% and response times below 1 ms, but they require driving voltage in the kV range, limiting the possible applications. One way to reduce the driving voltage of DEAs is to decrease the dielectric membrane thickness, which is typically in the 20-100 μm range, as reliable fabrication becomes challenging below this thickness. We report here the use of pad-printing to produce μm thick silicone membranes, on which we pad-print μm thick compliant electrodes to create DEAs. We achieve a lateral actuation strain of 7.5% at only 245 V on a 3 μm thick pad-printed membrane. This corresponds to a ratio of 125%/kV2, by far the highest reported value for DEAs. To quantify the increasing stiffening impact of the electrodes on DEA performance as the membrane thickness decreases, we compare two circular actuators, one with 3 μm- and one with 30 μm-thick membranes. Our experimental measurements show that the strain uniformity of the 3 μm-DEA is indeed affected by the mechanical impact of the electrodes. We developed a simple DEA model that includes realistic electrodes of finite stiffness, rather than assuming zero stiffness electrodes as is commonly done. The simulation results confirm that the stiffening impact of the electrodes is an important parameter that should not be neglected in the design of thin-DEAs. This work presents a practical approach towards low-voltage DEAs, a critical step for the development of real world applications.

  10. Interfacing dielectric elastomer actuators with liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Alexandre; Maffli, Luc; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    Methods and materials for liquid encapsulation in thin (19 μm) silicone membranes are presented in this work. A set of 12 liquids including solvents, oils, silicone pre-polymers and one ionic liquid are experimentally tested. We show that all selected liquids are chemically inert to silicone and that vapor pressure is the key parameter for stable encapsulation. It is demonstrated that encapsulated volume of silicone pre-polymers and ionic liquids can stay stable for more than 1 month. The actuation of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) in conductive liquids is also investigated. An analysis of the equivalent electrical circuits of immersed DEAs shows that non-overlapping regions of the electrodes should be minimized. It also provides guidelines to determine when the electrodes should be passivated. The effects of immersion in a conductive liquid are assessed by measuring the actuation strain and capacitance over periodic actuation. The experimental results show no sign of liquid-induced degradation over more than 45k actuation cycles.

  11. Self-stabilizing dielectric elastomer generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, P.; Rossiter, J.; Homer, M.

    2017-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) are an emerging technology for the conversion of mechanical into electrical energy. Despite many advantageous characteristics, there are still issues to overcome, including the need for charging at every cycle to produce an electrical output. Self-priming circuits (SPCs) are one possible solution, storing part of the electric energy output of one cycle to supply as input for the next, producing a voltage boost effect. Until now, studies regarding SPCs neglect to consider how the increasing voltage will create an electromechanical response and affect the DEG when driven by an oscillatory mechanical load. In the present work we model this force-based actuation, including coupling between the DEG and SPC, in order to predict the dynamics of the system. In such cases, the DEG has a mechanical response when charged (actuator behaviour), and as the voltage increases, this actuation-like effect increases the capacitance values that bound the cycle. We show how this inherent nonlinearity yields a reduction in the DEG’s capacitance swing and reduces the performance of the SPC, but also self-stabilizes the system. This stability is useful in the design of robust DEG energy harvesters that can operate near to, but not enter, failure mode.

  12. Dielectric elastomer pump for artificial organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Amy E.; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Walters, Peter J.; Ieropoulos, Ioannis A.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a bio-inspired, dielectric elastomer (DE) based tubular pumping unit, developed for eventual use as a component of an artificial digestive tract onboard a microbial fuel cell powered robot (EcoBot). The pump effects fluid displacement by direct actuation of the tube wall as opposed to excitation by an external body. The actuator consists of a DE tube moulded from silicone, held in a negative pressure chamber, which is used for prestraining the tube. The pump is coupled with custom designed polymeric check valves in order to rectify the fluid flow and assess the performance of the unit. The valves exhibited the necessary low opening pressures required for use with the actuator. The tube's actuation characteristics were measured both with and without liquid in the system. Based on these data the optimal operating conditions for the pump are discussed. The pump and valve system has achieved flowrates in excess of 40μl/s. This radially contracting/expanding actuator element is the fundamental component of a peristaltic pump. This 'soft pump' concept is suitable for biomimetic robotic systems, or for the medical or food industries where hard contact with the delivered substrate may be undesirable. Future work will look at connecting multiple tubes in series in order to achieve peristalsis.

  13. Energy harvesting for dielectric elastomer sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Iain A.; Illenberger, Patrin; O'Brien, Ben M.

    2016-04-01

    Soft and stretchy dielectric elastomer (DE) sensors can measure large strains on robotic devices and people. DE strain measurement requires electric energy to run the sensors. Energy is also required for information processing and telemetering of data to phone or computer. Batteries are expensive and recharging is inconvenient. One solution is to harvest energy from the strains that the sensor is exposed to. For this to work the harvester must also be wearable, soft, unobtrusive and profitable from the energy perspective; with more energy harvested than used for strain measurement. A promising way forward is to use the DE sensor as its own energy harvester. Our study indicates that it is feasible for a basic DE sensor to provide its own power to drive its own sensing signal. However telemetry and computation that are additional to this will require substantially more power than the sensing circuit. A strategy would involve keeping the number of Bluetooth data chirps low during the entire period of energy harvesting and to limit transmission to a fraction of the total time spent harvesting energy. There is much still to do to balance the energy budget. This will be a challenge but when we succeed it will open the door to autonomous DE multi-sensor systems without the requirement for battery recharge.

  14. Inflated dielectric elastomer actuator for eyeball's movements: fabrication, analysis and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanju; Shi, Liang; Liu, Liwu; Zhang, Zhen; Leng, Jinsong

    2008-03-01

    Bio-mimetic actuators are inspired to the human or animal organ and they are aimed at replicating actions exerted by the main organic muscles. We present here an inflated dielectric Electroactive Polymer actuator based on acrylic elastomer aiming at mimicing the ocular muscular of the human eye. Two sheets of polyacrylic elastomer coated with conductive carbon grease are sticked to a rotatable backbone, which function like an agonist-antagonist configuration. When stimulating the two elastomer sheets separately, the rotatable mid-arc of the actuator is capable of rotating from -50° to 50°. Experiments shows that the inflated actuator, compared with uninflated one, performs much bigger rotating angle and more strengthened. Connected with the actuator via an elastic tensive line, the eyeball rotates around the symmetrical axes. The realization of more accurate movements and emotional expressions of our native eye system is the next step of our research and still under studied. This inflated dielectric elastomer actuator shows as well great potential application in robofish and adaptive stucture.

  15. Development of soft robots using dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godaba, Hareesh; Wang, Yuzhe; Cao, Jiawei; Zhu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Soft robots are gaining in popularity due to their unique attributes such as low weight, compliance, flexibility and diverse range in motion types. This paper illustrates soft robots and actuators which are developed using dielectric elastomer. These developments include a jellyfish robot, a worm like robot and artificial muscle actuators for jaw movement in a robotic skull. The jellyfish robot which employs a bulged dielectric elastomer membrane has been demonstrated too generate thrust and buoyant forces and can move effectively in water. The artificial muscle for jaw movement employs a pure shear configuration and has been shown to closely mimic the jaw motion while chewing or singing a song. Thee inchworm robot, powered by dielectric elastomer actuator can demonstrate stable movement in one-direction.

  16. Dynamic electromechanical instability of a dielectric elastomer balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feifei; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Michael Yu

    2015-11-01

    Electromechanical instability, a significant phenomenon in dielectric elastomers, has been well studied in the literature. However, most previous work was based on the assumption that dielectric elastomers undergo quasi-static deformation. This letter investigates the dynamic electromechanical instability of a dielectric elastomer balloon which renders four types of oscillation subject to a parametric combination of DC and AC voltages. The simulated oscillations show that dynamic electromechanical instability occurs within quite a large range of excitation frequency, in the form of snap-through or snap-back, when the DC and AC voltages reach critical values. The balloon is at its most susceptible to dynamic electromechanical instability when the superharmonic, harmonic or subharmonic resonance is excited. Taking all excitation parameters into account, this letter analyzes the global critical condition which triggers the dynamic electromechanical instability of the balloon.

  17. Hemispherical breathing mode speaker using a dielectric elastomer actuator.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Naoki; Baba, Shun; Maeda, Shingo

    2015-10-01

    Although indoor acoustic characteristics should ideally be assessed by measuring the reverberation time using a point sound source, a regular polyhedron loudspeaker, which has multiple loudspeakers on a chassis, is typically used. However, such a configuration is not a point sound source if the size of the loudspeaker is large relative to the target sound field. This study investigates a small lightweight loudspeaker using a dielectric elastomer actuator vibrating in the breathing mode (the pulsating mode such as the expansion and contraction of a balloon). Acoustic testing with regard to repeatability, sound pressure, vibration mode profiles, and acoustic radiation patterns indicate that dielectric elastomer loudspeakers may be feasible.

  18. A high-performance dielectric elastomer consisting of bio-based polyester elastomer and titanium dioxide powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dan; Tian, Ming; Dong, Yingchao; Kang, Hailan; Gong, Daolin; Zhang, Liqun

    2013-10-01

    A bio-based polyester elastomer containing many polar groups was combined with high-dielectric-constant titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder to form a dielectric elastomer composite for the first time. The effects of the titanium dioxide filler on the elastic modulus, dielectric properties, and electromechanical responses of the polyester dielectric elastomer were studied. We found that the dielectric constant of composites increased with increasing content of TiO2. Nevertheless, the elastic modulus of the composites did not increase with increasing content of TiO2, and the polyester elastomer filled with 6 vol. % of TiO2 exhibited the lowest elastic modulus, which led to a high prestrain-free actuated strain of 11.8% at a low electric field of just 9.8 kV/mm. The actuated strain is better than other dielectric elastomers reported in the literature. The high electromechanical performance was attributed to the increase in dielectric constant and decrease in elastic modulus of the composite from those of the pure polyester elastomer. The decrease in elastic modulus was explained in detail by the competing effects of crosslink density and filler network. In addition, a dramatic increase in dielectric constant of the composite was observed and discussed through several dielectric mixing rules. Finally, the polyester elastomer and titanium dioxide are both environment-friendly, making possible the composite to be used in biological and medical devices.

  19. Improved electromechanical behavior in castable dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Samin; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-02-01

    Non-viscoelastic castable elastomers are replacing the polyacrylate VHB films in the new generations of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) to achieve fast and reliable actuation. We introduce the optimum prestretch conditions to enhance the electromechanical behavior of the castable DEAs resulting in large actuation strain. For castable actuator in which the thickness is selected independent of the prestretch, uniaxial prestretch mode offers the highest actuation strain in the transverse direction compared to biaxial and pure shear. We experimentally demonstrate that miniaturization hinders the loss of tension and up to 85% linear actuation strain is generated with a 300 × 300 μm2 polydimethylsiloxanes-based DEA.

  20. Energy scavenging strain absorber: application to kinetic dielectric elastomer generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, C.; Beaune, M.; Vu-Cong, T.; Sylvestre, A.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) are light, compliant, silent energy scavengers. They can easily be incorporated into clothing where they could scavenge energy from the human kinetic movements for biomedical applications. Nevertheless, scavengers based on dielectric elastomers are soft electrostatic generators requiring a high voltage source to polarize them and high external strain, which constitutes the two major disadvantages of these transducers. We propose here a complete structure made up of a strain absorber, a DEG and a simple electronic power circuit. This new structure looks like a patch, can be attached on human's wear and located on the chest, knee, elbow… Our original strain absorber, inspired from a sailing boat winch, is able to heighten the external available strain with a minimal factor of 2. The DEG is made of silicone Danfoss Polypower and it has a total area of 6cm per 2.5cm sustaining a maximal strain of 50% at 1Hz. A complete electromechanical analytical model was developed for the DEG associated to this strain absorber. With a poling voltage of 800V, a scavenged energy of 0.57mJ per cycle is achieved with our complete structure. The performance of the DEG can further be improved by enhancing the imposed strain, by designing a stack structure, by using a dielectric elastomer with high dielectric permittivity.

  1. Silicones with enhanced permittivity for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünki, Simon J.; Dascalu, Mihaela; Nüesch, Frank A.; Opris, Dorina M.

    2016-04-01

    The research efforts for silicone based elastomers with high dielectric permittivity (Ɛ') intensified significantly in the last years since such materials would allow the construction of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) with low operation voltages. Polar groups can be introduced to elastomers to adjust their permittivity. The results obtained regarding the functionalization of silicones with polar nitrile (CN) and trifluoropropyl (CF3) groups are presented. Those with CN groups were synthesized via anionic polymerization of nitrile containing cyclosiloxanes or via a post-polymerization modification of functional polysiloxanes. Polysiloxanes containing CF3 groups were prepared by anionic copolymerization of 1,3,5-tris(3,3,3-trifluoropropyl)-1,3,5-trimethylcyclosiloxane with octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane. Importantly, we have found that all polysiloxanes have glass transition temperatures (Tg) well below room temperature (<-50°C). This ensures that the materials turn into true elastomers after cross-linking. In addition to this, a linear increase in Ɛ' with increasing content of polar groups was observed with maximum values of Ɛ' = 18 and Ɛ' = 8.8 for polysiloxanes modified at every repeating unit with either CN or CF3 groups, respectively.

  2. A soft creeping robot actuated by dielectric elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianwen; Niu, Junyang; Liu, Liwu; Yu, Jiangcheng

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuator showed significant advantages at high energy density, large deformation with comparing to other artificial muscle. The robot actuated by dielectric elastomer will be more lightweight and have lower cost, which shows great potential in field of future planetary exploration based on a group of micro-robot. In this context, a quite simple structure for creeping was designed to make the robot more lightweight. The actuation unit of the robot is made of an ellipse frame which can expand and contract with membrane under electric field. After joining four actuation units, the robot can move forward in a cooperative manner. Fabrication and some preliminary experiments of the robot were presented and the proposed motion principle was demonstrated.

  3. TECHNICAL NOTE Rolling dielectric elastomer actuator with bulged cylindrical shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potz, Marco; Artusi, Matteo; Soleimani, Maryam; Menon, Carlo; Cocuzza, Silvio; Debei, Stefano

    2010-12-01

    This note presents preliminary investigations on the design and development of a rolling dielectric elastomer actuator (rDEA) with a bulged cylindrical shape. The actuator is based on an inflated silicone-based hollow cylinder consisting of a series of dielectric elastomer actuator sectors. The electrical activation of the sectors changes the shape of the rDEA; the induced geometrical change causes a variation of the position of the rDEA's centre of gravity and a consequent initiation of rolling of the rDEA. This paper presents a simplified parametric analytical model which is used to simulate the quasi-static behaviour of the rDEA. A testing procedure is used to assess the potential rolling performance of the rDEA prototypes.

  4. A survey on dielectric elastomer actuators for soft robots.

    PubMed

    Gu, Guo-Ying; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Li-Min; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2017-01-23

    Conventional industrial robots with the rigid actuation technology have made great progress for humans in the fields of automation assembly and manufacturing. With an increasing number of robots needing to interact with humans and unstructured environments, there is a need for soft robots capable of sustaining large deformation while inducing little pressure or damage when maneuvering through confined spaces. The emergence of soft robotics offers the prospect of applying soft actuators as artificial muscles in robots, replacing traditional rigid actuators. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are recognized as one of the most promising soft actuation technologies due to the facts that: i) dielectric elastomers are kind of soft, motion-generating materials that resemble natural muscle of humans in terms of force, strain (displacement per unit length or area) and actuation pressure/density; ii) dielectric elastomers can produce large voltage-induced deformation. In this survey, we first introduce the so-called DEAs emphasizing the key points of working principle, key components and electromechanical modeling approaches. Then, different DEA-driven soft robots, including wearable/humanoid robots, walking/serpentine robots, flying robots and swimming robots, are reviewed. Lastly, we summarize the challenges and opportunities for the further studies in terms of mechanism design, dynamics modeling and autonomous control.

  5. Flexible and stretchable electrodes for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-02-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are flexible lightweight actuators that can generate strains of over 100 %. They are used in applications ranging from haptic feedback (mm-sized devices), to cm-scale soft robots, to meter-long blimps. DEAs consist of an electrode-elastomer-electrode stack, placed on a frame. Applying a voltage between the electrodes electrostatically compresses the elastomer, which deforms in-plane or out-of plane depending on design. Since the electrodes are bonded to the elastomer, they must reliably sustain repeated very large deformations while remaining conductive, and without significantly adding to the stiffness of the soft elastomer. The electrodes are required for electrostatic actuation, but also enable resistive and capacitive sensing of the strain, leading to self-sensing actuators. This review compares the different technologies used to make compliant electrodes for DEAs in terms of: impact on DEA device performance (speed, efficiency, maximum strain), manufacturability, miniaturization, the integration of self-sensing and self-switching, and compatibility with low-voltage operation. While graphite and carbon black have been the most widely used technique in research environments, alternative methods are emerging which combine compliance, conduction at over 100 % strain with better conductivity and/or ease of patternability, including microfabrication-based approaches for compliant metal thin-films, metal-polymer nano-composites, nanoparticle implantation, and reel-to-reel production of μm-scale patterned thin films on elastomers. Such electrodes are key to miniaturization, low-voltage operation, and widespread commercialization of DEAs.

  6. Nonlinear electroelastic deformations of dielectric elastomer composites: II - Non-Gaussian elastic dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Victor; Lopez-Pamies, Oscar

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents an analytical framework to construct approximate homogenization solutions for the macroscopic elastic dielectric response - under finite deformations and finite electric fields - of dielectric elastomer composites with two-phase isotropic particulate microstructures. The central idea consists in employing the homogenization solution derived in Part I of this work for ideal elastic dielectric composites within the context of a nonlinear comparison medium method - this is derived as an extension of the comparison medium method of Lopez-Pamies et al. (2013) in nonlinear elastostatics to the coupled realm of nonlinear electroelastostatics - to generate in turn a corresponding solution for composite materials with non-ideal elastic dielectric constituents. Complementary to this analytical framework, a hybrid finite-element formulation to construct homogenization solutions numerically (in three dimensions) is also presented. The proposed analytical framework is utilized to work out a general approximate homogenization solution for non-Gaussian dielectric elastomers filled with nonlinear elastic dielectric particles that may exhibit polarization saturation. The solution applies to arbitrary (non-percolative) isotropic distributions of filler particles. By construction, it is exact in the limit of small deformations and moderate electric fields. For finite deformations and finite electric fields, its accuracy is demonstrated by means of direct comparisons with finite-element solutions. Aimed at gaining physical insight into the extreme enhancement in electrostriction properties displayed by emerging dielectric elastomer composites, various cases wherein the filler particles are of poly- and mono-disperse sizes and exhibit different types of elastic dielectric behavior are discussed in detail. Contrary to an initial conjecture in the literature, it is found (inter alia) that the isotropic addition of a small volume fraction of stiff (semi

  7. Analytical approach on the performance of helical dielectric elastomer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Konduru, Vamsi Krishna; Kim, Daewon

    2016-04-01

    This study takes the conceptual idea of the helical dielectric elastomer actuator (HDEA) and explores mathematical concepts for the actuator capabilities to provide a reasonable function in an industrial role. In the past, other researchers have demonstrated the contractile capabilities of the HDEA through experimental work and analytical modeling. The researchers in those work fabricated helical dielectric elastomer actuators with helical compliant electrodes interposed in an elastomeric insulator. Although an analytical electromechanical model was described, it was applicable only for relatively small strains and the elastomer was designed as a linearly elastic body. It is desirable to consider large strains for better prediction of the performance of the actuator. We begin our analysis by considering the 3D actuator as a purely hyperelastic model with no viscoelastic effects. The constructed mathematical concepts show the displacement, model capabilities, and also overall functionality of the HDEA. The electromechanical coupling of the actuator is modeled to produce a history of the actuator's strain response for specific activation voltages. The performance of the HDEA is also numerically compared using a commercial grade software.

  8. Dynamic performance of dielectric elastomers utilized as acoustic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochradel, K.; Rupitsch, S. J.; Sutor, A.; Lerch, R.; Vu, D. K.; Steinmann, P.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the frequency dependent behavior of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA). The introduced smart material actuators consist of 3M™'s elastomer VHB™4905 (9469) and a compliant, sputtered copper electrode on each side. The presented experiments on these compounds contain the active tuning of their resonance frequency and their application as acoustic actuators. We are able to decrease the membranes' eigenfrequency by 30% with an electrical offset potential. Alternatively, if an alternating signal is applied, sound pressure levels up to 130 dB in an enclosed volume of 28 ccm are achieved. In order to verify the results, a numerical simulation is introduced incorporating the two physical fields involved: electrical and mechanical.

  9. Applications of pressure-sensitive dielectric elastomer sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böse, Holger; Ocak, Deniz; Ehrlich, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer sensors for the measurement of compression loads with high sensitivity are described. The basic design of the sensors exhibits two profiled surfaces between which an elastomer film is confined. All components of the sensor were prepared with silicone whose stiffness can be varied in a wide range. Depending on details of the sensor design, various effects contribute to the enhancement of the capacitance. The intermediate elastomer film is stretched upon compression and electrode layers on the elastomer profiles and in the elastomer film approach each other. Different designs of the pressure sensor give rise to very different sensor characteristics in terms of the dependence of electric capacitance on compression force. Due to their inherent flexibility, the pressure sensors can be used on compliant substrates such as seats or beds or on the human body. This gives rise to numerous possible applications. The contribution describes also some examples of possible sensor applications. A glove was equipped with various sensors positioned at the finger tips. When grabbing an object with the glove, the sensors can detect the gripping forces of the individual fingers with high sensitivity. In a demonstrator of the glove equipped with seven sensors, the capacitances representing the gripping forces are recorded on a display. In another application example, a lower limb prosthesis was equipped with a pressure sensor to detect the load on the remaining part of the leg and the load is displayed in terms of the measured capacitance. The benefit of such sensors is to detect an eventual overload in order to prevent possible pressure sores. A third example introduces a seat load sensor system based on four extended pressure sensor mats. The sensor system detects the load distribution of a person on the seat. The examples emphasize the high performance of the new pressure sensor technology.

  10. The behavior of dielectric elastomer actuators connected in series and parallel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guorui; Liang, Yiming; Yang, Xuxu; Cheng, Tingyu; Huang, Zhilong; Li, Tiefeng

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer membrane has the ability of shrinking the thickness and expanding surface area when a voltage is applied through its thickness. Dielectric elastomer has been widely studied and used as dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), dielectric elastomer generator (DEG) and dielectric elastomer sensor (DES). We study the behavior of several DEAs connected in series and parallel, and find that the different connecting models can achieve different responses of the DEAs. DEAs connected in series can enhance the actuation, while DEA connected in parallel can enhance the actuation force. In our experiment, DEAs connected in series and parallel are loaded in actuation direction under a dead load providing pre-stretch. We discuss the results of the experiments and give the conclusions.

  11. Actuating dielectric elastomers in pure shear deformation by elastomeric conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yin; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Bai, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hong

    2014-02-10

    Pure shear experiments are commonly used to characterize dielectric elastomer (DE) material properties and to evaluate DE actuator/generator performance. It is increasingly important for many applications to replace conventional carbon grease electrodes with stretchable elastomeric conductors. We formulate a theory for DE with elastomeric conductors, synthesize transparent hydrogel as ionic conductors, and measure actuation of DE in pure shear deformation. Maximum 67% actuation strain is demonstrated. The theory agrees well with our measurement and also correlates well with reported experiments on DE with electronic conductors.

  12. Advances in dielectric elastomers for actuators and artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Brochu, Paul; Pei, Qibing

    2010-01-04

    A number of materials have been explored for their use as artificial muscles. Among these, dielectric elastomers (DEs) appear to provide the best combination of properties for true muscle-like actuation. DEs behave as compliant capacitors, expanding in area and shrinking in thickness when a voltage is applied. Materials combining very high energy densities, strains, and efficiencies have been known for some time. To date, however, the widespread adoption of DEs has been hindered by premature breakdown and the requirement for high voltages and bulky support frames. Recent advances seem poised to remove these restrictions and allow for the production of highly reliable, high-performance transducers for artificial muscle applications.

  13. Mechanics of dielectric elastomer-activated deformable transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Zhou, Jinxiong; Sun, Wenjie; Wu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ling

    2014-09-01

    Laminating a thin layer of elastomeric grating on the surface of a prestretched dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane forms a basic design of electrically tunable transmission grating. We analyze the inhomogeneous deformation of a circular multiple-region configuration. Variation of the geometric and material parameters, as well as of the critical condition determined by loss of tension instability, is probed to aid the design of a DE-based deformable grating. The predicted changes in the grating period agree substantially with the experimental results reported by Aschwanden et al (Aschwanden et al 2007 IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 19 1090).

  14. Nonlinear electroelastic deformations of dielectric elastomer composites: I-Ideal elastic dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Victor; Lopez-Pamies, Oscar

    2017-02-01

    This paper puts forth homogenization solutions for the macroscopic elastic dielectric response-under finite deformations and finite electric fields-of ideal elastic dielectric composites with two-phase isotropic particulate microstructures. Specifically, solutions are presented for three classes of microstructures: (i) an isotropic iterative microstructure wherein the particles are infinitely polydisperse in size, (ii) an isotropic distribution of polydisperse spherical particles of a finite number of different sizes, and (iii) an isotropic distribution of monodisperse spherical particles. The solution for the iterative microstructure, which corresponds to the viscosity solution of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation in five "space" variables, is constructed by means of a novel high-order WENO finite-difference scheme. On the other hand, the solutions for the microstructures with spherical particles are constructed by means of hybrid finite elements. Prompted by the functional features shared by all three obtained solutions, a simple closed-form approximation is proposed for the macroscopic elastic dielectric response of ideal elastic dielectric composites with any type of (non-percolative) isotropic particulate microstructure. As elaborated in a companion paper, the proposed approximate solution proves particularly useful as a fundamental building block to generate approximate solutions for the macroscopic elastic dielectric response of dielectric elastomer composites made up of non-Gaussian dielectric elastomers filled with nonlinear elastic dielectric particles.

  15. Acoustic transducer based on dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Christian; Maas, Jügen

    2012-04-01

    Dielectric electroactive polymers are thin films based on elastomeric material coated with compliant and conductive electrodes. By applying an electrical field, the polymer performs large deformations, which can be utilized to generate sound waves. When using such kind of electrostatic loudspeakers, no additional resonating sound boxes are required and the vibrating mass is very lightweight, resulting in an excellent impulse and wide-band frequency response. For the loudspeaker's operation both an electrical bias voltage and a mechanical bias stress have to be applied. In this contribution different possibilities are presented to generate the mechanical bias stress. The design of an appropriate power electronics for the acoustic transducer, which is build of standard components, is also described. Finally, the loudspeaker concepts are evaluated by experiments in an anechoic room.

  16. Zipping dielectric elastomer actuators: characterization, design and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffli, L.; Rosset, S.; Shea, H. R.

    2013-10-01

    We report on miniature dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) operating in zipping mode with an analytical model that predicts their behavior. Electrostatic zipping is a well-known mechanism in silicon MEMS to obtain large deformations and forces at lower voltages than for parallel plate electrostatic actuation. We extend this concept to DEAs, which allows us to obtain much larger out-of-plane displacements compared to silicon thanks to the softness of the elastomer membrane. We study experimentally the effect of sidewall angles and elastomer prestretch on 2.3 mm diameter actuators with PDMS membranes. With 15° and 22.5° sidewall angles, the devices zip in a bistable manner down 300 μm to the bottom of the chambers. The highly tunable bistable behavior is controllable by both chamber geometry and membrane parameters. Other specific characteristics of zipping DEAs include well-controlled deflected shape, tunable displacement versus voltage characteristics to virtually any shape, including multi-stable modes, sealing of embedded holes or channels for valving action and the reduction of the operating voltage. These properties make zipping DEAs an excellent candidate for applications such as integrated microfluidics actuators or Braille displays.

  17. Bio-lnspired dielectric elastomer actuator with AgNWs coated on carbon black electrode.

    PubMed

    Jun, K W; Lee, J M; Lee, J Y; Ohl, I K

    2014-10-01

    Bio-inspired dielectric elastomer actuators with AgNW-coated carbon black electrodes were developed in this study. The novel elastomer actuators show large in-plane deformations by electrical stimulation through the both electrodes. When a certain input voltage is applied to the elastomer electrode, the electrostatic force between cathode and anode electrodes compress the dielectric elastomer film, resulting large in in-plane direction deformation. The expanded area of the circular actuation device under 70 mV/m electric field was measured up to 50% due to a synergistic effect of highly conductive AgNW network and ultrahigh capacitance of carbon black electrodes.

  18. Cylindrical dielectric elastomer actuators reinforced with inextensible fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah C. S.

    2006-03-01

    Novel actuator configurations for various applications can be obtained using cylindrical dielectric elastomer actuators. A new configuration for a contractile electro-elastomer is presented here for the first time. A cylindrical or tubular configuration is used to realize simultaneous axial shortening and radial expansion when a voltage is applied across the thickness of the hollow cylinder. In this configuration, the inner and outer surfaces of a cylindrical dielectric elastomer are coated with compliant electrodes. The outer cylindrical surface is then enclosed by a network of helical fibers that are very thin, very flexible and inextensible. Fiber networks or cord families are commonly used in many different materials and for a variety of applications. The primary purpose of these networks is structural, that is to say, for reinforcement. The composite active structure proposed here is reminiscent of the McKibben actuator, a pneumatically actuated cylindrical construct consisting of a flexible rubber bladder sheathed in a fiber network, which garners its impressive contracting force from the inextensible fibers that prevent axial extension when an inflation pressure is applied to the internal bladder [1]. The system is modeled using an electro- elastic formulation derived from the large deformation theory of reinforced cylinders [2]. The model combines Maxwell-Faraday electrostatics and nonlinear elasticity theory [3]. Illustratively, solutions are obtained assuming a Mooney-Rivlin material model for a silicone actuator. The results indicate that the relationship between the axial contraction force and the axial shortening is linear for the voltage range considered. The importance of other system parameters such as the fiber angle and the applied constant pressure is also reported.

  19. Tubular dielectric elastomer actuator for active fluidic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoul, David; Pei, Qibing

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel low-profile, biomimetic dielectric elastomer tubular actuator capable of actively controlling hydraulic flow. The tubular actuator has been established as a reliable tunable valve, pinching a secondary silicone tube completely shut in the absence of a fluidic pressure bias or voltage, offering a high degree of resistance against fluidic flow, and able to open and completely remove this resistance to flow with an applied low power actuation voltage. The system demonstrates a rise in pressure of ∼3.0 kPa when the dielectric elastomer valve is in the passive, unactuated state, and there is a quadratic fall in this pressure with increasing actuation voltage, until ∼0 kPa is reached at 2.4 kV. The device is reliable for at least 2000 actuation cycles for voltages at or below 2.2 kV. Furthermore, modeling of the actuator and fluidic system yields results consistent with the observed experimental dependence of intrasystem pressure on input flow rate, actuator prestretch, and actuation voltage. To our knowledge, this is the first actuator of its type that can control fluid flow by directly actuating the walls of a tube. Potential applications may include an implantable artificial sphincter, part of a peristaltic pump, or a computerized valve for fluidic or pneumatic control.

  20. Asymmetry bistability for a coupled dielectric elastomer minimum energy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Wen-Ming; Zou, Hong-Xiang; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a novel design of asymmetry bistability for a coupled dielectric elastomer minimum energy structure (DEMES) is presented. The structure can be stable both in the stretched and curved configurations, which are induced by the geometry coupling effect of two DEMESs with perpendicular bending axes. The unique asymmetry bistability and fully flexible compact design of the coupled DEMES can enrich the active morphing modes of the dielectric elastomer actuators. A theoretical model of the system’s strain energy is established to explain the bistability. Furthermore, a prototype is fabricated to verify the conceptual design. The experimental results show that when the applied voltage is below a critical transition one, the structure behaves as a conventional DEMES, once the applied voltage exceeds the critical voltage, the structure could change from the stretched (curved) configuration to the curved (stretched) configuration abruptly and maintain in a new stable configuration when the voltage is removed. A multi-segment structure with the coupled DEMES is also presented and fabricated, and it displays various voltage-actuated morphings. It indicates that the coupled DEMES and the multi-segment structures can be useful for the soft and shape-shifting robots.

  1. Voltage-induced pinnacle response in the dynamics of dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Junshi; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2016-05-01

    A dielectric elastomer is capable of large deformation under alternating electromechanical excitation. In this paper, several dynamic properties of a dielectric elastomer are investigated, in particular the effect of strain stiffening. A theoretical model is established that shows that the bias voltage affects the amplitude and the response waveform during vibration, a curve with the shape of a pinnacle. We also describe the underlying physical mechanism by considering the molecular chain length and cross-linking density of the material. A phase portrait is presented that reveals the transitional behavior of the dielectric elastomer as it switches between soft and stiffened vibration states.

  2. Two percolation thresholds and remarkably high dielectric permittivity in pristine carbon nanotube/elastomer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehzad, Khurram; Hakro, Ayaz Ali; Zeng, You; Yao, Shang-Hong; Xiao-Hong, Yi; Mumtaz, Muhammad; Nadeem, Kashif; Khisro, Nasir Said; Dang, Zhi-Min

    2015-11-01

    Pristine carbon nanotube (CNT)/elastomer composites were fabricated using pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a thermoplastic elastomer. These composites exhibited a unique phenomenon of two electrical percolation thresholds that invoked very high dielectric values for the resulting composites. The first percolation was associated with a relatively low dielectric constant value of about 100, while in the vicinity of the second percolation threshold a very high dielectric constant value of 8,000 was achieved. The presence of two percolation thresholds was attributed to the unique distribution patterns of CNTs that ensued in a CNT/elastomer composite system with unique electrical properties.

  3. A lightweight push-pull acoustic transducer composed of a pair of dielectric elastomer films.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takehiro; Ando, Akio; Ono, Kazuho; Morita, Yuichi; Hosoda, Kosuke; Ishii, Daisaku; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2013-11-01

    A lightweight push-pull acoustic transducer using dielectric elastomer films was proposed for use in advanced audio systems in homes. The push-pull structure consists of two dielectric elastomer films developed to serve as an electroactive polymer. The transducer utilizes the change in the surface area of the dielectric elastomer film, induced by an electric-field-induced change in the thickness, for sound generation. The resonance frequency of the transducer was derived from modeling the push-pull configuration to estimate the lower limit of the frequency range. Measurement results presented an advantage of push-pull driving in the suppression of harmonic distortion.

  4. Chemical Modification and Structure-property Relationships of Acrylic and Ionomeric Thermoplastic Elastomer Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargantwar, Pruthesh Hariharrao

    Block copolymers (BCs) have remained at the forefront of materials research due to their versatility in applications ranging from hot-melt/pressure-sensitive adhesives and impact modifiers to compatibilizing agents and vibration-dampening/nanotemplating media. Of particular interest are macromolecules composed of two or more chemically dissimilar blocks covalently linked together to form triblock or pentablock copolymers. If the blocks are sufficiently incompatible and the copolymer behaves as a thermoplastic elastomer, the molecules can spontaneously self-assemble to form nanostructured materials that exhibit shape memory due to the formation of a supramolecular network. The BCs of these types are termed as conventional. When BCs contain blocks having ionic moieties such as sulfonic acid groups, they are termed as block ionomers. Designing new systems based on either conventional or ionic BCs, characterizing their structure-property relationships and later using them as electroacive polymers form the essential objectives of this work. Electroactive polymers (EAPs) exhibit electromechanical actuation when stimulated by an external electric field. In the first part of this work, it is shown that BCs resolve some of the outstanding problems presently encountered in the design of two different classes of EAP actuators: dielectric elastomers (DEs) and ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs). All-acrylic triblock copolymer gels used as DEs actuate with high efficacy without any requirement of mechanical prestrain and, thus, eliminate the need for bulky and heavy hardware essential with prestrained dielectric actuators, as well as material problems associated with stress relaxation. The dependence of actuation behavior on gel morphology as evaluated from mechanical and microstructure studies is observed. In the case of IPMCs, ionic BCs employed in this study greatly facilitate processing compared to other contenders such as NafionRTM, which is commonly used in this class

  5. Experimental investigations on energy harvesting performance of dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongquan; Liu, Xuejing; Xue, Huanhuan; Chen, Hualing; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the emerging technology of energy harvesting based on dielectric elastomers (DE), a new type of functional materials belonging to the family of Electroactive Polymers (EAPs), is presented with emphasis on its performance characteristics and some key influencing factors. At first, on the basic principle of DE energy harvesting, the effects of some control parameters are theoretically analyzed under certain mechanical and electrical constraints. Then, a type of annular DE generator using the commercial elastomers of VHB 4910 (3M, USA), is specially designed and fabricated. A series of experimental tests for the device's energy harvesting performance are implemented at different pre-stretch ratios, stretch amplitudes (displacements), and bias voltages in the constant charge (open-circuit) condition. The experiment results demonstrate the associated influence laws of the above control parameters on the performance of the DE generator, and have good consistent with those obtained from the theoretical analysis. This study is expected to provide a helpful guidance for the design and operation of practical DE energy harvesting devices/systems.

  6. Fully printed 3 microns thick dielectric elastomer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, A.; Rosset, S.; Shea, H.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a new fabrication technique to print thin dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs), reducing the driving voltage below 300 V while keeping good actuation performance. With operation voltages in the kV-range, standard DEAs are limited in terms of potential applications. Using thinner membranes is one of the few existing methods to achieve lower operation voltages. Typical DEAs have membranes in the 20-100 μm range, values below which membrane fabrication becomes challenging and the membrane quality and uniformity degrade. Using pad printing we produced thin silicone elastomer membranes, on which we pad-printed compliant electrodes. We then fabricated DEAs by assembling two membranes back to back. We obtain an actuation strain of 7.5% at only 245 V on a 3 μm thick DEA. In order to investigate the stiffening impact of the electrodes we developed a simple DEA model that includes their mechanical properties. We also developed a strain-mapping algorithm based on optical correlation. The simulation results and the strain-mapping measurements confirm that the stiffening impact of the electrodes increases for thinner membranes. Electrodes are an important element that cannot be neglected in the design and optimization of ultra-thin DEAs.

  7. An electronically tunable duct silencer using dielectric elastomer actuators.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenbo; Godaba, Hareesh; Cui, Yongdong; Foo, Choon Chiang; Debiasi, Marco; Zhu, Jian

    2015-09-01

    A duct silencer with tunable acoustic characteristics is presented in this paper. Dielectric elastomer, a smart material with lightweight, high elastic energy density and large deformation under high direct current/alternating current voltages, was used to fabricate this duct silencer. The acoustic performances and tunable mechanisms of this duct silencer were experimentally investigated. It was found that all the resonance peaks of this duct silencer could be adjusted using external control signals without any additional mechanical part. The physics of the tunable mechanism is further discussed based on the electro-mechanical interactions using finite element analysis. The present promising results also provide insight into the appropriateness of the duct silencer for possible use as next generation acoustic treatment device to replace the traditional acoustic treatment.

  8. Dynamic analyses of viscoelastic dielectric elastomers incorporating viscous damping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Zhao, Jianwen; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, based on the standard linear solid rheological model, a dynamics model of viscoelastic dielectric elastomers (DEs) is developed with incorporation of viscous damping effect. Numerical calculations are employed to predict the damping effect on the dynamic performance of DEs. With increase of damping force, the DEs show weak nonlinearity and vibration strength. Phase diagrams and Poincaré maps are utilized to detect the dynamic stability of DEs, and the results indicate that a transition from aperiodic vibration to quasi-periodic vibration occurs with enlargement of damping force. The resonance properties of DEs including damping effect are subsequently analyzed, demonstrating a reduction of resonant frequency and resonance peak with increase of damping force.

  9. Electromechanical deformation of conical dielectric elastomer actuator with hydrogel electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Sun, Wenjie; Chen, Hualing; Liu, Lei; Li, Bo; Li, Dichen

    2016-03-01

    A conical Dielectric Elastomer Actuator (DEA) undergoes large actuation strain in longitudinal direction when subject to a voltage across the membrane. The conical DEA is modeled using continuum mechanics and multilayered material thermodynamic theories which can consider not only the inhomogeneous deformation of the DEA but also the effect of elastomeric electrodes on the DEA. Hydrogels with lithium chloride electrolyte are synthesized and introduced as electrodes. The theory coincides well with the experimental results and succeeds in predicting the occurrence of loss of tension. At a low level of pre-stretch λp=2 , electric breakdown always occurs before the loss of tension, independent of shear modulus of hydrogels. When the pre-stretch increases to 4, the dominating failure mode changes from electric breakdown to loss of tension. At μGE L=6 kPa , loss of tension and electric breakdown almost happen simultaneously and the maximum actuation strain occurs at λp=4 .

  10. A solid-state dielectric elastomer switch for soft logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Nixon; Slipher, Geoffrey A.; O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Mrozek, Randy A.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a stretchable solid-state electronic switching material that operates at high voltage potentials, as well as a switch material benchmarking technique that utilizes a modular dielectric elastomer (artificial muscle) ring oscillator. The solid-state switching material was integrated into our oscillator, which self-started after 16 s and performed 5 oscillations at a frequency of 1.05 Hz with 3.25 kV DC input. Our materials-by-design approach for the nickel filled polydimethylsiloxane based switch has resulted in significant improvements over previous carbon grease-based switches in four key areas, namely, sharpness of switching behavior upon applied stretch, magnitude of electrical resistance change, ease of manufacture, and production rate. Switch lifetime was demonstrated to be in the range of tens to hundreds of cycles with the current process. An interesting and potentially useful strain-based switching hysteresis behavior is also presented.

  11. Giant voltage-induced deformation of a dielectric elastomer under a constant pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godaba, Hareesh; Foo, Choon Chiang; Zhang, Zhi Qian; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Zhu, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators coupled with liquid have recently been developed as soft pumps, soft lenses, Braille displays, etc. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a dielectric elastomer actuator, which is coupled with water. The experiments demonstrate that the membrane of a dielectric elastomer can achieve a giant voltage-induced area strain of 1165%, when subject to a constant pressure. Both theory and experiment show that the pressure plays an important role in determining the electromechanical behaviour. The experiments also suggest that the dielectric elastomer actuators, when coupled with liquid, may suffer mechanical instability and collapse after a large amount of liquid is enclosed by the membrane. This failure mode needs to be taken into account in designing soft actuators.

  12. Electromechanical phase transition in dielectric elastomers under uniaxial tension and electrical voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rui; Suo, Zhigang

    2012-02-01

    Subject to forces and voltage, a dielectric elastomer may undergo electromechanical phase transition. A phase diagram is constructed for an ideal dielectric elastomer membrane under uniaxial force and voltage, reminiscent of the phase diagram for liquid-vapor transition of a pure substance. We identify a critical point for the electromechanical phase transition. Two states of deformation (thick and thin) may coexist during the phase transition, with the mismatch in lateral stretch accommodated by wrinkling of the membrane in the thin state. The processes of electromechanical phase transition under various conditions are discussed. A reversible cycle is suggested for electromechanical energy conversion using the dielectric elastomer membrane, analogous to the classical Carnot cycle for a heat engine. The amount of energy conversion, however, is limited by failure of the dielectric elastomer due to electrical breakdown. With a particular combination of material properties, the electromechanical energy conversion can be significantly extended by taking advantage of the phase transition without electrical breakdown.

  13. Modelling and control of double-cone dielectric elastomer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, F.; Francesconi, A.

    2016-09-01

    Among various dielectric elastomer devices, cone actuators are of large interest for their multi-degree-of-freedom design. These objects combine the common advantages of dielectric elastomers (i.e. solid-state actuation, self-sensing capability, high conversion efficiency, light weight and low cost) with the possibility to actuate more than one degree of freedom in a single device. The potential applications of this feature in robotics are huge, making cone actuators very attractive. This work focuses on rotational degrees of freedom to complete existing literature and improve the understanding of such aspect. Simple tools are presented for the performance prediction of the device: finite element method simulations and interpolating relations have been used to assess the actuator steady-state behaviour in terms of torque and rotation as a function of geometric parameters. Results are interpolated by fit relations accounting for all the relevant parameters. The obtained data are validated through comparison with experimental results: steady-state torque and rotation are determined at a given high voltage actuation. In addition, the transient response to step input has been measured and, as a result, the voltage-to-torque and the voltage-to-rotation transfer functions are obtained. Experimental data are collected and used to validate the prediction capability of the transfer function in terms of time response to step input and frequency response. The developed static and dynamic models have been employed to implement a feedback compensator that controls the device motion; the simulated behaviour is compared to experimental data, resulting in a maximum prediction error of 7.5%.

  14. Precision synthesis of bio-based acrylic thermoplastic elastomer by RAFT polymerization of itaconic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kotaro; Lee, Dong-Hyung; Nagai, Kanji; Kamigaito, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Bio-based polymer materials from renewable resources have recently become a growing research focus. Herein, a novel thermoplastic elastomer is developed via controlled/living radical polymerization of plant-derived itaconic acid derivatives, which are some of the most abundant renewable acrylic monomers obtained via the fermentation of starch. The reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerizations of itaconic acid imides, such as N-phenylitaconimide and N-(p-tolyl)itaconimide, and itaconic acid esters, such as di-n-butyl itaconate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) itaconate, are examined using a series of RAFT agents to afford well-defined polymers. The number-average molecular weights of these polymers increase with the monomer conversion while retaining relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. Based on the successful controlled/living polymerization, sequential block copolymerization is subsequently investigated using mono- and di-functional RAFT agents to produce block copolymers with soft poly(itaconate) and hard poly(itaconimide) segments. The properties of the obtained triblock copolymer are evaluated as bio-based acrylic thermoplastic elastomers.

  15. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes/polymer composites in absence and presence of acrylic elastomer (ACM).

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Rath, T; Mahaling, R N; Mukherjee, M; Khatua, B B; Das, C K

    2009-05-01

    Polyetherimide/Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs) nanocomposites containing as-received and modified (COOH-MWNT) carbon nanotubes were prepared through melt process in extruder and then compression molded. Thermal properties of the composites were characterized by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images showed that the MWNTs were well dispersed and formed an intimate contact with the polymer matrix without any agglomeration. However the incorporation of modified carbon nanotubes formed fascinating, highly crosslinked, and compact network structure throughout the polymer matrix. This showed the increased adhesion of PEI with modified MWNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed high degree of dispersion of modified MWNTs along with broken ends. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed a marginal increase in storage modulus (E') and glass transition temperature (T(g)) with the addition of MWNTs. Increase in tensile strength and impact strength of composites confirmed the use the MWNTs as possible reinforcement agent. Both thermal and electrical conductivity of composites increased, but effect is more pronounced on modification due to formation of network of carbon nanotubes. Addition of acrylic elastomer to developed PEI/MWNTs (modified) nanocomposites resulted in the further increase in thermal and electrical properties due to the formation of additional bond between MWNTs and acrylic elastomers at the interface. All the results presented are well corroborated by SEM and FESEM studies.

  16. From boots to buoys: promises and challenges of dielectric elastomer energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornbluh, Roy D.; Pelrine, Ron; Prahlad, Harsha; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; McCoy, Brian; Kim, Susan; Eckerle, Joseph; Low, Tom

    2011-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers offer the promise of energy harvesting with few moving parts. Power can be produced simply by stretching and contracting a relatively low-cost rubbery material. This simplicity, combined with demonstrated high energy density and high efficiency, suggests that dielectric elastomers are promising for a wide range of energy harvesting applications. Indeed, dielectric elastomers have been demonstrated to harvest energy from human walking, ocean waves, flowing water, blowing wind, and pushing buttons. While the technology is promising, there are challenges that must be addressed if dielectric elastomers are to be a successful and economically viable energy harvesting technology. These challenges include developing materials and packaging that sustains long lifetime over a range of environmental conditions, design of the devices that stretch the elastomer material, as well as system issues such as practical and efficient energy harvesting circuits. Progress has been made in many of these areas. We have demonstrated energy harvesting transducers that have operated over 5 million cycles. We have also shown the ability of dielectric elastomer material to survive for months underwater while undergoing voltage cycling. We have shown circuits capable of 78% energy harvesting efficiency. While the possibility of long lifetime has been demonstrated at the watt level, reliably scaling up to the power levels required for providing renewable energy to the power grid or for local use will likely require further development from the material through to the systems level.

  17. The electro-mechanical phase transition of Gent model dielectric elastomer tube with two material constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liwu; Luo, Xiaojian; Fei, Fan; Wang, Yixing; Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Yanju

    2013-04-01

    Applied to voltage, a dielectric elastomer membrane may deform into a mixture of two states under certain conditions. One of which is the flat state and the other is the wrinkled state. In the flat state, the membrane is relatively thick with a small area, while on the contrary, in the wrinkled state, the membrane is relatively thin with a large area. The coexistence of these two states may cause the electromechanical phase transition of dielectric elastomer. The phase diagram of idea dielectric elastomer membrane under unidirectional stress and voltage inspired us to think about the liquid-to-vapor phase transition of pure substance. The practical working cycle of a steam engine includes the thermodynamical process of liquid-to-vapor phase transition, the fact is that the steam engine will do the maximum work if undergoing the phase transition process. In this paper, in order to consider the influence of coexistent state of dielectric elastomer, we investigate the homogeneous deformation of the dielectric elastomer tube. The theoretical model is built and the relationship between external loads and stretch are got, we can see that the elastomer tube experiences the coexistent state before reaching the stretching limit from the diagram. We think these results can guide the design and manufacture of energy harvesting equipments.

  18. Adhesion promoters for large scale fabrication of dielectric elastomer stack transducers (DESTs) made of pre-fabricated dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotepaß, T.; Förster-Zügel, F.; Mößinger, H.; Schlaak, H. F.

    2015-04-01

    Multilayer dielectric elastomer stack transducers (DESTs) are a promising new transducer technology with many applications in different industry sectors, like medical devices, human-machine-interaction, etc. Stacked dielectric elastomer transducers show larger thickness contraction driven by lower voltages than transducers made from a single dielectric layer. Traditionally multilayered DESTs are produced by repeatedly cross-linking a liquid elastomeric pre-polymer into the required shape. Our recent research focusses on a novel fabrication method for large scale stack transducers with a surface area over 200 x 300 mm by processing pre-fabricated elastomeric thin films of less than 50 μm thicknesses. The thin films are provided as two- or three-layer composites, where the elastomer is sandwiched between one or two sacrificial liners. Separating the elastomeric film from the residual layers and assembling them into dielectric elastomer stack transducers poses many challenges concerning adhesion, since the dielectric film merely separates from the liner if the adhesive forces between them are overcome. Conversely, during the assembly of a dielectric elastomer stack transducer, adhesive forces have to be established between two elastomeric layers or between the dielectric and the electrode layer. The very low Young's modulus of at least one adhesion partner requires suitable means of increasing the adhesive forces between the different adhesive layers of a dielectric elastomer stack transducer to prevent a delamination of the transducer during its lifetime. This work evaluates different surface activation treatments - corona, low-pressure plasma and UV-light - and their applicability in the production of large scale DESTs made from pre-fabricated elastomeric films.

  19. Temporal change in the electromechanical properties of dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures

    SciTech Connect

    Buchberger, G. Hauser, B.; Jakoby, B.; Hilber, W.; Schoeftner, J.; Bauer, S.

    2014-06-07

    Dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures (DEMES) are soft electronic transducers and energy harvesters with potential for consumer goods. The temporal change in their electromechanical properties is of major importance for engineering tasks. Therefore, we study acrylic DEMES by impedance spectroscopy and by optical methods for a total time period of approx. 4.5 months. We apply either compliant electrodes from carbon black particles only or fluid electrodes from a mixture of carbon black particles and silicone oil. From the measurement data, the equivalent series capacitances and resistances as well as the bending angles of the transducers are obtained. We find that the equivalent series capacitances change in average between −12 %/1000 h and −4.0 %/1000 h, while the bending angles decrease linearly with slopes ranging from −15 %/1000 h to −7 %/1000 h. Transducers with high initial bending angles and electrodes from carbon black particles show the smallest changes of the electromechanical characteristics. The capacitances decrease faster for DEMES with fluid electrodes. Some DEMES of this type reveal huge and unpredictable fluctuations of the resistances over time due to the ageing of the contacts. Design guidelines for DEMES follow directly from the observed transient changes of their electromechanical performance.

  20. Dielectric elastomer peristaltic pump module with finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Guoyong; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Junjie; Li, Tiefeng; Qu, Shaoxing; Yang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Inspired by various peristaltic structures existing in nature, several bionic peristaltic actuators have been developed. In this study, we propose a novel dielectric elastomer peristaltic pump consisting of short tubular modules, with the saline solution as the electrodes. We investigate the performance of this soft pump module under hydraulic pressure and voltage via experiments and an analytical model based on nonlinear field theory. It is observed that the individual pump module undergoes finite deformation and may experience electromechanical instability during operations. The driving pressure and displaced volume of the peristaltic pump module can be modulated by applied voltage. The efficiency of the pump module is enhanced by alternating current voltage, which can suppress the electromechanical pull-in instability. An analytical model is developed within the framework of the nonlinear field theory, and its predictive capacity is checked by experimental observations. The effects of the prestretch, aspect ratio, and voltage on the performance of the pump modules are characterized by the analytical model. This work can guide the designs of soft active peristaltic pumps in the field of artificial organs and industrial conveying systems.

  1. Flexible dielectric elastomer actuators for wearable human-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzmacher, Christian; Biggs, James; Srinivasan, Mandayam

    2006-03-01

    Wearable dielectric elastomer actuators have the potential to enable new technologies, such as tactile feedback gloves for virtual reality, and to improve existing devices, such as automatic blood pressure cuffs. They are potentially lighter, quieter, thinner, simpler, and cheaper than pneumatic and hydraulic systems now used to make compliant, actuated interfaces with the human body. Achieving good performance without using a rigid frame to prestrain the actuator is a fundamental challenge in using these actuators on body. To answer this challenge, a new type of fiber-prestrained composite actuator was developed. Equations that facilitate design of the actuator are presented, along with FE analysis, material tests, and experimental results from prototypes. Bending stiffness of the actuator material was found to be comparable to textiles used in clothing, confirming wearability. Two roll-to-roll machines are also presented that permit manufacture of this material in bulk as a modular, compact, prestressed composite that can be cut, stacked, and staggered, in order to build up actuators for a range of desired forces and displacements. The electromechanical properties of single- layered actuators manufactured by this method were measured (N=5). At non-damaging voltages, blocking force ranged from 3,7-5,0 gram per centimeter of actuator width, with linear strains of 20,0-30%. Driving the actuators to breakdown produced maximum force of 8,3-10 gram/cm, and actuation strain in excess 30%. Using this actuator, a prototype tactile display was constructed and demonstrated.

  2. Colour gamuts in polychromatic dielectric elastomer artificial chromatophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Cerruto, Antonio; Winters, Amy; Roke, Calum

    2014-03-01

    Chromatophores are the colour changing organelles in the skins of animals including fish and cephalopods. The ability of cephalopods in particular to rapidly change their colouration in response to environmental changes, for example to camouflage against a new background, and in social situations, for example to attract a mate or repel a rival, is extremely attractive for engineering, medical, active clothing and biomimetic robotic applications. The rapid response of these chromatophores is possible by the direct coupling of fast acting muscle and pigmented saccules. In artificial chromatophores we are able to mimic this structure using electroactive polymer artificial muscles. In contrast to prior research which has demonstrated monochromatic artificial chromatophores, here we consider a novel multi-colour, multi-layer, artificial chromatophore structure inspired by the complex dermal chromatophore unit in nature and which exploits dielectric elastomer artificial muscles as the electroactive actuation mechanism. We investigate the optical properties of this chromatophore unit and explore the range of colours and effects that a single unit and a matrix of chromatophores can produce. The colour gamut of the multi-colour chromatophore is analysed and shows its suitability for practical display and camouflage applications. It is demonstrated how, by varying actuator strain and chromatophore base colour, the gamut can be shifted through colour space, thereby tuning the artificial chromatophore to a specific environment or application.

  3. Dielectric elastomer actuators for octopus inspired suction cups.

    PubMed

    Follador, M; Tramacere, F; Mazzolai, B

    2014-09-25

    Suction cups are often found in nature as attachment strategy in water. Nevertheless, the application of the artificial counterpart is limited by the dimension of the actuators and their usability in wet conditions. A novel design for the development of a suction cup inspired by octopus suckers is presented. The main focus of this research was on the modelling and characterization of the actuation unit, and a first prototype of the suction cup was realized as a proof of concept. The actuation of the suction cup is based on dielectric elastomer actuators. The presented device works in a wet environment, has an integrated actuation system, and is soft. The dimensions of the artificial suction cups are comparable to proximal octopus suckers, and the attachment mechanism is similar to the biological counterpart. The design approach proposed for the actuator allows the definition of the parameters for its development and for obtaining a desired pressure in water. The fabricated actuator is able to produce up to 6 kPa of pressure in water, reaching the maximum pressure in less than 300 ms.

  4. Opportunities of hydrostatically coupled dielectric elastomer actuators for haptic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2011-04-01

    As a means to improve versatility and safety of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) for several fields of application, so-called 'hydrostatically coupled' DEAs (HC-DEAs) have recently been described. HC-DEAs are based on an incompressible fluid that mechanically couples a DE-based active part to a passive part interfaced to the load, so as to enable hydrostatic transmission. This paper presents ongoing developments of HC-DEAs and potential applications in the field of haptics. Three specific examples are considered. The first deals with a wearable tactile display used to provide users with tactile feedback during electronic navigation in virtual environments. The display consists of HCDEAs arranged in contact with finger tips. As a second example, an up-scaled prototype version of an 8-dots refreshable cell for dynamic Braille displays is shown. Each Braille dot consists of a miniature HC-DEA, with a diameter lower than 2 mm. The third example refers to a device for finger rehabilitation, conceived to work as a sort of active version of a rehabilitation squeezing ball. The device is designed to dynamically change its compliance according to an electric control. The three examples of applications intend to show the potential of the new technology and the prospective opportunities for haptic interfaces.

  5. Challenges of using dielectric elastomer actuators to tune liquid lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keong, Gih-Keong; La, Thanh-Giang; Shiau, Li-Lynn; Tan, Adrian W. Y.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) have been adopted to tune liquid membrane lens, just like ciliary muscles do to the lens in human eye. However, it faces some challenges, such as high stress, membrane puncture, high driving voltage requirement, and limited focus distance (not more than 707cm), that limit its practical use. The design problem gets more complex as the liquid lens shares the same elastomeric membrane as the DEA. To address these challenges, we separate DEA from the lens membrane. Instead, a liquid-immersed DEA, which is safe from terminal failure, is used as a diaphragm pump to inflate or deflate the liquid lens by hydraulic pressure. This opens up the possibility that the DEA can be thinned down and stacked up to reduce the driving voltage, independent of the lens membrane thickness. Preliminary study showed that our 8-mm-diameter tunable lens can focus objects in the range of 15cm to 50cm with a small driving voltage of 1.8kV. Further miniaturization of DEA could achieve a driving voltage less than 1kV.

  6. A dielectric elastomer actuator thin membrane rotary motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Iain A.; Calius, Emilio P.; Gisby, Todd; Hale, Thom; McKay, Thomas; O'Brien, Benjamin; Walbran, Scott

    2009-03-01

    We describe a low profile and lightweight membrane rotary motor based on the dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA). In this motor phased actuation of electroded sectors of the motor membrane imparts orbital motion to a central gear that meshes with the rotor. Two motors were fabricated: a three phase and four phase with three electroded sectors (120°/sector) and four sectors (90°/sector) respectively. Square segments of 3M VHB4905 tape were stretched equibiaxially to 16 times their original area and each was attached to a rigid circular frame. Electroded sectors were actuated with square wave voltages up to 2.5kV. Torque/power characteristics were measured. Contactless orbiter displacements, measured with the rotor removed, were compared with simulation data calculated using a finite element model. A measured specific power of approximately 8mW/g (based on the DEA membrane weight), on one motor compares well with another motor technology. When the mass of the frame was included a peak specific power of 0.022mW/g was calculated. We expect that motor performance can be substantially improved by using a multilayer DEA configuration, enabling the delivery of direct drive high torques at low speeds for a range of applications. The motor is inherently scalable, flexible, flat, silent in operation, amenable to deposition-based manufacturing approaches, and uses relatively inexpensive materials.

  7. Modeling a dielectric elastomer as driven by triboelectric nanogenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-01-01

    By integrating a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) and a thin film dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), the DEA can be directly powered and controlled by the output of the TENG, which demonstrates a self-powered actuation system toward various practical applications in the fields of electronic skin and soft robotics. This paper describes a method to construct a physical model for this integrated TENG-DEA system on the basis of nonequilibrium thermodynamics and electrostatics induction theory. The model can precisely simulate the influences from both the viscoelasticity and current leakage to the output performance of the TENG, which can help us to better understand the interaction between TENG and DEA devices. Accordingly, the established electric field, the deformation strain of the DEA, and the output current from the TENG are systemically analyzed by using this model. A comparison between real measurements and simulation results confirms that the proposed model can predict the dynamic response of the DEA driven by contact-electrification and can also quantitatively analyze the relaxation of the tribo-induced strain due to the leakage behavior. Hence, the proposed model in this work could serve as a guidance for optimizing the devices in the future studies.

  8. Response analysis of dielectric elastomer spherical membrane to harmonic voltage and random pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaoling; Wang, Yong; Chen, Michael Z. Q.; Huang, Zhilong

    2017-03-01

    Spherical membranes consisting of dielectric elastomer play important roles in flexible and stretchable devices, such as flexible actuators, sensors and loudspeakers. Executing various functions of devices depends on the dynamical behaviors of dielectric elastomer spherical membranes to external electrical and/or mechanical excitations. This manuscript concentrates on the random aspect of dielectric elastomer spherical membranes, i.e., the random response to combined excitations of harmonic voltage and random pressure. To analytically evaluate the response statistics of the stretch ratio, a specific transformation and stochastic averaging technique are successively adopted to solve the strongly nonlinear equation with respect to the stretch ratio. The stochastic differential equations for the system first integral and the phase difference between harmonic excitation and response are first derived through this transformation. The Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation with respect to the stationary probability density of the system first integral and the phase difference is obtained. The stationary probability densities and the response statistics of the stretch ratio and its rate of change are then subsequently calculated. The phenomenon of stochastic jumps is found and the stochastic jump bifurcates with the variations of the frequency and the amplitude of the harmonic voltage and the intensity of the random pressure. The efficacy and accuracy of the analytical results are verified by comparing with the results from Monte Carlo simulation. Besides, the reliability of the dielectric elastomer spherical membrane is discussed briefly. The obtained results could provide options in implementing and designing dielectric elastomer structures for dynamic applications.

  9. Modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric M.; Snyder, Alan J.

    2003-07-01

    The electromechanical behavior of dielectric elastomers is to be exploited for medical application in artificial blood pumps. It is required that the pump diaphragm achieves a swept volume increase of 70 cc into a systolic pressure of 120 mmHg with the main design objective being volumetric efficiency. As such, a model that accommodates large deformation behavior is used. In order to design prosthetic blood pumps that closely mimic the natural pumping chambers of the heart, a dielectric elastomer diaphragm design is proposed. The elastomer's change in shape in response to the applied electric field will permit it to be the active element of the pump just as the ventricular walls are in the natural heart. A comprehensive analytical model that accounts for the combined elastic and dielectric behavior of the membrane is used to compute the stresses and deformations of the inflated membrane. Dielectric elastomers are often pre-strained in order to obtain optimal electromechanical performance. The resulting model incorporates pre-strain and shows how system parameters such as pre-strain, pressure, electric field, and edge constraints affect membrane deformation. The model predicts more than adequate volume displacement for moderate pre-strain of the elastomer.

  10. Fabrication and electromechanical examination of a spherical dielectric elastomer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, S.; Gooyers, M.; Soleimani, M.; Menon, C.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, a procedure for fabricating and testing a seamless spherical dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) is presented. In previously developed spherical prototypes, the DEA material is pre-strained by a rigid frame to improve the actuator’s output force; however, it is possible to pre-strain a spherical DEA by inflating the sample with a liquid or gas as long as the sample contains the pressure. In this work, a very compliant silicone-based material was used to fabricate a nearly spherical balloon-shaped prototype. The DEA sample was inflated by air and various electrical-actuation regimes were considered. The performance of the DEA sample was studied using an analytical and a finite element-based model. An Ogden hyperelastic model was used in formulation of the analytical model to include nonlinear behavior of the silicone material. Full statistical analysis of the experimental and numerical results was carried out using the root-mean-square (RMS) error and the normalized RMS error. The analytical and FEM results were in good agreement with the experimental data. According to modeling results, it was found that the DEA’s actuation force can be mainly improved by increasing the voltage, reducing the thickness, lowering the stiffness, and/or increasing the initial pressure. As an example, a three-fold increase of the actuation force was found when the thickness was reduced to half of its initial value. This improvement of the efficiency suggests that the spherical DEA is suitable for use in several applications if an appropriate design with optimal governing parameters is developed.

  11. Design of an innovative dielectric elastomer actuator for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, Francesco; Sansone, Francesco; Francesconi, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    The capability of Dielectric Elastomers to show large deformations under high voltage loads has been deeply investigated to develop a number of actuators concepts. From a space systems point of view, the advantages introduced by this class of smart materials are considerable and include high conversion efficiency, distributed actuation, self-sensing capability, light weight and low cost. This paper focuses on the design of a solid-state actuator capable of high positioning resolution. The use of Electroactive Polymers makes this device interesting for space mechanisms applications, such as antenna and sensor pointing, solar array orientation, attitude control, adaptive structures and robotic manipulators. In particular, such actuation suffers neither wear, nor fatigue issues and shows highly damped vibrations, thus requiring no maintenance and transferring low disturbance to the surrounding structures. The main weakness of this actuator is the relatively low force/torque values available. The proposed geometry allows two rotational degrees of freedom, and simulations are performed to measure the expected instant angular deflection at zero load and the stall torque of the actuator under a given high voltage load. Several geometric parameters are varied and their influence on the device behaviour is studied. Simplified relations are extrapolated from the numerical results and represent useful predicting tools for design purposes. Beside the expected static performances, the dynamic behaviour of the device is also assessed and the input/output transfer function is estimated. Finally, a prototype design for laboratory tests is presented; the experimental activity aims to validate the preliminary results obtained by numerical analysis.

  12. Mechanical properties of dielectric elastomer actuators with smart metallic compliant electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benslimane, Mohammed; Gravesen, Peter; Sommer-Larsen, Peter

    2002-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuator technology is based on electric field induced deformation. From the viewpoint of materials technology, many points must be addressed, among which are material dielectric properties, breakdown voltage, viscoelastic losses and elastomer spring mechanical properties. From the viewpoint of actuator manufacturing, we will mention elastomer thin film and fiber processing as well as compliant electrode design. However, among all the previously mentioned key-points, compliant electrode design remains the major problem to solve, as electrodes required to distribute the electric field in the material need to be at least as compliant as the active elastomer material. In this paper, we present the analysis of dielectric elastomer-based actuators made with metallic compliant electrodes that show a relatively good overall mechanical performance. Large displacements, force densities and low creep, as well as fast response and million cycles are achieved using micro-structuring and thin-film techniques. We have succeeded in making smart anisotropic compliant metallic electrodes that can maintain conductivity up to 33% expansion before breaking and loosing electrical connectivity. Actuators are made with a silicone elastomer as the active material and silver as coating electrodes. The spring constant of a 3-layer actuator consisting of silver electrodes with a thickness up to 1100 A and elastomer film with a thickness up to 50 micrometers is typically 2 times larger than that of the elastomer film taken alone. Force-displacement and constant load measurements are used as a basis to analyze the mechanical properties of the artificial muscle. Capacity measurements at high frequency in the kilohertz range are carried out to study the built-in sensor properties for feedback control of the actuator.

  13. Electroelastomers: applications of dielectric elastomer transducers for actuation, generation, and smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornbluh, Roy D.; Pelrine, Ron; Pei, Qibing; Heydt, Richard; Stanford, Scott; Oh, Seajin; Eckerle, Joseph

    2002-07-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) can overcome many limitations of traditional smart material and transducer technologies. A particularly promising class of EAP is dielectric elastomer, also known as electroelastomer. Dielectric elastomer transducers are rubbery polymer materials with compliant electrodes that have a large electromechanical response to an applied electric field. The technology has been developed to the point where exceptional performance has already been demonstrated: for example, actuated strains of over 300 percent. These strains and the corresponding energy densities are beyond those of other field-activated materials including piezoelectrics. Because of their unique characteristics and expected low cost, dielectric elastomer transducers are under development in a wide range of applications including multifunctional (combined actuation, structure, and sensing) muscle-like actuators for biomimetic robots; microelectromechanical systems (MEMS); smart skins; conformal loudspeakers; haptic displays; and replacements for electromagnetic and pneumatic actuators for industrial and commercial applications. Dielectric elastomers have shown unique performance in each of these applications; however, some further development is required before they can be integrated into products and smart-materials systems. Among the many issues that may ultimately determine the success or failure of the technology for specific applications are durability, operating voltage and power requirements, and the size, cost, and complexity of the required electronic driving circuitry.

  14. Tactile sensor integrated dielectric elastomer actuator for simultaneous actuation and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadooka, Kevin; Imamura, Hiroya; Taya, Minoru

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DE) are a subgroup of electroactive polymers which may be used as soft transducers. Such soft transducers exhibit high energy density and silent operation, which makes them desirable for life-like robotic systems such as a robotic hand. A robotic hand must be able to sense the object being manipulated, in terms of normal and shear force being applied, and note when contact has been achieved or lost. To this end, a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) with integrated tactile sensing has been developed to provide simultaneous actuation and sensing. The tactile sensing dielectric elastomer actuator consists of a unimorph-type structure, where the active portion is a laminate of alternating DE and electrode material which expands under applied voltage, and the sensing portion is a stiffer sensing dielectric elastomer which has no electrical connection to the active portion. Under applied voltage, the deformation of the active portion expands but is constrained on one side by the sensing portion, resulting in bending actuation. The sensing portion is a DE with electrodes patterned to form 2x2 capacitive sensing arrays. Dome-shaped bumps positioned over the sensing arrays redistribute tactile forces onto the sensor segments, so that measurement of the capacitance change across the array allows for reconstruction of magnitude and direction of the incoming force.

  15. Design of a MRI-compatible dielectric elastomer powered jet valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proulx, Sylvain; Chouinard, Patrick; Lucking Bigue, Jean-Philippe; Miron, Geneviève; Plante, Jean-Sébastien

    2011-04-01

    Binary Pneumatic Air Muscles (PAM) arranged in an elastically-averaged configuration can form a cost effective solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided robotic interventions like prostate cancer biopsies and brachytherapies. Such binary pneumatic manipulators require about 10 to 20 MRI-compatible valves to control the pressure state of each PAM. In this perspective, this paper presents the design of a novel dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) driven jet-valve to control the states of the PAMs. DEAs are MRI compatible actuators that are well suited to the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of the binary manipulation approach. The key feature of the proposed valve design is its 2 stages configuration in which the pilot stage is moved with minimal mechanical friction by a rotary antagonistic DEA made with acrylic polymer films. The prismatic geometry also integrates the jet nozzle within the DEA volume to provide a compact embodiment with a reduced number of parts. The low actuation stretches enabled by the rotary configuration minimize viscoelastic losses, and thus, maximize the frequency response of the actuator while maximizing its reliability potential. The design space of the proposed jet valve is studied using an Ogden hyperelastic model and the valve dynamics is predicted with a 1D Bergstrom-Boyce viscoelastic model. Altogether, the low friction of the pilot stage and optimized DEA dynamics provide an experimental shifting time of the complete assembly in the 200-300ms range. Results from this work suggest that the DEA driven jet valve has great potential for switching a large number of pneumatic circuits in a MRI environment with a compact, low cost and simple embodiment.

  16. Enhanced electromechanical performance of bio-based gelatin/glycerin dielectric elastomer by cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Ning, Nanying; Wang, Zhifei; Yao, Yang; Zhang, Liqun; Tian, Ming

    2015-10-05

    To meet the growing demand of environmental protection and resource saving, it is imperative to explore bio-based elastomers as next-generation dielectric elastomers (DEs). In this study, we used a bio-based gelatin/glycerin (GG) elastomer as the DE matrix because GG exhibits high dielectric constant (ɛr). Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), extracted from natural cellulose fibers, were used to improve the mechanical strength of GG elastomer. The results showed that CNCs with a large number of hydroxyl groups disrupted the hydrogen bonds between gelatin molecules and formed new stronger hydrogen bonds with gelatin molecules. A good interfacial adhesion between CNCs and GG was formed, and thus a good dispersion of CNCs in GG matrix was obtained, leading to the improved mechanical strength of GG. More interestingly, the ɛr of GG elastomer was obviously increased by adding 5 wt% of CNCs, ascribed to the increase in the polarizability of gelatin chains caused by the disruption of hydrogen bonds of gelatin. As a result, a 230% increase in the actuated strain at low electric field of GG was obtained by adding 5 wt% of CNCs. Since CNCs, gelatin and glycerol are all bio-based, this study offers a new method to prepare high performance DE for its application in biological and medical fields.

  17. Semicylindrical acoustic transducer from a dielectric elastomer film with compliant electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takehiro; Ono, Kazuho; Ando, Akio; Morita, Yuichi; Hosoda, Kosuke; Ishii, Daisaku

    2011-08-01

    A semicylindrical acoustic transducer was constructed using a dielectric elastomer film with compliant electrodes that is an electroactive polymer composed of a polyurethane elastomer base and polyethylene dioxythiophene/polystyrene sulfonate electrodes. The use of this dielectric elastomer is advantageous because polyurethane is a common material that keeps its shape without any rigid frame. Because the dielectric elastomer films are essentially incompressible, electric-field-induced thickness changes are usually translated into much larger changes of the film area and side length. Here it is proposed that this change in side length can be utilized for sound generation when the film is bent into a semicylindrical shape. Accordingly, a semicylindrical acoustic transducer was fabricated using a film of thickness of 300 μm and its acoustic characteristics were investigated. The transducer can be operated at low applied voltages by reducing the film thickness, as long as the film is thick enough to generate sufficient force to overcome sound radiation impedance. The second harmonic distortion of the transducer was also investigated as a function of the ratio of the direct current bias voltage to the alternating current audio signal amplitude.

  18. Viscoelastic creep and relaxation of dielectric elastomers characterized by a Kelvin-Voigt-Maxwell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Ru, Jie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen; Lu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    For dielectric elastomers (DEs), the inherent viscoelasticity leads to a time-dependent deformation during actuation. To describe such a viscoelastic behavior, a constitutive model is developed by utilizing a combined Kelvin-Voigt-Maxwell (KVM) model. The established model captures both the initial jumping deformation and the following slow creeping. Subsequently, with an employment of VHB 4910 elastomer, experiments are performed to validate the viscoelastic KVM model. The results indicate a good agreement between the simulation and experimental data. Effect of the parameters in KVM model on the viscoelastic deformation of DEs is also investigated.

  19. Experimental study on behaviors of dielectric elastomer based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kuangjun; Chuc, Nguyen Huu; Kwon, Hyeok Yong; Phuc, Vuong Hong; Koo, Jachoon; Lee, Youngkwan; Nam, Jaedo; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol

    2010-04-01

    Previously, the dielectric elastomer based on Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR), called synthetic elastomer has been reported by our group. It has the advantages that its characteristics can be modified according to the requirements of performances, and thus, it is applicable to a wide variety of applications. In this paper, we address the effects of additives and vulcanization conditions on the overall performance of synthetic elastomer. In the present work, factors to have effects on the performances are extracted, e.g additives such as dioctyl phthalate (DOP), barium titanium dioxide (BaTiO3) and vulcanization conditions such as dicumyl peroxide (DCP), cross-linking times. Also, it is described how the performances can be optimized by using DOE (Design of Experiments) technique and experimental results are analyzed by ANOVA (Analysis of variance).

  20. Effects of conductive particles on the actuating behavior of dielectric elastomer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2010-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) are one particular type of electroactive polymers. Dielectric elastomers work as a variable capacitor. The effects of conductive particles on the actuating behavior of silicone rubber-based dielectric elastomer are studied in this work. Two different materials, which are carbon nanotube and carbon black, respectively, are used to increase the overall permittivity of the composites. Although the addition of these conductive particles increases the permittivity of the composite, they also produce a highly inhomogeneous electric field and reduced breakdown strength of the composite. This reduction in breakdown strength could be a serious drawback of nanocomposite approach. The main challenge, therefore, becomes how to enhance the permittivity of the composite while maintaining its high breakdown strength. These composites are characterized by dielectric spectroscopy, tensile mechanical analysis, and electromechanical transduction tests. The effect of variation in filler loadings on the complex and real parts of permittivity are distinctly visible, which has been explained on the basis of interfacial polarization of fillers in a heterogeneous medium. The phenomenon of percolation was discussed based on the measured changes in permittivity and morphology of composites at different concentrations of these particles.

  1. Dielectric Elastomer Generator with Improved Energy Density and Conversion Efficiency Based on Polyurethane Composites.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guoling; Yang, Yu; Song, Feilong; Renard, Christophe; Dang, Zhi-Min; Shi, Chang-Yong; Wang, Dongrui

    2017-02-15

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs), which follow the physics of variable capacitors and harvest electric energy from mechanical work, have attracted intensive attention over the past decade. The lack of ideal dielectric elastomers, after nearly two decades of research, has become the bottleneck for DEGs' practical applications. Here, we fabricated a series of polyurethane-based ternary composites and estimated their potential as DEGs to harvest electric energy for the first time. Thermoplastic polyurethane (PU) with high relative permittivity (∼8) was chosen as the elastic matrix. Barium titanate (BT) nanoparticles and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) plasticizers, which were selected to improve the permittivity and mechanical properties, respectively, were blended into the PU matrix. As compared to pristine PU, the resultant ternary composite films fabricated through a solution casting approach showed enhanced permittivity, remarkably reduced elastic modulus, and relatively good electrical breakdown strength, dielectric loss, and strain at break. Most importantly, the harvested energy density of PU was significantly enhanced when blended with BT and DBP. A composite film containing 25 phr of BT and 60 phr of DBP with the harvested energy density of 1.71 mJ/cm(3) was achieved, which is about 4 times greater than that of pure PU and 8 times greater than that of VHB adhesives. Remarkably improved conversion efficiency of mechano-electric energy was also obtained via cofilling BT and DBP into PU. The results shown in this work strongly suggest compositing is a very promising way to provide better dielectric elastomer candidates for forthcoming practical DEGs.

  2. Thin-film dielectric elastomer sensors to measure the contraction force of smooth muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araromi, O.; Poulin, A.; Rosset, S.; Favre, M.; Giazzon, M.; Martin-Olmos, C.; Liley, M.; Shea, H.

    2015-04-01

    The development of thin-film dielectric elastomer strain sensors for the characterization of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is presented here. Smooth muscle disorders are an integral part of diseases such as asthma and emphysema. Analytical tools enabling the characterization of SMC function i.e. contractile force and strain, in a low-cost and highly parallelized manner are necessary for toxicology screening and for the development of new and more effective drugs. The main challenge with the design of such tools is the accurate measurement of the extremely low contractile cell forces expected as a result of SMC monolayer contraction (as low as ~ 100 μN). Our approach utilizes ultrathin (~5 μm) and soft elastomer membranes patterned with elastomer-carbon composite electrodes, onto which the SMCs are cultured. The cell contraction induces an in-plane strain in the elastomer membrane, predicted to be in the order 1 %, which can be measured via the change in the membrane capacitance. The cell force can subsequently be deduced knowing the mechanical properties of the elastomer membrane. We discuss the materials and fabrication methods selected for our system and present preliminary results indicating their biocompatibility. We fabricate functional capacitive senor prototypes with good signal stability over the several hours (~ 0.5% variation). We succeed in measuring in-plane strains of 1 % with our fabricated devices with good repeatability and signal to noise ratio.

  3. Functionalized carbon nanotubes as a filler for dielectric elastomer composites with improved actuation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galantini, Fabia; Bianchi, Sabrina; Castelvetro, Valter; Gallone, Giuseppe

    2013-05-01

    Among the broad class of electro-active polymers, dielectric elastomer actuators represent a rapidly growing technology for electromechanical transduction. In order to further develop this applied science, the high driving voltages currently needed must be reduced. For this purpose, one of the most widely considered approaches is based on making elastomeric composites with highly polarizable fillers in order to increase the dielectric constant while maintaining both low dielectric losses and high-mechanical compliance. In this work, multi-wall carbon nanotubes were first functionalized by grafting either acrylonitrile or diurethane monoacrylate oligomers, and then dispersed into a polyurethane matrix to make dielectric elastomer composites. The procedures for the chemical functionalization of carbon nanotubes and proper characterizations of the obtained products are provided in detail. The consequences of the use of chemically modified carbon nanotubes as a filler, in comparison to using unmodified ones, were studied in terms of dielectric, mechanical and electromechanical response. In particular, an increment of the dielectric constant was observed for all composites throughout the investigated frequency spectrum, but only in the cases of modified carbon nanotubes did the loss factor remain almost unchanged with respect to the simple matrix, indicating that conductive percolation paths did not arise in such systems. An effective improvement in the actuation strain was observed for samples loaded with functionalized carbon nanotubes.

  4. Spring roll dielectric elastomer actuators for a portable force feedback glove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Lochmatter, Patrick; Kunz, Andreas; Kovacs, Gabor

    2006-03-01

    Miniature spring roll dielectric elastomer actuators for a novel kinematic-free force feedback concept were manufactured and experimentally characterized. The actuators exhibited a maximum blocking force of 7.2 N and a displacement of 5 mm. The theoretical considerations based on the material's incompressibility were discussed in order to estimate the actuator behavior under blocked-strain activation and free-strain activation. One prototype was built for the demonstration of the proposed force feedback concept.

  5. Modeling of a corrugated dielectric elastomer actuator for artificial muscle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadooka, Kevin; Taya, Minoru; Naito, Keishi; Saito, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators have many advantages, including light weight, simplicity, high energy density, and silent operation. These features make them suitable to replace conventional actuators and transducers, especially in artificial muscle applications where large contractile strains are necessary for lifelike motions. This paper will introduce the concept of a corrugated dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), which consists of dielectric elastomer (DE) laminated to a thin elastic layer to induce bending motion at each of the corrugations, resulting in large axial deformation. The location of the DE and elastic layers can be configured to provide tensile or compressive axial strain. Such corrugated DE actuators are also highly scalable: linking multiple actuators in series results in greater deformation, whereas multiple actuators in parallel results in larger force output. Analytical closed-form solutions based on linear elasticity were derived for the displacement and force output of curved unimorph and corrugated DEA, both consisting of an arbitrary number of lamina. A total strain energy analysis and Castigiliano's theorem were used to predict the nonlinear force-displacement behavior of the corrugated actuator. Curved unimorph and corrugated DEA were fabricated using VHB F9469PC as the DE material. Displacement of the actuators observed during testing agreed well with the modeling results. Large contractile strain (25.5%) was achieved by the corrugated DEA. Future work includes investigating higher performance DE materials such as plasticized PVDF terpolymers, processed by thin film deposition methods.

  6. A dielectric elastomer actuator coupled with water: snap-through instability and giant deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godaba, Hareesh; Foo, Choon Chiang; Zhang, Zhi Qian; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Zhu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    A dielectric elastomer actuator is one class of soft actuators which can deform in response to voltage. Dielectric elastomer actuators coupled with liquid have recently been developed as soft pumps, soft lenses, Braille displays, etc. In this paper, we conduct experiments to investigate the performance of a dielectric elastomer actuator which is coupled with water. The membrane is subject to a constant water pressure, which is found to significantly affect the electromechanical behaviour of the membrane. When the pressure is small, the membrane suffers electrical breakdown before snap-through instability, and achieves a small voltage-induced deformation. When the pressure is higher to make the membrane near the verge of the instability, the membrane can achieve a giant voltage-induced deformation, with an area strain of 1165%. When the pressure is large, the membrane suffers pressure-induced snap-through instability and may collapse due to a large amount of liquid enclosed by the membrane. Theoretical analyses are conducted to interpret these experimental observations.

  7. Dielectric elastomer for stretchable sensors: influence of the design and material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, C.; Iglesias, S.; Pruvost, S.; Duchet-Rumeau, J.; Chesné, S.

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers exhibit extended capabilities as flexible sensors for the detection of load distributions, pressure or huge deformations. Tracking the human movements of the fingers or the arms could be useful for the reconstruction of sporting gesture, or to control a human-like robot. Proposing new measurements methods are addressed in a number of publications leading to improving the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensing method. Generally, the associated modelling remains simple (RC or RC transmission line). The material parameters are considered constant or having a negligible effect which can lead to serious reduction of accuracy. Comparisons between measurements and modelling require care and skill, and could be tricky. Thus, we propose here a comprehensive modelling, taking into account the influence of the material properties on the performances of the dielectric elastomer sensor (DES). Various parameters influencing the characteristics of the sensors have been identified: dielectric constant, hyper-elasticity. The variations of these parameters as a function of the strain impact the linearity and sensitivity of the sensor of few percent. The sensitivity of the DES is also evaluated changing geometrical parameters (initial thickness) and its design (rectangular and dog-bone shapes). We discuss the impact of the shape regarding stress. Finally, DES including a silicone elastomer sandwiched between two high conductive stretchable electrodes, were manufactured and investigated. Classic and reliable LCR measurements are detailed. Experimental results validate our numerical model of large strain sensor (>50%).

  8. Switchable adhesion for wafer-handling based on dielectric elastomer stack transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotepaß, T.; Butz, J.; Förster-Zügel, F.; Schlaak, H. F.

    2016-04-01

    Vacuum grippers are often used for the handling of wafers and small devices. In order to evacuate the gripper, a gas flow is created that can harm the micro structures on the wafer. A promising alternative to vacuum grippers could be adhesive grippers with switchable adhesion. There have been some publications of gecko-inspired adhesive devices. Most of these former works consist of a structured surface which adheres to the object manipulated and an actuator for switching the adhesion. Until now different actuator principles have been investigated, like smart memory alloys and pneumatics. In this work for the first time dielectric elastomer stack transducers (DEST) are combined with a structured surface. DESTs are a promising new transducer technology with many applications in different industry sectors like medical devices, human-machine-interaction and soft robotics. Stacked dielectric elastomer transducers show thickness contraction originating from the electromechanical pressure of two compliant electrodes compressing an elastomeric dielectric when a voltage is applied. Since DESTs and the adhesive surfaces previously described are made of elastomers, it is self-evident to combine both systems in one device. The DESTs are fabricated by a spin coating process. If the flat surface of the spinning carrier is substituted for example by a perforated one, the structured elastomer surface and the DEST can be fabricated in one process. By electrical actuation the DEST contracts and laterally expands which causes the gecko-like cilia to adhere on the object to manipulate. This work describes the assembly and the experimental results of such a device using switchable adhesion. It is intended to be used for the handling of glass wafers.

  9. Tailoring Dielectric and Actuated Properties of Elastomer Composites by Bioinspired Poly(dopamine) Encapsulated Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Ning, Nanying; Ma, Qin; Liu, Suting; Tian, Ming; Zhang, Liqun; Nishi, Toshio

    2015-05-27

    In this study, we obtained dielectric elastomer composites with controllable dielectric and actuated properties by using a biomimetic method. We used dopamine (DA) to simultaneously coat the graphene oxide (GO) and partially reduce GO by self-polymerization of DA on GO. The poly(dopamine) (PDA) coated GO (GO-PDA) was assembled around rubber latex particles by hydrogen bonding interaction between carboxyl groups of carboxylated nitrile rubber (XNBR) and imino groups or phenolic hydroxyl groups of GO-PDA during latex compounding, forming a segregated GO-PDA network at a low percolation threshold. The results showed that the introduction of PDA on GO prevented the restack of GO in the matrix. The dielectric and actuated properties of the composites depend on the thickness of PDA shell. The dielectric loss and the elastic modulus decrease, and the breakdown strength increases with increasing the thickness of PDA shell. The maximum actuated strain increases from 1.7% for GO/XNBR composite to 4.4% for GO-PDA/XNBR composites with the PDA thickness of about 5.4 nm. The actuated strain at a low electric field (2 kV/mm) obviously increases from 0.2% for pure XNBR to 2.3% for GO-PDA/XNBR composite with the PDA thickness of 1.1 nm, much higher than that of other DEs reported in previous studies. Thus, we successfully obtained dielectric composites with low dielectric loss and improved breakdown strength and actuated strain at a low electric field, facilitating the wide application of dielectric elastomers.

  10. Temperature effect on the performance of a dissipative dielectric elastomer generator with failure modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. E.; Deng, L.; He, Z. C.; Li, Eric; Li, G. Y.

    2016-05-01

    Research on dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) which can be utilized to convert mechanical energy to electrical energy has gained wide attention lately. However, very few works account for the operating temperature, viscoelasticity and current leakage in the analysis of DEGs simultaneously. In this study, under several compound four-stroke conversion cycles, the electromechanical performance and energy conversion of a dissipative DEG made of a very-high-bond (VHB) elastomer are investigated at different operating temperatures. The performance parameters such as energy density and conversion efficiency are calculated under different temperatures. Moreover, the common failure modes of the generator are considered: material rupture, loss of tension, electrical breakdown and electromechanical instability. The numerical results have distinctly shown that the operating temperature plays an important role in the performance of DEGs, which could possibly make a larger conversion efficiency for the DEG.

  11. Transparent actuator made with few layer graphene electrode and dielectric elastomer, for variable focus lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taeseon; Kwon, Hyeok-Yong; Oh, Joon-Suk; Hong, Jung-Pyo; Hong, Seung-Chul; Lee, Youngkwan; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Jin Kim, Kwang; Hossain Bhuiya, Mainul; Nam, Jae-Do

    2013-07-01

    A transparent dielectric elastomer actuator driven by few-layer-graphene (FLG) electrode was experimentally investigated. The electrodes were made of graphene, which was dispersed in N-methyl-pyrrolidone. The transparent actuator was fabricated from developed FLG electrodes. The FLG electrode with its sheet resistance of 0.45 kΩ/sq (80 nm thick) was implemented to mask silicone elastomer. The developed FLG-driven actuator exhibited an optical transparency of over 57% at a wavenumber of 600 nm and produced bending displacement performance ranging from 29 to 946 μm as functions of frequency and voltage. The focus variation was clearly demonstrated under actuation to study its application-feasibility in variable focus lens and various opto-electro-mechanical devices.

  12. Muscle-like high-stress dielectric elastomer actuators with oil capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Thanh-Giang; Lau, Gih-Keong; Shiau, Li-Lynn; Wei-Yee Tan, Adrian

    2014-10-01

    Despite being capable of generating large strains, dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are short of strength. Often, they cannot produce enough stress or as much work as that achievable by human elbow muscles. Their maximum actuation capacity is limited by the electrical breakdown of dielectric elastomers. Often, failures of these soft actuators are pre-mature and localized at the weakest spot under high field and high stress. Localized breakdowns, such as electrical arcing, thermal runaway and punctures, could spread to ultimately cause rupture if they were not stopped. This work shows that dielectric oil immersion and self-clearable electrodes nibbed the buds of localized breakdowns from DEAs. Dielectric oil encapsulation in soft-membrane capsules was found to help the DEA sustain an ultra-high electrical breakdown field of 835\\;MV{{m}^{-1}}, which is 46% higher than the electrical breakdown strength of the dry DEA in air at 570\\;MV{\\mkern 1mu} {{m}^{-1}}. Because of the increased apparent dielectric strength, this oil-capsuled DEA realizes a higher maximum isotonic work density of up to 31.51Jk{{g}^{-1}}, which is 43.8% higher than that realized by the DEA in air. Meanwhile, it produces higher maximum isometric stress of up to 1.05 MPa, which is 75% higher than that produced by the DEA in air. Such improved actuator performances are comparable to those achieved by human flexor muscles, which can exert up to 1.2 MPa during elbow flexion. This muscle-like, high-stress dielectric elastomeric actuation is very promising to drive future human-like robots.

  13. Towards control of viscous effects in acrylic-based actuator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thylander, S.; Menzel, A.; Ristinmaa, M.

    2016-09-01

    Dielectric elastomers offer clear advantages over more traditional and conventional materials when soft, lightweight, noiseless actuator applications with large deformations are considered. However, the viscous time-dependent behaviour associated with most elastomers limit the number of possible applications. For this purpose, the possibility of controlling the viscous response by regulating the applied electric potential is explored. The constitutive model chosen is calibrated to fit the electro-viscoelastic response of an acrylic elastomer often used in dielectric elastomer actuators. The response of both homogeneous deformation examples and inhomogeneous finite element boundary value problems, chosen to mimic existing applications, are presented. Control of both force and displacement quantities are successfully achieved.

  14. Effect of initial stretch ratio on the electromechanical responses of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Huliang; Zou, Jiangjiang; Wang, Lin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the dynamic responses of a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) subjected to an electrical load are investigated. Various dynamical behaviors of the DEA system have been observed. For example, when the DEAs are under a constant electric field, the oscillation is periodic. For DEAs under harmonic electric excitation, however, quasiperiodic and chaotic oscillations may occur. Of particular interest is that the initial stretch ratio has significant influence on the electromechanical behavior of the DEA, showing that chaotic divergent oscillation (i.e., extreme contraction with respect to the height of the DEA) could occur within a certain parameter region of the initial stretch ratios.

  15. Influence of load on the dry frictional performance of alkyl acrylate copolymer elastomers coated with diamond-like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Martínez, D.; Nohava, Jiri; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the influence of applied load on the frictional behavior of alkyl acrylate copolymer elastomers coated with diamond-like carbon films is studied at dry conditions. The performance of two coatings with very different microstructure (patched vs. continuous film) is compared with the uncoated substrate. A wide range of applied loads is explored, from 1 mN to 1 N, which is achieved by using a specific tribometer. The variation of 3 orders of magnitude in the applied load leads to a strong variation of the observed frictional phenomena. The different behavior of both samples at various loads is explained using a model that considers two contributions to the friction coefficient, namely, an adhesive and a rubber hysteresis part. The constraints and applicability of such model are critically evaluated.

  16. Dielectric elastomers: from the beginning of modern science to applications in actuators and energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Richard; Keplinger, Christoph; Kaltseis, Rainer; Schwödiauer, Reinhard; Bauer, Siegfried

    2011-04-01

    Electrically deformable materials have a long history, with first quotations in a letter from Alessandro Volta. The topic turned out to be hot at the end of the 19th century, with a landmark paper of Röntgen anticipating the dielectric elastomer principle. In 2000, Pelrine and co-workers generated huge interest in such soft actuators, by demonstrating voltage induced huge area expansion rates of more than 300%. Since then, the field became mature, with first commercial applications appearing on the market. New frontiers also emerged recently, for example by using dielectric transducers in a reverse mode for scavenging mechanical energy. In the present survey we briefly discuss the latest developments in the field.

  17. Electro-elastic modeling of a dielectric elastomer diaphragm for a prosthetic blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.; Frecker, Mary I.; Mockensturm, Eric

    2004-07-01

    A dielectric elastomer diaphragm is to be designed for potential use in a prosthetic blood pump. Application of an electric field deforms the membrane such that it moves from an initially flat configuration to an inflated state. This motion creates positive displacement of blood from the cardiac chambers thus mimicking the pump-like behavior of the natural heart. A comprehensive large deformation model accounting for the combined dielectric and elastic effect has been formulated. This paper presents recent developments in the model to further incorporate the entire nonlinear range of material elastic behavior and to more accurately represent the applied electric field by keeping the voltage constant as the membrane thickness decreases. The updated model is used to calculate the effects of varying system parameters such as pressure, voltage, prestretch, material constants, and membrane geometry. Analytical results are obtained for biaxially stretched 3M VHB 4905 polyacrylate films.

  18. Biobased composites from thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer and cross-linked acrylated-epoxidized soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil is an important sustainable material. Crosslinked acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is brittle without flexibility and the incorporation of thermoplastic polyurethane improves its toughness for industrial applications. The hydrophilic functional groups from both oil and polyurethan...

  19. Activation of dielectric elastomer actuators by means of human electrophysiological signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, F.; Raspopovic, S.; De Rossi, D.

    2006-03-01

    The assessed high electromechanical performances of dielectric elastomer actuators are encouraging the study of possible future applications of such devices for active prosthetic or orthotic systems for humans. Although the high electric fields currently needed for their driving prevent today a short-term use in endo- prostheses, their adoption for eso-prostheses or orthoses can be considered more realistic. Exoskeletons for improving muscular performance in specific tasks or for rehabilitation are examples of possible fields of investigation. Beyond a necessary technological development towards materials and devices capable of improved performances at reduced fields, the study of such applications requires even the identification of suitable strategies of activation and control. In particular, actuators to be used for such applications may take advantage from the possibility of being activated by electrophysiological signals. This would permit advantageous body's controls of the artificial system. In this context, this work presents activities carried on towards such a goal. In particular, activations of silicone-made dielectric elastomer actuators by means of different types of electrophysiological signals, opportunely elaborated, are presented and discussed.

  20. Modeling self-priming circuits for dielectric elastomer generators towards optimum voltage boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, Plinio; Rossiter, Jonathan; Homer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    One of the main challenges for the practical implementation of dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) is supplying high voltages. To address this issue, systems using self-priming circuits (SPCs) — which exploit the DEG voltage swing to increase its supplied voltage — have been used with success. A self-priming circuit consists of a charge pump implemented in parallel with the DEG circuit. At each energy harvesting cycle, the DEG receives a low voltage input and, through an almost constant charge cycle, generates a high voltage output. SPCs receive the high voltage output at the end of the energy harvesting cycle and supply it back as input for the following cycle, using the DEG as a voltage multiplier element. Although rules for designing self-priming circuits for dielectric elastomer generators exist, they have been obtained from intuitive observation of simulation results and lack a solid theoretical foundation. Here we report the development of a mathematical model to predict voltage boost using self-priming circuits. The voltage on the DEG attached to the SPC is described as a function of its initial conditions, circuit parameters/layout, and the DEG capacitance. Our mathematical model has been validated on an existing DEG implementation from the literature, and successfully predicts the voltage boost for each cycle. Furthermore, it allows us to understand the conditions for the boost to exist, and obtain the design rules that maximize the voltage boost.

  1. Modelling and characterization of inflated dielectric elastomer actuators with tubular configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Chen, Hualing; Liu, Lei; Li, Dichen

    2015-06-01

    A dielectric elastomer undergoes large and fast deformation subject to external electric stimuli, making it a promising artificial muscle for various kinds of actuators, sensors and energy generators. This paper presents an actuator fabricated by (1) rolling a dielectric elastomer membrane, (2) pre-stretching the membrane along the radial direction and fixing the edges with rigid cylindrical plastic ends, and (3) applying a force to the end along the longitudinal direction and pumping air into the tube for inflation. Subject to a voltage, the structure works as an actuator with a large linear stroke. Governing equations of this actuator are established and simulation results are found to agree well with experimental results. We examine four modes of failure, namely loss of tension, electrical breakdown, snap-through instability and tensile rupture, with a variation in applied pressure. The actuating voltage is greatly reduced by applying pressure, providing the possibility of low-voltage driving. By regulating the applied pressure, large actuation strain and displacement are obtained simultaneously and the distributions of stretch, true stress and the true electric field become more homogeneous.

  2. Band-gap tunable dielectric elastomer filter for low frequency noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Kun; Wang, Mian; Lu, Tongqing; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Tiejun

    2016-05-01

    In the last decades, diverse materials and technologies for sound insulation have been widely applied in engineering. However, suppressing the noise radiation at low frequency still remains a challenge. In this work, a novel membrane-type smart filter, consisting of a pre-stretched dielectric elastomer membrane with two compliant electrodes coated on the both sides, is presented to control the low frequency noise. Since the stiffness of membrane dominates its acoustic properties, sound transmission band-gap of the membrane filter can be tuned by adjusting the voltage applied to the membrane. The impedance tube experiments have been carried out to measure the sound transmission loss (STL) of the filters with different electrodes, membrane thickness and pre-stretch conditions. The experimental results show that the center frequency of sound transmission band-gap mainly depends on the stress in the dielectric elastomer, and a large band-gap shift (more than 60 Hz) can be achieved by tuning the voltage applied to the 85 mm diameter VHB4910 specimen with pre-stretch {λ }0=3. Based on the experimental results and the assumption that applied electric field is independent of the membrane behavior, 3D finite element analysis has also been conducted to calculate the membrane stress variation. The sound filter proposed herein may provide a promising facility to control low frequency noise source with tonal characteristics.

  3. Liquid Metals: Stretchable, High-k Dielectric Elastomers through Liquid-Metal Inclusions (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Michael D; Fassler, Andrew; Kazem, Navid; Markvicka, Eric J; Mandal, Pratiti; Majidi, Carmel

    2016-05-01

    An all-soft-matter composite consisting of liquid metal microdroplets embedded in a soft elastomer matrix is presented by C. Majidi and co-workers on page 3726. This composite exhibits a high dielectric constant while maintaining exceptional elasticity and compliance. The image shows the composite's microstructure captured by 3D X-ray imaging using a nano-computed tomographic scanner.

  4. Development of Dielectric Elastomer Nanocomposites as Stretchable and Flexible Actuating Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) are a new type of smart materials showing promising functionalities as energy harvesting materials as well as actuating materials for potential applications such as artificial muscles, implanted medical devices, robotics, loud speakers, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), tunable optics, transducers, sensors, and even generators due to their high electromechanical efficiency, stability, lightweight, low cost, and easy processing. Despite the advantages of DEs, technical challenges must be resolved for wider applications. A high electric field of at least 10-30 V/um is required for the actuation of DEs, which limits the practical applications especially in biomedical fields. We tackle this problem by introducing the multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in DEs to enhance their relative permittivity and to generate their high electromechanical responses with lower applied field level. This work presents the dielectric, mechanical and electromechanical properties of DEs filled with MWNTs. The micromechanics-based finite element models are employed to describe the dielectric, and mechanical behavior of the MWNT-filled DE nanocomposites. A sufficient number of models are computed to reach the acceptable prediction of the dielectric and mechanical responses. In addition, experimental results are analyzed along with simulation results. Finally, laser Doppler vibrometer is utilized to directly detect the enhancement of the actuation strains of DE nanocomposites filled with MWNTs. All the results demonstrate the effective improvement in the electromechanical properties of DE nanocomposites filled with MWNTs under the applied electric fields.

  5. Mm-size bistable zipping dielectric elastomer actuators for integrated microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffli, Luc; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-04-01

    We report on a new structure of Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) called zipping DEAs, which have a set of unique characteristics that are a good match for the requirements of electrically-powered integrated microfluidic pumping and/or valving units as well as Braille displays. The zipping DEAs operate by pulling electrostatically an elastomer membrane in contact with the rigid sidewalls of a sloped chamber. In this work, we report on fully functional mm-size zipping DEAs that demonstrate a complete sealing of the chamber sidewalls and a tunable bistable behavior, and compare the measurements with an analytical model. Compared to our first generation of devices, we are able vary the sidewall angle and benefit therefore from more flexibility to study the requirements to make fully functional actuators. In particular, we show that with Nusil CF19 as membrane material (1.2 MPa Young's modulus), it is possible to zip completely 2.3 mm diameter chambers with 15° and 21° sidewalls angle equibiaxially prestretched to λ0=1.12 and 15° chambers with λ0=1.27.

  6. Analysis and application of a rolled dielectric elastomer actuator with two degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaming; Li, Luyang; Zhu, Yinlong; Yang, Weidong

    2016-12-01

    A rolled dielectric elastomer (DE) actuator with two degrees of freedom, which can bend and elongate, was implemented by membrane pre-stretching, interdigital shape electrode patterning, and wrapping on a compression spring. Then modeling of the actuator was conducted by constructing and solving differential equations, which include constitutive, geometrical, equilibrium equations and boundary conditions. Experiments show the actuator can bend up to 75.3o and elongate with a displacement of 8.4 mm at the voltage of 5.0 kV, which agree well with analytical results. The principal stress and stretch ratio distribution of each layer of elastomer were given, on which the effects of electrostatic pressure and interlayer pressure were also discussed. Two crawling robots with a single and a double-actuator were proposed, and their locomotion performance was investigated. Locomotion experiments show two robots can move forward with both bending and elongation strategies, and the maximum velocity reaches 20 mm s-1. This research is favorable to the application of soft DE in biomimetic robots.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of silicones containing cyanopropyl groups and their use in dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racles, Carmen; Cazacu, Maria; Fischer, Beatrice; Opris, Dorina M.

    2013-10-01

    Polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS) have recently been used as dielectric elastomer materials in electromechanical actuators. When they are soft enough, electric fields can change their shape. However, due to their low dielectric permittivity, large electric fields are required to induce a change. The approach presented here is to chemically modify silicones with cyanopropyl groups in order to increase their permittivity. Samples containing repeat units with cyanopropyl groups from 3 to 23% were synthesized, different methods being employed. The prepared polymers were cross-linked into thin films. The dielectric permittivity of these films increased from 2.4 (for the silicone matrix) to 6.5 for a film containing about 23% of cyanopropyl repeat units. The most promising materials were further optimized to meet the requirements for actuators and their electromechanical properties were investigated. Material A for example, which is a blend of PDMS and cyanopropyl-modified silicone, has a permittivity of 3.5 and higher moduli of elasticity as compared to the matrix but nevertheless shows 10% actuation strain at 40 V μm-1 which is a factor of 3.8 larger as compared to the matrix (2.6% actuation strain at the same voltage).

  8. Electromechanical characterization of a new synthetic rubber membrane for dielectric elastomer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertechy, R.; Fontana, M.

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomers (DE) are incompressible polymeric solids that experience finite elastic deformations and are electrically non-conductive. Stacking multiple DE films separated by compliant electrodes makes a deformable capacitor transducer, namely a DE Transducer (DET), which can expand in area while shrinking in thickness and vice versa. DETs can be used as solid-state actuators, sensors and generators. The development of an effective DET requires the accurate knowledge of the constitutive behavior of the employed DE material. In this context, this paper reports the experimental results of the electromechanical characterization of a new synthetic rubber membrane (TheraBanTM Latex Free Resistance Band Yellow (P/N #11726), or TheraBand LFRB-Y in short) to be used as elastic dielectric in DETs. Comparison of the obtained results with those of the best quoted Natural Rubber membrane (OPPO BAND 8003) is also provided that shows the superior performances of TheraBand LFRB-Y both in terms of reduced mechanical hysteresis and of higher dielectric strength stability to ambient wetness conditions.

  9. Large conversion of energy in dielectric elastomers by electromechanical phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tong-Qing; Suo, Zhi-Gang

    2012-08-01

    When air is pumped in, a tubular balloon initially inflates slightly and homogeneously. A short section of the balloon then forms a bulge, which coexists with the unbulged section of the balloon. As more air is pumped in, the bulged section elongates at the expense of the unbulged section, until the entire balloon is bulged. The phenomenon is analogous to the liquid-to-vapor phase transition. Here we study the bulging transition in a dielectric elastomer tube as air is pumped into the balloon and a voltage is applied through the thickness of the membrane. We formulate the condition for coexistent budged and unbulged sections, and identify allowable states set by electrical breakdown and mechanical rupture. We find that the bulging transition dramatically amplifies electromechanical energy conversion. Energy converted in an electromechanical cycle consisting of unbulged and bulged states is thousands of times that in an electromechanical cycle consisting of only unbulged states.

  10. A reduced order model for dielectric elastomer actuators over a range of frequencies and prestrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, Jillian; Manning, Michael; Adler, David; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    The actuation strain of an equibiaxially prestrained dielectric elastomer membrane is studied as a function of driving frequency and prestrain. Experimental data are gathered on the membrane's creep and recovery following DC actuation, as well as the steady state amplitude and phase for AC driving voltages ranging from 2 to 40 Hz. The effect of prestretch on steady state actuation was also investigated, using membranes of both 250% and 300% prestretch. A three-element generalized Kelvin-Voigt model is developed to capture the transient and steady-state actuation responses as a function of frequency and prestrain. We show that, despite its relative simplicity, this model captures the relevant timescales for the membrane behavior with good fidelity and can be used to accurately predict the actuation magnitude and phase as a function of time over a range of actuation configurations and driving conditions.

  11. Closed loop control of dielectric elastomer actuators based on self-sensing displacement feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzello, G.; Naso, D.; York, A.; Seelecke, S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a sensorless control algorithm for a positioning system based on a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA). The voltage applied to the membrane and the resulting current can be measured during the actuation and used to estimate its displacement, i.e., to perform self-sensing. The estimated displacement can be then used as a feedback signal for a position control algorithm, which results in a compact device capable of operating in closed loop control without the need for additional electromechanical or optical transducers. In this work, a circular DEA preloaded with a bi-stable spring is used as a case of study to validate the proposed control architecture. A comparison of the closed loop performance achieved using an accurate laser displacement sensor for feedback is also provided to better assess the performance limitations of the overall sensorless scheme.

  12. Feedforward deformation control of a dielectric elastomer actuator based on a nonlinear dynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guo-Ying; Gupta, Ujjaval; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Li-Min; Zhu, Xiang-Yang

    2015-07-01

    In the practical applications of actuators, the control of their deformation or driving force is a key issue. Most of recent studies on dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) focus on issues of mechanics, physics, and material science, whereas less importance is given to the control of these soft actuators. In this paper, we underline the importance of a nonlinear dynamic model as the basis for a feedforward deformation control approach of a rubber-based DEA. Experimental evidence shows the effectiveness of the feedforward controller. The present study confirms that a DEA's trajectory can be finely controlled with a solid nonlinear dynamic model despite the presence of material nonlinearities and electromechanical coupling. The effective control of DEAs may pave the way for extensive emerging applications to soft robots.

  13. Fish-like propulsion of an airship with planar membrane dielectric elastomer actuators.

    PubMed

    Jordi, C; Michel, S; Fink, E

    2010-06-01

    The goal of our project is to mimic fish-like movement in air, propelling an airship by undulating its hull and a caudal fin. The activation of the fish-like body in air is realized by dielectric elastomers. These actuators are quite unique for their soft light-weight membrane structure and they are therefore very appropriate to the application on inflated structures. The principles of biomimetics for the structural design and movement are discussed and the conception and design of the airship is described. Various development tests, including wind tunnel testing and flight trials, were performed and the results obtained are presented. It can be shown that an 8 m model airship can be propelled in a fish-like manner in air and that the propulsion can be drastically improved by undulating the body as well as the caudal fin contrary to propulsion with only the caudal fin.

  14. Experimental evaluation of a Dielectric Elastomer robotic arm for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, F.; Francesconi, A.

    2017-04-01

    A growing interest within the space community focuses on robotics due to the large number of possible applications in many mission scenarios. On-Orbit Servicing (OOS) is arguably the most appealing implementation of space automatic systems. In several cases, OOS requires the capture of orbital objects, which is a complex and risky operation that can be successfully performed by robotic manipulators. Soft robotics, in particular, seems to be suitable for such applications given its intrinsic compliance to the operative environment. Devices based on Dielectric Elastomers (DE) can be employed for the implementation of soft robotic systems and showed promising performances. The introduction of DEs to orbital systems would represent a breakthrough in space technologies. In addition, space conditions could further advantage DE robotics, given the reduced environmental loads experienced and the longer times for operations. Nevertheless, Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEA) are a low-TRL (Technology Readiness Level) technology that needs to prove its maturity and suitability to space implementation. In this work, the performances of a redundant manipulator based on DEAs are presented in terms of numerical and experimental results. A 4-DoF planar manipulator has been tested in a gravity-compensated setup. The system is composed by two double-cone actuators mounted in series, each of them providing actuation of two DoF. The end-effector is an optical marker whose position is detected by a vision system. The system has a total of four joint DoF and operates in the xy horizontal plane; only the x and y positions of the end-effector are controlled. Two degrees of redundancy are obtained and exploited for the optimization of joint torques to avoid the saturation of actuators. Numerical simulations have been conducted to predict the system behaviour. The laboratory facility emulates the zero-gravity orbital environment by means of a suspending cable. Detailed experimental results

  15. A density functional study on dielectric properties of acrylic acid grafted polypropylene.

    PubMed

    Ruuska, Henna; Arola, Eero; Kortelainen, Tommi; Rantala, Tapio T; Kannus, Kari; Valkealahti, Seppo

    2011-04-07

    Influence of acrylic acid grafting of isotactic polypropylene on the dielectric properties of the polymer is investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, both in the molecular modeling and three-dimensional (3D) bulk periodic system frameworks. In our molecular modeling calculations, polarizability volume, and polarizability volume per mass which reflects the permittivity of the polymer, as well as the HOMO-LUMO gap, one of the important measures indicating the electrical breakdown voltage strength, were examined for oligomers with various chain lengths and carboxyl mixture ratios. When a polypropylene oligomer is grafted with carboxyl groups (cf. acrylic acid), our calculations show that the increase of the polarizability volume α' of the oligomer is proportional to the increase of its mass m, while the ratio α'/m decreases from the value of a pure polymer when increasing the mixture ratio. The decreasing ratio of α'/m under carboxyl grafting indicates that the material permittivity might also decrease if the mass density of the material remains constant. Furthermore, our calculations show that the HOMO-LUMO gap energy decreases by only about 15% in grafting, but this decrease seems to be independent on the mixture ratio of carboxyl. This indicates that by doping polymers with additives better dielectric properties can be tailored. Finally, using the first-principles molecular DFT results for polarizability volume per mass in connection with the classical Clausius-Mossotti relation, we have estimated static permittivity for acrylic acid grafted polypropylene, assuming the structural density keeping constant under grafting. The computed permittivity values are in a qualitative agreement with the recent experiments, showing increasing tendency of the permittivity as a function of the grafting composition. In order to validate our molecular DFT based approach, we have also carried out extensive three-dimensional bulk periodic first

  16. Characterization, fabrication, and analysis of soft dielectric elastomer actuators capable of complex 3D deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, William

    Inspired by nature, the development of soft actuators has drawn large attention to provide higher flexibility and allow adaptation to more complex environment. This thesis is focused on utilizing electroactive polymers as active materials to develop soft planar dielectric elastomer actuators capable of complex 3D deformation. The potential applications of such soft actuators are in flexible robotic arms and grippers, morphing structures and flapping wings for micro aerial vehicles. The embraces design for a freestanding actuator utilizes the constrained deformation imposed by surface stiffeners on an electroactive membrane to avert the requirement of membrane pre-stretch and the supporting frames. The proposed design increases the overall actuator flexibility and degrees-of-freedom. Actuator design, fabrication, and performance are presented for different arrangement of stiffeners. Digital images correlation technique were utilized to evaluate the in-plane finite strain components, in order to elucidate the role of the stiffeners in controlling the three dimensional deformation. It was found that a key controlling factor was the localized deformation near the stiffeners, while the rest of the membrane would follow through. A detailed finite element modeling framework was developed with a user-material subroutine, built into the ABAQUS commercial finite element package. An experimentally calibrated Neo-Hookean based material model that coupled the applied electrical field to the actuator mechanical deformation was employed. The numerical model was used to optimize different geometrical features, electrode layup and stacking sequence of actuators. It was found that by splitting the stiffeners into finer segments, the force-stroke characteristics of actuator were able to be adjusted with stiffener configuration, while keeping the overall bending stiffness. The efficacy of actuators could also be greatly improved by increasing the stiffener periodicity. The developed

  17. Investigation into the electromechanical properties of dielectric elastomers subjected to pre-stressing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Betts, Anthony; Kennedy, David; Jerrams, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) are being exploited for biological applications such as artificial blood pumps, biomimetic grippers and biomimetic robots. Generally, polyacrylate and silicone rubber (SR) are the most widely used materials for fabricating DEs in terms of mixing with other polymers or compounding them with highly dielectric particles. Furthermore, pre-stretch offers an effective approach to increasing actuated strain and dielectric strength and eliminating 'pull-in' instability. In the work described here, a comparison in electromechanical properties was made between SR/10% barium titanate (BaTiO3) and commercial VHB 4910. Trends in these dielectric parameters are shown graphically for variation in pre-stretch ratio (λpre). It was found that permittivity of SR/10% BaTiO3 was independent of frequency, whereas permittivity was frequency-independent due to the polarization of polymer chains. The maximum deformation and the coupling efficiency for SR/10% BaTiO3 can be achieved at a pre-stretch ratio between 1.6 and 1.9. For VHB 4910, they can be obtained in the pre-stretch ratio range from 2.6 to 3.0. A maximum energy density of 0.05MJ/m(3) was achieved by SR/10% BaTiO3 (λpre=1.6) and VHB 4910 (λpre=3.4). The findings provide an insight into critical pre-stretch ratios required for a range of applications of DEs based on silicone and the commercially available polyacrylate VHB 4910.

  18. Viscoelastic effects on frequency tuning of a dielectric elastomer membrane resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianyou; Jiang, Liying; Khayat, Roger E.

    2014-03-01

    As a recent application of dielectric elastomers (DEs), DE resonators have become an alternative to conventional silicon-based resonators used in MEMS and have attracted much interest from the research community. However, most existing modeling works for the DE resonators ignore the intrinsic viscoelastic effect of the material that may strongly influence their dynamic performance. Based on the finite-deformation viscoelasticity theory for dielectrics, this paper theoretically examines the in-plane oscillation of a DE membrane resonator to demonstrate how the material viscoelasticity affects the actuation and frequency tuning processes of the resonator. From the simulation results, it is concluded that not only the applied voltage can change the natural frequency of the resonator, but also the inelastic deformation contributes to frequency tuning. Due to the viscoelasticity of the material, the electrical loading rate influences the actuation process of the DE resonator, while it has little effect on the final steady frequency tuned by the prescribed voltage within the safety range. With the consideration of the typical failure modes of the resonator and the evolution process of the material, the tunable frequency range and the safe range of the applied voltage of the DE membrane resonator with different dimension parameters are determined in this work, which are found to be dependent on the electrical loading rate. This work is expected to provide a better understanding on the frequency tuning of viscoelastic DE membrane resonators and a guideline for the design of DE devices.

  19. Viscoelastic effects on frequency tuning of a dielectric elastomer membrane resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianyou; Jiang, Liying Khayat, Roger E.

    2014-03-28

    As a recent application of dielectric elastomers (DEs), DE resonators have become an alternative to conventional silicon-based resonators used in MEMS and have attracted much interest from the research community. However, most existing modeling works for the DE resonators ignore the intrinsic viscoelastic effect of the material that may strongly influence their dynamic performance. Based on the finite-deformation viscoelasticity theory for dielectrics, this paper theoretically examines the in-plane oscillation of a DE membrane resonator to demonstrate how the material viscoelasticity affects the actuation and frequency tuning processes of the resonator. From the simulation results, it is concluded that not only the applied voltage can change the natural frequency of the resonator, but also the inelastic deformation contributes to frequency tuning. Due to the viscoelasticity of the material, the electrical loading rate influences the actuation process of the DE resonator, while it has little effect on the final steady frequency tuned by the prescribed voltage within the safety range. With the consideration of the typical failure modes of the resonator and the evolution process of the material, the tunable frequency range and the safe range of the applied voltage of the DE membrane resonator with different dimension parameters are determined in this work, which are found to be dependent on the electrical loading rate. This work is expected to provide a better understanding on the frequency tuning of viscoelastic DE membrane resonators and a guideline for the design of DE devices.

  20. Dielectric elastomer actuators of silicone rubber-titanium dioxide composites obtained by dielectrophoretic assembly of filler particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, S.; Razzaghi-Kashani, M.

    2010-04-01

    Formation of controlled morphology of fillers in polymeric composites may be difficult to achieve by conventional methods such as mechanical shear or chemical methods. Tunable structure of filler and anisotropic properties in composites can be obtained by exploiting dielectrophoretic assembly of fillers in a polymer composite by using electric fields. In this study, different concentrations of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) particles in silicone rubber matrix were assembled in a chain-like structure by using an alternating electric field. Silicone rubber matrix was vulcanized to transform the liquid to solid and maintain the filler structure in the desired direction. Generation of chain structure of filler was verified by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and equilibrium swelling. It was shown that dielectric permittivity of the oriented composite is higher whereas its dielectric loss factor is lower in the orientation (thickness) direction than those for the composites with random distribution of filler. This phenomenon was in agreement with results of dynamic-mechanical loss factor for these composites, and can be utilized in more efficient dielectric elastomer actuators. Elastic modulus is higher for the structured samples, but presence of titania filler induced a softening effect at higher strains where the actuators are practically being pre-stretched. A critical concentration of filler was distinguished as the percolation point at which the change in dielectric behavior is amplified. Using a simple blocking-force measurement, potential advantages of structured composites over the ones with randomly-distributed filler was explained for potential dielectric elastomer actuator applications.

  1. Multi-functional dielectric elastomer artificial muscles for soft and smart machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Iain A.; Gisby, Todd A.; McKay, Thomas G.; O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Calius, Emilio P.

    2012-08-01

    Dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators are popularly referred to as artificial muscles because their impressive actuation strain and speed, low density, compliant nature, and silent operation capture many of the desirable physical properties of muscle. Unlike conventional robots and machines, whose mechanisms and drive systems rapidly become very complex as the number of degrees of freedom increases, groups of DE artificial muscles have the potential to generate rich motions combining many translational and rotational degrees of freedom. These artificial muscle systems can mimic the agonist-antagonist approach found in nature, so that active expansion of one artificial muscle is taken up by passive contraction in the other. They can also vary their stiffness. In addition, they have the ability to produce electricity from movement. But departing from the high stiffness paradigm of electromagnetic motors and gearboxes leads to new control challenges, and for soft machines to be truly dexterous like their biological analogues, they need precise control. Humans control their limbs using sensory feedback from strain sensitive cells embedded in muscle. In DE actuators, deformation is inextricably linked to changes in electrical parameters that include capacitance and resistance, so the state of strain can be inferred by sensing these changes, enabling the closed loop control that is critical for a soft machine. But the increased information processing required for a soft machine can impose a substantial burden on a central controller. The natural solution is to distribute control within the mechanism itself. The octopus arm is an example of a soft actuator with a virtually infinite number of degrees of freedom (DOF). The arm utilizes neural ganglia to process sensory data at the local "arm" level and perform complex tasks. Recent advances in soft electronics such as the piezoresistive dielectric elastomer switch (DES) have the potential to be fully integrated with actuators

  2. Carbon black networking in elastomers monitored by simultaneous rheological and dielectric investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauser, Dagmar; Möwes, Markus; Klüppel, Manfred

    2016-12-01

    The rheo-dielectric response of carbon black filled elastomer melts is investigated by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy in the frequency range from 0.1 Hz up to 10 MHz during oszillatory shearing in a plate-plate rheometer. Various concentrations and types of carbon blacks dispersed in a non-crosslinked EPDM melt are considered. It is demonstrated that during heat treatment at low strain amplitude a pronounced flocculation of filler particles takes place leading to a successive increase of the shear modulus and conductivity. Followed up by a strain sweep, the filler network breaks up and both quantities decrease simultaneously with increasing strain amplitude. Two relaxation times, obtained from a Cole-Cole fit of the dielectric spectra, are identified, which both decrease strongly with increasing flocculation time. This behaviour is analyzed in the frame of fractal network models, describing the effect of structural disorder of the conducting carbon black network on the diffusive charge transport. Significant deviations from the predictions of percolation theory are observed, which are traced back to a superimposed cluster-cluster aggregation process (CCA). During flocculation, a universal scaling behaviour holds between the conductivity and the corresponding high frequency relaxation time, which fits all the measured data. The scaling exponent agrees fairly well with the prediction obtained from CCA. It is demonstrated that the underlying basic mechanism is a change of the correlation length of the filler network, i.e. the size of the fractal heterogeneities. This decreases during flocculation due to the formation of additional conductive paths, making the system more homogeneous. An addition less pronounced effect is found from nanoscopic gaps between adjacent filler particles, which decrease during flocculation. The same universal scaling behaviour, as obtained for flocculation, is found for temperature-dependent dielectric measurements of the cured

  3. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) as compliant electrodes for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Soo-Lim; Neo, Xin-Hui; Lau, Gih-Keong

    2011-04-01

    A stacked dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) consists of multiple layers of elastomeric dielectrics interleaved with compliant electrodes. It is capable of taking a tensile load if only the interleaving compliant electrodes provide a good bonding and enough elasticity. However, the stacked configuration of DEA was found to produce less actuation strain as compared to a single-layer configuration of pre-stretched membrane. It is believed the binder for compliant electrodes has a significant influence on the actuation strain. Yet, there has yet systematic study on the effect of binder. In this paper, we will study the effects of binder, solvent, and surface fictionalization on the compliant electrodes using the conductive filler of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT). Two types of binders are used, namely a soft silicone rubber (Mold Max 10T) and a soft silicone gel (Sylgard 527 gel). The present experiments show that the actuators using binders in the compliant electrodes produce a much lower areal strain as compared to the ones without binders in them. It is found that introducing a binder in the electrodes decreases the conductivity. The MWCNT compliant electrode with binder remains conductive (<1TΩ) up to a strain of 300%, whereas the one without binder remains conductive up to a strain of 800%. Changing the type of binder to a softer and less-viscous one increases the percolation ratio for MWCNT-COOH filler from 5% to 15% but this does not significantly increase the actuation strain. In addition, this study investigates the effect of MWCNT functionalization on the dielectric elastomeric actuation. The compliant electrodes using the MWCNT functionalized with (-COOH) group was also found to have a lower electrical conductivity and areal actuation strain, in comparison to the ones using the pristine MWCNT filler. In addition to binder, solvent for dispersing MWCNT-COOH was found to affect the actuation strain even though the solvent is eventually removed by

  4. Interconnection concepts for rigid micro-electrodes of a dielectric elastomer bending tube actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrheim, F.; Schlaak, H. F.

    2011-04-01

    A new concept for a tube-like dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) utilizes rigid micro-electrodes to stabilize the tube structure in azimuthal direction. The individual electrodes are stacked in axial direction within the tube wall. An axial arrangement of a number of those electrode stacks forms a single actuator filament. Application of electrical voltage induces mechanical tension into those stacks by the effect of Maxwell-stress. The interaction of individual electrodes causes a change of the total length of selected actuator filaments. A circular arrangement of a number of actuator filaments allows bending of the tube in any direction. The desired tube actuator is focused on thin walled structures with an outer diameter less than 6 mm and an available wall thickness of less than 0.4 mm. To supply individual electrode stacks with different electric potentials an efficient electrical circuit has to be integrated within the DEA structure. The challenges for the design and fabrication of this circuit primarily lie on the micro-electrode dimensions, the minimization of electrical resistances and severe requirements regarding low mechanical interference. As assumption the actuator electrodes are already stacked and each individual electrode must be accessible at the edge. Considering different surface manufacturing technologies an especially shaped conductor geometry should be deposited onto the electrode edges and the surrounding dielectric. The design of the interconnections considers electrical and mechanical requirements as well as the definition of applicable material parameters. The present work details different concepts for interconnecting rigid electrodes of a thin walled tube-like DEA and discusses related manufacturing technologies.

  5. Characterization of ultraviolet light cured polydimethylsiloxane films for low-voltage, dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpper, Tino; Wohlfender, Fabian; Weiss, Florian; Osmani, Bekim; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    The reduction the operation voltage has been the key challenge to realize of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) for many years - especially for the application fields of robotics, lens systems, haptics and future medical implants. Contrary to the approach of manipulating the dielectric properties of the electrically activated polymer (EAP), we intend to realize low-voltage operation by reducing the polymer thickness to the range of a few hundred nanometers. A study recently published presents molecular beam deposition to reliably grow nanometer-thick polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films. The curing of PDMS is realized using ultraviolet (UV) radiation with wavelengths from 180 to 400 nm radicalizing the functional side and end groups. The understanding of the mechanical properties of sub-micrometer-thin PDMS films is crucial to optimize DEAs actuation efficiency. The elastic modulus of UV-cured spin-coated films is measured by nano-indentation using an atomic force microscope (AFM) according to the Hertzian contact mechanics model. These investigations show a reduced elastic modulus with increased indentation depth. A model with a skin-like SiO2 surface with corresponding elastic modulus of (2.29 +/- 0.31) MPa and a bulk modulus of cross-linked PDMS with corresponding elastic modulus of (87 +/- 7) kPa is proposed. The surface morphology is observed with AFM and 3D laser microscopy. Wrinkled surface microstructures on UV-cured PDMS films occur for film thicknesses above (510 +/- 30) nm with an UV-irradiation density of 7.2 10-4 J cm-2 nm-1 at a wavelength of 190 nm.

  6. From land to water: bringing dielectric elastomer sensing to the underwater realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Christopher; Anderson, Iain

    2016-04-01

    Since the late 1990's dielectric elastomers (DEs) have been investigated for their use as sensors. To date, there have been some impressive developments: finger displacement controls for video games and integration with medical rehabilitation devices to aid patient recovery. It is clear DE sensing is well established for dry applications, the next frontier, however, is to adapt this technology for the other 71% of the Earth's surface. With proven and perhaps improved water resistance, many new applications could be developed in areas such as diver communication and control of underwater robotics; even wearable devices on land must withstand sweat, washing, and the rain. This study investigated the influence of fresh and salt water on DE sensing. In particular, sensors have been manufactured with waterproof connections and submersed in fresh and salt water baths. Temperature and resting capacitance were recorded. Issues with the basic DE sensor have been identified and compensated for with modifications to the sensor. The electrostatic field, prior and post modification, has been modeled with ANSYS Maxwell. The aim of this investigation was to identify issues, perform modifications and propose a new sensor design suited to wet and underwater applications.

  7. Cerebellar-inspired algorithm for adaptive control of nonlinear dielectric elastomer-based artificial muscle.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Emma D; Assaf, Tareq; Pearson, Martin J; Rossiter, Jonathan M; Anderson, Sean R; Porrill, John; Dean, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Electroactive polymer actuators are important for soft robotics, but can be difficult to control because of compliance, creep and nonlinearities. Because biological control mechanisms have evolved to deal with such problems, we investigated whether a control scheme based on the cerebellum would be useful for controlling a nonlinear dielectric elastomer actuator, a class of artificial muscle. The cerebellum was represented by the adaptive filter model, and acted in parallel with a brainstem, an approximate inverse plant model. The recurrent connections between the two allowed for direct use of sensory error to adjust motor commands. Accurate tracking of a displacement command in the actuator's nonlinear range was achieved by either semi-linear basis functions in the cerebellar model or semi-linear functions in the brainstem corresponding to recruitment in biological muscle. In addition, allowing transfer of training between cerebellum and brainstem as has been observed in the vestibulo-ocular reflex prevented the steady increase in cerebellar output otherwise required to deal with creep. The extensibility and relative simplicity of the cerebellar-based adaptive-inverse control scheme suggests that it is a plausible candidate for controlling this type of actuator. Moreover, its performance highlights important features of biological control, particularly nonlinear basis functions, recruitment and transfer of training.

  8. Eliminating electromechanical instability in dielectric elastomers by employing pre-stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liang; Betts, Anthony; Kennedy, David; Jerrams, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    Electromechanical instability (EMI) is one of most common failure modes for dielectric elastomers (DEs). It has been reported that pre-stretching a DE sample can suppress EMI due to strain stiffening taking place for larger strains and a higher elastic modulus are achieved at high stretch ratios when a voltage is applied to the material. In this work, the influence of equi-biaxial stretch on DE secant modulus was studied using VHB 4910 and silicone rubber (SR) composites containing barium titanate (BaTiO3, BT) particles and also dopamine coated BT (DP-BT) particles. The investigation of equi-biaxial deformation and EMI failure for VHB 4910 was undertaken by introducing a voltage-stretch function. The results showed that EMI was suppressed by equi-biaxial pre-stretch for all the DEs fabricated and tested. The stiffening properties of the DE materials were also studied with respect to the secant modulus. Furthermore, a voltage-induced strain of above 200% was achieved for the polyacrylate film by applying a pre-stretch ratio of 2.0 without EMI occurring. However, a maximum voltage-induced strain in the polyacrylate film of 78% was obtained by the SR/20 wt% DP-BT composite for a lower applied pre-stretch ratio of 1.6 and again EMI was eliminated.

  9. Method to Control Dynamic Snap-Through Instability of Dielectric Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2016-12-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) are a category of soft materials that are capable of large deformation, however, the actuation performance is affected by snap-through instability. In this article, a dynamics model is developed to investigate the dynamic snap-through instability of DEs by applying the triangle and sinusoidal voltages. The DE materials with different limiting stretches are considered. When the DE is under a triangle voltage or a sinusoidal voltage, the snap-through behavior may emerge during the response in time domain, and the DEs with a large value of limiting stretch are susceptible to dynamic snap-through instability. By tuning the mechanical tensile force, the occurrence of dynamic snap-through instability can be controlled. With the increase of tensile force, the dynamic snap-through behavior initially does not emerge during vibration, then accompanies the vibration, and eventually disappears. Phase paths and Poincaré maps are utilized to explore the dynamic stability evolution of the DE systems.

  10. Hydrostatically coupled dielectric elastomer actuators for tactile displays and cutaneous stimulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2010-04-01

    Hydrostatic coupling has been recently reported as a means to improve versatility and safety of dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators. Hydrostatically coupled DE actuators rely on an incompressible fluid that mechanically couples a DE-based active part to a passive part interfaced to the load. In this paper, we present ongoing development of bubble-like versions of such transducers, made of silicone and oil. In particular, the paper describes millimeter-scale actuators, currently being developed as soft, light, acoustically silent and cheap devices for two types of applications: tactile displays and cutaneous stimulators. In both cases, the most significant advantages of the proposed technology are represented by high versatility for design (due to the fluid based transmission mechanism), tailorable stiffness perceived by the user (obtained by adjusting the internal fluid pressure), and suitable electrical safety (enabled by both a passive interface with the user and the insulating internal fluid). Millimeter-scale prototypes showed a resonance frequency of about 250 Hz, which represents the value at which Pacinian cutaneous mechanoreceptors exhibit maximum sensitivity; this provides an optimum condition to eventually code tactile information dynamically, either in combination or as an alternative to static driving.

  11. Vibroacoustic modeling of an acoustic resonator tuned by dielectric elastomer membrane with voltage control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiang; Lu, Zhenbo; Cheng, Li; Cui, Fangsen

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the acoustic properties of a duct resonator tuned by an electro-active membrane. The resonator takes the form of a side-branch cavity which is attached to a rigid duct and covered by a pre-stretched Dielectric Elastomer (DE) in the neck area. A three-dimensional, analytical model based on the sub-structuring approach is developed to characterize the complex structure-acoustic coupling between the DE membrane and its surrounding acoustic media. We show that such resonator provides sound attenuation in the medium frequency range mainly by means of sound reflection, as a result of the membrane vibration. The prediction accuracy of the proposed model is validated against experimental test. The pre-stretched DE membrane with fixed edges responds to applied voltage change with a varying inner stress and, by the same token, its natural frequency and vibrational response can be tuned to suit particular frequencies of interest. The peaks in the transmission loss (TL) curves can be shifted towards lower frequencies when the voltage applied to the DE membrane is increased. Through simulations on the effect of increasing the voltage level, the TL shifting mechanism and its possible tuning range are analyzed. This paves the way for applying such resonator device for adaptive-passive noise control.

  12. Electrical properties of nanoscale metallic thin films on dielectric elastomer at various strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Md. Shahnewaz Sabit; Ye, Zhihang; Chen, Zheng; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have significant applications in artificial muscle and other biomedical equipment and device fabrications. Metallic thin films by thin film transfer and sputter coating techniques can provide conductive surfaces on the DE samples, and can be used as electrodes for the actuators and other biomedical sensing devices. In the present study, 3M VHB 4910 tape was used as a DE for the coating and electrical characterization tests. A 150 nm thickness of gold was coated on the DE surfaces by sputter coating under vacuum with different pre-strains, ranging from 0 to 100%. Some of the thin films were transferred to the surface of the DEs. Sputter coating, and direct transferring gold leaf coating methods were studied and the results were analyzed in detail in terms of the strain rates and electrical resistivity changes. Initial studies indicated that the metallic surfaces remain conductive even though the DE films were considerably elongated. The coated DEs can be used as artificial muscle by applying electrical stimulation through the conductive surfaces. This study may provide great benefits to the readers, researchers, as well as companies involved in manufacturing of artificial muscles and actuators using smart materials.

  13. Circuit design considerations for regulating energy generated by dielectric elastomer generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ho Cheong; Mckay, Thomas; O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Calius, Emilio; Anderson, Iain

    2011-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomer Generator(s) (DEG) have many unique properties that give them advantages over conventional electromagnetic generators. These include the ability to effectively generate power from slow and irregular motions, low cost, relatively large energy density, and a soft and flexible nature. For DEG to generate usable electrical energy circuits for charging (or priming) the stretched DEG and regulating the generated energy when relaxed are required. Most prior art has focused on the priming challenge, and there is currently very little work into developing circuits that address design issues for extracting the electrical energy and converting it into a usable form such as low DC voltages (~10 V) for small batteries or AC mains voltage (~100 V). This paper provides a brief introduction to the problems of regulating the energy generated by DEG. A buck converter and a charge pump are common DC-DC step-down circuits and are used as case studies to explore the design issues inherent in converting the high voltage energy into a form suitable for charging a battery. Buck converters are efficient and reliable but also heavy and bulky, making them suitable for large scale power generation. The smaller and simpler charge pump, though a less effective energy harvester, is better for small and discrete power generation. Future development in miniature DE fabrication is expected to reduce the high operational voltages, simplifying the design of these circuits.

  14. Bio-inspired annelid robot: a dielectric elastomer actuated soft robot.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Chen, Han-Qing; Zou, Jiang; Dong, Wan-Ting; Gu, Guo-Ying; Zhu, Li-Min; Zhu, Xiang-Yang

    2017-01-31

    Biologically inspired robots with inherent softness and body compliance increasingly attract attention in the field of robotics. Aimed at solving existing problems with soft robots, regarding actuation technology and biological principles, this paper presents a soft bio-inspired annelid robot driven by dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) that can advance on flat rigid surfaces. The DEA, a kind of soft functional actuator, is designed and fabricated to mimic the axial elongation and differential friction of a single annelid body segment. Several (at least three) DEAs are connected together into a movable multi-segment robot. Bristles are attached at the bottom of some DEAs to achieve differential friction for imitating the setae of annelids. The annelid robot is controlled by periodic square waves, propagating from the posterior to the anterior, which imitate the peristaltic waves of annelids. Controlled by these waves, each DEA, one-by-one from tail to head, anchors to the ground by circumferential distention and pushes the front DEAs forward by axial elongation, enabling the robot to advance. Preliminary tests demonstrate that a 3-segment robot can reach an average speed of 5.3 mm s(-1) (1.871 body lengths min(-1)) on flat rigid surfaces and can functionally mimic the locomotion of annelids. Compared to the existing robots that imitate terrestrial annelids our annelid robot shows advantages in terms of speed and bionics.

  15. Current status and future prospects of power generators using dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Seiki; Waki, Mikio; Kornbluh, Roy; Pelrine, Ron

    2011-12-01

    Electroactive polymer artificial muscle (EPAM), known collectively as dielectric elastomers in the literature, has been shown to offer unique capabilities as an actuator and is now being developed for a wide variety of generator applications. EPAM has several characteristics that make it potentially well suited for wave, water current, wind, human motion, and other environmental energy harvesting systems including a high energy density allowing for minimal EPAM material quantities, high energy conversion efficiency independent of frequency of operation and non-toxic and low-cost materials not susceptible to corrosion. Experiments have been performed on push-button and heel-mounted generator devices powered by human motion, ocean wave power harvesters mounted on buoys and water turbines. While the power output levels of such demonstration devices is small, the performance of these devices has supported the potential benefits of EPAM. For example, an electrical energy conversion efficiency of over 70% was achieved with small wave heights. The ability of EPAM to produce hydrogen fuel for energy storage was also demonstrated. Because the energy conversion principle of EPAM is capacitive in nature, the performance is largely independent of size and it should eventually be possible to scale up EPAM generators to the megawatt level to address a variety of electrical power needs.

  16. Oscillating-water-column wave-energy-converter based on dielectric elastomer generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertechy, R.; Fontana, M.; Rosati Papini, G. P.; Bergamasco, M.

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric Elastomers (DE) have been largely studied as actuators and sensors. Fewer researches have addressed their application in the field of energy harvesting. Their light weightiness, low cost, high corrosion resistance, and their intrinsic high-voltage and cyclical-way of operation make DE suited for harvesting mechanical energy from sea waves. To date, the development of cost-effective Wave Energy Converters (WECs) is hindered by inherent limitations of available material technologies. State of the art WECs are indeed based on traditional mechanical components, hydraulic transmissions and electromagnetic generators, which are all made by stiff, bulky, heavy and costly metallic materials. As a consequence, existing WECs result in being expensive, difficult to assemble, sensitive to corrosion and hard to maintain in the marine environment. DE generators could be an enabling technology for overcoming the intrinsic limitations of current WEC technologies. In this context, this paper focuses on Polymer-based Oscillating-Water-Column (Poly-OWC) type WECs, and analyzes the viability of using DE generators as power-take-off systems. Regarding paper structure, the first sections introduce the working principle of OWC devices and discuss possible layouts for their DE-based power-take-off system. Then, a simplified hydraulic-electro-hyperelastic model of a two-dimensional Poly-OWC is described. Finally, preliminary simulation results are shown which provide insights on the potential capabilities of Poly-OWC.

  17. Toward compression of small cell population: harnessing stress in passive regions of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Alexandre; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2014-03-01

    We present a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) for in vitro analysis of mm2 biological samples under periodic compressive stress. Understanding how mechanical stimuli affect cell functions could lead to significant advances in diseases diagnosis and drugs development. We previously reported an array of 72 micro-DEAs on a chip to apply a periodic stretch to cells. To diversify our cell mechanotransduction toolkit we have developed an actuator for periodic compression of small cell populations. The device is based on a novel design which exploits the effects of non-equibiaxial pre-stretch and takes advantage of the stress induced in passive regions of DEAs. The device consists of two active regions separated by a 2mm x 2mm passive area. When connected to an AC high-voltage source, the two active regions periodically compress the passive region. Due to the non-equibiaxial pre-stretch it induces uniaxial compressive strain greater than 10%. Cells adsorbed on top of this passive gap would experience the same uniaxial compressive stain. The electrodes configuration confines the electric field and prevents it from reaching the biological sample. A thin layer of silicone is casted on top of the device to ensure a biocompatible environment. This design provides several advantages over alternative technologies such as high optical transparency of the area of interest (passive region under compression) and its potential for miniaturization and parallelization.

  18. A smart experimental technique for the optimization of dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgins, M.; Rizzello, G.; York, A.; Naso, D.; Seelecke, S.

    2015-09-01

    In order to aid in moving dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) technology from the laboratory into a commercial product DEA prototypes should be tested against a variety of loading conditions and eventually in the end user conditions. An experimental test setup to seamlessly perform mechanical characterization and loading of the DEA would be a great asset toward this end. Therefore, this work presents the design, control and systematic validation of a benchtop testing station for miniature silicon based circular DEAs. A versatile benchtop tester is able to characterize and apply programmable loading forces to the DEA while measuring actuator performance. The tester successfully applied mechanical loads to the DEA (including positive, constant and negative stiffness loads) simulating biasing systems via an electromagnetic linear motor operating in closed loop with a force/mechanical impedance control scheme. The tester expedites mechanical testing of the DEA by eliminating the need to build intricate pre-load mechanisms or use multiple testing jigs for characterizing the DEA response. The results show that proper mechanical loading of the DEA increases the overall electromechanical sensitivity of the system and thereby the actuator output. This approach to characterize and apply variable loading forces to DEAs in a single test system will enable faster realization of higher performance actuators.

  19. Cerebellar-inspired algorithm for adaptive control of nonlinear dielectric elastomer-based artificial muscle

    PubMed Central

    Assaf, Tareq; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Porrill, John

    2016-01-01

    Electroactive polymer actuators are important for soft robotics, but can be difficult to control because of compliance, creep and nonlinearities. Because biological control mechanisms have evolved to deal with such problems, we investigated whether a control scheme based on the cerebellum would be useful for controlling a nonlinear dielectric elastomer actuator, a class of artificial muscle. The cerebellum was represented by the adaptive filter model, and acted in parallel with a brainstem, an approximate inverse plant model. The recurrent connections between the two allowed for direct use of sensory error to adjust motor commands. Accurate tracking of a displacement command in the actuator's nonlinear range was achieved by either semi-linear basis functions in the cerebellar model or semi-linear functions in the brainstem corresponding to recruitment in biological muscle. In addition, allowing transfer of training between cerebellum and brainstem as has been observed in the vestibulo-ocular reflex prevented the steady increase in cerebellar output otherwise required to deal with creep. The extensibility and relative simplicity of the cerebellar-based adaptive-inverse control scheme suggests that it is a plausible candidate for controlling this type of actuator. Moreover, its performance highlights important features of biological control, particularly nonlinear basis functions, recruitment and transfer of training. PMID:27655667

  20. Enabling variable-stiffness hand rehabilitation orthoses with dielectric elastomer transducers.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; Gerboni, Carlo; Gemignani, Jessica; De Rossi, Danilo

    2014-02-01

    Patients affected by motor disorders of the hand and having residual voluntary movements of fingers or wrist can benefit from self-rehabilitation exercises performed with so-called dynamic hand splints. These systems consist of orthoses equipped with elastic cords or springs, which either provide a sustained stretch or resist voluntary movements of fingers or wrist. These simple systems are limited by the impossibility of modulating the mechanical stiffness. This limitation does not allow for customizations and real-time control of the training exercise, which would improve the rehabilitation efficacy. To overcome this limitation, 'active' orthoses equipped with devices that allow for electrical control of the mechanical stiffness are needed. Here, we report on a solution that relies on compact and light-weight electroactive elastic transducers that replace the passive elastic components. We developed a variable-stiffness transducer made of dielectric elastomers, as the most performing types of electromechanically active polymers. The transducer was manufactured with a silicone film and tested with a purposely-developed stiffness control strategy that allowed for electrical modulations of the force-elongation response. Results showed that the proposed new technology is a promising and viable solution to develop electrically controllable dynamic hand orthoses for hand rehabilitation.

  1. Saddle-like deformation in a dielectric elastomer actuator embedded with liquid-phase gallium-indium electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wissman, J.; Finkenauer, L.; Deseri, L.; Majidi, C.

    2014-10-14

    We introduce a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) composed of liquid-phase Gallium-Indium (GaIn) alloy electrodes embedded between layers of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and examine its mechanics using a specialized elastic shell theory. Residual stresses in the dielectric and sealing layers of PDMS cause the DEA to deform into a saddle-like geometry (Gaussian curvature K<0). Applying voltage Φ to the liquid metal electrodes induces electrostatic pressure (Maxwell stress) on the dielectric and relieves some of the residual stress. This reduces the longitudinal bending curvature and corresponding angle of deflection ϑ. Treating the elastomer as an incompressible, isotropic, NeoHookean solid, we develop a theory based on the principle of minimum potential energy to predict the principal curvatures as a function of Φ. Based on this theory, we predict a dependency of ϑ on Φ that is in strong agreement with experimental measurements performed on a GaIn-PDMS composite. By accurately modeling electromechanical coupling in a soft-matter DEA, this theory can inform improvements in design and fabrication.

  2. Electromechanical behavior of a novel dielectric elastomer sensor for compressive force detection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junjie; Mao, Guoyong; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Zou, Zhanan; Qu, Shaoxing; Wang, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have been extensively studied as DE actuators, DE generators, and DE sensors. Compared with DE actuators and generators, DE sensing application has the advantage that it is no need for high voltage. However, to realize the high sensitivity of the DE sensor, a well-designed structure is essential. A typical DE sensor consists of DE membrane covered by compliant electrodes on both sides. Expanding in the area and shrinking in the thickness of DE membrane subjected to external force will lead to the increasement of the capacitance. We propose a novel DE sensor to detect compressive force. The DE sensor consists of three layers. The two layers of outside can penetrate each other to deform the middle layer and achieve high sensitivity for compressive force measurement. This sensor consists of a series of sensor elements made of DE membrane with out-of-plane deformation. Each sensor element experiences highly inhomogeneous large deformation to obtain high sensitivity. We conduct the experiment to optimize the performance of the sensor element, and also the corresponding theoretical analysis is developed. The effects of the prestretches and the aspect ratios of the sensor element on the sensitivity are achieved. The soft sensor composed of a series of such sensor elements may comply with complicated surfaces and can be used to detect both the total value and the distribution of the compressive force exerted on the surface. Furthermore, the reliability of the sensor element is studied by additional experimental investigation. The experiment shows that the sensor element operates steadily after 2000 cyclic loadings. This study provides guidance for the design and performance analysis of soft sensors. This work has been published in the Journal of Applied Mechanics, 82(10), No. 101004 (2015).

  3. Kinematics and control of redundant robotic arm based on dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, Francesco; Antonello, Andrea; Carron, Andrea; Carli, Ruggero; Francesconi, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Soft robotics is a promising field and its application to space mechanisms could represent a breakthrough in space technologies by enabling new operative scenarios (e.g. soft manipulators, capture systems). Dielectric Elastomers Actuators have been under deep study for a number of years and have shown several advantages that could be of key importance for space applications. Among such advantages the most notable are high conversion efficiency, distributed actuation, self-sensing capability, multi-degree-of-freedom design, light weight and low cost. The big potentialities of double cone actuators have been proven in terms of good performances (i.e. stroke and force/torque), ease of manufacturing and durability. In this work the kinematic, dynamic and control design of a two-joint redundant robotic arm is presented. Two double cone actuators are assembled in series to form a two-link design. Each joint has two degrees of freedom (one rotational and one translational) for a total of four. The arm is designed to move in a 2-D environment (i.e. the horizontal plane) with 4 DoF, consequently having two degrees of redundancy. The redundancy is exploited in order to minimize the joint loads. The kinematic design with redundant Jacobian inversion is presented. The selected control algorithm is described along with the results of a number of dynamic simulations that have been executed for performance verification. Finally, an experimental setup is presented based on a flexible structure that counteracts gravity during testing in order to better emulate future zero-gravity applications.

  4. Dielectric elastomer strain and pressure sensing enable reactive soft fluidic muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Sheng Q.

    2016-04-01

    Wearable assistive devices are the future of rehabilitation therapy and bionic limb technologies. Traditional electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators can provide the precise and powerful around-the-clock assistance that therapists cannot deliver. However, they do so in the confines of highly controlled factory environments, resulting in actuators too rigid, heavy, and immobile for wearable applications. In contrast, biological skeletal muscles have been designed and proven in the uncertainty of the real world. Bioinspired artificial muscle actuators aim to mimic the soft, slim, and self-sensing abilities of natural muscle that make them tough and intelligent. Fluidic artificial muscles are a promising wearable assistive actuation candidate, sharing the high-force, inherent compliance of their natural counterparts. Until now, they have not been able to self-sense their length, pressure, and force in an entirely soft and flexible system. Their use of rigid components has previously been a requirement for the generation of large forces, but reduces their reliability and compromises their ability to be comfortably worn. We present the unobtrusive integration of dielectric elastomer (DE) strain and pressure sensors into a soft Peano fluidic muscle, a planar alternative to the relatively bulky McKibben muscle. Characterization of these DE sensors shows they can measure the full operating range of the Peano muscle: strains of around 18% and pressures up to 400 kPa with changes in capacitance of 2.4 and 10.5 pF respectively. This is a step towards proprioceptive artificial muscles, paving the way for wearable actuation that can truly feel its environment.

  5. Multifunctional shape memory electrodes for dielectric elastomer actuators enabling high holding force and low-voltage multisegment addressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoul, David; Rosset, Samuel; Besse, Nadine; Shea, Herbert

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are an attractive form of electromechanical transducer, possessing high energy densities, an efficient design, mechanical flexibility, high speed, and noiseless operation. They have been incorporated into a variety of elegant devices, such as microfluidic devices, tunable optics, haptic displays, and minimum-energy grippers. Dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures (DEMESs) take advantage of the prestretch of the DEA to bend a non-stretchable but flexible component to perform mechanical work. The gripper is perhaps the most intuitive type of DEMES, capable of grasping objects but with only small to moderate forces. We present a novel configuration of a DEA using electrodes made of a conductive shape-memory polymer (SMP), incorporated into the design of a gripper. The SMP electrodes allow the DEA to be rigid in the cold state, offering greater holding force than a conventional gripper. Joule heating applied to the SMP electrodes softens them, allowing for electrostatic actuation. Cooling then locks in the actuated position without the need for continued power to be supplied. Additionally, the Joule heating voltage is at least one order of magnitude less than electrostatic actuation voltages, allowing for addressing of multiple actuator elements using commercially available transistors. The shape memory gripper incorporates this addressing into its design, enabling the three segments of each finger to be controlled independently.

  6. Lightweight mechanical amplifiers for rolled dielectric elastomer actuators and their integration with bio-inspired wing flappers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Gih-Keong; Lim, Hoong-Ta; Teo, Jing-Ying; Chin, Yao-Wei

    2014-02-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are attractive for use in bio-inspired flapping-wing robots because they have high work density (specific energy) and can produce a large actuation strain. Although the active membrane of a dielectric elastomer is lightweight, the support structure that pre-tensions the elastomeric membrane is massive and it lowers the overall work density. If the DEA is to be used successfully to drive flapping-wing robots, its support structure must be as lightweight as possible. In this work, we designed, analysed, and developed a lightweight shell using a cross-ply laminate of carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) to pre-strain a rolled DEA. The CFRP shell was shown to weigh 24.3% of the total mass for the whole DEA assembly, while providing up to 35.0% axial pre-strain to a rolled DEA (BJB-5005 silicone rubber). This DEA assembly using the CFRP shell achieved 30.9% of the theoretical work density for a BJB-TC5005 membrane at 33.5 MV m-1. In comparison, spring rolls with a massive spring core were reported with overall work density merely 10-20% of the maximum value. Furthermore, this CFRP shell can amplify an axial DEA stroke into a larger transverse shell deformation. With these deformation characteristics, this CFRP shell and a rolled DEA were successfully integrated with an insect-inspired thoracic mechanism and they were shown to be feasible to drive it for a flapping wing.

  7. Investigating the performance and properties of dielectric elastomer actuators as a potential means to actuate origami structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Ounaies, Z.; Frecker, M.

    2014-09-01

    Origami engineering aims to combine origami principles with advanced materials to yield active origami shapes, which fold and unfold in response to external stimuli. This paper explores the potential and limitations of dielectric elastomers (DEs) as the enabling material in active origami engineering. DEs are compliant materials in which the coupled electro-mechanical actuation takes advantage of their low modulus and high breakdown strength. Until recently, prestraining of relatively thick DE materials was necessary in order to achieve the high electric fields needed to trigger electrostatic actuation without inducing a dielectric breakdown. Although prestrain improves the breakdown strength of the DE films and reduces the voltage required for actuation, the need for a solid frame to retain the prestrain state is a limitation for the practical implementation of DEs, especially for active origami structures. However, the recent availability of thinner DE materials (50 μm, 130 μm, 260 μm) has made DEs a likely medium for active origami. In this work, the folding and unfolding of DE multilayered structures, along with the realization of origami-inspired 3D shapes, are explored. In addition, an exhaustive study on the fundamentals of DE actuation is done by directly investigating the thickness actuation mechanism and comparing their performance using different electrode types. Finally, changes in dielectric permittivity as a function of strain, electrode type and applied electric field are assessed and analyzed. These fundamental studies are key to obtaining more dramatic folding and to realizing active origami structures using DE materials.

  8. Achieving high performance electric field induced strain: a rational design of hyperbranched aromatic polyamide functionalized graphene-polyurethane dielectric elastomer composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian; Qiu, Jinhao; Zhu, Kongjun; Li, Jinhuan; Wang, Jingwen; Li, Shuqin; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2015-03-26

    Dielectric elastomers have great potentials as flexible actuators in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) due to their large deformation, light weight, mechanical compliancy, and low cost. The low dielectric constant of these elastomers requires a rather high voltage electric field, which has greatly limited their applications. In this work, a diaphragm-type flexible microactuator comprising a hyperbranched aromatic polyamide functionalized graphene (HAPFG) filler embedded into the polyurethane (PU) dielectric elastomer matrix is described. The rational designed HAPFG sheets exhibits uniform dispersion in PU matrix and strong adhesion with the matrix by hydrogen-bond coupling. Consequently, the HAPFG-PU composites possess high dielectric performance and low loss modulus. The effect of hyperbranched aromatic polyamide functionalized graphene on high voltage electric field induced strain was experimentally investigated using the Fotonic sensor. The high electric field response of the composite was discussed by applying different kinds of alternating-current field. In addition, a comparison of the breakdown strength between the HAPFG-PU composite and the pure PU was carried out.

  9. Elastomer unistructure insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, L.P.; Orham, E.L.; Anderson, R.L.

    1981-06-01

    A single elastomer high voltage dielectric provides low inductance interconnection of capacitors, railgaps, and vacuum load. It complies against conductors to prevent tracking. Operation below a threshold breakdown field provides long lifetime.

  10. Surface treatment of poly(ethylene terephthalate) by gamma-ray induced graft copolymerization of methyl acrylate and its toughening effect on poly(ethylene terephthalate)/elastomer blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Mozhen; Ge, Xuewu

    2013-09-01

    To improve the compatibility between ethylene-methyl acrylate-glycidyl methacrylate random terpolymer (E-MA-GMA) elastomer and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), thereby enhance the toughening effect of E-MA-GMA on PET, γ-radiation-induced graft copolymerization technique was used to graft methyl acrylate (MA) monomer onto PET. The produced PET-g-PMA copolymer can be used as a self-compatibilizer in PET/E-MA-GMA blend since the copolymer contains the same segments, respectively, with PET and E-MA-GMA. The impact strength of PET/E-MA-GMA blend increased nearly by 30% in the presence of less than 0.1 wt% PET-g-PMA compared with that of the neat PET/elastomer blend, without loss of the tensile strength of the blends. This work proposed a potential application of radiation-induced grafting copolymerization technique on the in-situ compatibilization of PET/elastomer blends so as to improve the integral mechanical properties of PET based engineering plastic.

  11. Aerosol-Jet-Printing silicone layers and electrodes for stacked dielectric elastomer actuators in one processing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitelshöfer, Sebastian; Göttler, Michael; Schmidt, Philip; Treffer, Philipp; Landgraf, Maximilian; Franke, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution we present recent findings of our efforts to qualify the so called Aerosol-Jet-Printing process as an additive manufacturing approach for stacked dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA). With the presented system we are able to print the two essential structural elements dielectric layer and electrode in one machine. The system is capable of generating RTV-2 silicone layers made of Wacker Elastosil P 7670. Therefore, two aerosol streams of both precursor components A and B are generated in parallel and mixed in one printing nozzle that is attached to a 4-axis kinematic. At maximum speed the printing of one circular Elastosil layer with a calculated thickness of 10 μm and a diameter of 1 cm takes 12 seconds while the process keeps stable for 4.5 hours allowing a quite high overall material output and the generation of numerous silicone layers. By adding a second printing nozzle and the infrastructure to generate a third aerosol, the system is also capable of printing inks with conductive particles in parallel to the silicone. We have printed a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) ink prepared in our lab to generate electrodes on VHB 4905, Elastosil foils and finally on Aerosol-Jet-Printed Elastosil layers. With rGO ink printed on Elastosil foil, layers with a 4-point measured sheet resistance as low as 4 kΩ can be realized leaving room for improving the electrode printing time, which at the moment is not as good as the quite good time-frame for printing the silicone layers. Up to now we have used the system to print a fully functional two-layer stacked DEA to demonstrate the principle of continuously 3D printing actuators.

  12. A simulation study of the electrostriction effects in dielectric elastomer composites containing polarizable inclusions with different spatial distributions.

    PubMed

    Allahyarov, Elshad; Löwen, Hartmut; Zhu, Lei

    2015-12-28

    Controlled actuation of electroactive polymers with embedded high dielectric nanoparticles is theoretically analyzed. If the inclusions are placed randomly in the elastomer body, the composite always contracts along the direction of the applied field. For a simple cubic distribution of inclusions, contraction occurs if the applied field is directed along the [001] direction of the lattice. For inclusions occupying the sites of other lattice structures such as body-centered or face-centered cubic crystals, the composite elongates along the field direction if it is applied along the [001] direction. The stability of the elongation against the imperfectness of the lattice site positions and the distortion ratio of the initial structures are examined. Finite elongation windows show up for the initially distorted body-centered cubic and face-centered cubic crystals as a function of the distortion ratio of the initial structure. The existence of these elongation windows are also predicted from the analysis of the electrostatic energy of the distorted body-centered cubic and face-centered cubic lattice structures. Our results indicate that the electrostriction effect, which is the main contribution to the actuation of low aspect-ratio composites, strongly depends on the geometry of the spatial distribution of nanoparticles, and can thereby largely be tuned.

  13. Control-focused, nonlinear and time-varying modelling of dielectric elastomer actuators with frequency response analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, William R.; Wilson, Emma D.; Assaf, Tareq; Rossiter, Jonathan; Dodd, Tony J.; Porrill, John; Anderson, Sean R.

    2015-05-01

    Current models of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are mostly constrained to first principal descriptions that are not well suited to the application of control design due to their computational complexity. In this work we describe an integrated framework for the identification of control focused, data driven and time-varying DEA models that allow advanced analysis of nonlinear system dynamics in the frequency-domain. Experimentally generated input-output data (voltage-displacement) was used to identify control-focused, nonlinear and time-varying dynamic models of a set of film-type DEAs. The model description used was the nonlinear autoregressive with exogenous input structure. Frequency response analysis of the DEA dynamics was performed using generalized frequency response functions, providing insight and a comparison into the time-varying dynamics across a set of DEA actuators. The results demonstrated that models identified within the presented framework provide a compact and accurate description of the system dynamics. The frequency response analysis revealed variation in the time-varying dynamic behaviour of DEAs fabricated to the same specifications. These results suggest that the modelling and analysis framework presented here is a potentially useful tool for future work in guiding DEA actuator design and fabrication for application domains such as soft robotics.

  14. Development of microsized slip sensors using dielectric elastomer for incipient slippage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Do-Yeon; Kim, Baek-chul; Cho, Han-Jeong; Li, Zhengyuan; Lee, Youngkwan; Nam, Jae-Do; Moon, Hyungpil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, J. C.

    2014-04-01

    A humanoid robot hand has received significant attention in various fields of study. In terms of dexterous robot hand, slip detecting tactile sensor is essential to grasping objects safely. Moreover, slip sensor is useful in robotics and prosthetics to improve precise control during manipulation tasks. In this paper, sensor based-human biomimetic structure is fabricated. We reported a resistance tactile sensor that enables to detect a slip on the surface of sensor structure. The resistance slip sensor that the novel developed uses acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) as a dielectric substrate and carbon particle as an electrode material. The presented sensor device in this paper has fingerprint-like structures that are similar with the role of the human's finger print. It is possible to measure the slip as the structure of sensor makes a deformation and it changes the resistance through forming a new conductive route. To verify effectiveness of the proposed slip detection, experiment using prototype of resistance slip sensor is conducted with an algorithm to detect slip and slip was successfully detected. In this paper, we will discuss the slip detection properties so four sensor and detection principle.

  15. Towards the development of active compression bandages using dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourazadi, S.; Ahmadi, S.; Menon, C.

    2014-06-01

    Disorders associated with the lower extremity venous system are common and significantly affect the quality of life of a large number of individuals. These disorders include orthostatic hypotension, oedema, deep vein thrombosis and a number of other conditions related to insufficient venous blood return. The common recommended treatment for these disorders is the use of hosiery compression stockings. In this research, an active compression bandage (ACB) based on the technology of dielectric elastomeric actuators (DEA) was designed, prototyped and tested. A customized calf prototype (CP) was developed to measure the pressure applied by the ACB. Experimental results performed with the CP showed that the pressure applied by the ACB could be electrically controlled to be either below or above the pressure exerted by commercially available compression stockings. An analytical model was used to provide the design criteria. A finite element model (FEM) was also developed to simulate the electromechanical behaviour of the DEA. Comparison of the experimental results with the FEM and analytical models showed that the modelling could accurately predict the behaviour of the ACB. The FEM was subsequently used to study how to improve the ACB performance by varying geometrical parameters such as the ACB thickness.

  16. Electro-spraying and ultra-violet light curing of polydimethylsiloxane to fabricate thin films for low-voltage dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Florian M.; Kovacs, Gabor; Töpper, Tino; Osmani, Bekim; Leung, Vanessa Y. F.; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Currently, dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are mainly based on micrometer-thin polymer films and require operating voltages of several hundred volts. In medical applications, however, voltages as low as a few tens of volts are required. To this end, we prepared nanometer-thin dielectric elastomer layers. It is demonstrated that alternating current, electro-spray deposition allows for the fabrication of homogenous, flat, nanometer-thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films. The growth of the PDMS with average number molecular weights ranging from 800 to 62,700 g/mol, at a constant flow rate of 267 nL/s, was in situ monitored by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry. The Cauchy layer model used for data interpretation may only be applied to flat PDMS layers. Thus, in the present study the droplet morphology was also determined by atomic force microscopy. Spectroscopic ellipsometry does allow for the qualitative determination of the thin film morphology. However, for high molecular weight polymers the precise measurement during deposition is challenging. Independent of the molecular weight, the roughness of the deposited PDMS films considerably smoothens during the ultra-violet radiation treatment. After curing, the electro-sprayed nanometer-thin PDMS films are homogeneous enough to qualify for the fabrication of low-voltage DEA.

  17. From electrode charges on dielectric elastomers to trapped charges and electric dipoles in electrets and ferroelectrets: fundamental and applications-relevant aspects of diversity in electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Reimund

    2016-04-01

    Some recent developments in the areas of soft and basically incompressible electro-electrets (dielectric elastomers) with large strains, of anisotropic polymer ferro- or piezo-electrets with quasi-ferroelectric behavior, of moleculardipole electrets with significant ferro-, pyro- and piezo-electricity, and of space-charge polymer electrets with locally stabilised charges are described. Such materials may be applied, e.g., in soft actuators, energy harvesters and flexible and stretchable sensors for devices such as artificial muscles, electrically controllable refractive and diffractive optics, flexible pyroelectric detectors, motion and displacement sensors, earphones and microphones, ultrasonic transducers, air filters, radiation dosimeters, etc. The performance of dielectric elastomers for actuator, energy-harvester and sensor applications relies on a high relative permittivity and a low elastic modulus. High densities of electric charges in the electrodes are required in order to provide large Maxwell stresses or high energy densities. Significant amounts of localised or trapped charges, as well as electric dipoles from pairs of charges, lead to useful electro-mechanical and mechano-electrical effects (or inverse and direct piezoelectricity, respectively) if they are properly arranged in dielectric materials with extremely low conductivities. Space-charge electret films and ferroelectret systems should exhibit thermal and long-term stability of the trapped charges within the respective materials. Ferroelectric polymers and other polar polymers show useful piezo- and pyroelectric properties if their polymer-chain conformations allow for parallel packing of the molecular dipoles. Space-charge and molecular-dipole electrets are widely applied, e.g. in microphones, air filters, radiation dosimeters, ultrasonic transducers, etc. Basically, the performance of all electro-active polymers relies on the attraction (and repulsion) of electric charges and thus directly on

  18. Theory of Dielectric Elastomers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-25

    under the condition that the two electrodes are subject to a constant voltage during deformation. If the voltage between the electrodes can be...varied, the force and the displacement may be changed independently. When the transducer is subject to a constant weight, but the voltage is changed...from 0 to 1 , the transducer changes from state A to state B, lifting the weight. When the displacement l is held constant , a change in the

  19. EVALUATION OF AN ACRYLATE TERPOLYMER, POLYURETHANE COMPOSITE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Composite films consisting of a flexible acrylate terpolymer substrate and an outer layer of poly (ester-urethane) elastomer were prepared and evaluated for use in cosmetic glove applications. (Author)

  20. Characterization of screen-printed electrodes for dielectric elastomer (DE) membranes: influence of screen dimensions and electrode thickness on actuator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasolt, Bettina; Hodgins, Micah; Seelecke, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Screen printing is used as a method for printing electrodes on silicone thin films for the fabrication of dielectric elastomer transducers (DET). This method can be used to manufacture a multitude of patternable designs for actuator and sensor applications, implementing the same method for prototyping as well as large-scale production. The fabrication of DETs does not only require the development of a flexible, highly conductive electrode material, which adheres to a stretched and unstretched silicone film, but also calls for a thorough understanding of the effects of the different printing parameters. This work studies the influence of screen dimensions (open area, mesh thickness) as well as the influence of multiple-layer- printing on the electrode stiffness, electrical resistance and capacitance as well as actuator performance. The investigation was conducted in a custom-built testing device, which enabled an electro-mechanical characterization of the DET, simultaneously measuring parameters such as strain, voltage, current, force, sheet resistance, capacitance and membrane thickness. Magnified pictures of the electrodes will additionally illustrate the effects of the different printing parameters.

  1. Holographic Structuring of Elastomer Actuator: First True Monolithic Tunable Elastomer Optics.

    PubMed

    Ryabchun, Alexander; Kollosche, Matthias; Wegener, Michael; Sakhno, Oksana

    2016-12-01

    Volume diffraction gratings (VDGs) are inscribed selectively by diffusive introduction of benzophenone and subsequent UV-holographic structuring into an electroactive dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), to afford a continuous voltage-controlled grating shift of 17%. The internal stress coupling of DEA and optical domain allows for a new generation of true monolithic tunable elastomer optics with voltage controlled properties.

  2. Effect of geometric size on mechanical properties of dielectric elastomers based on an improved visco-hyperelastic film model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Mengzhou; Wang, Zhenqing; Tong, Liyong; Liang, Wenyan

    2017-03-01

    Dielectric polymers show complex mechanical behaviors with different boundary conditions, geometry size and pre-stress. A viscoelastic model suitable for inhomogeneous deformation is presented integrating the Kelvin-Voigt model in a new form in this work. For different types of uniaxial tensile test loading along the length direction of sample, single-step-relaxation tests, loading–unloading tests and tensile–creep–relaxation tests the improved model provides a quite favorable comparison with the experiment results. Moreover, The mechanical properties of test sample with several length–width ratios under different boundary conditions are also invested. The influences of the different boundary conditions are calculated with a stress applied on the boundary point and the result show that the fixed boundary will increase the stress compare with homogeneous deformation. In modeling the effect of pre-stress in the shear test, three pre-stressed mode are discussed. The model validation on the general mechanical behavior shows excellent predictive capability.

  3. Synthesis and properties of a novel UV-cured fluorinated siloxane graft copolymer for improved surface, dielectric and tribological properties of epoxy acrylate coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenlong; Liu, Weiqu; Gao, Nan; Wang, Honglei; Su, Kui

    2013-11-01

    A novel functional fluorinated siloxane graft copolymer bearing with vinyl end-groups was synthesized from dihydroxypropyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), dicarboxyl terminated poly(2,2,3,4,4,4-hexafluorobutyl acrylate) oligomer (CTHFA), 2,4-toluene diissocyanate (TDI) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The chemical structure was characterized by FT-IR and GPC. The effect of concentration of the vinyl-capped fluorosilicone graft copolymer (Vi-PFSi) on the surface, thermal properties, dielectric and tribological properties of UV-cured films was investigated. Contact angles and surface energies showed that the high hydrophobic and oleophobic surfaces were obtained by incorporation of Vi-PFSi at very low amount (0.5 wt%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) evidenced that the fluorinated and siloxane moiety selectively migrated to the outermost surface of UV-cured film, thus reduced its surface energy from 45.42 to 15.40 mN/m2 without affecting its bulk properties. The morphology of fracture surface of modified film exhibited rough fracture surface only at the outermost surface, revealing fluorinated and siloxane groups migrated toward air-side surface. The dielectric constants decreased from 5.32 (1 MHz) for bisphenol-A epoxy methacrylate (EMA) to 2.82 (1 MHz) for modified film when the Vi-PFSi copolymer concentration increased from 0 to 0.8 wt%. Tribological results from abrasion tester suggested that the Vi-PFSi could obviously reduce the abrasion weight loss of modified films.

  4. Electrostrictive Graft Elastomers and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, J.; Harrison, J. S.; St.Clair, T. L.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Leary, S.

    1999-01-01

    Efficient actuators that are lightweight, high performance and compact are needed to support telerobotic requirements for future NASA missions. In this work, we present a new class of electromechanically active polymers that can potentially be used as actuators to meet many NASA needs. The materials are graft elastomers that offer high strain under an applied electric field. Due to its higher mechanical modulus, this elastomer also has a higher strain energy density as compared to previously reported electrostrictive polyurethane elastomers. The dielectric, mechanical and electromechanical properties of this new electrostrictive elastomer have been studied as a function of temperature and frequency. Combined with structural analysis using x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry on the new elastomer, structure-property interrelationship and mechanisms of the electric field induced strain in the graft elastomer have also been investigated. This electroactive polymer (EAP) has demonstrated high actuation strain and high mechanical energy density. The combination of these properties with its tailorable molecular composition and excellent processability makes it attractive for a variety of actuation tasks. The experimental results and applications will be presented.

  5. Preparation and dielectric analysis of microphase-separated poly(acrylonitrile-co-acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, D.Shiaw-Guang; Lin, Yow-Shi

    1993-12-31

    The acidic hydrolysis of polyacrylonitrile was carried out to yield a variety of terpolymers made up of nitriles, amides and acids. The formation of block structure was shown to follow a ripper mechanism occurring to acrylamide groups, that is more pronounced for a certain range of acrylamide content, evidenced by the composition analysis using {sup 1}H-NMR and base titration. The rates of formation of acrylamide fraction and acid fraction in the consecutive mode are approximately the same, yielding the content of ionic groups from 0.8 to 2.2. mole percent, dependent on the time of hydrolysis. The dielectric relaxation measurement on swollen gels shows three relaxation transitions, {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, over -150{degrees}C to 0{degrees}C, as influenced by the chemical composition and water absorption. The {beta} and {gamma} are associated with the polymer-water interaction and short-range motion of polymers and water.

  6. Reinforced poly(propylene oxide): a very soft and extensible dielectric electroactive polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, K.; Galantini, F.; Mazurek, P.; Daugaard, A. E.; Gallone, G.; Skov, A. L.

    2013-11-01

    Poly(propylene oxide) (PPO), a novel soft elastomeric material, and its composites were investigated as a new dielectric electroactive polymer (EAP). The PPO networks were obtained from thiol-ene chemistry by photochemical crosslinking of α,ω-diallyl PPO with a tetra-functional thiol. The elastomer was reinforced with hexamethylenedisilazane treated fumed silica to improve the mechanical properties of PPO. The mechanical properties of PPO and composites thereof were investigated by shear rheology and stress-strain measurements. It was found that incorporation of silica particles improved the stability of the otherwise mechanically weak pure PPO network. Dielectric spectroscopy revealed high relative dielectric permittivity of PPO at 103 Hz of 5.6. The relative permittivity was decreased slightly upon addition of fillers, but remained higher than the commonly used acrylic EAP material VHB4910. The electromechanical actuation performance of both PPO and its composites showed properties as good as VHB4910 and a lower viscous loss.

  7. Novel DEA with organically modified silicone elastomer for permittivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böse, Holger; Uhl, Detlev; Rabindranath, Raman

    2012-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) based on an organically modified silicone elastomer are introduced. The elastomer carries fluorinated sidegroups in the polysiloxane molecular chain and is synthesized from precursors which all are fluorinated. A fluorinated silicone oil is added in consecutive concentration steps as a softening agent. The electric properties of the modified silicone elastomers in terms of the permittivity, specific conductivity and electric breakdown field strength were investigated and compared with those of the unmodified silicone elastomer as the reference material. Moreover, the mechanical characteristics like Young's modulus in tensile and compressional load as well as the storage and loss modulus in shear load were studied. The permittivity of the modified silicone is enhanced by 80 % compared to the unmodified silicone elastomer. No strong alteration of the specific conductivity occurs. The electric breakdown field strength is comparable to that of the reference material. Simultaneously, the Young's modulus is decreased by the softening agent. Actuation measurements on model actuators show, that the actuation strain of the best materials surmounts that of the unmodified reference material by a factor of up to 5. The modified silicone elastomer materials can also be used for dielectric elastomer sensors and generators.

  8. Elastomer based electrically tunable, optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowik, Irma; Kronenberg, Nils M.; Franke, Markus; Fischer, Axel; Richter, Andreas; Gather, Malte C.; Leo, Karl

    2016-10-01

    Tunable optical elements are mostly realized by microelectromechanical systems, which require expensive and complex lithography during processing. We demonstrate an alternative device based on an electrically tunable microcavity employing a dielectric soft elastomer actuator. The cavity resonance is varied by changing the physical cavity thickness due to electrostriction of the soft elastomer. We realize a tunable metal-elastomer-distributed Bragg reflector multi-half wavelength microcavity with a cavity layer thickness around 12 μm and quality factors up to 700. Applying a voltage up to 60 V between bottom ITO and top metal electrode tunes the wavelength of the cavity modes up to Δ λ = 14 nm, which relates to a cavity thickness change of about 200 nm. This concept allows the implementation of tunable optical elements like tunable filters or resonators with low cost and simple processing.

  9. Strain-responsive structural colored elastomers by fixing colloidal crystal assembly.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tatsunori; Katsura, Chihiro; Sugimoto, Hideki; Nakanishi, Eiji; Inomata, Katsuhiro

    2013-11-12

    Colloidal crystal assembly film was prepared by using monodispersed colloidal particles of cross-linked random copolymer of methyl methacrylate and ethyl acrylate prepared by soap-free emulsion polymerization. The colloidal crystal film exhibited structural color when swollen with ethyl acrylate monomer. The structural color was maintained even after polymerization of the swelling monomer and cross-linker, suggesting the colloidal crystalline order was successfully fixed and embedded in the matrix of poly(ethyl acrylate) elastomer. Stretching deformation of the structural colored elastomer induced a sensitive change to shorter wavelength color. Peak wavelength of the UV-vis absorption spectrum of the stretched elastomer revealed an excellent proportional relationship with film thickness. In the swollen colloidal crystal film, ethyl acrylate was absorbed in the colloidal particle; therefore, poly(ethyl acrylate) chain should be penetrating into the colloidal particle after the polymerization of the matrix elastomer. This interpenetrated polymer network structure was considered to be effective for the rubber-like elasticity and sensitive strain-responsive color-changing phenomena of the structural colored elastomer.

  10. Contractive tension force stack actuator based on soft dielectric EAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Gabor; Düring, Lukas

    2009-03-01

    Among the electronic polymers EAPs especially the dielectric elastomers are functional materials that have promising potential as muscle-like actuators due to their inherent compliancy and good overall performance. The combination of huge active deformations, high energy densities, good efficiencies and fast response is unique to dielectric elastomers. Furthermore, they are lightweight, have a simple structure and can be easily tailored to various applications. Up to now most scientific research work has been focused on the planar expanding actuation mode due to the fact that the commercially available acrylic material VHB 4910 (3M) can easily be processed to planar actuators and has demonstrated very high actuation performance when pre-strained. Many different actuator designs have been developed and tested which expands in plane when voltage is applied and shrinks back as soon as the applied charges are removed from the electrodes. Obviously the contractive operation mode at activation is required for a wide range of application. Due to the principle of operation of soft DE EAP, mainly two directions to performed work against external loads are possible. Beside of the commonly used expanding actuation in planar direction the contractile actuation in thickness direction of the DE film represents a very promising option in the multilayer configuration. First approaches have been presented by the folded actuator design and by the multilayer tactile display device. In this study a novel approach for active structures driven by soft dielectric EAP is presented, which can perform contractive displacements at external tensile load. The device is composed of an array of equal segments, where the dielectric films are arranged in a pile-up configuration. In order to maintain satisfying structural integrity when external tension load is applied special attention was paid to the compliant electrode design which takes a central importance concerning the force transmission

  11. The Effect of Primer on Bond Strength of Silicone Prosthetic Elastomer to Polymethylmethacrylate: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    C.M., Ravi Kumar; A.A., Ponnanna; Bithu, Arvind Singh; Shah, Kelvin; Prajapati, Soham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study is to evaluate interfacial bond strength between silicone prosthetic elastomers and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Materials and Methods: Silicone elastomers were attached to PMMA and a total 120 specimens were fabricated which were then subdivided into 12 sub-groups. Each sample was then subjected to laboratory test to determine the bond strength. The specimen of silicone elastomer bonded to acrylic of different surfaces was placed into universal testing machine (HOUNSFIELD HT-400) for “PEEL TEST”. All the values obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis. Result: The bond strength of silicone elastomer to acrylic resin (TRAVELON) noticed highest (Mean 4.826 ± 0.008 n/mm) when only primer was used as a surface treatment. When silicone elastomer bonded to acrylic resin (DPI) showed the bond strength of (4.351 ± 0.0089) when only primer was used as a surface treatment. Whereas the least bond strength values were found when the silicone bonded to acrylic surface treated by 120 grit sand paper that is (0.076 ± 0.00 n/mm) and (0.082 ± 0.01 n/mm) for DPI and TRAVELON respectively. Conclusion: The bond strength of silicone elastomer to acrylic resin was higher when primer was used on the acrylic surface. The bond strength of silicone elastomer to acrylic resin was more with travelon resin when compared to DPI resin. But when silicone was bonded to acrylic surface with sand papering, showed less bond strength. PMID:25954703

  12. Elastomer degradation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Olness, D.U.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1989-06-01

    This document describes the present invention which is method and apparatus using piezoelectric oscillators as elastomer degradation sensors, particularly as in situ sensors. A piezoelectric material is placed in contact with an elastomer to form an oscillating system. The piezoelectric may contact a surface of the elastomer or be embedded therein. The elastomer can be in situ in a piece of equipment or vehicle. The characteristics of the piezoelectric material, such as size, shape, and composition, and the elasticity of the elastomer determine the resonant frequency and other properties or parameters of the oscillating system. The resonant oscillation of the oscillating system is used to drive a simple electric oscillator circuit. The frequency of this oscillator circuit, and hence the resonant frequency of the oscillating system, is measured with standard frequency counting electronics. Changes in the resonance frequency of the oscillating system indicate changes in the elastic properties of the elastomer. 7 figs.

  13. Methyl acrylate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl acrylate ; CASRN 96 - 33 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  14. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  15. QM ELASTOMER CONTRACT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELASTOMERS, SYNTHESIS(CHEMISTRY), FLUORINATED HYDROCARBONS, NITROGEN, CHEMICAL REACTIONS , FLUORINE, POLYMERS, SULFUR, OXYGEN, SILOXANES, ALKYL RADICALS, RUBBER, SYNTHETIC RUBBER, LOW TEMPERATURE, HIGH TEMPERATURE.

  16. Comparison of dielectric materials for the activation of a macro-scale hinge configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, C.; Schmidt, A.; Kovacs, G.; Ermanni, Paolo

    2011-04-01

    While much of the research on dielectric elastomer actuators used to concentrate on VHB 4910 as dielectric material, lately many new, specifically developed materials have come into focus. The acrylic VHB has been thoroughly characterized in a macro-scale agonist-antagonist configuration on an active hinge. This was carried out with the aim of using it on an airship, which was activated, undulating body and a fin and thus propelled in a fish-like manner. The concept was proved in flight, but still lifetime and viscosity of the actuators and the time-costing fabrication due to the necessary large pre-stretches of the dielectric membrane caused severe inconveniences. In order to evaluate the usability of other materials for this specific purpose, two other materials, a corrugated silicone with silver electrodes (by PolyPower) and an acrylic with interpenetrating network (IPN) developed by Pei et al. were characterized under similar conditions. The influence of the material on performance and design of the actuators and the conclusions for the use of the materials on the airship (and on applications with similar performance requirements) are presented.

  17. Biodegradable and radically polymerized elastomers with enhanced processing capabilities.

    PubMed

    Ifkovits, Jamie L; Padera, Robert F; Burdick, Jason A

    2008-09-01

    The development of biodegradable materials with elastomeric properties is beneficial for a variety of applications, including for use in the engineering of soft tissues. Although others have developed biodegradable elastomers, they are restricted by their processing at high temperatures and under vacuum, which limits their fabrication into complex scaffolds. To overcome this, we have modified precursors to a tough biodegradable elastomer, poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) with acrylates to impart control over the crosslinking process and allow for more processing options. The acrylated-PGS (Acr-PGS) macromers are capable of crosslinking through free radical initiation mechanisms (e.g., redox and photo-initiated polymerizations). Alterations in the molecular weight and % acrylation of the Acr-PGS led to changes in formed network mechanical properties. In general, Young's modulus increased with % acrylation and the % strain at break increased with molecular weight when the % acrylation was held constant. Based on the mechanical properties, one macromer was further investigated for in vitro and in vivo degradation and biocompatibility. A mild to moderate inflammatory response typical of implantable biodegradable polymers was observed, even when formed as an injectable system with redox initiation. Moreover, fibrous scaffolds of Acr-PGS and a carrier polymer, poly(ethylene oxide), were prepared via an electrospinning and photopolymerization technique and the fiber morphology was dependent on the ratio of these components. This system provides biodegradable polymers with tunable properties and enhanced processing capabilities towards the advancement of approaches in engineering soft tissues.

  18. Mechanical Design Handbook for Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlow, M.; Zorzi, E.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanical Design Handbook for Elastomers reviews state of art in elastomer-damper technology with particular emphasis on applications of highspeed rotor dampers. Self-contained reference but includes some theoretical discussion to help reader understand how and why dampers used for rotating machines. Handbook presents step-by-step procedure for design of elastomer dampers and detailed examples of actual elastomer damper applications.

  19. Toughening elastomers with sacrificial bonds and watching them break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creton, Costantino

    2014-03-01

    Most unfilled elastomers are relatively brittle, in particular when the average molecular weight between crosslinks is lower than the average molecular weight between entanglements. We created a new class of tough elastomers by introducing isotropically prestretched chains inside ordinary acrylic elastomers by successive swelling and polymerization steps. These new materials combine a high entanglement density with a densely crosslinked structure reaching elastic moduli of 4 MPa and fracture strength of 25 MPa. The highly prestretched chains are the minority in the material and can break in the bulk of the material before catastrophic failure occurs, increasing the toughness of the material by two orders of magnitude up to 5 kJ/m2. To investigate the details of the toughening mechanism we introduced specific sacrificial dioxetane bonds in the prestretched chains that emit light when they break. In uniaxial extension cyclic experiments, we checked that the light emission corresponded exactly and quantitatively to the energy dissipation in each cycle demonstrating that short chains break first and long chains later. We then watched crack propagation in notched samples and mapped spatially the location of bond breakage ahead of the crack tip before and during propagation. This new toughening mechanism for elastomers creates superentangled rubbers and is ideally suited to overcome the trade-off between toughness and stiffness of ordinary elastomers. We gratefully acknowledge funding from DSM Ahead

  20. Electrostrictive Graft Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An electrostrictive graft elastomer has a backbone molecule which is a non-crystallizable, flexible macromolecular chain and a grafted polymer forming polar graft moieties with backbone molecules. The polar graft moieties have been rotated by an applied electric field, e.g., into substantial polar alignment. The rotation is sustained until the electric field is removed. In another embodiment, a process for producing strain in an elastomer includes: (a) providing a graft elastomer having a backbone molecule which is a non-crystallizable, flexible macromolecular chain and a grafted polymer forming polar graft moieties with backbone molecules; and (b) applying an electric field to the graft elastomer to rotate the polar graft moieties, e.g., into substantial polar alignment.

  1. Buckling of elastomer sheets under non-uniform electro-actuation.

    PubMed

    Bense, Hadrien; Trejo, Miguel; Reyssat, Etienne; Bico, José; Roman, Benoît

    2017-04-12

    Dielectric elastomer sheets undergo in-plane expansion when stimulated by a transverse electric field. We study experimentally how dielectric plates subjected to a non-uniform voltage distribution undergo buckling instabilities. Two different configurations involving circular plates are investigated: plates freely floating on a bath of water, and plates clamped on a frame. We describe theoretically the out-of-plane deformation of the plates within the framework of weakly non-linear plate equations. This study constitutes a first step of a route to control the 3D activation of dielectric elastomers.

  2. Zipping it up: DEAs independent of the elastomer's electric breakdown field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbers, Pit; Grätzel, Chauncey; Maffli, Luc; Stamm, Christoph; Shea, Herbert

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate here an alternative dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) structure, which relies on the compliant nature of elastomer membranes but does not require any electric field in the elastomer. Our elastomer zipping device is a macroscopic version of the electrostatic zipping actuators common in silicon MEMS. It consists of a cm-sized metallic bottom electrode, covered by a thin insulator, on which the elastomer membrane is bonded, enclosing a tapered air gap. A compliant electrode is patterned on the lower face of the elastomer membrane. Applying a voltage between solid bottom electrode and compliant electrode leads to controlled pull-in in movement, comparable to the closing of a zipper, thus giving large strokes and forces with no electrical requirements on the elastomer since no voltage is applied across the membrane. The compliant electrodes (20 mm diameter) are produced by metal ion-implantation into the elastomer membranes. The bottom metal electrodes are coated with 10 to 30 μm of Al2O3. We report on our experimental study of membrane deflection and dynamics and discuss the effect of design parameters such as elastomer mechanical properties and actuator geometry. Membrane deflection of up to 1.4 mm was reached at only 200 V actuation voltage. The large membrane deformation achieved with this zipping actuation can be applied to applications such as pumps or tunable liquid lenses. The out-of plane movement of the membrane can be used for linear actuation.

  3. Bonding Elastomers To Metal Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, George E.; Kelley, Henry L.

    1990-01-01

    Improved, economical method for bonding elastomers to metals prevents failures caused by debonding. In new technique, vulcanization and curing occur simultaneously in specially designed mold that acts as form for desired shape of elastomer and as container that positions and supports metal parts. Increases interface adhesion between metal, adhesive, and elastomer.

  4. Elastin: a representative ideal protein elastomer.

    PubMed Central

    Urry, D W; Hugel, T; Seitz, M; Gaub, H E; Sheiba, L; Dea, J; Xu, J; Parker, T

    2002-01-01

    During the last half century, identification of an ideal (predominantly entropic) protein elastomer was generally thought to require that the ideal protein elastomer be a random chain network. Here, we report two new sets of data and review previous data. The first set of new data utilizes atomic force microscopy to report single-chain force-extension curves for (GVGVP)(251) and (GVGIP)(260), and provides evidence for single-chain ideal elasticity. The second class of new data provides a direct contrast between low-frequency sound absorption (0.1-10 kHz) exhibited by random-chain network elastomers and by elastin protein-based polymers. Earlier composition, dielectric relaxation (1-1000 MHz), thermoelasticity, molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations and thermodynamic and statistical mechanical analyses are presented, that combine with the new data to contrast with random-chain network rubbers and to detail the presence of regular non-random structural elements of the elastin-based systems that lose entropic elastomeric force upon thermal denaturation. The data and analyses affirm an earlier contrary argument that components of elastin, the elastic protein of the mammalian elastic fibre, and purified elastin fibre itself contain dynamic, non-random, regularly repeating structures that exhibit dominantly entropic elasticity by means of a damping of internal chain dynamics on extension. PMID:11911774

  5. Soft conductive elastomer materials for stretchable electronics and voltage controlled artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, Hristiyan; Kollosche, Matthias; Risse, Sebastian; Waché, Rémi; Kofod, Guggi

    2013-01-25

    Block copolymer elastomer conductors (BEC) are mixtures of block copolymers grafted with conducting polymers, which are found to support very large strains, while retaining a high level of conductivity. These novel materials may find use in stretchable electronics. The use of BEC is demonstrated in a capacitive strain sensor and in an artificial muscle of the dielectric elastomer actuator type, supporting more than 100% actuation strain and capacity strain sensitivity up to 300%.

  6. Space Shuttle Aging Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Cris E.

    2007-01-01

    The reusable Manned Space Shuttle has been flying into Space and returning to earth for more than 25 years. The Space Shuttle's uses various types of elastomers and they play a vital role in mission success. The Orbiter has been in service well past its design life of 10 years or 100 missions. As part of the aging vehicle assessment one question under evaluation is how the elastomers are performing. This paper will outline a strategic assessment plan, how identified problems were resolved and the integration activities between subsystems and Aging Orbiter Working Group.

  7. Small, fast, and tough: Shrinking down integrated elastomer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.

    2016-09-01

    We review recent progress in miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs), sensors, and energy harvesters. We focus primarily on configurations where the large strain, high compliance, stretchability, and high level of integration offered by dielectric elastomer transducers provide significant advantages over other mm or μm-scale transduction technologies. We first present the most active application areas, including: tunable optics, soft robotics, haptics, micro fluidics, biomedical devices, and stretchable sensors. We then discuss the fabrication challenges related to miniaturization, such as thin membrane fabrication, precise patterning of compliant electrodes, and reliable batch fabrication of multilayer devices. We finally address the impact of miniaturization on strain, force, and driving voltage, as well as the important effect of boundary conditions on the performance of mm-scale DEAs.

  8. Electrical behaviour of a silicone elastomer under simulated space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggero, A.; Dantras, E.; Paulmier, T.; Tonon, C.; Balcon, N.; Rejsek-Riba, V.; Dagras, S.; Payan, D.

    2015-04-01

    The electrical behavior of a space-used silicone elastomer was characterized using surface potential decay and dynamic dielectric spectroscopy techniques. In both cases, the dielectric manifestation of the glass transition (dipole orientation) and a charge transport phenomenon were observed. An unexpected linear increase of the surface potential with temperature was observed around Tg in thermally-stimulated potential decay experiments, due to molecular mobility limiting dipolar orientation in one hand, and 3D thermal expansion reducing the materials capacitance in the other hand. At higher temperatures, the charge transport process, believed to be thermally activated electron hopping with an activation energy of about 0.4 eV, was studied with and without the silica and iron oxide fillers present in the commercial material. These fillers were found to play a preponderant role in the low-frequency electrical conductivity of this silicone elastomer, probably through a Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars relaxation phenomenon.

  9. Development of a weatherable acrylic elastomer for solar cell encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, R.; Yavrouian, A.; Gupta, A.

    1981-01-01

    Poly-n-butylacrylate (PnBA) will be discussed as a potential candidate to be used in solar cell encapsulation. A new process has been developed in which PnBA can be readily cross-linked from a solvent-free syrup by a thermal process to give a highly flexible transparent film which does not creep significantly at temperature of up to 90 C. This process can be automated without the use of high cost capital equipment. Photodegradation of PnBA has also been modeled as a function of wavelengths and intensities. Its photostability will be discussed.

  10. Synthesis of perfluoroalkylether triazine elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Korus, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A method of perfluoroalkylether triazine elastomer synthesis is described. To form an elastomer, the resultant polymer is heated in a closed oven at slightly reduced pressures for 1-day periods at 100, 130 and 150 C. A high-molecular-weight perfluoroalkylether triazine elastomer is produced that exhibits thermal and oxidative stability. This material is potentially useful in applications such as high-temperature seals, 'O' rings, and wire enamels.

  11. High elongation elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, V. L.; Reed, R.; Merwin, L.; Nissan, R.

    1994-01-01

    A new class of liquid curable elastomers with unusual strength and elasticity has been developed at the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake. Over the years, studies have been conducted on polymer structure and its influence on the mechanical properties of the ensuing composites. Different tools, including nuclear magnetic resonance, have been used. This paper presents a summary of the factors controlling the mechanical behavior of composites produced with the new liquid curable elastomers, including the effects of plasticizers. It also provides an overview of the nuclear magnetic resonance study on polymer structure, the composition and properties of some live and inert formulations produced at China Lake, and some possible peace-time applications for these new elastomeric materials.

  12. Soft solvent-free elastomers and elastomer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, William; Zhou, Yang; Kirby, Sam; Sheiko, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    There are numerous filler based methods for altering the mechanical properties of elastomers. Hard particles and fibers enhance stiffness, strength and toughness while solvents and gas inclusions greatly reduce elastic moduli. Here we will discuss temperature responsive microsphere elastomer composites capable of reversible changing between a reinforced hard microsphere composites and soft syntactic foam. Financial support from the National Science Foundation DMR-1122483.

  13. Acrylate Systemic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Maxwell B; Pratt, Melanie D

    2015-01-01

    Acrylates, the 2012 American Contact Dermatitis Society allergen of the year, are found in a range of products including the absorbent materials within feminine hygiene pads. When fully polymerized, acrylates are nonimmunogenic; however, if not completely cured, the monomers can be potent allergens.A 28-year-old woman is presented, who had her teeth varnished with Isodan (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France) containing HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) with no initial reaction. Approximately 1 month later, the patient developed a genital dermatitis secondary to her feminine hygiene pads. The initial reaction resolved, but 5 months later, the patient developed a systemic contact dermatitis after receiving a second varnishing.The patient was dramatically patch test positive to many acrylates. This case demonstrates a reaction to likely unpolymerized acrylates within a feminine hygiene pad, as well as broad cross-reactivity or cosensitivity to acrylates, and possibly a systemic contact dermatitis with systemic re-exposure to unpolymerized acrylates.

  14. Silica Fillers for elastomer Reinforement

    SciTech Connect

    Kohls, D.J.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2009-08-26

    This article summarizes recent work on the structure of precipitated silica used in the reinforcement of elastomers. Silica has a unique morphology, consisting of multiple structural levels that can be controlled through processing. The ability to control and characterize the multiple structures of precipitated silica is an example of morphological engineering for reinforcement applications. In this summary of some recent research efforts using precipitated silica, small-angle scattering techniques are described and their usefulness for determining the morphology of silica in terms of primary particles, aggregates, and agglomerates are discussed. The structure of several different precipitated silica powders is shown as well as the mechanical properties of elastomers reinforced with these silica particles. The study of the mechanical properties of filled elastomer systems is a challenging and exciting topic for both fundamental science and industrial application. It is known that the addition of hard particulates to a soft elastomer matrix results in properties that do not follow a straightforward rule of mixtures. Research efforts in this area have shown that the properties of filled elastomers are influenced by the nature of both the filler and the matrix, as well as the interactions between them. Several articles have reviewed the influence of fillers like silica and carbon black on the reinforcement of elastomers. In general, the structure-property relationships developed for filled elastomers have evolved into the following major areas: Filler structure, hydrodynamic reinforcement, and interactions between fillers and elastomers.

  15. Silica Fillers for elastomer Reinforement

    SciTech Connect

    Kohls, D.J.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2012-09-10

    This article summarizes recent work on the structure of precipitated silica used in the reinforcement of elastomers. Silica has a unique morphology, consisting of multiple structural levels that can be controlled through processing. The ability to control and characterize the multiple structures of precipitated silica is an example of morphological engineering for reinforcement applications. In this summary of some recent research efforts using precipitated silica, small-angle scattering techniques are described and their usefulness for determining the morphology of silica in terms of primary particles, aggregates, and agglomerates are discussed. The structure of several different precipitated silica powders is shown as well as the mechanical properties of elastomers reinforced with these silica particles. The study of the mechanical properties of filled elastomer systems is a challenging and exciting topic for both fundamental science and industrial application. It is known that the addition of hard particulates to a soft elastomer matrix results in properties that do not follow a straightforward rule of mixtures. Research efforts in this area have shown that the properties of filled elastomers are influenced by the nature of both the filler and the matrix, as well as the interactions between them. Several articles have reviewed the influence of fillers like silica and carbon black on the reinforcement of elastomers. In general, the structure-property relationships developed for filled elastomers have evolved into the following major areas: Filler structure, hydrodynamic reinforcement, and interactions between fillers and elastomers.

  16. Fluorogel Elastomers with Tunable Transparency, Elasticity, ShapeMemory, and Antifouling Properties**

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, X; Dunn, SS; Kim, P; Duffy, M; Alvarenga, J; Aizenberg, J

    2014-03-18

    Omniphobic fluorogel elastomers were prepared by photocuring perfluorinated acrylates and a perfluoropolyether crosslinker. By tuning either the chemical composition or the temperature that control the crystallinity of the resulting polymer chains, a broad range of optical and mechanical properties of the fluorogel can be achieved. After infusing with fluorinated lubricants, the fluorogels showed excellent resistance to wetting by various liquids and anti-biofouling behavior, while maintaining cytocompatiblity.

  17. Fluorogel Elastomers with Tunable Transparency, Elasticity, Shape-Memory, and Antifouling Properties**

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Xi; Dunn, Stuart; Kim, Philseok; Duffy, Meredith; Alvarenga, Jack; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-04-22

    Omniphobic fluorogel elastomers were prepared by photocuring perfluorinated acrylates and a perfluoropolyether crosslinker. By tuning either the chemical composition or the temperature that control the crystallinity of the resulting polymer chains, a broad range of optical and mechanical properties of the fluorogel can be achieved. After infusing with fluorinated lubricants, the fluorogels showed excellent resistance to wetting by various liquids and anti-biofouling behavior, while maintaining cytocompatiblity.

  18. Fluorogel elastomers with tunable transparency, elasticity, shape-memory, and antifouling properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Xi; Dunn, Stuart S.; Kim, Philseok; Duffy, Meredith; Alvarenga, Jack; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-03-18

    In this study, omniphobic fluorogel elastomers were prepared by photocuring perfluorinated acrylates and a perfluoropolyether crosslinker. By tuning either the chemical composition or the temperature that control the crystallinity of the resulting polymer chains, a broad range of optical and mechanical properties of the fluorogel can be achieved. After infusing with fluorinated lubricants, the fluorogels showed excellent resistance to wetting by various liquids and anti-biofouling behavior, while maintaining cytocompatiblity.

  19. The effect of elastomer chain flexibility on protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vyner, Moira C; Liu, Lina; Sheardown, Heather D; Amsden, Brian G

    2013-12-01

    Cells are known to respond differently when grown on materials of varying stiffness. However, the mechanism by which a cell senses substrate stiffness is unknown. Lower crosslink density elastomers formed from acrylated star-poly(d,l lactide-co-ϵ-caprolactone) have previously been shown to support higher smooth muscle cell proliferation in in vitro culture. This difference in growth was hypothesized to be due to differences in protein adsorption that resulted from differences in polymer chain mobility at the surface. Therefore, layer mass and viscoelastic properties were measured for HSA, IgG, fibronectin, vitronectin, and serum supplemented media adsorbed to elastomers of two crosslink densities. Significantly more fibronectin adsorbed to the lower crosslink density surface while significantly more IgG adsorbed to the higher crosslink density surface. Furthermore, differences in fibronectin and IgG layer shear moduli were observed, suggesting that there was a difference in the conformation of the adsorbed protein. ATR-FTIR analysis showed that the lower crosslink density elastomer absorbed more surface water. The increased amount of water may cause greater entropic gains upon protein adsorption to the lower crosslink density surface, which increases total protein adsorption from serum and may cause differences in protein conformation and thus cell behavior.

  20. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A rubber-toughened addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state, and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride was mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  1. Optimising medical elastomer performance.

    PubMed

    Woo, Lecon

    2004-04-01

    The ability of DSC to detect and quantify the degree of cure is a major tool for optimising the property and processing of elastomer components. The rapid and information-rich OIT measurements can be applied in numerous ways to monitor and develop antioxidant packages. In addition, through some less applied tests, subtle differences between ionising radiation sources for sterilisation can be quantified and put to use in an advantageous way, for example, with reduction in surface tack and maintenance of mechanical strength in a surgical glove.

  2. Silicone/Acrylate Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Two-step process forms silicone/acrylate copolymers. Resulting acrylate functional fluid is reacted with other ingredients to produce copolymer. Films of polymer were formed by simply pouring or spraying mixture and allowing solvent to evaporate. Films showed good weatherability. Durable, clear polymer films protect photovoltaic cells.

  3. Novel Methods for Reinforcing Elastomers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-05

    elastomer bonding was not as strong as that observed in the case of silica. Zeolites , simply blended into poly(dimethylsiloxane), gave surprisingly good...Used to Reinforce an Elastomer, G. S. Sur and J. E. Mark, Polvm. Bulletin, 20, 131 (1988). -2-,,)flC-’ Avalaebility Codes COW - Av Ii and/or t4 spcla...Wang, Plvm. Bullen. 20, 443 (1988). 13. Zeolites as Reinforcing Fillers in an Elastomer, A. M. S. Al-ghamdi and J. E. Mark, Polm. Bulltin, 20, 537

  4. Elastomers that Endure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Through assistance from NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Dow Corning developed a strong, heat-protecting coating with applications in a variety of fields. Previously, NASA used silicate coatings that simply failed to adequately protect, which resulted in the frequent recoating of the damaged areas. The enormous expense of this repeat procedure led Kennedy's Materials Science Laboratory to investigate the possibilities of ablative-type coatings. The investigations resulted in the creation of a silicone ablative material known as the Dow Corning 3-6376 Fast Cure Elastomer. The new product, which does not require a primer coating, is a 100 percent silicone material. It is currently used in the automotive and aerospace industries and serves as an exceptional coating for engine compartment firewalls. Dow Corning's Fast Cure Elastomer has also proved to be an effective sealant. Moreover, it reduces the turnaround time for reuse of the launch structure because of fewer refurbishing operations. This means that NASA is not held up due to repairs when it comes time to launch another Shuttle. To date, the Agency has launched dozens of successful missions without the need for recoating.

  5. Self-healing elastomer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Michael W. (Inventor); Sottos, Nancy R. (Inventor); White, Scott R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A composite material includes an elastomer matrix, a set of first capsules containing a polymerizer, and a set of second capsules containing a corresponding activator for the polymerizer. The polymerizer may be a polymerizer for an elastomer. The composite material may be prepared by combining a first set of capsules containing a polymerizer, a second set of capsules containing a corresponding activator for the polymerizer, and a matrix precursor, and then solidifying the matrix precursor to form an elastomeric matrix.

  6. Voxelated liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Taylor H.; McConney, Michael E.; Wie, Jeong Jae; Tondiglia, Vincent P.; White, Timothy J.

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic control of shape can bring multifunctionality to devices. Soft materials capable of programmable shape change require localized control of the magnitude and directionality of a mechanical response. We report the preparation of soft, ordered materials referred to as liquid crystal elastomers. The direction of molecular order, known as the director, is written within local volume elements (voxels) as small as 0.0005 cubic millimeters. Locally, the director controls the inherent mechanical response (55% strain) within the material. In monoliths with spatially patterned director, thermal or chemical stimuli transform flat sheets into three-dimensional objects through controlled bending and stretching. The programmable mechanical response of these materials could yield monolithic multifunctional devices or serve as reconfigurable substrates for flexible devices in aerospace, medicine, or consumer goods.

  7. Mechanical design handbook for elastomers. [the design of elastomer dampers for application in rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlow, M.; Zorzi, E.

    1981-01-01

    A comprehensive guide for the design of elastomer dampers for application in rotating machinery is presented. Theoretical discussions, a step by step procedure for the design of elastomer dampers, and detailed examples of actual elastomer damper applications are included. Dynamic and general physical properties of elastomers are discussed along with measurement techniques.

  8. Thermo - optical studies of nematic liquid crystal elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharde, Rita A.; Mani, Santosh A.; Lal, Suman; Tripathi, S. K.; Khosla, Samriti

    2014-10-01

    The influences of structural parameter on thermo - optical properties of Nematic Liquid Crystal Elastomer (NLCE) were studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and Polarizing Microscopy Studies (PMS). Dielectric Measurement was also performed in addition to these measurements. The NLCE used in the present study were synthesized, has a unique coupling between anisotropic order of Liquid crystal component and elasticity of polymer network. The investigations were performed as function of temperature during heating and cooling processes. The study revealed the correlation of thermo - optical behavior of NLCE with the crosslinking agent and temperature.

  9. Artificial muscle using nonlinear elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratna, Banahalli

    2002-03-01

    Anisotropic freestanding films or fibers of nematic elastomers from laterally attached side-chain polymers show muscle-like mechanical properties. The orientational order of the liquid crystal side groups imposes a conformational anisotropy in the polymer backbone. When a large change in the order parameter occurs, as at the nematic-isotropic phase transition, there is a concomitant loss of order in the backbone which results in a contraction of the film in the direction of the director orientation. The crosslinked network imposes a symmetry-breaking field on the nematic and drives the nematic-isotropic transition towards a critical point with the application of external stress. Isostrain studies on these nonlinear elastomers, show that there are large deviations from ideal classical rubber elasticity and the contributions from total internal energy to the elastic restoring force cannot be ignored. The liquid crystal elastomers exhibiting anisoptopic contraction/extension coupled with a graded strain response to an applied external stimulus provide an excellent framework for mimicking muscular action. Liquid crystal elastomers by their very chemical nature have a number of ‘handles’ such as the liquid crystalline phase range, density of crosslinking, flexibility of the backbone, coupling between the backbone and the mesogen and the coupling between the mesogen and the external stimulus, that can be tuned to optimize the mechanical properties. We have demonstrated actuation in nematic elastomers under thermal and optical stimuli. We have been able to dope the elastomers with dyes to make them optically active. We have also doped them with carbon nanotubes in order to increase the thermal and electrical conductivity of the elastomer.

  10. Elastomers Compatible With High-Pressure Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Compatibility increased by fluorination. Report describes experiments aimed at improving compatibility of some fluorinated elastomers with high-pressure oxygen. Such elastomers needed for seals, gaskets, and positive-expulsion devices used with high-pressure oxygen. Oxygen - compatibility tests carried out on five elastomers chosen on the basis of literature survey.

  11. Phase separated microstructure and dynamics of polyurethane elastomers under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, Ciprian; Padsalgikar, Ajay; Runt, James

    The molecular mobility of polyurethane elastomers is of the utmost importance in establishing physical properties for uses ranging from automotive tires and shoe soles to more sophisticated aerospace and biomedical applications. In many of these applications, chain dynamics as well as mechanical properties under external stresses/strains are critical for determining ultimate performance. In order to develop a more complete understanding of their mechanical response, we explored the effect of uniaxial strain on the phase separated microstructure and molecular dynamics of the elastomers. We utilize X-ray scattering to investigate soft segment and hard domain orientation, and broadband dielectric spectroscopy for interrogation of the dynamics. Uniaxial deformation is found to significantly perturb the phase-separated microstructure and chain orientation, and results in a considerable slowing down of the dynamics of the elastomers. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements of the polyurethanes under uniaxial deformation are also employed and the results are quantitatively correlated with mechanical tensile tests and the degree of phase separation from small-angle X-ray scattering measurements.

  12. Acrylic vessel cleaning tests

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, D.; Hahn, R.L.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.

    1997-02-26

    The acrylic vessel as constructed is dirty. The dirt includes blue tape, Al tape, grease pencil, gemak, the glue or residue form these tapes, finger prints and dust of an unknown composition but probably mostly acrylic dust. This dirt has to be removed and once removed, the vessel has to be kept clean or at least to be easily cleanable at some future stage when access becomes much more difficult. The authors report on the results of a series of tests designed: (a) to prepare typical dirty samples of acrylic; (b) to remove dirt stuck to the acrylic surface; and (c) to measure the optical quality and Th concentration after cleaning. Specifications of the vessel call for very low levels of Th which could come from tape residues, the grease pencil, or other sources of dirt. This report does not address the concerns of how to keep the vessel clean after an initial cleaning and during the removal of the scaffolding. Alconox is recommended as the cleaner of choice. This acrylic vessel will be used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  13. Preparation and characterization of fractal elastomer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Yoshimune; Seino, Eri; Abe, Saya; Mayama, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The elastomer materials with hierarchical structure and suitable wettability are useful as biological surface model. In the present study, urethane resin and silicone resin elastomers with hierarchical rough surfaces were prepared and referred to as "fractal elastomers". We found a hierarchy of small projections that existed over larger ones on these surfaces. These elastomers were synthesized by transferring a fractal surface structure of alkylketene dimer. The rough structure enhanced the hydrophobicity and weakened friction resistance of the elastomer surfaces. These materials can be useful for artificial skin with biomimetic surface properties.

  14. Elastomer coated filler and composites thereof comprising at least 60% by weight of a hydrated filler and an elastomer containing an acid substituent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D.; Reilly, W. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The impact resistance of flame retardant composites, especially thermoplastic molding: compounds containing over 60% hydrated mineral filler such as Al(OH)3 or Mg(OH)2 as improved by coating the filler with 1 to 20% of an elastomer. The composite will fail by crazing or shearing rather than by brittle fracture. A well bonded elastomeric interphase resulted by utilizing acidic substituted resins such as ethyl-hexyl acrylate-acrylic acid copolymers which bond to and are cross-linked by the basic filler particles. Further improvement in impact resistance was provided by incorporating 1 to 10% of a resin fiber reinforcement such as polyvinyl alcohol fibers that decompose to yield at least 30% water when heated to decomposition temperature.

  15. Photo-Crosslinkable Shape-Memory Elastomers Containing Hydrogen-Bonding Side-Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahui; Lewis, Christopher; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2010-03-01

    Lightly crosslinked poly(butyl acrylate) networks containing self-complementary hydrogen bonding side-groups (e.g. ureidopyrimidinones) can exhibit unique shape-memory effects. Conventional free-radical solution polymerization of monomer mixtures offers a simple approach to achieving these networks, but presents the following limitations: (i) the H-bonding side- group content is limited by its solubility; (ii) prepared networks can only be studied in their crosslinked form; and (iii) upon solvent removal, intrinsic stress is generated making shape-memory responses difficult to interpret. Here, photo-polymerization of linear prepolymers is reported as an approach to overcome these limitations. A series of linear poly (butyl acrylate)s containing light-sensitive benzophenone side- groups and H-bonding side-groups were prepared using free radical polymerization. These pre-polymers can be fully characterized in solution (NMR, GPC). Moreover, following solvent removal, they can be molded into any desired shape and subsequently photo-crosslinked to form shape-memory elastomers. The impact of H-bonding side-group content and the benzophenone side-group content on the mechanical properties of the photo-crosslinked polymer will be discussed. A constitutive model is also developed to interpret the mechanical response of these shape-memory elastomers.

  16. Acrylic mechanical bond tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.

    1991-02-01

    The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  17. Effects Of Radiation On Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Report provides data on effects of radiation on elastomers. Quantifies effects by giving minimum radiation levels to induce changes of 1 percent and 25 percent in given properties. Electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties included in data. Combined effects of heat and radiation briefly considered. Data summarized in graphic form useful to designers.

  18. Elastomer Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Jared L.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers are reinforced with functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) giving them high-breaking strain levels and low densities. Cross-linked elastomers are prepared using amine-terminated, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), with an average molecular weight of 5,000 daltons, and a functionalized SWNT. Cross-link densities, estimated on the basis of swelling data in toluene (a dispersing solvent) indicated that the polymer underwent cross-linking at the ends of the chains. This thermally initiated cross-linking was found to occur only in the presence of the aryl alcohol functionalized SWNTs. The cross-link could have been via a hydrogen-bonding mechanism between the amine and the free hydroxyl group, or via attack of the amine on the ester linage to form an amide. Tensile properties examined at room temperature indicate a three-fold increase in the tensile modulus of the elastomer, with rupture and failure of the elastomer occurring at a strain of 6.5.

  19. Fabrication of highly oriented hexagonal boron nitride nanosheet/elastomer nanocomposites with high thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Zhiqiao; Chen, Yulong; Lu, Yonglai; Liu, Li; Hu, Shui; Wen, Shipeng; Mao, Yingyan; Zhang, Liqun

    2015-04-08

    A homogeneous dispersion of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) in elastomers is obtained by solution compounding methods, and a high orientation of BNNSs is achieved by strong shearing. The composites show high thermal conductivities, especially when BNNS loading exceeds 17.5 vol%, indicating that the material is promising for thermal-management applications which need high thermal conductivity, low dielectric constant, and adequate softness.

  20. 3D Printing of Transparent and Conductive Heterogeneous Hydrogel-Elastomer Systems.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kevin; Bae, Jinhye; Bakarich, Shannon E; Yang, Canhui; Gately, Reece D; Spinks, Geoffrey M; In Het Panhuis, Marc; Suo, Zhigang; Vlassak, Joost J

    2017-03-01

    A hydrogel-dielectric-elastomer system, polyacrylamide and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), is adapted for extrusion printing for integrated device fabrication. A lithium-chloride-containing hydrogel printing ink is developed and printed onto treated PDMS with no visible signs of delamination and geometrically scaling resistance under moderate uniaxial tension and fatigue. A variety of designs are demonstrated, including a resistive strain gauge and an ionic cable.

  1. Enhanced performance in capacitive force sensors using carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposites with high dielectric properties.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyeyoung; Yoon, Hyungsuk; Ko, Youngpyo; Choi, Jaeyoo; Lee, Sang-Soo; Jeon, Insu; Kim, Jong-Ho; Kim, Heesuk

    2016-03-14

    Force sensors have attracted tremendous attention owing to their applications in various fields such as touch screens, robots, smart scales, and wearable devices. The force sensors reported so far have been mainly focused on high sensitivity based on delicate microstructured materials, resulting in low reproducibility and high fabrication cost that are limitations for wide applications. As an alternative, we demonstrate a novel capacitive-type force sensor with enhanced performance owing to the increased dielectric properties of elastomers and simple sensor structure. We rationally design dielectric elastomers based on alkylamine modified-multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites, which have a higher dielectric constant than pure PDMS. The alkylamine-MWCNTs show excellent dispersion in a PDMS matrix, thus leading to enhanced and reliable dielectric properties of the composites. A force sensor array fabricated with alkylamine-MWCNT/PDMS composites presents an enhanced response due to the higher dielectric constant of the composites than that of pure PDMS. This study is the first to report enhanced performance of capacitive force sensors by modulating the dielectric properties of elastomers. We believe that the disclosed strategy to improve the sensor performance by increasing the dielectric properties of elastomers has great potential in the development of capacitive force sensor arrays that respond to various input forces.

  2. 21 CFR 177.1010 - Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid... Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid. Semirigid and rigid acrylic and modified acrylic plastics may be safely used as articles intended for use in contact with food, in accordance...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1010 - Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid... Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid. Semirigid and rigid acrylic and modified acrylic plastics may be safely used as articles intended for use in contact with food, in accordance...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1010 - Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid... Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid. Semirigid and rigid acrylic and modified acrylic plastics may be safely used as articles intended for use in contact with food, in accordance...

  5. 21 CFR 177.1010 - Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1010 Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid. Semirigid and rigid acrylic and modified acrylic plastics may be safely used...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1010 - Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid... Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid. Semirigid and rigid acrylic and modified acrylic plastics may be safely used as articles intended for use in contact with food, in accordance...

  7. Rheology of Hyperbranched Poly(triglyceride)-Based Thermoplastic Elastomers via RAFT polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mengguo; Cochran, Eric

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution we discuss how melt- and solid-state properties are influenced by the degree of branching and molecular weight in a family of hyperbranched thermoplastics derived from soybean oil. Acrylated epoxidized triglycerides from soybean oils have been polymerized to hyperbranched thermoplastic elastomers using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. With the proper choice of chain transfer agent, both homopolymer and block copolymer can be synthesized. By changing the number of acrylic groups per triglycerides, the chain architectures can range from nearly linear to highly branched. We show how the fundamental viscoelastic properties (e.g. entanglement molecular weight, plateau modulus, etc.) are influenced by chain architecture and molecular weight.

  8. Synthesis of perfluoroalkylether oxadiazole elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Korus, R. A.; Shalhoub, I. M.; Kwong, H.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous chain extension and crosslinking of perfluoroalkylethers which yields a thermally stable perfluoroalkylether oxadiazole elastomer crosslinked by trifunctional perfluoroalkylether-1,3,5-triazine is reported. In the preparation, hydroxylamine crystals prepared from hydroxylamine hydrochloride to which sodium butoxide had been added is mixed with perfluoroalkylether dinitrile to obtain the monomer, as the nitrile is converted to amidoxime. Monomers are heated at 140 to 200 C to form poly(perfluoroalkylether oxadiazole) with a 1,2,4-oxadiazole structure by a step-growth polymerization reaction. Simultaneous chain extension and crosslinking are observed to occur when the purified monomer is heated directly and when the remaining nitrile in the monomer is allowed to react with excess ammonia to form the corresponding amidine, which is then heated. Weight loss studies show the thermal stability of the perfluoroalkylether elastomer to be generally better than fluorosilicone or polyester elastomers, especially in air, indicating its potential usefulness for high-performance elastomeric applications.

  9. Liquid-Embedded Elastomer Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Rebecca; Majidi, Carmel; Park, Yong-Lae; Paik, Jamie; Wood, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Hyperelastic sensors are fabricated by embedding a silicone rubber film with microchannels of conductive liquid. In the case of soft tactile sensors, pressing the surface of the elastomer will deform the cross-section of underlying channels and change their electrical resistance. Soft pressure sensors may be employed in a variety of applications. For example, a network of pressure sensors can serve as artificial skin by yielding detailed information about contact pressures. This concept was demonstrated in a hyperelastic keypad, where perpendicular conductive channels form a quasi-planar network within an elastomeric matrix that registers the location, intensity and duration of applied pressure. In a second demonstration, soft curvature sensors were used for joint angle proprioception. Because the sensors are soft and stretchable, they conform to the host without interfering with the natural mechanics of motion. This marked the first use of liquid-embedded elastomer electronics to monitor human or robotic motion. Finally, liquid-embedded elastomers may be implemented as conductors in applications that call for flexible or stretchable circuitry, such as robotic origami.

  10. The electrospinning of the copolymer of styrene and butyl acrylate for its application as oil absorbent.

    PubMed

    Xu, Naiku; Cao, Jipeng; Lu, Yuyao

    2016-01-01

    Electrospun polystyrene materials have been employed as oil absorbents, but they have visible drawbacks such as poor strength at low temperature and unreliable integrity because of brittleness and insufficient cohesive force among fibers. Butyl acrylate can polymerize into flexible chains, and its polymer can be used as elastomer and adhesive material. Thereby it is possible to obtain the material that has better performance in comparison with electrospun polystyrene material through the electrospinning of the copolymer of styrene and butyl acrylate. In this work, a polymer was synthesized through suspension polymerization by using styrene and butyl acrylate as comonomers. The synthesis of the copolymer of styrene and butyl acrylate was verified through dissolution and hydrolysis experimental data; as well through nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. The viscous flow activation energy of the solution consisting of copolymer and N, N-dimethylformamide was determined via viscosity method and then adopted to establish the entanglement characteristics of butyl acrylate's chain segments. Finally, in order to electrospin the copolymer solution into fibrous membrane, the effects of monomer feed ratio and spinning parameters were investigated. The prepared fibrous membrane was found to have a potential use as oil absorbent.

  11. Anisotropic optical response of optically opaque elastomers with conductive fillers as revealed by terahertz polarization spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Makoto; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Elastomers are one of the most important materials in modern society because of the inherent viscoelastic properties due to their cross-linked polymer chains. Their vibration-absorbing and adhesive properties are especially useful and thus utilized in various applications, for example, tires in automobiles and bicycles, seismic dampers in buildings, and seals in a space shuttle. Thus, the nondestructive inspection of their internal states such as the internal deformation is essential in safety. Generally, industrial elastomers include various kinds of additives, such as carbon blacks for reinforcing them. The additives make most of them opaque in a wide spectral range from visible to mid-infrared, resulting in that the nondestructive inspection of the internal deformation is quite difficult. Here, we demonstrate transmission terahertz polarization spectroscopy as a powerful technique for investigating the internal optical anisotropy in optically opaque elastomers with conductive additives, which are transparent only in the terahertz frequency region. The internal deformation can be probed through the polarization changes inside the material due to the anisotropic dielectric response of the conductive additives. Our study about the polarization-dependent terahertz response of elastomers with conductive additives provides novel knowledge for in situ, nondestructive evaluation of their internal deformation. PMID:28008942

  12. Anisotropic optical response of optically opaque elastomers with conductive fillers as revealed by terahertz polarization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Makoto; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-12-01

    Elastomers are one of the most important materials in modern society because of the inherent viscoelastic properties due to their cross-linked polymer chains. Their vibration-absorbing and adhesive properties are especially useful and thus utilized in various applications, for example, tires in automobiles and bicycles, seismic dampers in buildings, and seals in a space shuttle. Thus, the nondestructive inspection of their internal states such as the internal deformation is essential in safety. Generally, industrial elastomers include various kinds of additives, such as carbon blacks for reinforcing them. The additives make most of them opaque in a wide spectral range from visible to mid-infrared, resulting in that the nondestructive inspection of the internal deformation is quite difficult. Here, we demonstrate transmission terahertz polarization spectroscopy as a powerful technique for investigating the internal optical anisotropy in optically opaque elastomers with conductive additives, which are transparent only in the terahertz frequency region. The internal deformation can be probed through the polarization changes inside the material due to the anisotropic dielectric response of the conductive additives. Our study about the polarization-dependent terahertz response of elastomers with conductive additives provides novel knowledge for in situ, nondestructive evaluation of their internal deformation.

  13. Computational Model of Hydrostatically Coupled Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Cai2, Federico Carpi3,4,a, and Zhigang Suo2,b 1) Department of Engineering Mechanics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, P.R. China 2) School of... Engineering and Applied Sciences, Kavli Institute for Nanobio Science and Technology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA 3...Interdepartmental Research Centre ―E. Piaggio,‖ School of Engineering , University of Pisa, Pisa 56100, Italy. 4) Technology & Life Institute, Pisa 56100, Italy

  14. Theoretical modelling and experimental results of electromechanical actuation of an elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Calleja, Ricardo; Llovera-Segovia, Pedro; Dominguez, José Jorge; Carsí Rosique, Marta; Quijano Lopez, Alfredo

    2013-06-01

    Electromechanical actuation is a growing field of research today both for applications or theoretical modelling. The interaction between electric and mechanical constraints has been used for electromechanic actuators or generators based on elastomers. From a theoretical point of view, many recent works have been focused on uniaxial or biaxial stretching of elastomer plates with compliant electrodes. Free stretching or pre-strained samples have been theoretically modelled, mainly by neo-Hookean equations. In this work, we present theoretical and experimental results of electromechanic actuation of an elastomer (the widely used 3M VHB4910, an acrylic foam) in a pre-strained case and a free case. Experimental characterization of the material shows that the Ogden model gives the best accurate fitting of mechanical properties. Thus, a theoretical development based on this model is carried out in order to obtain the curves describing the electromechanical behaviour of the material. The mechanical instability related to wrinkling of the material is theoretically calculated and experimentally verified.

  15. Poly(1-adamantyl acrylate): Living Anionic Polymerization, Block Copolymerization, and Thermal Properties

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Wei; Huang, Caili; Hong, Kunlun; ...

    2016-12-06

    Living anionic polymerization of acrylates is challenging due to intrinsic side reactions including backbiting reactions of propagating enolate anions and aggregation of active chain ends. In this study, the controlled synthesis of poly(1-adamatyl acrylate) (PAdA) was performed successfully for the first time via living anionic polymerization through investigation of the initiation systems of sec-butyllithium/diphenylethylene/lithium chloride (sec-BuLi/DPE/LiCl), diphenylmethylpotassium/diethylzinc (DPMK/Et2Zn), and sodium naphthalenide/dipenylethylene/diethylzinc (Na-Naph/DPE/Et2Zn) in tetrahydrofuran at -78 °C using custom glass-blowing and high-vacuum techniques. PAdA synthesized via anionic polymerization using DPMK with a large excess (more than 40-fold to DPMK) of Et2Zn as the ligand exhibited predicted molecular weights from 4.3more » to 71.8 kg/mol and polydispersity indices of around 1.10. In addition, the produced PAdAs exhibit a low level of isotactic content (mm triads of 2.1%). The block copolymers of AdA and methyl methacrylate (MMA) were obtained by sequential anionic polymerization, and the distinct living property of PAdA over other acrylates was demonstrated based on the observation that the resulting PAdA-b-PMMA block copolymers were formed with no residual PAdA homopolymer. The PAdA homopolymers exhibit a very high glass transition temperature (133 °C) and outstanding thermal stability (Td: 376 °C) as compared to other acrylic polymers such as poly(tert-butyl acrylate) and poly(methyl acrylate). These merits make PAdA a promising candidate for acrylic-based thermoplastic elastomers with high upper service temperature and enhanced mechanical strength.« less

  16. Poly(1-adamantyl acrylate): Living Anionic Polymerization, Block Copolymerization, and Thermal Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Huang, Caili; Hong, Kunlun; Kang, Nam-Goo; Mays, Jimmy W.

    2016-12-06

    Living anionic polymerization of acrylates is challenging due to intrinsic side reactions including backbiting reactions of propagating enolate anions and aggregation of active chain ends. In this study, the controlled synthesis of poly(1-adamatyl acrylate) (PAdA) was performed successfully for the first time via living anionic polymerization through investigation of the initiation systems of sec-butyllithium/diphenylethylene/lithium chloride (sec-BuLi/DPE/LiCl), diphenylmethylpotassium/diethylzinc (DPMK/Et2Zn), and sodium naphthalenide/dipenylethylene/diethylzinc (Na-Naph/DPE/Et2Zn) in tetrahydrofuran at -78 °C using custom glass-blowing and high-vacuum techniques. PAdA synthesized via anionic polymerization using DPMK with a large excess (more than 40-fold to DPMK) of Et2Zn as the ligand exhibited predicted molecular weights from 4.3 to 71.8 kg/mol and polydispersity indices of around 1.10. In addition, the produced PAdAs exhibit a low level of isotactic content (mm triads of 2.1%). The block copolymers of AdA and methyl methacrylate (MMA) were obtained by sequential anionic polymerization, and the distinct living property of PAdA over other acrylates was demonstrated based on the observation that the resulting PAdA-b-PMMA block copolymers were formed with no residual PAdA homopolymer. The PAdA homopolymers exhibit a very high glass transition temperature (133 °C) and outstanding thermal stability (Td: 376 °C) as compared to other acrylic polymers such as poly(tert-butyl acrylate) and poly(methyl acrylate). These merits make PAdA a promising candidate for acrylic-based thermoplastic elastomers with high upper service temperature and enhanced mechanical strength.

  17. Polyurethane elastomers for facial prostheses.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J B

    1978-02-01

    A review of the polyurethane elastomers used for facial prostheses has been presented. A description of the casting technique was given. The materials require accuracy and care in handling to insure the successful casting of a prosthesis. They seem to simulate the characteristics of the facial tissues and are more durable and comfortable than previously used materials. Over 300 patients have been exposed to or treated with these materials without evidencing significant adverse tissue reaction. In spite of the improvements that these materials present over previous ones (PVC and silicones), much work is still required to understand their behavior and their physical and mechanical characteristics and to compensate for the metameric phenomenon.

  18. Drilling fluid type affects elastomer selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bodepudi, V.; Wilson, J.M.; Patel, A.

    1998-10-26

    Thorough research and field studies, coupled with effective communications among interested parties, can help operators find the best elastomer for use in drilling operations. Because of increasingly stringent environmental standards, the oil and gas industry has developed more-environmentally friendly, synthetic-based drilling fluids as alternatives to conventional oil-based muds (OBMs). Some of these synthetic-based muds (SBMs), however, are incompatible with the conventional elastomers used in downhole equipment and drilling tools--a situation that can impair elastomer performance and result in costly, premature failures. Currently, researchers are examining the relationships between elastomer design and SBM formulation to find the most successful correlation between formation needs, drilling fluids, and elastomers. Ultimately, however, the real solution to the incompatibility problem may be found not only in this ongoing research, but also in cooperative efforts among the various contractors directing the onsite operations. The paper discusses the compatibility dilemma, SBMs versus OBMs, elastomers, elastomer damage, laboratory research, comprehension, communication, and cooperation.

  19. Electrical conductivity, dielectric response and space charge dynamics of an electroactive polymer with and without nanofiller reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetov, R.; Tsekmes, I. A.; Morshuis, P. H. F.

    2015-07-01

    Electroactive polymers have gained considerable attention over the last 20 years for exhibiting a large displacement in response to electrical stimulation. The promising fields of application include wave energy converters, muscle-like actuators, sensors, robotics, and biomimetics. For an electrical engineer, electroactive polymers can be seen as a dielectric elastomer film or a compliant capacitor with a highly deformable elastomeric medium. If the elastomer is pre-stretched and pre-charged, a reduction of the tensile force lets the elastomer revert to its original form and increases the electrical potential. The light weight of electroactive polymers, low cost, high intrinsic breakdown strength, cyclical way of operation, reliable performance, and high efficiency can be exploited to utilize the elastomeric material as a transducer. The energy storage for a linear dielectric polymer is determined by its relative permittivity and the applied electric field. The latter is limited by the dielectric breakdown strength of the material. Therefore, to generate a high energy density of a flexible capacitor, the film must be used at the voltage level close to the material’s breakdown or inorganic particles with high dielectric permittivity which can be introduced into the polymer matrix. In the present study, silicone-titania elastomer nanocomposites were produced and the influence of nanoparticles on the macroscopic dielectric properties of the neat elastomer including space charge dynamics, complex permittivity, and electrical conductivity, were investigated.

  20. Soft Dielectrics: Heterogeneity and Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudykh, Stephan; Debotton, Gal; Bhattacharya, Kaushik

    2012-02-01

    Dielectric Elastomers are capable of large deformations in response to electrical stimuli. Heterogeneous soft dielectrics with proper microstructures demonstrate much stronger electromechanical coupling than their homogeneous constituents. In turn, the heterogeneity is an origin for instability developments leading to drastic change in the composite microstructure. In this talk, the electromechanical instabilities are considered. Stability of anisotropic soft dielectrics is analyzed. Ways to achieve giant deformations and manipulating extreme material properties are discussed. 1. S. Rudykh and G. deBotton, ``Instabilities of Hyperelastic Fiber Composites: Micromechanical Versus Numerical Analyses.'' Journal of Elasticity, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/2010.1007/s10659-011-9313-x 2. S. Rudykh, K. Bhattacharya and G. deBotton, ``Snap-through actuation of thick-wall electroactive balloons.'' International Journal of Non-Linear Mechanics, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnonlinmec.2011.05.006 3. S. Rudykh and G. deBotton, ``Stability of Anisotropic Electroactive Polymers with Application to Layered Media.'' Zeitschrift f"ur angewandte Mathematik und Physik, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00033-011-0136-1 4. S. Rudykh, A. Lewinstein, G. Uner and G. deBotton, ``Giant Enhancement of the Electromechanical Coupling in Soft Heterogeneous Dielectrics.'' 2011 http://arxiv.org/abs/1105.4217v1

  1. Dielectric and Electromechanical Properties of Polyurethane and Polydimethylsiloxane Blends and their Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakmak, Enes

    Conventional means of converting electrical energy to mechanical work are generally considered too noisy and bulky for many contemporary technologies such as microrobotic, microfluidic, and haptic devices. Dielectric electroactive polymers (D-EAPs) constitude a growing class of electroactive polymers (EAP) that are capable of producing mechanica work induced by an applied electric field. D-EAPs are considered remarkably efficient and well suited for a wide range of applications, including ocean-wave energy harvesters and prosthetic devices. However, the real-world application of D-EAPs is very limited due to a number of factors, one of which is the difficulty of producing high actuation strains at acceptably low electric fields. D-EAPs are elastomeric polymers and produce large strain response induced by external electric field. The electromechanical properties of D-EAPs depend on the dielectric properties and mechanical properties of the D-EAP. In terms of dielectric behavior, these actuators require a high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss, and high dielectric strength to produce an improved actuation response. In addition to their dielectric properties, the mechanical properties of D-EAPs, such as elastic moduli and hysteresis, are also of importance. Therefore, material properties are a key feature of D-EAP technology. DE actuator materials reported in the literature cover many types of elastomers and their composites formed with dielectric fillers. Along with polymeric matrix materials, various ceramic, metal, and organic fillers have been employed in enhancing dielectric behavior of DEs. This work describes an effort to characterize elastomer blends and composites of different matrix and dielectric polymer fillers according to their dielectric, mechanical, and electromechanical responses. This dissertation focuses on the development and characterization of polymer-polymer blends and composites from a high-k polyurethane (PU) and polydimethylsiloxane

  2. Hencky's model for elastomer forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinikov, A. A.; Oleinikov, A. I.

    2016-08-01

    In the numerical simulation of elastomer forming process, Henckys isotropic hyperelastic material model can guarantee relatively accurate prediction of strain range in terms of large deformations. It is shown, that this material model prolongate Hooke's law from the area of infinitesimal strains to the area of moderate ones. New representation of the fourth-order elasticity tensor for Hencky's hyperelastic isotropic material is obtained, it possesses both minor symmetries, and the major symmetry. Constitutive relations of considered model is implemented into MSC.Marc code. By calculating and fitting curves, the polyurethane elastomer material constants are selected. Simulation of equipment for elastomer sheet forming are considered.

  3. Thermoset elastomers derived from carvomenthide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinyoung; Lee, Sangjun; Choi, Woo Jin; Seo, Howon; Kim, Pilhan; Kim, Geon-Joong; Kim, Young-Wun; Shin, Jihoon

    2015-01-12

    Renewable thermoset elastomers were prepared using the plant-based monomer carvomenthide. Controlled ring-opening transesterification polymerization of carvomenthide using diethylene glycol as an initiator gave α,ω-dihydroxyl poly(carvomenthide) (HO-PCM-OH), which was subsequently converted to carboxy-telechelic poly(carvomenthide) (HOOC-PCM-COOH) by esterification with excess succinic anhydride through a one-pot, two-step process, leading to no crystallinity, high viscosity, strong thermal resistance, and low glass transition temperature of the resulting functionalized polyester. Thermal curing processes of the resulting 3, 6, and 12 kg mol(-1) prepolymers were achieved with trifunctional aziridine to give cross-linked PCM elastomers. The thermal properties, mechanical behavior, and biocompatibility of the rubbery thermoset products were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, thermal gravimetric analysis, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile tests under static and cyclic loads, and cell adherence. These new materials are useful candidates to satisfy the design objective for the engineering of a variety of soft tissues.

  4. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE-PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ˜6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE-PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE-PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation.

  5. Röntgen’s electrode-free elastomer actuators without electromechanical pull-in instability

    PubMed Central

    Keplinger, Christoph; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Arnold, Nikita; Bauer, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    Electrical actuators made from films of dielectric elastomers coated on both sides with stretchable electrodes may potentially be applied in microrobotics, tactile and haptic interfaces, as well as in adaptive optical elements. Such actuators with compliant electrodes are sensitive to the pull-in electromechanical instability, limiting operational voltages and attainable deformations. Electrode-free actuators driven by sprayed-on electrical charges were first studied by Röntgen in 1880. They withstand much higher voltages and deformations and allow for electrically clamped (charge-controlled) thermodynamic states preventing electromechanical instabilities. The absence of electrodes allows for direct optical monitoring of the actuated elastomer, as well as for designing new 3D actuator configurations and adaptive optical elements. PMID:20173097

  6. Polymer-dispersed liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rešetič, Andraž; Milavec, Jerneja; Zupančič, Blaž; Domenici, Valentina; Zalar, Boštjan

    2016-10-01

    The need for mechanical manipulation during the curing of conventional liquid crystal elastomers diminishes their applicability in the field of shape-programmable soft materials and future applications in additive manufacturing. Here we report on polymer-dispersed liquid crystal elastomers, novel composite materials that eliminate this difficulty. Their thermal shape memory anisotropy is imprinted by curing in external magnetic field, providing for conventional moulding of macroscopically sized soft, thermomechanically active elastic objects of general shapes. The binary soft-soft composition of isotropic elastomer matrix, filled with freeze-fracture-fabricated, oriented liquid crystal elastomer microparticles as colloidal inclusions, allows for fine-tuning of thermal morphing behaviour. This is accomplished by adjusting the concentration, spatial distribution and orientation of microparticles or using blends of microparticles with different thermomechanical characteristics. We demonstrate that any Gaussian thermomechanical deformation mode (bend, cup, saddle, left and right twist) of a planar sample, as well as beat-like actuation, is attainable with bilayer microparticle configurations.

  7. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofan

    Dielectric polymers are widely used in a plurality of applications, such as electrical insulation, dielectric capacitors, and electromechanical actuators. Dielectric polymers with large strain deformations under an electric field are named dielectric elastomers (DE), because of their relative low modulus, high elongation at break, and outstanding resilience. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are superior to traditional transducers as a muscle-like technology: large strains, high energy densities, high coupling efficiency, quiet operation, and light weight. One focus of this dissertation is on the design of DE materials with high performance and easy processing. UV radiation curing of reactive species is studied as a generic synthesis methodology to provide a platform for material scientists to customize their own DE materials. Oligomers/monomers, crosslinkers, and other additives are mixed and cured at appropriate ratios to control the stress-strain response, suppress electromechanical instability of the resulting polymers, and provide stable actuation strains larger than 100% and energy densities higher than 1 J/g. The processing is largely simplified in the new material system by removal of the prestretching step. Multilayer stack actuators with 11% linear strain are demonstrated in a procedure fully compatible with industrial production. A multifunctional DE derivative material, bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP), is invented enabling repeatable rigid-to-rigid deformation without bulky external structures. Bistable actuation allows the polymer actuator to have two distinct states that can support external load without device failure. Plasticizers are used to lower the glass transition temperature to 45 °C. Interpenetrating polymer network structure is established inside the BSEP to suppress electromechanical instability, providing a breakdown field of 194 MV/m and a stable bistable strain as large as 228% with a 97% strain fixity. The application of BSEP

  8. Mechanochemical Reactions of Elastomers with Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    34i neeeeewy a"md&tf by week nmbo) Elastomers, Fracture, Free-radical reactions, Mechanochemistry , Metals , Macromolecular rupture, Organic radicals...from metallic grey to red-brown, indicating the formation of an increased amount of iron oxide . When this oxidized powder was mixed into SBR and the...Project NR 092-555In ID Technical Report No. 33 MECHANOCHEMICAL REACTIONS OF ELASTOMERS WITH METALS by A. N. Gent and W. R. Rodgers Institute of

  9. Toxicity of Pyrolysis Gases from Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, Carlos J.; Kosola, Kay L.; Solis, Alida N.; Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Parker, John A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acryltonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions; carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  10. Mechanical Response of Elastomers to Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, B. C.; Jolly, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    Elastomeric materials represent an important class of engineering materials, which are widely used to make components of structures, machinery, and devices for vibration and noise control. Elastomeric material possessing conductive or magnetic properties have been widely used in applications such as conductive and magnetic tapes, sensors, flexible permanent magnets, etc. Our interest in these materials has focussed on understanding and controlling the magnitude and directionality of their response to applied magnetic fields. The effect of magnetic fields on the mechanical properties of these materials has not been the subject of many published studies. Our interest and expertise in controllable fluids have given us the foundation to make a transition to controllable elastomers. Controllable elastomers are materials that exhibit a change in mechanical properties upon application of an external stimuli, in this case a magnetic field. Controllable elastomers promise to have more functionality than conventional elastomers and therefore could share the broad industrial application base with conventional elastomers. As such, these materials represent an attractive class of smart materials, and may well be a link that brings the applications of modern control technologies, intelligent structures and smart materials to a very broad industrial area. This presentation will cover our research work in the area of controllable elastomers at the Thomas Lord Research Center. More specifically, the presentation will discuss the control of mechanical properties and mathematical modeling of the new materials prepared in our laboratories along with experiments to achieve adaptive vibration control using the new materials.

  11. Adjustable Membrane Mirrors Incorporating G-Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Zensheu; Morgan, Rhonda M.; Xu, Tian-Bing; Su, Ji; Hishinuma, Yoshikazu; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2008-01-01

    Lightweight, flexible, large-aperture mirrors of a type being developed for use in outer space have unimorph structures that enable precise adjustment of their surface figures. A mirror of this type includes a reflective membrane layer bonded with an electrostrictive grafted elastomer (G-elastomer) layer, plus electrodes suitably positioned with respect to these layers. By virtue of the electrostrictive effect, an electric field applied to the G-elastomer membrane induces a strain along the membrane and thus causes a deflection of the mirror surface. Utilizing this effect, the mirror surface figure can be adjusted locally by individually addressing pairs of electrodes. G-elastomers, which were developed at NASA Langley Research Center, were chosen for this development in preference to other electroactive polymers partly because they offer superior electromechanical performance. Whereas other electroactive polymers offer, variously, large strains with low moduli of elasticity or small strains with high moduli of elasticity, G-elastomers offer both large strains (as large as 4 percent) and high moduli of elasticity (about 580 MPa). In addition, G-elastomer layers can be made by standard melt pressing or room-temperature solution casting.

  12. Composite theory applied to elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Reinforced elastomers form the basis for most of the structural or load carrying applications of rubber products. Computer based structural analysis in the form of finite element codes was highly successful in refining structural design in both isotropic materials and rigid composites. This has lead the rubber industry to attempt to make use of such techniques in the design of structural cord-rubber composites. While such efforts appear promising, they were not easy to achieve for several reasons. Among these is a distinct lack of a clearly defined set of material property descriptors suitable for computer analysis. There are substantial differences between conventional steel, aluminum, or even rigid composites such as graphite-epoxy, and textile-cord reinforced rubber. These differences which are both conceptual and practical are discussed.

  13. Elastomer compatibility with gear lubricants. Part I: Immersion testing

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, I.; Conary, G.S.

    1994-11-01

    This study examines the effect of various gear oil chemistry on elastomer degradation and demonstrates the advantage of some elastomer chemistry over others. Repeatability and reproducibility of the immersion test is discussed.

  14. Silphenylene elastomers have high thermal stability and tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Two polymeric silphenylene ethers, when cured by reactions with ethyl silicates and metal salts at room temperature, form elastomers having excellent thermal stability and tensile properties. The highest tensile strength obtained in a reinforced elastomer was 2800 psi.

  15. Using AFM Force Curves to Explore Properties of Elastomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Megan A.; Kozlowski, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers. Force curves are used to quantify the stiffness of elastomers prepared with different base-to-curing agent ratios. Trends in observed spring constants of the…

  16. Elastomers bonded to metal surfaces seal electrochemical cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1964-01-01

    A leakproof seal secondary cell containing alkaline electrolytes was developed by bonding an alkali-resistant elastomer, such as neoprene, to metal contact surfaces. Test results of several different elastomers strongly indicate the feasibility of this sealing method.

  17. Mechanical characterization of seismic base isolation elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    From the various devices proposed for seismic isolators, the laminated elastomer bearing is emerging as the preferred device for large buildings/structures, such as nuclear reactor plants. The laminated bearing is constructed from alternating thin layers of elastomer and metallic plates (shims). The elastomer is usually a carbon filled natural rubber that exhibits damping when subjected to shear. Recently, some blends of natural and synthetic rubbers have appeared. Before candidate elastomers can be used in seismic isolation bearings, their response to design-basis loads and beyond- design-basis loads must be determined. This entails the development of constitutive models and and then the determination of associated material parameters through specimen testing. This paper describes the methods used to obtain data for characterizing the mechanical response of elastomers used for seismic isolation. The data provides a data base for use in determining material parameters associated with nonlinear constitutive models. In addition, the paper presents a definition for a damping ratio that does not exhibit the usual reduction at higher strain cycles. 2 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The electrical breakdown strength of pre-stretched elastomers, with and without sample volume conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Shamsul; Morshuis, Peter H. F.; Yahia Benslimane, Mohamed; Yu, Liyun; Ladegaard Skov, Anne

    2015-05-01

    In practice, the electrical breakdown strength of dielectric electroactive polymers (DEAPs) determines the upper limit for transduction. During DEAP actuation, the thickness of the elastomer decreases, and thus the electrical field increases and the breakdown process is determined by a coupled electro-mechanical failure mechanism. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms behind the electro-mechanical breakdown process is required for developing reliable transducers. In this study, two experimental configurations were used to determine the stretch dependence of the electrical breakdown strength of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers. Breakdown strength was determined for samples with and without volume conservation and was found to depend strongly on the stretch ratio and the thickness of the samples. PDMS elastomers are shown to increase breakdown strength by a factor of ∼3 when sample thickness decreases from 120 to 30 μm, while the biaxial pre-stretching (λ = 2) of samples leads similarly to an increase in breakdown strength by a factor of ∼2.5.

  19. Properties of Atmospheric Pressure Ar Plasma Jet Depending on Treated Dielectric Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prysiazhnyi, Vadym; Ricci Castro, Alonso H.; Kostov, Konstantin G.

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in argon was utilized to modify surfaces of glass, acrylic, and PTFE dielectrics. This paper describes the influence of the dielectric substrate on operation and properties of plasma. Two modes of operation (each of those have two patterns) were described. The transition from one mode to another, values of the dissipated power, and spreading of plasma over the dielectric surfaces strongly depended on the substrate material. Additionally, three methods of plasma spreading estimation were presented and discussed.

  20. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  4. 63 FR 41279 - Acrylic Sheet From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-08-03

    ... COMMISSION Acrylic Sheet From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on acrylic sheet from Japan. SUMMARY: The... order on acrylic sheet from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  5. Enhanced performance in capacitive force sensors using carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposites with high dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyeyoung; Yoon, Hyungsuk; Ko, Youngpyo; Choi, Jaeyoo; Lee, Sang-Soo; Jeon, Insu; Kim, Jong-Ho; Kim, Heesuk

    2016-03-01

    Force sensors have attracted tremendous attention owing to their applications in various fields such as touch screens, robots, smart scales, and wearable devices. The force sensors reported so far have been mainly focused on high sensitivity based on delicate microstructured materials, resulting in low reproducibility and high fabrication cost that are limitations for wide applications. As an alternative, we demonstrate a novel capacitive-type force sensor with enhanced performance owing to the increased dielectric properties of elastomers and simple sensor structure. We rationally design dielectric elastomers based on alkylamine modified-multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites, which have a higher dielectric constant than pure PDMS. The alkylamine-MWCNTs show excellent dispersion in a PDMS matrix, thus leading to enhanced and reliable dielectric properties of the composites. A force sensor array fabricated with alkylamine-MWCNT/PDMS composites presents an enhanced response due to the higher dielectric constant of the composites than that of pure PDMS. This study is the first to report enhanced performance of capacitive force sensors by modulating the dielectric properties of elastomers. We believe that the disclosed strategy to improve the sensor performance by increasing the dielectric properties of elastomers has great potential in the development of capacitive force sensor arrays that respond to various input forces.Force sensors have attracted tremendous attention owing to their applications in various fields such as touch screens, robots, smart scales, and wearable devices. The force sensors reported so far have been mainly focused on high sensitivity based on delicate microstructured materials, resulting in low reproducibility and high fabrication cost that are limitations for wide applications. As an alternative, we demonstrate a novel capacitive-type force sensor with enhanced performance owing to the increased

  6. Poly (ricinoleic acid) based novel thermosetting elastomer.

    PubMed

    Ebata, Hiroki; Yasuda, Mayumi; Toshima, Kazunobu; Matsumura, Shuichi

    2008-01-01

    A novel bio-based thermosetting elastomer was prepared by the lipase-catalyzed polymerization of methyl ricinoleate with subsequent vulcanization. Some mechanical properties of the cured carbon black-filled polyricinoleate compounds were evaluated as a thermosetting elastomer. It was found that the carbon black-filled polyricinoleate compounds were readily cured by sulfur curatives to produce a thermosetting elastomer that formed a rubber-like sheet with a smooth and non-sticky surface. The curing behaviors and mechanical properties were dependent on both the molecular weight of the polyricinoleate and the amount of the sulfur curatives. Cured compounds consisting of polyricinoleate with a molecular weight of 100,800 showed good mechanical properties, such as a hardness of 48 A based on the durometer A measurements, a tensile strength at break of 6.91 MPa and an elongation at break of 350%.

  7. Protective effects in radiation modification of elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głuszewski, Wojciech; Zagórski, Zbigniew P.; Rajkiewicz, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Saturated character of ethylene/octene thermoplastic elastomers demands an application of nonconventional methods of crosslinking connections between chains of molecules. These are organic peroxides, usually in the presence of coagents or an application of ionizing radiation. Several approaches (radiation, peroxide, peroxide/plus radiation and radiation/plus peroxide) were applied in crosslinking of elastomere Engage 8200. Attention was directed to the protection effects by aromatic peroxides and by photo- and thermostabilizers on radiolysis of elastomers. Role of dose of radiation, dose rate of radiation as well as the role of composition of elastomere on the radiation yield of hydrogen and absorbtion of oxygen was investigated. DRS method was used to follow postirradiation degradation. Influence of crosslinking methods on properties of elastomers is described. Results were interpreted from the point of view of protective actions of aromatic compounds.

  8. Transverse vibration of nematic elastomer Timoshenko beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dong; Liu, Ying; Liu, Chuang

    2017-01-01

    Being a rubber-like liquid crystalline elastomer, a nematic elastomer (NE) is anisotropic viscoelastic, and displays dynamic soft elasticity. In this paper, the transverse vibration of a NE Timoshenko beam is studied based on the linear viscoelasticity theory of nematic elastomers. The governing equation of motion for the transverse vibration of a NE Timoshenko beam is derived. A complex modal analysis method is used to obtain the natural frequencies and decrement coefficients of NE beams. The influences of the nematic director rotation, the rubber relaxation time, and the director rotation time on the vibration characteristic of NE Timoshenko beams are discussed in detail. The sensitivity of the dynamic performance of NE beams to director initial angle and relaxation times provides a possibility of intelligent controlling of their dynamic performance.

  9. 78 FR 55644 - Styrene, Copolymers with Acrylic Acid and/or Methacrylic Acid; Tolerance Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... methacrylate, hydroxypropyl acrylate, hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and/or hydroxyethyl acrylate; and its sodium... methacrylate, hydroxypropyl acrylate, hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and/or hydroxyethyl acrylate; and its sodium... methacrylate, hydroxypropyl acrylate, hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and/or hydroxyethyl acrylate, and its...

  10. Copper-Coated Liquid-Crystalline Elastomer via Bioinspired Polydopamine Adhesion and Electroless Deposition.

    PubMed

    Frick, Carl P; Merkel, Daniel R; Laursen, Christopher M; Brinckmann, Stephan A; Yakacki, Christopher M

    2016-12-01

    This study explores the functionalization of main-chain nematic elastomers with a conductive metallic surface layer using a polydopamine binder. Using a two-stage thiol-acrylate reaction, a programmed monodomain is achieved for thermoreversible actuation. A copper layer (≈155 nm) is deposited onto polymer samples using electroless deposition while the samples are in their elongated nematic state. Samples undergo 42% contraction when heated above the isotropic transition temperature. During the thermal cycle, buckling of the copper layer is seen in the direction perpendicular to contraction; however, transverse cracking occurs due to the large Poisson effect experienced during actuation. As a result, the electrical conductivity of the layer reduced quickly as a function of thermal cycling. However, samples do not show signs of delamination after 25 thermal cycles. These results demonstrate the ability to explore multifunctional liquid-crystalline composites using relatively facile synthesis, adhesion, and deposition techniques.

  11. UV-absorbent lignin-based multi-arm star thermoplastic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juan; Wang, Jifu; Wang, Chunpeng; Liu, Yupeng; Xu, Yuzhi; Tang, Chuanbing; Chu, Fuxiang

    2015-02-01

    Lignin-grafted copolymers, namely lignin-graft-poly(methyl methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate) (lignin-g-P(MMA-co-BA)), are synthesized via "grafting from" atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) with the aid of lignin-based macroinitiators. By manipulating the monomer feed ratios of MMA/BA, grafted copolymers with tunable glass transition temperatures (-10-40 °C) are obtained. These copolymers are evaluated as sustainable thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs). The results suggest that the mechanical properties of these TPEs lignin-g-P(MMA-co-BA) copolymers are improved significantly by comparing with those of linear P(MMA-co-BA) copolymer counterparts, and the elastic strain recovery is nearly 70%. Lignin-g-P(MMA-co-BA) copolymers exhibit high absorption in the range of the UV spectrum, which might allow for applications in UV-blocking coatings.

  12. Highly Extensible Supramolecular Elastomers with Large Stress Generation Capability Originating from Multiple Hydrogen Bonds on the Long Soft Network Strands.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikihiro; Noro, Atsushi; Matsushita, Yushu

    2016-04-01

    Highly extensible supramolecular elastomers are prepared from ABA triblock-type copolymers bearing glassy end blocks and a long soft middle block with multiple hydrogen bonds. The copolymer used is polystyrene-b-[poly(butyl acrylate)-co-polyacrylamide]-b-polystyrene (S-Ba-S), which is synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Tensile tests reveal that the breaking elongation (εb ) increases with an increase in the middle block molecular weight (Mmiddle ). Especially, the largest S-Ba-S with Mmiddle of 3140k, which is synthesized via high-pressure RAFT polymerization, achieves εb of over 2000% with a maximum tensile stress of 3.6 MPa, while the control sample without any middle block hydrogen bonds, polystyrene-b-poly(butyl acrylate)-b-polystyrene with Mmiddle of 2780k, is merely a viscous material due to the large volume fraction of soft block. Thus, incorporation of hydrogen bonds into the large molecular weight soft middle block is found to be beneficial to prepare supramolecular elastomers attaining high extensibility and sufficiently large stress generation ability simultaneously. This outcome is probably due to concerted combination of entropic changes and internal potential energy changes originating from the dissociation of multiple hydrogen bonds by elongation.

  13. Mixing It Up with Acrylics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley

    1999-01-01

    Presents an art activity for fifth-grade students in which they learn about basic shapes and what happens when shapes overlap, draw seven overlapping geometric shapes, review the use of acrylic paint and mixing colors, and finally paint with primary colors. (CMK)

  14. Photo-cross-linked poly(ethylene carbonate) elastomers: synthesis, in vivo degradation, and determination of in vivo degradation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cornacchione, L A; Qi, B; Bianco, J; Zhou, Z; Amsden, B G

    2012-10-08

    Low-molecular-weight poly(ethylene carbonate) diols of varying molecular weight were generated through catalyzed thermal degradation of high-molecular-weight poly(ethylene carbonate). These polymers were then end functionalized with acrylate groups. The resulting α,ω-diacrylates were effectively photo-cross-linked upon exposure to long-wave UV light in the presence of a photoinitiator to yield rubbery networks of low sol content. The degree of cross-linking effectively controlled the in vivo degradation rate of the networks by adherent macrophages; higher cross-link densities yielded slower degradation rates. The cross-link density did not affect the number of adherent macrophages at the elastomer/tissue interface, indicating that cross-linking affected the susceptibility of the elastomer to degradative species released by the macrophages. The reactive species likely responsible for in vivo degradation appears to be superoxide anion, as the in vivo results were in agreement with in vitro degradation via superoxide anion, while cholesterol esterase, known to degrade similar poly(alkylene carbonate)s, had no affect on elastomer degradation.

  15. Rehabilitation of post-traumatic total nasal defect using silicone and acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vikas; Datta, Kusum; Kaur, Sukhjit

    2016-01-01

    Facial defects resulting from neoplasms, congenital abnormalities or trauma can affect the patient esthetically, psychologically, and even financially. Surgical reconstruction of large facial defects is sometimes not possible and frequently demands prosthetic rehabilitation. For success of such prosthesis, adequate replication of natural anatomy, color matching and blending with tissue interface are important criteria. Variety of materials and retention methods are advocated to achieve a functionally and esthetically acceptable restoration. Silicones are the most commonly used materials because of flexibility, lifelike appearance and ability to be used in combination with acrylic resin which is hard, provides body and helps in achieving retention to the prosthesis by engaging mechanical undercuts. Furthermore, the acrylic portion can be relined easily, thus helping comfortable wear and removal of the prosthesis by patient without traumatizing nasal mucosa. This case report describes time saving and cost effective prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with total nasal defect using custom sculpted nasal prosthesis made up of silicone elastomer and acrylic resin, which is retained by engaging mechanical undercut and use of biocompatible silicone adhesive. PMID:27134434

  16. 21 CFR 177.1590 - Polyester elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyester elastomers. 177.1590 Section 177.1590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1590 - Polyester elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyester elastomers. 177.1590 Section 177.1590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1590 - Polyester elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyester elastomers. 177.1590 Section 177.1590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as...

  19. 21 CFR 177.1590 - Polyester elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyester elastomers. 177.1590 Section 177.1590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use...

  20. Molecular Models of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajshekhar

    Liquid crystal elastomers combine the elastic properties of conventional rubbers with the optical properties of liquid crystals. This dual nature gives rise to unusual physical properties, including the stress induced transition from a polydomain state, consisting of multiple nematic regions with independent orientations, to a monodomain state consisting of a single nematic region with a uniform director. We propose several molecular-scale coarse-grained models of liquid crystal elastomers with varying degrees of resolution. The models employ the Gay-Berne soft potential, and exhibit the chain connectivity of a diamond network. Simulation results show that these models are able to capture the polydomain state exhibited by liquid crystal elastomers in the absence of any external stress. When subjected to uniaxial stress, our models exhibit a polydomain to monodomain transition. We explain that the polydomain state occurs through the aggregation of liquid crystal molecules assisted by crosslinking sites, and conclude that the transition mechanism to the monodomain state is based on the reorientation of nematic domains along the direction of applied stress. Our modeling efforts are primarily focused on three models. The first two models consider the effects of rigid and flexible crosslinkers in liquid crystal elastomers with a diamond topology for chain connectivity. The third model deviates from the diamond network topology and adopts a random network topology.

  1. Conductive elastomers by a new latex process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrically conductive polymers such as polyaniline can be used to in production of light-emitting diodes, printed circuit board components, antistatic materials, etc. Highly filled elastomers, such as those filled with metallic powders, can also conduct electricity. However, limitations due to co...

  2. Behavior of magnetorheological elastomers with coated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrooz, Majid; Sutrisno, Joko; Zhang, Lingyue; Fuchs, Alan; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2015-03-01

    Iron particle coating can improve the behavior of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) by inhibiting iron particle rusting; however, such a process can change physical properties of MREs such as oxidation resistance, shear modulus, and stiffness change due to an applied magnetic field. In this study, MRE samples are fabricated with regular and polymerized iron particles. To investigate the possibility and extent of these changes, polymerized particle MRE samples are made using a combination of reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer and click chemistry. Shear test sample MREs with pure elastomer and 50 wt% MRE with and without polymerization are fabricated. To observe the effect of oxidation on shear properties of MREs, pure elastomer and 50 wt% coated and non-coated samples are oxidized using accelerated oxidation procedure. Experimental results show that oxidation significantly reduces the shear modulus of the elastomer matrix. The coating process of iron particles does not significantly change the shear modulus of resulting MREs but reduces the loss of shear modulus due to oxidation.

  3. Polymer-dispersed liquid crystal elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Rešetič, Andraž; Milavec, Jerneja; Zupančič, Blaž; Domenici, Valentina; Zalar, Boštjan

    2016-01-01

    The need for mechanical manipulation during the curing of conventional liquid crystal elastomers diminishes their applicability in the field of shape-programmable soft materials and future applications in additive manufacturing. Here we report on polymer-dispersed liquid crystal elastomers, novel composite materials that eliminate this difficulty. Their thermal shape memory anisotropy is imprinted by curing in external magnetic field, providing for conventional moulding of macroscopically sized soft, thermomechanically active elastic objects of general shapes. The binary soft-soft composition of isotropic elastomer matrix, filled with freeze-fracture-fabricated, oriented liquid crystal elastomer microparticles as colloidal inclusions, allows for fine-tuning of thermal morphing behaviour. This is accomplished by adjusting the concentration, spatial distribution and orientation of microparticles or using blends of microparticles with different thermomechanical characteristics. We demonstrate that any Gaussian thermomechanical deformation mode (bend, cup, saddle, left and right twist) of a planar sample, as well as beat-like actuation, is attainable with bilayer microparticle configurations. PMID:27713478

  4. An in vitro study to evaluate the effect on dimensional changes of elastomers during cold sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Khinnavar, Poonam K.; Kumar, B. H. Dhanya; Nandeeshwar, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study was planned to evaluate the dimensional stability of elastomers during cold sterilization or immersion disinfection and also to evaluate the same, along with acrylic resin trays which are used in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A study mold according to revised American Dental Association. Specification no. 19 was used. Polyether, polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) (heavy body), PVS (regular body) and Hydrophilic addition reaction silicon (medium body) were selected for study. 2% glutaraldehyde and 0.525% sodium hypochlorite were the disinfectants used. The study was divided into group-I and group-II. In group-I study, 24 specimens of each impression material were prepared. Eight immersed in 2% glutaraldehyde, eight in 0.525% sodium hypochlorite and rest eight allowed to dry bench cure. After 16 h, the specimens measured under Leica WILD stereomicroscope and dimensions compared with master die. In group II study, 24 specimens of the material with the least dimensional changes were prepared and adhered to 24 acrylic resin disks using tray adhesive. Same immersion procedure was followed as in group I. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple tests. Results: Of four impression materials used, PVS (heavy body) was the most dimensionally stable, and Polyether was the least dimensionally stable in both the groups. Interpretation and Conclusion: Within the limitation of the study, PVS (heavy body) was most stable, and polyether was least stable of all the impression materials. PMID:26929499

  5. Block Copolymer-Based Supramolecular Elastomers with High Extensibility and Large Stress Generation Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noro, Atsushi; Hayashi, Mikihiro

    We prepared block copolymer-based supramolecular elastomers with high extensibility and large stress generation capability. Reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerizations were conducted under normal pressure and high pressure to synthesize several large molecular weight polystyrene-b-[poly(butyl acrylate)-co-polyacrylamide]-b-polystyrene (S-Ba-S) block copolymers. Tensile tests revealed that the largest S-Ba-S with middle block molecular weight of 3140k achieved a breaking elongation of over 2000% with a maximum tensile stress of 3.6 MPa and a toughness of 28 MJ/m3 while the reference sample without any middle block hydrogen bonds, polystyrene-b-poly(butyl acrylate)-b-polystyrene with almost the same molecular weight, was merely viscous and not self-standing. Hence, incorporation of hydrogen bonds into a long soft middle block was found to be beneficial to attain high extensibility and large stress generation capability probably due to concerted combination of entropic changes and internal potential energy changes originaing from the dissociation of multiple hydrogen bonds by elongation. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 13J02357, 24685035, 15K13785, and 23655213 for M.H. and A.N. A.N. also expresses his gratitude for Tanaka Rubber Science & Technology Award by Enokagaku-Shinko Foundation, Japan.

  6. Compatibility of selected elastomers with plutonium glovebox environment

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.

    1994-06-01

    This illustrative test was undertaken as a result of on-going failure of elastomer components in plutonium gloveboxes. These failures represent one of the major sources of required maintenance to keep gloveboxes operational. In particular, it was observed that the introduction of high specific activity Pu-238 into a glovebox, otherwise contaminated with Pu-239, resulted in an inordinate failure of elastomer components. Desiring to keep replacement of elastomer components to a minimum, a decision to explore a few possible alternative elastomer candidates was undertaken and reported upon herewith. Sample specimens of Neoprene, Urethane, Viton, and Hypalon elastomeric formulations were obtained from the Bacter Rubber Company. Strips of the elastomer specimens were placed in a plutonium glovebox and outside of a glovebox, and were observed for a period of three years. Of the four types of elastomers, only Hypalon remained completely viable.

  7. A case and elastomer annulus under lateral impulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, H.E.; Murray, Y.D. )

    1989-11-01

    Fourier series and finite element solutions are given for stresses in a cylindrical case filled with an annulus of elastomeric material. The fourier series solutions are for membrane stresses, which dominate at early time, and are given for three case-elastomer models: (1) a slide boundary model in which the case wall moves as a unit with the elastomer in radial motion but, with a weak bond between the case and elastomer, is free to slide relative to the elastomer in tangential motion, (2) a unit motion model for a well-bonded elastomer in which the case wall and elastomer are assumed to move together as a unit in both radial and tangential motion, and (3) a radiation boundary model in which tangential motion of the case wall radiates energy into a well-bonded elastomer. For typical case, elastomer and bond mechanical properties, the radiation boundary model gives the most appropriate solution, which differs substantially from the other solutions even for very soft elastomers. Finite element solutions agree closely with and support the validity of all three analytical models, which were used to guide the finite element experiments and interpret and generalize their results.

  8. Seismic base isolation: Elastomer characterization, bearing modeling and system response

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Wang, C.Y.; Hughes, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses several major aspects of seismic base isolation systems that employ laminated elastomer bearings. Elastomer constitutive models currently being used to represent the nonlinear elastic and hysteretic behavior are discussed. Some aspects of mechanical characterization testing of elastomers is presented along with representative tests results. The development of a finite element based mesh generator for laminated elastomer bearings is presented. Recent advances in the simulation of base isolated structures to earthquake motions are presented along with a sample problem. 13 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Addition polyimide adhesives containing ATBN and silicone elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Clair, A. K.; Saint Clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of added elastomers on the thermal stability, adhesive strength, and fracture toughness of LARC-13, a high-temperature addition polyimide adhesive. Various butadiene/acrylonitrile and silicon elastomers were incorporated into the polyimide resin either as physical polyblends, or by chemically reacting the elastomers with the polyimide backbone. Adhesive single lap-shear and T-peel strengths were measured before and after ageing at elevated temperature. A tapered double-cantilever beam specimen was used to determine the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified polyimide adhesives.

  10. Graphene-silicone elastomer nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Shuyang

    The incorporation of fillers to improve the Young's modulus, tensile strength, and elongation at failure of polymeric matrices is ubiquitous. While Young's modulus and tensile strength of the matrix increase with the filler concentration, a threshold filler concentration must be achieved for the elongation at failure to increase. Furthermore, a decrease in elongation at failure has also been observed beyond a critical filler concentration. While the increases in modulus and tensile strength have been attributed to the transfer of mechanical load to the stronger filler, the onset and reversal in elongation at failure are not understood. In this thesis, we use a functionalized graphene sheet (FGS) -- silicone elastomer (SE) nanocomposite as a model system to demonstrate the mechanisms responsible for this observed filler concentration-dependant elongation at failure as well its subsequent reversal. We will also demonstrate the mechanisms that create the continual increase in tensile strength as filler concentration increases. As the lateral size of FGS strongly influences the tensile strength of the resulting composite, in the first part of this thesis, we show that the oxidation path and the mechanical energy input influence the size of graphene oxide sheets derived from graphite oxide. The cross-planar oxidation of graphite from the (0002) plane results in periodic cracking of the uppermost graphene oxide layer, limiting its lateral dimension to less than 30 microm. We use an energy balance between the elastic strain energy associated with the undulation of graphene oxide sheets at the hydroxyl and epoxy sites, the crack formation energy, and the interaction energy between graphene layers to determine the cell size of the cracks. Under both edge-to-center and cross-planar oxidations, the size of graphene oxide sheets is determined by the aspect ratio of graphite and the mechanical energy input in processing the sheets. In the second part of this thesis, we use

  11. Controlled synthesis of SBR elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin-Ping

    to a great extent on the amount of block styrene. With constant styrene and vinyl contents, the copolymer with the larger and longer blocky styrene gave a lower Tg value but produced a higher loss tangent, tan delta, and thus higher hysteresis loss. The second objective of this research was to synthesize well-defmed, tin-linked, star-branched elastomers. It was found that the tetraallyltin could be used as a reversible chain transfer agent in alkyllithium-initiated diene polymerization, as a consequence of lithium/tin exchange reactions. The polymers produced had very different combinations of linear and star branched polymer, depending on the [Sn]/[Li] ratio and the polymerization procedures. Hydrolysis of these polymer mixtures by HCl in THF resulted in a single peak with a narrow molecular weight distribution, which indicates that the exchange reaction is fast and reversible. In general, the presence of alkyl-tin compounds has little, if any, effect on the polybutadiene microstructures. The linking reaction of poly(dienyl)lithium with Tin(IV) chloride proceeds as a "living" reaction because the coupled polymer chain ends can still grow when more monomer is added. Kinetic study of the interaction of poly(dienyl)lithium with tin-linked polybutadiene showed redistribution of arms and linear polymers. The mechanism of transmetallation is proposed to occur via a stable penta-coordinated alkyl-tin lithium intermediate.

  12. Effect of low concentrations of carbon nanotubes on electric dipole relaxation in a polyurethane elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabenok, E. V.; Novikov, G. F.; Estrin, Ya. I.; Badamshina, E. R.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of small (up to 0.018 wt %) additions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the complex electric modulus M*= M' - jM″ and the spectrum of the relaxation times G(τ) of a cross-linked polyurethane elastomer containing ˜10 vol % of polyamide-6 dispersed in the polyurethane matrix and incompatible with it was studied. The measurements were conducted in the range of electric field frequencies 10-3-105 Hz at temperatures from 133 to 413 K. Based on the shape analysis of the M″( M') diagrams, the contributions of electric conductivity and dielectric relaxation to complex dielectric permittivity ɛ* = ɛ' - jɛ″ were separated and the effect of additions on α and β relaxation for both polyurethane and polyamide phases was analyzed in accordance with the peculiarities of phase-separated systems. The introduction of SWNTs in the composite affected the dielectric properties of the material; the maximum effect was observed at concentrations of 0.002-0.008 wt %; at higher SWNT concentrations, the scatter of data increased and did not allow us to evaluate the effect. The effect of SWNTs on G(τ) in the main phase was opposite to that in the polyamide phase. In the temperature range of α relaxation of the polyurethane phase, the relaxation times increased after the introduction of SWNTs evidently because of the decrease in the free volume that determines the α relaxation times of polyurethane. In contrast, for the polyamide phase in the range of α relaxation, the relaxation times decreased after the introduction of SWNTs. The results agree with the literature data on the effect of ultrasmall SWNT concentrations on the physicomechanical characteristics of the polyurethane elastomer and its electric conductivity.

  13. Dipolar cross-linkers for PDMS networks with enhanced dielectric permittivity and low dielectric loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrt Madsen, Frederikke; Egede Daugaard, Anders; Hvilsted, Søren; Yahia Benslimane, Mohamed; Ladegaard Skov, Anne

    2013-10-01

    Dipole grafted cross-linkers were utilized to prepare polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers with various chain lengths and with various concentrations of functional cross-linker. The grafted cross-linkers were prepared by reaction of two alkyne-functional dipoles, 1-ethynyl-4-nitrobenzene and 3-(4-((4-nitrophenyl)diazenyl)phenoxy)-prop-1-yn-1-ylium, with a synthesized silicone compatible azide-functional cross-linker by click chemistry. The thermal, mechanical and electromechanical properties were investigated for PDMS films with 0 to 3.6 wt% of dipole-cross-linker. The relative dielectric permittivity was found to increase by ∼20% at only 0.46 wt% of incorporated dipole without significant changes in the mechanical properties. Furthermore, the dielectric losses were proved to be remarkably low while the electrical breakdown strengths were high.

  14. Carbon nanotubes dispersed in liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Ji, Yan

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs), as the name indicates, unite the anisotropic order of liquid crystals and rubber elasticity of elastomers into polymer networks. One of the most notable features of LCEs is that properly aligned LCEs exhibit dramatic and reversible shape deformation (e.g. elongation-contraction) in response to various stimuli. In recent years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were introduced into LCEs. Besides enabling remote and spatial control of the actuation via light and electronic field, CNTs are also utilized to align mesogens as well as to improve the mechanical and electronic property of the composites. Some potential applications of CNT-LCE nanocomposites have been demonstrated. This chapter describes the preparation of CNT dispersed LCEs, new physical properties resulted from CNTs, their actuation and their proposed applications.

  15. On a Minimum Problem in Smectic Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonsanti, Michele; Giovine, Pasquale

    2008-07-01

    Smectic elastomers are layered materials exhibiting a solid-like elastic response along the layer normal and a rubbery one in the plane. Balance equations for smectic elastomers are derived from the general theory of continua with constrained microstructure. In this work we investigate a very simple minimum problem based on multi-well potentials where the microstructure is taken into account. The set of polymeric strains minimizing the elastic energy contains a one-parameter family of simple strain associated with a micro-variation of the degree of freedom. We develop the energy functional through two terms, the first one nematic and the second one considering the tilting phenomenon; after, by developing in the rubber elasticity framework, we minimize over the tilt rotation angle and extract the engineering stress.

  16. Optical Properties of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Samriti; Lal, Suman; Tripathi, S. K.; Sood, Nitin; Singh, Darshan

    2011-12-01

    The linking of liquid crystals polymer chains together into gel network fixes their topology, and melt becomes an elastic solid. These materials are called liquid crystals elastomers. Liquid crystal elastomers possess properties of soft elasticity and spontaneous shape change. The constituent molecules of LCEs are orientationally ordered and there exist a strong coupling between the orientational order and mechanical strain. In LCEs the molecules start elongate when their component rods orient and reversibly contract when the order is lost (typically by heating). So there is a change of average molecular shape from spherical to spheroidal. These unique properties make these materials suitable for future biological applications. Various research groups have studied different properties of LCEs in which optical properties are predominant. LCE has been synthesized in our laboratory. In this paper, we report on the optical behavior of this material.

  17. Modeling of particle interactions in magnetorheological elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Biller, A. M. Stolbov, O. V. Raikher, Yu. L.

    2014-09-21

    The interaction between two particles made of an isotropic linearly polarizable magnetic material and embedded in an elastomer matrix is studied. In this case, when an external field is imposed, the magnetic attraction of the particles, contrary to point dipoles, is almost wraparound. The exact solution of the magnetic problem in the linear polarization case, although existing, is not practical; to circumvent its use, an interpolation formula is proposed. One more interpolation expression is developed for the resistance of the elastic matrix to the field-induced particle displacements. Minimization of the total energy of the pair reveals its configurational bistability in a certain field range. One of the possible equilibrium states corresponds to the particles dwelling at a distance, the other—to their collapse in a tight dimer. This mesoscopic bistability causes magnetomechanical hysteresis which has important implications for the macroscopic behavior of magnetorheological elastomers.

  18. Isothermal aging of three polyurethane elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.

    1996-05-01

    Two polyurethane systems, EN-7 and L-100, have a long history as encapsulants and coatings in Sandia programs. These materials contain significant amounts of toluene diisocyanate (TDI), a suspect human carcinogen. As part of efforts to reduce the use of hazardous materials in the workplace, PET-90A, a polyurethane with less than 0.1% free TDI, was identified as a candidate for new applications and as a replacement for the more hazardous polyurethanes in selected programs. This report documents the results of a two-year accelerated aging study of PET-90A, EN-7, and L-100 polyurethane elastomers to characterize the effect of 135{degrees}F isothermal aging on selected physical, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. In general, there was very little change in properties over the two year period for the three elastomers. The largest changes occurred in EN-7, which is the polyurethane with the longest service history in Sandia applications.

  19. Rubber elasticity: From topology to filled elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, G.; Vilgis, T.A.

    1993-12-31

    Various new aspects in the elasticity of rubbers and statistics of unfilled and filled elastomers, together with various consequences for practical application are discussed. It is shown that the role of network topology is crucial in the statistics of rubbers. This is seen mostly on the influence of heterogeneities of crosslink density which determine the elastic modulus, ultimate properties as well as the dynamical behavior. The filler effects, entanglements in filled rubbers, and the filler/bound rubber/mobile rubber problem are discussed from a novel point of view. A localization model is adopted, where it can be shown that on a rough (filler) surface more polymer can be adsorbed compared to a flat surface with similar energetic properties. The role of carbon black networking and fractal properties of the filler are discussed in relation to the dynamic-mechanical properties of the elastomer.

  20. High field dielectric properties of anisotropic polymer-ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tomer, V.; Randall, C. A.

    2008-10-01

    Using dielectrophoretic assembly, we create anisotropic composites of BaTiO{sub 3} particles in a silicone elastomer thermoset polymer. We study a variety of electrical properties in these composites, i.e., permittivity, dielectric breakdown, and energy density as function of ceramic volume fraction and connectivity. The recoverable energy density of these electric-field-structured composites is found to be highly dependent on the anisotropy present in the system. Our results indicate that x-y-aligned composites exhibit higher breakdown strengths along with large recoverable energy densities when compared to 0-3 composites. This demonstrates that engineered anisotropy can be employed to control dielectric breakdown strengths and nonlinear conduction at high fields in heterogeneous systems. Consequently, manipulation of anisotropy in high-field dielectric properties can be exploited for the development of high energy density polymer-ceramic systems.

  1. A novel method of fabricating laminated silicone stack actuators with pre-strained dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinitt, Andrew D.; Conn, Andrew T.

    2014-03-01

    In recent studies, stack based Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) have been successfully used in haptic feedback and sensing applications. However, limitations in the fabrication method, and materials used to con- struct stack actuators constrain their force and displacement output per unit volume. This paper focuses on a fabrication process enabling a stacked elastomer actuator to withstand the high tensile forces needed for high power applications, such as mimetics for mammalian muscle contraction (i.e prostheses), whilst requiring low voltage for thickness-mode contractile actuation. Spun elastomer layers are bonded together in a pre-strained state using a conductive adhesive filler, forming a Laminated Inter-Penetrating Network (L-IPN) with repeatable and uniform electrode thickness. The resulting structure utilises the stored strain energy of the dielectric elas- tomer to compress the cured electrode composite material. The method is used to fabricate an L-IPN example, which demonstrated that the bonded L-IPN has high tensile strength normal to the lamination. Additionally, the uniformity and retained dielectric layer pre-strain of the L-IPN are confirmed. The described method is envisaged to be used in a semi-automated assembly of large-scale multi-layer stacks of pre-strained dielectric layers possessing a tensile strength in the range generated by mammalian muscle.

  2. Toward a predictive model for elastomer seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Nicola; Khawaja, Musab; Sutton, Adrian; Mostofi, Arash

    Nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and hydrogenated-NBR (HNBR) are widely used elastomers, especially as seals in oil and gas applications. During exposure to well-hole conditions, ingress of gases causes degradation of performance, including mechanical failure. We use computer simulations to investigate this problem at two different length and time-scales. First, we study the solubility of gases in the elastomer using a chemically-inspired description of HNBR based on the OPLS all-atom force-field. Starting with a model of NBR, C=C double bonds are saturated with either hydrogen or intramolecular cross-links, mimicking the hydrogenation of NBR to form HNBR. We validate against trends for the mass density and glass transition temperature for HNBR as a function of cross-link density, and for NBR as a function of the fraction of acrylonitrile in the copolymer. Second, we study mechanical behaviour using a coarse-grained model that overcomes some of the length and time-scale limitations of an all-atom approach. Nanoparticle fillers added to the elastomer matrix to enhance mechanical response are also included. Our initial focus is on understanding the mechanical properties at the elevated temperatures and pressures experienced in well-hole conditions.

  3. Analytical and experimental analysis of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabia, Sarah

    Many engineering applications ranging from robotic joints to shock and vibration mitigation can benefit by incorporating components with variable stiffness. In addition, variable stiffness structures can provide haptic feedback (the sense of touch) to the user. In this work, it is proposed to study Magnetorheological Elastomers (MRE), where iron particles within the elastomer compound develop a dipole interaction energy, to be used in a device for haptic feedback. A novel feature of this MRE device is to introduce a field-induced variable shear modulus bias via a permanent magnet and using a current input to the electromagnetic control coil to change the modulus of the elastomer in both directions (softer or harder). In this preliminary work, both computational and experimental results of the proposed MRE design are presented. The design is created in COMSOL to verify that the magnetic field is in the desired direction. MRE was fabricated and characterized using a Bose Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer for the shear modulus. Using this information, it is possible to know how the MRE will react in magnetic fields within the haptic feedback device. Additionally, a model for an MRE is developed in a multi-physics COMSOL program that is linked to a MATLAB function that predicts the shear modulus and incorporates it into the material properties to best simulate the MRE's ability to change shear modulus.

  4. Develop Roll-to-Roll Manufacturing Process of ZrO2 Nanocrystals/Acrylic Nanocomposites for High Refractive Index Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Pooran C.; Compton, Brett G.; Li, Jianlin; Jellison, Jr, Gerald Earle; Duty, Chad E; Chen, Zhiyun

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to develop and evaluate ZrO2/acrylic nanocomposite coatings for integrated optoelectronic applications. The formulations engineered to be compatible with roll-to-roll process were evaluated in terms of optical and dielectric properties. The uniform distribution of the ZrO2 nanocrystals in the polymer matrix resulted in highly tunable refractive index and dielectric response suitable for advanced photonic and electronic device applications.

  5. Theory Of Dewetting In A Filled Elastomer Under Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Steven T. J.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents theoretical study of dewetting between elastomeric binder and filler particles of highly filled elastomer under multiaxial tension and resulting dilatation of elastomer. Study directed toward understanding and predicting nonlinear stress-vs.-strain behavior of filled elastomeric rocket propellant, also applicable to rubber in highly loaded tire or in damping pad.

  6. Dip molding to form intricately-shaped medical elastomer devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyles, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Preshaped mandrel mounted on rotating mechanism is partically immersed in tank filled with liquid elastomer. While mandrel rotates, elastomer film forms om mandrel surface due to surface tension and capillary behavior of liquid. Devices with well-defined flanges can be made using process.

  7. Bioactive glass reinforced elastomer composites for skeletal regeneration: A review.

    PubMed

    Zeimaran, Ehsan; Pourshahrestani, Sara; Djordjevic, Ivan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Towler, Mark R

    2015-08-01

    Biodegradable elastomers have clinical applicability due to their biocompatibility, tunable degradation and elasticity. The addition of bioactive glasses to these elastomers can impart mechanical properties sufficient for hard tissue replacement. Hence, a composite with a biodegradable polymer matrix and a bioglass filler can offer a method of augmenting existing tissue. This article reviews the applications of such composites for skeletal augmentation.

  8. Polyimide adhesives - Modified with ATBN and silicone elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Ezzell, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    A series of studies evaluating the effects of added elastomers on the properties of a high-temperature addition polyimide adhesive is reviewed. First, thermoset polyimides containing various butadiene/acrylonitrile and silicone elastomers were synthesized either as physical polybends or by chemically reacting the elastomers directly onto the polymer backbone. The modified adhesive resins were characterized for thermomechanical properties, fracture toughness and adhesive strength. A second series of elastomer-containing polyimides was also prepared in order to study the effects of the elastomer chain length on polymer properties. Aromatic amine-terminated silicone rubbers with repeat units varying from n = 10 to 105 were reacted onto the polyimide backbone, and the resulting polymers were characterized for their adhesive properties.

  9. Long Term Aging of Elastomers: Chemorheology of Viton B Fluorocarbon Elastomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.; Silver, R. H.; Mazzeo, A. A.; Lui, S. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a study to ascertain the nature, extent, and the rate of chemical changes that take place in certain selected elastomers is reported. Under discussion is Viton B, regarded as a temperature and fuel resistant fluorocarbon rubber. The kinetic analysis of the chemical stress relaxation, and infrared and gel permeation chromatography analysis results are discussed.

  10. High thermal conductivity in soft elastomers with elongated liquid metal inclusions.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Michael D; Kazem, Navid; Powell-Palm, Matthew J; Huang, Xiaonan; Sun, Wenhuan; Malen, Jonathan A; Majidi, Carmel

    2017-02-28

    Soft dielectric materials typically exhibit poor heat transfer properties due to the dynamics of phonon transport, which constrain thermal conductivity (k) to decrease monotonically with decreasing elastic modulus (E). This thermal-mechanical trade-off is limiting for wearable computing, soft robotics, and other emerging applications that require materials with both high thermal conductivity and low mechanical stiffness. Here, we overcome this constraint with an electrically insulating composite that exhibits an unprecedented combination of metal-like thermal conductivity, an elastic compliance similar to soft biological tissue (Young's modulus < 100 kPa), and the capability to undergo extreme deformations (>600% strain). By incorporating liquid metal (LM) microdroplets into a soft elastomer, we achieve a ∼25× increase in thermal conductivity (4.7 ± 0.2 W⋅m(-1)⋅K(-1)) over the base polymer (0.20 ± 0.01 W⋅m(-1)·K(-1)) under stress-free conditions and a ∼50× increase (9.8 ± 0.8 W⋅m(-1)·K(-1)) when strained. This exceptional combination of thermal and mechanical properties is enabled by a unique thermal-mechanical coupling that exploits the deformability of the LM inclusions to create thermally conductive pathways in situ. Moreover, these materials offer possibilities for passive heat exchange in stretchable electronics and bioinspired robotics, which we demonstrate through the rapid heat dissipation of an elastomer-mounted extreme high-power LED lamp and a swimming soft robot.

  11. Spacecraft dielectric material properties and spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Wall, J. A.; Cotts, D. B.; Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    The physics of spacecraft charging is reviewed, and criteria for selecting and testing semiinsulating polymers (SIPs) to avoid charging are discussed and illustrated. Chapters are devoted to the required properties of dielectric materials, the charging process, discharge-pulse phenomena, design for minimum pulse size, design to prevent pulses, conduction in polymers, evaluation of SIPs that might prevent spacecraft charging, and the general response of dielectrics to space radiation. SIPs characterized include polyimides, fluorocarbons, thermoplastic polyesters, poly(alkanes), vinyl polymers and acrylates, polymers containing phthalocyanine, polyacene quinones, coordination polymers containing metal ions, conjugated-backbone polymers, and 'metallic' conducting polymers. Tables summarizing the results of SIP radiation tests (such as those performed for the NASA Galileo Project) are included.

  12. Bottlebrush and comb-like elastomers as ultra-soft electrical and acoustically active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, William; Vatankhah-Varnosfaderani, Mohammad; Pandya, Ashish; Burdynska, Joanna; Morgan, Benjamin; Everhart, Matthew; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Dobrynin, Andrey; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei; UNC MIRT Team

    Without swelling in a solvent, it is challenging to obtain materials with a modulus below 105 Pa, which is dictated by chain entanglements. We show that macromolecules can be disentangled by dense grafting of side chains to long polymer chains. The bottlebrush and comb-like architectures demonstrate a unique combination of flexibility and network dilution, leading to significant decrease of the entanglement modulus (Ge) and increase of extensibility. Following theoretical predictions, it has been shown that the Ge is controlled by the polymerization degrees of sidechains (nsc) and grafting spacer (ng) as Ge ~ (ng /nsc) 1 . 5 . Using the reduced entanglement density, we developed solvent-free elastomers with moduli on the order of 100 Pa and excellent extensibility. Using bottlebrush architectures we have developed PDMS dielectric actuators with high deformation at low electric field strength. Additionally strong acoustic adsorption leads to materials showing shape and volume control in light opaque environments. NSF (DMR 1409710, DMR 1122483, DMR 1407645, and DMR 1436201).

  13. Radiopurity measurement of acrylic for DEAP-3600

    SciTech Connect

    Nantais, C. M.; Boulay, M. G.; Cleveland, B. T.

    2013-08-08

    The spherical acrylic vessel that contains the liquid argon target is the most critical detector component in the DEAP-3600 dark matter experiment. Alpha decays near the inner surface of the acrylic vessel are one of the main sources of background in the detector. A fraction of the alpha energy, or the recoiling nucleus from the alpha decay, could misreconstruct in the fiducial volume and result in a false candidate dark matter event. Acrylic has low levels of inherent contamination from {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th. Another background of particular concern is diffusion of {sup 222}Rn during manufacturing, leading to {sup 210}Pb contamination. The maximum acceptable concentrations in the DEAP-3600 acrylic vessel are ppt levels of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th equivalent, and 10{sup −8} ppt {sup 210}Pb. The impurities in the bulk acrylic will be measured by vaporizing a large quantity of acrylic and counting the concentrated residue with ultra-low background HPGe detectors and a low background alpha spectrometer. An overview of the acrylic assay technique is presented.

  14. 21 CFR 177.1060 - n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. 177.1060... Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1060 n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic...) Identity. For the purpose of this section, n-alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers are copolymers obtained...

  15. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section... Coatings § 175.210 Acrylate ester copolymer coating. Acrylate ester copolymer coating may safely be used as... prepared food, subject to the provisions of this section: (a) The acrylate ester copolymer is a...

  16. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  17. Monolithic F-16 Uniform Thickness Stretched Acrylic Canopy Transparency Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Thermoforming Finite Strain Analysis Finite Element Modeling Mooney Formulation Tensile Testing Acrylic Material Properties F-16 Transparency Thinning Uniform...OF ACRYLIC TENSILE SPECIMEN ...... 8 MARC ANALYSIS OF ACRYLIC HEMISPHERE ............ 12 IV ACRYLIC MATERIAL PROPERTIES AT THERMOFORMING TEMPERATURES...properties (necessary for finite element stress analysis work) were generated at temperatures in the range of thermoforming . A finite element code

  18. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  19. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be...) Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins are produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis or...

  20. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  1. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  2. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1310 - Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. 177.1310 Section... Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1310 Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. The ethylene-acrylic acid... for use in contact with food subject to the provisions of this section. (a) The ethylene-acrylic...

  4. Elastomer Compound Developed for High Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D.; Feuer, H.; Flanagan, D.; Rodriguez, G.; Teets, A.; Touchet, P.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Army is currently spending 300 million dollars per year replacing rubber track pads. An experimental rubber compound has been developed which exhibits 2 to 3 times greater service life than standard production pad compounds. To improve the service life of the tank track pads various aspects of rubber chemistry were explored including polymer, curing and reinforcing systems. Compounds that exhibited superior physical properties based on laboratory data were then fabricated into tank pads and field tested. This paper will discuss the compounding studies, laboratory data and field testing that led to the high wear elastomer compound.

  5. Poly(meth)acrylate-based coatings.

    PubMed

    Nollenberger, Kathrin; Albers, Jessica

    2013-12-05

    Poly(meth)acrylate coatings for pharmaceutical applications were introduced in 1955 with the launch of EUDRAGIT(®) L and EUDRAGIT(®) S, two types of anionic polymers. Since then, by introducing various monomers into their polymer chains and thus altering their properties, diverse forms with specific characteristics have become available. Today, poly(meth)acrylates function in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract and/or release the drug in a time-controlled manner. This article reviews the properties of various poly(meth)acrylates and discusses formulation issues as well as application possibilities.

  6. Haptic interfaces using dielectric electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozsecen, Muzaffer Y.; Sivak, Mark; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2010-04-01

    Quality, amplitude and frequency of the interaction forces between a human and an actuator are essential traits for haptic applications. A variety of Electro-Active Polymer (EAP) based actuators can provide these characteristics simultaneously with quiet operation, low weight, high power density and fast response. This paper demonstrates a rolled Dielectric Elastomer Actuator (DEA) being used as a telepresence device in a heart beat measurement application. In the this testing, heart signals were acquired from a remote location using a wireless heart rate sensor, sent through a network and DEA was used to haptically reproduce the heart beats at the medical expert's location. A series of preliminary human subject tests were conducted that demonstrated that a) DE based haptic feeling can be used in heart beat measurement tests and b) through subjective testing the stiffness and actuator properties of the EAP can be tuned for a variety of applications.

  7. Tunable electromechanical actuation in silicone dielectric film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, Andrea; Di Donato, Marco; Chiappone, Annalisa; Giorgis, Fabrizio; Canavese, Giancarlo

    2014-10-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuator films were fabricated on transparent conductive electrode using bi-component poly(dimethyl)siloxane (PDMS). PDMS is a well-known material in microfluidics and soft lithography for biomedical applications, being easy to process, low cost, biocompatible and transparent. Moreover its mechanical properties can be easily tuned by varying the mixing ratio between the oligomer base and the crosslinking agent. In this work we investigate the chemical composition and the electromechanical properties of PDMS thin film verifying for the first time the tuneable actuation response by simply modifying the amount of the curing agent. We demonstrate that, for a 20:1 ratio of base:crosslinker mixture, a striking 150% enhancement of Maxwell strain occurs at 1 Hz actuating frequency.

  8. New radiopaque acrylic bone cement. II. Acrylic bone cement with bromine-containing monomer.

    PubMed

    Rusu, M C; Ichim, I C; Popa, M; Rusu, M

    2008-07-01

    Bromine-containing methacrylate, 2-(2-bromopropionyloxy) ethyl methacrylate (BPEM), had been used in the formulation of acrylic radiopaque cements. The effect of this monomer incorporated into the liquid phase of acrylic bone cement, on the curing parameters, thermal properties, water absorption, density, compression tests and radiopacity was studied. A decrease of maximum temperature and an increase of the setting time were observed with the addition of the bromine-containing monomer in the radiolucent cement composition. Adding BPEM in radiolucent acrylic bone cements composition results in the decrease of glass transition temperature and increase of its thermal stability. Acrylic bone cements modified with bromine-containing comonomer are characterized by polymerization shrinkage lower than the radiolucent cement. Addition of bromine-containing comonomer in radiolucent acrylic bone cement composition determines the increase of compressive strength. Acrylic bone cements modified with bromine-containing comonomer proved to be radiopaque.

  9. Dielectric metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Jason

    While plasmonics metasurfaces have seen much development over the past several years, they still face throughput limitations due to ohmic losses. On the other hand, dielectric resonators and associated metasurfaces can eliminate the issue of ohmic loss while still providing the freedom to engineer the optical properties of the composite. In this talk, I will present our recent efforts to harness this freedom using metasurfaces formed from silicon and fabricated using CMOS-compatible techniques. Operating in the telecommunications band, I will discuss how we have used this platform to realize a number of novel functionalities including wavefront control, near-perfect reflection, and high quality factor resonances. In many cases the optical performance of these silicon-based metasurfaces can surpass their plasmonic counterparts. Furthermore, for some cases the surfaces are more amenable to large-area fabrication techniques.

  10. Metal and elastomer seal tests for accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.M.; McIntyre, G.T.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Skelton, R.; Pate, D.J.; Gill, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The vacuum system of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has more than a thousand metal vacuum seals. Also, numerous elastomer seals are used throughout the AGS to seal large beam component chambers. An accelerator upgrade program is being implemented to reduce the AGS operating pressure by x100 and improve the reliability of the vacuum system. This paper describes work in progress on metal and elastomer vacuum seals to help meet those two objectives. Tests are reported on the sealing properties of a variety of metal seals used on different sealing surfaces. Results are also given on reversible sorption properties of certain elastomers. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Active vibration isolation platform on base of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Valery P.; Bazinenkov, Alexey M.

    2017-06-01

    The article describes the active vibration isolation platform on base of magnetorheological (MR) elastomers. An active damper based on the MR elastomers can be used as an actuator of micro- or nanopositioning for a vibroinsulated object. The MR elastomers give such advantages for active control of vibration as large range of displacements (up to 1 mm), more efficient absorption of the vibration energy, possibility of active control of amplitude-frequency characteristics and positioning with millisecond response speed and nanometer running accuracy. The article presents the results of experimental studies of the most important active damper parameters. Those are starting current, transient time for stepping, transmission coefficient of the vibration displacement amplitude.

  12. Enhanced friction of elastomer microfiber adhesives with spatulate tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seok; Aksak, Burak; Sitti, Metin

    2007-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gecko foot-hair inspired elastomer microfibers with spatulate tips have significant adhesion enhancement compared to the flat elastomer surface. In this study, we report the friction enhancement of these highly adhesive fibers and analyze the relation between adhesion and friction of elastomer microfiber arrays with spatulate tips. Fabricated polyurethane fiber arrays with spatulate tips demonstrate macroscale static friction pressures up to 41N/cm2 for a preload pressure of 1.5N/cm2 on a 6mm diameter smooth glass hemisphere.

  13. Controlled Adhesion of Silicone Elastomer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Michael

    2000-03-01

    Opportunities exist for controllably enhancing the adhesion of silicone surfaces, ranging from modest enhancement of release force levels of pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) release liners by incorporation of adhesion promoters known as high release additives (HRA), to permanent bonding of silicone elastomers using surface modification techniques such as plasma or corona treatment. Although only a part of the complex interaction of factors contributing to adhesion, surface properties such as wettability are a critical component in the understanding and control of release and adhesion phenomena. Surface characterization studies of low-surface-energy silicones before and after various adhesion modification strategies are reviewed. The silicones include polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fluorosiloxane elastomers and coatings. Techniques used include contact angle, the Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Topics addressed are: use of HRA in PDMS release liners, the interaction of PDMS PSAs with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and the effect of plasma treatment on PDMS and fluorosiloxane surfaces.

  14. Study of shear-stiffened elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Tongfei; Li, Weihua; Ding, Jie; Alici, Gursel; Du, Haiping

    2013-06-01

    Shear thickening fluids, which are usually concentrated colloidal suspensions composed of non-aggregating solid particles suspended in fluids, exhibit a marked increase in viscosity beyond a critical shear rate. This increased viscosity is seen as being both 'field-activated', due to the dependence on shearing rate, as well as reversible. Shear thickening fluids have found good applications as protection materials, such as in liquid body armor, vibration absorber or dampers. This research aims to expand the protection material family by developing a novel solid status shear thickening material, called shear-stiffened elastomers. These new shear-stiffened elastomers were fabricated with the mixture of silicone rubber and silicone oil. A total of four SSE samples were fabricated in this study. Their mechanical and rheological properties under both steady-state and dynamic loading conditions were tested with a parallel-plate. The effects of silicone oil composition and angular frequency were summarized. When raising the angular frequency in dynamic shear test, the storage modulus of conventional silicone rubber shows a small increasing trend with the frequency. However, if silicone oil is selected to be mixed with silicone rubber, the storage modulus increases dramatically when the frequency and strain are both beyond the critical values.

  15. Liquid crystal elastomer strips as soft crawlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSimone, Antonio; Gidoni, Paolo; Noselli, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we speculate on a possible application of Liquid Crystal Elastomers to the field of soft robotics. In particular, we study a concept for limbless locomotion that is amenable to miniaturisation. For this purpose, we formulate and solve the evolution equations for a strip of nematic elastomer, subject to directional frictional interactions with a flat solid substrate, and cyclically actuated by a spatially uniform, time-periodic stimulus (e.g., temperature change). The presence of frictional forces that are sensitive to the direction of sliding transforms reciprocal, 'breathing-like' deformations into directed forward motion. We derive formulas quantifying this motion in the case of distributed friction, by solving a differential inclusion for the displacement field. The simpler case of concentrated frictional interactions at the two ends of the strip is also solved, in order to provide a benchmark to compare the continuously distributed case with a finite-dimensional benchmark. We also provide explicit formulas for the axial force along the crawler body.

  16. Soft and Ultra-soft Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, William; Burdynska, Joanna; Kirby, Sam; Zhou, Yang; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei; UNC-MIRT Team

    2014-03-01

    Polymeric networks are attractive engineering materials utilized for various mechanically demanding applications. As such, much attention has been paid to reinforcement of polymer mechanical properties with little interest in how to make softer elastomers to address numerous biomedical applications including implants and cell differentiation. Without swelling in a solvent, it is challenging to obtain materials with a modulus below ca.105 Pa, which is dictated by chain entanglements. Here we present two methodologies for the creation of soft and ultra-soft dry elastomeric compounds. The first method utilizes polymer capsules as temperature responsive filler. Depending on volume fraction of microcapsules this method is capable of fine tuning modulus within an order of magnitude. The second technique uses the densely grafted molecular brush architecture to create solvent-free polymer melts and elastomers with plateau moduli in the range one hundred to ten hundred Pa. Such compounds may find uses in biomedical applications including reconstructive surgery and cell differentiation. National Science Foundation DMR-1122483.

  17. Chemical Stress Cracking of Acrylic Fibers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    nitrile groups (similar to the "prefatory reaction" in pyrolysis of acrylic fibers), followed immediately by N- chlorination and7 chain scission...cyclization of nitrile groups (similar to the "prefatory reaction" in pyrolysis of acrylic fibers), followed immediately by N- chlorination and chain scission...present experiments were conducted at the boil, slightly greater than 100 C. The decomposition products-- chlorine , chlorate, plus oxygen originating

  18. Surface modifications of photocrosslinked biodegradable elastomers and their influence on smooth muscle cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ilagan, Bernadette G; Amsden, Brian G

    2009-09-01

    Photocrosslinked, biodegradable elastomers based on aliphatic polyesters have many desirable features as scaffolds for smooth muscle tissue engineering. However, they lack cell adhesion motifs. To address this shortcoming, two different modification procedures were studied utilizing a high and a low crosslink density elastomer: base etching and the incorporation of acryloyl-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) into the elastomer network during photocrosslinking. Base etching improved surface hydrophilicity without altering surface topography, but did not improve bovine aortic smooth muscle cell adhesion. Incorporation of PEG-GRGDS into the elastomer network significantly improved cell adhesion for both high and low crosslink density elastomers, with a greater effect with the higher crosslink density elastomer. Incorporation of GRGDS into the high crosslink density elastomer also enhanced smooth muscle cell proliferation, while proliferation on the low crosslink density unmodified, base etched, and PEG-GRGDS incorporated elastomers was significantly greater than on the high crosslink density unmodified and base etched elastomer.

  19. Independent Control of Elastomer Properties through Stereocontrolled Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Craig A.; Yu, Jiayi; Barker, Ian A.; Truong, Vinh X.; Cao, Zhen; Dobrinyin, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In most synthetic elastomers, changing the physical properties by monomer choice also results in a change to the crystallinity of the material, which manifests through alteration of its mechanical performance. Using organocatalyzed stereospecific additions of thiols to activated alkynes, high‐molar‐mass elastomers were isolated via step‐growth polymerization. The resulting controllable double‐bond stereochemistry defines the crystallinity and the concomitant mechanical properties as well as enabling the synthesis of materials that retain their excellent mechanical properties through changing monomer composition. Using this approach to elastomer synthesis, further end group modification and toughening through vulcanization strategies are also possible. The organocatalytic control of stereochemistry opens the realm to a new and easily scalable class of elastomers that will have unique chemical handles for functionalization and post synthetic processing. PMID:27654023

  20. Adhesion between a polydisperse polymer brush and an elastomer

    SciTech Connect

    Aubouy, M.; Leger, L.; Marciano, Y.; Raphaeel, E.; Brown, H.R.

    1996-01-01

    The interface between a flat solid surface and a cross-linked elastomer can be considerably strengthened by the addition of chains (chemically identical to the elastomer) that are tethered by one end to the solid surface. At high grafting densities these coupling chains may, however, segregate from the elastomer and the adhesion may drop considerably. This important problem has been recently considered by de Gennes {ital et} {ital al}. in the case of a monodisperse {open_quote}brush{close_quote}. In this article we analyse the adhesion between a polydisperse brush and an elastomer, having in mind some very recent experiments by Marciano {ital et} {ital al}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Fabrication and characterisation of protein fibril-elastomer composites.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, Tomas; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Lacour, Stéphanie P; Welland, Mark E

    2010-04-01

    Protein fibrils are emerging as a novel class of functional bionanomaterials. In this paper we make use of their rigidity by combining lysozyme fibrils with a silicone elastomer and demonstrating that at a filling ratio of 10%, the protein fibril composite is at minimum 2 times stiffer than a CNT elastomeric composite of the same filling ratio. We also show that when the elastomer is patterned such that the lysozyme fibrils can be spatially modulated within the elastomer, anisotropic moduli varying by a factor of 2 is produced. By using shear mixing as the fabrication process, the modulus of a 2 wt.% insulin fibril composite is equivalent to a CNT composite with the same filling ratio. In conclusion, we have presented the fabrication and mechanical characterisation of a class of elastomer/protein fibril composite material.

  2. Strain analysis of a chiral smectic-A elastomer.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Christopher M; Konnert, John H; Adams, James M; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Naciri, Jawad; Ratna, Banahalli R

    2010-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the molecular packing of a strained liquid crystal elastomer composed of chiral mesogens in the smectic-A phase. X-ray diffraction patterns of the elastomer collected over a range of orientations with respect to the x-ray beam were used to reconstruct the three-dimensional scattering intensity as a function of tensile strain. We show that the smectic domain order is preserved in these strained elastomers. Changes in the intensity within a given scattering plane are due to reorientation, and not loss, of the molecular order in directions orthogonal to the applied strain. Incorporating the physical parameters of the elastomer, a nonlinear elastic model is presented to describe the rotation of the smectic-layered domains under strain, thus providing a fundamental analysis to the mechanical response of these unique materials.

  3. Elastomer-modified phosphorus-containing imide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Phosphine oxide-containing polyimide resins modified by elastomers, are disclosed which have improved mechanical properties. These products are particularly useful in the production of fiber or fabric-reinforced composites or laminates.

  4. 21 CFR 177.2400 - Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (channel process of furnace combustion process) (CAS Reg. No. 1333-86-4) Not to exceed 15 parts per 100..._locations.html. (2) Thermogravimetry. Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers have a major decomposition...

  5. 21 CFR 177.2400 - Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (channel process of furnace combustion process) (CAS Reg. No. 1333-86-4) Not to exceed 15 parts per 100..._locations.html. (2) Thermogravimetry. Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers have a major decomposition...

  6. 21 CFR 177.2400 - Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (channel process of furnace combustion process) (CAS Reg. No. 1333-86-4) Not to exceed 15 parts per 100..._locations.html. (2) Thermogravimetry. Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers have a major decomposition...

  7. 21 CFR 177.2400 - Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (channel process of furnace combustion process) (CAS Reg. No. 1333-86-4) Not to exceed 15 parts per 100..._locations.html. (2) Thermogravimetry. Perfluorocarbon cured elastomers have a major decomposition...

  8. Independent Control of Elastomer Properties through Stereocontrolled Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Craig A; Yu, Jiayi; Barker, Ian A; Truong, Vinh X; Cao, Zhen; Dobrinyin, Andrey V; Becker, Matthew L; Dove, Andrew P

    2016-10-10

    In most synthetic elastomers, changing the physical properties by monomer choice also results in a change to the crystallinity of the material, which manifests through alteration of its mechanical performance. Using organocatalyzed stereospecific additions of thiols to activated alkynes, high-molar-mass elastomers were isolated via step-growth polymerization. The resulting controllable double-bond stereochemistry defines the crystallinity and the concomitant mechanical properties as well as enabling the synthesis of materials that retain their excellent mechanical properties through changing monomer composition. Using this approach to elastomer synthesis, further end group modification and toughening through vulcanization strategies are also possible. The organocatalytic control of stereochemistry opens the realm to a new and easily scalable class of elastomers that will have unique chemical handles for functionalization and post synthetic processing.

  9. EFFECTS OF GAMMA IRRADIATION ON EPDM ELASTOMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.

    2011-09-22

    Two formulations of EPDM elastomer, one substituting a UV stabilizer for the normal antioxidant in this polymer, and the other the normal formulation, were synthesized and samples of each were exposed to gamma irradiation in initially pure deuterium gas to compare their radiation stability. Stainless steel containers having rupture disks were designed for this task. After 130 MRad dose of cobalt-60 radiation in the SRNL Gamma Irradiation Facility, a significant amount of gas was created by radiolysis; however the composition indicated by mass spectroscopy indicated an unexpected increase in the total amount deuterium in both formulations. The irradiated samples retained their ductility in a bend test. No change of sample weight, dimensions, or density was observed. No change of the glass transition temperature as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis was observed, and most of the other dynamic mechanical properties remained unchanged. There appeared to be an increase in the storage modulus of the irradiated samples containing the UV stabilizer above the glass transition, which may indicate hardening of the material by radiation damage. Polymeric materials become damaged by exposure over time to ionizing radiation. Despite the limited lifetime, polymers have unique engineering material properties and polymers continue to be used in tritium handling systems. In tritium handling systems, polymers are employed mainly in joining applications such as valve sealing surfaces (eg. Stem tips, valve packing, and O-rings). Because of the continued need to employ polymers in tritium systems, over the past several years, programs at the Savannah River National Laboratory have been studying the effect of tritium on various polymers of interest. In these studies, samples of materials of interest to the SRS Tritium Facilities (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon{reg_sign}), Vespel{reg_sign} polyimide, and the elastomer

  10. Toward Strong Thermoplastic Elastomers with Asymmetric Miktoarm Block Copolymer Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-05

    Road, Berkeley, California 94720, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Thermoplastic elastomers ( TPEs ) are designed by embedding discrete...glassy or semicrystalline domains in an elastomeric matrix. Typical styrenic-based amorphous TPEs are made of linear ABA-type triblock copolymers...are a dominant category in the family of commercial thermoplastic elastomers ( TPEs ). Typical examples are polystyrene−poly(butadiene)−polystyrene (SBS

  11. Nonlinear effects in deformation of filled elastomers with nanodimensional fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zezin, Yu. P.; Lomakin, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    Various nonlinear effects manifesting themselves in the deformation of filled elastomers are analyzed, and the advantages and restrictions in the use of several constitutive relations proposed to describe the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of the materials under study are discussed. We also note that further development of models of nonlinear deformation of filled elastomers under finite strains, which would permit describing their deformation properties more completely, is highly desirable.

  12. Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight Silphenylene/Siloxane Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundley, N. H.; Patterson, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    Elastomers enhance thermal and mechancial properties. Capable of performing in extreme thermal/oxidative environments and having molecular weights above 10 to the sixth power prepared and analyzed in laboratory experiments. Made of methylvinylsilphenylene-siloxane terpolymers, new materials amenable to conventional silicone-processing technology. Similarly formulated commercial methyl-vinyl silicones, vulcanized elastomers exhibit enhance thermal/oxidative stability and equivalent or superior mechanical properties.

  13. Electrical behavior of carbon whisker reinforced elastomer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chellappa, V.; Chiou, Z.W.; Jang, B.Z.

    1994-12-31

    The electrical and mechanical properties of carbon whisker reinforced thermoplastic elastomer composites were investigated. The reinforcement whisker was made by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) process and the polymer matrix was from a thermoplastic elastomer (TPE, a butadiene-styrene block co-polymer). The electrical resistivity ({rho}) of the CCVD carbon whisker-elastomer composites can be varied by uniaxial deformation (10{sup 1}-10{sup 8}{Omega}-cm) and by changing the temperature (10{sup 1}-10{sup 5}{Omega}-cm). The temperature-resistivity studies indicate, that the resistivity of these composites depend on the physical property of the elastomer. The {rho} vs 1/T curves exhibit two distinct slopes intersected at the T{sub g} of the elastomer (-50{degrees}C). Further uniaxial deformation studies at room temperature (20{degrees}C) demonstrated that the resistivity increased exponentially with the deformation. The dependence of resistivity (or conductivity) of the composites with respect to deformation and temperature was explained on the basis of electron tunnelling induced conduction. CCVD carbon whiskers can be used as a reinforcement (filler) for the elastomer and can also make them electrically conductive.

  14. A nanostructured carbon-reinforced polyisobutylene-based thermoplastic elastomer.

    PubMed

    Puskas, Judit E; Foreman-Orlowski, Elizabeth A; Lim, Goy Teck; Porosky, Sara E; Evancho-Chapman, Michelle M; Schmidt, Steven P; El Fray, Mirosława; Piatek, Marta; Prowans, Piotr; Lovejoy, Krystal

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of a polyisobutylene (PIB)-based nanostructured carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer. This thermoplastic elastomer is based on a self-assembling block copolymer having a branched PIB core carrying -OH functional groups at each branch point, flanked by blocks of poly(isobutylene-co-para-methylstyrene). The block copolymer has thermolabile physical crosslinks and can be processed as a plastic, yet retains its rubbery properties at room temperature. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had more than twice the tensile strength of the neat polymer, exceeding the strength of medical grade silicone rubber, while remaining significantly softer. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer displayed a high T(g) of 126 degrees C, rendering the material steam-sterilizable. The carbon also acted as a free radical trap, increasing the onset temperature of thermal decomposition in the neat polymer from 256.6 degrees C to 327.7 degrees C. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had the lowest water contact angle at 82 degrees and surface nano-topography. After 180 days of implantation into rabbit soft tissues, the carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had the thinnest tissue capsule around the microdumbbell specimens, with no eosinophiles present. The material also showed excellent integration into bones.

  15. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-08-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer`s response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping.

  16. Treatment to Control Adhesion of Silicone-Based Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Seals are used to facilitate the joining of two items, usually temporarily. At some point in the future, it is expected that the items will need to be separated. This innovation enables control of the adhesive properties of silicone-based elastomers. The innovation may also be effective on elastomers other than the silicone-based ones. A technique has been discovered that decreases the level of adhesion of silicone- based elastomers to negligible levels. The new technique causes less damage to the material compared to alternative adhesion mitigation techniques. Silicone-based elastomers are the only class of rubber-like materials that currently meet NASA s needs for various seal applications. However, silicone-based elastomers have natural inherent adhesive properties. This stickiness can be helpful, but it can frequently cause problems as well, such as when trying to get items apart. In the past, seal adhesion was not always adequately addressed, and has caused in-flight failures where seals were actually pulled from their grooves, preventing subsequent spacecraft docking until the seal was physically removed from the flange via an extravehicular activity (EVA). The primary method used in the past to lower elastomer seal adhesion has been the application of some type of lubricant or grease to the surface of the seal. A newer method uses ultraviolet (UV) radiation a mixture of UV wavelengths in the range of near ultraviolet (NUV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelengths.

  17. Electrically activated artificial muscles made with liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2000-06-01

    Composites of monodomain nematic liquid crystal elastomers and a conducting material distributed within their network are shown to exhibit large deformations, i.e. contraction, expansion, bending with strains of over 200% and appreciable force, by Joule heating through electrical activation. The electrical activation of the conducting material induces a rapid Joule heating in the sample leading to a nematic to isotropic phase transition where the elastomer of dimensions 32 mm x 7 mm x 0.4 mm contracted in less than a second. The cooling process, isotropic to nematic transition where the elastomer expands back to its original length, was slow and took 8 seconds. The material studied here is a highly novel liquid crystalline co-elastomer, invented and developed by Heino Finkelmann and co-workers at Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet in Freiburg, Germany. The material is such that in which the mesogenic units are in both the side chains and the main chains of the elastomer. This co-elastomer was then mechanically loaded to induce a uniaxial network anisotropy before the cross-linking reaction was completed. These samples were then made into a composite with a conducting material such as dispersed silver particles or graphite fibers. The final samples was capable of undergoing more than 200% reversible strain in a few seconds.

  18. Highly stretchable nanoalginate based polyurethane elastomers.

    PubMed

    Daemi, Hamed; Barikani, Mehdi; Barmar, Mohammad

    2013-06-20

    Highly stretchable elastomeric samples based on cationic polyurethane dispersions-sodium alginate nanoparticles (CPUD/SA) were prepared by the solution blending of sodium alginate and aqueous polyurethane dispersions. CPUDs were synthesized by step growth polymerization technique using N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) as a source of cationic emulsifier. The chemical structure and thermal-mechanical properties of these systems were characterized using FTIR and DMTA, respectively. The presence of nanoalginate particles including nanobead and nanorod particles were proved by SEM and EDX. It was observed that thermal properties of composites increased with increasing SA content. All prepared samples were known as thermoplastic-elastomers with high percentages of elongation. Excellent compatibility of prepared nanocomposites was proved by the DMTA data.

  19. Elastomer degradation sensor using a piezoelectric material

    DOEpatents

    Olness, Dolores U.; Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B.

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring the degradation of elastomeric materials is provided. Piezoelectric oscillators are placed in contact with the elastomeric material so that a forced harmonic oscillator with damping is formed. The piezoelectric material is connected to an oscillator circuit,. A parameter such as the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q value of the oscillating system is related to the elasticity of the elastomeric material. Degradation of the elastomeric material causes changes in its elasticity which, in turn, causes the resonant frequency, amplitude or Q of the oscillator to change. These changes are monitored with a peak height monitor, frequency counter, Q-meter, spectrum analyzer, or other measurement circuit. Elasticity of elastomers can be monitored in situ, using miniaturized sensors.

  20. EB radiation crosslinking of elastomers [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, J.; Głuszewski, W.; Rzymski, W. M.; Zagórski, Z. P.

    2003-06-01

    Radiation-induced crosslinking is proposed as successful alternative to conventional, chemical methods of crosslinking of elastomers. Hydrogenated acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber was irradiated with 10 MeV electron beam to doses up to 300 kGy. Irradiated samples were investigated for the extent of crosslinking and for properties important for understanding of mechanisms. It follows from sol-gel analysis, that for 100 crosslinking acts there are 6-9 acts of chain scission. It is less than expected from the 20% participation of multi-ionization spurs, also in the solid state, as announced during the previous 9th Tihany Conference (Radiat. Phys. Chem. 56 (1999) 559). However, the apparent too low yield of multi-ionization spurs could be explained by partial conversion of scission products into crosslinks of specific trifunctional Y type. Our investigations confirm the usefulness of consideration of different radiation spurs in polymers, as well as in all, low LET irradiated media.

  1. Hysteretic behavior of soft magnetic elastomer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautz, Maria; Werner, David; Schrödner, Mario; Funk, Alexander; Jantz, Alexander; Popp, Jana; Eckert, Jürgen; Waske, Anja

    2017-03-01

    Composites of polymer and micron-sized particles of carbonyl-iron were investigated in terms of their magnetization behavior. Thermoplastic elastomers with varying Young's modulus (EPolymer=0.14-14.6 MPa) were used as matrix material. Field dependent magnetization curves reveal that the hysteretic behavior of the composites strongly depends on both the particle fraction (7, 10, 14, 21, 31 vol%) and on the mechanical properties of the polymer. It is shown that hysteresis only appears above a certain fraction of magnetic particles which can be accounted to the magnetic exchange between the particles. However, hysteresis is suppressed in the composite with largest Young's modulus of the polymer matrix, even at largest particle fraction.

  2. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1992-07-01

    Information contained in this reporters designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. Swell measurements have been made on approximately 50% of the proposed elastomers (94 total)in both the lubricant (7 total) and refrigerant (10 total) materials. Swell behavior in the these fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  3. A Recipe for Soft Fluidic Elastomer Robots

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Andrew D.; Katzschmann, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This work provides approaches to designing and fabricating soft fluidic elastomer robots. That is, three viable actuator morphologies composed entirely from soft silicone rubber are explored, and these morphologies are differentiated by their internal channel structure, namely, ribbed, cylindrical, and pleated. Additionally, three distinct casting-based fabrication processes are explored: lamination-based casting, retractable-pin-based casting, and lost-wax-based casting. Furthermore, two ways of fabricating a multiple DOF robot are explored: casting the complete robot as a whole and casting single degree of freedom (DOF) segments with subsequent concatenation. We experimentally validate each soft actuator morphology and fabrication process by creating multiple physical soft robot prototypes. PMID:27625913

  4. Thermal response of cholesteric liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Hama; Urayama, Kenji

    2015-08-01

    The effects of temperature variation on photonic properties of cholesteric liquid crystal elastomers (CLCEs) are investigated in mechanically unconstrained and constrained geometries. In the unconstrained geometry, cooling in the cholesteric state induces both a considerable shift of the selective reflection band to shorter wavelengths and a finite degree of macroscopic expansion in the two directions normal to the axis of the helical director configuration. The thermal deformation is driven by a change in orientational order of the underlying nematic structure S and the relation between the macroscopic strain and S is explained on the basis of the anisotropic Gaussian chain network model. The helical pitch varies with the film thickness in an affine manner under temperature variation. The CLCEs under the constrained geometry where thermal deformation is strictly prohibited show no shift of the reflection bands when subjected to temperature variation. This also reveals the strong correlation between the macroscopic dimensions and the pitch of the helical director configuration.

  5. Actuating materials. Voxelated liquid crystal elastomers.

    PubMed

    Ware, Taylor H; McConney, Michael E; Wie, Jeong Jae; Tondiglia, Vincent P; White, Timothy J

    2015-02-27

    Dynamic control of shape can bring multifunctionality to devices. Soft materials capable of programmable shape change require localized control of the magnitude and directionality of a mechanical response. We report the preparation of soft, ordered materials referred to as liquid crystal elastomers. The direction of molecular order, known as the director, is written within local volume elements (voxels) as small as 0.0005 cubic millimeters. Locally, the director controls the inherent mechanical response (55% strain) within the material. In monoliths with spatially patterned director, thermal or chemical stimuli transform flat sheets into three-dimensional objects through controlled bending and stretching. The programmable mechanical response of these materials could yield monolithic multifunctional devices or serve as reconfigurable substrates for flexible devices in aerospace, medicine, or consumer goods.

  6. Actuators Based on Liquid Crystalline Elastomer Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongrui; Li, Chensha; Huang, Xuezhen

    2013-01-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) exhibit a number of remarkable physical effects, including the unique, high-stroke reversible mechanical actuation when triggered by external stimuli. This article reviews some recent exciting developments in the field of LCEs materials with an emphasis on their utilization in actuator applications. Such applications include artificial muscles, industrial manufacturing, health and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). With suitable synthetic and preparation pathways and well-controlled actuation stimuli, such as heat, light, electric and magnetic field, excellent physical properties of LCE materials can be realized. By comparing the actuating properties of different systems, general relationships between the structure and the property of LCEs are discussed. How these materials can be turned into usable devices using interdisciplinary techniques is also described. PMID:23648966

  7. Minimal model for polydomain nematic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fangfu; Lu, Bing; Xing, Xiangjun; Goldbart, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Nematic elastomers are materials that possess both the elastic properties of cross-linked rubber and the orientational properties of nematic liquid crystals. When cross-linked in the isotropic phase, and subsequently cooled into the nematic regime, these materials usually form polydomain structures. To understand the formation of these polydomain structures, we develop a microscopic model based on an elastic network medium formed by the random end-linking, via springs, of rigid dimers. We assume that the dimers interact with one another through a Maier-Saupe term, and that the springs impose soft constraints, not only on the separations between the dimers that they link but also on the relative orientations of these dimers. We then use vulcanization theory to investigate: (i) how these orientational constraints lead to the emergence of polydomain structures, as the temperature is decreased; and (ii) the dependence of the characteristic size of the domains on temperature and link density.

  8. Radiation induced graft copolymerization of n-butyl acrylate onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films and thermal properties of the obtained graft copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Xiang; Wang, Mozhen; Ge, Xuewu

    2011-05-01

    n-Butyl acrylate (BA) was successfully grafted onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film using simultaneous radiation induced graft copolymerization with gamma rays. When BA concentration ranges from 20% to 30%, the Degree of Grafting (DG), measured by gravimetry and 1H NMR, increases with the monomer concentration and absorbed dose, but decreases with dose rate from 0.83 to 2.53 kGy/h. The maximum DG can reach up to 22.1%. The thermal transition temperatures such as glass-transition temperature ( Tg) and cold-crystallization temperature ( Tcc) of PET in grafted films were little different from those in original PET film, indicating that microphase separation occurred between PBA side chains and PET backbone. This work implied that if PET/elastomers (e.g., acrylate rubber) blends are radiated by high energy gamma rays under a certain condition, PET-g-polyacrylate copolymer may be produced in-situ, which will improve the compatibility between PET and the elastomers so as to improve the integral mechanical properties of PET based engineering plastic.

  9. Properties of the acrylic acid polymers obtained by atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topala, Ionut; Dumitrascu, Nicoleta; Popa, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    Plasma polymers of acrylic acid were obtained using an atmospheric pressure discharge system. The plasma polymerization reactor uses a dielectric barrier discharge, with the polyethylene terephthalate dielectric acting as substrate for deposition. The plasma was characterized by specific electrical measurements, monitoring the applied voltage and the discharge current. Based on the spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy, we analyzed the distribution of the excited species in the discharge gap, specific plasma temperatures (vibrational and gas temperatures) being calculated with the Boltzmann plot method. The properties of the plasma polymer films were investigated by contact angle measurements, infrared and UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy. The films produced by plasma polymerization at atmospheric pressure showed a hydrophilic character, in correlation with the strong absorbance of OH groups in the FTIR spectrum. Moreover, the surface of the plasma polymers at micrometric scale is smooth and free of defects without particular features.

  10. 75 FR 39664 - Grant of Authority For Subzone Status Materials Science Technology, Inc. (Specialty Elastomers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    .... (Specialty Elastomers and Fire Retardant Chemicals) Conroe, Texas Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign... manufacturing and distribution of specialty elastomers and fire retardant chemicals at the facility of...

  11. Skin-inspired hydrogel-elastomer hybrids with robust interfaces and functional microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuk, Hyunwoo; Zhang, Teng; Parada, German Alberto; Liu, Xinyue; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by mammalian skins, soft hybrids integrating the merits of elastomers and hydrogels have potential applications in diverse areas including stretchable and bio-integrated electronics, microfluidics, tissue engineering, soft robotics and biomedical devices. However, existing hydrogel-elastomer hybrids have limitations such as weak interfacial bonding, low robustness and difficulties in patterning microstructures. Here, we report a simple yet versatile method to assemble hydrogels and elastomers into hybrids with extremely robust interfaces (interfacial toughness over 1,000 Jm-2) and functional microstructures such as microfluidic channels and electrical circuits. The proposed method is generally applicable to various types of tough hydrogels and diverse commonly used elastomers including polydimethylsiloxane Sylgard 184, polyurethane, latex, VHB and Ecoflex. We further demonstrate applications enabled by the robust and microstructured hydrogel-elastomer hybrids including anti-dehydration hydrogel-elastomer hybrids, stretchable and reactive hydrogel-elastomer microfluidics, and stretchable hydrogel circuit boards patterned on elastomer.

  12. Skin-inspired hydrogel-elastomer hybrids with robust interfaces and functional microstructures.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Hyunwoo; Zhang, Teng; Parada, German Alberto; Liu, Xinyue; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2016-06-27

    Inspired by mammalian skins, soft hybrids integrating the merits of elastomers and hydrogels have potential applications in diverse areas including stretchable and bio-integrated electronics, microfluidics, tissue engineering, soft robotics and biomedical devices. However, existing hydrogel-elastomer hybrids have limitations such as weak interfacial bonding, low robustness and difficulties in patterning microstructures. Here, we report a simple yet versatile method to assemble hydrogels and elastomers into hybrids with extremely robust interfaces (interfacial toughness over 1,000 Jm(-2)) and functional microstructures such as microfluidic channels and electrical circuits. The proposed method is generally applicable to various types of tough hydrogels and diverse commonly used elastomers including polydimethylsiloxane Sylgard 184, polyurethane, latex, VHB and Ecoflex. We further demonstrate applications enabled by the robust and microstructured hydrogel-elastomer hybrids including anti-dehydration hydrogel-elastomer hybrids, stretchable and reactive hydrogel-elastomer microfluidics, and stretchable hydrogel circuit boards patterned on elastomer.

  13. Skin-inspired hydrogel–elastomer hybrids with robust interfaces and functional microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Yuk, Hyunwoo; Zhang, Teng; Parada, German Alberto; Liu, Xinyue; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by mammalian skins, soft hybrids integrating the merits of elastomers and hydrogels have potential applications in diverse areas including stretchable and bio-integrated electronics, microfluidics, tissue engineering, soft robotics and biomedical devices. However, existing hydrogel–elastomer hybrids have limitations such as weak interfacial bonding, low robustness and difficulties in patterning microstructures. Here, we report a simple yet versatile method to assemble hydrogels and elastomers into hybrids with extremely robust interfaces (interfacial toughness over 1,000 Jm−2) and functional microstructures such as microfluidic channels and electrical circuits. The proposed method is generally applicable to various types of tough hydrogels and diverse commonly used elastomers including polydimethylsiloxane Sylgard 184, polyurethane, latex, VHB and Ecoflex. We further demonstrate applications enabled by the robust and microstructured hydrogel–elastomer hybrids including anti-dehydration hydrogel–elastomer hybrids, stretchable and reactive hydrogel–elastomer microfluidics, and stretchable hydrogel circuit boards patterned on elastomer. PMID:27345380

  14. Elastomer Filled With Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Files, Bradley S.; Forest, Craig R.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that composites of a silicone elastomer with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are significantly stronger and stiffer than is the unfilled elastomer. The large strengthening and stiffening effect observed in these experiments stands in contrast to the much smaller strengthening effect observed in related prior efforts to reinforce epoxies with SWNTs and to reinforce a variety of polymers with multiple-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The relative largeness of the effect in the case of the silicone-elastomer/SWNT composites appears to be attributable to (1) a better match between the ductility of the fibers and the elasticity of the matrix and (2) the greater tensile strengths of SWNTs, relative to MWNTs. For the experiments, several composites were formulated by mixing various proportions of SWNTs and other filling materials into uncured RTV-560, which is a silicone adhesive commonly used in aerospace applications. Specimens of a standard "dog-bone" size and shape for tensile testing were made by casting the uncured elastomer/filler mixtures into molds, curing the elastomer, then pressing the specimens from a "cookie-cutter" die. The results of tensile tests of the specimens showed that small percentages of SWNT filler led to large increases in stiffness and tensile strength, and that these increases were greater than those afforded by other fillers. For example, the incorporation of SWNTs in a proportion of 1 percent increased the tensile strength by 44 percent and the modulus of elasticity (see figure) by 75 percent. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases decreased with increasing nanotube percentages because more nanotubes made the elastomer/nanotube composites more brittle. At an SWNT content of 10 percent, the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity were 125 percent and 562 percent, respectively, greater than the corresponding values for the unfilled elastomer.

  15. 21 CFR 177.1060 - n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. 177.1060... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1060 n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers identified in this section may be safely used as...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1060 - n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. 177.1060... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1060 n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers identified in this section may be safely used as...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1060 - n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. 177.1060... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1060 n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers identified in this section may be safely used as...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5325 - Nickel acrylate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nickel acrylate complex. 721.5325... Substances § 721.5325 Nickel acrylate complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nickel acrylate complex (PMN P-85-1034) is subject to reporting...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5325 - Nickel acrylate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nickel acrylate complex. 721.5325... Substances § 721.5325 Nickel acrylate complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nickel acrylate complex (PMN P-85-1034) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5325 - Nickel acrylate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel acrylate complex. 721.5325... Substances § 721.5325 Nickel acrylate complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nickel acrylate complex (PMN P-85-1034) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5325 - Nickel acrylate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nickel acrylate complex. 721.5325... Substances § 721.5325 Nickel acrylate complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nickel acrylate complex (PMN P-85-1034) is subject to reporting...

  2. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section... COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.210 Acrylate ester copolymer coating. Acrylate ester copolymer coating may safely be used as a food-contact surface of articles intended for...

  3. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section... COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.210 Acrylate ester copolymer coating. Acrylate ester copolymer coating may safely be used as a food-contact surface of articles intended for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  7. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section... COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.210 Acrylate ester copolymer coating. Acrylate ester copolymer coating may safely be used as a food-contact surface of articles intended for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section... COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.210 Acrylate ester copolymer coating. Acrylate ester copolymer coating may safely be used as a food-contact surface of articles intended for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10477 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10477... Substances § 721.10477 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-04-290) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10477 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10477... Substances § 721.10477 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-04-290) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10537 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10537... Substances § 721.10537 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-01-579) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10537 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10537... Substances § 721.10537 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-01-579) is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylate-acrylamide resins. 173.5 Section 173.5... CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.5 Acrylate-acrylamide resins. Acrylate-acrylamide resins may be safely used in food under the following prescribed conditions: (a)...

  1. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylate-acrylamide resins. 173.5 Section 173.5... CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.5 Acrylate-acrylamide resins. Acrylate-acrylamide resins may be safely used in food under the following prescribed conditions: (a)...

  2. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  3. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  4. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  5. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  6. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  7. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  8. 40 CFR 721.484 - Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.484 Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... fluorinated acrylic copolymer (PMN P-95-1208) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  9. 40 CFR 721.484 - Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.484 Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... fluorinated acrylic copolymer (PMN P-95-1208) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  10. 21 CFR 177.1060 - n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. 177.1060... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1060 n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers identified in this section may be safely used as...

  11. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. 177.1320... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1320 Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers may be safely used to produce packaging materials,...

  12. 21 CFR 177.1310 - Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. 177.1310 Section... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1310 Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. The ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. 177.1320... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1320 Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers may be safely used to produce packaging materials,...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. 177.1320... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1320 Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers may be safely used to produce packaging materials,...

  15. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1310 - Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. 177.1310 Section... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1310 Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. The ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1310 - Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. 177.1310 Section... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1310 Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. The ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1310 - Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. 177.1310 Section... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1310 Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. The ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be...

  19. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  20. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  1. High thermal conductivity in soft elastomers with elongated liquid metal inclusions

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Michael D.; Powell-Palm, Matthew J.; Huang, Xiaonan; Sun, Wenhuan; Malen, Jonathan A.; Majidi, Carmel

    2017-01-01

    Soft dielectric materials typically exhibit poor heat transfer properties due to the dynamics of phonon transport, which constrain thermal conductivity (k) to decrease monotonically with decreasing elastic modulus (E). This thermal−mechanical trade-off is limiting for wearable computing, soft robotics, and other emerging applications that require materials with both high thermal conductivity and low mechanical stiffness. Here, we overcome this constraint with an electrically insulating composite that exhibits an unprecedented combination of metal-like thermal conductivity, an elastic compliance similar to soft biological tissue (Young’s modulus < 100 kPa), and the capability to undergo extreme deformations (>600% strain). By incorporating liquid metal (LM) microdroplets into a soft elastomer, we achieve a ∼25× increase in thermal conductivity (4.7 ± 0.2 W⋅m−1⋅K−1) over the base polymer (0.20 ± 0.01 W⋅m−1·K−1) under stress-free conditions and a ∼50× increase (9.8 ± 0.8 W⋅m−1·K−1) when strained. This exceptional combination of thermal and mechanical properties is enabled by a unique thermal−mechanical coupling that exploits the deformability of the LM inclusions to create thermally conductive pathways in situ. Moreover, these materials offer possibilities for passive heat exchange in stretchable electronics and bioinspired robotics, which we demonstrate through the rapid heat dissipation of an elastomer-mounted extreme high-power LED lamp and a swimming soft robot. PMID:28193902

  2. Thermal Degradation Studies of Polyurethane/POSS Nanohybrid Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J P; Pielichowski, K; TremblotDeLaCroix, P; Janowski, B; Todd, D; Liggat, J J

    2010-03-05

    Reported here is the synthesis of a series of Polyurethane/POSS nanohybrid elastomers, the characterization of their thermal stability and degradation behavior at elevated temperatures using a combination of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Thermal Volatilization Analysis (TVA). A series of PU elastomers systems have been formulated incorporating varying levels of 1,2-propanediol-heptaisobutyl-POSS (PHIPOSS) as a chain extender unit, replacing butane diol. The bulk thermal stability of the nanohybrid systems has been characterized using TGA. Results indicate that covalent incorporation of POSS into the PU elastomer network increase the non-oxidative thermal stability of the systems. TVA analysis of the thermal degradation of the POSS/PU hybrid elastomers have demonstrated that the hybrid systems are indeed more thermally stable when compared to the unmodified PU matrix; evolving significantly reduced levels of volatile degradation products and exhibiting a {approx}30 C increase in onset degradation temperature. Furthermore, characterization of the distribution of degradation products from both unmodified and hybrid systems indicate that the inclusion of POSS in the PU network is directly influencing the degradation pathways of both the soft and hard block components of the elastomers: The POSS/PU hybrid systems show reduced levels of CO, CO2, water and increased levels of THF as products of thermal degradation.

  3. Synergistic effects in the processes of crosslinking of elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głuszewski, Wojciech; Zagórski, Zbigniew P.; Rajkiewicz, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Radiation crosslinking of elastomers is an example of the modification of polymers by ionizing radiation. In practice, often parallel both traditional crosslinking (with peroxide) and radiation treatment is applied (Bik et al., 2003, 2004). Elastomers can be irradiated both before and/or after vulcanization products. The aim of this study was to investigate the system of the mixed radiation/peroxide and peroxide/radiation crosslinking of selected elastomers (Engage 8200, HNBR). In particular, attention was directed to the influence of the protective effects of aromatic additives in elastomers (peroxides, thermal- and light stabilizers) on the phenomenon of crosslinking and postradiation oxidation. Aromatic peroxides may undergo modifications during the preirradiation, which affect the subsequent processes of vulcanization. In this way the method of gas chromatography (GC) was applied for determination of hydrogen and oxidation effects, never described before for Engage 8200. Using that approach, radiation efficiency of hydrogen evolution and oxygen absorption efficiency of the polymers has been identified. To describe the phenomena of postradiation oxidation of elastomers, the method of Diffuse Reflection Spectrophotometry (DRS) was also applied.

  4. Elastomer mounted rotors - An alternative for smoother running turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tecza, J. A.; Jones, S. W.; Smalley, A. J.; Cunningham, R. E.; Darlow, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the design of elastomeric bearing supports for a rotor built to simulate the power turbine of an advanced gas turbine engine which traverses two bending critical speeds. The elastomer dampers were constructed so as to minimize rotor dynamic response at the critical speeds. Results are presented of unbalance response tests performed with two different elastomer materials. These results showed that the resonances on the elastomer-mounted rotor were well damped for both elastomer materials and showed linear response to the unbalance weights used for response testing. Additional tests were performed using solid steel supports at either end (hand-mounted), which resulted in drastically increased sensitivity and nonlinear response, and with steel supports in one end of the rotor and the elastomer at the other, which yielded results which were between the soft- and hard-mounted cases. It is concluded that elastomeric supports are a viable alternative to other methods of mounting flexible rotors, that damping was well in excess of predictions and that elastomeric supports are tolerant of small rotor misalignments.

  5. Stainless steel mesh-acrylic cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Tysvaer, A T; Hovind, K H

    1977-03-01

    Twenty-four steel mesh-acrylic plates have been used for repair of skull defects in 1970-73. Three plates had to be removed due to complications, two due to infection and one due to an allergic reaction. The plate is easy to mould, strong, and light. The cosmetic results are excellent.

  6. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2805 Acrylate ester. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34637, June 18, 2014. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an...

  7. Acrylic Tanks for Stunning Chemical Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirholm, Alexander; Ellervik, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    We describe the use of acrylic tanks (400 x 450 x 27 mm) for visualization of chemical demonstrations in aqueous solutions. Examples of well-suited demonstrations are oscillating reactions, pH indicators, photochemical reduction of Lauth's violet, and chemoluminiscent reactions. (Contains 1 figure.)

  8. Mesoscopic magnetomechanical hysteresis in a magnetorheological elastomer.

    PubMed

    Biller, A M; Stolbov, O V; Raikher, Yu L

    2015-08-01

    Field-induced magnetostatic interaction in a pair of identical particles made of a magnetically soft ferromagnet is studied. It is shown that due to saturation of the ferromagnet magnetization, this case differs significantly from the (super)paramagnetic one. A numerical solution is given, discussed, and compared with that provided by a simpler model (nonlinear mutual dipoles). We show that for multidomain ferromagnetic particles embedded in an elastomer matrix, as for paramagnetic ones in the same environment, pair clusters may form or break by a hysteresis scenario. However, the magnetization saturation brings in important features to this effect. First, the bistability state and the hysteresis take place only in a limited region of the material parameters of the system. Second, along with the hysteresis jumps occurring under the sole influence of the field, the "latent" hysteresis is possible which realizes only if the action of the field is combined with some additional (nonmagnetic) external factor. The obtained conditions, when used to assess the possibility of clustering in real magnetorheological polymers, infer an important role of mesoscopic magnetomechanical hysteresis for the macroscopic properties of these composites.

  9. Theory and simulation of chemically reacting elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottach, Dana R.

    The field of rubber elasticity has advanced significantly in the past several decades. New models of rubber elasticity have been proposed and adjusted to better match the behavior of elastomeric networks. The manner in which these properties change with age has, however, been relatively neglected. Theories developed for classical models of rubber elasticity have been largely forgotten. This work aims to incorporate an especially elegant treatment of the aging of rubbers brought forth for early classical models into modern theories of the behavior of rubbery polymeric networks. Tobolsky's independent network hypothesis was developed during the early days of polymer physics to describe the aging of elastomers. It was shown rigorous for the classical descriptions of rubber elasticity, the affine and phantom models but has been neglected by more modern, more accurate models of rubber. This research has three main aspects. First, to corroborate the independent network hypothesis using simulations. Second, to incorporate the independent network concept into modern theories of rubber elasticity. Finally, to apply the effective crosslink density concept, developed for the classical models to account for crosslink decay, to the modern theories considered previously. Constituitive models incorporating the independent network hypothesis and the stress transfer effect is made possible by this research.

  10. Nematic Elastomers and the Red Blood Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Alex J.; Lubensky, T. C.; Dalhaimer, Paul; Discher, Dennis

    2001-03-01

    Nematic elastomers(H. Finkelmann et al./), Makromol. Chem. Rapid Commun, 5, 287 (1984) (M. Warner and E.M. Terentjev, Prog. Polym. Sci. 21), 853 (1996)., which are composed of cross--linked nematic polymers, have novel thermodynamic(M. Hébert et al./) J. Phys. I France 7, 909 (1997) and mechanical properties due to the coupling of the nematic order parameter to the strain field of the underlying, elastic material. Such properties may play a role in the formation and function of various biopolymer systems, particularly cytoskeletal networks consisting of stiff elements mixed together with softer elements. One biological example is the quasi--two--dimensional, spectrin--actin skeleton of the RBC, in which stiff actin filaments are localized at nodes of a soft spectrin network. In this talk we report the derivation of the coupled equations of motion of the strain and nematic order parameter variables and discuss the mode structure of the system in both the isotropic and nematic phases. We will also discuss preliminary results from numerical simulations of a model spectrin--actin network as it undergoes a transition under an applied lateral pressure.

  11. Biocompatible, hyaluronic acid modified silicone elastomers.

    PubMed

    Alauzun, Johan G; Young, Stuart; D'Souza, Renita; Liu, Lina; Brook, Michael A; Sheardown, Heather D

    2010-05-01

    Although silicones possess many useful properties as biomaterials, their hydrophobicity can be problematic. To a degree, this issue can be addressed by surface modification with hydrophilic polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol), but the resulting structures are usually not conducive to cell growth. In the present work, we describe the synthesis and characterization of covalently linked hyaluronic acid (HA) (35 kDa) to poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer surfaces. HA is of interest because of its known biological properties; its presence on a surface was expected to improve the biocompatibility of silicone materials for a wide range of bioapplications. HA was introduced with a coupling agent in two steps from high-density, tosyl-modified, poly(ethylene glycol) tethered silicone surfaces. All materials synthesized were characterized by water contact angle, ATR-FTIR, XPS and (13)C solid state NMR spectroscopy. Biological interactions with these modified silicone surfaces were assessed by examining interactions with fibrinogen as a model protein as well as determining the in vitro response of fibroblast (3T3) and human corneal epithelial cells relative to unmodified poly(dimethylsiloxane) controls. The results suggest that HA modification significantly enhances cell interactions while decreasing protein adsorption and may therefore be effective for improving biocompatibility of PDMS and other materials.

  12. BD monomer and elastomer production processes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, J

    2001-06-01

    The monomer 1,3 butadiene (BD) is a product of the petrochemical industry. It is used to make several elastomers including the very high volume styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) that comprises the bulk of automobile tires. It is also used to make polybutadiene rubber that is used in parts of tires, coatings, composites and other products. The monomer can be converted to chlorobutadiene (chloroprene) and used to make polychloroprene (neoprene). BD is one of the several olefins created by cracking hydrocarbons in the presence of steam. A mixed C4 stream from the steam cracker is then sent to a BD monomer extraction unit. Modern units typically use dimethyl formamide as the extraction solvent. SBR is commonly made by the copolymerization of BD and styrene, along with various additives to control the reaction, in a water emulsion. The reaction proceeds in a continuous chain of reactors until it is 'shortstopped' by a strong reducing agent. After removing unreacted monomers from the stabilized latex, it is blended, coagulated and dewatered. The resulting dry rubber crumb is bailed, film wrapped and stored in crates. The polymerization of BD to make polybutadiene rubber can be conducted as a water suspension type polymerization similar to SBR or in a solvent system followed by solvent recovery and transfer into water suspension.

  13. Inorganic particle analysis of dental impression elastomers.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively and qualitatively the inorganic particle fraction of commercially available dental elastomers. The inorganic volumetric fraction of two addition silicones (Reprosil Putty/Fluid and Flexitime Easy Putty/Fluid), three condensation silicones (Clonage Putty/Fluid, Optosil Confort/Xantopren VL and Silon APS Putty/Fluid), one polyether (Impregum Soft Light Body) and one polysulfide (Permlastic Light Body) was accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 600 ºC, during 3 h. Unsettled material samples were soaked in acetone and chloroform for removal of the organic portion. The remaining filler particles were sputter-coated with gold evaluation of their morphology and size, under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexitime Easy Putty was the material with the highest results for volumetric particle fraction, while Impregum Soft had the lowest values. Silon 2 APS Fluid presented the lowest mean filler size values, while Clonage Putty had the highest values. SEM micrographs of the inorganic particles showed several morphologies - lathe-cut, spherical, spherical-like, sticks, and sticks mixed to lathe-cut powder. The results of this study revealed differences in particle characteristics among the elastometic materials that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  14. Localized soft elasticity in liquid crystal elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Taylor H.; Biggins, John S.; Shick, Andreas F.; Warner, Mark; White, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic approaches to prepare designer materials that localize deformation, by combining rigidity and compliance in a single material, have been widely sought. Bottom-up approaches, such as the self-organization of liquid crystals, offer potential advantages over top–down patterning methods such as photolithographic control of crosslink density, relating to the ease of preparation and fidelity of resolution. Here, we report on the directed self-assembly of materials with spatial and hierarchical variation in mechanical anisotropy. The highly nonlinear mechanical properties of the liquid crystalline elastomers examined here enables strain to be locally reduced >15-fold without introducing compositional variation or other heterogeneities. Each domain (⩾0.01 mm2) exhibits anisotropic nonlinear response to load based on the alignment of the molecular orientation with the loading axis. Accordingly, we design monoliths that localize deformation in uniaxial and biaxial tension, shear, bending and crack propagation, and subsequently demonstrate substrates for globally deformable yet locally stiff electronics. PMID:26902873

  15. Shear Stress Sensing using Elastomer Micropillar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Lin, Yi; Jackson, Allen M.; Cissoto, Alexxandra; Sheplak, Mark; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of shear stress developed as a fluid moves around a solid body is difficult to measure. Stresses at the fluid-solid interface are very small and the nature of the fluid flow is easily disturbed by introducing sensor components to the interface. To address these challenges, an array of direct and indirect techniques have been investigated with various advantages and challenges. Hot wire sensors and other indirect sensors all protrude significantly into the fluid flow. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices, although facilitating very accurate measurements, are not durable, are prone to contamination, and are difficult to implement into existing model geometries. One promising approach is the use of engineered surfaces that interact with fluid flow in a detectable manner. To this end, standard lithographic techniques have been utilized to generate elastomeric micropillar arrays of various lengths and diameters. Micropillars of controlled length and width were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer using a soft-lithography technique. The 3D mold for micropillar replication was fabricated using laser ablative micromachining and contact lithography. Micropillar dimensions and mechanical properties were characterized and compared to shear sensing requirements. The results of this characterization as well as shear stress detection techniques will be discussed.

  16. Artificial muscles based on liquid crystal elastomers.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Hui; Keller, Patrick

    2006-10-15

    This paper presents our results on liquid crystal (LC) elastomers as artificial muscle, based on the ideas proposed by de Gennes. In the theoretical model, the material consists of a repeated series of main-chain nematic LC polymer blocks, N, and conventional rubber blocks, R, based on the lamellar phase of a triblock copolymer RNR. The motor for the contraction is the reversible macromolecular shape change of the chain, from stretched to spherical, that occurs at the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition in the main-chain nematic LC polymers. We first developed a new kind of muscle-like material based on a network of side-on nematic LC homopolymers. Side-on LC polymers were used instead of main-chain LC polymers for synthetic reasons. The first example of these materials was thermo-responsive, with a typical contraction of around 35-45% and a generated force of around 210 kPa. Subsequently, a photo-responsive material was developed, with a fast photochemically induced contraction of around 20%, triggered by UV light. We then succeeded in preparing a thermo-responsive artificial muscle, RNR, with lamellar structure, using a side-on nematic LC polymer as N block.Micrometre-sized artificial muscles were also prepared. This paper illustrates the bottom-up design of stimuli-responsive materials, in which the overall material response reflects the individual macromolecular response, using LC polymer as building block.

  17. The effect of elastomer chain length on properties of silicone-modified polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.; Ezzell, S.

    1981-01-01

    A series of polyimides containing silicone elastomers was synthesized in order to study the effects of the elastomer chain length on polymer properties. The elastomer with repeat units varying from n=10 to 105 was chemically reacted into the backbone of an addition polyimide oligomer via reactive aromatic amine groups. Glass transition temperatures of the elastomer and polyimide phases were observed by torsional braid analysis. The elastomer-modified polyimides were tested as adhesives for bonding titanium in order to determine their potential for aerospace applications. Adhesive lap shear tests were performed before and after aging bonded specimens at elevated temperatures.

  18. Single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in magnetoactive elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Viktor M.; Snarskii, Andrei A.; Zorinets, Denis; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-06-01

    Magnetoactive elastomers (MAEs) are composite materials comprised of micrometer-sized ferromagnetic particles in a nonmagnetic elastomer matrix. A single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in MAEs, assuming the rotation of a soft magnetic, mechanically rigid particle with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in magnetic fields is identified and considered theoretically within the framework of an alternative model. In this mechanism, the total magnetic anisotropy energy of the filling particles in the matrix is the sum over single particles. Matrix displacements in the vicinity of the particle and the resulting direction of the magnetization vector are calculated. The effect of matrix deformation is pronounced well if the magnetic anisotropy coefficient K is much larger than the shear modulus µ of the elastic matrix. The feasibility of the proposed magnetostriction mechanism in soft magnetoactive elastomers and gels is elucidated. The magnetic-field-induced internal stresses in the matrix lead to effects of magnetodeformation and may increase the elastic moduli of these composite materials.

  19. Single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in magnetoactive elastomers.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Viktor M; Snarskii, Andrei A; Zorinets, Denis; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-06-01

    Magnetoactive elastomers (MAEs) are composite materials comprised of micrometer-sized ferromagnetic particles in a nonmagnetic elastomer matrix. A single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in MAEs, assuming the rotation of a soft magnetic, mechanically rigid particle with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in magnetic fields is identified and considered theoretically within the framework of an alternative model. In this mechanism, the total magnetic anisotropy energy of the filling particles in the matrix is the sum over single particles. Matrix displacements in the vicinity of the particle and the resulting direction of the magnetization vector are calculated. The effect of matrix deformation is pronounced well if the magnetic anisotropy coefficient K is much larger than the shear modulus µ of the elastic matrix. The feasibility of the proposed magnetostriction mechanism in soft magnetoactive elastomers and gels is elucidated. The magnetic-field-induced internal stresses in the matrix lead to effects of magnetodeformation and may increase the elastic moduli of these composite materials.

  20. A toolbox of oligopeptide-modified polymers for tailored elastomers.

    PubMed

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Liang, Su; Schweizer, Thomas; Balog, Sandor; Mionić, Marijana; Snellings, Ruben; Cugnoni, Joël; Michaud, Véronique; Frauenrath, Holger

    2014-09-08

    Biomaterials are constructed from limited sets of building blocks but exhibit extraordinary and versatile properties, because hierarchical structure formation lets them employ identical supramolecular motifs for different purposes. Here we exert a similar degree of structural control in synthetic supramolecular elastomers and thus tailor them for a broad range of thermomechanical properties. We show that oligopeptide-terminated polymers selectively self-assemble into small aggregates or nanofibrils, depending on the length of the oligopeptides. This process is self-sorting if differently long oligopeptides are combined so that different nanostructures coexist in bulk mixtures. Blends of polymers with oligopeptides matching in length furnish reinforced elastomers that exhibit shear moduli one order of magnitude higher than the parent polymers. By contrast, novel interpenetrating supramolecular networks that display excellent vibration damping properties are obtained from blends comprising non-matching oligopeptides or unmodified polymers. Hence, blends of oligopeptide-modified polymers constitute a toolbox for tailored elastomers with versatile properties.

  1. Mechanical tests for validation of seismic isolation elastomer constitutive models

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1992-01-01

    High damping laminated elastomeric bearings are becoming the preferred device for seismic isolation of large buildings and structures, such as nuclear power plants. The key component of these bearings is a filled natural rubber elastomer. This material exhibits nonlinear behavior within the normal design range. The material damping cannot be classified as either viscous or hysteritic, but it seems to fall somewhere in between. This paper describes a series of tests that can be used to characterize the mechanical response of these elastomers. The tests are designed to determine the behavior of the elastomer in the time scale of the earthquake, which is typically from 30 to 60 seconds. The test results provide data for use in determining the material parameters associated with nonlinear constitutive models. 4 refs.

  2. Mechanical tests for validation of seismic isolation elastomer constitutive models

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1992-05-01

    High damping laminated elastomeric bearings are becoming the preferred device for seismic isolation of large buildings and structures, such as nuclear power plants. The key component of these bearings is a filled natural rubber elastomer. This material exhibits nonlinear behavior within the normal design range. The material damping cannot be classified as either viscous or hysteritic, but it seems to fall somewhere in between. This paper describes a series of tests that can be used to characterize the mechanical response of these elastomers. The tests are designed to determine the behavior of the elastomer in the time scale of the earthquake, which is typically from 30 to 60 seconds. The test results provide data for use in determining the material parameters associated with nonlinear constitutive models. 4 refs.

  3. Effect of environmental stress on Sylgard 170 silicone elastomer

    SciTech Connect

    Buckalew, W.H.; Wyant, F.J.

    1985-05-01

    Dow Corning Sylgard 170 Silicone Elastomer has been investigated to characterize its response to accelerated thermal aging, radiation exposure, and its behavior under applied compressive forces. Sylgard 170 response to accelerated thermal aging suggests the material properties are not particularly age dependent. Radiation exposures, however, produce significant, monotonic changes in both elongation and hardness with increasing absorbed radiation dose. Elastomer response to an applied compressive force was strongly dependent on environment temperature and degree of material confinement. Variations in temperature produced large changes in compressive forces applied to confined samples. Attempts to mitigate force fluctuations by means of pressure relief paths resulted in total loss of the applied compressive force. Thus, seal applications employing this elastomer in Class 1E equipment required to function during or following an accident should consider the potential loss of compressive force from long-term aging and potential LOCA-temperature transient conditions.

  4. Efficient enzymatic acrylation through transesterification at controlled water activity.

    PubMed

    Nordblad, Mathias; Adlercreutz, Patrick

    2008-04-15

    Enzymatic acrylation is a process of potentially strong interest to the chemical industry. Direct esterification involving acrylic acid is unfortunately rather slow, with inhibition phenomena appearing at high acid concentrations. In the present study the acrylation of 1-octanol catalyzed by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (Novozym 435) was shown to be as much as an order of magnitude faster when ethyl acrylate served as the donor of the acrylic group. Water activity is a key parameter for optimizing the rate of ester synthesis. The optimum water activity for the esterification of octanol by acrylic acid was found to be 0.75, that for its esterification by propionic acid to be 0.45 and the transesterification involving ethyl acrylate to be fastest at a water activity of 0.3. The reasons for these differences in optimum water activity are discussed in terms of enzyme specificity, substrate solvation, and mass transfer effects.

  5. Large Acrylic Spherical Windows In Hyperbaric Underwater Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lones, Joe J.; Stachiw, Jerry D.

    1983-10-01

    Both acrylic plastic and glass are common materials for hyperbaric optical windows. Although glass continues to be used occasionally for small windows, virtually all large viewports are made of acrylic. It is easy to uderstand the wide use of acrylic when comparing design properties of this plastic with those of glass, and glass windows are relatively more difficult to fabricate and use. in addition there are published guides for the design and fabrication of acrylic windows to be used in the hyperbaric environment of hydrospace. Although these procedures for fabricating the acrylic windows are somewhat involved, the results are extremely reliable. Acrylic viewports are now fabricated to very large sizes for manned observation or optical quality instrumen tation as illustrated by the numerous acrylic submersible vehicle hulls for hu, an occupancy currently in operation and a 3600 large optical window recently developed for the Walt Disney Circle Vision under-water camera housing.

  6. Mechanical characterisation of polyurethane elastomer for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kanyanta, Valentine; Ivankovic, Alojz

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical testing and modelling of a material for biomedical applications have to be based on conditions representative of the application of interest. In this work, an ether-based polyurethane elastomer is used to build mock arteries. The aim is to study the behaviour of arteries under pulsatile loading conditions and how that behaviour changes with the development and progression of atherosclerosis. Polyurethane elastomers are widely used as biomaterials, e.g. in tube form for bypasses and catheters. However, their mechanical behaviour has not been extensively characterised. This work establishes the variations in the behaviour of polyurethane elastomer with temperature, humidity and strain rate and also reports planar and equibiaxial tension, relaxation, creep and cyclic test results, providing a comprehensive characterisation of the material. Test results are used to determine the properties of the polyurethane elastomer and in the selection of a representative material model for future simulations of arterial behaviour and the development of atherosclerosis. The results show that the behaviour of the elastomer is significantly dependent on both humidity and temperature, with Young's modulus of 7.4 MPa, 5.3 MPa and 4.7 MPa under dry-room temperature, wet-room temperature and wet at 37 ( composite function)C conditions, respectively. The elastomer also exhibits rate-dependent viscoelastic behaviour. Yeoh's hyperelastic material model provided the best fit to the entire range of experimental data. The Neo-Hookean model provides a good fit at small strain but significantly diverges at large strains. Nevertheless, in applications where deformations are relatively small, i.e. below 15%, the Neo-Hookean model can be used.

  7. Acoustic and relaxation behaviors of polydimethylsiloxane studied by using brillouin and dielectric spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung Wan; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Park, Jaehoon; Shin, Dong-Myeong; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-04-01

    The temperature dependences of the acoustic properties and the dielectric relaxation times of polydimethylsiloxane were investigated by using high-resolution Brillouin and broadband dielectric spectroscopies. The longitudinal sound velocity showed a large increase upon approaching the glass transition temperature while the acoustic absorption coefficient exhibited a maximum at ~263 K. Comparison of these results with previous ultrasonic data revealed a substantial frequency dispersion of the acoustic properties of this silicone-based elastomer. The relaxation times derived from the acoustic absorption peaks were consistent with the temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation time of the structural a process, indicating a strong coupling between the acoustic waves and the segmental motions of the main chains.

  8. Acrylate in Phaeocystis colonies does not affect the surrounding bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordkamp, D. J. B.; Gieskes, W. W. C.; Gottschal, J. C.; Forney, L. J.; van Rijssel, M.

    2000-08-01

    Acrylate accumulates to concentrations of 1.3-6.5 mM in the mucus of Phaeocystis colonies and may have an effect on the surrounding bacterial community, either as an inhibitor or as a carbon source. Both in the field and in the laboratory, effects of acrylate on bacterial growth and on its consumption were investigated. During a Phaeocystis bloom, acrylate-consuming bacteria were found to be present (1% of total number counted by microscopy) and a 5-fold increase of the number of these bacteria was observed after the Phaeocystis bloom (4.9% of the total number counted by microscopy). Acrylate consumption rates were higher in filtered (≤20 μm) seawater samples than in unfiltered samples, indicating that particles larger than 20 μm, mostly Phaeocystis colonies, caused a reduction in the rate of acrylate consumption. This was not found when axenic Phaeocystis was added to an acrylate-consuming bacterium (strain AC-2) that had been isolated from the highest MPN dilution from field samples. Furthermore, we could not find a decrease in growth rates of the total bacterial community or of isolated strains in the presence of high acrylate concentrations (≤10 mM). In co-cultures of Phaeocystis and strain AC-2 we observed that the production of acrylate was not affected by the bacterium and that the consumption of acrylate by strain AC-2 was not affected by the presence of Phaeocystis. Acrylate concentrations in the mucous layer of the Phaeocystis colonies in those co-cultures were high (6.7-7.7 mM) and comparable with acrylate concentrations in the mucous layer of axenic Phaeocystis colonies. Acrylate seems to be sorbed to the mucus matrix of the colony and diffusion of acrylate out of this mucus matrix appears to be slow. Upon disruption of the colony skin acrylate was immediately solubilised from the mucus matrix.

  9. Simulation studies of liquid crystal elastomers: response to light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinger, Robin; Selinger, Jonathan V.; Mbanga, Badel L.

    2007-03-01

    Azo-dye doped nematic elastomers bend and flex when subject to photoexcitation. We model this mechanical response at the continuum level using nonlinear finite element simulation. Our finite element algorithm uses explicit dynamics based on a Hamiltonian which couples mechanical strain and nematic order. Our explicit dynamics algorithm is structured essentially like molecular dynamics, and we discuss how this continuum level code can be easily integrated into a multiscale model. We use the model further to explore potential applications of nematic elastomers in microfluidics, fiber orientation control, and biologically-inspired robots.

  10. A Molecular View of Liquid Crystalline Elastomers and Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, Juan

    2011-03-01

    A combination of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations is used to examine the order-disorder transitions that arise in model liquid crystalline elastomers and colloidal gels as a function of concentration and strain, respectively. Two models are considered. In the first, a lattice model is used to represent a colloidal gel of nematogens and nanoparticles. In the second, a cross-linked elastomer of Gay-Berne mesogens is adopted to examine the order-disroder transition that arises as a function of strain. The results of simulations are compared to those of recent experiments for these two classes of systems.

  11. Collapse of triangular channels in a soft elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepáyotl-Ramírez, Daniel; Lu, Tong; Park, Yong-Lae; Majidi, Carmel

    2013-01-01

    We extend classical solutions in contact mechanics to examine the collapse of channels in a soft elastomer. These channels have triangular cross-section and collapse when pressure is applied to the surrounding elastomer. Treating the walls of the channel as indenters that penetrate the channel base, we derive an algebraic mapping between pressure and cross-sectional area. These theoretical predictions are in strong agreement with results that we obtain through finite element analysis and experimental measurements. This is accomplished without data fitting and suggests that the theoretical approach may be generalized to a broad range of cross-sectional geometries in soft microfluidics.

  12. Phenomenological Theory of Isotropic-Genesis Nematic Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Ye, Fangfu; Xing, Xiangjun; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    We consider the impact of the elastomer network on the nematic structure and fluctuations in isotropic-genesis nematic elastomers, via a phenomenological model that underscores the role of network compliance. The model contains a network-mediated nonlocal interaction as well as a new kind of random field that reflects the memory of the nematic order present at network formation and also encodes local anisotropy due to localized nematogenic polymers. This model enables us to predict regimes of short-ranged oscillatory spatial correlations (thermal and glassy) in the nematic alignment.

  13. Cycloolefin effect in cycloolefin-(meth)acryl copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun Soon; Seo, Dong Chul; Lee, Chang Soo; Park, Sang Wok; Kim, Sang Jin; Shin, Dae Hyeon; Shin, Jin Bong; Park, Joo Hyun

    2008-11-01

    One of the most important factors in ArF resist development is a resin platform, which dominates a lot of parts of resist characteristics. It has been much changed in order to improve their physical properties such as resolution, pattern profile, etch resistance and line edge roughness. Through the low etch resistance in ArF initial (meth)acryl type copolymer and low transmittance in COMA type copolymer most researchers were interested in developing of (meth)acryl type copolymer again for ArF photoresist. On the other hand, we have studied various polymer platforms suitable ArF photoresist except for meth(acryl) type copolymer. As a result of this study we had developed ROMA type polymers and cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymers. Among the polymers cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymer has many attractions such as etch roughness, resist reflow which needs low glass transition temperature and solvent solubility. In this study, we intend to find out cycloolefin-(meth)acryl copolymer characteristics compared with (meth)acryl copolymer. And, we have tried to find out any differences between acrylate type copolymer and cycloolefin-(meth)acrylate type copolymer with various evaluation results. As a result of this study we are going to talk about the reason that the resist using acrylate type copolymer and cycloolefin-(meth)acryl type copolymer show good pattern profile while acrylate type copolymer show poor pattern profile. We also intend to explain the role of cycloolefin as a function of molecular weight variation and substitution ratio variation of cycloolefin in cycloolefin-(meth)acrylate resin.One of the most important factors in ArF resist development is a resin platform, which dominates a lot of parts of resist characteristics. It has been much changed in order to improve their physical properties such as resolution, pattern profile, etch resistance and line edge roughness. Through the low etch resistance in ArF initial (meth)acryl type copolymer and low

  14. Allergic contact dermatitis from acrylic nails in a flamenco guitarist.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Nicolás, F A; Pastor-Nieto, M A; Sánchez-Herreros, C; Pérez-Mesonero, R; Melgar-Molero, V; Ballano, A; De-Eusebio, E

    2016-12-01

    Acrylates are molecules that are well known for their strong sensitizing properties. Historically, many beauticians and individuals using store-bought artificial nail products have developed allergic contact dermatitis from acrylates. More recently, the use of acrylic nails among flamenco guitarists to strengthen their nails has become very popular. A 40-year-old non-atopic male patient working as a flamenco guitarist developed dystrophy, onycholysis and paronychia involving the first four nails of his right hand. The lesions were confined to the fingers where acrylic materials were used in order to strengthen his nails to play the guitar. He noticed improvement whenever he stopped using these materials and intense itching and worsening when he began reusing them. Patch tests were performed and positive results obtained with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA), 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (2-HEA), ethyleneglycol-dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (2-HPMA). The patient was diagnosed with occupational allergic contact dermatitis likely caused by acrylic nails. Artificial nails can contain many kinds of acrylic monomers but most cases of contact dermatitis are induced by 2-HEMA, 2-HPMA and EGDMA. This is the first reported case of occupational allergic contact dermatitis from acrylates in artificial nails in a professional flamenco guitar player. Since the practice of self-applying acrylic nail products is becoming very popular within flamenco musicians, we believe that dermatology and occupational medicine specialists should be made aware of the potentially increasing risk of sensitization from acrylates in this setting.

  15. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    DOEpatents

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  16. Thermodynamics of coil-hyperbranched poly(styrene-b-acrylated epoxidized soybean oil) block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fang-Yi; Hohmann, Austin; Hernández, Nacú; Cochran, Eric

    Here we present the phase behavior of a new type of coil-hyperbranched diblock copolymer: poly(styrene- b-acrylated epoxidized soybean oil), or PS-PAESO. PS-PAESO is an example of a biorenewable thermoplastic elastomer (bio-TPE). To date, we have shown that bio-TPEs can be economical commercial substitutes for their petrochemically derived analogues--such as poly(styrene- b-butadiene- b-styrene) (SBS)--in a range of applications including pressure sensitive adhesives and bitumen modification. From a polymer physics perspective, PS-PAESO is an interesting material in that it couples a linear coil-like block with a highly branched block. Thus in contrast to the past five decades of studies on linear AB diblock copolymers, coil-hyperbranched block copolymers are relatively unknown to the community and can be expected to deviate substantially from the standard ``universal'' phase behavior in the AB systems. To explore these new materials, we have constructed a library of PS-PAESO materials spanning a range of molecular weight and composition values. The phase transition behavior and the morphology information will be interpreted by isochronal temperature scanning in dynamic shear rheology, small angle X-ray scattering and the corresponding transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Inductive dielectric analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agranovich, Daniel; Polygalov, Eugene; Popov, Ivan; Ben Ishai, Paul; Feldman, Yuri

    2017-03-01

    One of the approaches to bypass the problem of electrode polarization in dielectric measurements is the free electrode method. The advantage of this technique is that, the probing electric field in the material is not supplied by contact electrodes, but rather by electromagnetic induction. We have designed an inductive dielectric analyzer based on a sensor comprising two concentric toroidal coils. In this work, we present an analytic derivation of the relationship between the impedance measured by the sensor and the complex dielectric permittivity of the sample. The obtained relationship was successfully employed to measure the dielectric permittivity and conductivity of various alcohols and aqueous salt solutions.

  18. Effect of carbon black and/or elastomer on thermoplastic elastomer-based blends and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasar, M.; Bayram, G.; Celebi, H.

    2015-05-01

    It was aimed to investigate the effect of carbon black and/or elastomer on the electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of thermoplastic elastomer (TPE). Carbon black (CB) and ethylene-glycidyl methacrylate (E-GMA) were used as additives in the main matrix. The blends and composites were characterized in terms of their electrical conductivity and mechanical properties. CB concentration was varied as 0.5, 1, 3 and 5 wt.%. In order to modify the surface of CB, paraffinic oil and silane coupling agents were used. E-GMA was added to the matrix at 5, 10, 20, and 30 wt.% concentration. In order to prepare ternary composites, 5 wt.% of modified or unmodified carbon black and 10 wt.% of E-GMA were mixed with the TPE matrix. The tensile strength, impact strength and elongation at break values of TPE/CB composites decreased while elastic moduli and electrical conductivities increased with increasing CB concentration. It was observed that the surface modification of CB did not alter the tensile properties significantly. However, impact strength of the composites improved upon modification. For TPE/E-GMA blends, E-GMA addition enhanced the tensile strength and impact strength values of neat TPE. Nevertheless, elongation at break values began to decrease at 10 wt% and higher concentrations of E-GMA. It was observed that CB was more effective than the E-GMA on the mechanical properties of the ternary composites. The addition of 10 wt.% E-GMA increased the electrical resistivity and impact strength values of the ternary composites, as expected.

  19. Multiple Internal Reflections in Acrylic Triangle Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki, A.; Setiawan, D.; Purwanto, H.; Yunianto, M.

    2016-11-01

    Theoretical and experimental study of light propagation in acrylic triangle waveguides has been studied theoretically and experimentally aimed to obtain a light cone which can tunnel and bring the light to a certain place. Numerical aperture of light cones which have a length of 7 cm but different cross-section area have been measured using he-Ne laser (λ=632 nm) and the results were compared to those obtained theoretically and no significant different was observed.

  20. 'Weightless' acrylic painting by Jack Kroehnke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    'Weightless' acrylic painting by Jack Kroehnke depicts STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers participating in extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation in JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. In the payload bay (PLB) mockup, Hilmers, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), holds onto the mission-peculiar equipment support structure in foreground while SCUBA-equipped diver monitors activity overhead and camera operator records EVA procedures. Copyrighted art work for use by NASA.