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Sample records for acrylic fiber manufacturing

  1. Electrocoagulation pretreatment of wet-spun acrylic fibers manufacturing wastewater to improve its biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chenhao; Zhang, Zhongguo; Li, Haitao; Li, Duo; Wu, Baichun; Sun, Yuwei; Cheng, Yanjun

    2014-06-15

    The electrocoagulation (EC) process was used to pretreat wastewater from the manufacture of wet-spun acrylic fibers, and the effects of varying the operating parameters, including the electrode area/wastewater volume (A/V) ratio, current density, interelectrode distance and pH, on the EC treatment process were investigated. About 44% of the total organic carbon was removed using the optimal conditions in a 100 min procedure. The optimal conditions were a current density of 35.7 mA cm(-2), an A/V ratio of 0.28 cm(-1), a pH of 5, and an interelectrode distance of 0.8 cm. The biodegradability of the contaminants in the treated water was improved by the EC treatment (using the optimal conditions), increasing the five-day biological oxygen demand/chemical oxygen demand ratio to 0.35, which could improve the effectiveness of subsequent biological treatments. The improvement in the biodegradability of the contaminants in the wastewater was attributed to the removal and degradation of aromatic organic compounds, straight-chain paraffins, and other organic compounds, which we identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The EC process was proven to be an effective alternative pretreatment for wastewater from the manufacture of wet-spun acrylic fibers, prior to biological treatments.

  2. Microbubble enhanced ozonation process for advanced treatment of wastewater produced in acrylic fiber manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tianlong; Wang, Qunhui; Zhang, Tao; Shi, Zhining; Tian, Yanli; Shi, Shanshan; Smale, Nicholas; Wang, Juan

    2015-04-28

    This work investigated microbubble-ozonation for the treatment of a refractory wet-spun acrylic fiber wastewater in comparison to macrobubble-ozonation. CODcr, NH3-N, and UV254 of the wastewater were removed by 42%, 21%, and 42%, respectively in the microbubble-ozonation, being 25%, 9%, and 35% higher than the removal rates achieved by macrobubble-ozonation at the same ozone dose. The microbubbles (with average diameter of 45μm) had a high concentration of 3.9×10(5) counts/mL at a gas flow rate of 0.5L/min. The gas holdup, total ozone mass-transfer coefficient, and average ozone utilization efficiency in the microbubble-ozonation were 6.6, 2.2, and 1.5 times higher than those of the macrobubble-ozonation. Greater generation of hydroxyl radicals and a higher zeta potential of the bubbles were also observed in the microbubble ozonation process. The biodegradability of the wastewater was also significantly improved by microbubble-ozonation, which was ascribed to the enhanced degradation of alkanes, aromatic compounds, and the many other bio-refractory organic compounds in the wastewater. Microbubble-ozonation can thus be a more effective treatment process than traditional macrobubble-ozonation for refractory wastewater produced by the acrylic fiber manufacturing industry.

  3. Microbubble enhanced ozonation process for advanced treatment of wastewater produced in acrylic fiber manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tianlong; Wang, Qunhui; Zhang, Tao; Shi, Zhining; Tian, Yanli; Shi, Shanshan; Smale, Nicholas; Wang, Juan

    2015-04-28

    This work investigated microbubble-ozonation for the treatment of a refractory wet-spun acrylic fiber wastewater in comparison to macrobubble-ozonation. CODcr, NH3-N, and UV254 of the wastewater were removed by 42%, 21%, and 42%, respectively in the microbubble-ozonation, being 25%, 9%, and 35% higher than the removal rates achieved by macrobubble-ozonation at the same ozone dose. The microbubbles (with average diameter of 45μm) had a high concentration of 3.9×10(5) counts/mL at a gas flow rate of 0.5L/min. The gas holdup, total ozone mass-transfer coefficient, and average ozone utilization efficiency in the microbubble-ozonation were 6.6, 2.2, and 1.5 times higher than those of the macrobubble-ozonation. Greater generation of hydroxyl radicals and a higher zeta potential of the bubbles were also observed in the microbubble ozonation process. The biodegradability of the wastewater was also significantly improved by microbubble-ozonation, which was ascribed to the enhanced degradation of alkanes, aromatic compounds, and the many other bio-refractory organic compounds in the wastewater. Microbubble-ozonation can thus be a more effective treatment process than traditional macrobubble-ozonation for refractory wastewater produced by the acrylic fiber manufacturing industry. PMID:25681716

  4. Evaluation of performance and microbial community in a two-stage UASB reactor pretreating acrylic fiber manufacturing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Wang, Jun; Luan, Zhaokun; Deng, Yanqin; Chen, Lin

    2011-05-01

    A two-stage UASB reactor was employed to pretreat acrylic fiber manufacturing wastewater. Mesophilic operation (35 ± 0.5°C) was performed with hydraulic retention time (HRT) varied between 28 and 40 h. Mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) in the reactor was maintained about 8000 mg/L. The results showed COD and sulfate removal could be kept at 51% and 75%, respectively, when the HRT was no less than 38 h. Sulfate reduction mainly occurred in the acidification-stage reactor while methane production mainly occurred in the methane-stage reactor. The size of granule formed in the acidification-stage reactor ranged between 1 and 5mm while the largest size of granule in the methane-stage reactor ranged from 0.5 to 2mm. Compared to microbial populations in the acidification-stage reactor, the microbial diversity in methane-stage reactor was more abundant. In the acidification-stage reactor, the Syntrophobacter sulfatireducens devoted to both sulfate reduction and acetate production.

  5. Study of a three-stage fluidized bed process treating acrylic synthetic-fiber manufacturing wastewater containing high-strength nitrogenous compounds.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S S; Chen, Y N; Wu, K L; Chuang, H P; Chen, S D

    2004-01-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) is one of the major synthetic fibers commonly used in the mass production of clothing. The chemical synthesis of PAN is carried out by polymerization of the acrylonitrile (AN) monomers with co-monomers such as vinyl acetate, methyl acrylate and cyclohexyl acrylate. Using water quality analysis of the PAN wastewater, high concentration of organic nitrogen was found and the TKN/COD ratios achieved were 0.15-0.26, indicating the complicated biodegradation characteristics for the PAN wastewater. In order to enhance biodegradation of nitrogenous compounds in PAN wastewater, a combined three-stage process of thermophilic anaerobic/anoxic denitrification/aerobic nitrification fluidized bed reactors was employed. The results indicated that the concentration of effluent in the three-stage process of OD and organic nitrogen was 175 mg/L and 13 mg/L, respectively. Furthermore, molecular biotechnology was applied to study the microbial population in the thermophilic anaerobic fluidized bed reactor. From the results of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, the diversity of PAN-degrading bacteria would change in different volumetric loading. Furthermore, the bacteria communities in the thermophilic anaerobic fluidized bed reactor were also studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Alpha and delta-Proteobacteria were dominant in the bacteria population, and some high G+C content bacteria and Clostridium could be characterized in this system. PMID:15137414

  6. A simple solubility tests for the discrimination of acrylic and modacrylic fibers.

    PubMed

    Suga, Keisuke; Narita, Yuji; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2014-05-01

    In a crime scene investigation, single fibers play an important role as significant trace physical evidence. Acrylic fibers are frequently encountered in forensic analysis. Currently, acrylic and modacrylic are not discriminated clearly in Japan. Only results of FT-IR, some of acrylics were difficult to separate clearly to acrylic and modacrylic fibers. Solubility test is primitive but convenient useful method, and Japan Industrial Standards (JIS) recommends FT-IR and solubility test to distinguish acrylic and modacrylic fibers. But recommended JIS dissolving test using 100% N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) as a solvent, some acrylics could not be discriminated. In this report, we used DMF and ethanol (90:10, v/v) solvent. The JIS method could not discriminate 6 acrylics in 60 acrylics; hence, DMF and ethanol (90:10, v/v) solvent discriminated 59 of the 60 fibers (43 acrylic and 16 modacrylic fibers) clearly, but only one modacrylic fiber incorrectly identified as acrylic.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10530 - Acrylate manufacture byproduct distillation residue (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... distillation residue (generic). 721.10530 Section 721.10530 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10530 Acrylate manufacture byproduct distillation... substance is identified generically as acrylate manufacture byproduct distillation residue (PMN P-12-87)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10530 - Acrylate manufacture byproduct distillation residue (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... distillation residue (generic). 721.10530 Section 721.10530 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10530 Acrylate manufacture byproduct distillation... substance is identified generically as acrylate manufacture byproduct distillation residue (PMN P-12-87)...

  9. Graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto polyamide fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhlouf, Chahira; Marais, Stéphane; Roudesli, Sadok

    2007-04-01

    The grafting of acrylic acid (AA) monomer (CH 2dbnd CH sbnd COOH) on polyamide 6.6 monofilaments (PA 6.6) using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as initiator was carried out in order to enhance the hydrophilic nature of fibers. The grafting rate depends on the AA concentration, the BPO concentration, the time and the temperature of reaction. The best conditions for optimum rate of grafting were obtained with a AA concentration of 0.5 M, a BPO concentration of 0.03 M, a reaction temperature of T = 85 °C and a reaction time of 120 mn. The fiber surface has been investigated by many experimental techniques of characterization such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), calorimetric analysis (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and contact angle measurements. The effect of grafting of acrylic acid onto PA 6.6 fibers on their moisture and mechanical resistances was analyzed from water sorption and elongation at break measurements. The analysis of the experimental data shows clearly the efficiency of the grafting reaction used, leading to a significant increase of the hydrophilic character of the PA 6.6 surface.

  10. Silver hollow optical fibers with acrylic silicone resin coating as buffer layer for sturdy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Katsumasa; Takaku, Hiroyuki; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Song; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    For sturdy silver hollow optical fibers, acrylic silicone resin is newly used as a buffer layer between an inner silver layer and a silica capillary. This acrylic silicone resin film prevents the glass surface from chemical and mechanical micro damages during silver plating process, which deteriorate mechanical strength of the hollow fibers. In addition, it keeps high adhesion of the silver layer with the glass surface. We discuss improvement of mechanical strength of the hollow glass fibers without deterioration of optical properties.

  11. Automation for the manufacturing of fiber Bragg grating arrays enables new applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, P.; Vincelette, A.; Beaulieu, C.; Ficocelli, P.

    2005-11-01

    The manufacturing process has a huge impact on the characteristics of the all optical fiber sensors array. By automating the manufacturing of fiber Bragg gratings, FBG arrays with much larger count of sensing points, stronger mechanical strength, tighter optical parameters tolerances and enhanced reliability are produced in a cost effective manner. Such fiber Bragg grating arrays are now commercially available with both acrylate or polyimide coating widening the range of applications for FBG sensors to larger scale of services for strain and temperature in a distributed configuration.

  12. Nitrile Hydratase and Amidase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous Hydrolyze Acrylic Fibers and Granular Polyacrylonitriles

    PubMed Central

    Tauber, M. M.; Cavaco-Paulo, A.; Robra, K.-H.; Gübitz, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 11216 produced nitrile hydratase (320 nkat mg of protein−1) and amidase activity (38.4 nkat mg of protein−1) when grown on a medium containing propionitrile. These enzymes were able to hydrolyze nitrile groups of both granular polyacrylonitriles (PAN) and acrylic fibers. Nitrile groups of PAN40 (molecular mass, 40 kDa) and PAN190 (molecular mass, 190 kDa) were converted into the corresponding carbonic acids to 1.8 and 1.0%, respectively. In contrast, surfacial nitrile groups of acrylic fibers were only converted to the corresponding amides. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 16% of the surfacial nitrile groups were hydrolyzed by the R. rhodochrous enzymes. Due to the enzymatic modification, the acrylic fibers became more hydrophilic and thus, adsorption of dyes was enhanced. This was indicated by a 15% increase in the staining level (K/S value) for C.I. Basic Blue 9. PMID:10742253

  13. The antimicrobial effect of benzalkonium chloride on some pathogenic microbes observed on fibers of acrylic carpet.

    PubMed

    Khajavi, Ramin; Sattari, Morteza; Ashjaran, Ali

    2007-02-15

    In the presented research, the main aim is to investigate the antibacterial effectiveness of BAC solutions on acrylic fibers used in machinery carpet. An acrylic pile carpet laid in a public place for 30 days and the existence of some microbes were investigated on it. The antimicrobial effect of different BAC solutions for identified microbes was studied in vitro. The acrylic fibers were treated with the same different solutions of BAC as before and the antibacterial effectiveness was assessed by the zone of inhibition method in different times. Two pieces of carpet untreated and treated with BAC solution sewed together and laid for one week in the public place and the amounts of bacterial growth determined by colony count method and the results compared. Finally some mechanical properties of treated acrylic fibers measured after 30 days and compared with untreated one. The results showed the presence of some pathogenic microbes on the laid carpet such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The inhalation time for treated acrylic fibers improved. The amount of colony growth on treated carpet reduced considerably and besides the mechanical tests results showed no significant deterioration effect of studied properties in comparing with untreated yarn.

  14. Glass fiber manufacturing and fiber safety: the producer's perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, J R; Hadley, J G

    1994-01-01

    Historically, the potential health effects of airborne fibers have been associated with the dose, dimension, and durability. Increasing focus is being placed on the latter category. Concern about airborne fiber safety could be reduced by manufacturing fibers that are not respirable; however, due to performance and manufacturing constraints on glasswool insulations, this is not possible today. These products are an important part of today's economy and as a major manufacturer, Owens-Corning is committed to producing and marketing materials that are both safe and effective in their intended use. To this end, manufacturing technology seeks to produce materials that generate low concentrations of airborne fibers, thus minimizing exposure and irritation. The range of fiber diameters is controlled to assure effective product performance and, as far as possible, to minimize respirability. Glass compositions are designed to allow effective fiber forming and ultimate product function. Fiber dissolution is primarily a function of composition; this too, can be controlled within certain constraints. Coupled with these broad parameters is an extensive product stewardship program to assure the safety of these materials. This article will discuss the factors that influence glasswool insulation production, use, and safety. PMID:7882953

  15. Manufacturing of Smart Structures Using Fiber Placement Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Matthew M.; Glowasky, Robert A.; McIlroy, Bruce E.; Story, Todd A.

    1996-01-01

    Smart structures research and development, with the ultimate aim of rapid commercial and military production of these structures, are at the forefront of the Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost-Effective Structures (SPICES) program. As part of this ARPA-sponsored program, MDA-E is using fiber placement processes to manufacture integrated smart structure systems. These systems comprise advanced composite structures with embedded fiber optic sensors, shape memory alloys, piezoelectric actuators, and miniature accelerometers. Cost-effective approaches and solutions to smart material synthesis in the fiber-placement process, based upon integrated product development, are discussed herein.

  16. Carbon fiber manufacturing via plasma technology

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Yarborough, Kenneth D.; Meek, Thomas T.

    2002-01-01

    The disclosed invention introduces a novel method of manufacturing carbon and/or graphite fibers that avoids the high costs associated with conventional carbonization processes. The method of the present invention avoids these costs by utilizing plasma technology in connection with electromagnetic radiation to produce carbon and/or graphite fibers from fully or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors. In general, the stabilized or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors are placed under slight tension, in an oxygen-free atmosphere, and carbonized using a plasma and electromagnetic radiation having a power input which is increased as the fibers become more carbonized and progress towards a final carbon or graphite product. In an additional step, the final carbon or graphite product may be surface treated with an oxygen-plasma treatment to enhance adhesion to matrix materials.

  17. Thermoresponsive fibers containing n-stearyl acrylate groups for shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Yu, X.; Feng, X.; Han, Y. L.; Liu, M.; Lin, T. X.

    2007-07-01

    A novel kind of thermoresponsive shape memory fiber was prepared by mixing the P(SA-co-AA) copolymers of stearyl acrylate (SA), and acrylic acid (AA), with PVA polyvinyl alcohol through chemically crosslinking after spinning. The molecular structure, thermomechanical properties and shape memory behaviors were investigated. It was found that the mixed P(SA-co-AA)/PVA fibers had crystalline structures and showed a dramatic change in Young's modulus at melting temperature (Tm) due to the reversible order-disorder transition. The mixed P(SA-co-AA)/PVA fibers also showed a good shape memory effect, through which the deformed fibers could recover to their original shapes and sizes within 40 seconds after they were heated above their Tm again.

  18. Is the bond between acrylic resin denture teeth and denture base resin stronger if they are both made by the same manufacturer?

    PubMed

    Patil, Reshma; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R; Clark, Robert K F

    2010-03-01

    A previous study suggested that a stronger bond may be achieved between acrylic resin denture base material and acrylic denture teeth when both are made by the same manufacturer. Three denture base acrylic resins from three different manufacturers were bonded to three different acrylic resin denture teeth, one of which was manufactured by each of the manufacturers of the base material. In each group there was a trend that the bond strength achieved between the teeth and base material from the same manufacturer was higher than the unmatched pairs but statistical significance was not achieved. PMID:20397502

  19. Radiation grafting of acrylic and methacrylic acid to cellulose fibers to impart high water sorbency

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, A.H.; Williams, J.L.; Stannett, V.T.

    1980-04-01

    Acrylic and methacrylic acids have been directly grafted to rayon and cotton using the preirradiation technique with /sup 60/ Co gamma rays. The rate of grafting increased with increasing temperature and monomer concentration, as did the final degree of grafting. The amount and rate of grafting also increased with the total irradiation dose but tended to level off at higher doses, in agreement with the leveling off of the radical content reported previously. Methacrylic acid grafted more and faster than acrylic acid to both rayon and cotton. Methacrylic acid grafted more with rayon than cotton, but acrylic acid gave somewhat similar yields with both fibers. The water abosrbency of the grafted fibers depended strongly on their posttreatment. Decrystallizing with 70% zinc chloride or with hot sodium hydroxidy developed supersorbency. The two treatments in succession, respectively, gave the highest values. Metacrylic acid brought about less sorbency than the corrsponding acrylic acid grafts. Useful levels of grafting and supersorbency could be readily and practically achieved by the methods described.

  20. Production and characterization of cut resistant acrylic/copolyaramid fibers via bicomponent wet spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipp, Stephen James

    A composite fiber system consisting of a sheath core bicomponent polymer fiber loaded with hard ceramic particles was developed and characterized for use in cut protective clothing. The core component was comprised of a copolyaramid in order to provide high base cut resistance. An acrylic-copolyaramid polymer blend was used for the sheath component to improve processability and provide potential benefits such as dyeability. Lastly, aluminum oxide particles were incorporated into the fiber core to deflect and deform the cutting edge, further improving cut resistance. A series of designed experiments was used to explore the effects of the wet spinning and heat treatment processes on the structure and properties of the bicomponent fiber. Cut strength of the as-spun fibers was highest when the coagulation rate was slow, promoting the formation of a dense, macrovoid free fiber structure. Upon drawing, fibrillar domains developed within the fiber, further improving cut performance. Cut strength was greatly improved by the heat treatment process despite the fibers becoming highly anisotropic. Addition of the hard particle fillers to the bicomponent fibers showed a decrease in cut strength at the fiber level but nearly doubled the cut strength of resulting fabrics. Finally, the processability of the particle loaded bicomponent fibers was evaluated.

  1. Improvement of mechanical properties of acrylic bone cement by fiber reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Saha, S; Pal, S

    1984-01-01

    Acrylic bone cement is significantly weaker and less stiff than compact bone. Bone cement is also weaker in tension than in compression. This limits its use in orthopaedics to areas where tensile stresses are minimum. We have attempted to improve the mechanical properties of PMMA by reinforcing it with metal wires, and graphite and aramid fibers. Normal, carbon fiber reinforced and aramid fiber reinforced bone cement specimens were tested in compression. Addition of a small percentage (1-2% by weight for carbon and up to 6% for aramid) of these fibers improved the mechanical properties significantly. Due to the improved mechanical properties of fiber reinforced bone cement, its clinical use may reduce the incidence of cement fracture and thus loosening of the prosthesis. PMID:6480622

  2. Femtosecond fiber laser additive manufacturing of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian; Yang, Pei; Zhai, Meiyu; Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is promising to produce complex shaped components, including metals and alloys, to meet requirements from different industries such as aerospace, defense and biomedicines. Current laser AM uses CW lasers and very few publications have been reported for using pulsed lasers (esp. ultrafast lasers). In this paper, additive manufacturing of Tungsten materials is investigated by using femtosecond (fs) fiber lasers. Various processing conditions are studied, which leads to desired characteristics in terms of morphology, porosity, hardness, microstructural and mechanical properties of the processed components. Fully dense Tungsten part with refined grain and increased hardness was obtained and compared with parts made with different pulse widths and CW laser. The results are evidenced that the fs laser based AM provides more dimensions to modify mechanical properties with controlled heating, rapid melting and cooling rates compared with a CW or long pulsed laser. This can greatly benefit to the make of complicated structures and materials that could not be achieved before.

  3. The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie J; Kunc, Vlastimil; Rios, Orlando; Duty, Chad E; Post, Brian K; Blue, Craig A

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing holds tremendous promise in terms of revolutionizing manufacturing. However, fundamental hurdles limit mass adoption of the technology. First, production rates are extremely low. Second, the physical size of parts is generally small, less than a cubic foot. Third, while there is much excitement about metal additive manufacturing, the major growth area is in polymer additive manufacturing systems. Unfortunately, the mechanical properties of the polymer parts are poor, limiting the potential for direct part replacement. To address this issue, we describe three benefits of blending carbon fiber with polymer additive manufacturing. First, development of carbon fiber reinforced polymers for additive manufacturing achieves specific strengths approaching aerospace quality aluminum. Second, carbon fiber radically changes the behavior of the material during deposition, enabling large scale, out-of-the-oven, high deposition rate manufacturing. Finally, carbon fiber technology and additive manufacturing complement each other. Merging the two manufacturing processes enables the construction of complex components that would not be possible otherwise.

  4. Enzyme immobilization on ultrafine cellulose fibers via poly(acrylic acid) electrolyte grafts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2005-05-20

    Ultrafine cellulose fiber (diameter 200-400 nm) surfaces were grafted with polyacrylic acid (PAA) via either ceric ion initiated polymerization or methacrylation of cellulose with methacrylate chloride (MACl) and subsequent free-radical polymerization of acrylic acid. PAA grafts by ceric ion initiated polymerization increased with increasing reaction time (2-24 h), monomer (0.3-2.4 M), and initiator (1-10 mM) concentrations, and spanned a broad range from 5.5-850%. PAA grafts on the methacrylated cellulose fibers also increased with increasing molar ratios of MACl to cellulosic hydroxyl groups (MACl/OH, 2-6.4) and monomer acrylic acid (AA) to initiator potassium persulfate (KPS) ratios ([AA]/[KPS], 1.5-6), and were in a much narrower range between 12.8% and 29.4%. The adsorption of lipase (at 1 mg/ml lipase and pH 7) and the activity of adsorbed lipase (pH 8.5, 30 degrees C), in both cases decreased with increasing PAA grafts. The highest adsorption and activity of the lipase on the ceric ion initiated grafted fibers were 1.28 g/g PAA and 4.3 U/mg lipase, respectively, at the lowest grafting level of 5.5% PAA, whereas they were 0.33 g/g PAA and 7.1 U/mg lipase, respectively, at 12.8% PAA grafts on the methacrylated and grafted fibers. The properties of the grafted fibers and the absorption behavior and activity of lipase suggest that the PAA grafts are gel-like by ceric-initiated reaction and brush-like by methacrylation and polymerization. The adsorbed lipase on the ceric ion-initiated grafted surface possessed greatly improved organic solvent stability over the crude lipase. The adsorbed lipases exhibited 0.5 and 0.3 of the initial activity in the second and third assay cycles, respectively. PMID:15816022

  5. Adhesion enhancement of steel fibers to acrylic bone cement through a silane coupling agent.

    PubMed

    Kotha, S P; Lieberman, M; Vickers, A; Schmid, S R; Mason, J J

    2006-01-01

    The use of a silane coupling agent (methacryloxypropyl-trichlorosilane) to improve the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced acrylic bone cements was assessed. Changes to the tensile and fracture properties of bone cements reinforced with silane-coated or uncoated 316L stainless steel fibers of different aspect ratios were studied. Contact-angle measurements indicated that the coupling agent coats the metal surface through room temperature treatments in a short time (within 2 h). Push-out tests indicated that the interfacial shear strength of silane-coated 316L stainless steel rods is 141% higher than the uncoated rods. The elastic moduli, ultimate stresses, and fracture toughness of the silane-coated, steel fiber-reinforced bone cements are significantly higher than the bone cements reinforced with uncoated steel fibers. There were no differences in the tensile mechanical properties of the silane-coated or uncoated, steel fiber-reinforced cements after aging in a physiological saline solution, indicating that the bonding effectiveness is decreased by the intrusion of water at the metal-polymer interface. Because of possible biocompatibility issues with leaching of the silane coupling agent and no long-term mechanical benefit in simulated aging experiments, the use of these agents is not recommended for in vivo use.

  6. Partial nitrification in a sequencing batch reactor treating acrylic fiber wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Yu, Deshuang; Zhang, Peiyu

    2013-06-01

    A sequencing batch reactor was employed to treat the acrylic fiber wastewater. The dissolved oxygen and mixed liquor suspended solids were 2-3 and 3,500-4,000 mg/L, respectively. The results showed ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) had superior growth rate at high temperature than nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Partial nitrification could be obtained with the temperature of 28 °C. When the pH value was 8.5, the nitrite-N accumulation efficiency was 82 %. The combined inhibitions of high pH and free ammonium to NOB devoted to the nitrite-N buildup. Hydraulic retention time (HRT) was a key factor in partial nitrification control, and the optimal HRT was 20 h for nitrite-N buildup in acrylic fiber wastewater treatment. The ammonium oxidation was almost complete and the transformation from nitrite to nitrate could be avoided. AOB and NOB accounted for 2.9 and 4.7 %, respectively, corresponding to the pH of 7.0. When the pH was 8.5, they were 6.7 and 0.9 %, respectively. AOB dominated nitrifying bacteria, and NOB was actually washed out from the system.

  7. Acrylic acid grafted cellulosic Luffa cylindrical fiber for the removal of dye and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Agarwal, Shilpi; Singh, Prerna; Pathania, Deepak

    2013-10-15

    Acrylic acid grafted cellulosic Luffa cylindrical fiber was utilized for the removal of methylene blue and metal ions from the water system using batch process. The grafted sample used was found to demonstrate a maximum grafting efficiency of 90.8% under concentrations of 0.432×10(-3) mol/L, temperature of 35 °C, time of 60 min and pH of 7.0 respectively. The remarkable improvement in thermal properties of the grafted sample was observed. The formation of new bands in FTIR spectra of grafted sample confirmed the grafting of acrylic acid onto the cellulosic fiber. The maximum adsorption capacity of dye onto adsorbent was observed to be 62.15 mg g(-1) at 175 min. A maximum removal of 45.8% was observed for Mg(2+) as compared to other metal ions. High values of correlation coefficient for methylene blue (0.995) and metal ions such as Mg(2+) (0.996), Ni(2+) (0.995), Zn(2+) (0.996) confirmed the applicability of Langmuir isotherm that assumed a monolayer coverage and uniform activity distribution on the adsorbent surface.

  8. Workplace for manufacturing devices based on optical fiber tapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martan, Tomáš; Honzátko, Pavel; Kaňka, Jiři; Novotný, Karel

    2007-04-01

    Many important optical fiber components are based on tapered optical fibers. A taper made from a single-mode optical fiber can be used, e.g., as a chemical sensor, bio-chemical sensor, or beam expander. A fused pair of tapers can be used as a fiber directional coupler. Fiber tapers can be fabricated in several simple ways. However, a tapering apparatus is required for more sophisticated fabrication of fiber tapers. The paper deals with fabrication and characterization of fiber tapers made from a single-mode optical fiber. A tapering apparatus was built for producing devices based on fiber tapers. The apparatus is universal and enables one to taper optical fibers of different types by a method utilizing stretching a flame-heated section of a silica fiber. Fiber tapers with constant waist length and different waist diameters were fabricated. The transition region of each fiber taper monotonically decreased in diameter along its length from the untapered fiber to the taper waist. The fiber tapers were fabricated with a constant drawing velocity, while the central zone of the original single-mode fiber was heated along a constant length. The spectral transmissions of the manufactured fiber tapers with different parameters were measured by the cut-back method.

  9. Transformation characteristics of organic pollutants in Fered-Fenton process for dry-spun acrylic fiber wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jian; Song, Yonghui; Meng, Xiaoguang; Tu, Xiang; Pic, Jean-Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    The Fered-Fenton process using Ti sheet as cathode and RuO2/Ti as anode was employed for the pretreatment of dry-spun acrylic fiber manufacturing wastewater. The effects of feeding mode and concentration of H2O2 on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency as well as the biodegradability variation during the Fered-Fenton process were investigated. The feeding mode of H2O2 had significant influence on COD removal efficiency: the removal efficiency was 44.8% if all the 60.0 mM H2O2 was fed at once, while it could reach 54.1% if the total H2O2 was divided into six portions and fed six times. The biochemical oxygen demand/COD ratio increased from 0.29 to above 0.68 after 180 min treatment. The transformation characteristics of organic pollutants during the Fered-Fenton process were evaluated by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Most of the refractory organic pollutants with aromatic structure or large molecular weight were decomposed during the Fered-Fenton process.

  10. High Power Fiber Lasers and Applications to Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Martin; McComb, Timothy; Sudesh, Vikas

    2008-09-01

    We summarize recent developments in high power fiber laser technologies and discuss future trends, particularly in their current and future use in manufacturing technologies. We will also describe our current research programs in fiber laser development, ultra-fast and new lasers, and will mention the expectations in these areas for the new Townes Laser Institute. It will focus on new core laser technologies and their applications in medical technologies, advanced manufacturing technologies and defense applications. We will describe a program on large mode area fiber development that includes results with the new gain-guiding approach, as well as high power infra-red fiber lasers. We will review the opportunities for high power fiber lasers in various manufacturing technologies and illustrate this with applications we are pursuing in the areas of femtosecond laser applications, advanced lithographies, and mid-IR technologies.

  11. BN Bonded BN fiber article and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Robert S.

    1981-08-18

    A boron nitride bonded boron nitride fiber article and the method for its manufacture which comprises forming a shaped article with a composition comprising a bonding compound selected from boron oxide and boric acid and a structural fiber selected from the group consisting of boron oxide, boron nitride and partially nitrided boron oxide fibers, heating the composition in an anhydrous gas to a temperature above the melting point of the compound and nitriding the resulting article in ammonia gas.

  12. Process for the manufacture of carbon or graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overhoff, D.; Winkler, E.; Mueller, D.

    1979-01-01

    Carbon or graphite fibers are manufactured by heating polyacrylonitrile fiber materials in various solutions and gases. They are characterized in that the materials are heated to temperatures from 150 to 300 C in a solution containing one or more acids from the group of carbonic acids, sulfonic acids, and/or phenols. The original molecular orientation of the fibers is preserved by the cyclization that occurs before interlacing, which gives very strong and stiff carbon or graphite fibers without additional high temperature stretching treatments.

  13. Method of manufacture of bonded fiber flywheel

    SciTech Connect

    Weyler, G.M. Jr.

    1981-02-01

    Layers of fiberglass cloth, generally forming a circular mass, are prestressed by rotation during the curing of epoxy which surrounds and thereby couples together fibers and layers of the cloth. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  14. Containerless Manufacture of Glass Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Ethridge, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Contamination and crystallization reduced in proposed process. Solid optical fiber drawn from an acoustically levitated lump of molten glass. New material added in solid form, melted and then moved into main body of molten glass. Single axis acoustic levitation furnances levitate glass melts at temperature up to about 700 degrees C. Processing in unit limited to low-melting temperature glasses.

  15. Acrylic and metal based Y-branch plastic optical fiber splitter with optical NOA63 polymer waveguide taper region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsan, Abang Annuar; Shaari, Sahbudin; Rahman, Mohd Kamil Abd.

    2011-01-01

    We proposed a simple low-cost acrylic and metal-based Y-branch plastic optical fiber (POF) splitter which utilizes a low cost optical polymer glue NOA63 as the main waveguiding medium at the waveguide taper region. The device is composed of three sections: an input POF waveguide, a middle waveguide taper region and output POF waveguides. A desktop high speed CNC engraver is utilized to produce the mold inserts used for the optical devices. Short POF fibers are inserted into the engraved slots at the input and output ports. UV curable optical polymer glue NOA63 is injected into the waveguide taper region and cured. The assembling is completed when the top plate is positioned to enclose the device structure and connecting screws are secured. Both POF splitters have an average insertion loss of 7.8 dB, coupling ratio of 55: 45 and 57: 43 for the acrylic and metal-based splitters respectively. The devices have excess loss of 4.82 and 4.73 dB for the acrylic and metal-based splitters respectively.

  16. New Manufacturing Method for Paper filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-11-22

    The study compares commercial available filler products with a new developed “Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material” and how main structural, optical and strength properties are affected by increasing the filler content of at least 5% over commercial values. The study consists of: (i) an overview of paper filler materials used in the paper production process, (ii) discusses the manufacturing technology of lime based filler materials for paper applications, (iii) gives an overview of new emerging paper filler technologies, (iv) discusses a filler evaluation of commercial available digital printing paper products, (v) reports from a detailed handsheet study and 12” pilot plant paper machine trial runs with the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material, and (vi) evaluates and compares commercial filler products and the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material with a life cycle analyses that explains manufacturing, economic and environmental benefits as they are applied to uncoated digital printing papers.

  17. Removal of reactive dyes from textile wastewater by immobilized chitosan upon grafted Jute fibers with acrylic acid by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mahmoud S.

    2015-10-01

    Jute fibers were grafted with acrylic acid by gamma irradiation technique. Chitosan was immobilized upon the grafted Jute fibers to be used as an adsorbent for waste reactive dye. The treated Jute fibers were characterized by using of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of Jute treatment on its thermal stability by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and its mechanical properties were investigated. The adsorption isotherm and the different factors affecting the dye adsorption such as pH and contact time were also studied. It was found that the dye adsorption was enhanced in the low pH range and increased with increasing of the contact time, regardless of temperature change.

  18. Development of multifunctional carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFRCs) - Manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagno, Liberata; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Vietri, Umberto; Barra, Giuseppina; Vertuccio, Luigi; Volponi, Ruggero; Cosentino, Giovanni; De Nicola, Felice; Grilli, Andrea; Spena, Paola

    2014-05-01

    This work describes a successful attempt toward the development of CFRCs based on nanofilled epoxy resins. The epoxy matrix was prepared by mixing a tetrafunctional epoxy precursor with a reactive diluent which allows to reduce the viscosity of the initial epoxy precursor and facilitate the nanofiller dispersion step. As nanofiller, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were embedded in the epoxy matrix with the aim of improving the electrical properties of the resin used to manufacture CFRCs. Panels were manufactured by Resin Film Infusion (RFI) using a non-usual technique to infuse a nano-filled resin into a carbon fiber dry preform.

  19. The analysis of colored acrylic, cotton, and wool textile fibers using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Part 2: comparison with the traditional methods of fiber examination.

    PubMed

    Buzzini, Patrick; Massonnet, Genevieve

    2015-05-01

    In the second part of this survey, the ability of micro-Raman spectroscopy to discriminate 180 fiber samples of blue, black, and red cottons, wools, and acrylics was compared to that gathered with the traditional methods for the examination of textile fibers in a forensic context (including light microscopy methods, UV-vis microspectrophotometry and thin-layer chromatography). This study shows that the Raman technique plays a complementary and useful role to obtain further discriminations after the application of light microscopy methods and UV-vis microspectrophotometry and assure the nondestructive nature of the analytical sequence. These additional discriminations were observed despite the lower discriminating powers of Raman data considered individually, compared to those of light microscopy and UV-vis MSP. This study also confirms that an instrument equipped with several laser lines is necessary for an efficient use as applied to the examination of textile fibers in a forensic setting. PMID:25731068

  20. Short fiber-reinforced cementitious composites manufactured by extrusion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Bin

    The use of short fibers in the cement-based composites is more preferable due to the simplicity and economic nature in fabrication. The short fiber-reinforced cementitious composite (SFRCC) manufactured by the extrusion method show a great improvement in both strength and toughness as compared to the fiber-reinforced composites made by traditional casting methods. This improvement can be attributed to the achievement of low porosity and good interfacial bond in SFRCC under high shear and compressive stress during the extrusion process. In the present study, products of cylinders, sheets, pipes and honeycomb panels incorporating various mineral admixtures such as slag, silica fume, and metakaolin have been manufactured by the extrusion technology. Two kinds of short fibers, ductile polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers and stronger but less ductile glass fibers, were used as the reinforcement in the products. After the specimens were extruded, tension, bending and impact tests were performed to study the mechanical properties of these products. The rheology test was performed for each mix to determine its viscoelastic properties. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) technology were employed to get an insight view of the mechanism. A freezing and thawing experiment (ASTM C666) was also carried to investigate the durability of the specimens. Based on these experimental results, the reinforcing behaviors of these two short fibers were investigated. The enhancing effects of silica fume and metakaolin on the extrudates were compared and discussed. Finally, the optimum amount of silica fume and slag was proposed. Since the key point for a successful extrusion is the properly designed rheology which controls both internal and external flow properties of extrudate, a nonlinear viscoelastic model was applied to investigate the rheological behavior of a movable fresh cementitious composite in an extruder channel. The velocity profile of the

  1. An additive manufacturing acrylic for use in the 32 Tesla all superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Zachary

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is building a world record all superconducting magnet known as the "32T". It requires many thousands of parts, but in particular one kind is unusually expensive to manufacture, called "heater lead covers". These parts are traditionally made out of a glass filled epoxy known as G-10, and conventionally machined. The machining is the expensive portion, as there are many tight tolerance details. The proposal in this paper is to change the material and manufacturing method to additive manufacturing with the material called "RGD 430". The cost per part with traditional machining is approximately 1,500 each. The cost per part with additive manufacturing of RGD 430 is approximately 32.5 each. There will be at least 14 of this style of part on the completed 32T project. Thus the total cost for the project will be reduced from 21,000 to 455, a 98% cost savings. The additive manufacturing also allows the machine designers to expand the dimensions of the part to any shape possible. Through testing of the material it was found to follow the common polymer characteristics. Its linear elastic modulus at cryogenic temperatures approached 10 GPa. The yield strength was always over 100 MPa, when not damaged. The fracture mechanism was repeatable, and brittle in cryogenic environments. The geometric tolerancing of the additive manufacturing process are, as expected extremely precise. The final tolerances for dimensions in the profile of the printer are more precise than +/- 0.10mm. The final tolerances for dimensions in the thickness of the printer are more precise than +/-0.25mm. Before utilizing the material, there should be a few additional tests run on it to ensure it will work in-situ. Those tests are outside the scope of this thesis.

  2. Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing Hydroxyapatite/Epoxide Acrylate Maleic Compound Construction for Craniomaxillofacial Bone Defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Shen, Shunyao; Yu, Hongbo; Shen, Steve Guofang; Wang, Xudong

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing hydroxyapatite (HA)/epoxide acrylate maleic (EAM) compound construction artificial implants for craniomaxillofacial bone defects. Computed tomography, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing and three-dimensional reconstruction, as well as rapid prototyping were performed in 12 patients between 2008 and 2013. The customized HA/EAM compound artificial implants were manufactured through selective laser sintering using a rapid prototyping machine into the exact geometric shapes of the defect. The HA/EAM compound artificial implants were then implanted during surgical reconstruction. Color-coded superimpositions demonstrated the discrepancy between the virtual plan and achieved results using Geomagic Studio. As a result, the HA/EAM compound artificial bone implants were perfectly matched with the facial areas that needed reconstruction. The postoperative aesthetic and functional results were satisfactory. The color-coded superimpositions demonstrated good consistency between the virtual plan and achieved results. The three-dimensional maximum deviation is 2.12 ± 0.65  mm and the three-dimensional mean deviation is 0.27 ± 0.07  mm. No facial nerve weakness or pain was observed at the follow-up examinations. Only 1 implant had to be removed 2 months after the surgery owing to severe local infection. No other complication was noted during the follow-up period. In conclusion, computer-aided, individually fabricated HA/EAM compound construction artificial implant was a good craniomaxillofacial surgical technique that yielded improved aesthetic results and functional recovery after reconstruction.

  3. Assessment of different dietary fibers (tomato fiber, beet root fiber, and inulin) for the manufacture of chopped cooked chicken products.

    PubMed

    Cava, Ramón; Ladero, Luis; Cantero, V; Rosario Ramírez, M

    2012-04-01

    Three dietary fibers (tomato fiber [TF], beet root fiber [BRF], and inulin) at 3 levels of addition (1%, 2%, and 3%) were assessed for the manufacture of chopped, cooked chicken products and compared with a control product without fiber added. The effect of fiber incorporation on (i) batters, (ii) cooked (30 min at 70 °C), and (iii) cooked and stored (for 10 d at 4 °C) chicken products were studied. The addition of the fiber to chicken meat products reduced the pH of chicken batters in proportional to the level of fiber addition. Fiber incorporation increased water-holding capacity but only the addition of TF reduced cook losses. The color of batters and cooked products was significantly modified by the type and level of fiber added. These changes were more noticeable when TF was added. Texture parameters were affected by the incorporation of TF and BRF; they increased the hardness in proportional to the level of addition. The addition of tomato and BRF to chicken meat products reduced lipid oxidation processes. These changes were dependent on the level of fiber added. The reduction of lipid oxidation processes was more marked in TF meat products than in products with other types of fibers. In contrast, the addition level of inulin increased TBA-RS numbers in chicken meat products. Although the addition of TF increased the redness of the meat products, the use of this fiber was more suitable as it reduced the extent of lipid oxidation processes. INDUSTRIAL APPLICATION: Nowadays, the reduction of fat and the increase of fiber content in meat products is one of the main goals of meat industry. Numerous sources of fiber can be added to the meat products; however, before that it is necessary to study their technological effect on raw and cooked meat products in order to evaluate their suitability for meat products manufacture. In addition, some of them could have beneficial effect on meat products conservation that could also increase their shelf life.

  4. Precision laser processing for micro electronics and fiber optic manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Andrew; Osborne, Mike; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Dinkel, Duane W.

    2008-02-01

    The application of laser based materials processing for precision micro scale manufacturing in the electronics and fiber optic industry is becoming increasingly widespread and accepted. This presentation will review latest laser technologies available and discuss the issues to be considered in choosing the most appropriate laser and processing parameters. High repetition rate, short duration pulsed lasers have improved rapidly in recent years in terms of both performance and reliability enabling flexible, cost effective processing of many material types including metal, silicon, plastic, ceramic and glass. Demonstrating the relevance of laser micromachining, application examples where laser processing is in use for production will be presented, including miniaturization of surface mount capacitors by applying a laser technique for demetalization of tracks in the capacitor manufacturing process and high quality laser machining of fiber optics including stripping, cleaving and lensing, resulting in optical quality finishes without the need for traditional polishing. Applications include telecoms, biomedical and sensing. OpTek Systems was formed in 2000 and provide fully integrated systems and sub contract services for laser processes. They are headquartered in the UK and are establishing a presence in North America through a laser processing facility in South Carolina and sales office in the North East.

  5. Removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II) using cellulose extracted from sisal fiber and cellulose-g-acrylic acid copolymer.

    PubMed

    Hajeeth, T; Vijayalakshmi, K; Gomathi, T; Sudha, P N

    2013-11-01

    The extraction of cellulose from sisal fiber was done initially using the steam explosion method. The batch adsorption studies were conducted using the cellulose extracted from the sisal fiber and cellulose-g-acrylic acid as an adsorbent for the removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II) metal ions from aqueous solution. The effect of sorbent amount, agitation period and pH of solution that influence sorption capacity were investigated. From the observed results, it was evident that the adsorption of metal ions increases with the increase in contact time and adsorbent dosage. The optimum pH was found to be 5.0 for the removal of copper(II) and nickel(II) for both the extracted cellulose and cellulose-g-acrylic acid copolymer. The adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The experimental results of the Langmuir, Freundlich isotherms revealed that the adsorption of Cu(II) and nickel(II) ion onto cellulose extracted from the sisal fiber and cellulose-g-acrylic acid copolymer was found to fit well with Freundlich isotherm. The kinetics studies show that the adsorption follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics. From the above results, it was concluded that the cellulose-g-acrylic acid copolymer was found to be an efficient adsorbent. PMID:23994787

  6. Density-modulus relationship in graphite fibers made from acrylic yarns.

    PubMed

    Ezekiel, H M

    1970-07-10

    Three types of polyacrylonitrile yarn were converted to graphite fibers. There was a linear relation between density and Young's modulus of the graphite fibers, the ranges observed being 1.58 to 2.18 grams per cubic centimeter and 25 to 112 x 10(6) pounds per square inch.

  7. 16 CFR 303.33 - Country where textile fiber products are processed or manufactured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Country where textile fiber products are... UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.33 Country where textile fiber products are processed or manufactured. (a) In addition...

  8. Manufacturing of robust natural fiber preforms utilizing bacterial cellulose as binder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Koon-Yang; Shamsuddin, Siti Rosminah; Fortea-Verdejo, Marta; Bismarck, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A novel method of manufacturing rigid and robust natural fiber preforms is presented here. This method is based on a papermaking process, whereby loose and short sisal fibers are dispersed into a water suspension containing bacterial cellulose. The fiber and nanocellulose suspension is then filtered (using vacuum or gravity) and the wet filter cake pressed to squeeze out any excess water, followed by a drying step. This will result in the hornification of the bacterial cellulose network, holding the loose natural fibers together. Our method is specially suited for the manufacturing of rigid and robust preforms of hydrophilic fibers. The porous and hydrophilic nature of such fibers results in significant water uptake, drawing in the bacterial cellulose dispersed in the suspension. The bacterial cellulose will then be filtered against the surface of these fibers, forming a bacterial cellulose coating. When the loose fiber-bacterial cellulose suspension is filtered and dried, the adjacent bacterial cellulose forms a network and hornified to hold the otherwise loose fibers together. The introduction of bacterial cellulose into the preform resulted in a significant increase of the mechanical properties of the fiber preforms. This can be attributed to the high stiffness and strength of the bacterial cellulose network. With this preform, renewable high performance hierarchical composites can also be manufactured by using conventional composite production methods, such as resin film infusion (RFI) or resin transfer molding (RTM). Here, we also describe the manufacturing of renewable hierarchical composites using double bag vacuum assisted resin infusion. PMID:24893649

  9. Manufacturing Of Robust Natural Fiber Preforms Utilizing Bacterial Cellulose as Binder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Koon-Yang; Shamsuddin, Siti Rosminah; Fortea-Verdejo, Marta; Bismarck, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A novel method of manufacturing rigid and robust natural fiber preforms is presented here. This method is based on a papermaking process, whereby loose and short sisal fibers are dispersed into a water suspension containing bacterial cellulose. The fiber and nanocellulose suspension is then filtered (using vacuum or gravity) and the wet filter cake pressed to squeeze out any excess water, followed by a drying step. This will result in the hornification of the bacterial cellulose network, holding the loose natural fibers together. Our method is specially suited for the manufacturing of rigid and robust preforms of hydrophilic fibers. The porous and hydrophilic nature of such fibers results in significant water uptake, drawing in the bacterial cellulose dispersed in the suspension. The bacterial cellulose will then be filtered against the surface of these fibers, forming a bacterial cellulose coating. When the loose fiber-bacterial cellulose suspension is filtered and dried, the adjacent bacterial cellulose forms a network and hornified to hold the otherwise loose fibers together. The introduction of bacterial cellulose into the preform resulted in a significant increase of the mechanical properties of the fiber preforms. This can be attributed to the high stiffness and strength of the bacterial cellulose network. With this preform, renewable high performance hierarchical composites can also be manufactured by using conventional composite production methods, such as resin film infusion (RFI) or resin transfer molding (RTM). Here, we also describe the manufacturing of renewable hierarchical composites using double bag vacuum assisted resin infusion. PMID:24893649

  10. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Doelle, Klaus

    2013-08-25

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections. and it is important to understand the effect that new manufacturing methods of calcium carbonates have on the energy efficiency and paper production. Research conducted under this award showed that the new fiber filler composite material has the potential to increase the paper filler content by up to 5% without losing mechanical properties. Benefits of the technology can be summarized as follows for a 1% filler increase per metric ton of paper produced: (i) production cost savings over $12, (ii) Energy savings of 100,900 btu, (iii) CO{sub 2} emission savings of 33 lbs, and additional savings for wood preparation, pulping, recovery of 203593 btu with a 46lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per 1% filler increase. In addition the technology has the potential to save: (i) additional $3 per ton of bleached pulp produced, (ii) bleaching energy savings of 170,000 btu, (iii) bleaching CO{sub 2} emission savings of 39 lbs, and (iv) additional savings for replacing conventional bleaching chemicals with a sustainable bleaching chemical is estimated to be 900,000 btu with a 205 lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per ton of bleached pulp produced. All the above translates to a estimated annual savings for a 12% filler increase of 296 trillion buts or 51 million barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) or 13.7% of the industries energy demand. This can lead to a increase of renewable energy usage from 56% to close to 70% for the industry sector. CO{sub 2} emission of the industry at a 12% filler increase could be lowered by over 39 million tons annually

  11. Monitoring techniques for the manufacture of tapered optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Mullaney, Kevin; Correia, Ricardo; Staines, Stephen E; James, Stephen W; Tatam, Ralph P

    2015-10-01

    The use of a range of optical techniques to monitor the process of fabricating optical fiber tapers is investigated. Thermal imaging was used to optimize the alignment of the optical system; the transmission spectrum of the fiber was monitored to confirm that the tapers had the required optical properties and the strain induced in the fiber during tapering was monitored using in-line optical fiber Bragg gratings. Tapers were fabricated with diameters down to 5 μm and with waist lengths of 20 mm using single-mode SMF-28 fiber. PMID:26479631

  12. 16 CFR 303.8 - Procedure for establishing generic names for manufactured fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedure for establishing generic names for manufactured fibers. 303.8 Section 303.8 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT §...

  13. A New Fiber Preform with Nanocarbon Binder for Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite by Liquid Molding Process.

    PubMed

    Seong, Dong Gi; Ha, Jong Rok; Lee, Jea Uk; Lee, Wonoh; Kim, Byung Sun

    2015-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite has been a good candidate of lightweight structural component in the automotive industry. As fast production speed is essential to apply the composite materials for the mass production area such as automotive components, the high speed liquid composite molding processes have been developed. Fast resin injection through the fiber preform by high pressure is required to improve the production speed, but it often results in undesirable deformations of the fiber preform which causes defectives in size and properties of the final composite products. In order to prevent the undesirable deformation and improve the stability of preform shape, polymer type binder materials are used. More stable fiber preform can be obtained by increasing the amount of binder material, but it disturbs the resin impregnation through the fiber preform. In this study, carbon nanomaterials such as graphene oxide were embedded on the surface of carbon fiber by electrophoretic deposition method in order to improve the shape stability of fiber preform and interfacial bonding between polymer and the reinforcing fiber. Effects of the modified reinforcing fiber were investigated in two respects. One is to increase the binding energy between fiber tows, and the other is to increase the interfacial bonding between polymer matrix and fiber surface. The effects were analyzed by measuring the binding force of fiber preform and interlaminar shear strength of the composite. This study also investigated the high speed liquid molding process of the composite materials composed of polymer matrix and the carbon fiber preforms embedded by carbon nanomaterials. Process parameter such as permeability of fiber preform was measured to investigate the effect of nanoscale surface modification on the macroscale processing condition for composite manufacturing. PMID:26726642

  14. A New Fiber Preform with Nanocarbon Binder for Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite by Liquid Molding Process.

    PubMed

    Seong, Dong Gi; Ha, Jong Rok; Lee, Jea Uk; Lee, Wonoh; Kim, Byung Sun

    2015-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite has been a good candidate of lightweight structural component in the automotive industry. As fast production speed is essential to apply the composite materials for the mass production area such as automotive components, the high speed liquid composite molding processes have been developed. Fast resin injection through the fiber preform by high pressure is required to improve the production speed, but it often results in undesirable deformations of the fiber preform which causes defectives in size and properties of the final composite products. In order to prevent the undesirable deformation and improve the stability of preform shape, polymer type binder materials are used. More stable fiber preform can be obtained by increasing the amount of binder material, but it disturbs the resin impregnation through the fiber preform. In this study, carbon nanomaterials such as graphene oxide were embedded on the surface of carbon fiber by electrophoretic deposition method in order to improve the shape stability of fiber preform and interfacial bonding between polymer and the reinforcing fiber. Effects of the modified reinforcing fiber were investigated in two respects. One is to increase the binding energy between fiber tows, and the other is to increase the interfacial bonding between polymer matrix and fiber surface. The effects were analyzed by measuring the binding force of fiber preform and interlaminar shear strength of the composite. This study also investigated the high speed liquid molding process of the composite materials composed of polymer matrix and the carbon fiber preforms embedded by carbon nanomaterials. Process parameter such as permeability of fiber preform was measured to investigate the effect of nanoscale surface modification on the macroscale processing condition for composite manufacturing.

  15. Cryogenic Fiber Optic Assemblies for Spaceflight Environments: Design, Manufacturing, Testing, and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomes, W. Joe; Ott, Melanie N.; Chuska, Richard; Switzer, Robert; Onuma, Eleanya; Blair, Diana; Frese, Erich; Matyseck, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic assemblies have been used on spaceflight missions for many years as an enabling technology for routing, transmitting, and detecting optical signals. Due to the overwhelming success of NASA in implementing fiber optic assemblies on spaceflight science-based instruments, system scientists increasingly request fibers that perform in extreme environments while still maintaining very high optical transmission, stability, and reliability. Many new applications require fiber optic assemblies that will operate down to cryogenic temperatures as low as 20 Kelvin. In order for the fiber assemblies to operate with little loss in optical throughput at these extreme temperatures requires a system level approach all the way from how the fiber assembly is manufactured to how it is held, routed, and integrated. The NASA Goddard Code 562 Photonics Group has been designing, manufacturing, testing, and integrating fiber optics for spaceflight and other high reliability applications for nearly 20 years. Design techniques and lessons learned over the years are consistently applied to developing new fiber optic assemblies that meet these demanding environments. System level trades, fiber assembly design methods, manufacturing, testing, and integration will be discussed. Specific recent examples of ground support equipment for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST); the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2); and others will be included.

  16. Study on parameters affecting the mechanical properties of dry fiber bundles during continuous composite manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, A.; Schledjewski, R.

    2016-07-01

    For continuous manufacturing processes mechanical preloading of the fibers occurs during the delivery of the fibers from the spool creel to the actual manufacturing process step. Moreover preloading of the dry roving bundles might be mandatory, e.g. during winding, to be able to produce high quality components. On the one hand too high tensile loads within dry roving bundles might result in a catastrophic failure and on the other hand the part produced under too low pre-tension might have low quality and mechanical properties. In this work, load conditions influencing mechanical properties of dry glass fiber bundles during continuous composite manufacturing processes were analyzed. Load conditions, i.e. fiber delivery speed, necessary pre-tension and other effects of the delivery system during continuous fiber winding, were chosen in process typical ranges. First, the strain rate dependency under static tensile load conditions was investigated. Furthermore different free gauge lengths up to 1.2 m, interactions between fiber points of contact regarding influence of sizing as well as impregnation were tested and the effect of twisting on the mechanical behavior of dry glass fiber bundles during the fiber delivery was studied.

  17. Flame-resistant kapok fiber manufactured using gamma ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Hyeong, Min Ho; An, Byung Chull; Lee, Eun Mi; Lee, Seung Sik; Kim, Jin-Hong; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Cho, Jae-Young

    2009-07-01

    Owing to homogeneous hollow tube shape and hydrophobicity of kapok fiber, the usages of this fiber are various such as fiberfill in pillows, quilts, non-woven fabric for oil spill cleanup and plastic green house. Even though kapok fiber is able to apply various industrial usages, it has a serious disadvantage which is the extreme sensitivity to spark or flame. Therefore, we try to make flame-resistant kapok fiber using gamma ray. The radiation caused loss of hydrophobic compounds in kapok fiber and no morphological change, especially fine hollow tube shape, was observed. The lignin contents were negligible changed after gamma irradiation. However, the building units of lignin polymer such as coniferyl alcohol, and sinapyl alcohol were significantly changed that is, functional group as a methoxyl group from lignin polymer was cleaved by gamma irradiation. Based on the results of removal of hydrophobic compounds and cleavage of methoxyl group from lignin polymer, kapok fiber can be converted into a flame-resistant fiber by gamma ray treatment.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Aluminum Manufactured by High-Pressure Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachold, Franziska; Singer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced aluminum was produced by a specially adapted high-pressure die casting process. The MMC has a fiber volume fraction of 27%. Complete infiltration was achieved by preheating the bidirectional, PAN-based carbon fiber body with IR-emitters to temperatures of around 750 °C. The degradation of the fibers, due to attack of atmospheric oxygen at temperatures above 600 °C, was limited by heating them in argon-rich atmosphere. Additionally, the optimization of heating time and temperature prevented fiber degradation. Only the strength of the outer fibers is reduced by 40% at the most. The fibers in core of fiber body are nearly undamaged. In spite of successful manufacturing, the tensile strength of the MMC is below strength of the matrix material. Also unidirectional MMCs with a fiber volume fraction of 8% produced under the same conditions, lack of the reinforcing effect. Two main reasons for the unsatisfactory mechanical properties were identified: First, the fiber-free matrix, which covers the reinforced core, prevents effective load transfer from the matrix to the fibers. And second, the residual stresses in the fiber-free zones are as high as 100 MPa. This causes premature failure in the matrix. From this, it follows that the local reinforcement of an actual part is limited. The stress distribution caused by residual stresses and by loading needs to be known. In this way, the reinforcing phase can be placed and aligned accordingly. Otherwise delamination and premature failure might occur.

  19. Basalt fiber manufacturing technology and the possibility of its use in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavaeva, E.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Nikitin, V.; Cherepennikov, Yu; Lysakov, A.

    2015-11-01

    The article touches upon the technology of basalt fiber manufacturing and prospects of its use in dental practice. Two kinds of construction using basalt fiber have been proposed. The first one is a splinting construction for mobile teeth and the second one is the reinforced base for removable plate-denture. The work presents the results of the investigation of physical and mechanical properties of the constructions based on basalt fiber. It also describes the aspects of biomechanical modeling of such constructions in the ANSYS software package. The results of the investigation have proved that applying constructions using basalt fiber is highly promising for prosthetic dentistry practice.

  20. Method of Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method for forming a carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines is discussed. The process includes the steps of braiding carbon fiber into a rope thereby forming a cylindrically shaped valve stem portion and continuing to braid said fiber while introducing into the braiding carbon fiber rope a carbon matrix plug having an outer surface in a net shape of a valve head thereby forming a valve head portion. The said carbon matrix plug acting as a mandrel over which said carbon fiber rope is braided, said carbon fiber rope and carbon matrix plug forming a valve head portion suitable for mating with a valve seat; cutting said braided carbon valve stem portion at one end to form a valve tip and cutting said braided carbon fiber after said valve head portion to form a valve face and thus provide a composite valve preform; and densifying said preform by embedding the braided carbon in a matrix of carbon to convert said valve stem portion to a valve stem and said valve head portion to a valve head thereby providing said composite valve.

  1. Critical fiber length technique for composite manufacturing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sivley, G.N.; Vandiver, T.L.; Dougherty, N.S.; Pinkleton, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    An improved injection technique for composite structures has been cooperatively developed by the U.S. Army Missile Command (MICOM) and Rockwell International (RI). This process simultaneously injects chopped fiberglass fibers and an epoxy resin matrix into a mold. Four injection techniques: (1){open_quotes}Little Willie{close_quotes} RTM system, (2) Pressure Vat system, (3) Pressure Vat system with vacuum assistance, and (4) Injection gun system, were investigated for use with a 304.8 mm x 304.8 mm x 5.08 mm (12 in x 12 in x 0.2 in) flat plaque mold. The driving factors in the process optimization included: fiber length, fiber weight, matrix viscosity, injection pressure, flow rate, and tool design. At fiber weights higher than 30 percent, the injection gun appears to have advantages over the other systems investigated. Results of an experimental investigation are reviewed in this paper. The investigation of injection techniques is the initial part of the research involved in a developing process, {open_quotes}Critical Fiber Length Technique{close_quotes}. This process will use the data collected in injection experiment along with mechanical properties derived from coupon test data to be incorporated into a composite material design code. The {open_quotes}Critical Fiber Length Technique{close_quotes} is part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) established in 1994 between MICOM and RI.

  2. Fiber Volume Fraction Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid resin is injected into the tapered injection chamber through the injection slots to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements in a resin injection pultrusion process. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the centerline causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to effectively penetrate through the fibers and achieve complete wetout. Fiber volume fraction in the final pultruded composite is a key to decide the mechanical and/or chemical properties of the composite. If the fiber volume fraction is too high, more fibers are squeezed together creating a fiber lean region near the wall and fiber rich region away from the wall. Also, the design of the injection chamber significantly affects the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. A tapered injection chamber is considered such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures due to the taper angle of the injection chamber. In this study, the effect of fiber volume fraction on the fiber reinforcement compaction and complete fiber wetout for a tapered injection chamber is investigated.

  3. Manufacture of fiber-epoxy test specimens: Including associated jigs and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S. B.; Felbeck, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental work on the manufacture and strength of graphite-epoxy composites is considered. The correct data and thus a true assessment of the strength properties based on a proper and scientifically modeled test specimen with engineered design, construction, and manufacture has led to claims of a very broad spread in optimized values. Such behavior is in the main due to inadequate control during manufacture of test specimen, improper curing, and uneven scatter in the fiber orientation. The graphite fibers are strong but brittle. Even with various epoxy matrices and volume fraction, the fracture toughness is still relatively low. Graphite-epoxy prepreg tape was investigated as a sandwich construction with intermittent interlaminar bonding between the laminates in order to produce high strength, high fracture toughness composites. The quality and control of manufacture of the multilaminate test specimen blanks was emphasized. The dimensions, orientation and cure must be meticulous in order to produce the desired mix.

  4. Innovative design of composite structures: Design, manufacturing, and testing of plates utilizing curvilinear fiber trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Rust, R. J.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As a means of improving structural design, the concept of fabricating flat plates containing holes by incorporating curvilinear fiber trajectories to transmit loads around the hole is studied. In the present discussion this concept is viewed from a structural level, where access holes, windows, doors, and other openings are of significant size. This is opposed to holes sized for mechanical fasteners. Instead of cutting the important load-bearing fibers at the hole edge, as a conventional straightline design does, the curvilinear design preserves the load-bearing fibers by orienting them in smooth trajectories around the holes, their loading not ending abruptly at the hole edge. Though the concept of curvilinear fiber trajectories has been studied before, attempts to manufacture and test such plates have been limited. This report describes a cooperative effort between Cincinnati Milacron Inc., NASA Langley Research Center, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University to design, manufacture, and test plates using the curvilinear fiber trajectory concept. The paper discusses details of the plate design, details of the manufacturing, and a summary of results from testing the plates with inplane compressive buckling loads and tensile loads. Comparisons between the curvilinear and conventional straightline fiber designs based on measurements and observation are made. Failure modes, failure loads, strains, deflections, and other key responses are compared.

  5. Automated fiber placement composite manufacturing: The mission at MSFC's Productivity Enhancement Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John H.; Pelham, Larry I.

    1993-01-01

    Automated fiber placement is a manufacturing process used for producing complex composite structures. It is a notable leap to the state-of-the-art in technology for automated composite manufacturing. The fiber placement capability was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Productivity Enhancement Complex in 1992 in collaboration with Thiokol Corporation to provide materials and processes research and development, and to fabricate components for many of the Center's Programs. The Fiber Placement System (FPX) was developed as a distinct solution to problems inherent to other automated composite manufacturing systems. This equipment provides unique capabilities to build composite parts in complex 3-D shapes with concave and other asymmetrical configurations. Components with complex geometries and localized reinforcements usually require labor intensive efforts resulting in expensive, less reproducible components; the fiber placement system has the features necessary to overcome these conditions. The mechanical systems of the equipment have the motion characteristics of a filament winder and the fiber lay-up attributes of a tape laying machine, with the additional capabilities of differential tow payout speeds, compaction and cut-restart to selectively place the correct number of fibers where the design dictates. This capability will produce a repeatable process resulting in lower cost and improved quality and reliability.

  6. Automated fiber placement composite manufacturing: The mission at MSFC's Productivity Enhancement Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, John H.; Pelham, Larry I.

    1993-02-01

    Automated fiber placement is a manufacturing process used for producing complex composite structures. It is a notable leap to the state-of-the-art in technology for automated composite manufacturing. The fiber placement capability was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Productivity Enhancement Complex in 1992 in collaboration with Thiokol Corporation to provide materials and processes research and development, and to fabricate components for many of the Center's Programs. The Fiber Placement System (FPX) was developed as a distinct solution to problems inherent to other automated composite manufacturing systems. This equipment provides unique capabilities to build composite parts in complex 3-D shapes with concave and other asymmetrical configurations. Components with complex geometries and localized reinforcements usually require labor intensive efforts resulting in expensive, less reproducible components; the fiber placement system has the features necessary to overcome these conditions. The mechanical systems of the equipment have the motion characteristics of a filament winder and the fiber lay-up attributes of a tape laying machine, with the additional capabilities of differential tow payout speeds, compaction and cut-restart to selectively place the correct number of fibers where the design dictates. This capability will produce a repeatable process resulting in lower cost and improved quality and reliability.

  7. Design and Manufacturing of Tow-Steered Composite Shells Using Fiber Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Tatting, Brian F.; Smith, Brett H.; Stevens, Randy S.; Occhipiniti, Gina P.; Swift, Jonathan B.; Achary, David C.; Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced composite shells that may offer the potential to improve the structural performance of future aircraft fuselage structures were developed under this joint NASA-industry collaborative effort. Two cylindrical shells with tailored, tow-steered layups and continuously varying fiber angle orientations were designed and built at the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing - Louisiana Partnership. The shells were fabricated from unidirectional IM7/8552 graphite-epoxy pre-preg slit tape material fiber-placed on a constant-diameter mandrel. Each shell had the same nominal 8-ply [plus or minus 45/plus or minus Theta]s layup, where the nominal fiber angle in the tow-steered plies varied continuously from 10 degrees along the crown to 45 degrees on each side, then back to 10 degrees on the keel. One shell was fabricated with all 24 tows placed during each pass of the fiber placement machine, resulting in many tow overlaps on the shell surface. The fiber placement machine's individual tow cut/restart capability was also used to manufacture a second shell with tow drops and a more uniform laminate thickness. This paper presents an overview of the detailed design and manufacturing processes for these shells, and discusses issues encountered during their fabrication and post-cure evaluation. Future plans for structural testing and analyses of the shells are also discussed.

  8. Influence of thermal history on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber-acrylate composites cured by electron beam and thermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Vautard, Frederic; Ozcan, Soydan; Poland, Laura E; Meyer III, Harry M

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of an acrylate resin and its carbon fiber composite, as well as the adhesion strength between them, were characterized in the case of thermal and electron beam curing. The thermal history during the cure was also recorded. It was shown that the properties of the matrix were similar but that the thermal history during the curing had a direct influence on the type of interactions that were generated at the interface, leading to different level of adhesion strength and level of performance for the associated composites. In the case of a thermal cure, the thermal profile allowed the generation of covalent bonding at the interface, leading to a high level of adhesion strength, which was not the case for electron beam curing. The thermal history during the cure appeared to be a determining parameter for the level of performance of composites cured by electron beam.

  9. Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Fiber Glass Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Haun

    2005-07-15

    The U.S. fiber glass industry disposes of more than 260,000 tons of industrial fiber glass waste in landfills annually. New technology is needed to reprocess this industrial waste into useful products. A low-cost energy-saving method of manufacturing ceramic tile from fiber glass waste was developed. The technology is based on sintering fiber glass waste at 700-900 degrees C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 degrees C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 degrees C. The process also eliminates other energy intensive processing steps, including mining and transportation of raw materials, spray-drying to produce granulated powder, drying pressed tile, and glazing. The technology completely transforms fiber glass waste into a dense ceramic product, so that all future environmental problems in the handling and disposal of the fibers is eliminated. The processing steps were developed and optimized to produce glossy and matte surface finishes for wall and floor tile applications. High-quality prototype tile samples were processed for demonstration and tile standards testing. A Market Assessment confirmed the market potential for tile products produced by the technology. Manufacturing equipment trials were successfully conducted for each step of the process. An industrial demonstration plant was designed, including equipment and operating cost analysis. A fiber glass manufacturer was selected as an industrial partner to commercialize the technology. A technology development and licensing agreement was completed with the industrial partner. Haun labs will continue working to transfer the technology and assist the industrial partner with commercialization beyond the DOE project.

  10. The effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resin: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Anasane, Nayana; Ahirrao, Yogesh; Chitnis, Deepa; Meshram, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Denture fracture is an unresolved problem in complete denture prosthodontics. However, the repaired denture often experiences a refracture at the repaired site due to poor transverse strength. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 specimens of heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin of dimensions 64 × 10 × 2.5 mm were fabricated. Fifteen intact specimens served as the control and 120 test specimens were divided into four groups (30 specimens each), depending upon the joint surface contour (butt, bevel, rabbet and round), with two subgroups based on type of the repair. Half of the specimens were repaired with plain repair resin and the other half with glass fibers reinforced repair resin. Transverse strength of the specimens was determined using three-point bending test. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test (α= 0.05). Results: Transverse strength values for all repaired groups were significantly lower than those for the control group (P < 0.001) (88.77 MPa), with exception of round surface design repaired with glass fiber reinforced repair resin (89.92 MPa) which was significantly superior to the other joint surface contours (P < 0.001). Glass fiber reinforced resin significantly improved the repaired denture base resins as compared to the plain repair resin (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Specimens repaired with glass fiber reinforced resin and round surface design exhibited highest transverse strength; hence, it can be advocated for repair of denture base resins. PMID:23946739

  11. Effect of different palatal vault shapes on the dimensional stability of glass fiber-reinforced heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture base material

    PubMed Central

    Dalkiz, Mehmet; Arslan, Demet; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza; Bilgin, M.Selim; Aykul, Halil

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different palatal vault shapes on the dimensional stability of a glass fiber reinforced heat polymerized acrylic resin denture base material. Methods: Three edentulous maxilla with shallow, deep and medium shaped palatal vaults were selected and elastomeric impressions were obtained. A maxillary cast with four reference points (A, B, C, and D) was prepared to serve as control. Point (A) was marked in the anterior midline of the edentulous ridge in the incisive papillary region, points (B) and (C) were marked in the right and left posterior midlines of the edentulous ridge in the second molar regions, and point (D) was marked in the posterior palatal midline near the fovea palatina media (Figure 2). To determine linear dimensional changes, distances between four reference points (A–B, A–C, A–D and B–C) were initially measured with a metal gauge accurate within 0.1 mm under a binocular stereo light microscope and data (mm) were recorded. Results: No significant difference of interfacial distance was found in sagittal and frontal sections measured 24 h after polymerization and after 30 days of water storage in any of experimental groups (P>.05). Significant difference of linear dimension were found in all experimental groups (P<.01) between measurements made 24 h after polymerization of specimens and 30 days after water storage. Conclusion: Palatal vault shape and fiber impregnation into the acrylic resin bases did not affect the magnitude of interfacial gaps between the bases and the stone cast surfaces. PMID:22229010

  12. LOW-COST COMPOSITES IN VEHICLE MANUFACTURE - Natural-fiber-reinforced polymer composites in automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Holbery, Jim; Houston, Dan

    2006-11-01

    In the last decade, natural fiber composites have experienced rapid growth in the European automotive market, and this trend appears to be global in scale, provided the cost and performance is justified against competing technologies. However, mass reduction, recyclability, and performance requirements can be met today by competing systems such as injection-molded unreinforced thermoplastics; natural fiber composites will continue to expand their role in automotive applications only if such technical challenges as moisture stability, fiber-polymer interface compatibility, and consistent, repeatable fiber sources are available to supply automotive manufacturers. Efforts underway by Tier I and II automotive suppliers to explore hybrid glass-natural fiber systems, as well as applications that exploit such capabilities as natural fiber sound dampening characteristics, could very well have far-reaching effects. In addition, the current development underway of bio-based resins such as Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biodegradable polyesters and bio-based polyols could provide fully bio-based composite options to future automotive designers. In short, the development of the natural fiber composite market would make a positive impact on farmers and small business owners on a global scale, reduce US reliance on foreign oil, improve environmental quality through the development of a sustainable resource supply chain, and achieve a better CO2 balance over the vehicle?s lifetime with near-zero net greenhouse gas emissions.

  13. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  14. 40 CFR 414.30 - Applicability; description of the other fibers subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (*). *Acrylic Fibers (85% Polyacrylonitrile) *Cellulose Acetate Fibers *Fluorocarbon (Teflon) Fibers *Modacrylic... (Quiana) *Polyaramid (Kevlar) Resin-Fibers *Polyaramid (Nomex) Resin-Fibers *Polyester...

  15. 40 CFR 414.30 - Applicability; description of the other fibers subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... those fibers and fiber groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Acrylic...) *Polyaramid (Kevlar) Resin-Fibers *Polyaramid (Nomex) Resin-Fibers *Polyester Fibers *Polyethylene...

  16. 40 CFR 414.30 - Applicability; description of the other fibers subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... those fibers and fiber groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Acrylic...) *Polyaramid (Kevlar) Resin-Fibers *Polyaramid (Nomex) Resin-Fibers *Polyester Fibers *Polyethylene...

  17. 40 CFR 414.30 - Applicability; description of the other fibers subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... those fibers and fiber groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Acrylic...) *Polyaramid (Kevlar) Resin-Fibers *Polyaramid (Nomex) Resin-Fibers *Polyester Fibers *Polyethylene...

  18. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  19. Methyl acrylate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl acrylate ; CASRN 96 - 33 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  20. Evaluation of shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Ana Paula G. O.; Karam, Leandro Z.; Galvão, José R.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was evaluate the shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique. Two implants were placed in an artificial bone, with the two transfer copings joined with dental floss and acrylic resins; two dental resins are used. Measurements of deformation and temperature were performed with Fiber Braggs grating sensor for 17 minutes. The results revealed that one type of resin shows greater values of polymerization shrinkage than the other. Pattern resins did not present lower values of shrinkage, as usually reported by the manufacturer.

  1. Interconnected, microporous hollow fibers for tissue engineering: commercially relevant, industry standard scale-up manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Tuin, Stephen A; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-09-01

    Significant progress has been achieved in the field of tissue engineering to create functional tissue using biomimetic three-dimensional scaffolds that support cell growth, proliferation, and extracellular matrix production. However, many of these constructs are severely limited by poor nutrient diffusion throughout the tissue-engineered construct, resulting in cell death and tissue necrosis at the core. Nutrient transport can be improved by creation and use of scaffolds with hollow and microporous fibers, significantly improving permeability and nutrient diffusion. The purpose of this review is to highlight current technological advances in the fabrication of hollow fibers with interconnected pores throughout the fiber walls, with specific emphasis on developing hollow porous nonwoven fabrics for use as tissue engineering constructs via industry standard processing technologies: Spunbond processing and polymer melt extrusion. We outline current methodologies to create hollow and microporous scaffolds with the aim of translating that knowledge to the production of such fibers into nonwoven tissue engineering scaffolds via spunbond technology, a commercially relevant and viable melt extrusion manufacturing approach that allows for facile scale-up.

  2. The Effects of Environmental Exposure on the Optical, Physical, and Chemical Properties of Manufactured Fibers of Natural Origin.

    PubMed

    Brinsko, Kelly M; Sparenga, Sebastian; King, Meggan

    2016-09-01

    Manufactured fibers derived from natural origins include viscose rayon, azlon, and polylactic acid (PLA). A 2-year study was conducted to document any changes these fibers undergo as a result of exposure to various environmental conditions. Fabric swatches representing each fiber type were exposed to freshwater, saltwater, heat, cold, ultraviolet light, or composter conditions. Fibers from the swatches were periodically analyzed using polarized light microscopy and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. Fiber solubility and melting-point behavior were measured every 6 months. Except for the complete degradation of viscose rayon in the composter, saltwater, and freshwater environs, no changes in the optical properties, infrared spectra, solubility, or melting points of the remaining fibers in any of the environments were observed. However, microscopic morphological changes were observed in fibers from two azlon swatches submerged in freshwater and saltwater, two PLA swatches exposed to ultraviolet light, and two viscose rayon swatches exposed to ultraviolet light. PMID:27351454

  3. The Effects of Environmental Exposure on the Optical, Physical, and Chemical Properties of Manufactured Fibers of Natural Origin.

    PubMed

    Brinsko, Kelly M; Sparenga, Sebastian; King, Meggan

    2016-09-01

    Manufactured fibers derived from natural origins include viscose rayon, azlon, and polylactic acid (PLA). A 2-year study was conducted to document any changes these fibers undergo as a result of exposure to various environmental conditions. Fabric swatches representing each fiber type were exposed to freshwater, saltwater, heat, cold, ultraviolet light, or composter conditions. Fibers from the swatches were periodically analyzed using polarized light microscopy and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. Fiber solubility and melting-point behavior were measured every 6 months. Except for the complete degradation of viscose rayon in the composter, saltwater, and freshwater environs, no changes in the optical properties, infrared spectra, solubility, or melting points of the remaining fibers in any of the environments were observed. However, microscopic morphological changes were observed in fibers from two azlon swatches submerged in freshwater and saltwater, two PLA swatches exposed to ultraviolet light, and two viscose rayon swatches exposed to ultraviolet light.

  4. Manufacturing methods and technology program for ruggedized tactical fiber optic cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Hand, C.

    1981-04-01

    This report covers manufacturing methods and technology program for ruggedized tactical fiber optic cable. The scope of this effort, as reported herein, includes the following tasks and achievements: (a) Cable process optimization -- (1) Produce trial runs of confirmatory; (2) Complete lay length samples (two lays); (3) Perform optical and mechanical tests on trial confirmatory samples; and (4) Produce samples and evaluate polyurethanes (three types). (b) Use of facilities -- (1) Operate high speed strander, Kevlar braider, and extruder at production speeds. (c) Secondary performance -- (1) Evaluate low temperature performance.

  5. Manufacturing scale-up of electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) fibers containing tenofovir for vaginal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Krogstad, Emily A.; Woodrow, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospun fibers containing antiretroviral drugs have recently been investigated as a new dosage form for topical microbicides against HIV-1. However, little work has been done to evaluate the scalability of the fiber platform for pharmaceutical production of medical fabrics. Scalability and cost-effectiveness are essential criteria in developing fibers as a practical platform for use as a microbicide and for translation to clinical use. To address this critical gap in the development of fiber-based vaginal dosage forms, we assessed the scale-up potential of drug-eluting fibers delivering tenofovir (TFV), a nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor and lead compound for topical HIV-1 chemoprophylaxis. Here we describe the process of free-surface electrospinning to scale up production of TFV fibers, and evaluate key attributes of the finished products such as fiber morphology, drug crystallinity, and drug loading and release kinetics. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) containing up to 60 wt% TFV was successfully electrospun into fibers using a nozzle-free production-scale electrospinning instrument. Actual TFV loading in fibers increased with increasing weight percent TFV in solution, and encapsulation efficiency was improved by maintaining TFV solubility and preventing drug sedimentation during batch processing. These results define important solution and processing parameters for scale-up production of TFV drug-eluting fibers by wire electrospinning, which may have significant implications for pharmaceutical manufacturing of fiber-based medical fabrics for clinical use. PMID:25169075

  6. Multifunctional fiber optic sensor for manufacturing of thermoset matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Russell G.; Shinpaugh, Kevin A.; Duncan, Paul G.; Loos, Alfred C.; Claus, Richard O.

    1997-05-01

    Despite the attractive mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites, which include high specific stiffness and strength, their use has been limited in many cost-sensitive applications due to high manufacturing costs. Since the processing of these materials is a major component of the cost of the finished product, the development of adaptive systems using feedback sensors for control of the composite cure process will accelerate the adoption of composites technology for diverse commercial and industrial applications. We present an embeddable fiber optic sensor for monitoring of the cure of thermoset resins by measuring the rheology of the polymer. By coupling a fiber optic strain sensor to an actuator, it is possible to realize a miniature dynamic mechanical analysis system. If the sensor is immersed in a curing thermoset resin, and a time-varying excitation is applied to the actuator, the sensor can be made to vibrate harmonically. By comparing the phase of the excitation to the phase of the resulting strain as detected by the strain sensor, it is possible to derive the loss tangent of the resin, which can be related to the degree of cure of the resin. After the resin hardens, the embedded sensor may be used as a conventional fiber optic strain gage to measure in-service strains.

  7. Develop Roll-to-Roll Manufacturing Process of ZrO2 Nanocrystals/Acrylic Nanocomposites for High Refractive Index Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Pooran C.; Compton, Brett G.; Li, Jianlin; Jellison, Jr, Gerald Earle; Duty, Chad E; Chen, Zhiyun

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to develop and evaluate ZrO2/acrylic nanocomposite coatings for integrated optoelectronic applications. The formulations engineered to be compatible with roll-to-roll process were evaluated in terms of optical and dielectric properties. The uniform distribution of the ZrO2 nanocrystals in the polymer matrix resulted in highly tunable refractive index and dielectric response suitable for advanced photonic and electronic device applications.

  8. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, Jr., Joseph K.; Gensse, Chantal

    1993-01-01

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials.

  9. Characterization of embedded fiber optic strain sensors into metallic structures via ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomer, John J.; Hehr, Adam J.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors measure deviation in a reflected wavelength of light to detect in-situ strain. These sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference, and the inclusion of multiple FBGs on the same fiber allows for a seamlessly integrated sensing network. FBGs are attractive for embedded sensing in aerospace applications due to their small noninvasive size and prospect of constant, real-time nondestructive evaluation. In this study, FBG sensors are embedded in aluminum 6061 via ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM), a rapid prototyping process that uses high power ultrasonic vibrations to weld similar and dissimilar metal foils together. UAM was chosen due to the desire to embed FBG sensors at low temperatures, a requirement that excludes other additive processes such as selective laser sintering or fusion deposition modeling. In this paper, the embedded FBGs are characterized in terms of birefringence losses, post embedding strain shifts, consolidation quality, and strain sensing performance. Sensors embedded into an ASTM test piece are compared against an exterior surface mounted foil strain gage at both room and elevated temperatures using cyclic tensile tests.

  10. 77 FR 73978 - Foreign-Trade Zone 148-Knoxville, TN, Toho Tenax America, Inc. (Carbon Fiber Manufacturing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... polyacrylonitrile fiber (Board Order 1868, 77 FR 69435, 11/19/2012). Board Order 1868 did not include authority to... Manufacturing Authority), Opening of Comment Period on New Evidence On November 7, 2012, the Foreign-Trade Zones... submission to the FTZ Board (incorporating information from TTA) that included new evidence in response...

  11. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, J.K. Jr.; Gensse, C.

    1993-09-14

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials. 8 figures.

  12. Mass-manufacturable polymer microfluidic device for dual fiber optical trapping.

    PubMed

    De Coster, Diane; Ottevaere, Heidi; Vervaeke, Michael; Van Erps, Jürgen; Callewaert, Manly; Wuytens, Pieter; Simpson, Stephen H; Hanna, Simon; De Malsche, Wim; Thienpont, Hugo

    2015-11-30

    We present a microfluidic chip in Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) for optical trapping of particles in an 80µm wide microchannel using two counterpropagating single-mode beams. The trapping fibers are separated from the sample fluid by 70µm thick polymer walls. We calculate the optical forces that act on particles flowing in the microchannel using wave optics in combination with non-sequential ray-tracing and further mathematical processing. Our results are compared with a theoretical model and the Mie theory. We use a novel fabrication process that consists of a premilling step and ultraprecision diamond tooling for the manufacturing of the molds and double-sided hot embossing for replication, resulting in a robust microfluidic chip for optical trapping. In a proof-of-concept demonstration, we show the trapping capabilities of the hot embossed chip by trapping spherical beads with a diameter of 6µm, 8µm and 10µm and use the power spectrum analysis of the trapped particle displacements to characterize the trap strength.

  13. [Use of algarrobo (Prosopis chilensis (Mol) Stuntz) flour as protein and dietary fiber source in cookies and fried chips manufacture].

    PubMed

    Escobar, Berta; Estévez, Ana María; Fuentes, Carolina; Venegas, Daniela

    2009-06-01

    Limiting amino acids of the protein from chilean "algarrobo" are isoleucine, theronine and methionine/cyteine. Cereals and legume blends allow to improve the amino acid balance, since legume have more lysine, and cereals are richer in sulphur amino acids. Due to the nutritional interest of "algarrobo" cotyledons, the use of "algarrobo cotyledon" flour (ACF) in sweet and salty snack manufacture was evaluated. Cookies and fried salty chips with 0%, 10% and 20% ACF were prepared. Flours were analyzed for color, particle size, moisture, proximate composition, available lysine, and soluble, insoluble and total dietary fiber. Cookies and chips were analyzed for the same characteristics (except for particle size); besides there were determined water activity, weight and size of the units, and also, the caloric value was computed. Sensory quality and acceptance of both products were evaluated. It is noticeable the high amount of protein, lipids, ash, crude fiber (63.6; 10.2; 4.3 and 4.2 g/100 g dmb, respectively), available lysine (62.4 mg/g protein) and total dietary fiber (24.2 g/100 g dmb) of ACF. Both, cookies and chips with ACF, showed a significant increase in the amount of protein, lipids, ash, crude fiber and, available lysine (from 15.5 to 19,3 and from 20.3 a 29.6 mg lisina/g protein, respectively), and total dietary fiber (from 1.39 to 2.80 and from 1.60 a 5.60 g/100 g dmb, respectively). All of the cookies trials were well accepted ("I like it very much"); chips with 10% of AFC showed the highest acceptance ("I like it"). It can be concluded that the use of ACF in cookies and chips manufacture increases the contribution of available lysine; their protein and dietary fiber content, improving the soluble/insoluble fiber ratio, without affect neither their physical nor their sensory acceptance.

  14. Heat-resistant fiber and/or fire retardant synthetic fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurada, I.; Kaji, K.; Okada, T.

    1984-08-21

    A heat resistant and/or fire retardant synthetic fiber is obtained by a process comprising immersing a polyethylene fiber into a solution of acrylic acid or impregnating a polyethylene fiber with a solution of acrylic acid and irradiating the polyethylene fiber with an ionizing radiation to graft polymerize the polyethylene fiber with at least 15%, based on the weight of the polyethylene fiber, of acrylic acid, or a process comprising irradiating a polyethylene fiber with an ionizing radiation and then immersing the polyethylene fiber into a solution of acrylic acid or impregnating the polyethylene fiber with a solution of acrylic acid to graft polymerize the polyethylene fiber with at least 15%, based on the weight of the polyethylene fiber, of acrylic acid.

  15. Radiopurity measurement of acrylic for DEAP-3600

    SciTech Connect

    Nantais, C. M.; Boulay, M. G.; Cleveland, B. T.

    2013-08-08

    The spherical acrylic vessel that contains the liquid argon target is the most critical detector component in the DEAP-3600 dark matter experiment. Alpha decays near the inner surface of the acrylic vessel are one of the main sources of background in the detector. A fraction of the alpha energy, or the recoiling nucleus from the alpha decay, could misreconstruct in the fiducial volume and result in a false candidate dark matter event. Acrylic has low levels of inherent contamination from {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th. Another background of particular concern is diffusion of {sup 222}Rn during manufacturing, leading to {sup 210}Pb contamination. The maximum acceptable concentrations in the DEAP-3600 acrylic vessel are ppt levels of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th equivalent, and 10{sup −8} ppt {sup 210}Pb. The impurities in the bulk acrylic will be measured by vaporizing a large quantity of acrylic and counting the concentrated residue with ultra-low background HPGe detectors and a low background alpha spectrometer. An overview of the acrylic assay technique is presented.

  16. Dry Process for Manufacturing Hybridized Boron Fiber/Carbon Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Materials from a Solution Coated Precursor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite from precursor tape and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the precursor tapes and the precursor tape processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the precursor tape with the boron fibers becomes a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite. A driving mechanism is used to pulled the precursor tape through the method and a take-up spool is used to collect the formed hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite.

  17. Natural Fiber Composite Retting, Preform Manufacture and Molding (Project 18988/Agreement 16313)

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Howe, Daniel T.; Laddha, Sachin; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2009-12-31

    Plant-based natural fibers can be used in place of glass in fiber reinforced automotive composites to reduce weight, cost and provide environmental benefits. Current automotive applications use natural fibers in injection molded thermoplastics for interior, non-structural applications. Compression molded natural fiber reinforced thermosets have the opportunity to extend natural fiber composite applications to structural and semi-structural parts and exterior parts realizing further vehicle weight savings. The development of low cost molding and fiber processing techniques for large volumes of natural fibers has helped in understanding the barriers of non-aqueous retting. The retting process has a significant effect on the fiber quality and its processing ability that is related to the natural fiber composite mechanical properties. PNNL has developed a compression molded fiber reinforced composite system of which is the basis for future preforming activities and fiber treatment. We are using this process to develop preforming techniques and to validate fiber treatment methods relative to OEM provided application specifications. It is anticipated for next fiscal year that demonstration of larger quantities of SMC materials and molding of larger, more complex components with a more complete testing regimen in coordination with Tier suppliers under OEM guidance.

  18. Manufacture of and environmental effects on carbon fiber-reinforced phenylethynyl-terminated poly(etherimide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullions, Todd Aaron

    The initial objective of this research project was to determine the feasibility of manufacturing carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR) composites with a matrix consisting of a phenylethynyl-terminated version of a thermoplastic poly(etherimide) termed PETU. Successful composite manufacture with 3,000 g/mol (3k) PETU led to a survey of CFR 3kPETU mechanical properties for comparison with other high-performance composites. Encouraging results led to a study of moisture sorption effects on CFR 3kPETU properties. The success of these initial studies spawned the large scale production of 2,500 g/mol (2.5k) PETU. Thermal characterization of neat and CFR 2.5kPETU via differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, and parallel plate rheometry resulted in an understanding of the influence of cure time and temperature on reaction progress via both reaction kinetics and monitoring of the glass transition temperature. From the rheological characterization, a two-stage, dual-Arrhenius model was developed to successfully model isothermal complex viscosity over the range of processing temperatures. Neat 2.5kPETU and CFR 2.5kPETU specimens were exposed separately to elevated temperature environments of different moisture and different oxygen concentrations to evaluate the effects of moisture absorption, moisture desorption, and thermal oxidation on material properties. Moisture absorption took place in a 90°C/85% relative humidity environment followed by moisture desorption in a 90°C/10% relative humidity environment. Thermal-oxidative aging for up to 5000 hours took place at 204°C in environments of four different oxygen partial pressures: 0.0 kPa, 2.84 kPa, 20.2 kPa, and 40.4 kPa. Following exposure to the different aging environments, the specimens were tested for retention of mechanical properties. In addition, moisture sorption properties were measured. Results from the moisture sorption studies on CFR 3kPETU and CFR 2.5kPETU suggest that fully cured

  19. Development of extrusion processing technology for manufacture of fine-celled plastic/wood-fiber composite foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, Ghaus Muhammad

    The main benefits of incorporating wood-fibers in plastics are the increased stiffness and lowered cost of the resulting composites. However, these improvements are usually accompanied by loss in the ductility and impact resistance of the composites. These shortcomings can be significantly improved by effectively foaming and incorporating a fine-cell structure in the composites. This thesis presents the development of the processing methodology for the manufacture of fine-celled plastic/wood-fiber composite (PWC) foams and focuses on the elucidation of the fundamental foaming mechanisms and the related issues involved. The volatiles evolved from the wood-fiber during extrusion processing play a dominant role in the foaming process, and can lead to gross deterioration of cell structure unless proper strategies are adopted to limit their contribution to foaming. Thermal analysis of wood-fibers (from pine wood) revealed that apart from moisture, a substantial part of the volatile emissions were evolved from the 'extractives', and hence can contribute to the foaming process as a blowing agent. A tandem extrusion system was developed which could effectively control the volatile wood-fiber emissions, and produce fine-celled PWC foams having the desired density and cell morphology. A series of critical experiments were performed to develop a suitable methodology for controlling the foam density and cell morphology. Fundamental foaming mechanisms for different foaming conditions are proposed.

  20. Manufacturing and Mechanical Testing of a New Functionally Graded Fiber Reinforced Cement Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Bin; Hubler, Mija; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Struble, Leslie J.

    2008-02-15

    A functionally graded (FG) material system is employed to make fiber use more efficient in a fiber reinforced cement composite (FRCC). This preliminary study demonstrates beam elements that were functionally graded fiber reinforced cement composite (FGFRCC) with four layers, each with a different fiber volume ratio. Fiber volume ratio was graded in accordance with its potential contribution to the mechanical load-bearing capacity so as to reduce the overall fiber volume ratio while preserving the flexural strength and ductility of the beam. Extrusion was used to produce single homogeneous layers of constant fiber volume ratio. The FRCC layers with different fiber volume ratios were stacked according to a desired configuration and then pressed to make an integrated FGFRCC. Flexural tests were carried out to characterize the mechanical behavior, and the results were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of the designed fiber distribution. Compared with homogeneous FRCC with the same overall fiber volume fraction, the FGFRCC exhibited about 50% higher strength and comparable ductility.

  1. Cryogenic fiber optic temperature sensor and method of manufacturing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochergin, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention teaches the fiber optic sensors temperature sensors for cryogenic temperature range with improved sensitivity and resolution, and method of making said sensors. In more detail, the present invention is related to enhancement of temperature sensitivity of fiber optic temperature sensors at cryogenic temperatures by utilizing nanomaterials with a thermal expansion coefficient that is smaller than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber but larger in absolute value than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber at least over a range of temperatures.

  2. Acrylate Systemic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Maxwell B; Pratt, Melanie D

    2015-01-01

    Acrylates, the 2012 American Contact Dermatitis Society allergen of the year, are found in a range of products including the absorbent materials within feminine hygiene pads. When fully polymerized, acrylates are nonimmunogenic; however, if not completely cured, the monomers can be potent allergens.A 28-year-old woman is presented, who had her teeth varnished with Isodan (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France) containing HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) with no initial reaction. Approximately 1 month later, the patient developed a genital dermatitis secondary to her feminine hygiene pads. The initial reaction resolved, but 5 months later, the patient developed a systemic contact dermatitis after receiving a second varnishing.The patient was dramatically patch test positive to many acrylates. This case demonstrates a reaction to likely unpolymerized acrylates within a feminine hygiene pad, as well as broad cross-reactivity or cosensitivity to acrylates, and possibly a systemic contact dermatitis with systemic re-exposure to unpolymerized acrylates.

  3. Effect of curing cycle on the tensile strength of the bond between heat cured denture base acrylic resin and acrylic resin denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Ayesha; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R; Clark, Robert K F

    2009-12-01

    The effect of different curing cycles on the tensile strength of the bond between one brand of cross-linked acrylic resin teeth and three heat cured denture base acrylic resins was tested. There were differences in the tensile bond strength between the three heat cured denture base acrylic resins and the three curing cycles used. The bond strength of the acrylic resin denture base material made by the same manufacturer as the cross-linked acrylic resin denture teeth was higher. The bond strength following the short cycle was lowest in all cases, individual differences between curing cycles failed to reach statistical significance. PMID:20158054

  4. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  5. Characterization of Potential Exposures to Nanoparticles and Fibers during Manufacturing and Recycling of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polypropylene Composites.

    PubMed

    Boonruksa, Pongsit; Bello, Dhimiter; Zhang, Jinde; Isaacs, Jacqueline A; Mead, Joey L; Woskie, Susan R

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) polymer composites are widely used as raw materials in multiple industries because of their excellent properties. This expansion, however, is accompanied by realistic concerns over potential release of CNTs and associated nanoparticles during the manufacturing, recycling, use, and disposal of CNT composite products. Such data continue to be limited, especially with regards to post-processing of CNT-enabled products, recycling and handling of nanowaste, and end-of-life disposal. This study investigated for the first time airborne nanoparticle and fibers exposures during injection molding and recycling of CNT polypropylene composites (CNT-PP) relative to that of PP. Exposure characterization focused on source emissions during loading, melting, molding, grinding, and recycling of scrap material over 20 cycles and included real-time characterization of total particle number concentration and size distribution, nanoparticle and fiber morphology, and fiber concentrations near the operator. Total airborne nanoparticle concentration emitted during loading, melting, molding, and grinding of CNT-PP had geometric mean ranging from 1.2 × 10(3) to 4.3 × 10(5) particles cm(-3), with the highest exposures being up to 2.9 and 300.7 times above the background for injection molding and grinding, respectively. Most of these emissions were similar to PP synthesis. Melting and molding of CNT-PP and PP produced exclusively nanoparticles. Grinding of CNT-PP but not PP generated larger particles with encapsulated CNTs, particles with CNT extrusions, and respirable fiber (up to 0.2 fibers cm(-3)). No free CNTs were found in any of the processes. The number of recycling runs had no significant impact on exposures. Further research into the chemical composition of the emitted nanoparticles is warranted. In the meanwhile, exposure controls should be instituted during processing and recycling of CNT-PP.

  6. Characterization of Potential Exposures to Nanoparticles and Fibers during Manufacturing and Recycling of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polypropylene Composites.

    PubMed

    Boonruksa, Pongsit; Bello, Dhimiter; Zhang, Jinde; Isaacs, Jacqueline A; Mead, Joey L; Woskie, Susan R

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) polymer composites are widely used as raw materials in multiple industries because of their excellent properties. This expansion, however, is accompanied by realistic concerns over potential release of CNTs and associated nanoparticles during the manufacturing, recycling, use, and disposal of CNT composite products. Such data continue to be limited, especially with regards to post-processing of CNT-enabled products, recycling and handling of nanowaste, and end-of-life disposal. This study investigated for the first time airborne nanoparticle and fibers exposures during injection molding and recycling of CNT polypropylene composites (CNT-PP) relative to that of PP. Exposure characterization focused on source emissions during loading, melting, molding, grinding, and recycling of scrap material over 20 cycles and included real-time characterization of total particle number concentration and size distribution, nanoparticle and fiber morphology, and fiber concentrations near the operator. Total airborne nanoparticle concentration emitted during loading, melting, molding, and grinding of CNT-PP had geometric mean ranging from 1.2 × 10(3) to 4.3 × 10(5) particles cm(-3), with the highest exposures being up to 2.9 and 300.7 times above the background for injection molding and grinding, respectively. Most of these emissions were similar to PP synthesis. Melting and molding of CNT-PP and PP produced exclusively nanoparticles. Grinding of CNT-PP but not PP generated larger particles with encapsulated CNTs, particles with CNT extrusions, and respirable fiber (up to 0.2 fibers cm(-3)). No free CNTs were found in any of the processes. The number of recycling runs had no significant impact on exposures. Further research into the chemical composition of the emitted nanoparticles is warranted. In the meanwhile, exposure controls should be instituted during processing and recycling of CNT-PP. PMID:26447230

  7. Electronic manufacturing process improvement (EMPI) for automatic winding of quadrupole fiber optic gyro sensor coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Gregory S.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this EMPI program was to design an Automatic Coil Winding Station (ACWS) for winding Fiber Optic Gyro (FOG) sensor coils through the use of TQM, QFD, etc., followed by use of Taguchi an other statistical techniques to optimize the coil winding process. Four phases were involved: Process Definition, Critical Factor Identification, Variability Reduction, and SPC Implementation. Winding FOG coils is both difficult and fragile in that it is a quadrupole wind - as apposed to the conventional thread wind - compounded by the requirement for low tension precision, high-fiber packing density, and always risk of damage to the delicate fiber itself. The critical factor identification in the quadrupole winding process was reduced to fiber crossover - a significant detrimental influence on gyro performance - which, in turn, was closely identified with fiber gap control. The station was completed and deployed to the field where production coils are currently being wound. The ACWS not only lowered the required labor skill but succeeded in reducing the winding cycle time to 1 hour (from 24 hours) and touch labor time to 0.3 hours (from 24 hours) while improving the yield and performance through improved process control.

  8. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  9. Mechanically induced long period fiber gratings on single mode tapered optical fiber for structure sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Navarro, María. G.; Marrujo-García, Sigifredo; Álvarez-Chávez, José A.; Velázquez-González, Jesús S.; Martínez-Piñón, Fernando; Escamilla-Ambrosio, Ponciano J.

    2015-08-01

    The modal characteristics of tapered single mode optical fibers and its strain sensing characteristics by using mechanically induced long period fiber gratings are presented in this work. Both Long Period Fiber Gratings (LPFG) and fiber tapers are fiber devices that couple light from the core fiber into the fiber cladding modes. The mechanical LPFG is made up of two plates, one flat and the other grooved. For this experiment the grooved plate was done on an acrylic slab with the help of a computer numerical control machine. The manufacturing of the tapered fiber is accomplished by applying heat using an oxygen-propane flame burner and stretching the fiber, which protective coating has been removed. Then, a polymer-tube-package is added in order to make the sensor sufficiently stiff for the tests. The mechanical induced LPFG is accomplished by putting the tapered fiber in between the two plates, so the taper acquires the form of the grooved plate slots. Using a laser beam the transmission spectrum showed a large peak transmission attenuation of around -20 dB. The resultant attenuation peak wavelength in the transmission spectrum shifts with changes in tension showing a strain sensitivity of 2pm/μɛ. This reveals an improvement on the sensitivity for structure monitoring applications compared with the use of a standard optical fiber. In addition to the experimental work, the supporting theory and numerical simulation analysis are also included.

  10. A Comparative in Vitro Study of Power Output Deterioration over Time Between Ho:YAG Laser Fibers from Different Manufacturers as a Function of Deflection and Power Input

    PubMed Central

    Bourdoumis, Andreas; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Raj, Nirmal; Fedder, Artemis; Buchholz, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the performance of laser fibers from 6 major manufacturers in vitro and to identify the effect of time and angulations (180° and 0°) on fiber power output. Materials and Methods Overall, 36 single-use fibers were used. Each was tested with an energy input of 0.8, 1.4 and 2.0 Joules. A power detector measured power output after 1, 5, 10 and 15 minutes for three 15-minute cycles of continuous use. For the first 2 cycles, the fiber was bent to 180° with the use of a pre fabricated mould. Analysis of the data was performed by ANOVA and Tukey's test when the results were significant amongst groups. Statistical significance was deemed p < 0.05. Results No fiber fracture occurred. There was no significant difference in output at 15 minutes of continuous use at 0° and 180°. The reduction in energy output at the 15th minute of continuous use at 180° was not significant for any fiber type or initial input. Only output differences between the fibers proved to be significant (p = 0.001). Conclusion Fiber fracture and decline in performance is not due to deflection and continuous use. Frictional forces that occur between the fiber tip and the stone fragments may be responsible. PMID:26989365

  11. Manufacture of magnetically active fiber-reinforced composites for use in power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etches, Julie; Bond, Ian; Mellor, Phil

    2004-07-01

    A major issue yet to be resolved for embedding sensors, actuators and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in 'smart' structures is that of providing power. Work is ongoing in the field with examples of micro battery technology, use of solar power and micro fuel cells. The work presented here considers a technology to enable the development of integrated power generation and actuation. Magnetic fibre reinforced composite material has been developed which utilises hollow glass fibres filled with active magnetic material. The resulting material maintains structural integrity as well as providing a possible means of electrical power generation from a dynamically loaded structure. The hollow glass fibres were manufactured in-house using a bespoke fibre drawing facility. Hard magnetic powder materials were introduced into the hollow fibre cores to provide an active electromagnetic function. This paper will discuss the manufacture, characterization and optimisation of active magnetic fibre reinforced composite materials.

  12. Process for the manufacture of seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing seamless metal-clad composite structures includes providing a hollow, metallic inner member and an outer sleeve to surround the inner member and define an inner space therebetween. A plurality of continuous reinforcing fibers is attached to the distal end of the outside diameter of the inner member, and the inner member is then introduced, distal end first, into one end of the outer sleeve. The inner member is then moved, distal end first, into the outer sleeve until the inner member is completely enveloped by the outer sleeve. A liquid matrix material is then injected into the space containing the reinforcing fibers between the inner member and the outer sleeve. Next a pressurized heat transfer medium is passed through the inner member to cure the liquid matrix material. Finally, the wall thickness of both the inner member and the outer sleeve are reduced to desired dimensions by chemical etching, which adjusts the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to a desired value.

  13. Double crucible method in the fiber optic image guides (tapers) manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kociszewski, Longin; Pysz, Dariusz; Stepien, Ryszard

    1993-11-01

    Fiber optic image guides (tapers) are one of the most important elements used to build many optoelectronic Instruments for technical purposes and medicine. Application of these elements has croated entirely new technical possibilities for image processing. They are applied in X- ray units, apparatuses for endoscopy, LLLTV cameras as Well as in modern types of night vision devices. The images obtained with the use of image guides may be observed in real time on a television monitor. The images feature high resoution and contrast. The other advantage may also be pointed out, such as the possibility to register and edit the image with the use of computer or the possibility to reduce the exposure tme and intensity in X-ray units.

  14. Acrylic vessel cleaning tests

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, D.; Hahn, R.L.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.

    1997-02-26

    The acrylic vessel as constructed is dirty. The dirt includes blue tape, Al tape, grease pencil, gemak, the glue or residue form these tapes, finger prints and dust of an unknown composition but probably mostly acrylic dust. This dirt has to be removed and once removed, the vessel has to be kept clean or at least to be easily cleanable at some future stage when access becomes much more difficult. The authors report on the results of a series of tests designed: (a) to prepare typical dirty samples of acrylic; (b) to remove dirt stuck to the acrylic surface; and (c) to measure the optical quality and Th concentration after cleaning. Specifications of the vessel call for very low levels of Th which could come from tape residues, the grease pencil, or other sources of dirt. This report does not address the concerns of how to keep the vessel clean after an initial cleaning and during the removal of the scaffolding. Alconox is recommended as the cleaner of choice. This acrylic vessel will be used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  15. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  16. [Treatment of acrylate wastewater by electrocatalytic reduction process].

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Na; Song, Yu-Dong; Zhou, Yue-Xi; Zhu, Shu-Quan; Zheng, Sheng-Zhi; Ll, Si-Min

    2011-10-01

    High-concentration acrylate wastewater was treated by an electrocatalytic reduction process. The effects of the cation exchange membrane (CEM) and cathode materials on acrylate reduction were investigated. It indicated that the acrylate could be reduced to propionate acid efficiently by the electrocatalytic reduction process. The addition of CEM to separator with the cathode and anode could significantly improve current efficiency. The cathode materials had significant effect on the reduction of acrylate. The current efficiency by Pd/Nickel foam, was greater than 90%, while those by nickel foam, the carbon fibers and the stainless steel decreased successively. Toxicity of the wastewater decreased considerably and methane production rate in the biochemical methane potential (BMP) test increased greatly after the electrocatalytic reduction process.

  17. Acrylic purification and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuźniak, Marcin

    2011-04-01

    Radon (Rn) and its decay daughters are a well-known source of background in direct WIMP detection experiments, as either a Rn decay daughter or an alpha particle emitted from a thin inner surface layer of a detector could produce a WIMP-like signal. Different surface treatment and cleaning techniques have been employed in the past to remove this type of contamination. A new method of dealing with the problem has been proposed and used for a prototype acrylic DEAP-1 detector. Inner surfaces of the detector were coated with a layer of ultra pure acrylic, meant to shield the active volume from alphas and recoiling nuclei. An acrylic purification technique and two coating techniques are described: a solvent-borne (tested on DEAP-1) and solvent-less (being developed for the full scale DEAP-3600 detector).

  18. Acrylic purification and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzniak, Marcin

    2011-04-27

    Radon (Rn) and its decay daughters are a well-known source of background in direct WIMP detection experiments, as either a Rn decay daughter or an alpha particle emitted from a thin inner surface layer of a detector could produce a WIMP-like signal. Different surface treatment and cleaning techniques have been employed in the past to remove this type of contamination. A new method of dealing with the problem has been proposed and used for a prototype acrylic DEAP-1 detector. Inner surfaces of the detector were coated with a layer of ultra pure acrylic, meant to shield the active volume from alphas and recoiling nuclei. An acrylic purification technique and two coating techniques are described: a solvent-borne (tested on DEAP-1) and solvent-less (being developed for the full scale DEAP-3600 detector).

  19. Production and application of chemical fibers with special properties for manufacturing composite materials and goods of different usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levit, R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of modern technologies demands the creation of new nonmetallic, fibrous materials with specific properties. The fibers and materials developed by NII 'Chimvolokno', St. Petersburg, can be divided into two groups. The first group includes heat-resistant fibers, fire-resistant fibers, thermotropic fibers, fibers for medical application, and textile structures. The second group contains refractory fibers, chemoresistant and antifriction fibers, fibers on the basis of polyvinyl alcohol, microfiltering films, and paperlike and nonwoven materials. In cooperation with NPO 'Chimvolokno' MYTITSHI, we developed and started producing heat-resistant high-strength fibers on the base of polyhetarearilin and aromatic polyimides (SVM and terlon); heat-resistant fibers on the base of polyemede (aramid); fire-retardant fibers (togilen); chemoresistant and antifriction fibers on the basis of homo and copolymers of polytetrafluoroethylene (polyfen and ftorin); and water soluble, acetylated, and high-modulus fibers from polyvinyl alcohol (vylen). Separate reports will deal with textile structures and thermotropic fibers, as well as with medical fibers. One of the groups of refractory fibers carbon fibers (CF) and the corresponding paperlike nonwoven materials are discussed in detail. Also, composite materials (CM) and their base, which is the subject of the author's research since 1968, is discussed.

  20. Flexural Strength of Cold and Heat Cure Acrylic Resins Reinforced with Different Materials

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Bijan; Firouz, Farnaz; Izadi, Alireza; Ahmadvand, Shahbaz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Heat-polymerized acrylic resin has been the most commonly used denture base material for over 60 years. However, the mechanical strength of acrylic resin is not adequate for long-term clinical performance of dentures. Consequently, fracture is a common clinical occurrence, which often develops in the midline of the denture base. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of cold-cure and heat-cure acrylic resins, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire for denture base repair. Materials and Methods: Ninety specimens were prepared and allocated to nine groups. Ten specimens were considered as controls, and 80 were divided into 8 experimental groups. In the experimental groups, the specimens were sectioned into two halves from the middle, and were then divided into two main groups: one group was repaired with heat cure acrylic resin, and the other with cold cure acrylic resin. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups: unreinforced, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire. All specimens were subjected to a 3-point bending test, and the flexural strength was calculated. Results: The group repaired with heat cure acrylic resin and reinforced with glass fiber showed the highest flexural strength; however, the group repaired with cold cure acrylic resin and reinforced with polyethylene fibers had the lowest flexural strength. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with heat cure and cold cure acrylic resins without reinforcement. Conclusion: Repairing denture base with heat cure acrylic resin, reinforced with glass fibers increases the flexural strength of denture base. PMID:26877726

  1. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.1 Intelligent Manufacturing of Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMARY In this subtask, the manufacturability of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) was investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the VARTM process and its parameters to manufacture cost-effective wind turbine blades with no defects (mainly eliminate dry spots and reduce manufacturing time). A 2.5-dimensional model and a 3-dimensional model were developed to simulate mold filling and part curing under different conditions. These conditions included isothermal and non-isothermal filling, curing of the part during and after filling, and placement of injection gates at different locations. Results from this investigation reveal that the process can be simulated and also that manufacturing parameters can be optimized to eliminate dry spot formation and reduce the manufacturing time. Using computer-based models is a cost-effective way to simulate manufacturing of wind turbine blades. The approach taken herein allows the design of the wind blade manufacturing processes without physically running trial-and-error experiments that are expensive and time-consuming; especially for larger blades needed for more demanding environmental conditions. This will benefit the wind energy industry by reducing initial design and manufacturing costs which can later be passed down to consumers and consequently make the wind energy industry more competitive.

  2. Gel polymer electrolytes based on nanofibrous polyacrylonitrile–acrylate for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dul-Sun; Woo, Jang Chang; Youk, Ji Ho; Manuel, James; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanofibrous polyacrylonitrile–acrylate membranes were prepared by electrospinning. • Trimethylolpropane triacrylate was used as a crosslinking agent of fibers. • The GPE based on PAN–acrylate (1/0.5) showed good electrochemical properties. - Abstract: Nanofibrous membranes for gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) were prepared by electrospinning a mixture of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) at weight ratios of 1/0.5 and 1/1. TMPTA is used to achieve crosslinking of fibers thereby improving mechanical strength. The average fiber diameters increased with increasing TMPTA concentration and the mechanical strength was also improved due to the enhanced crosslinking of fibers. GPEs based on electrospun membranes were prepared by soaking them in a liquid electrolyte of 1 M LiPF{sub 6} in ethylene carbonate (EC)/dimethyl carbonate (DMC) (1:1, v/v). The electrolyte uptake and ionic conductivity of GPEs based on PAN and PAN–acrylate (weight ratio; 1/1 and 1/0.5) were investigated. Ionic conductivity of GPEs based on PAN–acrylate was the highest for PAN/acrylate (1/0.5) due to the proper swelling of fibers and good affinity with liquid electrolyte. Both GPEs based on PAN and PAN–acrylate membranes show good oxidation stability, >5.0 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Cells with GPEs based on PAN–acrylate (1/0.5) showed remarkable cycle performance with high initial discharge capacity and low capacity fading.

  3. Acrylic mechanical bond tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.

    1991-02-01

    The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  4. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... broccoli, spinach, and artichokes legumes (split peas, soy, lentils, etc.) almonds Look for the fiber content of ... salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Add lentils or whole-grain barley to your favorite soups. ...

  5. [Effect of acrylate industry wastes on the environment and the prevention of their harmful action].

    PubMed

    Tikhomirov, Iu P

    1991-01-01

    Acrylic and methacrylic++ acids and monomers as raw materials for production of polymers and copolymers are highly and extremely dangerous substances causing chronic intoxication. At low concentrations, acrylates and methacrylates++ have been found to produce not only systemic toxic, but embryotoxic effects. Manufacture of methacrylic++ and acrylic acids and monomers yields waste gases and waters that contain various acrylic compounds as impurities. The sewage treatment system introduced prevents the pollution of reservoirs with these compounds. High concentrations of acrylates and methacrylates are recorded in the sources of waste gases. It is required that fundamentally new waste--free technological processes for production of methacrylates++ and acrylates be designed and introduced and that the waste gas decontamination systems be improved in order to enhance the efficiency of measures to prevent environmental pollution.

  6. 21 CFR 177.1010 - Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid... Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid. Semirigid and rigid acrylic and modified acrylic plastics may be safely used as articles intended for use in contact with food, in accordance...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1010 - Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid... Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid. Semirigid and rigid acrylic and modified acrylic plastics may be safely used as articles intended for use in contact with food, in accordance...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1010 - Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid... Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid. Semirigid and rigid acrylic and modified acrylic plastics may be safely used as articles intended for use in contact with food, in accordance...

  9. Novel localized surface plasmon resonance based optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muri, Harald Ian D. I.; Hjelme, Dag R.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade various optical fiber sensing schemes have been proposed based on local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). LSPR are interacting with the evanescent field from light propagating in the fiber core or by interacting with the light at the fiber end face. Sensor designs utilizing the fiber end face is strongly preferred from a manufacturing point of view. However, the different techniques available to immobilize metallic nanostructures on the fiber end face for LSPR sensing is limited to essentially a monolayer, either by photolithographic structuring of metal film, thermal nucleation of metal film, or by random immobilization of nanoparticles (NP). In this paper, we report on a novel LSPR based optical fiber sensor architecture. The sensor is prepared by immobilizing gold NP's in a hydrogel droplet polymerized on the fiber end face. This design has several advantages over earlier designs. It dramatically increase the number of NP's available for sensing, it offers precise control over the NP density, and the NPs are position in a true 3D aqueous environment. The sensor design is also compatible with low cost manufacturing. The sensor design can measure volumetric changes in a stimuli-responsive hydrogel or measure binding to receptors on the NP surface. It can also be used as a two-parameter sensor by utilizing both effects. We present results from proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating a pH sensor based on LSPR sensing in a poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogel embedding gold nanoparticles.

  10. Uranium Adsorbent Fibers Prepared by Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization from Chlorinated Polypropylene and Polyethylene Trunk Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Suree; Chatterjee, Sabornie; Li, Meijun; Yue, Yanfeng; Tsouris, Costas; Janke, Christopher J.; Saito, Tomonori; Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-10

    Seawater contains a large amount of uranium (~4.5 billion tons) which can serve as a limitless supply of an energy source. However, in order to make the recovery of uranium from seawater economically feasible, lower manufacturing and deployment costs are required, and thus, solid adsorbents must have high uranium uptake, reusability, and high selectivity toward uranium. In this study, atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), without the radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP), was used for grafting acrylonitrile (AN) and tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) from a new class of trunk fibers, forming adsorbents in a readily deployable form. The new class of trunk fibers was prepared by the chlorination of PP round fiber, hollow-gear-shaped PP fiber, and hollow-gear-shaped PE fiber. During ATRP, degrees of grafting (d.g.) varied according to the structure of active chlorine sites on trunk fibers and ATRP conditions, and the d.g. as high as 2570% was obtained. Resulting adsorbent fibers were evaluated in U-spiked simulated seawater and the maximum adsorption capacity of 146.6 g U/kg, much higher than that of a standard adsorbent JAEA fiber (75.1 g/kg), was obtained. This new type of trunk fibers can be used for grafting a variety of uranium-interacting ligands, including designed ligands that are highly selective toward uranium.

  11. Uranium Adsorbent Fibers Prepared by Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization from Chlorinated Polypropylene and Polyethylene Trunk Fibers

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Suree; Chatterjee, Sabornie; Li, Meijun; Yue, Yanfeng; Tsouris, Costas; Janke, Christopher J.; Saito, Tomonori; Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-10

    Seawater contains a large amount of uranium (~4.5 billion tons) which can serve as a limitless supply of an energy source. However, in order to make the recovery of uranium from seawater economically feasible, lower manufacturing and deployment costs are required, and thus, solid adsorbents must have high uranium uptake, reusability, and high selectivity toward uranium. In this study, atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), without the radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP), was used for grafting acrylonitrile (AN) and tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) from a new class of trunk fibers, forming adsorbents in a readily deployable form. The new class of trunk fibers wasmore » prepared by the chlorination of PP round fiber, hollow-gear-shaped PP fiber, and hollow-gear-shaped PE fiber. During ATRP, degrees of grafting (d.g.) varied according to the structure of active chlorine sites on trunk fibers and ATRP conditions, and the d.g. as high as 2570% was obtained. Resulting adsorbent fibers were evaluated in U-spiked simulated seawater and the maximum adsorption capacity of 146.6 g U/kg, much higher than that of a standard adsorbent JAEA fiber (75.1 g/kg), was obtained. This new type of trunk fibers can be used for grafting a variety of uranium-interacting ligands, including designed ligands that are highly selective toward uranium.« less

  12. Custom cranioplasty using stereolithography and acrylic.

    PubMed

    D'Urso, P S; Earwaker, W J; Barker, T M; Redmond, M J; Thompson, R G; Effeney, D J; Tomlinson, F H

    2000-04-01

    Numerous methods of cranioplasty have been described. Customization and prefabrication have been reported to reduce operating time and improve cosmesis. An original technique for the manufacture of customized cranioplastic implants has been developed and tested in 30 patients.Thirty patients requiring cranioplasties were selected. Data acquired from computed tomography (CT) were used to manufacture exact plastic replicas (biomodels) of craniotomy defects and master cranioplastic implants using the rapid prototyping technology of stereolithography (SL). The three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques of mirroring and interpolation were used to extrapolate on existing anatomy to design the master implants. The master implants were hand finished to fit the defect in the corresponding cranial biomodel exactly and were then used to create a cavity mould. The mould was used to cast thermally polymerised custom acrylic implants. The surgeons reported that the customized implants reduced operating time, afforded excellent cosmesis and were cost effective. The patients reported that the opportunity to see the biomodel and implant preoperatively improved their understanding of the procedure. Two complications were noted, one infection and one implant required significant trimming. The simultaneous manufacture of the master implant (male) and biomodel (female) components from SL allowed custom accurate implants to be manufactured. Disadvantages identified were the time required for computer manipulations of the CT data (up to 2 h), difficulty in assessing the accuracy of the computer generated master as a 3D rendering, the potential for SL parts to warp, manufacturing time (minimum 2 days) and the cost of approximately $1300 US per case ($1000 for the SL biomodel and $300 for the acrylic casting). PMID:10738323

  13. Control of contamination of radon-daughters in the DEAP-3600 acrylic vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jillings, Chris; DEAP Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    DEAP-3600 is a 3600kg single-phase liquid-argon dark matter detector under construction at SNOLAB with a sensitivity of 10-46cm2 for a 100 GeV WIMP. The argon is held an an acrylic vessel coated with wavelength-shifting 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB). Acrylic was chosen because it is optically transparent at the shifted wavelength of 420 nm; an effective neutron shield; and physically strong. With perfect cleaning of the acrylic surface before data taking the irreducible background is that from bulk 210Pb activity that is near the surface. To achieve a background rate of 0.01 events in the 1000-kg fiducial volume per year of exposure, the allowed limit of Pb-210 in the bulk acrylic is 31 mBq/tonne (= 1.2 × 10-20g/g). We discuss how pure acrylic was procured and manufactured into a complete vessel paying particular attention to exposure to radon during all processes. In particular field work at the acrylic panel manufacturer, RPT Asia, and acrylic monomer supplier, Thai MMA Co. Ltd, in Thailand is described. The increased diffusion of radon during annealing the acrylic at 90C as well as techniques to mitigate against this are described.

  14. Control of contamination of radon-daughters in the DEAP-3600 acrylic vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Jillings, Chris; Collaboration: DEAP Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    DEAP-3600 is a 3600kg single-phase liquid-argon dark matter detector under construction at SNOLAB with a sensitivity of 10{sup −46}cm{sup 2} for a 100 GeV WIMP. The argon is held an an acrylic vessel coated with wavelength-shifting 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB). Acrylic was chosen because it is optically transparent at the shifted wavelength of 420 nm; an effective neutron shield; and physically strong. With perfect cleaning of the acrylic surface before data taking the irreducible background is that from bulk {sup 210}Pb activity that is near the surface. To achieve a background rate of 0.01 events in the 1000-kg fiducial volume per year of exposure, the allowed limit of Pb-210 in the bulk acrylic is 31 mBq/tonne (= 1.2 × 10{sup −20}g/g). We discuss how pure acrylic was procured and manufactured into a complete vessel paying particular attention to exposure to radon during all processes. In particular field work at the acrylic panel manufacturer, RPT Asia, and acrylic monomer supplier, Thai MMA Co. Ltd, in Thailand is described. The increased diffusion of radon during annealing the acrylic at 90C as well as techniques to mitigate against this are described.

  15. Development of manufacturing process for large-diameter composite monofilaments by pyrolysis of resin-impregnated carbon-fiber bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, W. G.; Pinoli, P. C.; Vidoz, A. E.

    1972-01-01

    Large diameter, carbon-carbon composite, monofilaments were produced from the pyrolysis of organic precursor resins reinforced with high-strenght carbon fibers. The mechanical properties were measured before and after pyrolysis and the results were correlated with the properties of the constituents. The composite resulting from the combination of Thornel 75 and GW-173 resin precursor produced the highest tensile strength. The importance of matching strain-to-failure of fibers and matrix to obtain all the potential reinforcement of fibers is discussed. Methods are described to reduce, within the carbonaceous matrix, pyrolysis flaws which tend to reduce the composite strength. Preliminary studies are described which demonstrated the feasibility of fiber-matrix copyrolysis to alleviate matrix cracking and provide an improved matrix-fiber interfacial bonding.

  16. Good manufacturing practice-compliant animal-free expansion of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stroma cells in a closed hollow-fiber-based bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Nold, Philipp; Brendel, Cornelia; Neubauer, Andreas; Bein, Gregor; Hackstein, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stroma cells (MSC) are increasingly recognized for various applications of cell-based therapies such as regenerative medicine or immunomodulatory treatment strategies. Standardized large-scale expansions of MSC under good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant conditions avoiding animal derived components are mandatory for further evaluation of these novel therapeutic approaches in clinical trials. We applied a novel automated hollow fiber cell expansion system (CES) for in vitro expansion of human bone marrow derived MSC employing a GMP-compliant culture medium with human platelet lysate (HPL). Between 8 and 32 ml primary bone marrow aspirate were loaded into the hollow fiber CES and cultured for 15-27 days. 2-58 million MSC were harvested after primary culture. Further GMP-compliant cultivation of second passage MSC for 13 days led to further 10-20-fold enrichment. Viability, surface antigen expression, differentiation capacity and immunosuppressive function of MSC cultured in the hollow fiber CES were in line with standard criteria for MSC definition. We conclude that MSC can be enriched from primary bone marrow aspirate in a GMP-conform manner within a closed hollow fiber bioreactor and maintain their T lymphocyte inhibitory capacity. Standardized and reliable conditions for large scale MSC expansion pave the way for safe applications in humans in different therapeutic approaches.

  17. Impact Delamination and Fracture in Aluminum/Acrylic Sandwich Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Benjamin; Zeichner, Glenn; Liu, Yanxiong; Bowles, Kenneth J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Impact-induced delamination and fracture in 6061-T6 aluminum/cast acrylic sandwich plates adhered by epoxy were generated in an instrumented drop-weight impact machine. Although only a small dent was produced on the aluminum side when a hemispherical penetrator tup was dropped onto it from a couple of inches, a large ring of delamination at the interface was observed. The delamination damage was often accompanied by severe shattering in the acrylic substratum. Damage patterns in the acrylic layer include radial and ring cracks and, together with delamination at the interface, may cause peeling-off of acrylic material from the sandwich plate. Theory of stress-wave propagation can be used to explain these damage patterns. The impact tests were conducted at various temperatures. The results also show clearly that temperature effect is very important in impact damage. For pure cast acrylic nil-ductile transition (NDT) occurs between 185-195 F. Excessive impact energy was dissipated into fracture energy when tested at temperature below this range or through plastic deformation when tested at temperature above the NDT temperature. Results from this study will be used as baseline data for studying fiber-metal laminates, such as GLARE and ARALL for advanced aeronautical and astronautical applications.

  18. Testing of gloves for permeability to UV-curable acrylate coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, R.; Levy, N.; Pruitt, P.M.

    1987-07-01

    The handling of UV-curable acrylate formulations used in the coating of optical fiber requires protective measures to prevent contact dermatitis and/or allergic dermatitis. To characterize the permeability of various glove materials to a UV-curable acrylate coating, a study was undertaken using a modification of a standard ASTM permeability test, which demonstrated that nitrile rubber gloves provided the best protection of those glove materials tested.

  19. Ultra-miniature all-glass Fabry-Pérot pressure sensor manufactured at the tip of a multimode optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Éric; Cibula, Edvard; Đonlagić, Denis

    2007-09-01

    The design and fabrication of an ultra-miniature all-glass pressure sensor with a diameter of 125 μm are presented. The sensor consists of a thin flexible silica membrane fused on a capillary tube section, which is assembled at the tip of a standard multimode fiber, thus forming a Fabry-Pérot air cavity whose length depends on applied pressure. Controlled polishing steps including on-line tuning of the diaphragm thickness during the manufacturing process achieve good repeatability and high sensitivity of the pressure sensor. The prototypes obtained with the described manufacturing method could easily have a sensitivity of ~2 nm/kPa (~0.3 nm/mmHg) with a record, so far, of ~5 nm/kPa (~0.7 nm/mmHg). The relatively simple fabrication technique using common and inexpensive equipments and materials combined with the fact that such sensitive sensors with multimode fiber could be interrogated with low-cost commercial interrogators (such as those using white-light interferometry) make this option very attractive for many applications involving pressure measurement. The sensor significant size reduction is valuable especially for the medical field, for applications such as minimally invasive patient health monitoring and diagnostics or small animals testing. Disposable sensors with ultra-miniature size will certainly open the way for new medical diagnostics and therapies.

  20. Low attenuation optical fiber of deuterated polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, J.K.; Beckerbauer, R.; Schleinitz, H.M.; Wilson, F.C.

    1985-04-16

    Light-transmitting optical fiber having a core of a (deuterated acrylate) polymer selected from the group consisting of a deuterated methacrylate homopolymer, a deuterated methacrylate copolymer and a deuterated methacrylate/acrylate copolymer which exhibits remarkably high transmission of light in the visible and at certain wavelengths in the near-infrared region of the spectrum.

  1. 75 FR 34943 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Para-Aramid Fibers and Yarns Manufactured in a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... the Federal Register on December 18, 2008 (73 FR 76970). The comment period closed on February 17... Accordingly, the interim rule amending 48 CFR parts 225 and 252, which was published at 73 FR 76970 on... made from DuPont Kevlar. DuPont supplies its Kevlar staple fiber to four major and six minor...

  2. Deep UV patterning of acrylic masters for molding biomimetic dry adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameoto, D.; Menon, C.

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel fabrication method for the production of biomimetic dry adhesives that allows enormous variation in fiber shapes and sizes. The technology is based on deep-UV patterning of commercial acrylic with semi-collimated light available from germicidal lamps, and combined careful processing conditions, material selection and novel developer choices to produce relatively high-aspect-ratio fibers with overhanging caps on large areas. These acrylic fibers are used as a master mold for subsequent silicone rubber negative mold casting. Because the bulk acrylic demonstrates little inherent adhesion to silicone rubbers, the master molds created in this process do not require any surface treatments to achieve high-yield demolding of interlocked structures. Multiple polymers can be cast from silicone rubber negative molds and this process could be used to structure smart materials on areas over multiple square feet. Using direct photopatterning of acrylic allows many of the desired structures for biomimetic dry adhesives to be produced with relative ease compared to silicon-based molding processes, including angled fibers and hierarchical structures. Optimized fiber shapes for a variety of polymers can be produced using this process, and adhesion measurements on a well-characterized polyurethane, ST-1060, are used to determine the effect of fiber geometry on adhesion performance.

  3. Bonding auto-polymerising acrylic resin to acrylic denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Susan; Ray, Noel J; Burke, Francis M; Gorman, Catherine M

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of surface treatments on the shear bond strength of an auto-polymerising acrylic resin cured to acrylic denture teeth. The surface treatments included a combination of grit-blasting and/or wetting the surface with monomer. Samples were prepared and then stored in water prior to shear testing. The results indicated that the application of monomer to the surface prior to bonding did not influence the bond strength. Grit blasting was found to significantly increase the bond strength. PMID:19839190

  4. [Survey of carbon fiber reinforced plastic orthoses and occupational and medical problems based on a questionnaire administered to companies involved in the manufacture of prosthetics and orthotics].

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Yuko; Furuta, Nami; Makino, Kenichiro; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    We surveyed carbon fiber reinforced plastic orthoses (carbon orthoses) and their associated occupational and medical problems based on a questionnaire sent to 310 companies which were members of the Japan Orthotics and Prosthetics Association. Of all the companies, 232 responded: 77 of the 232 companies dealt with ready-made carbon orthoses, 52 dealt with fabricated custom-made orthoses, and 155 did not dealt with carbon orthoses. Although the total number of custom-made carbon ortheses in Japan was 829/ 5 years, there was a difference by region, and one company fabricated only 12 (per 5 years) custom-made carbon orthoses on average. The advantages of the carbon orthosis were the fact that it was "light weight", "well-fitted", had a "good appearance", and "excellent durability", while the disadvantages were that it was "expensive", "high cost of production", of "black color", and required a "longer time for completion", and "higher fabrication techniques". From the standpoint of industrial medicine, "scattering of fine fragments of carbon fibers", "itching on the skin" and "health hazards" were indicated in companies that manufacture the orthosis. In order to make the carbon orthosis more popular, it is necessary to develop a new carbon material that is easier to fabricate at a lower cost, to improve the fabrication technique, and to resolve the occupational and medical problems.

  5. Three-dimensional architecture of lithium-anodes made from graphite fibers coated with thin-films of silicon oxycarbide: Design, performance and manufacturability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Ibrahim; Raj, Rishi

    2016-04-01

    Silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) is an amorphous molecular network of Sisbnd Csbnd O tetrahedra anchored to graphene-like carbon. The graphene forms a three dimensional cellular network with a domain size of ∼5 nm. Therefore nanometer thick films of SiCO grown on graphite may be expected to have unusual behavior. We grow these films on a bed of commercially available graphite fibers that serve the dual function of a current collector. The electrochemical behavior of the composite is measured as a function of the thickness of the SiCO films. Thick films approach the typical behavior of bulk SiCO (which has three times the capacity of graphite, but suffers from poor first cycle efficiency). However, films, approximately 100 nm thick, show high first cycle efficiency as well as high capacity. The composite performs better than the prediction from the rule-of-mixtures, which further substantiates the unusual behavior of the thin-film architecture. The Raman spectra of these thin films also differ from bulk SiCO. The development of thin graphite fibers, with a high surface to volume ratio that have the same capacity as the current graphite-powder technology, coupled with manufacturing of these thin-films by a liquid-polymer precursor based process, can propel these results toward commercialization.

  6. Enhancing Textile Fiber Identification with Detergent Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Mujumdar, Nirvani; Heider, Emily C; Campiglia, Andres D

    2015-12-01

    Discovering common origins of trace evidential textile fibers can be a challenging task when fiber structure or dye composition does not provide exclusive identifying information. Introduction of new chemical species after mass production and distribution of a textile may be exploited to trace its history and identify the origin of its fibers. In this article, fluorescence microscopy is used to examine the alteration in the fluorescence spectral fingerprint of single fibers resulting from exposure to commonly used detergents that contain fluorescent whitening agents. Dyed acrylic, cotton, and nylon fibers were laundered and the spectral contribution of the detergent on single fibers was quantified and shown to reach a maximum after five sequential washes; some detergents showed statistically meaningful differences to fiber spectra after only a single wash. Principal component cluster analysis was used to determine that the spectra of laundered fibers are distinct from the spectra of dyed, unwashed cotton or nylon, but not acrylic, fibers. PMID:26647148

  7. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  11. Mixing It Up with Acrylics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley

    1999-01-01

    Presents an art activity for fifth-grade students in which they learn about basic shapes and what happens when shapes overlap, draw seven overlapping geometric shapes, review the use of acrylic paint and mixing colors, and finally paint with primary colors. (CMK)

  12. Precipitation polymerization of acrylic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Romack, T.J.; Maury, E.E.; DeSimone, J.M.

    1995-02-13

    Increasing concern regarding the dissemination of chemical waste (both aqueous and organic) into their environment has prompted considerable interest in new technologies aimed at reducing current waste streams. Processes utilizing carbon dioxide in lieu of conventional solvents for chemical manufacturing and processing provide a viable route to achieving near-zero waste production for these important industries. The authors report the successful precipitation polymerization of acrylic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide at pressure ranging from 125 to 345 bar utilizing AIBN as a free radical initiator. Analyses by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicate that for the pressure range studied there is no appreciable effect on product molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, or particle size or morphology. In addition, effective molecular weight control was demonstrated for precipitation polymerizations of acrylic acid in CO{sub 2} through the use of ethyl mercaptan as a chain transfer agent.

  13. Completion of evaluation of manufacturing processes for B/Al composites containing 0.2mm diameter boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.; Moorhead, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    Four fabricators produced a total of 54 B/1100 Al, B/6061 Al, and B/2024 Al panels for evaluation. The 8 ply unidirectional, 45 to 50 volume percent, panels were made using 0.20 mm diameter boron fibers which were obtained from a single supplier. Hot press consolidation was carried out in vacuum except for one set of dry woven tape panels which were hot pressed in air. A single testing contractor conducted nondestructive inspection, metallography, fractography and mechanical property tests. The mechanical property tests included 21 and 260 C tensile tests and 21 C shear tests. Panel quality, as measured by nondestructive evaluation, was generally good as were the 21 C tensile properties. The panels hot pressed in air delaminated in the shear tests. Shear strength values were lower in these panels. But tensile strengths were not affected by the delaminations because of the relation between the tensile loading direction and the delaminations. Composite tensile strength was found to be proportional to the volume percent boron and the aluminum matrix rather than to the tape used or fabrication technique. Suitability of these composites for 260 C service was confirmed by tensile tests.

  14. Influence of laser irradiation on fiber post retention.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Denis Y; de Freitas, Patricia M; Morimoto, Susana; Oda, Margareth; Vieira, Glauco F

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the bond strength between fiber post and laser-treated root canals. Forty single-rooted bovine teeth were endodontically treated and randomly divided into four groups of equal size according to the root canal treatment: group 1 conventional treatment (without laser irradiation); group 2 Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 10 Hz, 100 mJ); group 3 Er,Cr:YSGG laser (0.75 W, 20 Hz); and group 4 Nd:YAG + Er,Cr:YSGG lasers. The fiber posts were cemented with an adhesive system + resin cement, in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. A mini acrylic pipe was fixed on the coronal section of the post using a light-polymerized resin. Specimens were mounted on an acrylic pipe with a self-polymerized resin. Retention forces were determined using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p <0.05). The post retention force in group 2 was found to be lower than that in the other experimental groups. Fractures were observed at the interface between the dentin and the resin in all groups. High-intensity lasers can be used in conventional endodontic treatment; however, root canal surface irradiation using the Nd:YAG laser was shown to negatively affect the post retention force.

  15. Fireblocking Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    PBI was originally developed for space suits. In 1980, the need for an alternative to asbestos and stricter government anti-pollution standards led to commercialization of the fire blocking fiber. PBI is used for auto racing driver suits and aircraft seat covers. The fiber does not burn in air, is durable and easily maintained. It has been specified by a number of airliners and is manufactured by Hoechst-Celanese Corporation.

  16. Real-time monitoring of the penetration of amphiphilic acrylate copolymer in leather using a fluorescent copolymer as tracer.

    PubMed

    Du, Jin-Xia; Shi, Lu; Peng, Bi-Yu

    2015-12-01

    A fluorescent tracer, poly (acrylic-co-stearyl acrylate-co-3-acryloyl fluorescein) [poly (AA-co-SA-co-Ac-Flu)], used for real-time monitoring the penetration of amphiphilic acrylate copolymer, poly (acrylic-co-stearyl acrylate) [poly (AA-co-SA)], in leather was synthesized by radical polymerization of acrylic, stearyl acrylate and fluorescent monomer, 3-acryloyl fluorescein (Ac-Flu). The structure, molecular weight, introduced fluorescent group content and fluorescent characteristics of the fluorescent tracer and target copolymer, amphiphilic acrylate copolymer, were also characterized. The results show that the tracer presents the similar structural characteristics to the target and enough fluorescence intensity with 1.68 wt % of the fluorescent monomer introduced amount. The vertical section of the leather treated with the target copolymer mixing with 7% of the tracer exhibits evident fluorescence, and the change of fluorescence intensity along with the vertical section with treating time increasing can reflect the penetration depth of the target copolymer. The introduction of the fluorescent group in polymer structure through copolymerization with a limited amount of fluorescent monomer, Ac-Flu, is an effective way to make a tracer to monitor the penetration of the target in leather, which provides a new thought for the penetration research of syntans such as vinyl copolymer materials in leather manufacture.

  17. Acrylic microspheres-based optosensor for visual detection of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Noor, Nur Syarmim Mohamed; Tan, Ling Ling; Heng, Lee Yook; Chong, Kwok Feng; Tajuddin, Saiful Nizam

    2016-09-15

    A new optosensor for visual quantitation of nitrite (NO2(-)) ion has been fabricated by physically immobilizing Safranine O (SO) reagent onto a self-adhesive poly(n-butyl acrylate) [poly(nBA)] microspheres matrix, which was synthesized via facile microemulsion UV lithography technique. Evaluation and optimization of the optical NO2(-) ion sensor was performed with a fiber optic reflectance spectrophotometer. Scanning electron micrograph showed well-shaped and smooth spherical morphology of the poly(nBA) microspheres with a narrow particles size distribution from 0.6 μm up to 1.8 μm. The uniform size distribution of the acrylic microspheres promoted homogeneity of the immobilized SO reagent molecules on the microspheres' surfaces, thereby enhanced the sensing response reproducibility (<5% RSD) with a linear range obtained from 10 to 100 ppm NO2(-) ion. The micro-sized acrylic immobilization matrix demonstrated no significant barrier for diffusion of reactant and product, and served as a good solid state ion transport medium for reflectometric nitrite determination in food samples. PMID:27080889

  18. Radiation-induced grafting of acrylic acid onto polypropylene film and its biodegradability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Dev K.; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K.; Chaudhari, C. V.; Dubey, K. A.; Varshney, L.

    2016-06-01

    Polypropylene based commodity polyolefins are widely used in packaging, manufacturing, electrical, pharmaceutical and other applications. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of grafting of acrylic acid on the biodegradability of acrylic acid grafted polypropylene. The effect of different conditions showed that grafting percentage increased with increase in monomer concentration, radiation dose and inhibitor concentration but decreased with increase in radiation dose rate. The maximum grafting of 159.4% could be achieved at optimum conditions. The structure of grafted polypropylene films at different degree of grafting was characterized by EDS, FTIR, TGA, DSC, SEM and XRD. EDS studies showed that the increase in acrylic acid grafting percentage increased the hydrophilicity of the grafted films. FTIR studies indicated the presence of acrylic acid on the surface of polypropylene film. TGA studies revealed that thermal stability decreased with increase in grafting percentage. DSC studies showed that melting temperature and crystallinity of the grafted polypropylene films lower than polypropylene film. SEM studies indicated that increase in acrylic acid grafting percentage increased the wrinkles in the grafted films. The maximum biodegradability could be achieved to 6.85% for 90.5% grafting. This suggested that microorganisms present in the compost could biodegrade acrylic acid grafted polypropylene.

  19. A method for preparing sodium acrylate-d3, a useful and stable precursor for deuterated acrylic monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jun; Hong, Kunlun; Bonnesen, Peter V

    2011-01-01

    A convenient and economical method for converting propiolic acid to sodium acrylate-d3 is described. Successive D/H exchange of the alkyne proton of sodium propiolate (prepared from propiolic acid) using D2O affords sodium propiolate-d having up to 99 atom% D. Sodium propiolate-d can be partially reduced to sodium acrylate-d3 with 90% conversion and 89% yield, using D2 and the Lindlar catalyst with control of reaction parameters to maximize conversion while minimizing over reduction.

  20. Esterification of acrylic acid with methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarov, G.A.; Danov, S.M.; Logutov, V.I.; Obmelyukhina, T.N.

    1984-01-01

    The esterification of acrylic acid with methanol in the absence of catalysis by strong mineral acids has been studied. The esterification rate was estimated from the amount of methyl acrylate formed at the end of a definite time, and the reaction rate was found to be first order with respect to methanol and second order with respect to acrylic acid. Mathematical relationships in good agreement with experimental data were derived from the results of the kinetic studies.

  1. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  2. Comparison of recoated fiber Bragg grating sensors under tension on a steel coupon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, E.; Thomson, D. J.; Mufti, A. A.

    2005-05-01

    One of the key elements in a structural health monitoring system is the sensing element and data acquisition system. One type of fiber optic sensor used to measure strain is the fiber Bragg grating. Bragg gratings are fabricated using different methods. One method involves placing a mask pattern over the optical fiber and projecting UV light through it to change the refractive index of the core. However, before the grating is written into the core of the fibre, the outer fibre coatings must be stripped away either mechanically or chemically. Fibre Bragg gratings are then recoated after the grating has been written to maintain the strength and flexibility of the fibre by protecting the exposed glass from damage. Acrylate and polyimide are two types of recoat material typically used on fibre Bragg grating sensors. This work is a controlled comparison of polyimide and acrylate recoated fibres for Bragg grating strain sensors. The comparison was carried out using a tension test coupon with recoated FBG and electrical strain gauges bonded to its surface. The tension test specimen was made of cold rolled steel and was designed according to ASTM A30-97a standard. The dimensions were chosen such that three fibre optic sensors and a strain gauge can be attached on each side. The load was applied in 40 μɛ steps until the strain reached approximately 200 ´ɛ. The load was then incrementally decreased back to zero. FBG sensors from 2 manufacturers were compared. For the first manufacturer the Acrylate coated sensors required a gauge factor is 0.75 in order for electrical and FBG strain readings to agree. For Polyimide coated sensors, the appropriate gauge factor was very close to the theoretically predicted value of 0.8. Using these gauge factors, the error between the first manufacturers sensor readings and the strain gauges was well within +/-5´ɛ. On the other hand, the second manufacturers sensors did not perform nearly as well. Their readings were substantially lower

  3. The bond between acrylic resin denture teeth and the denture base: recommendations for best practice.

    PubMed

    Radford, D R; Juszczyk, A S; Clark, R K F

    2014-02-01

    Failure of the bond between denture teeth and base acrylic resin has been shown to be a cause of denture failure leading to inconvenience and costly repair. The optimal combination of acrylic resin denture tooth, denture base material, laboratory protocol and processing method has not yet been established. Extensive research enables the following recommendations for best practice to be made. Adopt practices that maximise the strength of the bond: select appropriate denture teeth; select base acrylic resin from the same manufacturer as the denture teeth; remove the glaze from ridgelaps of the denture teeth; apply monomer to the ridgelaps of the denture teeth before packing the base acrylic resin dough; use the manufacturers' recommended liquid/powder ratio; follow the manufacturers' recommended curing cycle; allow the flask to cool slowly and rest before deflasking. Adopt practices that avoid factors detrimental to bond strength: remove all traces of wax from the ridge laps of the denture teeth; remove all traces of mould seal from the ridgelaps of the denture teeth. It is evident that a number of factors are involved which may assist or prevent formation of an adequate bond, suggesting that attention to detail by the dental technician may be the most critical factor.

  4. The bond between acrylic resin denture teeth and the denture base: recommendations for best practice.

    PubMed

    Radford, D R; Juszczyk, A S; Clark, R K F

    2014-02-01

    Failure of the bond between denture teeth and base acrylic resin has been shown to be a cause of denture failure leading to inconvenience and costly repair. The optimal combination of acrylic resin denture tooth, denture base material, laboratory protocol and processing method has not yet been established. Extensive research enables the following recommendations for best practice to be made. Adopt practices that maximise the strength of the bond: select appropriate denture teeth; select base acrylic resin from the same manufacturer as the denture teeth; remove the glaze from ridgelaps of the denture teeth; apply monomer to the ridgelaps of the denture teeth before packing the base acrylic resin dough; use the manufacturers' recommended liquid/powder ratio; follow the manufacturers' recommended curing cycle; allow the flask to cool slowly and rest before deflasking. Adopt practices that avoid factors detrimental to bond strength: remove all traces of wax from the ridge laps of the denture teeth; remove all traces of mould seal from the ridgelaps of the denture teeth. It is evident that a number of factors are involved which may assist or prevent formation of an adequate bond, suggesting that attention to detail by the dental technician may be the most critical factor. PMID:24557385

  5. Applications of Blue Light-curing Acrylic Resin to Forensic Sample Preparation and Microtomy.

    PubMed

    Groves, Ethan; Palenik, Christopher S

    2016-03-01

    This study discusses the results of an evaluation of a one-part blue light-curing acrylic resin for embedding trace evidence prior to the preparation of thin sections with a microtome. Through a comparison to several epoxy resins, the physical properties relevant to both trace evidence examination and analytical microscopy in general, including as viscosity, clarity, color, hardness, and cure speed, were explored. Finally, thin sections from paint samples embedded in this acrylic resin were evaluated to determine if, through smearing or impregnation, the resin contributed to the infrared spectra. The results of this study show that blue light-curing acrylic resins provide the desired properties of an embedding medium, generate high-quality thin sections, and can significantly simplify the preparation of paint chips, fibers and a multitude of other types of microscopic samples in the forensic trace evidence laboratory.

  6. Applications of Blue Light-curing Acrylic Resin to Forensic Sample Preparation and Microtomy.

    PubMed

    Groves, Ethan; Palenik, Christopher S

    2016-03-01

    This study discusses the results of an evaluation of a one-part blue light-curing acrylic resin for embedding trace evidence prior to the preparation of thin sections with a microtome. Through a comparison to several epoxy resins, the physical properties relevant to both trace evidence examination and analytical microscopy in general, including as viscosity, clarity, color, hardness, and cure speed, were explored. Finally, thin sections from paint samples embedded in this acrylic resin were evaluated to determine if, through smearing or impregnation, the resin contributed to the infrared spectra. The results of this study show that blue light-curing acrylic resins provide the desired properties of an embedding medium, generate high-quality thin sections, and can significantly simplify the preparation of paint chips, fibers and a multitude of other types of microscopic samples in the forensic trace evidence laboratory. PMID:27404623

  7. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34637, June 18, 2014. (a) Chemical substance and... ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  8. Fiber Optic Sensors for Cure/Health Monitoring of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, K. H.; Brown, T. L.; Wu, M. C.; Gause, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the current program is to develop techniques for using optical fibers to monitor the cure of composite materials in real time during manufacture and to monitor the in-service structural health of composite structures. Single and multimode optical fibers containing Bragg gratings have been used to perform Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy on high refractive index resins and show promise as embedded sensors. In order for chemical spectroscopy to be possible, intimate contact must be achieved between the fiber core and the composite resin. This contact is often achieved by stripping the cladding off of a portion of the fiber, thus making it brittle and easily broken in the composite processing environment. To avoid weakening the fiber to this extent, high refractive index fibers have been fabricated that use a low refractive index acrylate coating which serves as the cladding. This is ideal, as the coating is easily solvent stripped and intimate contact with the glass core can be achieved. Real time resin and composite chemical spectra have been obtained, with possible multifunctional capability using Bragg gratings to assess physical properties such as strain, modulus and other parameters of interest.

  9. Characterization of Glass Fiber Separator Material for Lithium Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Frank, H.

    1984-01-01

    Characterization studies were carried out on a glass fiber paper that is currently employed as a separator material for some LiSOCl2 primary cells. The material is of the non-woven type made from microfilaments of E-type glass and contains an ethyl acrylate binder. Results from extraction studies and tensile testing revealed that the binder content and tensile strength of the paper were significantly less than values specified by the manufacturer. Scanning electron micrographs revealed the presence of clusters of impurities many of which were high in iron content. Results of emission spectroscopy revealed high overall levels of iron and leaching, followed by atomic absorption measurements, revealed that essentially all of this iron is soluble in SOCl2.

  10. The electrospinning of the copolymer of styrene and butyl acrylate for its application as oil absorbent.

    PubMed

    Xu, Naiku; Cao, Jipeng; Lu, Yuyao

    2016-01-01

    Electrospun polystyrene materials have been employed as oil absorbents, but they have visible drawbacks such as poor strength at low temperature and unreliable integrity because of brittleness and insufficient cohesive force among fibers. Butyl acrylate can polymerize into flexible chains, and its polymer can be used as elastomer and adhesive material. Thereby it is possible to obtain the material that has better performance in comparison with electrospun polystyrene material through the electrospinning of the copolymer of styrene and butyl acrylate. In this work, a polymer was synthesized through suspension polymerization by using styrene and butyl acrylate as comonomers. The synthesis of the copolymer of styrene and butyl acrylate was verified through dissolution and hydrolysis experimental data; as well through nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. The viscous flow activation energy of the solution consisting of copolymer and N, N-dimethylformamide was determined via viscosity method and then adopted to establish the entanglement characteristics of butyl acrylate's chain segments. Finally, in order to electrospin the copolymer solution into fibrous membrane, the effects of monomer feed ratio and spinning parameters were investigated. The prepared fibrous membrane was found to have a potential use as oil absorbent. PMID:27610302

  11. Effect of long-term water immersion or thermal shock on mechanical properties of high-impact acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hirono; Hamanaka, Ippei; Takahashi, Yutaka; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term water immersion or thermal shock on the mechanical properties of high-impact acrylic denture base resins. Two high-impact acrylic denture base resins were selected for the study. Specimens of each denture base material tested were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions (n=10). The flexural strength at the proportional limit, the elastic modulus and the impact strength of the specimens were evaluated. The flexural strength at the proportional limit of the high-impact acrylic denture base resins did not change after six months' water immersion or thermocycling 50,000 times. The elastic moduli of the high-impact acrylic denture base resins significantly increased after six months' water immersion or thermocycling 50,000 times. The impact strengths of the high-impact acrylic denture base resins significantly decreased after water immersion or thermocycling as described above.

  12. 21 CFR 177.1310 - Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. 177.1310 Section... Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1310 Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. The ethylene-acrylic acid... for use in contact with food subject to the provisions of this section. (a) The ethylene-acrylic...

  13. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be...) Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins are produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis or...

  14. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  15. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  16. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1060 - n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. 177.1060... Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1060 n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic...) Identity. For the purpose of this section, n-alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers are copolymers obtained...

  18. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  19. Possible utilization of acrylic paint and copper phthalocyanine pigment sludge for vermiculture.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Deepanjan; Buch, Vaidehi; Macwan, Praisy; Patel, Jignesh

    2010-05-01

    Sludge generated from water treatment plants in two different paint and pigment manufacturing industries, one manufacturing CPC Green (copper phthalocyanine green) and the other acrylic (pure and styrene) washable distempers, synthetic enamels, fillers and putties, were used for culturing earthworms (Eisenia foetida Savigny). The possibility of getting a quality vermicompost was also explored. The sludges were used pure and mixed with month-old cow dung at 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 2:1 and 3:1 ratios (sludge:cow dung). In pure sludges and in the 3:1 ratio, earthworms did not survive. Earthworms had very low survival in CPC Green sludge and its mixtures while acrylic paint sludge was very efficient in supporting worm growth and worm castings were generated quickly. Both sludges were alkaline, non-saline, but had appreciable Ca, Al, Pb, Zn, and Mn. CPC Green had high Cu (12,900 mg kg(-1)) and acrylic paint sludge had high total Cr (155 mg kg(-1)). High Ca and Al in both came from water treatment chemicals (lime and alum), while CPC Green itself is a copper-based pigment. The sludges were suitable for land application with regard to their metal contents, except for Cu in CPC Green. CPC Green did not support proper growth of plants (green gram, Vigna radiata (L). R. Wilcz.), while acrylic paint sludge supported growth in pure form and mixtures with soil.

  20. Assessment of the flexural strength of two heat-curing acrylic resins for artificial eyes.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Aline Ursula Rocha; Portugal, Aline; Veloso, Letícia Rocha; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Santos, Daniela Micheline dos

    2009-01-01

    Prosthetic eyes are artificial substitutes for the eyeball, made of heat-curing acrylic resin, serving to improve the esthetic appearance of the mutilated patient and his/her inclusion in society. The aim of this study was to assess the flexural strength of two heat-curing acrylic resins used for manufacturing prosthetic eyes. Thirty-six specimens measuring 64 x 10 x 3.3 mm were obtained and divided into four groups: acrylic resin for artificial sclera N1 (Artigos Odontológicos Clássico, São Paulo, SP, Brazil), heat-cure water technique (GI) and microwave-cured (GII); colorless acrylic resin for prosthetic eyes (Artigos Odontológicos Clássico, São Paulo, SP, Brazil), heat-cure water technique (GIII) and microwave-cured (GIV). Mechanical tests using three point loads were performed in a test machine (EMIC, São José dos Pinhais, PR, Brazil). The analysis of variance and the Tukey test were used to identify significant differences (p < 0.01). Groups GII and GIV presented, respectively, the highest (98.70 +/- 11.90 MPa) and lowest means (71.07 +/- 8.93 MPa), with a statistically significant difference. The cure method used for the prosthetic eye resins did not interfere in their flexural strength. It was concluded that all the resins assessed presented sufficient flexural strength values to be recommended for the manufacture of prosthetic eyes.

  1. Possible utilization of acrylic paint and copper phthalocyanine pigment sludge for vermiculture.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Deepanjan; Buch, Vaidehi; Macwan, Praisy; Patel, Jignesh

    2010-05-01

    Sludge generated from water treatment plants in two different paint and pigment manufacturing industries, one manufacturing CPC Green (copper phthalocyanine green) and the other acrylic (pure and styrene) washable distempers, synthetic enamels, fillers and putties, were used for culturing earthworms (Eisenia foetida Savigny). The possibility of getting a quality vermicompost was also explored. The sludges were used pure and mixed with month-old cow dung at 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 2:1 and 3:1 ratios (sludge:cow dung). In pure sludges and in the 3:1 ratio, earthworms did not survive. Earthworms had very low survival in CPC Green sludge and its mixtures while acrylic paint sludge was very efficient in supporting worm growth and worm castings were generated quickly. Both sludges were alkaline, non-saline, but had appreciable Ca, Al, Pb, Zn, and Mn. CPC Green had high Cu (12,900 mg kg(-1)) and acrylic paint sludge had high total Cr (155 mg kg(-1)). High Ca and Al in both came from water treatment chemicals (lime and alum), while CPC Green itself is a copper-based pigment. The sludges were suitable for land application with regard to their metal contents, except for Cu in CPC Green. CPC Green did not support proper growth of plants (green gram, Vigna radiata (L). R. Wilcz.), while acrylic paint sludge supported growth in pure form and mixtures with soil. PMID:20124313

  2. Producing Silicon Carbide/Silicon Nitride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Manufacturing process makes CxSiyNz fibers. Precursor fibers spun from extruding machine charged with polycarbosilazane resin. When pyrolyzed, resin converted to cross-linked mixture of silicon carbide and silicon nitride, still in fiber form. CxSiyNz fibers promising substitutes for carbon fibers in high-strength, low-weight composites where high electrical conductivity unwanted.

  3. Crystal structure transformation in potassium acrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai Verneker, V. R.; Vasanthakumari, R.

    1983-10-01

    Potassium acrylate undergoes a reversible phase transformation around 335°K with an activation energy of 133 kcal/mole. Differential scanning calorimetry and high temperature X-ray powder diffraction techniques have been used to probe this phenomenon.

  4. Encapsulation of photocells with acrylic prepolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Avenel, M.; Evrard, P.; Leca, J.-P.

    1985-10-22

    Acrylic prepolymer comprising: from 10 to 50% by weight of units derived from at least one alkyl acrylate, the alkyl group having from 4 to 12 carbon atoms, from 30 to 60% by weight of units derived from at least one alkyl methacrylate, the alkyl group having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms, and from 10 to 40% by weight of units derived from methyl acrylate. The prepolymer is used to encapsulate photocells, connected to one another by conducting wires and positioned on a support plate, by casting a resin into the space located between the support plate and a second protective plate, the resin being obtained by mixing 100 parts of the acrylic prepolymer, from 0.1 to 4 parts of a vanadium arenesulphonate and from 0.5 to 4 parts of a free-radical initiator, at a temperature between 10 and 70 C. and for a sufficient time to solidify the polymeric resin at the temperature selected.

  5. The effect of various frequencies of ultrasonic cleaner in reducing residual monomer in acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Charasseangpaisarn, Taksid; Wiwatwarrapan, Chairat

    2015-12-01

    Monomer remaining in denture base acrylic can be a major problem because it may cause adverse effects on oral tissue and on the properties of the material. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of various ultrasonic cleaner frequencies on the amount of residual monomer in acrylic resin after curing. Forty-two specimens each of Meliodent heat-polymerized acrylic resin (M) and Unifast Trad Ivory auto-polymerized acrylic resin (U) were prepared according to their manufacturer's instructions and randomly divided into seven groups: Negative control (NC); Positive control (PC); and five ultrasonic treatment groups: 28 kHz (F1), 40 kHz (F2), 60 kHz (F3) (M=10 min, U=5 min), and 28 kHz followed by 60 kHz (F4: M=5 min per frequency, U=2.5 min per frequency, and F5: M=10 min followed by 5 min per frequency, U=5 min followed by 2.5 min per frequency). Residual monomer was determined by HPLC following ISO 20795-1. The data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD. There was significantly less residual monomer in the auto-polymerized acrylic resin in all ultrasonic treatment groups and the PC group than that of the NC group (p<0.05). However, the amount of residual monomer in group F3 was significantly higher than that of the F1, F4, and PC groups (p<0.05). In contrast, ultrasonic treatment did not reduce the amount of residual monomer in heat-polymerized acrylic resin (p>0.05). The amount of residual monomer in heat-polymerized acrylic resin was significantly lower than that of auto-polymerized acrylic resin. In conclusion, ultrasonic treatment at low frequencies is recommended to reduce the residual monomer in auto-polymerized acrylic resin and this method is more practical in a clinical situation than previously recommended methods because of reduced chairside time.

  6. Direct fermentation route for the production of acrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hun Su; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Yun, Jiae; Choi, In Suk; Nam, Tae-Wook; Cho, Kwang Myung

    2015-11-01

    There have been growing concerns regarding the limited fossil resources and global climate changes resulting from modern civilization. Currently, finding renewable alternatives to conventional petrochemical processes has become one of the major focus areas of the global chemical industry sector. Since over 4.2 million tons of acrylic acid (AA) is annually employed for the manufacture of various products via petrochemical processes, this chemical has been the target of efforts to replace the petrochemical route by ecofriendly processes. However, there has been limited success in developing an approach combining the biological production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) and its chemical conversion to AA. Here, we report the first direct fermentative route for producing 0.12 g/L of AA from glucose via 3-HP, 3-HP-CoA, and Acryloyl-CoA, leading to a strain of Escherichia coli capable of directly producing acrylic acid. This route was developed through extensive screening of key enzymes and designing a novel metabolic pathway for AA. PMID:26319589

  7. Acrylic coatings: Anticorrosive and antifouling. (Latest citations from World Surface Coatings Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the compositions and applications of anticorrosion and antifouling acrylic coatings. Applications include appliances, house siding and windows, manufacturing equipment, marine structures and ships, reinforcing bars in concrete, sheet and construction steel, sheet and plastics for vehicles, and iron and steel pipes. Some of the citations report on effectiveness and durability of the coatings. Powder-coatings and water-based coatings are examined in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Manufacturing Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2007-01-01

    According to the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), "manufacturing is the engine that drives American prosperity". When NAM and its research and education arm, The Manufacturing Institute, released the handbook, "The Facts About Modern Manufacturing," in October 2006, NAM President John Engler noted, that manufacturing output in America…

  9. Allergic contact dermatitis to acrylates in disposable blue diathermy pads.

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, S. K.; Shaw, S.

    1999-01-01

    We report 2 cases of elicitation of allergic contact dermatitis to acrylates from disposable blue diathermy pads used on patients who underwent routine surgery. Their reactions were severe, and took approximately 5 weeks to resolve. Both patients gave a prior history of finger tip dermatitis following the use of artificial sculptured acrylic nails, which is a common, but poorly reported, cause of acrylate allergy. Patch testing subsequently confirmed allergies to multiple acrylates present in both the conducting gel of disposable blue diathermy pads, and artificial sculptured acrylic nails. We advocate careful history taking prior to surgery to avoid unnecessary exposure to acrylates in patients already sensitized. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10364952

  10. Properties study of cotton stalk fiber/gypsum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guozhong; Yu Yanzhen; Zhao Zhongjian; Li Jianquan; Li Changchun

    2003-01-01

    This manuscript addresses treating cotton stalk fiber surface with styrene acrylic emulsion, which improves the interfacial combined state of cotton stalk fiber/gypsum composite effectively and improves its mechanical properties notably. Mixes less slag, ordinary Portland cement, etc., to modify gypsum base. The electron microscope was utilized to analyze and research on the effect on composite properties of the abovementioned mixtures.

  11. [Acrylic resin reinforcement with metallic and nonmetallic inserts].

    PubMed

    Preoteasa, Elena; Murariu, Cătălina Măgureanu; Ionescu, Ecaterina; Preoteasa, Cristina Teodora

    2007-01-01

    In the current use of acrylic resin for removable dentures and orthodontic treatments we are frequently facing the fact of base fracture. The repairing of this, determine most of the time, discomfort of the patient, by excluding the prosthetic device, affecting the treatment, loosing patient's time, doctor's time, implying the dental laboratory and extra expenses. The causes of fractures are many, from clinical cases with some specific anatomic and functional particularities, or parafunctional, to the incorrect designing, manufacturing or wearing of the prosthetic part, being connected with the materials characteristics. The consequences and costs of these fractures are leading to unsatisfying results in some of the clinical cases, in presence of parafunctions like bruxism or clenching and specifically for the new types of prosthetic rehabilitation, on natural teeth or implants. PMID:17983190

  12. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... additive consists of one of the following: (1) Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin (hydrolyzed polyacrylamide) is... and acrylic acid, with the greater part of the polymer being composed of acrylamide units. (2)...

  13. The measurement of sucrose concentration by two-tapered all-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer employing different coupling structures and manufacture processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Hsin-Wen; Hsu, Yi-Cheng

    2016-08-01

    The sucrose concentration measurement and characteristics of light coupling taper structure on sensitivity with various fabrication processes of taper structure for all-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (AFMZI) are presented. Using fusion splicer with electrical discharge, the standard single-mode fiber is employed to be fabricated as conical coupling/decoupling taper structure. The basic two fabrication processes are designed as single fusion-stretching (SFS), multiple fusions without stretching (MF). The third advanced process is composed of SFS and multiple fusions without stretching processes, and called multiple fusions with single stretching (MFSS). Various types of coupling/decoupling taper structures were fabricated based on the three kinds of fabrication processes. The effects of geometry shape including taper waist, taper angle, and sensing length on sensing sensitivity of AFMZIs are estimated. The modifications of fiber core and cladding induced by thermal effect affect the refractive index distributions and shapes of taper structure. The effects of refractive index changes of fiber core and cladding on sensing sensitivity are also discussed. The AFMZI was tested by measuring aqueous sucrose solution of refractive index unit (RIU) from 1.333 to 1.420 RIU. The optical spectrums are measured by a spectrometer. The spectrum dip shifts and sensing sensitivity was measured and calculated, respectively. As shown in results, sensing sensitivities of AFMZIs of taper structure fabricated by MFSS and multiple fusions without stretching processing are generally higher than SFS. The reasons could be aimed on materials modification through thermal effect on blurring fiber core-cladding interface and proper taper angle of taper structure. The more homogeneous refractive index distribution on fiber core-cladding interface, the more detecting light power decoupled through core-cladding interface to interact with exterior environment and enhance the sensing sensitivity

  14. The Influence of Polymerization Type and Reinforcement Method on Flexural Strength of Acrylic Resin

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Kasuya, Amanda Vessoni Barbosa; Favarão, Isabella Negro; Naves, Lucas Zago; Hoeppner, Márcio Grama

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength of acrylic resin bars by varying the types of resin polymerization and reinforcement methods. Fourteen groups (N = 10) were created by the interaction of factors in study: type of resin (self-cured (SC) or heat-cured (HC)) and reinforcement method (industrialized glass fiber (Ind), unidirectional glass fiber (Uni), short glass fiber (Short), unidirectional and short glass fiber (Uni-Short), thermoplastic resin fiber (Tpl), and steel wire (SW)). Reinforced bars (25 × 2 × 2 mm) were tested in flexural strength (0.5 mm/min) and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data (MPa) were submitted to factorial analysis, ANOVA, and Tukey and T-student tests (a = 5%) showing significant interaction (P = 0.008), for SC: Uni (241.71 ± 67.77)a, Uni-Short (221.05 ± 71.97)a, Ind (215.21 ± 46.59)ab, SW (190.51 ± 31.49)abc, Short (156.31 ± 28.76)bcd, Tpl (132.51 ± 20.21)cd, Control SC (101.47 ± 19.79)d and for HC: Ind (268.93 ± 105.65)a, Uni (215.14 ± 67.60)ab, Short (198.44 ± 95.27)abc, Uni-Short (189.56 ± 92.27)abc, Tpl (161.32 ± 62.51)cd, SW (106.69 ± 28.70)cd, and Control HC (93.39 ± 39.61)d. SEM analysis showed better fiber-resin interaction for HC. Nonimpregnated fibers, irrespective of their length, tend to improve fracture strength of acrylics. PMID:25879079

  15. The influence of polymerization type and reinforcement method on flexural strength of acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Kasuya, Amanda Vessoni Barbosa; Favarão, Isabella Negro; Naves, Lucas Zago; Hoeppner, Márcio Grama

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength of acrylic resin bars by varying the types of resin polymerization and reinforcement methods. Fourteen groups (N=10) were created by the interaction of factors in study: type of resin (self-cured (SC) or heat-cured (HC)) and reinforcement method (industrialized glass fiber (Ind), unidirectional glass fiber (Uni), short glass fiber (Short), unidirectional and short glass fiber (Uni-Short), thermoplastic resin fiber (Tpl), and steel wire (SW)). Reinforced bars (25×2×2 mm) were tested in flexural strength (0.5 mm/min) and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data (MPa) were submitted to factorial analysis, ANOVA, and Tukey and T-student tests (a=5%) showing significant interaction (P=0.008), for SC: Uni (241.71±67.77)a, Uni-Short (221.05±71.97)a, Ind (215.21±46.59)ab, SW (190.51±31.49)abc, Short (156.31±28.76)bcd, Tpl (132.51±20.21)cd, Control SC (101.47±19.79)d and for HC: Ind (268.93±105.65)a, Uni (215.14±67.60)ab, Short (198.44±95.27)abc, Uni-Short (189.56±92.27)abc, Tpl (161.32±62.51)cd, SW (106.69±28.70)cd, and Control HC (93.39±39.61)d. SEM analysis showed better fiber-resin interaction for HC. Nonimpregnated fibers, irrespective of their length, tend to improve fracture strength of acrylics.

  16. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  17. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  18. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5325 - Nickel acrylate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nickel acrylate complex. 721.5325... Substances § 721.5325 Nickel acrylate complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nickel acrylate complex (PMN P-85-1034) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5325 - Nickel acrylate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel acrylate complex. 721.5325... Substances § 721.5325 Nickel acrylate complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nickel acrylate complex (PMN P-85-1034) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5325 - Nickel acrylate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nickel acrylate complex. 721.5325... Substances § 721.5325 Nickel acrylate complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nickel acrylate complex (PMN P-85-1034) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5325 - Nickel acrylate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nickel acrylate complex. 721.5325... Substances § 721.5325 Nickel acrylate complex. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34637, June 18, 2014... nickel acrylate complex (PMN P-85-1034) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5325 - Nickel acrylate complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nickel acrylate complex. 721.5325... Substances § 721.5325 Nickel acrylate complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nickel acrylate complex (PMN P-85-1034) is subject to reporting...

  4. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid...

  5. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylate-acrylamide resins. 173.5 Section 173.5... CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.5 Acrylate-acrylamide resins. Acrylate-acrylamide resins may be safely used in food under the following prescribed conditions: (a)...

  6. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  7. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1310 - Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. 177.1310 Section... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1310 Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. The ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be...

  9. 21 CFR 177.1310 - Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. 177.1310 Section... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1310 Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. The ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be...

  10. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  11. 21 CFR 177.1310 - Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. 177.1310 Section... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1310 Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. The ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10537 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10537... Substances § 721.10537 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-01-579) is subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10477 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10477... Substances § 721.10477 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-04-290) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10477 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10477... Substances § 721.10477 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-04-290) is subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10537 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10537... Substances § 721.10537 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-01-579) is subject...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prescribed for polyethylene in § 177.1520. (1) Specifications—(i) Infrared identification. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (ii) Quantitative determination of ethyl acrylate content. The ethyl acrylate can be determined by the infrared spectra. Prepare...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... prescribed for polyethylene in § 177.1520. (1) Specifications—(i) Infrared identification. Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (ii) Quantitative determination of ethyl acrylate content. The ethyl acrylate can be determined by the infrared spectra. Prepare...

  18. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  19. 40 CFR 721.324 - Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic... Substances § 721.324 Alkoxylated acrylate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as alkoxylated acrylate...

  20. 40 CFR 721.484 - Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.484 Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... fluorinated acrylic copolymer (PMN P-95-1208) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  1. 40 CFR 721.484 - Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.484 Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... fluorinated acrylic copolymer (PMN P-95-1208) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1060 - n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. 177.1060... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1060 n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers identified in this section may be safely used as...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  6. 40 CFR 721.484 - Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.484 Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... fluorinated acrylic copolymer (PMN P-95-1208) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  7. 40 CFR 721.484 - Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.484 Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... fluorinated acrylic copolymer (PMN P-95-1208) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1060 - n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. 177.1060... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1060 n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers identified in this section may be safely used as...

  9. 21 CFR 177.1060 - n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. 177.1060... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1060 n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers identified in this section may be safely used as...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. 21 CFR 177.1310 - Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. 177.1310 Section... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1310 Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers. The ethylene-acrylic acid copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be...

  12. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  13. 40 CFR 721.484 - Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.484 Fluorinated acrylic copolymer (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... fluorinated acrylic copolymer (PMN P-95-1208) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1060 - n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. 177.1060... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1060 n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers. n-Alkylglutarimide/acrylic copolymers identified in this section may be safely used as...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10307 - Acrylate resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate resin (generic). 721.10307... Substances § 721.10307 Acrylate resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate resin (PMN P-01-343) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10307 - Acrylate resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylate resin (generic). 721.10307... Substances § 721.10307 Acrylate resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate resin (PMN P-01-343) is subject...

  18. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylate-acrylamide resins. 173.5 Section 173.5... CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.5 Acrylate-acrylamide resins. Acrylate-acrylamide resins may be safely used in food under the following prescribed conditions: (a)...

  19. High-Speed Fiber Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Walter; Tarasenko, Oleksandr; Yu, Zhangwei; Fonjallaz, Pierre-Yves; Knape, Harald

    2008-10-01

    All-fiber optical switches based on fiber with electrodes exhibit transition times <10 ns. The devices are monolithic and robust, they are simple and could potentially be manufactured at low cost. The insertion loss is extremely low and the devices are compatible with single mode fiber technology. Two types of switches are discussed, one based on polarization rotation, the other one relying on the wavelength shift of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG).

  20. Acrylic Tanks for Stunning Chemical Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirholm, Alexander; Ellervik, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    We describe the use of acrylic tanks (400 x 450 x 27 mm) for visualization of chemical demonstrations in aqueous solutions. Examples of well-suited demonstrations are oscillating reactions, pH indicators, photochemical reduction of Lauth's violet, and chemoluminiscent reactions. (Contains 1 figure.)

  1. 40 CFR 721.405 - Polyether acrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 721.405 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.405 Polyether acrylate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting....

  2. 40 CFR 721.405 - Polyether acrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 721.405 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.405 Polyether acrylate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting....

  3. UV-curable acrylated coating from epoxidized palm oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nurliyana Abd; Badri, Khairiah Haji; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik

    2014-09-01

    The properties of coating film prepared from the incorporation of acrylated palm oil (EPOLA) in commercial epoxy acrylate have been studied. A series of different amount of EPOLA was mixed with commercial epoxy acrylate. The blended acrylates passed through UV light to produce a non-tacky film. The conversion of acrylate double bond was monitored by FTIR. The effect of EPOLA concentration onto coated films were investigated by determination of the pendulum hardness and gel content. The higher the amount of EPOLA, the lower the pendulum hardness and the gel content but to a level acceptable for usage in the high-end applications.

  4. Electrohydrodynamic Printing and Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Poon, Hak Fei (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-hua (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An stable electrohydrodynamic filament is obtained by causing a straight electrohydrodynamic filament formed from a liquid to emerge from a Taylor cone, the filament having a diameter of from 10 nm to 100.mu.m. Such filaments are useful in electrohydrodynamic printing and manufacturing techniques and their application in liquid drop/particle and fiber production, colloidal deployment and assembly, and composite materials processing.

  5. Large Acrylic Spherical Windows In Hyperbaric Underwater Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lones, Joe J.; Stachiw, Jerry D.

    1983-10-01

    Both acrylic plastic and glass are common materials for hyperbaric optical windows. Although glass continues to be used occasionally for small windows, virtually all large viewports are made of acrylic. It is easy to uderstand the wide use of acrylic when comparing design properties of this plastic with those of glass, and glass windows are relatively more difficult to fabricate and use. in addition there are published guides for the design and fabrication of acrylic windows to be used in the hyperbaric environment of hydrospace. Although these procedures for fabricating the acrylic windows are somewhat involved, the results are extremely reliable. Acrylic viewports are now fabricated to very large sizes for manned observation or optical quality instrumen tation as illustrated by the numerous acrylic submersible vehicle hulls for hu, an occupancy currently in operation and a 3600 large optical window recently developed for the Walt Disney Circle Vision under-water camera housing.

  6. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base.

    PubMed

    Gad, Mohammed; ArRejaie, Aws S; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers.

  7. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base

    PubMed Central

    ArRejaie, Aws S.; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers. PMID:27366150

  8. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base.

    PubMed

    Gad, Mohammed; ArRejaie, Aws S; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers. PMID:27366150

  9. Evaluation of in vitro glistening formation in hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lenses

    PubMed Central

    Thomes, Brett E; Callaghan, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of continuous manufacturing process improvements on glistening formation in AcrySof hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs) by comparing lenses manufactured in 2003 with lenses manufactured in 2012. Methods Glistenings were experimentally created as aqueous-filled microvacuoles utilizing an accelerated laboratory method by immersing the lens in water at 45°C for 24 hours and then reducing the temperature to 37°C for 2.5 hours. To determine the impact of continuous improvements on glistening formation, AcrySof IOLs (Alcon Laboratories, Inc) Model SB30 AL manufactured in 2003 were compared with AcrySof IOLs Model SN60 WF manufactured in 2012. Results Glistenings were present in all lenses after the accelerated microvacuole test method. The mean microvacuole density for IOLs manufactured in 2003 was 315.7 microvacuoles per square millimeter (MVs/mm2) with a glistening severity less than 100 MVs/mm2 in 1.0% of the IOLs. The mean microvacuole density for IOLs manufactured in 2012 was 39.9 MVs/mm2 with a glistening severity less than 100 MVs/mm2 in 95.2% of the IOLs. Laboratory-induced microvacuole density was significantly lower in IOLs manufactured in 2012 (mean 39.9 MVs/mm2) relative to IOLs manufactured in 2003 (mean 315.7 MVs/mm2) as indicated by the Wilcoxon test of significance (P < 0.0005). Conclusion AcrySof IOLs recently manufactured in 2012 demonstrated a significant reduction in glistening density (87% reduction in mean density) as a result of continuous manufacturing process improvements compared with IOLs manufactured in 2003. PMID:23926419

  10. Manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is at the core of Sandia National Laboratories' advanced manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process. The center's capabilities in product and process development are summarized in the following disciplines: (1) mechanical - rapid prototyping, manufacturing engineering, machining and computer-aided manufacturing, measurement and calibration, and mechanical and electronic manufacturing liaison; (2) electronics - advanced packaging for microelectronics, printed circuits, and electronic fabrication; and (3) materials - ceramics, glass, thin films, vacuum technology, brazing, polymers, adhesives, composite materials, and process analysis.

  11. Intercalation of acrylic acid and sodium acrylate into kaolinite and their in situ polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Yanfeng; Pan, Xiaobing; Jia, Xin; Wang, Xiaolong

    2007-02-01

    Novel nano-composites of poly (acrylic acid)-kaolinite were prepared, and intercalation and in situ polymerization were used in this process. The nano-composites were obtained by in situ polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) and sodium acrylate (AANa) intercalated into organo-kaolinite, which was obtained by refining and chemically modifying with solution intercalation step in order to increase the basal plane distance of the original clay. The modification was completed by using dimethyl-sulfoxide (DMSO)/methanol and potassium acetate (KAc)/water systems step by step. The materials were characterized with the help of XRD, FT-IR and TEM; the results confirmed that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(sodium acrylate) (PAANa) were intercalated into the interlamellar spaces of kaolinite, the resulting copolymer composites (CC0 : copolymer crude kaolinite composite, CC1 : copolymer DMSO kaolinite composite, CC2 : copolymer KAc kaolinite composite) of CC2 exhibited a lamellar nano-composite with a mixed nano-morphology, and partial exfoliation of the intercalating clay platelets should be the main morphology. Finally, the effect of neutralization degree on the intercalation behavior was also investigated.

  12. Cellulose nanocrystal-filled poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposite fibrous membranes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2009-10-14

    Nanocomposite fibrous membranes have been fabricated by electrospinning cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-loaded poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) ethanol mixtures. Incorporating CNC in PAA significantly reduced fiber diameters and improved fiber uniformity. The average diameters of the as-spun nanocomposite fibers were significantly reduced from 349 nm to 162 nm, 141 nm, 90 nm and 69 nm at 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% CNC loading (by weight of a constant 4% PAA solution), respectively. CNC was well dispersed in the fibers as isolated rods oriented along the fiber axis and as spheres in the PAA matrix. The Young modulus and stress of the PAA/CNC nanocomposite fibers were significantly improved with increasing CNC loadings by up to 35-fold and 16-fold, respectively. Heat-induced esterification between the CNC surface hydroxyls and PAA carboxyl groups produced covalent crosslinks at the CNC-PAA interfaces, rendering the nanocomposite fibrous membranes insoluble in water, more thermally stable and far more superior in tensile strength. With 20% CNC, the crosslinked nanocomposite fibrous membrane exhibited a very impressive 77-fold increase in modulus and 58-fold increase in stress.

  13. 'Weightless' acrylic painting by Jack Kroehnke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    'Weightless' acrylic painting by Jack Kroehnke depicts STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers participating in extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation in JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. In the payload bay (PLB) mockup, Hilmers, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), holds onto the mission-peculiar equipment support structure in foreground while SCUBA-equipped diver monitors activity overhead and camera operator records EVA procedures. Copyrighted art work for use by NASA.

  14. ICI/BASF PP for acrylics swap

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-01-27

    ICI (London) and BASF (Ludwigshafen) have announced their long-awaited polypropylene (PP) for acrylics swap deal. ICI is buying BASF's European acrylic resin business, and the German firm will acquire ICI's European PP operations. The deal is due for completion by mid-1993, subject to regulatory approvals. BASF, hitherto a small-scale PP producer, doubles capacity to 600,000 m.t./year and moves up the European PP league to number three, behind Himont and Shell. BASF, whose process is used in the plants, secures a foothold in the UK PP market, where Shell - planning a merger with Himont - is the only other producer, with 170,000 m.t./year. ICI's purchase involves BASF's Resart GmbH and Critesa SA subsidiaries, located at Mainz, Germany and near Barcelona, Spain, respectively. The business - which will add about [Brit pounds]60 million ($93 million) to ICI Acrylics [Brit pounds]300-million revenues - employs 400 people, who will transfer to ICI.

  15. Performance comparison of acrylic and thiol-acrylic resins in two-photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lijia; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Yushen; Liu, Ying; Huang, Xi; Li, Dawei; Baldacchini, Tommaso; Jiang, Lan; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-06-13

    Microfabrication by two-photon polymerization is investigated using resins based on thiol-ene chemistry. In particular, resins containing different amounts of a tetrafunctional acrylic monomer and a tetrafunctional thiol molecule are used to create complex microstructures. We observe the enhancement of several characteristics of two-photon polymerization when using thiol-acrylic resins. Specifically, microfabrication is carried out using higher writing velocities and it produces stronger polymeric microstructures. Furthermore, the amount of shrinkage typically observed in the production of three-dimensional microstructures is reduced also. By means of microspectrometry, we confirm that the thiol-acrylate mixture in TPP resins promote monomer conversion inducing a higher degree of cross-linked network formation.

  16. Performance comparison of acrylic and thiol-acrylic resins in two-photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lijia; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Yushen; Liu, Ying; Huang, Xi; Li, Dawei; Baldacchini, Tommaso; Jiang, Lan; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-06-13

    Microfabrication by two-photon polymerization is investigated using resins based on thiol-ene chemistry. In particular, resins containing different amounts of a tetrafunctional acrylic monomer and a tetrafunctional thiol molecule are used to create complex microstructures. We observe the enhancement of several characteristics of two-photon polymerization when using thiol-acrylic resins. Specifically, microfabrication is carried out using higher writing velocities and it produces stronger polymeric microstructures. Furthermore, the amount of shrinkage typically observed in the production of three-dimensional microstructures is reduced also. By means of microspectrometry, we confirm that the thiol-acrylate mixture in TPP resins promote monomer conversion inducing a higher degree of cross-linked network formation. PMID:27410383

  17. Piezoelectric ceramic fibers for active fiber composites: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornmann, Xavier; Huber, Christian; Elsener, Hans-Rudolf

    2003-08-01

    The morphology and the free strain performances of three different piezoelectric ceramic fibers used for the manufacture of active fiber composites (AFCs) have been investigated. The morphology of the fibers has a direct influence on the manufacture of the AFCs. Fibers with non-uniform diameters are more difficult to contact with the interdigitated electrodes and can be the cause of irreparable damages in AFCs. An indirect method requiring the use of a simple analytical model is proposed to evaluate the free strain of active fiber composites. This indirect method presents a relatively good agreement with direct free strain measurements performed with strain gages glued on both sides of an AFC. The results show a systematic difference of ca. 20 % between the indirect and the direct methods. However, the indirect method did not permit to see differences of piezoelectric performance between the types of fibers.

  18. Admixtures and fibers for shotcrete in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Tazawa, Yujiro

    1995-12-31

    In recent years in Japan the following additives are increasingly being used for Shotcreting in tunnels: Accelerator for shotcreting based on calcium aluminate; dust control agent; and fiber. While dry mix shotcrete was predominantly used in Japan, accelerator of shotcrete based on inorganic salts contributed a great deal to the performance of shotcrete. However this type of accelerator is not so effective to wet mix which has been taking the place of dry mix in recent years. For wet mix shotcrete, accelerator for shotcrete based on Amorphous calcium aluminate is found to be quite effective in gaining sufficient early strength without aggravating long term strength. Practical performance in various cases is reported. A dust control agent for shotcreting is often used to improve working conditions in tunnels. This agent is reported to reduce a great deal of the dust generated in shotcreting operations. A variety of dust control agents are now available, of which constituents are cellulose epoxy , acrylic epoxy, polyvinyl alcohol etc. Use of fibers in shotcrete is also becoming popular in Japan to increase strength and toughness of the concrete. Not only steel fibers but also glass fibers are widely used. Recently more variety of materials such as PVA fiber acrylic and aramid fibers have been tested and some of them are being put into practical use, giving similar properties to shotcrete with steel fibers.

  19. Palladium (Ii) Catalyzed Polymerization Of Norbornene And Acrylates

    DOEpatents

    Sen, Ayusman; Kacker, Smita; Hennis, April; Polley, Jennifer D.

    2001-10-09

    Homopolymers or copolymers of acrylates, homopolymers or copolymers of norbornenes, and copolymers of acrylates with norbornenes, may be prepared by contacting acrylate and/or norbornene monomer reactant under polymerization conditions and in the presence of a solvent with a catalyst system consisting essentially of a Pd(II) dimer component having the formula: where L is a monodentate phosphorus or nitrogen ligand, X is an anionic group, and R is an alkyl or aryl group.

  20. Palladium (II) catalyized polymerization of norbornene and acrylates

    DOEpatents

    Sen, Ayusman; Kacker, Smita; Hennis, April; Polley, Jennifer D.

    2000-08-29

    Homopolymers or copolymers of acrylates, homopolymers or copolymers of norbornenes, and copolymers of acrylates with norbornenes, may be prepared by contacting acrylate and/or norbornene monomer reactant under polymerization conditions and in the presence of a solvent with a catalyst system consisting essentially of a Pd(II) dimer component having the formula: [(L)Pd(R)(X)].sub.2, where L is a monodentate phosphorus or nitrogen ligand, X is an anionic group, and R is an alkyl or aryl group.

  1. BN Bonded BN fiber article from boric oxide fiber

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Robert S.

    1978-12-19

    A boron nitride bonded boron nitride fiber article and the method for its manufacture which comprises forming a shaped article with a composition comprising boron oxide fibers and boric acid, heating the composition in an anhydrous gas to a temperature above the melting point of the boric acid and nitriding the resulting article in ammonia gas.

  2. Pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of ethyl acrylate and hydroxy ethyl acrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safrany, A.; Biro, A.; Wojnarovits, L.

    1993-10-01

    Ethyl- and hydroxy ethyl acrylate show high reactivities with hydrated electron and hydroxyl radical intermediates of water radiolysis. The electron adduct reversibly protonate with pK values of 5.7 and 7.3. The adducts may take part in irreversible protonation at the β carbon atom forming α-carboxyl alkyl radicals. Same type of radical forms in reaction of acrylates with OH: at low concentration the adduct mainly disappear in self termination reactions. Above 5 mmol dm -1 the signals showed the startup of oligomerization.

  3. Cable manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, P.

    1972-01-01

    A survey is presented of flat electrical cable manufacturing, with particular reference to patented processes. The economics of manufacture based on an analysis of material and operating costs is considered for the various methods. Attention is given to the competitive advantages of the several processes and their resulting products. The historical area of flat cable manufacture is presented to give a frame of reference for the survey.

  4. Severe Onychodystrophy due to Allergic Contact Dermatitis from Acrylic Nails

    PubMed Central

    Mattos Simoes Mendonca, Marcela; LaSenna, Charlotte; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Acrylic nails, including sculptured nails and the new ultraviolet-curable gel polish lacquers, have been associated with allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). We report 2 cases of ACD to acrylic nails with severe onychodystrophy and psoriasiform changes including onycholysis and subungual hyperkeratosis. In both cases, the patients did not realize the association between the use of acrylate-based manicures and nail changes. One patient had been previously misdiagnosed and treated unsuccessfully for nail psoriasis. The informed clinician should elicit a history of acrylic manicure in patients with these nail changes, especially in cases of suspected nail psoriasis refractory to treatment. Patch testing is a useful tool in confirming diagnosis. PMID:27170940

  5. Severe Onychodystrophy due to Allergic Contact Dermatitis from Acrylic Nails.

    PubMed

    Mattos Simoes Mendonca, Marcela; LaSenna, Charlotte; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-09-01

    Acrylic nails, including sculptured nails and the new ultraviolet-curable gel polish lacquers, have been associated with allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). We report 2 cases of ACD to acrylic nails with severe onychodystrophy and psoriasiform changes including onycholysis and subungual hyperkeratosis. In both cases, the patients did not realize the association between the use of acrylate-based manicures and nail changes. One patient had been previously misdiagnosed and treated unsuccessfully for nail psoriasis. The informed clinician should elicit a history of acrylic manicure in patients with these nail changes, especially in cases of suspected nail psoriasis refractory to treatment. Patch testing is a useful tool in confirming diagnosis. PMID:27170940

  6. Acrylic-based 1×2 Y-Branch POF coupler with high index contrast waveguide taper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsan, A. A.; Abd Rahman, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    An acrylic-based 1x2 Y-Branch POF coupler consists of input POF waveguide, a middle high index contrast waveguide taper and output POF waveguides has been developed. The optical device is based on a 1x2 Y-branch coupler design with a middle high index contrast waveguide taper. Device modeling has been performed using non-sequential ray tracing with an insertion loss of 4.68 dB and coupling ratio of 50:50. Low cost acrylic material has been used for the device substrate. This middle waveguide taper region is constructed on the acrylic block itself without using any additional optical waveguiding medium injected into the engraved taper region. Fabrication of the devices is done by producing the device structures on an acrylic block using high speed CNC machining tool. Input and output POF fibers are inserted in to this device structure in such a way that they are passively aligned to the middle waveguide taper structure. The measured insertion loss is 7.5 dB and with a splitting ratio of 50:50.

  7. Acrylic-based 1×2 Y-Branch POF coupler with high index contrast waveguide taper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsan, A. A.; Abd Rahman, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic-based 1x2 Y-Branch POF coupler consists of input POF waveguide, a middle high index contrast waveguide taper and output POF waveguides has been developed. The optical device is based on a 1x2 Y-branch coupler design with a middle high index contrast waveguide taper. Device modeling has been performed using non-sequential ray tracing with an insertion loss of 4.68 dB and coupling ratio of 50:50. Low cost acrylic material has been used for the device substrate. This middle waveguide taper region is constructed on the acrylic block itself without using any additional optical waveguiding medium injected into the engraved taper region. Fabrication of the devices is done by producing the device structures on an acrylic block using high speed CNC machining tool. Input and output POF fibers are inserted in to this device structure in such a way that they are passively aligned to the middle waveguide taper structure. The measured insertion loss is 7.5 dB and with a splitting ratio of 50:50.

  8. Dimensional stability of natural fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Mark S.

    2013-04-19

    One of the main problems associated with the use of natural fibers as reinforcing agents in composites is their uptake of moisture. Many natural fibers are lignocellulosic, which causes them to swell and shrink as the amount of available moisture changes. Swelling and shrinking can cause composites to prematurely fail. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study that considers the use of two different low molecular weight monomers, hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), polymerized by electron beam ionizing radiation, to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers. Eight different treatments consisting of varying amounts of monomer, encapsulating agent, and cross-linkers, were evaluated for their ability to dimensionally stabilize sisal fiber. Results indicate that both polymerized HEA and HEMA can reduce the swelling of sisal fiber. The effectiveness of HEA and HEMA can be further enhanced with the use of a cross-linker (SR 454). The use of hydroxylated monomers to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers may play an important role in reducing delamination and improving fiber-resin adhesion in composites.

  9. Dimensional stability of natural fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Mark S.; Smith, Jennifer L.; Woods, Sean; Tiss, Kenneth J.; Larsen, L. Scott

    2013-04-01

    One of the main problems associated with the use of natural fibers as reinforcing agents in composites is their uptake of moisture. Many natural fibers are lignocellulosic, which causes them to swell and shrink as the amount of available moisture changes. Swelling and shrinking can cause composites to prematurely fail. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study that considers the use of two different low molecular weight monomers, hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), polymerized by electron beam ionizing radiation, to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers. Eight different treatments consisting of varying amounts of monomer, encapsulating agent, and cross-linkers, were evaluated for their ability to dimensionally stabilize sisal fiber. Results indicate that both polymerized HEA and HEMA can reduce the swelling of sisal fiber. The effectiveness of HEA and HEMA can be further enhanced with the use of a cross-linker (SR 454). The use of hydroxylated monomers to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers may play an important role in reducing delamination and improving fiber-resin adhesion in composites.

  10. Spallation Characteristics of Poly-Methyl Meth-Acrylic (PMMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowski, Peter; Dandekar, D. P.

    1999-06-01

    This work describes the results derived from plane shock wave spallation experiments performed on Poly-Methyl Meth-Acrylic (PMMA) Polymer. These experiments were conducted using the Army Research Laboratories 102 mm Bore, 8 m long Light Gas Gun located at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD. The PMMA used in this work was manufactured by Rohm & Haas as their Ultra-Violet Absorbing (UVA), Type II Plexiglass. Its density is 1.188 Mg/m3 and longitudinal shock velocity is 2.72 mm/μ s. Spallation experiments were conducted at impact stresses between 0.2 and 2.0 GPa. The PMMA appears to exhibit a constant tensile strength of 0.15 GPa up to an impact stress of 0.75 GPa. Unlike metal and ceramic materials, the PMMA exhibits a dwell time in the spallation inversly proportional to the impact stress. At a low impact stress of 0.40 GPa, spallation of the PMMA occurs over a time period of 0.80 micro-seconds. At an impact stress of 0.75 GPa, the spallation occurs over 0.40 micro-seconds. This variation in time required to spall the PMMA will be analyzed and theories discussed.

  11. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  12. Manufacturing Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, James L.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high school industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in manufacturing technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to manufacturing, materials processing, personnel management, production management,…

  13. Toxicity analysis of ocular prosthesis acrylic resin with or without pigment incorporation in human conjunctival cell line.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Bonatto, Liliane da Rocha; de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha de

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pigment incorporation on the cytotoxicity of ocular prosthesis N1 color acrylic resin. Nine samples were manufactured by heat-polymerization in water bath and divided into 3 groups: acrylic resin without pigment incorporation (group R), acrylic resin with pigment incorporation (group RP), and acrylic pigment (group P). Eluates formed after 72h of sample immersion in medium were incubated with conjunctival cell line (Chang conjunctival cells) for 72h. The negative control group consisted in medium without samples (group C). The cytotoxic effect from the eluates was evaluated using MTT assay (cell proliferation), ELISA assay (quantification of IL1β, IL6, TNF α and CCL3/MIP1α) and RT-PCR assay (mRNA expression of COL IV, TGF β and MMP9). Data were submitted to ANOVA with Bonferroni post-tests (p<0.05). All groups were considered non-cytotoxic based on cell proliferation. However, resin with pigment incorporation showed significant IL6 quantity increase. Resin without pigment incorporation exhibited higher mRNA expression of COL IV, MMP9 and TGF β, however it was also observed for the negative control group. The materials exhibited divergent biological behavior. Despite the pigment incorporation that resulted in an increase of IL6, no cytotoxicity was observed based on cell proliferation. PMID:27521695

  14. Toxicity analysis of ocular prosthesis acrylic resin with or without pigment incorporation in human conjunctival cell line.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Bonatto, Liliane da Rocha; de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha de

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pigment incorporation on the cytotoxicity of ocular prosthesis N1 color acrylic resin. Nine samples were manufactured by heat-polymerization in water bath and divided into 3 groups: acrylic resin without pigment incorporation (group R), acrylic resin with pigment incorporation (group RP), and acrylic pigment (group P). Eluates formed after 72h of sample immersion in medium were incubated with conjunctival cell line (Chang conjunctival cells) for 72h. The negative control group consisted in medium without samples (group C). The cytotoxic effect from the eluates was evaluated using MTT assay (cell proliferation), ELISA assay (quantification of IL1β, IL6, TNF α and CCL3/MIP1α) and RT-PCR assay (mRNA expression of COL IV, TGF β and MMP9). Data were submitted to ANOVA with Bonferroni post-tests (p<0.05). All groups were considered non-cytotoxic based on cell proliferation. However, resin with pigment incorporation showed significant IL6 quantity increase. Resin without pigment incorporation exhibited higher mRNA expression of COL IV, MMP9 and TGF β, however it was also observed for the negative control group. The materials exhibited divergent biological behavior. Despite the pigment incorporation that resulted in an increase of IL6, no cytotoxicity was observed based on cell proliferation.

  15. Acrylic Finger Prosthesis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bandela, Vinod; M, Bharathi; S V, Giridhar Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Hands basic function is to grasp, hold and manipulate items. Hand gesture is perhaps the most blatant example of non-verbal communication. Finger and partial finger amputations are most frequently encountered forms of partial hand loss. Common causes are traumatic injuries, congenital absence or malformations present great clinical challenges. In addition to immediate loss of grasp strength, finger absence may cause marked psychological trauma. Individuals who desire finger replacement usually have high expectation for the appearance of prosthesis. This clinical report portrays simple method to retain acrylic finger prosthesis. PMID:25302271

  16. 78 FR 16247 - Approval for Export-Only Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 203, SGL Automotive Carbon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Approval for Export-Only Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 203, SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers, LLC, (Carbon Fiber Manufacturing), Moses Lake, Washington Pursuant to its authority... requested export-only manufacturing authority on behalf of SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers, LLC, within FTZ...

  17. Quantum Dots Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, Stan; Williams, Phillip; Burke, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide are presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dot application technique are discussed.

  18. 40 CFR 721.10500 - Acrylated mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylated mixed metal oxides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10500 Acrylated mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... mixed metal oxides (PMN P-06-341) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10500 - Acrylated mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylated mixed metal oxides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10500 Acrylated mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... mixed metal oxides (PMN P-06-341) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  20. 40 CFR 721.8082 - Polyester polyurethane acrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polyester polyurethane acrylate. 721... Substances § 721.8082 Polyester polyurethane acrylate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyester polyurethane...

  1. 40 CFR 721.8082 - Polyester polyurethane acrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyester polyurethane acrylate. 721... Substances § 721.8082 Polyester polyurethane acrylate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyester polyurethane...

  2. 40 CFR 721.8082 - Polyester polyurethane acrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polyester polyurethane acrylate. 721... Substances § 721.8082 Polyester polyurethane acrylate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyester polyurethane...

  3. 40 CFR 721.8082 - Polyester polyurethane acrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polyester polyurethane acrylate. 721... Substances § 721.8082 Polyester polyurethane acrylate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyester polyurethane...

  4. 40 CFR 721.8082 - Polyester polyurethane acrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polyester polyurethane acrylate. 721... Substances § 721.8082 Polyester polyurethane acrylate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as polyester polyurethane...

  5. The Acrylation of Glycerol: a Precursor to Functionalized Lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Didecanoylacryloylglycerol was synthesized from decanoic and acrylic acids and glycerol using K2O as catalyst. This reaction was carried out in hexane in a closed stainless steel reactor at 200°C for 5h. The reactants were added in a 1:3:4 glycerol:decanoic acid:acrylic acid molar ratio. The resu...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10307 - Acrylate resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate resin (generic). 721.10307 Section 721.10307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10307 Acrylate resin...

  7. 40 CFR 721.330 - Aromatic acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.330 Aromatic acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an aromatic acrylate (PMN P-01-420)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.330 - Aromatic acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.330 Aromatic acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an aromatic acrylate (PMN P-01-420)...

  9. Hybrid resist systems based on α-substituted acrylate copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Sundberg, Linda K.; Bozano, Luisa; Lofano, Elizabeth M.; Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Terui, Yoshiharu; Fujiwara, Masaki

    2009-03-01

    Classical electron-beam resists such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and Nippon Zeon's ZEP function as high resolution and low roughness positive resists on the basis of radiation induced main chain scission to reduce the molecular weight while chemical amplification resists utilized in device manufacturing function on the basis of acidcatalyzed deprotection to change the polarity. In an attempt to increase the resolution and reduce the line roughness of chemical amplification resists, we prepared copolymers that undergo radiation induced main chain scission and acidcatalyzed deprotection. In another word, we wanted to increase the sensitivity of the PMMA resist by incorporating the acid-catalyzed deprotection mechanism in polymers that undergo main chain scission, maintaining the high resolution and low roughness of PMMA. To synthesize such hybrid resist polymers, we selected α-substituted acrylates and α- substituted styrenes. The former included methyl methacrylate (MMA), t-butyl methacrylate (TBMA), methyl α- fluoroacrylate (MFA), t-butyl α-fluoroacrylate (TBFA), and t-butyl α-trifluoromethylacrylate (TBTFMA) and the latter α-methylstyrene (αMEST), α-methyleneindane (αMEIN), and α-methylenetetralin (αMETL). The α-substituted tbutyl acrylic esters were copolymerized with the methyl esters and also with α-substituted styrenic monomers using 2, 2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN). Hybrid resists were formulated by adding a photochemical acid generator and a base quencher to the copolymers and developers were selected by studying the dissolution behavior of unexposed and 254 nm exposed resist films using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). In addition to the difference in the imaging mechanism, PMMA and ZEP differ from the chemical amplification resists in developers; organic solvent vs. aqueous base. We were interested in looking also into the influence of the developer on the lithographic performance. Contrast curves were generated by exposing

  10. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K.L.

    1997-02-01

    The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

  11. Cryogenic Fiber Optic Sensors Based on Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinehart, P. R.; Maklad, M.; Courts, S. S.

    2008-03-01

    Fiber optic sensing has many favorable characteristics—a single fiber can be used to multiplex multiple sensors along the length of the fiber, fiber optic sensing is immune to electromagnetic noise and is inherently safe for combustible liquids and atmospheres. Previously, fiber optic sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) have been demonstrated for cryogenic use for both temperature and strain sensing, but often little data is supplied as to the reproducibility or unit-to-unit uniformity of these sensors. Lake Shore Cryotronics has manufactured fiber optic cryogenic temperature sensors based on Bragg gratings using novel packaging techniques. The temperature response and reproducibility is reported from 80K to 480K for glass-packaged sensors, and a calibration for a high sensitivity, wide range zinc-packaged sensor is reported.

  12. MEGARA optical manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, E.; Páez, G.; Granados, F.; Percino, E.; Castillo-Domínguez, E.; Avilés, J. L.; García-Vargas, M. L.; Gil de Paz, A.; Gallego, J.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Cedazo, R.

    2014-07-01

    MEGARA is the future visible integral-field and multi-object spectrograph for the GTC 10.4-m telescope located in La Palma. INAOE is a member of the MEGARA Consortium and it is in charge of the Optics Manufacturing work package. MEGARA passed the Optics Detailed Design Review in May 2013, and the blanks of the main optics have been already ordered and their manufacturing is in progress. Except for the optical fibers and microlenses, the complete MEGARA optical system will be manufactured in Mexico, shared between the workshops of INAOE and CIO. This includes a field lens, a 5-lenses collimator, a 7-lenses camera and a complete set of volume phase holographic gratings with 36 flat windows and 24 prisms, being all these elements very large and complex. Additionally, the optical tests and the complete assembly of the camera and collimator subsystems will be carried out in Mexico. Here we describe the current status of the optics manufacturing process.

  13. Smart Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jim; Edgar, Thomas; Graybill, Robert; Korambath, Prakashan; Schott, Brian; Swink, Denise; Wang, Jianwu; Wetzel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Historic manufacturing enterprises based on vertically optimized companies, practices, market share, and competitiveness are giving way to enterprises that are responsive across an entire value chain to demand dynamic markets and customized product value adds; increased expectations for environmental sustainability, reduced energy usage, and zero incidents; and faster technology and product adoption. Agile innovation and manufacturing combined with radically increased productivity become engines for competitiveness and reinvestment, not simply for decreased cost. A focus on agility, productivity, energy, and environmental sustainability produces opportunities that are far beyond reducing market volatility. Agility directly impacts innovation, time-to-market, and faster, broader exploration of the trade space. These changes, the forces driving them, and new network-based information technologies offering unprecedented insights and analysis are motivating the advent of smart manufacturing and new information technology infrastructure for manufacturing. PMID:25898070

  14. Smart Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jim; Edgar, Thomas; Graybill, Robert; Korambath, Prakashan; Schott, Brian; Swink, Denise; Wang, Jianwu; Wetzel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Historic manufacturing enterprises based on vertically optimized companies, practices, market share, and competitiveness are giving way to enterprises that are responsive across an entire value chain to demand dynamic markets and customized product value adds; increased expectations for environmental sustainability, reduced energy usage, and zero incidents; and faster technology and product adoption. Agile innovation and manufacturing combined with radically increased productivity become engines for competitiveness and reinvestment, not simply for decreased cost. A focus on agility, productivity, energy, and environmental sustainability produces opportunities that are far beyond reducing market volatility. Agility directly impacts innovation, time-to-market, and faster, broader exploration of the trade space. These changes, the forces driving them, and new network-based information technologies offering unprecedented insights and analysis are motivating the advent of smart manufacturing and new information technology infrastructure for manufacturing.

  15. Manufacturing Aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    Contractor's work for Lewis Research Center on "thermal barrier" coatings designed to improve aircraft engine efficiency resulted in two related but separate spinoffs. The Materials and Manufacturing Technology Center of TRW, Inc. invented a robotic system for applying the coating, and in the course of that research found it necessary to develop a new, extremely accurate type of optical gage that offers multiple improvements in controlling the quality of certain manufactured parts.

  16. The Use of Micro and Nano Particulate Fillers to Modify the Mechanical and Material Properties of Acrylic Bone Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Joshua A.

    Acrylic bone cement (polymethyl methacrylate) is widely used in total joint replacements to provide long-term fixation of implants. In essence, bone cement acts as a grout by filling in the voids left between the implant and the patient's bone, forming a mechanical interlock. While bone cement is considered the `gold standard' for implant fixation, issues such as mechanical failure of the cement mantle (aseptic loosening) and the development of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) still plague joint replacement procedures and often necessitate revision arthroplasty. In an effort to address these failures, various modifications are commonly made to bone cement such as mechanical reinforcement with particles/fibers and the addition of antibiotics to mitigate PJI. Despite these attempts, issues such as poor particle interfacial adhesion, inadequate drug release, and the development of multidrug resistant bacteria limit the effectiveness of bone cement modifications. Therefore, the overall goal of this work was to use micro and nanoparticles to enhance the properties of acrylic bone cement, with particular emphasis placed on improving the mechanical properties, cumulative antibiotic release, and antimicrobial properties. An acrylic bone cement (Palacos R) was modified with three types of particles in various loading ratios: mesoporous silica nanoparticles (for mechanical reinforcement), xylitol microparticles (for increased antibiotic release), and silver nanoparticles (as an antimicrobial agent). These particles were used as sole modifications, not in tandem with one another. The resulting cement composites were characterized using a variety of mechanical (macro to nano, fatigue, fracture, and dynamic), imaging, chemical, thermal, biological, and antimicrobial testing techniques. The primary outcomes of this dissertation demonstrate that: (1) mesoporous silica, as used in this work, is a poor reinforcement phase for acrylic bone cement, (2) xylitol can significantly

  17. Stability of carbon fiber surface chemistry under temperature and its influence on interfacial adhesion with polymer matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Vautard, Frederic; Grappe, Hippolyte A; Ozcan, Soydan

    2013-01-01

    The thermal stability of the surface chemistry of a surface treated carbon fiber was investigated by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Within a range of temperatures from room temperature to 400 C, the only surface functionalities that decomposed were carboxylic acids and dangling nitrogen containing functionalities like amines, amides or nitriles. Significant amounts of water were desorbed as well. This study enabled the testing of the coherence our the fitting of the C(1s), O(1s) and N(1s) peaks. Particularly, when considering the fitting of in the O(1s) peak, carboxylic acids were shown to be included in a single component peak centered at a binding energy of 532.1 eV. The reaction of the carbon fiber surface and an acrylate resin at high temperature, because of the decomposition of carboxylic acids, was highlighted by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The thermal history of the composite material during its manufacture appeared to be a major influence on the nature of the interactions generated at the fiber-matrix interface and the resulting mechanical properties.

  18. Thermal stability of grafted fibers. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sundardi, F.; Kadariah; Marlianti, I.

    1983-10-01

    Presented the experimental results on the study of thermal stability of grafted fibers, i.e., polypropylene-, polyester-, and rayon-grafted fibers. These fibers were obtained by radiation grafting processes using hydrophylic monomers such as 1-vinyl 2-pyrolidone, acrylic acid, N-methylol acrylamide, and acrylonitrile. The thermal stability of the fibers was studied using a Shimadzu Thermal Analyzer DT-30. The thermal stability of the fibers, which can be indicated by the value of the activation energy for thermal degradation, was not improved by radiation grafting. The degree of improvement depends on the thermal stability of the monomers used for grafting. The thermal stability of a polypropylene fiber, either a grafted or an ungrafted one, was found to be inferior compared to the polyester of a rayon fiber, which may be due to the lack of C=O and C=C bonds in the polypropylene molecules. The thermal stability of a fiber grafted with acrylonitrile monomer was found to be better than that of an ungrafted one. However, no improvement was detected in the fibers grafted with 1-vinyl 2-pyrrolidone monomer, which may be due to the lower thermal stability of poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone), compared to the polypropylene or polyester fibers. 17 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Antifungal Effect of Henna against Candida albicans Adhered to Acrylic Resin as a Possible Method for Prevention of Denture Stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Nawasrah, Amal; AlNimr, Amani; Ali, Aiman A

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting the oral mucosa of denture wearers. The aim of this study was to measure the antifungal effect of henna against Candida albicans adhered to acrylic resin as a possible method for prevention of denture stomatitis. One-hundred-eighty acrylic plates were prepared of heat-cured acrylic denture resin. The specimens were divided into six groups of 30 samples each. The first group was only polymer and monomer following the conventional manufacturer instruction for processing complete dentures. The other five groups were processed by adding different concentration of Yamani henna powder (Harazi) to the polymer in a concentration of henna: polymer 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%, respectively. Samples were incubated in artificial saliva rich with Candida albicans at 37 °C, and the effect of henna on Candida albicans was evaluated in two different methods: semi-quantitative slide count and a culture-based quantitative assay (quantitative). Variation in the number of live Candida was observed with the increase in the concentration of Yamani henna powder. It was observed that the variation in live Candida, between control group and group B (concentration of Yamani henna powder was 1%), was statistically significant with a p-value of 0.0001. Similarly, variations in live Candida were significant, when the concentration of powder was 7.5% or 10% in contrast with control group and p-values were 0.0001 and 0.001 respectively. Adding henna to acrylic resin denture could be effective in controlling Candida albicans proliferation on the denture surface; however, its effects on the physical properties of acrylic resin denture need further studies. PMID:27223294

  20. Antifungal Effect of Henna against Candida albicans Adhered to Acrylic Resin as a Possible Method for Prevention of Denture Stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Nawasrah, Amal; AlNimr, Amani; Ali, Aiman A

    2016-05-23

    Denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting the oral mucosa of denture wearers. The aim of this study was to measure the antifungal effect of henna against Candida albicans adhered to acrylic resin as a possible method for prevention of denture stomatitis. One-hundred-eighty acrylic plates were prepared of heat-cured acrylic denture resin. The specimens were divided into six groups of 30 samples each. The first group was only polymer and monomer following the conventional manufacturer instruction for processing complete dentures. The other five groups were processed by adding different concentration of Yamani henna powder (Harazi) to the polymer in a concentration of henna: polymer 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%, respectively. Samples were incubated in artificial saliva rich with Candida albicans at 37 °C, and the effect of henna on Candida albicans was evaluated in two different methods: semi-quantitative slide count and a culture-based quantitative assay (quantitative). Variation in the number of live Candida was observed with the increase in the concentration of Yamani henna powder. It was observed that the variation in live Candida, between control group and group B (concentration of Yamani henna powder was 1%), was statistically significant with a p-value of 0.0001. Similarly, variations in live Candida were significant, when the concentration of powder was 7.5% or 10% in contrast with control group and p-values were 0.0001 and 0.001 respectively. Adding henna to acrylic resin denture could be effective in controlling Candida albicans proliferation on the denture surface; however, its effects on the physical properties of acrylic resin denture need further studies.

  1. Antifungal Effect of Henna against Candida albicans Adhered to Acrylic Resin as a Possible Method for Prevention of Denture Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nawasrah, Amal; AlNimr, Amani; Ali, Aiman A.

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting the oral mucosa of denture wearers. The aim of this study was to measure the antifungal effect of henna against Candida albicans adhered to acrylic resin as a possible method for prevention of denture stomatitis. One-hundred-eighty acrylic plates were prepared of heat-cured acrylic denture resin. The specimens were divided into six groups of 30 samples each. The first group was only polymer and monomer following the conventional manufacturer instruction for processing complete dentures. The other five groups were processed by adding different concentration of Yamani henna powder (Harazi) to the polymer in a concentration of henna: polymer 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%, respectively. Samples were incubated in artificial saliva rich with Candida albicans at 37 °C, and the effect of henna on Candida albicans was evaluated in two different methods: semi-quantitative slide count and a culture-based quantitative assay (quantitative). Variation in the number of live Candida was observed with the increase in the concentration of Yamani henna powder. It was observed that the variation in live Candida, between control group and group B (concentration of Yamani henna powder was 1%), was statistically significant with a p-value of 0.0001. Similarly, variations in live Candida were significant, when the concentration of powder was 7.5% or 10% in contrast with control group and p-values were 0.0001 and 0.001 respectively. Adding henna to acrylic resin denture could be effective in controlling Candida albicans proliferation on the denture surface; however, its effects on the physical properties of acrylic resin denture need further studies. PMID:27223294

  2. Study of fiber optics standardization, reliability, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The use of fiber optics in space applications is investigated. Manufacturers and users detailed the problems they were having with the use or manufacture of fiber optic components. The general consensus of all the companies/agencies interviewed is that fiber optics is a maturing technology and will definitely have a place in future NASA system designs. The use of fiber optics was found to have two main advantages - weight savings and increased bandwidth.

  3. 76 FR 1599 - Foreign-Trade Zone 203-Moses Lake, Washington; Application for Manufacturing Authority, SGL...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 203--Moses Lake, Washington; Application for Manufacturing Authority, SGL Automotive Carbon Fibers, LLC, (Carbon Fiber Manufacturing), Moses Lake, WA An application... Corporation, grantee of FTZ 203, requesting export-only manufacturing authority on behalf of SGL...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1340 - Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. 177...-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins may be safely used as... prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, the ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer...

  5. Electrochemical characterization of aminated acrylic conducting polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Norma Mohammad; Heng, Lee Yook; Ling, Tan Ling

    2015-09-25

    New attempt has been made to synthesize aminated acrylic conducting polymer (AACP) using precursor of phenylvinylsulfoxide (PVS). The process was conducted via the integration of microemulsion and photopolymerization techniques. It has been utilized for covalent immobilization of amino groups by the adding of N-achryiloxisuccinimide (NAS). Thermal eliminating of benzene sulfenic acids from PVS has been done at 250 °C to form electroactive polyacetylene (PA) segment. Characterization of AACP has been conducted using fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and linear sweep cyclic voltammetry (CV). A range of 0.3-1.25μm particle size obtained from SEM characterization. A quasi-reversible system performed as shown in electrochemical study.

  6. Electrochemical characterization of aminated acrylic conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Norma Mohammad; Heng, Lee Yook; Ling, Tan Ling

    2015-09-01

    New attempt has been made to synthesize aminated acrylic conducting polymer (AACP) using precursor of phenylvinylsulfoxide (PVS). The process was conducted via the integration of microemulsion and photopolymerization techniques. It has been utilized for covalent immobilization of amino groups by the adding of N-achryiloxisuccinimide (NAS). Thermal eliminating of benzene sulfenic acids from PVS has been done at 250 °C to form electroactive polyacetylene (PA) segment. Characterization of AACP has been conducted using fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and linear sweep cyclic voltammetry (CV). A range of 0.3-1.25μm particle size obtained from SEM characterization. A quasi-reversible system performed as shown in electrochemical study.

  7. Flexible, stretchable electroadhesives based on acrylic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duduta, Mihai; Wood, Robert J.; Clarke, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Controllable adhesion is a requirement for a wide variety of applications including robotic manipulation, as well as locomotion including walking, crawling and perching. Electroadhesives have several advantages such as reversibility, low power consumption and controllability based on applied voltage. Most demonstrations of electroadhesive devices rely on fairly rigid materials, which cannot be stretched reversibly, as needed in some applications. We have developed a fast and reliable method for building soft, stretchable electroadhesive pads based on acrylic elastomers and electrodes made of carbon nanotubes. The devices produced were tested pre-deformation and in a stretched configuration. The adhesive force was determined to be in the 0.1 - 3.0 N/cm2 range, depending on the adhering surface. The electroadhesive devices were integrated with pre-stretched dielectric elastomer actuators to create a device in which the adhesion force could be tuned by changes in either the applied voltage or total area.

  8. Temperature sensing on tapered single mode fiber using mechanically induced long period fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrujo-García, Sigifredo; Velázquez-González, Jesús Salvador; Pulido-Navarro, María. Guadalupe; González-Ocaña, Ernesto; Mújica-Ascencio, Saúl; Martínez-Piñón, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    The modeling of a temperature optical fiber sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this work. The suggested structure to obtain the sensing temperature characteristics is by the use of a mechanically induced Long Period Fiber Grating (LPFG) on a tapered single mode optical fiber. A biconical fiber optic taper is made by applying heat using an oxygen-propane flame burner while stretching the single mode fiber (SMF) whose coating has been removed. The resulting geometry of the device is important to analyze the coupling between the core mode to the cladding modes, and this will determine whether the optical taper is adiabatic or non-adiabatic. On the other hand, the mechanical LPFG is made up of two plates, one grooved and other flat, the grooved plate was done on an acrylic slab with the help of a computerized numerical control machine (CNC). In addition to the experimental work, the supporting theory is also included.

  9. Poly(amide-graft-acrylate) interfacial compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Michael Perez

    Graft copolymers with segments of dissimilar chemistries have been shown to be useful in a variety of applications as surfactants, compatibilizers, impact modifiers, and surface modifiers. The most common route to well defined graft copolymers is through the use of macromonomers, polymers containing a reactive functionality and thus capable of further polymerization. However, the majority of the studies thus far have focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of reacting with vinyl monomers to form graft copolymers. This study focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of participating in condensation polymerizations. A chain transfer functionalization method was utilized. Cysteine was evaluated as a chain transfer agent for the synthesis of amino acid functionalized poly(acrylate) and poly(methacrylate) macromonomers. Low molar mass, functionalized macromonomers were produced. These macromonomers were proven to be capable of reacting with amide precursors to form poly(amide-g-acrylate) graft copolymers. Macromonomers and graft copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis (EA), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The second part of this research involved poly(dimethacrylate) dental restorative materials. Volumetric shrinkage during the cure of these resins results in a poor interface between the resin and the remaining tooth structure, limiting the lifetime of these materials. Cyclic anhydrides were incorporated into common monomer compositions used in dental applications. Volume expansion from the ring opening hydrolysis of these anhydrides was shown to be feasible. The modified dental resins were characterized by swelling, extraction and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), and density measurements. Linear poLymers designed to model the crosslinked dental resins were

  10. Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol and Butyl Acrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Thomas; Erpelding, Michael; Schmid, Josef; Chin, Andrew; Sammons, Rhea; Rockafellow, Erin

    2015-04-10

    Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol and Butyl Acrylate. The purpose of Archer Daniels Midlands Integrated Biorefinery (IBR) was to demonstrate a modified acetosolv process on corn stover. It would show the fractionation of crop residue to distinct fractions of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The cellulose and hemicellulose fractions would be further converted to ethanol as the primary product and a fraction of the sugars would be catalytically converted to acrylic acid, with butyl acrylate the final product. These primary steps have been demonstrated.

  11. Investigation of Acrylic Acid at High Pressure Using Neutron Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article details the exploration of perdeuterated acrylic acid at high pressure using neutron diffraction. The structural changes that occur in acrylic acid-d4 are followed via diffraction and rationalized using the Pixel method. Acrylic acid undergoes a reconstructive phase transition to a new phase at ∼0.8 GPa and remains molecular to 7.2 GPa before polymerizing on decompression to ambient pressure. The resulting product is analyzed via Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry and found to possess a different molecular structure compared with polymers produced via traditional routes. PMID:24650085

  12. Methods for the synthesis of deuterated acrylate salts

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Hong, Kunlun

    2014-09-09

    A method for synthesizing a deuterated acrylate of the Formula (1), the method comprising: (i) deuterating a propiolate compound of Formula (2) to a methyne-deuterated propiolate compound of Formula (3) in the presence of a base and D.sub.2O: and (ii) reductively deuterating the methyne-deuterated propiolate compound of Formula (3) in a reaction solvent in the presence of deuterium gas and a palladium-containing catalyst to afford the deuterated acrylate of the Formula (1). The resulting deuterated acrylate compounds, derivatives thereof, and polymers derived therefrom are also described.

  13. Microgravity Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Manufacturing capability in outer space remains one of the critical milestones to surpass to allow humans to conduct long-duration manned space exploration. The high cost-to-orbit for leaving the Earth's gravitational field continues to be the limiting factor in carrying sufficient hardware to maintain extended life support in microgravity or on other planets. Additive manufacturing techniques, or 'chipless' fabrication, like RP are being considered as the most promising technologies for achieving in situ or remote processing of hardware components, as well as for the repair of existing hardware. At least three RP technologies are currently being explored for use in microgravity and extraterrestrial fabrication.

  14. [Determination of 9 residual acrylic monomers in acrylic resins by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with microwave assisted extraction].

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying; Lin, Rui; Cai, Luxin; Ge, Xiuxiu; Huang, Changchun

    2012-01-01

    A reliable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed for the determination of 9 residual acrylic monomers (methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, ethyl methacrylate, n-butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, styrene, acrylic acid and methacrylic acid) in acrylic resins. Solid resin was precipitated with methanol after microwave assisted extraction with ethyl acetate for 30 min, and liquid resin was diluted with methanol directly. The nine acrylic monomers got a good separation within 20 min on a DB-WAX column. The limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N = 10) of the method were in the range of 1-10 mg/kg for liquid resin and 3-50 mg/kg for solid resin. The calibration curves were linear within 1-500 mg/L range with correlation coefficients above 0. 995. The recoveries ranged from 84.4% to 108.6% at five spiked levels. The sensitivity, recovery and selectivity of the method can fully meet the requirements of practical work.

  15. Biocompatibility and other properties of acrylic bone cements prepared with antiseptic activators.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, B; Fernández, M; Vázquez, B; Collía, F; de Pedro, J A; López-Bravo, A; San Román, J

    2003-08-15

    Acrylic bone cements prepared with activators of reduced toxicity have been formulated with the aim of improving the biocompatibility of the final material. The activators used were N,N-dimethylaminobenzyl alcohol (DMOH) and 4,4'-dimethylamino benzydrol (BZN). The toxicity, cytotoxicity, and antiseptic action of these activators were first studied. DMOH and BZN presented LD50 values 3-4 times higher than DMT, were less cytotoxic against polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and possessed an antimicrobial character, with a high activity against the most representative microorganisms involved in postoperative infections. The properties of the acrylic bone cements formulated with DMOH and BZN were evaluated to determine the influence of these activators on the curing process and the physicochemical characteristics of the cements. A decrease of the peak temperature was observed for the curing with DMOH or BZN with respect to that of one commercially available formulation (CMW 3). However, residual monomer content and mechanical properties in tension and compression were comparable to those of CMW 3. The biocompatibility of acrylic bone cements containing DMOH or BZN was studied and compared with CMW 3. To that end, intramuscular and intraosseous implantation procedures were carried out and the results were obtained from the histological analysis of the surrounding tissues at different periods of time. Implantation of rods of cement into the dorsal muscle of rats showed the presence of a membrane of connective tissue, which increased in collagen fibers with time of implantation, for all formulations. The intraosseous implantation of the cements in the dough state in the femur of rabbits, revealed a higher and early osseous neoformation, with the presence of osteoid material surrounding the rest of the cured material, for the cement prepared with the activator BZN in comparison with that obtained following the implantation of the cement cured with DMOH or DMT (CMW 3).

  16. 77 FR 69435 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status and Partial Approval of Manufacturing Authority; Toho Tenax...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... Authority; Toho Tenax America, Inc. (Oxidized Polyacrylonitrile Fiber and Carbon Fiber), Rockwood, TN... polyacrylonitrile fiber (OPF) and carbon fiber manufacturing and distribution facilities of Toho Tenax America, Inc... carbon fiber for export; and Whereas, at this time, the Board is unable to approve authority...

  17. Acrylic-based Y-branch POF coupler for "do-it-yourself" next generation optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsan, Abang Annuar; Shaari, Sahbudin; Abd Rahman, Mohd Kamil

    2010-10-01

    Optical devices are components which require sophisticated equipment and technically skilled manpower for device fabrication and assembling and most of the production costs are on the device assembly. However, the next generation optical components may not be devices assembled at the production line but it will be based on the concept of 'do-it yourself' optical devices. We proposed a simple low-cost acrylic-based Y-branch POF coupler which can be assembled easily by the end users themselves. The device is composed of three sections: an input POF waveguide, an intermediate adjustable hollow waveguide taper region and output POF waveguides. Low cost acrylic-based material has been used for the device material. A desktop high speed CNC engraver is utilized to produce the mold inserts used for the optical device. In addition to the engraved device structure, 4 holes are drilled at each corner to allow a top plate to be screwed on top and enclosed the device structure. Included with this POF coupler assembly kit will be the mold insert, top acrylic block, input and output POF fibers (cleaved and stripped with different stripping lengths) and connecting screws. The short POF fibers are inserted into the engraved slots at the input and output ports until the fibers are positioned just before or butt-coupled to each other. The assembling is completed when the top plate is positioned and the connecting screws are secured. The POF coupler has an average insertion loss of 5.8 +/- 0.1 dB, excess loss of 2.8 dB and a good coupling ratio of 1:1.

  18. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, O.T.; Lowry, M.E.

    1999-01-05

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectronic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems. 26 figs.

  19. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, Oliver T.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectonic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems.

  20. Use of acrylic sheet molds for elastomeric products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Koerner, A. E.; Messineo, S. M.

    1970-01-01

    Molds constructed of acrylic sheet are more easily machined than metal, are transparent to ensure complete filling during injection, and have smooth surfaces free of contamination. Technique eliminates flashing on molded parts and mold release agents.

  1. Performance behavior of modified cellulosic fabrics using polyurethane acrylate copolymer.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Mohammad; Shah, Sayyed Asim Ali; Jamil, Tahir; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan

    2014-06-01

    The surface of the cellulosic fabrics was modified using self-prepared emulsions of polyurethane acrylate copolymers (PUACs). PUACs were prepared by varying the molecular weight of polycaprolactone diol (PCL). The PCL was reacted with isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and chain was extended with 2-hydroxy ethyl acrylate (HEA) to form vinyl terminated polyurethane (VTPU) preploymer. The VTPU was further co-polymerized through free radical polymerization with butyl acrylate in different proportions. The FT-IR spectra of monomers, prepolymers and copolymers assured the formation of proposed PUACs structure. The various concentrations of prepared PUACs were applied onto the different fabric samples using dip-padding techniques. The results revealed that the application of polyurethane butyl acrylate copolymer showed a pronounced effect on the tear strength and pilling resistance of the treated fabrics.

  2. Emulsion Polymerization of Butyl Acrylate: Spin Trapping and EPR Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.; Westmoreland, D.

    1994-01-01

    The propagating radical in the emulsion polymerization reaction of butyl acrylate was detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy using two spin trapping agents, 2-methyl-2nitrosopropane and alpha -N-tert-butylnitrone.

  3. PERMEATION OF MULTIFUNCTIONAL ACRYLATES THROUGH SELECTED PROTECTIVE GLOVE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the Premanufacture Notification (PMN) program of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Toxic Substances, the resistance of three glove materials to permeation by multifunctional acrylate compounds was evaluated through a program for the Office of Research ...

  4. Measurement comparison of cotton fiber micronaire and its components by portable near infrared spectroscopy instruments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronaire is a key cotton fiber classing and quality assessment property, and changes in fiber micronaire can impact downstream fiber processing and dye consistency in the textile manufacturing industry. Micronaire is a function of two fiber components—fiber maturity and fineness. Historically, m...

  5. Stabilizing effects of estertins mercaptide (methyl acrylate) for PVC degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. H.; Liu, T. M.; Li, J. L.; Wang, C. R.; Li, C.; Wang, Z. Q.

    2016-07-01

    The thermal and UV light (ultraviolet light) stability of PVC films with estertins mercaptide (methyl acrylate), methyltins mercaptide and the compound consisted of estertins mercaptide (methyl acrylate) and hydrotalcite (2:2.5) were investigated by ageing in a circulation oven at 190 °C and irradiating with 72W UV light for 96h, respectively, and then the yellowness and transmission rate were tested by Color Quest XE. Hydrotalcite was proved to have good synergies with estertins mercaptide (methyl acrylate) on improving the thermal stability and UV light stability. The retarding effects of the heat stabilizers to PVC degradation were tested by TGA from 50°C to 600°C. The results show that temperature of HCl evolution from PVC film was improved obviously by compounding with estertins mercaptide(methyl acrylate) and hydrotalcite and estertins mercaptide(methyl acrylate) was found to have a better long term stability. Sn4+ consistence of water and seawater in which films before and after UV light irradiation were soaked for 60 days was analyzed by ICP; the results indicate that the Sn4+ consistence from the films with estertins mercaptide(methyl acrylate) as thermal stabilizer was lower than that from the film with methyltins mercaptide. The crosslink moderately by UV irradiation for PVC films can hold back the dissolution of organotin heat stabilizers from PVC products into water and seawater.

  6. Fiber biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber cells arising from seed epidermis is the most important agricultural textile commodity in the world. To produce fully mature fibers, approximately two months of fiber developmental process are required. The timing of four distinctive fiber development stages consisting of initiation, ...

  7. Apparel Manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center teamed with the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) in 1989 on a program involving development of advanced simulation software. Concurrently, the State of Alabama chartered UAH to conduct a technology advancement program in support of the state's apparel manufacturers. In 1992, under contract to Marshall, UAH developed an apparel-specific software package that allows manufacturers to design and analyze modules without making an actual investment -- it functions on ordinary PC equipment. By 1995, Marshall had responded to requests for the package from more than 400 companies in 36 states; some of which reported savings up to $2 million. The National Garment Company of Missouri, for example, uses the system to design and balance a modular line before committing to expensive hardware; for setting up sewing lines; and for determining the composition of a new team.

  8. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L.

    1993-08-01

    This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high- voltage varistors. Selective laser sintering automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves performance of photoresist stripper (simulation on Cray supercomputer reveals path to uniform plasma). And mathematical models help make dream of low- cost ceramic composites come true.

  9. Industrially relevant epoxy-acrylate hybrid resin photopolymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajiboye, Gbenga I.

    Photopolymerization of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins takes advantages of inherent properties present in the free-radical and cationic reactions to reduce oxygen inhibition problems that plague free-radical reactions. Similarly, the combined reaction mechanisms reduce moisture sensitivity of the cationic reactions. Despite the advantages of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins, problems persist that need to be addressed. For example, low conversion and polymerization rate of the epoxides are a problem, because the fast acrylate conversion prevents the epoxide from reaching high conversion. Controlling phase separation is challenging, since two moieties with different properties are reacting. The physical properties of the polymer will be impacted by the availability of different moieties. High shrinkage stress results from the acrylate moiety, causing buckling and cracking in film and coating applications. The overall goal of this study is to use the fundamental knowledge of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins to formulate industrially viable polymers. In order to achieve this goal, the study focuses on the following objectives: (I) determine the apparent activation energy of the hybrid monomer METHB, (II) increase epoxide conversion and polymerization rate of hybrid formulations, and (III) control physical properties in epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins. In order to increase the epoxide conversion and rate of polymerization, the sensitivity of epoxides to alcohol is used to facilitate the activated monomer (AM) mechanism and induce a covalent bond between the epoxide and acrylate polymers through the hydroxyl group. It is hypothesized that if the AM mechanism is facilitated, epoxide conversion will increase. As a result, the resins can be tailored to control phase separation and physical properties, and shrinkage stress can be reduced. In pursuit of these objectives, the hybrid monomer METHB was polymerized at temperatures ranging from 30°C to 70°C to obtain apparent activation

  10. Advances in acrylic-alkyd hybrid synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziczkowski, Jamie

    2008-10-01

    In situ graft acrylic-alkyd hybrid resins were formed by polymerizing acrylic and acrylic-mixed monomers in the presence of alkyds by introduction of a free radical initiator to promote graft formation. Two-dimensional NMR, specifically gradient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (gHMQC), was used to clarify specific graft sites of the hybrid materials. Both individual and mixed-monomer systems were produced to determine any individual monomer preferences and to model current acrylic-alkyd systems. Different classes of initiators were used to determine any initiator effects on graft location. The 2D-NMR results confirm grafting at doubly allylic hydrogens located on the fatty acid chains and the polyol segment of the alkyd backbone. The gHMQC spectra show no evidence of grafting across double bonds on either pendant fatty acid groups or THPA unsaturation sites for any of the monomer or mixed monomer systems. It was also determined that choice of initiator has no effect on graft location. In addition, a design of experiments using response surface methodology was utilized to obtain a better understanding of this commercially available class of materials and relate both the chemical and physical properties to one another. A Box-Behnkin design was used, varying the oil length of the alkyd phase, the degree of unsaturation in the polyester backbone, and acrylic to alkyd ratio. Acrylic-alkyd hybrid resins were reduced with an amine/water mixture. Hydrolytic stability was tested and viscoelastic properties were obtained to determine crosslink density. Cured films were prepared and basic coatings properties were evaluated. It was found that the oil length of the alkyd is the most dominant factor for final coatings properties of the resins. Acrylic to alkyd ratio mainly influences the resin properties such as acid number, average molecular weight, and hydrolytic stability. The degree of unsaturation in the alkyd backbone has minimal effects on resin and film

  11. Green Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  12. Olfactory function in chemical workers exposed to acrylate and methacrylate vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, B.S.; Doty, R.L.; Frye, R. ); Monroe, C.; Barker, S. )

    1989-05-01

    An investigation of the olfactory function of 731 workers at a chemical facility which manufactures acrylates and methacrylates was undertaken using a standardized quantitative test. In a cross-section analysis of the data, no associations of chemical exposure with olfactory test scores were observed. A nested case-control study designed to evaluate the cumulative effects of exposure on olfactory function, however, revealed elevated crude exposure odds ratios of 2.0 (1.1, 3.8) for all workers and 6.0 (1.7, 21.5) for workers who never smoked cigarettes. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for multiple confounders, revealed exposure odds ratios of 2.8 (1.1, 7.0) and 13.5 (2.1, 87.6) in these same groups, respectively, and a dose-response relationship between olfactory dysfunction and cumulative exposure scores - semi-quantitative indices of lifetime exposure to the acrylates. The data also revealed decreasing exposure odds ratios with increasing duration since last exposure to these chemicals, suggesting that the effects may be reversible.

  13. High Methane Storage Working Capacity in Metal-Organic Frameworks with Acrylate Links.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Juncong; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Zhang, Yue-Biao; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-08-17

    High methane storage capacity in porous materials is important for the design and manufacture of vehicles powered by natural gas. Here, we report the synthesis, crystal structures and methane adsorption properties of five new zinc metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), MOF-905, MOF-905-Me2, MOF-905-Naph, MOF-905-NO2, and MOF-950. All these MOFs consist of the Zn4O(-CO2)6 secondary building units (SBUs) and benzene-1,3,5-tri-β-acrylate, BTAC. The permanent porosity of all five materials was confirmed, and their methane adsorption measured up to 80 bar to reveal that MOF-905 is among the best performing methane storage materials with a volumetric working capacity (desorption at 5 bar) of 203 cm(3) cm(-3) at 80 bar and 298 K, a value rivaling that of HKUST-1 (200 cm(3) cm(-3)), the benchmark compound for methane storage in MOFs. This study expands the scope of MOF materials with ultrahigh working capacity to include linkers having the common acrylate connectivity. PMID:27442620

  14. Olfactory function in chemical workers exposed to acrylate and methacrylate vapors.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, B S; Doty, R L; Monroe, C; Frye, R; Barker, S

    1989-05-01

    An investigation of the olfactory function of 731 workers at a chemical facility which manufacturers acrylates and methacrylates was undertaken using a standardized quantitative test. In a cross-sectional analysis of the data, no associations of chemical exposure with olfactory test scores were observed. A nested case-control study designed to evaluate the cumulative effects of exposure on olfactory function, however, revealed elevated crude exposure odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of 2.0 (1.1, 3.8) for all workers and 6.0 (1.7, 21.5) for workers who never smoked cigarettes. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for multiple confounders, revealed exposure odds ratios of 2.8 (1.1, 7.0) and 13.5 (2.1, 87.6) in these same groups, respectively, and a dose-response relationship between olfactory dysfunction and cumulative exposure scores--semi-quantitative indices of lifetime exposure to the acrylates. The data also revealed decreasing exposure odds ratios with increasing duration since last exposure to these chemicals, suggesting that the effects may be reversible. PMID:2784947

  15. Fiber coupler end face wavefront surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compertore, David C.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Marcus, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the field of fiber optic communications, one area remains surprisingly `low-tech': fiber termination. In many instances it involves manual labor and subjective visual inspection. At the same time, high quality fiber connections are one of the most critical parameters in constructing an efficient communication link. The shape and finish of the fiber end faces determines the efficiency of a connection comprised of coupled fiber end faces. The importance of fiber end face quality becomes even more critical for fiber connection arrays and for in the field applications. In this article we propose and demonstrate a quantitative inspection method for the fiber connectors using reflected wavefront technology. The manufactured and polished fiber tip is illuminated by a collimated light from a microscope objective. The reflected light is collected by the objective and is directed to a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A set of lenses is used to create the image of the fiber tip on the surface of the sensor. The wavefront is analyzed by the sensor, and the measured parameters are used to obtain surface properties of the fiber tip, and estimate connection loss. For example, defocus components in the reflected light indicate the presence of bow in the fiber end face. This inspection method provides a contact-free approach for quantitative inspection of fiber end faces and for estimating the connection loss, and can potentially be integrated into a feedback system for automated inspection and polishing of fiber tips and fiber tip arrays.

  16. Small Business Innovations (Fiber Optics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Foster-Miller, Inc. Waltham, MA developed the In-Situ Fiber Optic Polymer Reaction Monitor which could lead to higher yields and lower costs in complex composite manufacturing. The monitor, developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center, uses an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. It is the first analytical system capable of directly measuring the chemistry of advanced composite materials.

  17. Analysis of emulsion stability in acrylic dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions either micro or nano permit transport or solubilization of hydrophobic substances within a water-based phase. Different methods have been introduced at laboratory and industrial scales: mechanical stirring, high-pressure homogenization, or ultrasonics. In digital imaging, toners may be formed by aggregating a colorant with a latex polymer formed by batch or semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. Latex emulsions are prepared by making a monomer emulsion with monomer like Beta-carboxy ethyl acrylate (β-CEA) and stirring at high speed with an anionic surfactant like branched sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonates , aqueous solution until an emulsion is formed. Initiator for emulsion polymerization is 2-2'- azobis isobutyramide dehydrate with chain transfer agent are used to make the latex. If the latex emulsion is unstable, the resulting latexes produce a toner with larger particle size, broader particle size distribution with relatively higher latex sedimentation, and broader molecular weight distribution. Oswald ripening and coalescence cause droplet size to increase and can result in destabilization of emulsions. Shear thinning and elasticity of emulsions are applied to determine emulsion stability.

  18. Fracture properties of an acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Bialoblocka-Juszczyk, E; Baleani, M; Cristofolini, L; Viceconti, M

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated experimentally the fracture properties, i.e., the fatigue strength, the resistance to crack propagation and the fracture toughness, of an acrylic bone cement (Cemex RX). The mean endurance limit was determined following the staircase method. The endurance limit was estimated at 9.2 MPa. The fatigue crack propagation rate was measured according to the ASTM E647 standard. The equation of the line fitting the crack growth per cycle (da/dN) versus the stress-intensity factor range (delta K), in a log-log graph, was used to calculate the empirical constants of Paris' law for the selected bone cement: da/dN (m/cycle) = 3.56 x 10(-7) x delta K (MPa x m1/2)5.79. This power-law relationship described well (R2 = 0.96) the growth rate in the stable crack growth region, i.e., in the mid delta K range. The fracture toughness K(IC) of the bone cement was determined according to the ASTM E399 standard. The K(IC) mean value was 1.38 MPa x m1/2. These experimental results provide the set of necessary inputs for numerical studies aimed to investigate the damage accumulation process in the mantle fixing cemented prostheses.

  19. Passive component manufacturing in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The serious downturn of optical fiber communication industry in the past three years speeds up the consolidation of passive component manufacturing. Automation activity and investment stopped due to no driving force from the volume demand. A lot of skillful but low cost labors must be needed in the future for manufacturing when the demand comes back. Except MEMS based VOA, most of components based on advanced technology seem to get delayed in most applications. Furthermore, the highly integrated products are also delayed and become uncertain, especially AWG technology. Most of the manufacturing of passive components already moved or are moving to Asia especially China. Browave already built its manufacturing factory and is almost doing all the manufacturing in Zhong Shan. Browave tries to optimize the value of Taiwan plus China, i.e., Tawan provides superior management system, quality systems and manufacturing engineering support where China provides a lot of skillful but low cost labors. Browave is now not only providing the basic elements like Couplers, Isolators, TFF add/drop filter, Thin Film based GFF (Gain Flattened Filters), but also providing "Dedicated Lines" for the components/modules/subsystems for the players who need the value as mentioned above.

  20. Using a Fiber Loop and Fiber Bragg Grating as a Fiber Optic Sensor to Simultaneously Measure Temperature and Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yao-Tang; Yen, Chih-Ta; Wu, Yue-Shiun; Cheng, Hsu-Chih

    2013-01-01

    This study integrated a fiber loop manufactured by using commercial fiber (SMF-28, Corning) and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) to form a fiber optic sensor that could simultaneously measure displacement and temperature. The fiber loop was placed in a thermoelectric cooling module with FBG affixed to the module, and, consequently, the center wavelength displacement of FBG was limited by only the effects of temperature change. Displacement and temperature were determined by measuring changes in the transmission of optical power and shifts in Bragg wavelength. This study provides a simple and economical method to measure displacement and temperature simultaneously. PMID:23681094

  1. The effects of strain rate and temperature on commercial acrylic artist paints aged one year to decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Eric W. S.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Young, Christina R. T.; Learner, Thomas J. S.

    2015-11-01

    Acrylic artist paints are viscoelastic composites containing a high molecular weight copolymer, pigment and a variety of additives. The glass transition temperature of the latex binder is typically slightly below ambient conditions, giving mechanical properties that are strongly dependent on strain rate and temperature. In previous work, the viscoelastic behaviour of custom-formulated latex artist paints was reported for films with known volume fractions of pigment using data from uniaxial tensile tests at different strain rates and temperatures. Secant Young's modulus and failure strain master curves were constructed for each film through time-temperature superposition, allowing predictions beyond the experimental timescale at a selected reference temperature. A similar analysis is now presented for a small set of commercial artist paints tested at ages of 1 and 27 years. Experimental shift factor values are reported with fits to the Arrhenius, WLF and Vogel Fulcher equations, along with a comparison with published data for acrylic polymers. The tensile results highlight a spectrum of properties that acrylic paints may exhibit—brittle glass to hyperelastic—depending on the conditions during deformation. Strong similarities are shown between products from different manufacturers, and the findings suggest a high degree of stability with age. A method for predicting failure as a function of strain rate and temperature is also presented, and the methodology gives a framework for investigating other artist materials and the factors influencing their mechanical properties.

  2. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-10-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  3. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  4. Computer-aided fiber analysis for crime scene forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Mario; Arndt, Christian; Makrushin, Andrey; Dittmann, Jana

    2012-03-01

    The forensic analysis of fibers is currently completely manual and therefore time consuming. The automation of analysis steps can significantly support forensic experts and reduce the time, required for the investigation. Moreover, a subjective expert belief is extended by objective machine estimation. This work proposes the pattern recognition pipeline containing the digital acquisition of a fiber media, the pre-processing for fiber segmentation, and the extraction of the distinctive characteristics of fibers. Currently, basic geometrical features like width, height, area of optically dominant fibers are investigated. In order to support the automatic classification of fibers, supervised machine learning algorithms are evaluated. The experimental setup includes a car seat and two pieces clothing of a different fabric. As preliminary work, acrylic as synthetic and sheep wool as natural fiber are chosen to be classified. While sitting on the seat, a test person leaves textile fibers. The test aims at automatic distinguishing of clothes through the fiber traces gained from the seat with the help of adhesive tape. The digitalization of fiber samples is provided by a contactless chromatic white light sensor. First test results showed, that two optically very different fibers can be properly assigned to their corresponding fiber type. The best classifier achieves an accuracy of 75 percent correctly classified samples for our suggested features.

  5. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L

    1998-01-01

    The mission of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been to have an adequate base of manufacturing technology, not necessarily resident at LLNL, to conduct their future business. The specific goals were (1) to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes; (2) to construct general purpose process models that have wide applicability; (3) to document their findings and models in journals; (4) to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues; and (5) to develop continuing relationships with the industrial and academic communities to advance their collective understanding of fabrication processes. In support of this mission, two projects were reported here, each of which explores a way to bring higher precision to the manufacturing challenges that we face over the next few years. The first, ''A Spatial-Frequency-Domain Approach to Designing a Precision Machine Tools,'' is an overall view of how they design machine tools and instruments to make or measure workpieces that are specified in terms of the spatial frequency content of the residual errors of the workpiece surface. This represents an improvement of an ''error budget,'' a design tool that saw significant development in the early 1980's, and has been in active use since then. The second project, ''Micro-Drilling of ICF Capsules,'' is an attempt to define the current state in commercial industry for drilling small holes, particularly laser-drilling. The report concludes that 1-{micro}m diameter holes cannot currently be drilled to high aspect ratios, and then defines the engineering challenges that will have to be overcome to machine holes small enough for NIF capsules.

  6. Carbon nanotubes and carbon onions for modification of styrene-acrylate copolymer based nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Ivanova, Tatjana; Bitenieks, Juris; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Moseenkov, Sergey

    2014-05-15

    Styrene acrylate polymer (SAC) nanocomposites with various carbon nanofillers (multiwalled carbon nanotubes MWCNTs and onion like carbon OLC) are manufactured by means of latex based routes. Concentration of the carbon nanofillers is changed in a broad interval starting from 0.01 up to 10 wt. %. Elastic, dielectric and electromagnetic properties of SAC nanocomposites are investigated. Elastic modulus, electrical conductivity and electromagnetic radiation absorption of the investigated SAC nanocomposites increase along with rising nanofiller content. The effect of the addition of anisometric MWCNTs on the elastic properties of the composite is higher than in the case of the addition of OLC. Higher electrical conductivity of the OLC containing nanocomposites is explained with the fact that reasonable agglomeration of the nanofiller can promote the development of electrically conductive network. Efficiency of the absorption of electromagnetic radiation depends on the development of conductive network within the SAC matrix.

  7. Lattice Dynamics of Colloidal Crystals During Photopolymerization of Acrylic Monomer Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunkara, H. B,; Penn, B. G.; Frazier, D. O.; Ramachandran, N.

    1998-01-01

    The photoinitiated bulk polymerization process, which has been used recently in the manufacture of solid optical diffraction filters, is examined to understand the dynamics of both the crystalline colloidal arrays (CCA) and the host monomer species. Our analysis indicates that volume shrinkage of the monomer, changes in the dielectric properties of the monomer, and inhomogeneities of polymerization reaction rate across the dispersion during the polymerization process, are the major contributors for observed lattice compression and lattice disorder of the CCA of silica spheres in polymerized acrylic/methacrylic ester films. The effect of orientation of photocell with respect to the radiation source on Bragg diffraction of CCA indicated the presence of convective stirring in the thin fluid system during the photopolymerization that deleteriously affects the periodic array structures. To devise reproducible and more efficient optical filters, experimental methods to minimize or eliminate convective instabilities in monomeric dispersions during polymerization are suggested.

  8. Carbon nanotubes and carbon onions for modification of styrene-acrylate copolymer based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Ivanova, Tatjana; Bitenieks, Juris; Kuzhir, Polina; Maksimenko, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Moseenkov, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    Styrene acrylate polymer (SAC) nanocomposites with various carbon nanofillers (multiwalled carbon nanotubes MWCNTs and onion like carbon OLC) are manufactured by means of latex based routes. Concentration of the carbon nanofillers is changed in a broad interval starting from 0.01 up to 10 wt. %. Elastic, dielectric and electromagnetic properties of SAC nanocomposites are investigated. Elastic modulus, electrical conductivity and electromagnetic radiation absorption of the investigated SAC nanocomposites increase along with rising nanofiller content. The effect of the addition of anisometric MWCNTs on the elastic properties of the composite is higher than in the case of the addition of OLC. Higher electrical conductivity of the OLC containing nanocomposites is explained with the fact that reasonable agglomeration of the nanofiller can promote the development of electrically conductive network. Efficiency of the absorption of electromagnetic radiation depends on the development of conductive network within the SAC matrix.

  9. Method of manufacturing fibrous hemostatic bandages

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Gustavo; Spretz, Ruben; Velarde-Ortiz, Raffet

    2012-09-04

    A method of manufacturing a sturdy and pliable fibrous hemostatic dressing by making fibers that maximally expose surface area per unit weight of active ingredients as a means for aiding in the clot forming process and as a means of minimizing waste of active ingredients. The method uses a rotating object to spin off a liquid biocompatible fiber precursor, which is added at its center. Fibers formed then deposit on a collector located at a distance from the rotating object creating a fiber layer on the collector. An electrical potential difference is maintained between the rotating disk and the collector. Then, a liquid procoagulation species is introduced at the center of the rotating disk such that it spins off the rotating disk and coats the fibers.

  10. Acrylic Resin Cytotoxicity for Denture Base--Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo C; Freitas, Emily; dos Santos, Daniela; de Medeiros, Rodrigo; Sonego, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Acrylic resin is a widely used material in clinical practice, and a satisfactory biocompatibility is essential. When the resin polymerization reaction is incomplete, residual monomers are released into the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate, through a literature review, the cytotoxicity caused by the denture base acrylic resin used, and its components. The selection of published studies was performed on the Pubmed database from January 2008 to July 2013. The keywords used were: "cytotoxicity and acrylic resins", "cytotoxicity and denture base resins" and "cytotoxicity and oral prosthesis". Inclusion criteria were: in vitro studies and literature reviews published in English that evaluated the acrylic resin cytotoxicity for denture base and its components. Studies with no reference to the search strategy were excluded. A total of 182 articles were found. Among these, only 13 were included for writing this review. The MTT test is the most common test used to evaluate acrylic resin cytotoxicity. Auto-polymerized resin is more cytotoxic than heat-polymerized resin because of its higher quantity of residual monomers which cause cell and tissue changes in the oral mucosa. However, more studies are necessary for the development of biocompatible materials.

  11. High power performance limits of fiber components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holehouse, Nigel; Magné, Julien; Auger, Mathieu

    2015-03-01

    High power combiners are essential for practical fiber lasers, recent developments in pump technology has increased the available brightness and power of pumps significantly, enabling multi kW lasers and pushing combiner designs to new limits. I will present the challenges, measurements and some solutions to these issues. Traditional calculations for combiners underestimate the issues associated with the `tails' of the pump NA distribution, losses in fully filled combiners increase rapidly as pump NA blooms, and subsequent heating effects dominate the combiner's power handling. Acrylate coated pump fibers are reaching their limits and devices and measurements on double clad pump combiners with losses <0.05dB, will be presented enabling multi kW operation, The use of triple clad fibers in the gain section will discussed as a solution for multi kW applications. Results on ultra-low background loss FBG's will be presented, along with developed measurement techniques.

  12. Cation adsorption on manganese dioxide impregnated fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S. ); Stahel, E.P. )

    1992-12-01

    Complete removal of radioactive cations by standard mixed bed ion exchange resins is sometimes not achieved in liquid radwaste systems. Based on a literature survey, acrylic fibers impregnated with manganese dioxide were chosen as a media warranting study of their ability to adsorb the cations present in radwaste systems in the hope of improving performance of such treatment processes. A system to produce impregnated fiber with a heavy MnO[sub 2] loading was designed, constructed, and operated. The system produced fiber at an average fiber loading of 22.5 percent MnO[sub 2] by weight. Leaching tests made on the MnO[sub 2] fiber exhibited no signs of soluble manganese, insoluble MnO[sub 2], acrylonitrile leaching or fiber loss. Laboratory testing has been performed on the adsorption of calcium, cadmium, cesium, cobalt, iron, and manganese on MnO[sub 2] impregnated fiber. Removal of metals from solution was measured at levels specific for each metal tested. The removal efficiency when they were present in combination was also evaluated.

  13. Nanosecond laser damage of optical multimode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Guido; Krüger, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    For pulse laser materials processing often optical step index and gradient index multimode fibers with core diameters ranging from 100 to 600 μm are used. The design of a high power fiber transmission system must take into account limitations resulting from both surface and volume damage effects. Especially, breakdown at the fiber end faces and selffocusing in the fiber volume critically influence the fiber performance. At least operation charts are desirable to select the appropriate fiber type for given laser parameters. In industry-relevant studies the influence of fiber core diameter and end face preparation on laser-induced (surface) damage thresholds (LIDT) was investigated for frequently used all-silica fiber types (manufacturer LEONI). Experiments on preform material (initial fiber material) and compact specimens (models of the cladding and coating material) accompanied the tests performed in accordance with the relevant LIDT standards ISO 21254-1 and ISO 21254-2 for 1-on-1 and S-on-1 irradiation conditions, respectively. The relation beam diameter vs. LIDT was investigated for fused silica fibers. Additionally, laser-induced (bulk) damage thresholds of fused silica preform material F300 (manufacturer Heraeus) in dependence on external mechanical stress simulating fiber bending were measured. All experiments were performed with 10-ns laser pulses at 1064 and 532 nm wavelength with a Gaussian beam profile.

  14. Biosynthetic pathway for acrylic acid from glycerol in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wenhua; Xu, Ying; Xian, Mo; Niu, Wei; Guo, Jiantao; Liu, Huizhou; Zhao, Guang

    2016-06-01

    Acrylic acid is an important industrial feedstock. In this study, a de novo acrylate biosynthetic pathway from inexpensive carbon source glycerol was constructed in Escherichia coli. The acrylic acid was produced from glycerol via 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde, 3-hydroxypropionyl-CoA, and acrylyl-CoA. The acrylate production was improved by screening and site-directed mutagenesis of key enzyme enoyl-CoA hydratase and chromosomal integration of some exogenous genes. Finally, our recombinant strain produced 37.7 mg/L acrylic acid under shaking flask conditions. Although the acrylate production is low, our study shows feasibility of engineering an acrylate biosynthetic pathway from inexpensive carbon source. Furthermore, the reasons for limited acrylate production and further strain optimization that should be performed in the future were also discussed. PMID:26782744

  15. Cellular manufacturing for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Jonathan; Klassen, Henry; Bauer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Rapid progress has been made in the development of novel cell-based approaches for the potential treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. As a result, one must consider carefully the conditions under which these therapeutics are manufactured if they are to be used in clinical studies or, ultimately, be approved as licensed cellular therapeutics. Here, we describe the principles behind the manufacturing of clinical-grade cellular products, as well as potential methods for large-scale expansion and processing according to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standards sets by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Standards for personnel, materials, procedures, and facilities required for such manufacturing processes are reviewed. We also discuss current and future scale-up methods for the manufacturing of large doses of cellular therapeutics under GMP conditions and compare the use of conventional culture methods such as tissue culture flasks and multi-layered cell factories with novel systems such as closed system hollow-fiber bioreactors. Incorporation of these novel bioreactor systems into GMP facilities may enable us to provide adequate cell numbers for multi-center clinical trials and paves the way for development of cellular therapeutics with the potential to treat very large numbers of patients.

  16. Fiber Metal Laminates Made by the VARTM Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Cano, Roberto J.; Hales, Stephen J.; Alexa, Joel A.; Weiser, Erik S.; Loos, Alfred; Johnson, W.S.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber metal laminates (FMLs) are multi-component materials utilizing metals, fibers and matrix resins. Tailoring their properties is readily achievable by varying one or more of these components. Established FMLs like GLARE utilize aluminum foils, glass fibers and epoxy matrices and are manufactured using an autoclave. Two new processes for manufacturing FMLs using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) have been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). A description of these processes and the resulting FMLs are presented.

  17. Nucleophilic addition of reactive dyes on amidoximated acrylic fabrics.

    PubMed

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M; El-Zawahry, Manal M; Abdelghaffar, Fatma; Ahmed, Nahed S E

    2014-01-01

    Seven reactive dyes judiciously selected based on chemical structures and fixation mechanisms were applied at 2% of of shade on amidoximated acrylic fabrics. Amidoximated acrylic fabric has been obtained by a viable amidoximation process. The dyeability of these fabrics was evaluated with respect to the dye exhaustion, fixation, and colour strength under different conditions of temperature and dyeing time. Nucleophilic addition type reactive dyes show higher colour data compared to nucleophilic substitution ones. FTIR studies further implicate the binding of reactive dyes on these fabrics. A tentative mechanism is proposed to rationalize the high fixation yield obtained using nucleophilic addition type reactive dyes. Also, the levelling and fastness properties were evaluated for all dyes used. Excellent to good fastness and levelling properties were obtained for all samples irrespective of the dye used. The result of investigation offers a new method for a viable reactive dyeing of amidoximated acrylic fabrics.

  18. Properties of the modified cellulosic fabrics using polyurethane acrylate copolymers.

    PubMed

    Tabasum, Shazia; Zuber, Mohammad; Jabbar, Abdul; Zia, Khalid Mahmood

    2013-05-15

    Polyurethane acrylate copolymers (PAC) were synthesized via emulsion polymerization following three step synthesis process using toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, hydroxy terminated poly(caprolactone) diol, 2-hydroxyethylacrylate (HEA) and butyl acrylate (BuA). Structural characteristics of the synthesized polyurethane acrylate copolymer (PAC) were studied using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectrophotometer and are with accordance with the proposed PAC structure. The physicochemical properties such as solid contents (%), tackiness, film appearance and emulsion stability were studied, discussed and co-related with other findings. The plain weave poly-cotton printed fabrics after application of PAC was evaluated applying colorfastness standard test method. The results revealed that emulsion stability is the main controlling factor of the synthesized material in order to get better applications and properties. The emulsion stability of the synthesized material increased with increase in molecular weight of the polycaprolactone diol. PMID:23544644

  19. Properties of the modified cellulosic fabrics using polyurethane acrylate copolymers.

    PubMed

    Tabasum, Shazia; Zuber, Mohammad; Jabbar, Abdul; Zia, Khalid Mahmood

    2013-05-15

    Polyurethane acrylate copolymers (PAC) were synthesized via emulsion polymerization following three step synthesis process using toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, hydroxy terminated poly(caprolactone) diol, 2-hydroxyethylacrylate (HEA) and butyl acrylate (BuA). Structural characteristics of the synthesized polyurethane acrylate copolymer (PAC) were studied using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectrophotometer and are with accordance with the proposed PAC structure. The physicochemical properties such as solid contents (%), tackiness, film appearance and emulsion stability were studied, discussed and co-related with other findings. The plain weave poly-cotton printed fabrics after application of PAC was evaluated applying colorfastness standard test method. The results revealed that emulsion stability is the main controlling factor of the synthesized material in order to get better applications and properties. The emulsion stability of the synthesized material increased with increase in molecular weight of the polycaprolactone diol.

  20. Biocatalytic functionalization of hydroxyalkyl acrylates and phenoxyethanol via phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tasnádi, Gábor; Hall, Mélanie; Baldenius, Kai; Ditrich, Klaus; Faber, Kurt

    2016-09-10

    The enzymatic phosphorylation of phenoxyethanol, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate and 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate catalyzed by acid phosphatases PhoN-Sf and PiACP at the expense of inorganic di-, tri-, hexameta- or polyphosphate was applied to the preparative-scale synthesis of phosphorylated compounds. The reaction conditions were optimized with respect to enzyme immobilization, substrate concentration, pH and type of phosphate donor. The mild reaction conditions prevented undesired polymerization and hydrolysis of the acrylate ester moiety. Application of a continuous flow system allowed facile scale-up and mono-phosphates were obtained in up to 26% isolated yield with space-time yields of 0.89kgL(-1)h(-1). PMID:27422352

  1. Biocatalytic functionalization of hydroxyalkyl acrylates and phenoxyethanol via phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tasnádi, Gábor; Hall, Mélanie; Baldenius, Kai; Ditrich, Klaus; Faber, Kurt

    2016-09-10

    The enzymatic phosphorylation of phenoxyethanol, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate and 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate catalyzed by acid phosphatases PhoN-Sf and PiACP at the expense of inorganic di-, tri-, hexameta- or polyphosphate was applied to the preparative-scale synthesis of phosphorylated compounds. The reaction conditions were optimized with respect to enzyme immobilization, substrate concentration, pH and type of phosphate donor. The mild reaction conditions prevented undesired polymerization and hydrolysis of the acrylate ester moiety. Application of a continuous flow system allowed facile scale-up and mono-phosphates were obtained in up to 26% isolated yield with space-time yields of 0.89kgL(-1)h(-1).

  2. Experimental characterization of PZT fibers using IDE electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, Nicholas; Ben Atitallah, Hassene; Ounaies, Zoubeida

    2016-04-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers are mainly used in active fiber composites (AFC) where they are embedded in a polymer matrix. Interdigitated electrodes (IDE) along the direction of the fibers are used to achieve planar actuation, hereby exploiting the d33 coefficient of PZT. When embedded in the AFC, the PZT fibers are subjected to mechanical loading as well as non-uniform electric field as a result of the IDEs. Therefore, it is important to characterize the electrical and electromechanical behavior of these fibers ex-situ using the IDE electrodes to assess the impact of nonuniform electric field on the properties of the fibers. For that reason, this work aims at quantifying the impact of IDE electrodes on the electrical and electromechanical behavior of PZT fibers, which is necessary for their successful implementation in devices like AFC. The tested fibers were purchased from Advanced Cerametrics and they have an average diameter of 250 micrometers. The IDE electrodes were screen printed on an acrylic substrate. The PZT fibers were subjected to frequency sweeps at low voltages to determine permittivity for parallel and interdigitated electrodes. The piezoelectric e33 constant is determined from electromechanical testing of PZT fibers in parallel electrodes to compare the electromechanical behavior for PZT in bulk and fiber form. The dielectric constant and e33 were found to be lower for the IDE and parallel electrodes compared to bulk but comparable to results published in literature.

  3. Colour Stability of Heat and Cold Cure Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, P R; Reddy, Madan Mohan; Ebenezar, A.V. Rajesh; Sivakumar, G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the colour stability of heat and cold cure acrylic resins under simulated oral conditions with different colorants. Materials and Methods: Three different brands of heat cure acrylic resin and two rapid cure auto polymerizing acrylic resin of commercial products such as Trevelon Heat Cure (THC), DPI Heat cure (DHC), Pyrax Heat Cure (PHC), DPI Cold cure (DCC) and Acralyn-R-Cold cure (ACC) have been evaluated for discoloration and colour variation on subjecting it to three different, commonly employed food colorants such as Erythrosine, Tartarizine and Sunset yellow. In order to simulate the oral condition the food colorants were diluted with artificial saliva to the samples taken up for the study. These were further kept in an incubator at 37°C ± 1°C. The UV-visible spectrophotometer has been utilized to evaluate the study on the basis of CIE L* a* b* system. The prepared samples for standard evaluation have been grouped as control group, which has been tested with a white as standard, which is applicable for testing the colour variants. Results: The least colour changes was found to be with Sunset Yellow showing AE* value of 3.55 with heat cure acrylic resin branded as PHC material and the highest colour absorption with Tartarizine showing AE* value of 12.43 in rapid cure autopolymerzing acrylic resin material branded as ACC material. Conclusion: ACC which is a self cure acrylic resin shows a higher colour variation to the tartarizine food coloration. There were not much of discoloration values shown on the denture base resins as the food colorants are of organic azodyes. PMID:25738078

  4. Technology and the use of acrylics for provisional dentine protection.

    PubMed

    Kapusevska, Biljana; Dereban, Nikola; Popovska, Mirjana; Nikolovska, Julijana; Radojkova Nikolovska, Vеrа; Zabokova Bilbilova, Efka; Mijoska, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Acrylics are compounds polymerized from monomers of acrylic, metacrylic acid or acrylonitrates. The purpose of this paper is to present the technology and use of acrylics for provisional dentine protection in the practice of dental prosthodontics. For this reason, we followed 120 clinical cases from the everyday clinical practice, divided into 4 groups of 30 patients who needed prosthetic reconstruction. The first group included cases in which we applied celluloid crowns for dentine protection, for the second group we used acrylic teeth from a set of teeth for complete dentures; in the third and fourth groups the fabrication was done with the system of an impression matrix and the acrylic resin block technique respectively. In all the examined patients, the gingival index by Silness and Loe and the vitality of the dental pulp were verified clinically, after preparation and 8 days from the placement of the provisional crown. The value for dental sensitivity measured after preparation was 2.59, and 8 days after the placement of the provisional crown it bwas 3.1. From these results we can conclude that after the 8th day from the placement of the provisional crown, there was an adaptation period, characterized by a decrease in the painful sensations. The value of the Silness and Loe gingival index measured after the preparation was 1.34, and 8 days from the placement of the provisional crown was 0.94. The results inclined us to the fact that the provisional acrylic crowns facilitated the reparation of the periodontal tissue. PMID:24566021

  5. Damage monitoring and impact detection using optical fiber vibration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. C.; Han, K. S.

    2002-06-01

    Intensity-based optical fiber vibrations sensors (OFVSs) are used in damage monitoring of fiber-reinforced plastics, in vibration sensing, and location of impacts. OFVSs were constructed by placing two cleaved fiber ends in a capillary tube. This sensor is able to monitor structural vibrations. For vibration sensing, the optical fiber sensor was mounted on the carbon fiber reinforced composite beam, and its response was investigated for free and forced vibration. For locating impact points, four OFVSs were placed at chosen positions and the different arrival times of impact-generated vibration signals were recorded. The impact location can be determined from these time delays. Indentation and tensile tests were performed with the measurement of the optical signal and acoustic emission (AE). The OFVSs accurately detected both free and forced vibration signals. Accurate locations of impact were determined on an acrylate plate. It was found that damage information, comparable in quality to AE data, could be obtained from the OFVS signals.

  6. Emerging Materials Technologies That Matter to Manufacturers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2015-01-01

    A brief overview of emerging materials technologies. Exploring the weight reduction benefit of replacing Carbon Fiber with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) in Polymer Composites. Review of the benign purification method developed for CNT sheets. The future of manufacturing will include the integration of computational material design and big data analytics, along with Nanomaterials as building blocks.

  7. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilden, K. S.; Harris, C. G.; Flynn, B. W.; Gessel, M. G.; Scholz, D. B.; Stawski, S.; Winston, V.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program is to develop the technology required for cost-and weight-efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements, and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of stringer-stiffened and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant-section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements cocured to skin structures. Significant process development efforts included AFP, braiding, RTM, autoclave cure, and core blanket fabrication for both sandwich and stiffened-skin structure. Outer-mold-line and inner-mold-line tooling was developed for sandwich structures and stiffened-skin structure. The effect of design details, process control and tool design on repeatable, dimensionally stable, structure for low cost barrel assembly was assessed. Subcomponent panels representative of crown, keel, and side quadrant panels were fabricated to assess scale-up effects and manufacturing anomalies for full-scale structures. Manufacturing database including time studies, part quality, and manufacturing plans were generated to support the development of designs and analytical models to access cost, structural performance, and dimensional tolerance.

  8. The creep behavior of acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Sadiku, E R; Biotidara, F O

    1996-01-01

    The creep behavior of acrylic dental base resins, at room temperature and at different loading conditions, has been examined. The behaviors of these resins are similar to that of "commercial perspex" at room temperature over a period of 1000 seconds. The pseudo-elastic moduli of the blends of PMMA VC show a significant increase compared with PMMA alone. The addition of the PVC powder to the heat-cured acrylic resin increased the time-dependent elastic modulus. This increase in elastic modulus is advantageous in the production of denture based resins of improv mechanical properties.

  9. Kinetic relationships governing addition of methanol to methyl acrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarov, G.A.; Danov, S.M.; Kutnyaya, M.Yu.

    1988-11-10

    The kinetic relationships governing the addition of methanol to methyl acrylate and the reverse reaction, i.e., the elimination of methanol from methyl /beta/-methoxypropionate catalyzed by sulfuric and p-toluenesulfonic acids, were investigated. The rate of the forward reaction depends on the concentrations of methyl acrylate, methanol, and the catalyst, and the rate of the reverse reaction depends on the concentration of methyl /beta/-methoxypropionate and of the catalyst. A kinetic expression which describes the process well was obtained.

  10. Corrosion resistant properties of polyaniline acrylic coating on magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Azim, S. Syed; Venkatachari, G.

    2006-12-01

    The performance of the paint coating based on acrylic-polyaniline on magnesium alloy ZM 21 has been studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.5% NaCl solution. The polyaniline was prepared by chemical oxidative method of aniline with ammonium persulphate in phosphoric acid medium. The phosphate-doped polyaniline was characterized by FTIR and XRD methods. Acrylic paint containing the phosphate-doped polyaniline was prepared and coated on magnesium ZM 21 alloy. The coating was able to protect the magnesium alloy and no base metal dissolution was noted even after 75 days exposure to sodium chloride solution.

  11. Cardiovascular effects of acrylic bone cement in rabbits and cats.

    PubMed

    Pelling, D; Butterworth, K R

    1973-06-16

    The cardiovascular responses to forcing acrylic bone cement, Plasticine, or soft paraffin wax into the medullary cavity of the femur have been studied in rabbits and cats. An acute fall in blood pressure, occurring within a few seconds of insertion, was demonstrated with each substance. In a few of the animals the blood pressure response had a second more protracted component and it is suggested that more than one mechanism is involved. The cardiovascular effects that have been observed in man when acrylic cement is used in prosthetic hip surgery also may be due to more than one mechanism. PMID:4714847

  12. Lipase-catalyzed aza-Michael reaction on acrylate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Steunenberg, Peter; Sijm, Maarten; Zuilhof, Han; Sanders, Johan P M; Scott, Elinor L; Franssen, Maurice C R

    2013-04-19

    A methodology has been developed for an efficient and selective lipase-catalyzed aza-Michael reaction of various amines (primary and secondary) with a series of acrylates and alkylacrylates. Reaction parameters were tuned, and under the optimal conditions it was found that Pseudomonas stutzeri lipase and Chromobacterium viscosum lipase showed the highest selectivity for the aza-Michael addition to substituted alkyl acrylates. For the first time also, some CLEAs were examined that showed a comparable or higher selectivity and yield than the free enzymes and other formulations.

  13. Effects of sterilization on optical and mechanical reliability of specialty optical fibers and terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolov, Andrei A.; Warych, Edward T.; Smith, William P.; Fournier, Paula L.; Hokansson, Adam S.; Li, Jie; Allen, R. Steve

    2014-02-01

    Optical fibers and terminations were subjected to different sterilization techniques, including multiple autoclaving and treatments with peracetic acid, E-beam and UV radiation. Effects of different sterilization techniques on key optical and mechanical properties of the fibers and the terminations were revealed. The primary attention was given to behavior of the coatings on the fibers and adhesives used in the terminations in harsh sterilization environments. The optical fibers with following four coating/buffer types were investigated: (i) dual acrylate, (ii) polyimide, (iii) silicone/PEEK and (iv) fluoroacrylate hard cladding/ETFE.

  14. 40 CFR 721.6560 - Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6560 Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene. (a) Chemical... as acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene (PMN P-91-521) is subject to reporting under...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  17. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  18. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  19. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10032 - Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10032 Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (generic). (a... generically as acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (PMN P-02-269) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.6560 - Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6560 Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene. (a) Chemical... as acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene (PMN P-91-521) is subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10032 - Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10032 Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (generic). (a... generically as acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (PMN P-02-269) is subject to reporting...

  4. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.6560 - Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6560 Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene. (a) Chemical... as acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene (PMN P-91-521) is subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10032 - Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10032 Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (generic). (a... generically as acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (PMN P-02-269) is subject to reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10101 - Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10101 Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and...) The chemical substance identified generically as copolymer of alkyl acrylate and...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10101 - Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10101 Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and...) The chemical substance identified generically as copolymer of alkyl acrylate and...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10101 - Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10101 Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and...) The chemical substance identified generically as copolymer of alkyl acrylate and...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10101 - Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10101 Copolymer of alkyl acrylate and...) The chemical substance identified generically as copolymer of alkyl acrylate and...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1340 - Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. 177.1340... copolymer resins. Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins may be safely used as articles or components of...) For the purpose of this section, the ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins consist of...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10192 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl], acrylates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. 721... Substances § 721.10192 Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- , acrylates (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10192 - Amides, coco, N-[3-(dibutylamino)propyl], acrylates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. 721... Substances § 721.10192 Amides, coco, N- , acrylates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amides, coco, N- , acrylates (PMN...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1340 - Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. 177... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1340 Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins may be safely used...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1340 - Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. 177... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1340 Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins may be safely used...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1340 - Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. 177... Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1340 Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. Ethylene-methyl... section, the ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins consist of basic copolymers produced by...

  19. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  20. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10032 - Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10032 Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (generic). (a... generically as acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (PMN P-02-269) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  4. 40 CFR 721.6560 - Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6560 Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene. (a) Chemical... as acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene (PMN P-91-521) is subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10032 - Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10032 Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (generic). (a... generically as acrylic acid, polymer with substituted acrylamides (PMN P-02-269) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.6560 - Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6560 Acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene. (a) Chemical... as acrylic acid, polymer with substituted ethene (PMN P-91-521) is subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9640 - Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9640 Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (generic). (a... generically as salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (PMN P-99-817) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.321 - Substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted acrylamides and acrylic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.321 Substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer... identified generically as substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer (PMN P-00-0490) is subject...

  10. 40 CFR 721.321 - Substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted acrylamides and acrylic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.321 Substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer... identified generically as substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer (PMN P-00-0490) is subject...

  11. 40 CFR 721.321 - Substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted acrylamides and acrylic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.321 Substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer... identified generically as substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer (PMN P-00-0490) is subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9640 - Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9640 Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (generic). (a... generically as salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (PMN P-99-817) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9640 - Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9640 Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (generic). (a... generically as salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (PMN P-99-817) is subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.338 - Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic... Substances § 721.338 Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as salt of an acrylate...

  15. 40 CFR 721.338 - Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic... Substances § 721.338 Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as salt of an acrylate...

  16. 40 CFR 721.338 - Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic... Substances § 721.338 Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic). Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34636... substances identified generically as salt of an acrylate copolymer (PMNs P-00-0333 and P-00-0334) are...

  17. 40 CFR 721.338 - Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic... Substances § 721.338 Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as salt of an acrylate...

  18. 40 CFR 721.338 - Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic... Substances § 721.338 Salt of an acrylate copolymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as salt of an acrylate...

  19. 40 CFR 721.321 - Substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted acrylamides and acrylic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.321 Substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer... identified generically as substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer (PMN P-00-0490) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.321 - Substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted acrylamides and acrylic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.321 Substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer... identified generically as substituted acrylamides and acrylic acid copolymer (PMN P-00-0490) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9640 - Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9640 Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (generic). (a... generically as salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (PMN P-99-817) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9640 - Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9640 Salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (generic). (a... generically as salt of an acrylic acid - acrylamide terpolymer (PMN P-99-817) is subject to reporting...

  3. The Economics of Big Area Addtiive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Brian; Lloyd, Peter D; Lindahl, John; Lind, Randall F; Love, Lonnie J; Kunc, Vlastimil

    2016-01-01

    Case studies on the economics of Additive Manufacturing (AM) suggest that processing time is the dominant cost in manufacturing. Most additive processes have similar performance metrics: small part sizes, low production rates and expensive feedstocks. Big Area Additive Manufacturing is based on transitioning polymer extrusion technology from a wire to a pellet feedstock. Utilizing pellets significantly increases deposition speed and lowers material cost by utilizing low cost injection molding feedstock. The use of carbon fiber reinforced polymers eliminates the need for a heated chamber, significantly reducing machine power requirements and size constraints. We hypothesize that the increase in productivity coupled with decrease in feedstock and energy costs will enable AM to become more competitive with conventional manufacturing processes for many applications. As a test case, we compare the cost of using traditional fused deposition modeling (FDM) with BAAM for additively manufacturing composite tooling.

  4. Effects of sterilization methods on key properties of specialty optical fibers used in medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolov, Andrei A.; Slyman, Brian E.; Burgess, David T.; Hokansson, Adam S.; Li, Jie; Allen, R. Steve

    2013-03-01

    Optical fibers with different types of polymer coatings were exposed to three sterilization conditions: multiple autoclaving, treatment with ethylene oxide and treatment with gamma rays. Effects of different sterilization techniques on key optical and mechanical properties of the fibers are reported. The primary attention is given to behavior of the coatings in harsh sterilization environments. The following four coating/buffer types were investigated: (i) dual acrylate, (ii) polyimide, (iii) silicone/PEEK and (iv) fluoroacrylate hard cladding/ETFE.

  5. Tensile bond strength between auto-polymerized acrylic resin and acrylic denture teeth treated with MF-MA solution

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the effect of chemical surface treatment using methyl formate-methyl acetate (MF-MA) solution on the tensile bond strength between acrylic denture teeth and auto-polymerized acrylic resin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy maxillary central incisor acrylic denture teeth for each of three different brands (Yamahachi New Ace; Major Dent; Cosmo HXL) were embedded with incisal edge downwards in auto-polymerized resin in polyethylene pipes and ground with silicone carbide paper on their ridge lap surfaces. The teeth of each brand were divided into seven groups (n=10): no surface treatment (control group), MF-MA solution at a ratio of 25:75 (v/v) for 15 seconds, 30 seconds, 60 seconds, 120 seconds, 180 seconds, and MMA for 180 seconds. Auto-polymerized acrylic resin (Unifast Trad) was applied to the ground surface and polymerized in a pressure cooker. A tensile strength test was performed with a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Dunnett T3 test (α=.05). RESULTS The surface treatment groups had significantly higher mean tensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P<.05) when compared within the same brand. Among the surface treatment groups of each brand, there were no significantly different tensile bond strengths between the MF-MA groups and the MMA 180 second group (P>.05), except for the Yamahachi New Ace MF-MA 180-second group (P<.05). CONCLUSION 15-second MF-MA solution can be an alternative chemical surface treatment for repairing a denture base and rebonding acrylic denture teeth with auto-polymerized acrylic resin, for both conventional and cross-linked teeth. PMID:27555897

  6. V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

  7. Cloud manufacturing: a new manufacturing paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Luo, Yongliang; Tao, Fei; Li, Bo Hu; Ren, Lei; Zhang, Xuesong; Guo, Hua; Cheng, Ying; Hu, Anrui; Liu, Yongkui

    2014-03-01

    Combining with the emerged technologies such as cloud computing, the Internet of things, service-oriented technologies and high performance computing, a new manufacturing paradigm - cloud manufacturing (CMfg) - for solving the bottlenecks in the informatisation development and manufacturing applications is introduced. The concept of CMfg, including its architecture, typical characteristics and the key technologies for implementing a CMfg service platform, is discussed. Three core components for constructing a CMfg system, i.e. CMfg resources, manufacturing cloud service and manufacturing cloud are studied, and the constructing method for manufacturing cloud is investigated. Finally, a prototype of CMfg and the existing related works conducted by the authors' group on CMfg are briefly presented.

  8. Oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber reinforced PVC/ENR blend-electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, Chantara Thevy; Raju, Gunasunderi; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2007-12-01

    The effect of irradiation on the tensile properties of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber reinforced poly(vinyl chloride)/epoxidized natural rubber (PVC/ENR) blends were studied. The composites were prepared by mixing the fiber and the PVC/ENR blend using HAAKE Rheomixer at 150 °C. The composites were then irradiated by using a 3.0 MeV electron beam machine at doses ranging from 0 to 100 kGy in air and room temperature. The tensile strength, Young's modulus, elongation at break and gel fraction of the composites were measured. Comparative studies were also made by using poly(methyl acrylate) grafted OPEFB fiber in the similar blend system. An increase in tensile strength, Young's modulus and gel fraction, with a concurrent reduction in the elongation at break (Eb) of the PVC/ENR/OPEFB composites were observed upon electron beam irradiation. Studies revealed that grafting of the OPEFB fiber with methyl acrylate did not cause appreciable effect to the tensile properties and gel fraction of the composites upon irradiation. The morphology of fractured surfaces of the composites, examined by a scanning electron microscope showed an improvement in the adhesion between the fiber and the matrix was achieved upon grafting of the fiber with methyl acrylate.

  9. Fracture Mechanisms of Layer-By-Layer Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheng, Eugene R.

    A layer-by-layer(LBL) manufactured material is examined in detail in this thesis. Improvements are made to the method of its manufacture. Efforts are made to understand its fracture mechanisms and take advantage of these fracture mechanisms in the absorption of impact energy. A novel series of experiments has been performed on LBL manufactured thin films to demonstrate their unique fracture mechanisms. Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) (PU/PAA) and PU/PAA/(PU/Clay)5 nanocomposite films readily undergo Interlaminar mode II fracture, because of the relatively weak elctrostatic bonds between monolayers. Tensile tests performed while under observation by a scanning electron microscope demonstrate the tendency of these nanocomposite films to undergo interlaminar mode II fracture even when loads are applied in the plane of nanocomposite film. It is concluded that these mechanisms of energy dissipation are responsible for the enhanced toughness of these films when used as layers between glass blocks in the prevention of impact damage to the glass. A novel automated manufacturing facility has been designed and built to deposit large sheets of Layer-by-Layer nanocomposite film. These large sheets are incorporated into a borosillicate glass composite in order to compare the ballistic characteristics of LBL PU based nanocomposite films to a single cast layer of polyurethane. It is demonstrated that shear fracture is the mode of failure in the blocks containing the nanocomposite film. The shear fracture surface in the nanocomposite after it has undergone a ballistic impact is characterized. Additional experiments are performed to characterize the interlaminar fracture stresses and toughnesses of the nanocomposite LBL layers, to assist in the implementation of a numerical crack band model that describes the nanocomposite film. The computational model predicts the failure of the ballistic nanocomposite samples, and the predicted V50 velocity is found to be in good agreement with

  10. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  11. Degradation of a Sodium Acrylate Oligomer by an Arthrobacter sp

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takaya; Mukouyama, Masaharu; Sakano, Kouichi; Tani, Yoshiki

    1993-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain NO-18 was first isolated from soil as a bacterium which could degrade the sodium acrylate oligomer and utilize it as the sole source of carbon. When 0.2% (wt/wt) oligomer was added to the culture medium, the acrylate oligomer was found to be degraded by 70 to 80% in 2 weeks, using gel permeation chromatography. To determine the maximum molecular weight for biodegradation, the degradation test was done with the hexamer, heptamer, and octamer, which were separated from the oligomer mixture by fractional gel permeation chromatography. The hexamer and heptamer were consumed to the extents of 58 and 36%, respectively, in 2 weeks, but the octamer was not degraded. Oligomers with three different terminal groups were synthesized to examine the effect of the different terminal groups on biodegradation, but few differences were found. Arthrobacter sp. NO-18 assimilated acrylic acid, propionic acid, glutaric acid, 2-methylglutaric acid, and 1,3,5-pentanetricarboxylic acid. Degradation of the acrylic unit structure by this strain is discussed. PMID:8517751

  12. Bond strength between acrylic resin and maxillofacial silicone

    PubMed Central

    HADDAD, Marcela Filié; GOIATO, Marcelo Coelho; dos SANTOS, Daniela Micheline; CREPALDI, Nádia de Marchi; PESQUEIRA, Aldiéris Alves; BANNWART, Lisiane Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The development of implant dentistry improved the possibilities of rehabilitation with maxillofacial prosthesis. However, clinically it is difficult to bond the silicone to the attachment system. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an adhesive system on the bond strength between acrylic resin and facial silicone. Material and Methods A total of 120 samples were fabricated with auto-polymerized acrylic resin and MDX 4-4210 facial silicone. Both materials were bonded through mechanical retentions and/or application of primers (DC 1205 primer and Sofreliner primer S) and adhesive (Silastic Medical Adhesive Type A) or not (control group). Samples were divided into 12 groups according to the method used to attach the silicone to the acrylic resin. All samples were subjected to a T-peel test in a universal testing machine. Failures were classified as adhesive, cohesive or mixed. The data were evaluated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey's HSD test (α=.05). Results The highest bond strength values (5.95 N/mm; 3.07 N/mm; 4.75 N/mm) were recorded for the samples that received a Sofreliner primer application. These values were significantly higher when the samples had no scratches and did not receive the application of Silastic Medical Adhesive Type A. Conclusions The most common type of failure was adhesive. The use of Sofreliner primer increased the bond strength between the auto-polymerized acrylic resin and the Silastic MDX 4-4210 facial silicone. PMID:23329247

  13. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). 721.329 Section 721.329 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... substance may cause internal organ effects (kidney and blood). The requirements of this section do not...

  14. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). 721.329 Section 721.329 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... substance may cause internal organ effects (kidney and blood). The requirements of this section do not...

  15. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). 721.329 Section 721.329 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... substance may cause internal organ effects (kidney and blood). The requirements of this section do not...

  16. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). 721.329 Section 721.329 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... substance may cause internal organ effects (kidney and blood). The requirements of this section do not...

  17. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). 721.329 Section 721.329 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... substance may cause internal organ effects (kidney and blood). The requirements of this section do not...

  18. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and holding food, including heating of prepared food, subject to the provisions of this section: (a... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section 175.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  19. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... a food-contact surface of articles intended for packaging and holding food, including heating of... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section 175.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  20. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and holding food, including heating of prepared food, subject to the provisions of this section: (a... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section 175.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  1. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and holding food, including heating of prepared food, subject to the provisions of this section: (a... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section 175.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  2. Acrylic resin injection method for blood vessel investigations.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Fumihiko; Uemura, Mamoru; Takemura, Akimichi; Toda, Isumi; Fang, Yi-Ru; Xu, Yuan Jin; Zhang, Zhi Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The injection of acrylic resin into vessels is an excellent method for macroscopically and microscopically observing their three-dimensional features. Conventional methods can be enhanced by removal of the polymerization inhibitor (hydroquinone) without requiring distillation, a consistent viscosity of polymerized resin, and a constant injection pressure and speed. As microvascular corrosion cast specimens are influenced by viscosity, pressure, and speed changes, injection into different specimens yields varying results. We devised a method to reduce those problems. Sodium hydroxide was used to remove hydroquinone from commercial methylmethacrylate. The solid polymer and the liquid monomer were mixed using a 1 : 9 ratio (low-viscosity acrylic resin, 9.07 ± 0.52 mPa•s) or a 3:7 ratio (high-viscosity resin, 1036.33 ± 144.02 mPa•s). To polymerize the acrylic resin for injection, a polymerization promoter (1.0% benzoyl peroxide) was mixed with a polymerization initiator (0.5%, N, N-dimethylaniline). The acrylic resins were injected using a precise syringe pump, with a 5-mL/min injection speed and 11.17 ± 1.60 mPa injection pressure (low-viscosity resin) and a 1-mL/min injection speed and 58.50 ± 5.75 mPa injection pressure (high-viscosity resin). Using the aforementioned conditions, scanning electron microscopy indicated that sufficient resin could be injected into the capillaries of the microvascular corrosion cast specimens.

  3. JKR studies of adhesion with model acrylic elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, K.R.; Ahn, D.

    1996-12-31

    Acrylic elastomers are widely used in coating applications because of their inherent thermal stability, oil resistance and adhesive properties. These same features make acrylic elastomers attractive for fundamental studies of polymer adhesion. This endeavor has been simplified recently by the development of techniques for producing monodisperse acrylic homopolymers and block copolymers from anionically synthesized parent polyacrylates, thus allowing precise microstructural control of adhering surfaces. In terms of the adhesion measurement itself, an adhesion test based upon the theory of Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR), henceforth referred to as the JKR technique, is well suited for probing the molecular origins of adhesion in elastomeric systems. This technique is quite practical, and minimizes the sample volume to reduce bulk viscoelastic losses. Further, the JKR technique permits testing at very low crack velocities, where interfacial effects are unobscured by bulk effects. In this paper, the authors report the results of JKR adhesion tests between poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PNBA) elastomers and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The latter is employed as a control substrate because its inertness and low surface energy (relative to metallic or silicon based surfaces) are conducive to the creation of reproducible solid surfaces.

  4. 21 CFR 177.1320 - Ethylene-ethyl acrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... prescribed in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, when tested by the methods prescribed for polyethylene in... identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (ii) Quantitative determination of ethyl acrylate... less than 0.920 nor more than 0.935, as determined by ASTM method D1505-68 (Reapproved 1979),...

  5. Antimicrobial activity of poly(acrylic acid) block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Gratzl, Günther; Paulik, Christian; Hild, Sabine; Guggenbichler, Josef P; Lackner, Maximilian

    2014-05-01

    The increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has developed into a major health problem. In particular, biofilms are the main reason for hospital-acquired infections and diseases. Once formed, biofilms are difficult to remove as they have specific defense mechanisms against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial surfaces must therefore kill or repel bacteria before they can settle to form a biofilm. In this study, we describe that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) containing diblock copolymers can kill bacteria and prevent from biofilm formation. The PAA diblock copolymers with poly(styrene) and poly(methyl methacrylate) were synthesized via anionic polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate with styrene or methyl methacrylate and subsequent acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the tert-butyl ester. The copolymers were characterized via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis, and acid-base titrations. Copolymer films with a variety of acrylic acid contents were produced by solvent casting, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tested for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of the acidic diblock copolymers increased with increasing acrylic acid content, independent of the copolymer-partner, the chain length and the nanostructure.

  6. 40 CFR 721.336 - Perfluoroalkylethyl acrylate copolymer (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.336 Perfluoroalkylethyl acrylate copolymer (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified...

  7. 40 CFR 721.336 - Perfluoroalkylethyl acrylate copolymer (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.336 Perfluoroalkylethyl acrylate copolymer (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified...

  8. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  9. 40 CFR 414.20 - Applicability; description of the rayon fibers subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rayon fibers subcategory. 414.20 Section 414.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Rayon Fibers § 414.20 Applicability; description of the rayon fibers subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to process wastewater discharges resulting from the manufacture of rayon fiber...

  10. LC50 values for rats acutely exposed to vapors of acrylic and methacrylic acid esters

    SciTech Connect

    Oberly, R.; Tansy, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    Acute exposure studies were conducted using adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to obtain LC50/24 concentrations for the common esters of acrylic and methacrylic acids. The order of acute toxicity was determined to be methyl acrylate > ethyl acrylate > butyl acrylate > butyl methacrylate > methyl methacrylate > ethyl methacrylate. Four-hour daily exposures (excluding weekends) of young adult male rats to 110 ppm methyl acrylate in air over a period of 32 d failed to produce significant differences in body or tissue weights, blood chemistries, gross metabolic performance, and spontaneous small-intestinal motor activities when compared with a sham-exposed group.

  11. Application of a photonic crystal fiber LPG for vibration monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, I. M.; Chesini, G.; Sousa, Marco; Osório, Jonas H.; Baptista, J. M.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.; Jorge, Pedro A. S.

    2013-05-01

    A fiber optic sensor based on a long-period grating (LPG) inscribed in a photonic crystal fiber is investigated for vibration sensing for structural monitoring applications. In this paper, preliminary results are shown demonstrating the sensor ability to detect vibration induced in a test structure. The sensor frequency response when attached to a loudspeaker-acrylic plate stimulation system (tested in the range from 40 Hz to 2.5 kHz) is analyzed using an intensity based scheme with a tunable laser. An alternative interrogation scheme, where the vibration signal is retrieved from a spectral scan, is also demonstrated and analyzed showing promising characteristics for structural health monitoring.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Polyurethane Acrylates for UV Curable Coating Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mi Na; Kang, Young Soo; Oh, Sun Wha; Ahn, Byung Hyun; Moon, Myung Jun

    The single hydroxyl-terminated urethane acrylate oligomers were synthesized from 2-mercaptoethanol (2-MEOH), alkyl (methyl, butyl, and 2-ethylhexyl) acrylate, and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN, initiator), with dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTDL) as a catalyst. 2-MEOH was used as a functional chain transfer agent. Poly(alkyl urethane) acrylate oligomers were obtained by the reaction of single hydroxyl-terminated polyalkyl acrylates and 2-isocyanatoethyl acrylate. They were characterized by NMR, FT-IR spectroscopy, rheometer, and DSC. Because poly(alkyl urethane) acrylate oligomers have lower Tg and viscosity than hydroxyl-terminated polyalkyl acrylate oligomers (HTPAO) non-containing urethane groups, they can be used for ultraviolet (UV) curable coatings, inks, and adhesives.

  13. Multiscale characterization of chemical–mechanical interactions between polymer fibers and cementitious matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández-Cruz, Daniel; Hargis, Craig W.; Bae, Sungchul; Itty, Pierre A.; Meral, Cagla; Dominowski, Jolee; Radler, Michael J.; Kilcoyne, David A.; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Together with a series of mechanical tests, the interactions and potential bonding between polymeric fibers and cementitious materials were studied using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and microtomography (lCT). Experimental results showed that these techniques have great potential to characterize the polymer fiber-hydrated cement-paste matrix interface, as well as differentiating the chemistry of the two components of a bi-polymer (hybrid) fiber the polypropylene core and the ethylene acrylic acid copolymer sheath. Similarly, chemical interactions between the hybrid fiber and the cement hydration products were observed, indicating the chemical bonding between the sheath and the hardened cement paste matrix. Microtomography allowed visualization of the performance of the samples, and the distribution and orientation of the two types of fiber in mortar. Beam flexure tests confirmed improved tensile strength of mixes containing hybrid fibers, and expansion bar tests showed similar reductions in expansion for the polypropylene and hybrid fiber mortar bars.

  14. Process modifications for improved carbon fiber composites: Alleviation of the electrical hazards problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1980-01-01

    Attempts to alleviate carbon-fiber-composite electrical hazards during airplane crash fires through fiber gasification are described. Thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetric experiments found several catalysts that caused fibers to combust when composites were exposed to test fires. Composites were tested in the 'Burn-Bang' apparatus and in high voltage electrical detection grid apparatus. In a standard three minute burn test modified composites released no fibers, while state-of-the-art composites released several hundred fiber fragments. Expected service life with and without catalytic modification was studied and electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis furnished physical appearance and chemical composition data. An acrylic acid polymer fiber coating was developed that wet the carbon fiber surface uniformly with the catalyst, providing a marked contrast with the uneven coats obtained by solution-dipping.

  15. Desktop Manufacturing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Desktop manufacturing is the use of data from a computer-assisted design system to construct actual models of an object. Emerging processes are stereolithography, laser sintering, ballistic particle manufacturing, laminated object manufacturing, and photochemical machining. (SK)

  16. Optical Fiber Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    F&S Inc. developed and commercialized fiber optic and microelectromechanical systems- (MEMS) based instrumentation for harsh environments encountered in the aerospace industry. The NASA SBIR programs have provided F&S the funds and the technology to develop ruggedized coatings and coating techniques that are applied during the optical fiber draw process. The F&S optical fiber fabrication facility and developed coating methods enable F&S to manufacture specialty optical fiber with custom designed refractive index profiles and protective or active coatings. F&S has demonstrated sputtered coatings using metals and ceramics and combinations of each, and has also developed techniques to apply thin coatings of specialized polyimides formulated at NASA Langley Research Center. With these capabilities, F&S has produced cost-effective, reliable instrumentation and sensors capable of withstanding temperatures up to 800? C and continues building commercial sales with corporate partners and private funding. More recently, F&S has adapted the same sensing platforms to provide the rapid detection and identification of chemical and biological agents

  17. Effect of Polymerization Cycles on Gloss, Roughness, Hardness and Impact Strength of Acrylic Resins.

    PubMed

    Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Folli, Bianca L; Nogueira, Moises C F; Correr, Americo Bortolazzo; Mesquita, Marcelo F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the conventional and boiled polymerization cycles on gloss, roughness, hardness and impact strength of acrylic resins. Samples were made for each Classico and QC-20 materials (n=10) in dental stone molds obtained from rectangular metallic matrices embedded in metallic flasks. The powder-liquid ratio and manipulation of the acrylic resins' were accomplished according to manufacturers' instructions and the resins were conventionally packed in metallic flasks. After polymerization by (1) conventional: 74 °C for 9 h (Classico) and (2) boiled: 20 min (QC-20) cycles, the samples were deflasked after cooling at room temperature and conventionally finished and polished. The properties were evaluated after storage in water at 37 °C for 24 h. Gloss was verified with Multi Gloss 268 meter (Konica Minolta), surface roughness was measured with Surfcorder SE 1700 rugosimeter (Kosaka), Knoop hardness number was obtained with HMV-200 microdurometer, and impact strength was measured in an Otto Wolpert-Werke device by Charpy system (40 kpcm). Data were subjected to Student's t-test (at α=0.05). The results were: Gloss: 67.7 and 62.2 for Classico and QC-20 resins, respectively; Surface roughness: 0.874 and 1.469 Ra-µm for Classico and QC-20, respectively; Knoop hardness: 27.4 and 26.9 for Classico and QC-20, respectively; and Impact strength: 37.6 and 33.6 kgf/cm2 for Classico and QC-20, respectively. No statistically significant difference (p>0.05)were found between the resins for the evaluated properties. In conclusion, conventional and boiled polymerization cycles had similar effects on gloss, roughness, hardness and impact strength of both Classico and QC-20 resins.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Fergyanto E.; Homma, Hiroomi; Brodjonegoro, Satryo S.; Hudin, Afzer Bin Baseri; Zainuddin, Aryanti Binti

    In tropical countries such as Indonesia and Malaysia, the empty fruit bunches are wastes of the oil palm industry. The wastes are abundantly available and has reached a level that severely threats the environment. Therefore, it is a great need to find useful applications of those waste materials; but firstly, the mechanical properties of the EFB fiber should be quantified. In this work, a small tensile test machine is manufactured, and the tensile test is performed on the EFB fibers. The results show that the strength of the EFB fiber is strongly affected by the fiber diameter; however, the fiber strength is relatively low in comparison to other natural fibers.

  19. Scintillating optical fibers for fine-grained hodoscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Borenstein, S.R.; Strand, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Fast detectors with fine spatial resolution will be needed to exploit high event rates at ISABELLE. Scintillating optical fibers for fine grained hodoscopes have been developed by the authors. A commercial manufacturer of optical fibers has drawn and clad PVT scintillator. Detection efficiencies greater than 99% have been achieved for a 1 mm fiber with a PMT over lengths up to 60 cm. Small diameter PMT's and avalanche photodiodes have been tested with the fibers. Further improvements are sought for the fiber and for the APD's sensitivity and coupling efficiency with the fiber.

  20. Development of silica glass microstructured optical fibers technology in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, J.; Janoszczyk, B.; Poturaj, K.; Makara, M.; Walewski, A.; Mergo, P.; Klimek, J.; Skorupski, K.; Czyżewska, L.

    2007-04-01

    Paper presents the state of advance of the silica glass microstructured optical fibers technology n Poland especially in Department of Optical Fibers Technology Maria Curie Sklodowska University. Only in this Department there are the technological apparatus for advanced investigations on the technology of the silica glass optical fibers. In paper was describe the technology of optical fiber photonic structure manufacturing, high silica glass synthesis from vapor phase with MCVD and OVD methods. Next was describe some kinds of microstructured optical fibers witch technologies elaborated in UMCS in support of own and received from cooperated research teams optical fibers structures, modeling and measurements results.

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies of carbon fiber surfaces. 22. Comparison between surface treatment of untreated and previously surface-treated fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.Q.; Viswanathan, H.; Audi, A.A.; Sherwood, P.M.A.

    2000-04-01

    IM7 PAN-based carbon fibers, with a proprietary surface treatment applied by the manufacturer, were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface treatment applied by the manufacturer was removed by heating in a vacuum. The fibers detreated in this manner were then subjected to electrochemical treatment. The electrochemical behavior of the as-received fibers and detreated fibers were measured and analyzed. When the same electrochemical treatment was applied to the as-received fibers with their commercial surface treatment intact, a different surface chemistry was observed for the detreated fibers. This study shows that the surface chemistry of treated fibers depends closely on the initial surface chemistry of the fibers and its detreatment. This work shows the importance of using untreated or detreated fibers as precursors for applying reproducible surface treatment so that one can understand and control the surface chemistry of fibers and their interfacial interaction in composites.

  2. Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologies Project - Preliminary Manufacturing Demonstration Articles for Ares V Payload Shroud Barrel Acreage Structure

  3. Ultrasonic NDE Simulation for Composite Manufacturing Defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of composites in aerospace components is expected to continue into the future. The large scale use of composites in aerospace necessitates the development of composite-appropriate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods to quantitatively characterize defects in as-manufactured parts and damage incurred during or post manufacturing. Ultrasonic techniques are one of the most common approaches for defect/damage detection in composite materials. One key technical challenge area included in NASA's Advanced Composite's Project is to develop optimized rapid inspection methods for composite materials. Common manufacturing defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites include fiber waviness (in-plane and out-of-plane), porosity, and disbonds; among others. This paper is an overview of ongoing work to develop ultrasonic wavefield based methods for characterizing manufacturing waviness defects. The paper describes the development and implementation of a custom ultrasound simulation tool that is used to model ultrasonic wave interaction with in-plane fiber waviness (also known as marcelling). Wavefield data processing methods are applied to the simulation data to explore possible routes for quantitative defect characterization.

  4. Wavelength Shifters and Interactions of EDTA with Acrylic & LAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Yuvraj; SNO+ Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The SNO + experiment, an upgrade to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, will use linear alkyl-benzene (LAB) liquid scintillator to probe new physics, including 0 νββ decay. Event detection efficiency is heavily affected by radioactive backgrounds, two sources being Rn-222 and Po-210 daughters, some of which has become embedded in the SNO + acrylic vessel after years underground. The leading candidate for polonium leaching is Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Before deployment on-site, EDTA's effects on the mechanical integrity of acrylic must be determined. It also must not be soluble in LAB or must be removed before scintillator fill of the vessel, as its presence would result in reduced light yield due to scattering. It was found that EDTA had negligible effects on the Young's Modulus of acrylic. EDTA is also slightly soluble in LAB, but can be completely removed by rinsing with water. Additionally, the study of the light yield and alpha/beta timing profiles of two wavelength shifters - bisMSB and perylene - is critical to determining which should be added to the 0 νββ isotope (tellurium) LAB cocktail. Small-scale results hint that perylene might be better, but this is being confirmed with larger-scale tests. The SNO + experiment, an upgrade to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, will use linear alkyl-benzene (LAB) liquid scintillator to probe new physics, including 0 νββ decay. Event detection efficiency is heavily affected by radioactive backgrounds, two sources being Rn-222 and Po-210 daughters, some of which has become embedded in the SNO + acrylic vessel after years underground. The leading candidate for polonium leaching is Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Before deployment on-site, EDTA's effects on the mechanical integrity of acrylic must be determined. It also must not be soluble in LAB or must be removed before scintillator fill of the vessel, as its presence would result in reduced light yield due to scattering. It was found that EDTA

  5. Phase 9 Fiber Optic Cable Microbending and Temperature Cycling Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abushagur, Mustafa A.G.; Huang, Po T.; Hand, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Optical fibers represent the back bone of the current communications networks. Their performance in the field lacks long term testing data because of the continuous evolution of the manufacturing of fibers and cables. An optical fiber cable that is installed in NASA's KSC has experienced a dramatic increase in attenuation after three years of use from 0.7 dB/km to 7 dB/km in some fibers. A thorough study is presented to assess the causes of such an attenuation increase. Material and chemical decomposition testing showed that there are no changes in the composition of the fiber which might have caused the increase in attenuation. Microbending and heat cycling tests were performed on the cable and individual fibers. It was found that the increase in attenuation is due to microbending caused by excessive stress exerted on the fibers. This was the result of manufacturing and installation irregularities.

  6. 76 FR 48804 - Grants to Manufacturers of Certain Worsted Wool Fabrics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ..., manufacturers of two categories of worsted wool fabrics. The first category are manufacturers of worsted wool fabrics, containing 85 percent or more by weight of wool, with average fiber diameters greater than 18.5... each manufacturers' production of worsted wool fabric included in HTS 9902.51.11. The second...

  7. 75 FR 47544 - Grants to Manufacturers of Certain Worsted Wool Fabrics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ..., manufacturers of two categories of worsted wool fabrics. The first category are manufacturers of worsted wool fabrics, containing 85 percent or more by weight of wool, with average fiber diameters greater than 18.5... each manufacturers' production of worsted wool fabric included in HTS 9902.51.11. The second...

  8. Manufacture and analysis of multilayer woven preforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, M.K.; Herszberg, I.; Coman, F.; Raper, H.; Curiskis, J.

    1994-12-31

    Multilayer woven preforms were manufactured from high-tenacity, continuous multifilament polyester yarn and HTA carbon yarn. Orthogonal fiber architectures were constructed with a variety of binder thread configurations and yarn densities. The effect of the binder thread arrangement upon the as-woven preform architecture was examined. The preforms were then consolidated using liquid moulding techniques and the effect of the consolidation pressure upon the fiber architecture was investigated. Modeling of the preform architecture in its as-woven state is progressing and preliminary results are presented in this paper.

  9. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  10. N-carboxyethyl chitosan fibers prepared as potential use in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuoshuo; Dong, Qi; Yang, Hongjun; Liu, Xin; Gu, Shaojin; Zhou, Yingshan; Xu, Weilin

    2016-01-01

    To improve the hydrophilicity of chitosan fiber, N-carboxyethyl chitosan fiber was prepared through Michael addition between chitosan fiber with acrylic acid. The structure was studied by (1)H NMR. The degree of N-substitution, measured via (1)H NMR, was easily varied from 0.10 to 0.51 by varying the molar ratio of acrylic acid to chitosan. Series of properties of N-carboxyethyl chitosan fiber including mechanical property, crystallinity, thermal property and in vitro degradation were investigated by Instron machine, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. The results showed that, introducing the carboxyethyl group into the backbone chain of chitosan fiber destroyed the intra/intermolecular hydrogen bonding, leading to loss of the intra/intermolecular hydrogen bonding and improvement of hydrophilicity. Indirect cytotoxicity assessment of carboxyethyl chitosan fibers was investigated using a L929 cell line. And the obtained results clearly suggested that N-carboxyethyl chitosan fiber was nontoxic to L929 cells. The N-carboxyethyl chitosan fibers are potential as tissue engineering scaffolds.

  11. Chronic pulmonary dysfunction following acute inhalation of butyl acrylate.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ravindra; Ducatman, Alan; Finkel, Mitchell S; Petsonk, Edward; Hunt, Janet; Beto, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Butyl Acrylate (BA) (2-propionic acid; CH2 = CHCOOC4H9) is a colorless liquid commonly used in impregnation agents and adhesives. Dermal contact with BA has previously been reported to cause moderate skin irritation with skin sensitizing potential in humans. Health effects of inhalation of BA have not been previously reported. Accordingly, we document the health conditions of a bystander, first responder and landfill worker exposed to butyl acrylate (BA) released to the atmosphere following a collision and roadside spill in October 1998. Retrospective data were collected via chart review and analyzed for exposure, symptoms, physical findings and radiological, laboratory and spirometry results over a ten-year period. All three patients had similar respiratory symptoms including a dramatic hacking cough and dyspnea. Findings included abnormal pulmonary function tests and breath sounds. These data underscore the potential hazards of BA inhalational exposure and the need to wear additional protective equipment. PMID:23472539

  12. A New Process for Acrylic Acid Synthesis by Fermentative Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunelli, B. H.; Duarte, E. R.; de Toledo, E. C. Vasco; Wolf Maciel, M. R.; Maciel Filho, R.

    With the synthesis of chemical products through biotechnological processes, it is possible to discover and to explore innumerable routes that can be used to obtain products of high addes value. Each route may have particular advantages in obtaining a desired product, compared with others, especially in terms of yield, productivity, easiness to separate the product, economy, and environmental impact. The purpose of this work is the development of a deterministic model for the biochemical synthesis of acrylic acid in order to explore an alternative process. The model is built-up with the tubular reactor equations together with the kinetic representation based on the structured model. The proposed process makes possible to obtain acrylic acid continuously from the sugar cane fermentation.

  13. Dimensional stability of autopolymerizing acrylic resin impression trays.

    PubMed

    Fehling, A W; Hesby, R A; Pelleu, G B

    1986-05-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the optimal interval between fabrication of an autopolymerizing acrylic resin custom impression tray and making a final impression. Twenty mandibular arch-shaped trays, 10 each of Fastray and Formatray resin, were evaluated for dimensional change. Both materials behaved similarly. Cross-arch contraction of the borders of buccal flanges and unilateral expansion of the borders of buccal-to-lingual flanges were observed. These changes indicate distortion. Linear dimensional changes occurred throughout 6 hours, which suggests that any impression made in a methyl methacrylate acrylic resin custom impression tray should be poured as soon as is conveniently possible. Significant linear dimensional changes were observed for only 40 minutes from the initiation of tray fabrication. This study concludes that while an aged tray is preferred, it is acceptable to make an impression in an autopolymerizing resin custom impression tray after 40 minutes.

  14. Cytotoxicity of denture base acrylic resins: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Janaina Habib; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Machado, Ana Lúcia; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2003-08-01

    Acrylic resins are widely used in the fabrication of denture bases and have been shown to be cytotoxic as a result of substances that leach from the resin. The primary eluate is residual monomer. Numerous reports suggest that residual monomer may be responsible for mucosal irritation and sensitization of tissues. This information is important, not only to assess the biologic effects of such materials, but also to enable a comparison among the different polymerization methods, thus assisting the clinician in selecting a material with minimal cytotoxicity. This article reviews the literature published from 1973 to 2000, selected by use of a Medline search, associated with cytotoxic effects usually ascribed to acrylic denture base materials.

  15. Surface modification of nanoparticles for radiation curable acrylate clear coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, F.; Gläsel, H.-J.; Hartmann, E.; Bilz, E.; Mehnert, R.

    2003-08-01

    To obtain transparent, scratch and abrasion resistant coatings a high content of nanosized silica and alumina filler was embedded in radiation-curable acrylate formulations by acid catalyzed silylation using trialkoxysilanes. 29SiMAS NMR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry were employed to elucidate the structure of the surface-grafted methacryloxypropyl-, vinyl- and n-propyl-trimethoxysilane. In accordance with NMR findings, MALDI-TOF MS showed highly condensed oligomeric siloxanes of more than 20 monomeric silane units. A ladder-like structure of bound polysiloxanes is proposed rather than a simplified picture of tridentate silane bonding. Hence, silane coupling agents do not only modify the chemical nature of the filler surface but also strongly effect the rheological properties of the acrylate nanodispersions.

  16. Cellular Response to Linear and Branched Poly(acrylic acid).

    PubMed

    Whitty, Elizabeth G; Maniego, Alison R; Bentwitch, Sharon A; Guillaneuf, Yohann; Jones, Mark R; Gaborieau, Marianne; Castignolles, Patrice

    2015-12-01

    Poly(acrylic acid-co-sodium acrylate) (PNaA) is a pH-responsive polymer with potential in anticancer drug delivery. The cytotoxicity and intracellular effects of 3-arm star, hyperbranched and linear PNaA were investigated with L1210 progenitor leukemia cells and L6 myoblast cells. Free solution capillary electrophoresis demonstrated interactions of PNaA with serum proteins. In a 72 h MTT assay most PNaAs exhibited a IC50 between 7 and 14 mmol L(-1), showing that precipitation may be a sufficient purification for PNaA dilute solutions. Dialyzed 3-arm star and hyperbranched PNaA caused an increase in L6 cell viability, challenging the suitability of MTT as cytotoxicity assay for PNaA. Fluorescent confocal microscopy revealed merging of cellular lipids after exposure to PNaA, likely caused by serum starvation.

  17. Polymerization of acrylic acid using atmospheric pressure DBD plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, M.; Bashir, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper polymerization of acrylic acid was performed using non thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet technology. The goal of this study is to deposit organic functional coatings for biomedical applications using a low cost and rapid growth rate plasma jet technique. The monomer solution of acrylic acid was vaporized and then fed into the argon plasma for coating. The discharge was powered using a laboratory made power supply operating with sinusoidal voltage signals at a frequency of 10 kHz. The optical emission spectra were collected in order to get insight into the plasma chemistry during deposition process. The coatings were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and growth rates analysis. A high retention of carboxylic functional groups of the monomer was observed at the surface deposited using this low power technique.

  18. Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, Ajoy; Thyagarajan, K.

    With the development of extremely low-loss optical fibers and their application to communication systems, a revolution has taken fiber glass place during the last 40 years. In 2001, using glass fibers as the transmission medium and lightwaves as carrier wave waves, information was transmitted at a rate more than 1 Tbit/s (which is roughly equivalent to transmission of about 15 million simultaneous telephone conversations) through one hair thin optical fiber. Experimental demonstration of transmission at the rate of 14 Tbit/s over a 160 km long single fiber was demonstrated in 2006, which is equivalent to sending 140 digital high definition movies in 1 s. Very recently record transmission of more than 100 Tbit/s over 165 km single mode fiber has been reported. These can be considered as extremely important technological achievements. In this chapter we will discuss the propagation characteristics of optical fibers with special applications to optical communication systems and also present some of the noncommunication applications such as sensing.

  19. Darcy Permeability of Hollow Fiber Bundles Used in Blood Oxygenation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Heather E.; Eash, Heidi J.; Federspiel, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Many industrial and biomedical devices (e.g. blood oxygenators and artificial lungs) use bundles of hollow fiber membranes for separation processes. Analyses of flow and mass transport within the shell-side of the fiber bundles most often model the bundle for simplicity as a packed bed or porous media, using a Darcy permeability coefficient estimated from the Blake-Kozeny equation to account for viscous drag from the fibers. In this study, we developed a simple method for measuring the Darcy permeability of hollow fiber membrane bundles and evaluated how well the Blake-Kozeny (BK) equation predicted the Darcy permeability for these bundles. Fiber bundles were fabricated from commercially available Celgard® ×30-240 fiber fabric (300 μm outer diameter fibers @ 35 and 54 fibers/inch) and from a fiber fabric with 193 μm fibers (61 fibers/inch). The fiber bundles were mounted to the bottom of an acrylic tube and Darcy permeability was determined by measuring the elapsed time for a column of glycerol solution to flow through a fiber bundle. The ratio of the measured Darcy permeability to that predicted from the BK equation varied from 1.09 to 0.56. A comprehensive literature review suggested a modified BK equation with the “constant” correlated to porosity. This modification improved the predictions of the BK equation, with the ratio of measured to predicted permeability varying from 1.13 to 0.84. PMID:22927706

  20. Industrial applications of fiber optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desforges, Francois X.; Blocksidge, Robert

    1996-08-01

    Thanks to the growth of the fiber optics telecommunication industry, fiber optic components have become less expensive, more reliable and well known by potential fiber optic sensor users. LEDs, optical fibers, couplers and connectors are now widely distributed and are the building blocks for the fiber optic sensor manufacturer. Additionally, the huge demand in consumer electronics of the past 10 years has provided the manufacturer with cheap and powerful programmable logic components which reduce the development time as well as the cost of the associated instrumentation. This market trend has allowed Photonetics to develop, manufacture and sell fiber optic sensors for the last 10 years. The company contribution in the fields of fiber optic gyros (4 licenses sold world wide), white light interferometry and fiber optic sensor networks is widely recognized. Moreover, its 1992 acquisition of some of the assets of Metricor Inc., greatly reinforced its position and allowed it to pursue new markets. Over the past four years, Photonetics has done an important marketing effort to better understand the need of its customers. The result of this research has fed R&D efforts towards a new generation instrument, the Metricor 2000, better adapted to the expectations of fiber optic sensors users, thanks to its unique features: (1) universality -- the system can accept more than 20 different sensors (T, P, RI, . . .). (2) scalability -- depending on the customer needs, the system can be used with 1 to 64 sensors. (3) performance -- because of its improved design, overall accuracies of 0.01% FS can be reached. (4) versatility -- its modular design enables a fast and easy custom design for specific applications. This paper presents briefly the Metricor 2000 and its family of FO probes. Then, it describes two fiber optic sensing (FOS) applications/markets where FOS have proven to be very useful.

  1. Acrylate functionalized tetraalkylammonium salts with ionic liquid properties.

    PubMed

    Grothe, Dorian C; Meyer, Wolfdietrich; Janietz, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Acrylate functionalized ionic liquids based on tetraalkylammonium salts with terminal acrylates- and methylacrylates were synthesized. Melting points and ionic conductivity of twenty compounds in six groups were determined. Within one group the effect of three different counterions was investigated and discussed. The groups differ in cationic structure elements because of their functional groups such as acrylate and methacrylate, alkyl residues at the nitrogen and number of quaternary ammonium atoms within the organic cation. The effect of these cationic structure elements has been examined concerning the compiled parameters with a view to qualifying them as components for solid state electrolytes. The newly synthesized ionic liquids were characterized by NMR and FTIR analysis. The exchange of halide ions like bromide as counter ions to weakly coordinating [PF₆]⁻, [OTf]⁻ or [TFSI]⁻ reduces the melting points significantly and leads to an ion conductivity of about 10⁻⁴ S/cm at room temperature. In the case of the dicationic ionic liquid, an ion conductivity of about 10⁻³ S/cm was observed.

  2. Light-curing acrylic resin as an orthodontic baseplate material.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Kerr, W J

    1998-08-01

    Heat-curing autopolymerizing (self-cure or cold-cure), thermoplastic, and light-curing acrylic resin are the most commonly used orthodontic baseplate materials. While cured acrylic resins present few problems to the patient, in the laboratory acrylic resin has to be sprayed, mixed, or packed in a fume-extraction unit because of the harmful fumes emitted by the raw inflammable chemicals. Light-curing material, on the other hand, is virtually nonflammable and has virtually no aroma. A light-cure technique for the construction of orthodontic baseplates is described. While buildup of the baseplate is slightly slower than for self-cured material, the shorter time involved in trimming and polishing means that overall construction is faster. It is easier to obtain a uniform thickness with light-cured material, and it provides superior fit. These results, however, are subject to more extensive clinical trials. The only apparent disadvantage is the fine powder produced during trimming. Even with a bench equipped with an extraction unit, it is advisable to use a face mask to prevent the inhalation of dust.

  3. Synthesis and properties of acrylic copolymers for ocular implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboul, Adam C.

    There is a need for flexible polymers with higher refractive index and extended UV absorbing properties for improved intraocular lenses (IOLs). This research was devoted to the synthesis of new acrylic copolymers for foldable IOLs and to studies concerning IOL polymer properties. New polymers were synthesized from phenylated acrylates copolymerized with N-vinyl carbazole derivatives using bulk free radical addition methods. The copolymers had low Tg values, high refractive index, and were flexible. The N-vinyl carbazole derivatives were characterized by NMR and copolymers were characterized by DSC, UV-Vis, and refractometry. New phenothiazine based UV absorbers with high extinction coefficients were also synthesized for incorporation into ocular materials. Patent disclosures on UV absorbers and high refractive index polymers were prepared. A so called "glistening" phenomenon that occurs in all foldable intraocular lenses currently in clinical use is poorly understood and was studied. Research on this microvoid forming behavior included studies and development of methods to inhibit glistening in low Tg acrylic based copolymers. Glistenings were characterized using SEM and optical microscopy. A novel technique for inhibiting glistening was found and a patent disclosure was prepared.

  4. Formation of acrylic acid from lactic acid in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, W.S.L.; Antal, M.J. Jr. ); Jones, M. Jr. )

    1989-09-15

    Supercritical (SC) water is an unusual medium in which fast and specific heterolytic reactions can be conducted at temperatures as high as 400{degree}C. In supercritical water, lactic acid decomposes into gaseous and liquid products via three primary reaction pathways. Products of the acid-catalyzed heterolytic decarbonylation pathway are carbon monoxide, water, and acetaldehyde. Products of the homolytic, decarboxylation pathway are carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and acetaldehyde. Products of the heterolytic, dehydration pathway are acrylic acid and water. The intramolecular nucleophilic displacement of the {alpha}-hydroxyl by the carbonyl group of lactic acid, producing {alpha}-propiolactone as an unstable intermediate which subsequently rearranges to become the unsaturated acid, is a likely mechanism for acrylic acid formation, although an intramolecular E2 elimination initiated by attack of the carbonyl oxygen on a methyl hydrogen cannot be ruled out. Support for the former mechanism comes in part from the observed 100% relative yield of acrylic acid from {beta}-propiolactone in SC water.

  5. Effect of conventional water-bath and experimental microwave polymerization cycles on the flexural properties of denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Spartalis, Guilherme Kloster; Cappelletti, Lucas Kravchychyn; Schoeffel, Amanda Cristina; Michél, Milton Domingos; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini

    2015-01-01

    The effect of polymerization cycles on flexural properties of conventional (Vipi Cril(®)-VC) or microwave-processed (Vipi Wave(®)-VW) denture base acrylic resins was evaluated. Specimens (n=10) were submitted to the cycles: WB=65ºC for 1 h+1 h boiling water (VC cycle); M630/25=10 min at 270 W+5 min at 0 W+10 min at 360 W (VW cycle); M650/5=5 min at 650 W; M700/4=4 min at 700 W; and M550/3=3 min at 550 W. Specimens were submitted to a three-point bending test at 5 mm/min until fracture. Flexural strength (MPa) and elastic modulus (GPa) data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA/Tukey HSD (α=0.05). Overall, VC showed higher values than VW. The results obtained with microwave polymerization did not differ from those obtained with water-bath for both acrylic resins. The results observed when polymerization cycles using medium power and shorter time were used did not differ from those when manufacturer's recommended microwave cycle was applied. Conventional VC might be microwave-processed without compromising its flexural properties. PMID:26438986

  6. Effect of conventional water-bath and experimental microwave polymerization cycles on the flexural properties of denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Spartalis, Guilherme Kloster; Cappelletti, Lucas Kravchychyn; Schoeffel, Amanda Cristina; Michél, Milton Domingos; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini

    2015-01-01

    The effect of polymerization cycles on flexural properties of conventional (Vipi Cril(®)-VC) or microwave-processed (Vipi Wave(®)-VW) denture base acrylic resins was evaluated. Specimens (n=10) were submitted to the cycles: WB=65ºC for 1 h+1 h boiling water (VC cycle); M630/25=10 min at 270 W+5 min at 0 W+10 min at 360 W (VW cycle); M650/5=5 min at 650 W; M700/4=4 min at 700 W; and M550/3=3 min at 550 W. Specimens were submitted to a three-point bending test at 5 mm/min until fracture. Flexural strength (MPa) and elastic modulus (GPa) data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA/Tukey HSD (α=0.05). Overall, VC showed higher values than VW. The results obtained with microwave polymerization did not differ from those obtained with water-bath for both acrylic resins. The results observed when polymerization cycles using medium power and shorter time were used did not differ from those when manufacturer's recommended microwave cycle was applied. Conventional VC might be microwave-processed without compromising its flexural properties.

  7. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

  8. Preparation and properties of UV curable acrylic PSA by vinyl bonded graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Beili; Ryu, Chong-Min; Jin, Xin; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2013-11-01

    Acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) with higher thermal stability for thin wafer handling were successfully prepared by forming composite with the graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles modified to have vinyl groups via subsequent reaction with isophorone diisocyanate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The acrylic copolymer was synthesized as a base resin for PSAs by solution radical polymerization of ethyl acrylate, 2-ethylhexyl acrylate, and acrylic acid followed by further modification with GMA to have the vinyl groups available for UV curing. The peel strength of PSA decreased with the increase of gel content which was dependent on both modified GO content and UV dose. Thermal stability of UV-cured PSA was improved noticeably with increasing the modified GO content mainly due to the strong and extensive interfacial bonding formed between the acrylic copolymer matrix and GO fillers

  9. Epoxy-acrylic core-shell particles by seeded emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Hong, Liang; Lin, Jui-Ching; Meyers, Greg; Harris, Joseph; Radler, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We developed a novel method for synthesizing epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes. We first prepared an aqueous dispersion of high molecular weight solid epoxy prepolymers using a mechanical dispersion process at elevated temperatures, and we subsequently used the epoxy dispersion as a seed in the emulsion polymerization of acrylic monomers comprising methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA). Advanced analytical techniques, such as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and peak force tapping atomic force microscopy (PFT-AFM), have elucidated a unique core-shell morphology of the epoxy-acrylic hybrid particles. Moreover, the formation of the core-shell morphology in the seeded emulsion polymerization process is primarily attributed to kinetic trapping of the acrylic phase at the exterior of the epoxy particles. By this new method, we are able to design the epoxy and acrylic polymers in two separate steps, and we can potentially synthesize epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes with a broad range of compositions. PMID:27078740

  10. Epoxy-acrylic core-shell particles by seeded emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Hong, Liang; Lin, Jui-Ching; Meyers, Greg; Harris, Joseph; Radler, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We developed a novel method for synthesizing epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes. We first prepared an aqueous dispersion of high molecular weight solid epoxy prepolymers using a mechanical dispersion process at elevated temperatures, and we subsequently used the epoxy dispersion as a seed in the emulsion polymerization of acrylic monomers comprising methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA). Advanced analytical techniques, such as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and peak force tapping atomic force microscopy (PFT-AFM), have elucidated a unique core-shell morphology of the epoxy-acrylic hybrid particles. Moreover, the formation of the core-shell morphology in the seeded emulsion polymerization process is primarily attributed to kinetic trapping of the acrylic phase at the exterior of the epoxy particles. By this new method, we are able to design the epoxy and acrylic polymers in two separate steps, and we can potentially synthesize epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes with a broad range of compositions.

  11. Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application

    SciTech Connect

    Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik; Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat; Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd

    2014-02-12

    The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

  12. Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajau, Rida; Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat; Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik

    2014-02-01

    The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

  13. Technology Validation of Optical Fiber Cables for Space Flight Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Friedberg, Patricia; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Periodically, commercially available (COTS) optical fiber cable assemblies are characterized for space flight usage under the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program (NEPP). The purpose of this is to provide a family of optical fiber cable options to a variety of different harsh environments typical to space flight missions. The optical fiber cables under test are evaluated to bring out known failure mechanisms that are expected to occur during a typical mission. The tests used to characterize COTS cables include: (1) vacuum exposure, (2) thermal cycling, and (3) radiation exposure. Presented here are the results of the testing conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on COTS optical fiber cables over this past year. Several optical fiber cables were characterized for their thermal stability both during and after thermal cycling. The results show how much preconditioning is necessary for a variety of available cables to remain thermally stable in a space flight environment. Several optical fibers of dimensions 100/140/172 microns were characterized for their radiation effects at -125 C using the dose rate requirements of International Space Station. One optical fiber cable in particular was tested for outgassing to verify whether an acrylate coated fiber could be used in a space flight optical cable configuration.

  14. Studies on the hydrolysis of biocompatible acrylic polymers having aspirin-moieties.

    PubMed

    Gu, Z W; Li, F M; Feng, X D; Voong, S T

    1983-01-01

    Both the homogeneous and heterogeneous hydrolysis of five new acrylic polymers having aspirin-moieties, i.e. polymers of beta-(acetylsalicylyloxy)ethyl methacrylate, beta-(acetylsalicylyloxy) propyl methacrylate,beta-(acetylsalicylyloxy) ethyl acrylate, beta-hydroxy-gamma-(acetylsalicylyloxy) propyl methacrylate, beta-hydroxy-gamma-(acetylsalicylyloxy) propyl acrylate were investigated in acidic or alkaline medium at 30 degrees C or 60 degrees C, respectively. It was observed that the chief hydrolyzed product is always aspirin with minor amount of salicylic acid.

  15. N-Butyl acrylate polymer composition for solar cell encapsulation and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A polymer syrup for encapsulating solar cell assemblies. The syrup includes uncrosslinked poly(n-butyl)acrylate dissolved in n-butyl acrylate monomer. Preparation of the poly(n-butyl)acrylate and preparation of the polymer syrup is disclosed. Methods for applying the polymer syrup to solar cell assemblies as an encapsulating pottant are described. Also included is a method for solar cell construction utilizing the polymer syrup as a dual purpose adhesive and encapsulating material.

  16. Fibrillogenesis in Continuously Spun Synthetic Collagen Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Wen, Jing; Cui, Wanxing; Martinez, Adam; Apkarian, Robert; Coats, Julie E.; Berland, Keith; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2013-01-01

    The universal structural role of collagen fiber networks has motivated the development of collagen gels, films, coatings, injectables, and other formulations. However, reported synthetic collagen fiber fabrication schemes have either culminated in short, discontinuous fiber segments at unsuitably low production rates, or have incompletely replicated the internal fibrillar structure that dictates fiber mechanical and biological properties. We report a continuous extrusion system with an off-line phosphate buffer incubation step for the manufacture of synthetic collagen fiber. Fiber with a cross-section of 53±14 by 21±3 µm and an ultimate tensile strength of 94±19 MPa was continuously produced at 60 m/hr from an ultrafiltered monomeric collagen solution. The effect of collagen solution concentration, flow rate, and spinneret size on fiber size was investigated. The fiber was further characterized by microdifferential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), second harmonic generation (SHG) analysis, and in a subcutaneous murine implant model. Calorimetry demonstrated stabilization of the collagen triple helical structure, while TEM and SHG revealed a dense, axially aligned D-periodic fibril structure throughout the fiber cross-section. Implantation of glutaraldehyde crosslinked and non-crosslinked fiber in the subcutaneous tissue of mice demonstrated limited inflammatory response and biodegradation after a 6-week implant period. PMID:20024969

  17. Ultrasound fiber guides and sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaai-Jazi, A.

    2007-09-01

    An overview of ultrasound fiber guides, their transmission properties, and their applications in sensing is presented. Ultrasound fiber guides are structures similar to optical fibers that are used for transmission of acoustic waves. They consist of a core region surrounded by a cladding layer to help confine the wave to the core. Ultrasound fiber guides may be fabricated with glass materials such as pure and doped fused silica, using fiber optics manufacturing technology. The underlying principles of fiber optic sensing in many cases are also applicable to ultrasound fiber guides, hence the potential applications of these waveguides in sensing and health monitoring of infrastructures. Propagation properties of ultrasound fiber guides are reviewed. Attention is focused on guides with small differences between the parameters of the core and cladding, often a necessary requirement for single-mode operation. Various types of guided modes including flexural, torsional, and radial modes are discussed. These modes are predominantly shear type. Ultrasound fiber guides also support another group of modes with complex propagation constants, which are referred to as leaky longitudinal modes. These modes lose power as propagate along the guide through radiation. Similarities and differences between optical and ultrasound modes in fiber guides are addressed.

  18. Static Fatigue of Optical Fibers in Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D.; Cuellar, E.; Middleman, L.; Zucker, J.

    1987-02-01

    While delayed fracture, or static fatigue, of optical fibers is well known, it is not well understood, and the prediction of the time to failure under a given set of conditions can be problematic. Unlike short term fracture, which is quite well understood and quantified in terms of the theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics, the long term strength remains empirical. The goal of this study is to determine the design criteria for optical fibers subjected to long term applied mechanical loads. One difficulty in making lifetime predictions, as pointed out by Matthewson (Reference 1) and others, is that predictions made from data taken in tension and in bending do not agree. Another difficulty is the statistical nature of the fracture of glass. In making lifetime predictions it becomes important therefore that one (a) have ample data for statistical analysis and (b) have data for the loading configuration of interest. This is the purpose of our work. Since there is less data available in bending, and since several applications (such as wiring in aircraft and missiles) require bending, the data are taken in that configuration. The most significant finding in our work so far is the very large difference in static fatigue behavior between buffer coatings. Chandan and Kalish (Reference 2) and others have reported static fatigue curves, log (time to failure) versus log (applied stress), which are not linear, but rather bimodal. Our study confirms this result, but so far only for acrylate coated fibers. Silicone coated fibers show unimodal behavior. That is, the log (time to failure) versus log (applied stress) curve is linear, at least on the time scale studied so far. Data for acrylate coated fibers at 80°C in water are linear only for time scales of about one day, where a pronounced "knee" is observed. Data for silicone coated fibers under the same conditions are linear up to at least 6 months. Longer time scale tests and tests on fibers with other buffer materials

  19. Antimicrobial activity of poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly(acrylic acid) electrospun nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Morales, Javier; Amariei, Georgiana; Letón, Pedro; Rosal, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Electrospun nanofibers were prepared from blends of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). The fibers were stabilized by heat curing at 140°C via anhydride and ketone formation and crosslinking esterification. The antimicrobial effect was assessed using strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by tracking their capacity to form colonies and their metabolic impairment upon contact with PAA/PVA membranes. Membranes containing >35wt.% PAA displayed significant antibacterial activity, which was particularly high for the gram-positive S. aureus. All membranes were negatively charged, with surface ζ-potential in the (-34.5)-(-45.6)mV range, but the electrostatic interaction with the negatively charged cells was not the reason for the antimicrobial effect. Neither pH reduction nor the passing of non-crosslinked polymers to the solution affected microbial growth. The antibacterial activity was attributed to the chelation of the divalent cations stabilizing the outer cell membrane. The effect on gram-positive bacteria was attributed to the destabilization of the peptidoglycan layer. The sequestration of divalent cations was demonstrated with experiments in which calcium and a chelating agent were added to the cultures in contact with membranes. The damage to bacterial cells was tracked by measuring their surface charge and the evolution of intracellular calcium during the early stages after contact with PAA/PVA membranes. PMID:27318959

  20. A polarisation maintaining fiber optimized for high temperature gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutu, F.; Hill, Mark; Cooper, Laurence; Gillooly, A.

    2015-05-01

    Fiber optic gyroscopes (FOGs) are being used within increasingly severe environments, requiring operational temperatures in excess of the standard operating range for FOGs. Applications requiring these higher temperatures include: directional drilling of wells in oil and gas fields, space applications and military FOG applications. This paper will describe the relative merits of two high temperature acrylate coatings for an optical fiber designed for a FOG in such operating environments. Results for two high temperature acrylates are presented, tested in a 200m length of loose wound fiber, coiled and supported at 75mm diameter, in line with TIA/EIA-455-192 (FOTP-192). It can be seen that both coating types give very good polarization extinction ratio (PER) performance at high temperature up to 180oC, with better performance shown by one coating type on the low temperature side, since it does not harden to the same extent below 0oC. The long term thermal exposure effects will be discussed and experimental results presented which include testing the PER performance over temperature both before and after an extended period of high temperature endurance. This will demonstrate the relative merits of different styles of coatings. From the PER performance, the h-parameter of the fiber can be calculated and hence the preferred coating type selected and recommended for the customer operating environment.