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Sample records for acrylic resin materials

  1. Light-curing acrylic resin as an orthodontic baseplate material.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Kerr, W J

    1998-08-01

    Heat-curing autopolymerizing (self-cure or cold-cure), thermoplastic, and light-curing acrylic resin are the most commonly used orthodontic baseplate materials. While cured acrylic resins present few problems to the patient, in the laboratory acrylic resin has to be sprayed, mixed, or packed in a fume-extraction unit because of the harmful fumes emitted by the raw inflammable chemicals. Light-curing material, on the other hand, is virtually nonflammable and has virtually no aroma. A light-cure technique for the construction of orthodontic baseplates is described. While buildup of the baseplate is slightly slower than for self-cured material, the shorter time involved in trimming and polishing means that overall construction is faster. It is easier to obtain a uniform thickness with light-cured material, and it provides superior fit. These results, however, are subject to more extensive clinical trials. The only apparent disadvantage is the fine powder produced during trimming. Even with a bench equipped with an extraction unit, it is advisable to use a face mask to prevent the inhalation of dust.

  2. Flexural Strength of Cold and Heat Cure Acrylic Resins Reinforced with Different Materials

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Bijan; Firouz, Farnaz; Izadi, Alireza; Ahmadvand, Shahbaz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Heat-polymerized acrylic resin has been the most commonly used denture base material for over 60 years. However, the mechanical strength of acrylic resin is not adequate for long-term clinical performance of dentures. Consequently, fracture is a common clinical occurrence, which often develops in the midline of the denture base. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of cold-cure and heat-cure acrylic resins, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire for denture base repair. Materials and Methods: Ninety specimens were prepared and allocated to nine groups. Ten specimens were considered as controls, and 80 were divided into 8 experimental groups. In the experimental groups, the specimens were sectioned into two halves from the middle, and were then divided into two main groups: one group was repaired with heat cure acrylic resin, and the other with cold cure acrylic resin. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups: unreinforced, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire. All specimens were subjected to a 3-point bending test, and the flexural strength was calculated. Results: The group repaired with heat cure acrylic resin and reinforced with glass fiber showed the highest flexural strength; however, the group repaired with cold cure acrylic resin and reinforced with polyethylene fibers had the lowest flexural strength. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with heat cure and cold cure acrylic resins without reinforcement. Conclusion: Repairing denture base with heat cure acrylic resin, reinforced with glass fibers increases the flexural strength of denture base. PMID:26877726

  3. [Comparative analysis of tissue reaction to acrylic resin materials in studies on Wistar strain rats].

    PubMed

    Sobolewska, E

    1999-01-01

    The study takes up the issue of assessing rat tissue reaction to operatively inserted implants of different acrylic resin materials used in prosthetic dentistry. The materials subjected to analysis were polyacrylics: Vertex Soft, Vertex R.S., Vertex S.C., Superacryl and silicone material Molloplast B. The prolongation of life and the dynamic development of prosthetic treatment have caused removable dentures to be used longer and among more people. Polymerised acrylic resin material of these dentures is a potential pathogenic factor to the oral cavity mucosa which is in contact with it. As many as 20 to 70% of patients using removable acrylic dentures suffer from prosthetic stomatopathy. It is considered that the mucosa irritation may be caused by denture trauma, a mycotic infection or toxic action of some components of acrylic materials. Therefore the use of new generation acrylic materials in producing prosthetic dentures needs a precise assessment of undesirable local and systemic effects. A comparative analysis of the effect of correctly polymerised acrylic material on rat mucosa, parotid glands and lymphatic nodes was carried out. Systemic toxicity of these materials was assessed. Acrylic plates were prepared from the most often used acrylic resin materials in the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry PAM and a silicone material (these materials were polymerised precisely according to the producers instruction). Before implantation the plates underwent a thermodynamic analysis in order to ensure that the polymerisation process was carried out correctly and to determine thermal resistance of particular materials. Next sterile acrylic plates were implanted in rats under general anaesthesia. The animals were divided into 6 groups, 10 rats each. In four groups acrylic plates were implanted, in one group silicone material plates were implanted and it represented the comparative group, in one control group an incision of the buccal mucosa was made. The rats were

  4. [Comparative analysis of tissue reaction to acrylic resin materials in studies on Wistar strain rats].

    PubMed

    Sobolewska, E

    1999-01-01

    The study takes up the issue of assessing rat tissue reaction to operatively inserted implants of different acrylic resin materials used in prosthetic dentistry. The materials subjected to analysis were polyacrylics: Vertex Soft, Vertex R.S., Vertex S.C., Superacryl and silicone material Molloplast B. The prolongation of life and the dynamic development of prosthetic treatment have caused removable dentures to be used longer and among more people. Polymerised acrylic resin material of these dentures is a potential pathogenic factor to the oral cavity mucosa which is in contact with it. As many as 20 to 70% of patients using removable acrylic dentures suffer from prosthetic stomatopathy. It is considered that the mucosa irritation may be caused by denture trauma, a mycotic infection or toxic action of some components of acrylic materials. Therefore the use of new generation acrylic materials in producing prosthetic dentures needs a precise assessment of undesirable local and systemic effects. A comparative analysis of the effect of correctly polymerised acrylic material on rat mucosa, parotid glands and lymphatic nodes was carried out. Systemic toxicity of these materials was assessed. Acrylic plates were prepared from the most often used acrylic resin materials in the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry PAM and a silicone material (these materials were polymerised precisely according to the producers instruction). Before implantation the plates underwent a thermodynamic analysis in order to ensure that the polymerisation process was carried out correctly and to determine thermal resistance of particular materials. Next sterile acrylic plates were implanted in rats under general anaesthesia. The animals were divided into 6 groups, 10 rats each. In four groups acrylic plates were implanted, in one group silicone material plates were implanted and it represented the comparative group, in one control group an incision of the buccal mucosa was made. The rats were

  5. Effect of silver nanoparticles incorporation on viscoelastic properties of acrylic resin denture base material

    PubMed Central

    Mahross, Hamada Zaki; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) incorporation on viscoelastic properties of acrylic resin denture base material. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 specimens (60 × 10 × 2 mm) of heat cured acrylic resin were constructed and divided into four groups (five for each), according to the concentration of AgNPs (1%, 2%, and 5% vol.) which incorporated into the liquid of acrylic resin material and one group without additives (control group). The dynamic viscoelastic test for the test specimens was performed using the computerized material testing system. The resulting deflection curves were analyzed by material testing software NEXYGEN MT. Results: The 5% nanoparticles of silver (NAg) had significantly highest mean storage modulus E’ and loss tangent Tan δ values followed by 2% NAg (P < 0.05). For 1% nanosilver incorporation (group B), there were no statistically significant differences in storage modulus E’, lost modulus E” or loss tangent Tan δ with other groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The AgNPs incorporation within the acrylic denture base material can improve its viscoelastic properties. PMID:26038651

  6. Using silicone impression material and acrylic resin to fabricate remount casts for removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-tsung; Farmer, John B

    2005-06-01

    A technique is described for fabrication of a remount cast for a removable partial denture. This procedure consists of filling the occlusal/incisal third with acrylic resin and injecting polyvinylsiloxane impression material into the irreversible hydrocolloid impression. This technique provides a simple method for making a remount cast and enables the clinician to remove and easily place the partial denture on the cast during occlusal refinement procedures without damage to the removable partial denture or the remount cast.

  7. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  8. Effect of microwave irradiation on the flexural strength and residual monomer levels of an acrylic resin repair material.

    PubMed

    Yunus, N; Harrison, A; Huggett, R

    1994-11-01

    The degree of polymerization of an acrylic resin repair material, as established by residual monomer estimation, was compared using three different polymerization methods, i.e. bench-cure, hydroflask-cure and microwave irradiation cure. The repair strength of a conventional heat-polymerized resin was then assessed following repairs using each of these three methods. The lowest level of residual monomer was achieved with the microwave irradiation cure. It was also demonstrated that of the three methods, polymerization using microwave energy resulted in the strongest repair.

  9. Biofilm-forming ability and adherence to poly-(methyl-methacrylate) acrylic resin materials of oral Candida albicans strains isolated from HIV positive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Uzunoglu, Emel; Dolapci, Istar; Dogan, Arife

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the adhesion to acrylic resin specimens and biofilm formation capability of Candida albicans strains isolated from HIV positive subjects' oral rinse solutions. MATERIALS AND METHODS The material tested was a heat-cured acrylic resin (Acron Duo). Using the adhesion and crystal violet assays, 14 oral Candida albicans isolated from HIV-positive subjects and 2 references Candida strains (C. albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 90128) were compared for their biofilm production and adhesion properties to acrylic surfaces in vitro. RESULTS There were no significant differences in adhesion (P=.52) and biofilm formation assays (P=.42) by statistical analysis with Mann-Whitney test. CONCLUSION Denture stomatitis and increased prevalence of candidal carriage in HIV infected patients is unlikely to be related to the biofilm formation and adhesion abilities of C. albicans to acrylic resin materials. PMID:24605203

  10. Factors affecting the bond strength of denture base and reline acrylic resins to base metal materials

    PubMed Central

    TANOUE, Naomi; MATSUDA, Yasuhiro; YANAGIDA, Hiroaki; MATSUMURA, Hideo; SAWASE, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective The shear bond strengths of two hard chairside reline resin materials and an auto-polymerizing denture base resin material to cast Ti and a Co-Cr alloy treated using four conditioning methods were investigated. Material and Methods Disk specimens (diameter 10 mm and thickness 2.5 mm) were cast from pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy. The specimens were wet-ground to a final surface finish of 600 grit, air-dried, and treated with the following bonding systems: 1) air-abraded with 50-70-µm grain alumina (CON); 2) 1) + conditioned with a primer, including an acidic phosphonoacetate monomer (MHPA); 3) 1) + conditioned with a primer including a diphosphate monomer (MDP); 4) treated with a tribochemical system. Three resin materials were applied to each metal specimen. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after 10,000 thermocycles. Results The strengths decreased after thermocycling for all combinations. Among the resin materials assessed, the denture base material showed significantly (p<0.05) greater shear bond strengths than the two reline materials, except for the CON condition. After 10,000 thermocycles, the bond strengths of two reline materials decreased to less than 10 MPa for both metals. The bond strengths of the denture base material with MDP were sufficient: 34.56 MPa for cast Ti and 38.30 for Co-Cr alloy. Conclusion Bonding of reline resin materials to metals assessed was clinically insufficient, regardless of metal type, surface treatment, and resin composition. For the relining of metal denture frameworks, a denture base material should be used. PMID:24037070

  11. Effect of curing cycle on the tensile strength of the bond between heat cured denture base acrylic resin and acrylic resin denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Ayesha; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R; Clark, Robert K F

    2009-12-01

    The effect of different curing cycles on the tensile strength of the bond between one brand of cross-linked acrylic resin teeth and three heat cured denture base acrylic resins was tested. There were differences in the tensile bond strength between the three heat cured denture base acrylic resins and the three curing cycles used. The bond strength of the acrylic resin denture base material made by the same manufacturer as the cross-linked acrylic resin denture teeth was higher. The bond strength following the short cycle was lowest in all cases, individual differences between curing cycles failed to reach statistical significance. PMID:20158054

  12. The effect of monomer/polymer mixing ratio, time between mixing and packing of heat cured acrylic resin denture base material and bond assisting agents on the bond strength to acrylic resin denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, A M; Spithourakis, S A; Juszczyk, A S; Radford, D R; Clark, R K F

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of varying the monomer/polymer mixing ratio, the time from mixing to packing heat cured acrylic resin and the effect of two bond assisting agents on the strength of the bond between denture base acrylic resin and acrylic resin denture teeth. Statistical differences were found in bond strength with monomer/polymer ratio and time between mixing and packing with one of the heat cured resins investigated. The benefit of using the bonding agents was not demonstrated.

  13. Acrylic Resin Cytotoxicity for Denture Base--Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo C; Freitas, Emily; dos Santos, Daniela; de Medeiros, Rodrigo; Sonego, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Acrylic resin is a widely used material in clinical practice, and a satisfactory biocompatibility is essential. When the resin polymerization reaction is incomplete, residual monomers are released into the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate, through a literature review, the cytotoxicity caused by the denture base acrylic resin used, and its components. The selection of published studies was performed on the Pubmed database from January 2008 to July 2013. The keywords used were: "cytotoxicity and acrylic resins", "cytotoxicity and denture base resins" and "cytotoxicity and oral prosthesis". Inclusion criteria were: in vitro studies and literature reviews published in English that evaluated the acrylic resin cytotoxicity for denture base and its components. Studies with no reference to the search strategy were excluded. A total of 182 articles were found. Among these, only 13 were included for writing this review. The MTT test is the most common test used to evaluate acrylic resin cytotoxicity. Auto-polymerized resin is more cytotoxic than heat-polymerized resin because of its higher quantity of residual monomers which cause cell and tissue changes in the oral mucosa. However, more studies are necessary for the development of biocompatible materials.

  14. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be...) Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins are produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis or...

  15. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  16. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  17. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  18. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  19. Colour Stability of Heat and Cold Cure Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, P R; Reddy, Madan Mohan; Ebenezar, A.V. Rajesh; Sivakumar, G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the colour stability of heat and cold cure acrylic resins under simulated oral conditions with different colorants. Materials and Methods: Three different brands of heat cure acrylic resin and two rapid cure auto polymerizing acrylic resin of commercial products such as Trevelon Heat Cure (THC), DPI Heat cure (DHC), Pyrax Heat Cure (PHC), DPI Cold cure (DCC) and Acralyn-R-Cold cure (ACC) have been evaluated for discoloration and colour variation on subjecting it to three different, commonly employed food colorants such as Erythrosine, Tartarizine and Sunset yellow. In order to simulate the oral condition the food colorants were diluted with artificial saliva to the samples taken up for the study. These were further kept in an incubator at 37°C ± 1°C. The UV-visible spectrophotometer has been utilized to evaluate the study on the basis of CIE L* a* b* system. The prepared samples for standard evaluation have been grouped as control group, which has been tested with a white as standard, which is applicable for testing the colour variants. Results: The least colour changes was found to be with Sunset Yellow showing AE* value of 3.55 with heat cure acrylic resin branded as PHC material and the highest colour absorption with Tartarizine showing AE* value of 12.43 in rapid cure autopolymerzing acrylic resin material branded as ACC material. Conclusion: ACC which is a self cure acrylic resin shows a higher colour variation to the tartarizine food coloration. There were not much of discoloration values shown on the denture base resins as the food colorants are of organic azodyes. PMID:25738078

  20. Effect of cervical relining of acrylic resin copings on the accuracy of stone dies obtained using a polyether impression material.

    PubMed

    de Sá, André Tomazini Gomes; de Freitas, César Antunes; de Sá, Fátima Cristina; Ursi, Wagner José Silva; Simões, Tânia Christina; de Freitas, Márcia Furtado Antunes

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the respective dies after polyether elastomeric procedure in the presence or absence of cervical contact of the acrylic resin shell with the cervical region, establishing a comparison to dies obtained with stock trays. This study consisted of three groups with 10 specimens each: 1) acrylic copings without cervical contact, (cn); 2) acrylic copings with cervical contact (cc); 3) perforated stock tray, (st). The accuracy of the resulting dies was verified with the aid of a master crown, precisely fit to the master steel die. ANOVA test found statistically significant differences among groups (p<0.001). Tukey's test found that the smallest discrepancy occurred in group cn, followed by cc, while the st group presented the highest difference (cc x cn: p=0.007; st x cn: p<0.001; st x cc: p<0.001).

  1. Bonding auto-polymerising acrylic resin to acrylic denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Susan; Ray, Noel J; Burke, Francis M; Gorman, Catherine M

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of surface treatments on the shear bond strength of an auto-polymerising acrylic resin cured to acrylic denture teeth. The surface treatments included a combination of grit-blasting and/or wetting the surface with monomer. Samples were prepared and then stored in water prior to shear testing. The results indicated that the application of monomer to the surface prior to bonding did not influence the bond strength. Grit blasting was found to significantly increase the bond strength. PMID:19839190

  2. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylate-acrylamide resins. 173.5 Section 173.5... CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.5 Acrylate-acrylamide resins. Acrylate-acrylamide resins may be safely used in food under the following prescribed conditions: (a)...

  3. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  4. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  5. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  6. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10307 - Acrylate resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate resin (generic). 721.10307... Substances § 721.10307 Acrylate resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate resin (PMN P-01-343) is subject...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10307 - Acrylate resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylate resin (generic). 721.10307... Substances § 721.10307 Acrylate resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate resin (PMN P-01-343) is subject...

  9. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylate-acrylamide resins. 173.5 Section 173.5... CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.5 Acrylate-acrylamide resins. Acrylate-acrylamide resins may be safely used in food under the following prescribed conditions: (a)...

  10. Dimensional stability of autopolymerizing acrylic resin impression trays.

    PubMed

    Fehling, A W; Hesby, R A; Pelleu, G B

    1986-05-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the optimal interval between fabrication of an autopolymerizing acrylic resin custom impression tray and making a final impression. Twenty mandibular arch-shaped trays, 10 each of Fastray and Formatray resin, were evaluated for dimensional change. Both materials behaved similarly. Cross-arch contraction of the borders of buccal flanges and unilateral expansion of the borders of buccal-to-lingual flanges were observed. These changes indicate distortion. Linear dimensional changes occurred throughout 6 hours, which suggests that any impression made in a methyl methacrylate acrylic resin custom impression tray should be poured as soon as is conveniently possible. Significant linear dimensional changes were observed for only 40 minutes from the initiation of tray fabrication. This study concludes that while an aged tray is preferred, it is acceptable to make an impression in an autopolymerizing resin custom impression tray after 40 minutes.

  11. Fluoride Release from Hollow Silica Microsphere-Containing Dental Restorative Acrylate Resin.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuqin; Gao, Jun; Yin, Hengbo; Wang, Aili; Jiang, Tingshun; Wu, Gang; Wu, Zhanao

    2015-05-01

    Hollow silica microspheres with mesoporous shells were prepared by the sacrificial template method. Hollow silica microsphere-containing acrylate resin-based dental restoration materials were prepared by using hollow silica microspheres as NaF reservoirs. Fluoride release performances from naked hollow silica microspheres, acrylate resin, and hollow silica microsphere-containing acrylate resin-based dental restorative materials in an artificial saliva were investigated. The results showed that hollow silica microsphere-containing acrylate resin-based dental restorative materials had higher cumulative fluoride release quantities and sustained fluoride release rates than traditional acrylate resin-based dental restorative materials. Fluoride release could be tuned by changing the mesoporous shell thickness of hollow silica microsphere.

  12. Bond strength between acrylic resin and maxillofacial silicone

    PubMed Central

    HADDAD, Marcela Filié; GOIATO, Marcelo Coelho; dos SANTOS, Daniela Micheline; CREPALDI, Nádia de Marchi; PESQUEIRA, Aldiéris Alves; BANNWART, Lisiane Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The development of implant dentistry improved the possibilities of rehabilitation with maxillofacial prosthesis. However, clinically it is difficult to bond the silicone to the attachment system. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an adhesive system on the bond strength between acrylic resin and facial silicone. Material and Methods A total of 120 samples were fabricated with auto-polymerized acrylic resin and MDX 4-4210 facial silicone. Both materials were bonded through mechanical retentions and/or application of primers (DC 1205 primer and Sofreliner primer S) and adhesive (Silastic Medical Adhesive Type A) or not (control group). Samples were divided into 12 groups according to the method used to attach the silicone to the acrylic resin. All samples were subjected to a T-peel test in a universal testing machine. Failures were classified as adhesive, cohesive or mixed. The data were evaluated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey's HSD test (α=.05). Results The highest bond strength values (5.95 N/mm; 3.07 N/mm; 4.75 N/mm) were recorded for the samples that received a Sofreliner primer application. These values were significantly higher when the samples had no scratches and did not receive the application of Silastic Medical Adhesive Type A. Conclusions The most common type of failure was adhesive. The use of Sofreliner primer increased the bond strength between the auto-polymerized acrylic resin and the Silastic MDX 4-4210 facial silicone. PMID:23329247

  13. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid...

  14. Effect of repair surface design, repair material, and processing method on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic denture resin.

    PubMed

    Ward, J E; Moon, P C; Levine, R A; Behrendt, C L

    1992-06-01

    The transverse strengths of blocks of denture base acrylic resin repaired with autopolymerizing monomer and polymer and autopolymerizing monomer and heat-cured polymer were measured with a three-point bending test. Three repair joints were studied: butt, round, and 45-degree bevel. Three processing methods were used: bench cure, hydroflask with hot water for 10 minutes, and hydroflask with hot water for 30 minutes. The strengths of repairs made with round and 45-degree bevel joint designs were similar and significantly greater than those with a butt joint design. The strengths of repairs processed in a hydroflask for 10 minutes and 30 minutes were similar and significantly greater than those cured on the bench top. There was no difference in the strength of repairs made with autopolymerizing monomer and polymer and autopolymerizing monomer and heat-cured polymer.

  15. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... additive consists of one of the following: (1) Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin (hydrolyzed polyacrylamide) is... and acrylic acid, with the greater part of the polymer being composed of acrylamide units. (2)...

  16. Color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasp denture

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dae-Eun; Lee, Ji-Young; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Jang-Jae

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp dentures to those of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional heat-polymerized denture base resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three types of denture base resin, which are conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20), thermoplastic polyamide resin (Bio Tone), thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) were used as materials for this study. One hundred five specimens were fabricated. For the color stability test, specimens were immersed in the coffee and green tee for 1 and 8 weeks. Color change was measured by spectrometer. Water sorption was tested after 1 and 8 weeks immersion in the water. For the test of cytotoxicity, cell viability assay was measured and cell attachment was analyzed by FE-SEM. RESULTS All types of denture base resin showed color changes after 1 and 8 weeks immersion. However, there was no significant difference between denture base resins. All specimens showed significant color changes in the coffee than green tee. In water sorption test, thermoplastic acrylic resin showed lower values than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin and thermoplastic polyamide resin. Three types of denture base showed low cytotoxicity in cell viability assay. Thermoplastic acrylic resin showed the similar cell attachment but more stable attachment than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin. CONCLUSION Thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp denture showed acceptable color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity. To verify the long stability in the mouth, additional in vitro studies are needed. PMID:26330974

  17. Cytotoxicity of denture base acrylic resins: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Janaina Habib; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Machado, Ana Lúcia; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2003-08-01

    Acrylic resins are widely used in the fabrication of denture bases and have been shown to be cytotoxic as a result of substances that leach from the resin. The primary eluate is residual monomer. Numerous reports suggest that residual monomer may be responsible for mucosal irritation and sensitization of tissues. This information is important, not only to assess the biologic effects of such materials, but also to enable a comparison among the different polymerization methods, thus assisting the clinician in selecting a material with minimal cytotoxicity. This article reviews the literature published from 1973 to 2000, selected by use of a Medline search, associated with cytotoxic effects usually ascribed to acrylic denture base materials.

  18. [Adaptation of acrylic resin dentures polymerized using various activation modes].

    PubMed

    Takamata, T; Inoue, Y; Hashimoto, K; Sugitou, S; Arakawa, H; Kurasawa, I

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of maxillary dentures made using a conventional heat-activated PMMA resin, a pour resin, a visible light-activated resin, and a microwave-activated acrylic resin. Two simple methods for measuring dimensional accuracy were used: (1) weight of impression material entrapped between the base and master die and (2) measurement of the posterior border gap at five locations. The volume of space between the denture base and the master die was determined by (1) computation and (2) estimation. Statistical analysis (Bartlett, ANOVA and Tukey's Tests) supported the following conclusions: (1) all groups showed a processing contraction, most apparent from buccal flange to buccal flange, (2) the poorest fitting group was processed in a brass flask and a water bath at a temperature which rose from 70 to 100 degrees C, using a heat activated resin (Acron), (3) the visible light activated resin (Triad) produced dentures of intermediate accuracy, as did Acupac 20 when either heat or microwave activated, (4) the two best fitting groups were prepared from a chemically activated resin system using pressure at low heat (PER form), and the resin developed for microwave activation (Acron MC).

  19. 40 CFR 721.10307 - Acrylate resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate resin (generic). 721.10307 Section 721.10307 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10307 Acrylate resin...

  20. Is the bond between acrylic resin denture teeth and denture base resin stronger if they are both made by the same manufacturer?

    PubMed

    Patil, Reshma; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R; Clark, Robert K F

    2010-03-01

    A previous study suggested that a stronger bond may be achieved between acrylic resin denture base material and acrylic denture teeth when both are made by the same manufacturer. Three denture base acrylic resins from three different manufacturers were bonded to three different acrylic resin denture teeth, one of which was manufactured by each of the manufacturers of the base material. In each group there was a trend that the bond strength achieved between the teeth and base material from the same manufacturer was higher than the unmatched pairs but statistical significance was not achieved. PMID:20397502

  1. A Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Ceramic and Resin Denture Teeth on Different Acrylic Resin Bases

    PubMed Central

    Corsalini, Massimo; Venere, Daniela Di; Pettini, Francesco; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Catapano, Santo; Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Carossa, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of different resin bases and artificial teeth made of ceramic or acrylic resin materials and whether tooth-base interface may be treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting. Experimental measurements were carried on 80 specimens consisting of a cylinder of acrylic resin into which a single tooth is inserted. An ad hoc metallic frame was realized to measure the shear bond strength at the tooth-base interface. A complete factorial plan was designed and a three-way ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate if shear bond strength is affected by the following factors: (i) tooth material (ceramic or resin); (ii) base material (self-curing or thermal-curing resin); (iii) presence or absence of aluminium oxide sandblasting treatment at the tooth-base interface. Tukey post hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant difference between shear strength values measured for the dif-ferently prepared samples. It was found from ANOVA that the above mentioned factors all affect shear strength. Furthermore, post hoc analysis indi-cated that there are statistically significant differences (p-value=0.000) between measured shear strength values for: (i) teeth made of ceramic material vs. teeth made of acrylic resin material; (ii) bases made of self-curing resin vs. thermal-curing resin; (iii) specimens treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting vs. untreated specimens. Shear strength values measured for acryl-ic resin teeth were on average 70% higher than those measured for ceramic teeth. The shear bond strength was maximized by preparing samples with thermal-curing resin bases and resin teeth submitted to aluminium oxide sandblasting. PMID:25614770

  2. A comparison of shear bond strength of ceramic and resin denture teeth on different acrylic resin bases.

    PubMed

    Corsalini, Massimo; Di Venere, Daniela; Pettini, Francesco; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Catapano, Santo; Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Carossa, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of different resin bases and artificial teeth made of ceramic or acrylic resin materials and whether tooth-base interface may be treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting. Experimental measurements were carried on 80 specimens consisting of a cylinder of acrylic resin into which a single tooth is inserted. An ad hoc metallic frame was realized to measure the shear bond strength at the tooth-base interface. A complete factorial plan was designed and a three-way ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate if shear bond strength is affected by the following factors: (i) tooth material (ceramic or resin); (ii) base material (self-curing or thermal-curing resin); (iii) presence or absence of aluminium oxide sandblasting treatment at the tooth-base interface. Tukey post hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant difference between shear strength values measured for the dif-ferently prepared samples. It was found from ANOVA that the above mentioned factors all affect shear strength. Furthermore, post hoc analysis indi-cated that there are statistically significant differences (p-value=0.000) between measured shear strength values for: (i) teeth made of ceramic material vs. teeth made of acrylic resin material; (ii) bases made of self-curing resin vs. thermal-curing resin; (iii) specimens treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting vs. untreated specimens. Shear strength values measured for acryl-ic resin teeth were on average 70% higher than those measured for ceramic teeth. The shear bond strength was maximized by preparing samples with thermal-curing resin bases and resin teeth submitted to aluminium oxide sandblasting.

  3. Effect of different palatal vault shapes on the dimensional stability of glass fiber-reinforced heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture base material

    PubMed Central

    Dalkiz, Mehmet; Arslan, Demet; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza; Bilgin, M.Selim; Aykul, Halil

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different palatal vault shapes on the dimensional stability of a glass fiber reinforced heat polymerized acrylic resin denture base material. Methods: Three edentulous maxilla with shallow, deep and medium shaped palatal vaults were selected and elastomeric impressions were obtained. A maxillary cast with four reference points (A, B, C, and D) was prepared to serve as control. Point (A) was marked in the anterior midline of the edentulous ridge in the incisive papillary region, points (B) and (C) were marked in the right and left posterior midlines of the edentulous ridge in the second molar regions, and point (D) was marked in the posterior palatal midline near the fovea palatina media (Figure 2). To determine linear dimensional changes, distances between four reference points (A–B, A–C, A–D and B–C) were initially measured with a metal gauge accurate within 0.1 mm under a binocular stereo light microscope and data (mm) were recorded. Results: No significant difference of interfacial distance was found in sagittal and frontal sections measured 24 h after polymerization and after 30 days of water storage in any of experimental groups (P>.05). Significant difference of linear dimension were found in all experimental groups (P<.01) between measurements made 24 h after polymerization of specimens and 30 days after water storage. Conclusion: Palatal vault shape and fiber impregnation into the acrylic resin bases did not affect the magnitude of interfacial gaps between the bases and the stone cast surfaces. PMID:22229010

  4. In vitro cytotoxicity of self-curing acrylic resins of different colors

    PubMed Central

    Retamoso, Luciana Borges; da Cunha, Taís de Morais Alves; Pithon, Matheus Melo; dos Santos, Rogério Lacerda; Martins, Fernanda Otaviano; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity of acrylic resins of different colors over time. Methods Specimens were divided into 4 groups (n = 6) according to the color of the acrylic resin (Orto Class, Clássico, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil): Group 1: clear acrylic resin; group 2: pink acrylic resin; group 3: blue acrylic resin and group 4: green acrylic resin. All specimens were fabricated according to the mass manipulation technique and submitted to mechanical polishing protocol. The control was performed with an amalgam specimen (C+), a glass specimen (C-) and cell control (CC). Specimens were immersed in Minimum Eagle's Medium (MEM) and incubated for 24 h at 37ºC. The extracts from the experimental material were filtered and mixed with L929 fibroblast. Cytotoxicity was evaluated at 4 different times, 24, 48, 72 and 168 h. After contact, cells were incubated for 24 h and added to 100 µ of 0.01% neutral red dye. The cells were incubated for 3 h for pigment incorporation and fixed. Cells viability was determined by a spectroscopic (BioTek, Winooski, Vermont, USA) with a 492-nm wavelength λ=492 nm). Results There were no statistical differences between the experimental groups and the CC and C- groups. Conclusion Clear, pink, blue and green self-curing acrylic resins fabricated by means of the mass manipulation technique and mechanically polished are not cytotoxic. Neither the pigment added to the self-curing acrylic resin nor the factor of time influenced the cytotoxicity of the material. PMID:25279523

  5. The creep behavior of acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Sadiku, E R; Biotidara, F O

    1996-01-01

    The creep behavior of acrylic dental base resins, at room temperature and at different loading conditions, has been examined. The behaviors of these resins are similar to that of "commercial perspex" at room temperature over a period of 1000 seconds. The pseudo-elastic moduli of the blends of PMMA VC show a significant increase compared with PMMA alone. The addition of the PVC powder to the heat-cured acrylic resin increased the time-dependent elastic modulus. This increase in elastic modulus is advantageous in the production of denture based resins of improv mechanical properties.

  6. Acrylic resin injection method for blood vessel investigations.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Fumihiko; Uemura, Mamoru; Takemura, Akimichi; Toda, Isumi; Fang, Yi-Ru; Xu, Yuan Jin; Zhang, Zhi Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The injection of acrylic resin into vessels is an excellent method for macroscopically and microscopically observing their three-dimensional features. Conventional methods can be enhanced by removal of the polymerization inhibitor (hydroquinone) without requiring distillation, a consistent viscosity of polymerized resin, and a constant injection pressure and speed. As microvascular corrosion cast specimens are influenced by viscosity, pressure, and speed changes, injection into different specimens yields varying results. We devised a method to reduce those problems. Sodium hydroxide was used to remove hydroquinone from commercial methylmethacrylate. The solid polymer and the liquid monomer were mixed using a 1 : 9 ratio (low-viscosity acrylic resin, 9.07 ± 0.52 mPa•s) or a 3:7 ratio (high-viscosity resin, 1036.33 ± 144.02 mPa•s). To polymerize the acrylic resin for injection, a polymerization promoter (1.0% benzoyl peroxide) was mixed with a polymerization initiator (0.5%, N, N-dimethylaniline). The acrylic resins were injected using a precise syringe pump, with a 5-mL/min injection speed and 11.17 ± 1.60 mPa injection pressure (low-viscosity resin) and a 1-mL/min injection speed and 58.50 ± 5.75 mPa injection pressure (high-viscosity resin). Using the aforementioned conditions, scanning electron microscopy indicated that sufficient resin could be injected into the capillaries of the microvascular corrosion cast specimens.

  7. 21 CFR 177.1340 - Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. 177...-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins may be safely used as... prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, the ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer...

  8. Fatigue properties of acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K

    1989-12-01

    Observations were made of fractured surfaces caused by flexural and tensile fatigue tests made in polymethyl methacrylate denture base resins (PMMA). In addition, the changes in dynamic viscoelastic and tensile properties of the materials along with fatigue propagation were investigated. In the tensile and flexural fatigue tests, both the fractured surfaces, which had striations on their surfaces and cracks near the fractured section, closely resembled each other in appearance. On the other hand, all of the tensile properties, such as elastic modulus, toughness and tensile strength, decreased with the increase of the number of stress cycles in the fatigue test. The storage modulus (E') of the material decreased gradually along with fatigue propagation over the whole range of temperatures tested. The loss modulus (E") and mechanical loss tangent (tan delta) increased slightly. The fatigue limit of four commercial denture base resins varied widely from one product to another.

  9. 21 CFR 177.1340 - Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. 177.1340... copolymer resins. Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins may be safely used as articles or components of...) For the purpose of this section, the ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins consist of...

  10. In Vitro Antifungal Evaluation of Seven Different Disinfectants on Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim-Bicer, A. Z.; Peker, I.; Akca, G.; Celik, I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate alternative methods for the disinfection of denture-based materials. Material and Methods. Two different denture-based materials were included in the study. Before microbial test, the surface roughness of the acrylic resins was evaluated. Then, the specimens were divided into 8 experimental groups (n = 10), according to microorganism considered and disinfection methods used. The specimens were contaminated in vitro by standardized suspensions of Candida albicans ATCC#90028 and Candida albicans oral isolate. The following test agents were tested: sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl 1%), microwave (MW) energy, ultraviolet (UV) light, mouthwash containing propolis (MCP), Corega Tabs, 50% and 100% white vinegar. After the disinfection procedure, the number of remaining microbial cells was evaluated in CFU/mL. Kruskal-Wallis, ANOVA, and Dunn's test were used for multiple comparisons. Mann Whitney U test was used to compare the surface roughness. Results. Statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) was found between autopolymerised and heat-cured acrylic resins. The autopolymerised acrylic resin surfaces were rougher than surfaces of heat-cured acrylic resin. The most effective disinfection method was 100% white vinegar for tested microorganisms and both acrylic resins. Conclusion. This study showed that white vinegar 100% was the most effective method for tested microorganisms. This agent is cost-effective and easy to access and thus may be appropriate for household use. PMID:24995305

  11. Incorporation of antimicrobial macromolecules in acrylic denture base resins: a research composition and update.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Indumathi; Arunachalam, Kuthalingam Subbiah; Sajjan, Suresh; Ramaraju, Alluri Venkata; Rao, Bheemalingeshwara; Kamaraj, Bindu

    2014-06-01

    Contemporary research in acrylic denture base materials focuses on the development of a novel poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) resin with antimicrobial properties. Although PMMA resin has fulfilled all the requirements of an ideal denture base material, its susceptibility to microbial colonization in the oral environment is a formidable concern to clinicians. Many mechanisms including the absence of ionic charge in the methyl methacrylate resins, hydrophobic interactions, electrostatic interactions, and mechanical attachment have been found to contribute to the formation of biofilm. The present article outlines the basic categories of potential antimicrobial polymer (polymeric biocides) formulations (modified PMMA resins) and considers their applicability, biological status, and usage potential over the coming years.

  12. Performance comparison of acrylic and thiol-acrylic resins in two-photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lijia; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Yushen; Liu, Ying; Huang, Xi; Li, Dawei; Baldacchini, Tommaso; Jiang, Lan; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-06-13

    Microfabrication by two-photon polymerization is investigated using resins based on thiol-ene chemistry. In particular, resins containing different amounts of a tetrafunctional acrylic monomer and a tetrafunctional thiol molecule are used to create complex microstructures. We observe the enhancement of several characteristics of two-photon polymerization when using thiol-acrylic resins. Specifically, microfabrication is carried out using higher writing velocities and it produces stronger polymeric microstructures. Furthermore, the amount of shrinkage typically observed in the production of three-dimensional microstructures is reduced also. By means of microspectrometry, we confirm that the thiol-acrylate mixture in TPP resins promote monomer conversion inducing a higher degree of cross-linked network formation.

  13. Performance comparison of acrylic and thiol-acrylic resins in two-photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lijia; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Yushen; Liu, Ying; Huang, Xi; Li, Dawei; Baldacchini, Tommaso; Jiang, Lan; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-06-13

    Microfabrication by two-photon polymerization is investigated using resins based on thiol-ene chemistry. In particular, resins containing different amounts of a tetrafunctional acrylic monomer and a tetrafunctional thiol molecule are used to create complex microstructures. We observe the enhancement of several characteristics of two-photon polymerization when using thiol-acrylic resins. Specifically, microfabrication is carried out using higher writing velocities and it produces stronger polymeric microstructures. Furthermore, the amount of shrinkage typically observed in the production of three-dimensional microstructures is reduced also. By means of microspectrometry, we confirm that the thiol-acrylate mixture in TPP resins promote monomer conversion inducing a higher degree of cross-linked network formation. PMID:27410383

  14. Color stability of acrylic resin adhesives with different initiation modes.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Naomi; Koishi, Yoshikazu; Yanagida, Hiroaki; Atsuta, Mitsuru; Shimada, Kazuki; Matsumura, Hideo

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the color stability of two acrylic resin adhesives with different activation systems: a benzoyl peroxide (BPO)-amine redox system and a tri-n-butylborane (TBB) derivative system. The colorimetric values of the two resins in different shades (Clear and Ivory) were determined (n=5) 24 hours after polymerization as a baseline using the L*a*b* system of the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE). The specimens were thereafter immersed in distilled water, and the color difference (deltaE*) values were calculated. After 24 weeks, the TBB-initiated material showed a significantly (p<0.05) lower color change than the BPO-amine-initiated material. The deltaE* values for the BPO-amine-initiated materials were 6.9 for Clear and 15.8 for Ivory, whereas those for the TBB-initiated materials were 1.3 and 1.8 respectively. Thus, it was concluded that the TBB-initiated material had superior color stability to that of the BPO-amine-initiated material.

  15. Tensile bond strength between auto-polymerized acrylic resin and acrylic denture teeth treated with MF-MA solution

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the effect of chemical surface treatment using methyl formate-methyl acetate (MF-MA) solution on the tensile bond strength between acrylic denture teeth and auto-polymerized acrylic resin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy maxillary central incisor acrylic denture teeth for each of three different brands (Yamahachi New Ace; Major Dent; Cosmo HXL) were embedded with incisal edge downwards in auto-polymerized resin in polyethylene pipes and ground with silicone carbide paper on their ridge lap surfaces. The teeth of each brand were divided into seven groups (n=10): no surface treatment (control group), MF-MA solution at a ratio of 25:75 (v/v) for 15 seconds, 30 seconds, 60 seconds, 120 seconds, 180 seconds, and MMA for 180 seconds. Auto-polymerized acrylic resin (Unifast Trad) was applied to the ground surface and polymerized in a pressure cooker. A tensile strength test was performed with a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Dunnett T3 test (α=.05). RESULTS The surface treatment groups had significantly higher mean tensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P<.05) when compared within the same brand. Among the surface treatment groups of each brand, there were no significantly different tensile bond strengths between the MF-MA groups and the MMA 180 second group (P>.05), except for the Yamahachi New Ace MF-MA 180-second group (P<.05). CONCLUSION 15-second MF-MA solution can be an alternative chemical surface treatment for repairing a denture base and rebonding acrylic denture teeth with auto-polymerized acrylic resin, for both conventional and cross-linked teeth. PMID:27555897

  16. Spectroscopic study performed on films of (3-trimethoxysilylpropyl) ethylenediamine and a dental material (acrylic resin) doped with the luminescent complexes Eu(fod) 3·2H 2O and Eu(fod) 3·terpy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Farias, Robson F.; Alves, Severino; Belian, Mônica F.; Vieira, Magda R. S.; de Souza, Jucimar M.; Pedrosa, Gilmara G.; de Sá, Gilberto F.

    2002-10-01

    By using (3-trimethoxysilylpropyl) ethylenediamine (TSPED) and a dental material (acrylic resin) as precursors, self-standing films doped with the luminescent complexes Eu(fod) 3·2H 2O and Eu(fod) 3·terpy were prepared. The doped films were so studied from a spectroscopic point of view. Is verified that the film composition exerts remarkable effects on both, the intensity and lifetime of the emission process. Acrylic resin films reduces the intensity of the emission process, but increases the lifetime of a such process, in comparison with TSPED films, for which an opposite behavior is observed. The measured lifetimes for the emission process for the compounds Eu(fod) 3·2H 2O in TSPED and acrylic resin films are 306 and 369 μs, respectively. For the same film matrices, the measured lifetimes for the complex Eu(fod) 3·terpy gave the values 347 and 880 μs, respectively.

  17. Effect of tea, coffee and turmeric solutions on the colour of denture base acrylic resin: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Singh, S V; Aggarwal, Priyanki

    2012-09-01

    Discoloration of acrylic resin denture base when it comes in contact with various food materials and beverages in the oral cavity may cause aesthetic concern to a denture wearer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of tea, coffee and turmeric solutions on the colour of different brands of heat cure acrylic resin denture base materials commonly used in India. Spectrophotometer was used to evaluate the colour change. A significant difference was found when change in colour was statistically analysed.

  18. Processing factors affecting the clarity of a rapid-curing clear acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Keng, S B; Cruickshanks-Boyd, D W; Davies, E H

    1979-10-01

    The difficulty in repeatedly producing unblemished, clear acrylic resin in the dental laboratory has hindered its wider use, despite its many advantages over coloured material. Recently, rapid-cure dental acrylics have been introduced, which are available in both clear and coloured forms. This investigation examined various factors which may influence the production of unblemished, rapid-curing, clear acrylic resin. Utilizing a quantitative assessment of clarity, the most important factor influencing the clarity of the resin is shown to be the choice of separating medium. Tin-foil produces extremely high clarity, but alginate mould separator causes surface blanching. However, this surface blanching can be removed by polishing. Porosity, caused by too rapid curing, and stone model dryness are of only secondary importance. Possible water contamination of the monomer liquid due to accidental exposure only affects clarity at very high levels of contamination.

  19. [Acrylic resin reinforcement with metallic and nonmetallic inserts].

    PubMed

    Preoteasa, Elena; Murariu, Cătălina Măgureanu; Ionescu, Ecaterina; Preoteasa, Cristina Teodora

    2007-01-01

    In the current use of acrylic resin for removable dentures and orthodontic treatments we are frequently facing the fact of base fracture. The repairing of this, determine most of the time, discomfort of the patient, by excluding the prosthetic device, affecting the treatment, loosing patient's time, doctor's time, implying the dental laboratory and extra expenses. The causes of fractures are many, from clinical cases with some specific anatomic and functional particularities, or parafunctional, to the incorrect designing, manufacturing or wearing of the prosthetic part, being connected with the materials characteristics. The consequences and costs of these fractures are leading to unsatisfying results in some of the clinical cases, in presence of parafunctions like bruxism or clenching and specifically for the new types of prosthetic rehabilitation, on natural teeth or implants. PMID:17983190

  20. 21 CFR 177.1340 - Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. 177... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1340 Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins may be safely used...

  1. 21 CFR 177.1340 - Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. 177... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1340 Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins may be safely used...

  2. 21 CFR 177.1340 - Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. 177... Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1340 Ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins. Ethylene-methyl... section, the ethylene-methyl acrylate copolymer resins consist of basic copolymers produced by...

  3. The effect of various frequencies of ultrasonic cleaner in reducing residual monomer in acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Charasseangpaisarn, Taksid; Wiwatwarrapan, Chairat

    2015-12-01

    Monomer remaining in denture base acrylic can be a major problem because it may cause adverse effects on oral tissue and on the properties of the material. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of various ultrasonic cleaner frequencies on the amount of residual monomer in acrylic resin after curing. Forty-two specimens each of Meliodent heat-polymerized acrylic resin (M) and Unifast Trad Ivory auto-polymerized acrylic resin (U) were prepared according to their manufacturer's instructions and randomly divided into seven groups: Negative control (NC); Positive control (PC); and five ultrasonic treatment groups: 28 kHz (F1), 40 kHz (F2), 60 kHz (F3) (M=10 min, U=5 min), and 28 kHz followed by 60 kHz (F4: M=5 min per frequency, U=2.5 min per frequency, and F5: M=10 min followed by 5 min per frequency, U=5 min followed by 2.5 min per frequency). Residual monomer was determined by HPLC following ISO 20795-1. The data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD. There was significantly less residual monomer in the auto-polymerized acrylic resin in all ultrasonic treatment groups and the PC group than that of the NC group (p<0.05). However, the amount of residual monomer in group F3 was significantly higher than that of the F1, F4, and PC groups (p<0.05). In contrast, ultrasonic treatment did not reduce the amount of residual monomer in heat-polymerized acrylic resin (p>0.05). The amount of residual monomer in heat-polymerized acrylic resin was significantly lower than that of auto-polymerized acrylic resin. In conclusion, ultrasonic treatment at low frequencies is recommended to reduce the residual monomer in auto-polymerized acrylic resin and this method is more practical in a clinical situation than previously recommended methods because of reduced chairside time.

  4. Influence of Surface Modifications of Acrylic Resin Teeth on Shear Bond Strength with Denture Base Resin-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Madhusudan; Krishnan, Chitra Shankar; Azhagarasan, N.S.; Sampathkumar, Jayakrishnakumar; Ramasubramanian, Hariharan

    2015-01-01

    Background Debonding of artificial teeth from the denture base is an important issue for edentulous patients rehabilitated with conventional or implant supported complete dentures. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate shear bond strength between denture base resin and acrylic resin denture teeth subjected to three different surface modifications on the ridge lap area as compared to unmodified denture teeth. Materials and Methods Forty acrylic resin central incisor denture teeth were selected and randomly divided into four test groups. The teeth in each group were subjected to one of the three different surface modifications, namely, chemical treatment, sandblasting and placement of retentive grooves on the ridge lap area respectively, prior to packing of the denture base resin. The group with unmodified teeth served as control. Forty acrylic resin test blocks thus obtained were tested for shear bond strength between acrylic resin teeth and denture base resin in Universal Testing Machine. Data obtained was statistically analysed using one-way ANOVA and Student- Newman- Keul’s test (p< 0.05). Results Analysis of shear bond strength revealed that retentive grooves on the ridge lap area showed highest bond strength values followed by sandblasting and both were statistically significant compared to the control and chemically treated groups. Unmodified surface of the resin teeth showed the least bond strength. Conclusion Within the limitations of this invitro study the placement of retentive grooves or sandblasting of the ridge lap area showed highly significant improvement in shear bond strength compared to the unmodified surface. Chemical treatment did not result in any significant improvement in the shear bond strength compared to the unmodified surface. PMID:26501005

  5. Industrially relevant epoxy-acrylate hybrid resin photopolymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajiboye, Gbenga I.

    Photopolymerization of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins takes advantages of inherent properties present in the free-radical and cationic reactions to reduce oxygen inhibition problems that plague free-radical reactions. Similarly, the combined reaction mechanisms reduce moisture sensitivity of the cationic reactions. Despite the advantages of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins, problems persist that need to be addressed. For example, low conversion and polymerization rate of the epoxides are a problem, because the fast acrylate conversion prevents the epoxide from reaching high conversion. Controlling phase separation is challenging, since two moieties with different properties are reacting. The physical properties of the polymer will be impacted by the availability of different moieties. High shrinkage stress results from the acrylate moiety, causing buckling and cracking in film and coating applications. The overall goal of this study is to use the fundamental knowledge of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins to formulate industrially viable polymers. In order to achieve this goal, the study focuses on the following objectives: (I) determine the apparent activation energy of the hybrid monomer METHB, (II) increase epoxide conversion and polymerization rate of hybrid formulations, and (III) control physical properties in epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins. In order to increase the epoxide conversion and rate of polymerization, the sensitivity of epoxides to alcohol is used to facilitate the activated monomer (AM) mechanism and induce a covalent bond between the epoxide and acrylate polymers through the hydroxyl group. It is hypothesized that if the AM mechanism is facilitated, epoxide conversion will increase. As a result, the resins can be tailored to control phase separation and physical properties, and shrinkage stress can be reduced. In pursuit of these objectives, the hybrid monomer METHB was polymerized at temperatures ranging from 30°C to 70°C to obtain apparent activation

  6. Cytocompatible antifungal acrylic resin containing silver nanoparticles for dentures

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; Mendieta, Irasema; Nuñez-Anita, Rosa Elvira; Cajero-Juárez, Marcos; Castaño, Víctor M

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition of Candida albicans on denture resins could play a significant role in preventing the development of denture stomatitis. The safety of a new dental material with antifungal properties was analyzed in this work. Methods Poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] discs and PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs were formulated, with the commercial acrylic resin, Nature-CrylTM, used as a control. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dispersive Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antifungal effect was assessed using a luminescent microbial cell viability assay. Biocompatibility tests were carried out using NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a Jurkat human lymphocyte cell line. Cells were cultured for 24 or 72 hours in the presence or absence of the polymer formulations and analyzed using three different tests, ie, cellular viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cell proliferation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay BrdU, and genomic DNA damage (Comet assay). Finally, the samples were evaluated mechanically, and the polymer-bearing silver nanoparticles were analyzed microscopically to evaluate dispersion of the nanoparticles. Results The results show that PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs significantly reduce adherence of C. albicans and do not affect metabolism or proliferation. They also appear not to cause genotoxic damage to cells. Conclusion The present work has developed a new biocompatible antifungal PMMA denture base material. PMID:22969297

  7. Morphological analysis and interleukin release in human gingival fibroblasts seeded on different denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Trubiani, O; Toniato, E; Di Iorio, D; Diomede, F; Merciaro, I; D' Arcangelo, C; Caputi, S

    2012-01-01

    The development of different types of materials with application in practice dentistry is an area of intense growth and research due to its importance in oral health. Among the diverse materials currently used in restoration or in dentures, the acrylic based resins have been widely employed. The release of toxic components and the changes on their physical and mechanical properties actually represent a goal of intensive research. In vivo analysis showed that the surface roughness of the acrylic resin represents a factor that could stimulate bacteria colonization and soft tissue inflammation. For this purpose, in this work, we have analyzed the cell response to acrylic based resins Ivoclar, Tokuso and Coldpack in basal conditions, unpolished, and after the polished procedure performed to reduce the surface roughness. Our in vitro results using human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) showed a decrease of cell growth, evaluated by MTT assay starting at 24 h of incubation, in samples seeded on resins in basal conditions and after the polished procedure. This cell growth reduction was associated to evident morphological changes in unpolished materials. After 24 h of culture in presence of polished and unpolished resins a spontaneous release was present of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and -8 (IL-8), which was higher in unpolished resins, indicating that the polished procedure, minimizing the cytotoxicity process, could contribute to reduce the gingival inflammation processes.

  8. Effect of 5.25 % sodium hypochlorite on color stability of acrylic and silicone based soft liners and a denture base acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of a chemical disinfectant (sodium hypochlorite 5.25 %) on color stability of a denture base acrylic resin and two processed soft denture lining materials of two different types (acrylic-based and silicone-based). Ten specimens from each type of materials tested were made (2 × 20 × 20 mm). All specimens were immersed in sodium hypochlorite (5.25 %). Colorimetric measurements for each specimen were taken before immersion, and after 24 h and 7 days of immersion. Color changes were evaluated using the CIE L*a*b* colorimetric system. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (α = 0.05). ANOVA was followed by Bonferroni test to determine which groups differed from each other. ΔE and ΔL* of the silicone-based liner at the 1st and 7th days of immersion were significantly more than of denture base acrylic resin and acrylic-based liner. Change in ΔL* values of denture base acrylic resin and acrylic-based liner was small and statistically insignificant after 24 h of its immersion. However, the increase in ΔL* values of the acrylic-based liner after 7 days of immersion was considerably more than of denture base acrylic resin. Color changes in denture base acrylic resin and soft denture liners tended to increase with longer immersion times, and the color stability of the soft denture liners was influenced by its chemical type.

  9. Comparing the degree of exothermic polymerization in commonly used acrylic and provisional composite resins for intraoral appliances.

    PubMed

    Rice, C A; Riehl, Jessica; Broman, Karl; Soukup, Jason W; Gengler, William R

    2012-01-01

    The use of dental acrylics and composite resins in veterinary dentistry has become widespread. However their use is not without potential complications. All acrylics and composite resins produce an exothermic reaction during the polymerization process. The aim of the current study was to evaluate thermal conduction during the polymerization reaction of each material to offer clinical guidelines when choosing a material with particular consideration for the significant volumes typically used. Results showed that methylmethacrylate based resins generated a significantly higher degree of heat during polymerization. Bis-acryl based composite resins generated a significantly lower degree of heat during polymerization, making them the material of choice to potentially minimize thermal injury to the dentin-pulp complex. It is the responsibility of the clinician to become aware of all materials available, and to have an understanding of their properties to guide them in making sound clinical judgments.

  10. [MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF RAT MUCOUS MEMBRANE OF THE TONGUE EARLY AFFECTED BY ACRYLIC RESIN MONOMER].

    PubMed

    Davydenko, V; Nidzelskiy, M; Starchenko, I; Davydenko, A; Kuznetsov, V

    2016-03-01

    Base materials, made on the basis of various derivatives of acrylic and methacrylic acids, have been widely used in prosthetic dentistry. Free monomer, affecting the tissues of prosthetic bed and the whole body, is always found in dentures. Therefore, study of the effect of acrylic resins' monomer on mucous membrane of the tongue is crucial. Rat tongue is very similar to human tongue, and this fact has become the basis for selecting these animals to be involved into the experiment. The paper presents the findings related to the effect of "Ftoraks" base acrylic resin monomer on the state of rat mucous membrane of the tongue and its regeneration. The microscopy has found that the greatest changes in the mucous membrane of the tongue occur on day 3 and 7 day after applying the monomer and are of erosive and inflammatory nature. Regeneration of tongue epithelium slows down. PMID:27119844

  11. Effect of Nanoclay on Thermal Conductivity and Flexural Strength of Polymethyl Methacrylate Acrylic Resin

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Tahereh; Barzegar, Ali; Hamedi Rad, Fahimeh; Moslehifard, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The mechanical and thermal properties of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) acrylic resin should be improved to counterweigh its structural deficiencies. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the flexural strength and thermal conductivity of conventional acrylic resin and acrylic resin loaded with nanoclay. Materials and Method The methacrylate monomer containing the 0.5, 1 and 2 wt% of nanoclay was placed in an ultrasonic probe and mixed with the PMMA powder. Scanning electron microscopy was used to verify homogeneous distribution of particles. Twenty-four 20×20×200-mm cubic samples were prepared for flexural strength test; 18 samples containing nanoclay and 6 samples for the control group. Another 24 cylindrical samples of 38×25 mm were prepared for thermal conductivity test. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis, followed by multiple-comparison test (Scheffé’s test). Statistical significance was set at p< 0.05. Results Increasing the concentration of nanoclay incorporated into the acrylic resin samples increased thermal conductivity but decreased flexural strength (p< 0.05). Conclusion Based on the results of this study, adding nanoclay particles to PMMA improved its thermal conductivity, while it had a negative effect on the flexural strength. PMID:27284557

  12. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin “Versacryl.” Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its lingual flanges made of flexible acrylic resin Versacryl. Digital force-meter was used to measure retention of mandibular dentures at delivery and at 2 weeks and 45 days following denture insertion. Results: The statistical analysis showed that at baseline and follow-up appointments, retention of mandibular complete dentures with flexible lingual flanges was significantly greater than retention of conventional mandibular dentures (P < 0.05). In both types of mandibular dentures, retention of dentures increased significantly over the follow-up period (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The use of flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges in the construction of mandibular complete dentures improved denture retention. PMID:26539387

  13. The bond between acrylic resin denture teeth and the denture base: recommendations for best practice.

    PubMed

    Radford, D R; Juszczyk, A S; Clark, R K F

    2014-02-01

    Failure of the bond between denture teeth and base acrylic resin has been shown to be a cause of denture failure leading to inconvenience and costly repair. The optimal combination of acrylic resin denture tooth, denture base material, laboratory protocol and processing method has not yet been established. Extensive research enables the following recommendations for best practice to be made. Adopt practices that maximise the strength of the bond: select appropriate denture teeth; select base acrylic resin from the same manufacturer as the denture teeth; remove the glaze from ridgelaps of the denture teeth; apply monomer to the ridgelaps of the denture teeth before packing the base acrylic resin dough; use the manufacturers' recommended liquid/powder ratio; follow the manufacturers' recommended curing cycle; allow the flask to cool slowly and rest before deflasking. Adopt practices that avoid factors detrimental to bond strength: remove all traces of wax from the ridge laps of the denture teeth; remove all traces of mould seal from the ridgelaps of the denture teeth. It is evident that a number of factors are involved which may assist or prevent formation of an adequate bond, suggesting that attention to detail by the dental technician may be the most critical factor.

  14. The bond between acrylic resin denture teeth and the denture base: recommendations for best practice.

    PubMed

    Radford, D R; Juszczyk, A S; Clark, R K F

    2014-02-01

    Failure of the bond between denture teeth and base acrylic resin has been shown to be a cause of denture failure leading to inconvenience and costly repair. The optimal combination of acrylic resin denture tooth, denture base material, laboratory protocol and processing method has not yet been established. Extensive research enables the following recommendations for best practice to be made. Adopt practices that maximise the strength of the bond: select appropriate denture teeth; select base acrylic resin from the same manufacturer as the denture teeth; remove the glaze from ridgelaps of the denture teeth; apply monomer to the ridgelaps of the denture teeth before packing the base acrylic resin dough; use the manufacturers' recommended liquid/powder ratio; follow the manufacturers' recommended curing cycle; allow the flask to cool slowly and rest before deflasking. Adopt practices that avoid factors detrimental to bond strength: remove all traces of wax from the ridge laps of the denture teeth; remove all traces of mould seal from the ridgelaps of the denture teeth. It is evident that a number of factors are involved which may assist or prevent formation of an adequate bond, suggesting that attention to detail by the dental technician may be the most critical factor. PMID:24557385

  15. Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application

    SciTech Connect

    Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik; Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat; Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd

    2014-02-12

    The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

  16. Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajau, Rida; Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat; Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik

    2014-02-01

    The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

  17. Effect of long-term water immersion or thermal shock on mechanical properties of high-impact acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hirono; Hamanaka, Ippei; Takahashi, Yutaka; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term water immersion or thermal shock on the mechanical properties of high-impact acrylic denture base resins. Two high-impact acrylic denture base resins were selected for the study. Specimens of each denture base material tested were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions (n=10). The flexural strength at the proportional limit, the elastic modulus and the impact strength of the specimens were evaluated. The flexural strength at the proportional limit of the high-impact acrylic denture base resins did not change after six months' water immersion or thermocycling 50,000 times. The elastic moduli of the high-impact acrylic denture base resins significantly increased after six months' water immersion or thermocycling 50,000 times. The impact strengths of the high-impact acrylic denture base resins significantly decreased after water immersion or thermocycling as described above.

  18. A temporary space maintainer using acrylic resin teeth and a composite resin.

    PubMed

    Kochavi, D; Stern, N; Grajower, R

    1977-05-01

    A one-session technique for preparing a temporary space maintainer has been described. The technique consists of attaching an acrylic resin pontic to etched surfaces of natural adjacent teeth by means of a composite resin. The main advantages of this technique are elimination of premature tooth preparation, good esthetics, fair strength, low cost, and rapid completion of the restoration without the need of a dental laboratory.

  19. A Study on Effect of Surface Treatments on the Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Gupta, Tapas K; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-03-01

    Visible light-cured composite resins have become popular in prosthetic dentistry for the replacement of fractured/debonded denture teeth, making composite denture teeth on partial denture metal frameworks, esthetic modification of denture teeth to harmonize with the characteristics of adjacent natural teeth, remodelling of worn occlusal surfaces of posterior denture teeth etc. However, the researches published on the bond strength between VLC composite resins and acrylic resin denture teeth is very limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of five different methods of surface treatments on acrylic resin teeth on the shear bond strength between light activated composite resin and acrylic resin denture teeth. Ninety cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were done upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into six groups, containing 15 samples each. Over all the treated and untreated surfaces of all groups, light-cured composite resin was applied. The shear strengths were measured in a Universal Testing Machine using a knife-edge shear test. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mean values were compared by the F test. Application of bonding agent with prior treatment of methyl methacrylate on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  20. Effect of deep-freezing on some properties of acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Isik, Gul; Harrison, Alan

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of freezing the acrylic resin polymer/monomer dough mix on a range of properties of the polymerized denture base material. Powder and liquid of acrylic resin were mixed and at the dough stage transferred to a deep freezer and frozen for periods of 24 h, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. At the end of the storage time, sufficient dough was removed, thawed, packed, and polymerized, and specimens were prepared from the polymerized plates. A control series was prepared from dough which had followed conventional mixing and packing procedures without freezing. The strength properties, hardness, and flash thickness were examined. Statistical analysis was carried out using ANOVA (one-way and two-way) with multiple range tests. The flexural strength was significantly (p=0.03) increased and the impact strength, hardness, and flash thickness were not affected by freezing the material during the dough stage. The flexural modulus was significantly (p=0.0001) reduced when the storage time in the freezer was increased to 3 months. Six months' frozen material proved to be unpackable. It was concluded that the acrylic resin polymer/monomer dough mix can be stored in the freezer for up to 1 month without any statistically significant effect on the properties of the polymerized denture base material. PMID:16191909

  1. Effect of deep-freezing on some properties of acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Isik, Gul; Harrison, Alan

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of freezing the acrylic resin polymer/monomer dough mix on a range of properties of the polymerized denture base material. Powder and liquid of acrylic resin were mixed and at the dough stage transferred to a deep freezer and frozen for periods of 24 h, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. At the end of the storage time, sufficient dough was removed, thawed, packed, and polymerized, and specimens were prepared from the polymerized plates. A control series was prepared from dough which had followed conventional mixing and packing procedures without freezing. The strength properties, hardness, and flash thickness were examined. Statistical analysis was carried out using ANOVA (one-way and two-way) with multiple range tests. The flexural strength was significantly (p=0.03) increased and the impact strength, hardness, and flash thickness were not affected by freezing the material during the dough stage. The flexural modulus was significantly (p=0.0001) reduced when the storage time in the freezer was increased to 3 months. Six months' frozen material proved to be unpackable. It was concluded that the acrylic resin polymer/monomer dough mix can be stored in the freezer for up to 1 month without any statistically significant effect on the properties of the polymerized denture base material.

  2. An evaluation of the cure of acrylic resin by three methods.

    PubMed

    Gay, W D; King, G E

    1979-10-01

    An investigation was designed and carried out to compare methyl acrylic resin processed by three methods--boiling, in the heat platen press, and a 9 hour, 75 degrees C cure. The material was cured in certain thicknesses in the heat platen press and by boiling without porosity. All samples cured for 9 hours at 75 degrees C had no porosity. The value of the heat platen press as a time-saving device and its applications in a maxillofacial laboratory were discussed.

  3. [Determination of 9 residual acrylic monomers in acrylic resins by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with microwave assisted extraction].

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying; Lin, Rui; Cai, Luxin; Ge, Xiuxiu; Huang, Changchun

    2012-01-01

    A reliable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed for the determination of 9 residual acrylic monomers (methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, ethyl methacrylate, n-butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, styrene, acrylic acid and methacrylic acid) in acrylic resins. Solid resin was precipitated with methanol after microwave assisted extraction with ethyl acetate for 30 min, and liquid resin was diluted with methanol directly. The nine acrylic monomers got a good separation within 20 min on a DB-WAX column. The limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N = 10) of the method were in the range of 1-10 mg/kg for liquid resin and 3-50 mg/kg for solid resin. The calibration curves were linear within 1-500 mg/L range with correlation coefficients above 0. 995. The recoveries ranged from 84.4% to 108.6% at five spiked levels. The sensitivity, recovery and selectivity of the method can fully meet the requirements of practical work.

  4. Flexural Strength of Acrylic Resin Denture Bases Processed by Two Different Methods

    PubMed Central

    Gharechahi, Jafar; Asadzadeh, Nafiseh; Shahabian, Foad; Gharechahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to compare flexural strength of specimens processed by conventional and injection-molding techniques. Materials and methods. Conventional pressure-packed PMMA was used for conventional pressure-packed and injection-molded PMMA was used for injection-molding techniques. After processing, 15 specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature until measured. Three-point flexural strength test was carried out. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS using t-test. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results. Flexural strength of injection-polymerized acrylic resin specimens was higher than that of the conventional method (P=0.006). This difference was statistically significant (P=0.006). Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, flexural strength of acrylic resin specimens was influenced by the molding technique. PMID:25346833

  5. Flexural strength of acrylic resin denture bases processed by two different methods.

    PubMed

    Gharechahi, Jafar; Asadzadeh, Nafiseh; Shahabian, Foad; Gharechahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to compare flexural strength of specimens processed by conventional and injection-molding techniques. Materials and methods. Conventional pressure-packed PMMA was used for conventional pressure-packed and injection-molded PMMA was used for injection-molding techniques. After processing, 15 specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature until measured. Three-point flexural strength test was carried out. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS using t-test. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results. Flexural strength of injection-polymerized acrylic resin specimens was higher than that of the conventional method (P=0.006). This difference was statistically significant (P=0.006). Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, flexural strength of acrylic resin specimens was influenced by the molding technique.

  6. Flexural strength of acrylic resin denture bases processed by two different methods.

    PubMed

    Gharechahi, Jafar; Asadzadeh, Nafiseh; Shahabian, Foad; Gharechahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to compare flexural strength of specimens processed by conventional and injection-molding techniques. Materials and methods. Conventional pressure-packed PMMA was used for conventional pressure-packed and injection-molded PMMA was used for injection-molding techniques. After processing, 15 specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature until measured. Three-point flexural strength test was carried out. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS using t-test. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results. Flexural strength of injection-polymerized acrylic resin specimens was higher than that of the conventional method (P=0.006). This difference was statistically significant (P=0.006). Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, flexural strength of acrylic resin specimens was influenced by the molding technique. PMID:25346833

  7. Influence of ozone and paracetic acid disinfection on adhesion of resilient liners to acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of paracetic acid (PAA) and ozone disinfection on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of silicone-based resilient liners to acrylic resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS One hundred and twenty dumbbell shaped heat-polymerized acrylic resins were prepared. From the mid segment of the specimens, 3 mm of acrylic were grinded off and separated parts were reattached by resilient liners. The specimens were divided into 2 control (control1, control7) and 4 test groups of PAA and ozone disinfection (PAA1, PAA7, ozone1 and ozone7; n=10). While control groups were immersed in distilled water for 10 min (control1) and 7 days (control7), test groups were subjected to PAA (16 g/L) or ozone rich water (4 mg/L) for 1 cycle (10 min for PAA and 60 min for ozone) per day for 7 days prior to tensile tests. Measurements of the TBS were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. RESULTS Adhesive strength of Mollosil decreased significantly by application of ozone disinfection. PAA disinfection had no negative effect on the TBS values of Mollosil and Molloplast B to acrylic resin. Single application of ozone disinfection did not have any negative effect on TBS values of Molloplast B, but prolonged exposure to ozone decreased its adhesive strength. CONCLUSION The adhesion of resilient liners to acrylic was not adversely affected by PAA disinfection. Immersion in ozonated water significantly decreased TBS of Mollosil. Prolonged exposure to ozone negatively affects adhesion of Molloplast B to denture base materials. PMID:27555898

  8. Effect of Beverages on the Hardness and Tensile Bond Strength of Temporary Acrylic Soft Liners to Acrylic Resin Denture Base

    PubMed Central

    Safari, A; Vojdani, M; Mogharrabi, S; Iraji Nasrabadi, N; Derafshi, R

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Two potential problems commonly identified with a denture base incorporating a resilient liner are failure of the bond between acrylic resin and soft liner material, and loss of resiliency of the soft liner over time. Since patients may drink different beverages, it is important to evaluate their effects on physical properties of soft lining materials. Purpose: The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different beverages on the hardness of two temporary acrylic-based soft lining materials and their bond strength to the denture base resin. Materials and Method: For the hardness test; a total of 80 rectangular specimens (40mm×10mm×3mm) were fabricated from a heat-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate. Two commercially auto-polymerized acrylic resin-based resilient liners; Coe-Soft and Visco-gel were prepared according to the manufacturers’ instructions and applied on the specimens. For the tensile test, 160 cylindrical specimens (30mm×10mm) were prepared. The liners were added between specimens with a thickness of 3 mm. The specimens of both soft liners were divided into 4 groups (n=10) and immersed in distilled water as the control group, Coca-Cola, 8% and 50% ethanol. All groups were stored in separate containers at 37oC for 12 days. All beverages were changed daily. The hardness was determined using a Shore A durometer and tensile bond strength was determined in a ZwickRoell testing machine at a cross-head speed of 5mm/min. The results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results: There was no significant interaction between the soft liners and the drinks for both hardness (p= 0.748) and bond strength (p= 0.902). There were statistically significant differences between all drinks for both hardness (p< 0.001) and bond strength (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it seems that drinking Coca-Cola and alcoholic beverages would not be potentially causing any problems for the temporary

  9. Flexural strength of acrylic resin repairs processed by different methods: water bath, microwave energy and chemical polymerization

    PubMed Central

    ARIOLI FILHO, João Neudenir; BUTIGNON, Luís Eduardo; PEREIRA, Rodrigo de Paula; LUCAS, Matheus Guilherme; MOLLO JUNIOR, Francisco de Assis

    2011-01-01

    Denture fractures are common in daily practice, causing inconvenience to the patient and to the dentists. Denture repairs should have adequate strength, dimensional stability and color match, and should be easily and quickly performed as well as relatively inexpensive. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength of acrylic resin repairs processed by different methods: warm water-bath, microwave energy, and chemical polymerization. Material and methods Sixty rectangular specimens (31x10x2.5 mm) were made with warm water-bath acrylic resin (Lucitone 550) and grouped (15 specimens per group) according to the resin type used to make repair procedure: 1) specimens of warm water-bath resin (Lucitone 550) without repair (control group); 2) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with warm water-bath; 3) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with microwave resin (Acron MC); 4) specimens of warm water-bath resin repaired with autopolymerized acrylic resin (Simplex). Flexural strength was measured with the three-point bending in a universal testing machine (MTS 810 Material Test System) with load cell of 100 kgf under constant speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results The control group showed the best result (156.04±1.82 MPa). Significant differences were found among repaired specimens and the results were decreasing as follows: group 3 (43.02±2.25 MPa), group 2 (36.21±1.20 MPa) and group 4 (6.74±0.85 MPa). Conclusion All repaired specimens demonstrated lower flexural strength than the control group. Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin showed the lowest flexural strength. PMID:21625742

  10. Water Sorption and Flexural Strength of Thermoplastic and Conventional Heat-Polymerized Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati, Mohammad Ali; Vafaee, Fariborz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the water sorption and flexural strength of thermoplastic and conventional acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: Water sorption and flexural strength were compared between a thermoplastic modified polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin (group A) and a heat-polymerized PMMA acrylic resin (group B) as the control group (n=10). A three-point bending test was carried out for flexural strength testing. For water sorption test, 10 disc-shaped samples were prepared. After desiccating, the samples were weighed and immersed in distilled water for seven days. Then, they were weighed again, and desiccated for the second and third times. Differences between the mean values in the two groups were analyzed using Student’s t-test. Results: The mean value of water sorption was 14.74±1.36 μg/mm3 in group A, and 19.11±0.90 μg/mm3 in group B; this difference was statistically significant (P< 0.001). The mean value of flexural strength was 88.21±8.63 MPa in group A and 77.77±9.49 MPa in group B. A significant difference was observed between the two groups (P= 0.019). Conclusion: Flexural strength of group A was significantly higher than that of group B, and its water sorption was significantly lower. Thus, thermoplastic resins can be a suitable alternative to conventional PMMA acrylic resins as denture base materials. PMID:26877737

  11. Dimensional Changes of Acrylic Resin Denture Bases: Conventional Versus Injection-Molding Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gharechahi, Jafar; Asadzadeh, Nafiseh; Shahabian, Foad; Gharechahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acrylic resin denture bases undergo dimensional changes during polymerization. Injection molding techniques are reported to reduce these changes and thereby improve physical properties of denture bases. The aim of this study was to compare dimensional changes of specimens processed by conventional and injection-molding techniques. Materials and Methods: SR-Ivocap Triplex Hot resin was used for conventional pressure-packed and SR-Ivocap High Impact was used for injection-molding techniques. After processing, all the specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature until measured. For dimensional accuracy evaluation, measurements were recorded at 24-hour, 48-hour and 12-day intervals using a digital caliper with an accuracy of 0.01 mm. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) using t-test and repeated-measures ANOVA. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results: After each water storage period, the acrylic specimens produced by injection exhibited less dimensional changes compared to those produced by the conventional technique. Curing shrinkage was compensated by water sorption with an increase in water storage time decreasing dimensional changes. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, dimensional changes of acrylic resin specimens were influenced by the molding technique used and SR-Ivocap injection procedure exhibited higher dimensional accuracy compared to conventional molding. PMID:25584050

  12. Acrylic Resin Molding Based Head Fixation Technique in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Roh, Mootaek; Lee, Kyungmin; Jang, Il-Sung; Suk, Kyoungho; Lee, Maan-Gee

    2016-01-12

    Head fixation is a technique of immobilizing animal's head by attaching a head-post on the skull for rigid clamping. Traditional head fixation requires surgical attachment of metallic frames on the skull. The attached frames are then clamped to a stationary platform resulting in immobilization of the head. However, metallic frames for head fixation have been technically difficult to design and implement in general laboratory environment. In this study, we provide a novel head fixation method. Using a custom-made head fixation bar, head mounter is constructed during implantation surgery. After the application of acrylic resin for affixing implants such as electrodes and cannula on the skull, additional resins applied on top of that to build a mold matching to the port of the fixation bar. The molded head mounter serves as a guide rails, investigators conveniently fixate the animal's head by inserting the head mounter into the port of the fixation bar. This method could be easily applicable if implantation surgery using dental acrylics is necessary and might be useful for laboratories that cannot easily fabricate CNC machined metal head-posts.

  13. Color difference threshold determination for acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiabao; Lin, Hong; Huang, Qingmei; Liang, Qifan; Zheng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to set evaluation indicators, i.e., perceptibility and acceptability color difference thresholds, of color stability for acrylic denture base resins for a spectrophotometric assessing method, which offered an alternative to the visual method described in ISO 20795-1:2013. A total of 291 disk specimens 50±1 mm in diameter and 0.5±0.1 mm thick were prepared (ISO 20795-1:2013) and processed through radiation tests in an accelerated aging chamber (ISO 7491:2000) for increasing times of 0 to 42 hours. Color alterations were measured with a spectrophotometer and evaluated using the CIE L*a*b* colorimetric system. Color differences were calculated through the CIEDE2000 color difference formula. Thirty-two dental professionals without color vision deficiencies completed perceptibility and acceptability assessments under controlled conditions in vitro. An S-curve fitting procedure was used to analyze the 50:50% perceptibility and acceptability thresholds. Furthermore, perceptibility and acceptability against the differences of the three color attributes, lightness, chroma, and hue, were also investigated. According to the S-curve fitting procedure, the 50:50% perceptibility threshold was 1.71ΔE00 (r(2)=0.88) and the 50:50% acceptability threshold was 4.00 ΔE00 (r(2)=0.89). Within the limitations of this study, 1.71/4.00 ΔE00 could be used as perceptibility/acceptability thresholds for acrylic denture base resins.

  14. Impression techniques for multiple implants: a photoelastic analysis. Part II: comparison of four acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Júnior, Itamar; de Lima Lucas, Barbara; Gomide, Henner Alberto; Gomes, Vanderlei Luiz

    2013-10-01

    Four commercial brands of chemically activated acrylic resin were compared through photoelastic analysis. Photoelastic resin blocks were made with 2 implants placed parallel to each other and 2 square transfer copings splinted. Both transfers were splinted with chemically activated acrylic resin: Dencrilay, Duralay I, Duralay II, and GC. Data were analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P < .05). Statistically significant differences were found among the 3 brands of chemically activated acrylic resin. Dencrilay showed greater dimensional alteration. Duralay I and GC are recommended for the transfer of the position of the multi-implants.

  15. Effect of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Tensile Strength of Dental Acrylic Resins.

    PubMed

    Shirkavand, Saeed; Moslehifard, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Adding further fillers to dental resins may enhance their physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of heat-curing acrylic resin reinforced by TiO2nanoparticles added into the resin matrix. Materials and methods. Commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained and characterized using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their crystalline structure, particle size and morphology. TiO2-acrylic resin nanocomposite was prepared by mixing 0.5, 1 and 2 (wt%) of surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles in an amalgamator providing three groups of samples. Before curing, the obtained paste was packed into steel molds. After cur-ing, the specimens were removed from the molds. The tensile strength test samples were prepared according to ISO 1567. Results. Two crystalline phases were found in TiO2 nanoparticles including: (i) anatase as the major one, and (ii) rutile. The average particle size calculated according to the Scherrer equation was 20.4 nm, showing a normal size distribution. According to SEM images, the nanocomposite with 1wt% TiO2 nanoparticles had a better distribution compared to other groups. In addition, the group by 1wt% TiO2 exhibited higher tensile strength with a significant difference compared to other groups. ANOVA showed significant differences between the contents of TiO2 particles in acrylic resin (F = 22.19; P < 0.001). Conclusion. A considerable increase in tensile strength was observed with titania NPs reinforcement agents in 1wt% by weight. Further increase of TiO2 nanoparticles decreased the tensile strength.

  16. Effect of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Tensile Strength of Dental Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Shirkavand, Saeed; Moslehifard, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Adding further fillers to dental resins may enhance their physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of heat-curing acrylic resin reinforced by TiO2nanoparticles added into the resin matrix. Materials and methods. Commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained and characterized using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their crystalline structure, particle size and morphology. TiO2-acrylic resin nanocomposite was prepared by mixing 0.5, 1 and 2 (wt%) of surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles in an amalgamator providing three groups of samples. Before curing, the obtained paste was packed into steel molds. After cur-ing, the specimens were removed from the molds. The tensile strength test samples were prepared according to ISO 1567. Results. Two crystalline phases were found in TiO2 nanoparticles including: (i) anatase as the major one, and (ii) rutile. The average particle size calculated according to the Scherrer equation was 20.4 nm, showing a normal size distribution. According to SEM images, the nanocomposite with 1wt% TiO2 nanoparticles had a better distribution compared to other groups. In addition, the group by 1wt% TiO2 exhibited higher tensile strength with a significant difference compared to other groups. ANOVA showed significant differences between the contents of TiO2 particles in acrylic resin (F = 22.19; P < 0.001). Conclusion. A considerable increase in tensile strength was observed with titania NPs reinforcement agents in 1wt% by weight. Further increase of TiO2 nanoparticles decreased the tensile strength. PMID:25587380

  17. Allergic effects of the residual monomer used in denture base acrylic resins

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Vohra, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Denture base resins are extensively used in dentistry for a variety of purposes. These materials can be classified as chemical, heat, light, and microwave polymerization materials depending upon the factor which starts the polymerization reaction. Their applications include use during denture base construction, relining existing dentures, and for fabrication of orthodontic removable appliances. There have been increased concerns regarding the safe clinical application of these materials as their biodegradation in the oral environment leads to harmful effects. Along with local side effects, the materials have certain occupational hazards, and numerous studies can be found in the literature mentioning those. The purpose of this article is to outline the cytotoxic consequences of denture base acrylic resins and clinical recommendations for their use. PMID:26929705

  18. Allergic effects of the residual monomer used in denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Vohra, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Denture base resins are extensively used in dentistry for a variety of purposes. These materials can be classified as chemical, heat, light, and microwave polymerization materials depending upon the factor which starts the polymerization reaction. Their applications include use during denture base construction, relining existing dentures, and for fabrication of orthodontic removable appliances. There have been increased concerns regarding the safe clinical application of these materials as their biodegradation in the oral environment leads to harmful effects. Along with local side effects, the materials have certain occupational hazards, and numerous studies can be found in the literature mentioning those. The purpose of this article is to outline the cytotoxic consequences of denture base acrylic resins and clinical recommendations for their use.

  19. Rehabilitation of post-traumatic total nasal defect using silicone and acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vikas; Datta, Kusum; Kaur, Sukhjit

    2016-01-01

    Facial defects resulting from neoplasms, congenital abnormalities or trauma can affect the patient esthetically, psychologically, and even financially. Surgical reconstruction of large facial defects is sometimes not possible and frequently demands prosthetic rehabilitation. For success of such prosthesis, adequate replication of natural anatomy, color matching and blending with tissue interface are important criteria. Variety of materials and retention methods are advocated to achieve a functionally and esthetically acceptable restoration. Silicones are the most commonly used materials because of flexibility, lifelike appearance and ability to be used in combination with acrylic resin which is hard, provides body and helps in achieving retention to the prosthesis by engaging mechanical undercuts. Furthermore, the acrylic portion can be relined easily, thus helping comfortable wear and removal of the prosthesis by patient without traumatizing nasal mucosa. This case report describes time saving and cost effective prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with total nasal defect using custom sculpted nasal prosthesis made up of silicone elastomer and acrylic resin, which is retained by engaging mechanical undercut and use of biocompatible silicone adhesive.

  20. Toxicity analysis of ocular prosthesis acrylic resin with or without pigment incorporation in human conjunctival cell line.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Bonatto, Liliane da Rocha; de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha de

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pigment incorporation on the cytotoxicity of ocular prosthesis N1 color acrylic resin. Nine samples were manufactured by heat-polymerization in water bath and divided into 3 groups: acrylic resin without pigment incorporation (group R), acrylic resin with pigment incorporation (group RP), and acrylic pigment (group P). Eluates formed after 72h of sample immersion in medium were incubated with conjunctival cell line (Chang conjunctival cells) for 72h. The negative control group consisted in medium without samples (group C). The cytotoxic effect from the eluates was evaluated using MTT assay (cell proliferation), ELISA assay (quantification of IL1β, IL6, TNF α and CCL3/MIP1α) and RT-PCR assay (mRNA expression of COL IV, TGF β and MMP9). Data were submitted to ANOVA with Bonferroni post-tests (p<0.05). All groups were considered non-cytotoxic based on cell proliferation. However, resin with pigment incorporation showed significant IL6 quantity increase. Resin without pigment incorporation exhibited higher mRNA expression of COL IV, MMP9 and TGF β, however it was also observed for the negative control group. The materials exhibited divergent biological behavior. Despite the pigment incorporation that resulted in an increase of IL6, no cytotoxicity was observed based on cell proliferation. PMID:27521695

  1. Toxicity analysis of ocular prosthesis acrylic resin with or without pigment incorporation in human conjunctival cell line.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Bonatto, Liliane da Rocha; de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha de

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pigment incorporation on the cytotoxicity of ocular prosthesis N1 color acrylic resin. Nine samples were manufactured by heat-polymerization in water bath and divided into 3 groups: acrylic resin without pigment incorporation (group R), acrylic resin with pigment incorporation (group RP), and acrylic pigment (group P). Eluates formed after 72h of sample immersion in medium were incubated with conjunctival cell line (Chang conjunctival cells) for 72h. The negative control group consisted in medium without samples (group C). The cytotoxic effect from the eluates was evaluated using MTT assay (cell proliferation), ELISA assay (quantification of IL1β, IL6, TNF α and CCL3/MIP1α) and RT-PCR assay (mRNA expression of COL IV, TGF β and MMP9). Data were submitted to ANOVA with Bonferroni post-tests (p<0.05). All groups were considered non-cytotoxic based on cell proliferation. However, resin with pigment incorporation showed significant IL6 quantity increase. Resin without pigment incorporation exhibited higher mRNA expression of COL IV, MMP9 and TGF β, however it was also observed for the negative control group. The materials exhibited divergent biological behavior. Despite the pigment incorporation that resulted in an increase of IL6, no cytotoxicity was observed based on cell proliferation.

  2. Effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on microhardness of acrylic resin denture base.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Baptista, Gabriella Trunckle; Moreno, Amália; Andreotti, Agda Marobo; Dekon, Stéfan Fiuza de Carvalho

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on the microhardness of acrylic resins denture base. Four different brands of acrylic resins were evaluated: Onda Cryl, QC 20, Classico and Lucitone. Each brand of acrylic resin was divided into four groups (n = 7) according to the disinfection method (microwave, Efferdent, 4% chlorhexidine and 1% hypochlorite). Samples were disinfected during 60 days. Before and after disinfection, samples were thermal cycled between 5-55 °C with 30-s dwell times for 1000 cycles. The microhardness was measured using a microhardener, at baseline (B), after first thermal cycling (T1), after disinfection (D) and after second thermal cycling (T2). The microhardness values of all groups reduced over time. QC-20 acrylic resin exhibited the lowest microhardness values. At B and T1 periods, the acrylic resins exhibited statistically greater microhardness values when compared to D and T2 periods. It can be concluded that the microhardness values of the acrylic resins denture base were affected by the thermal cycling and disinfection procedures. However, all microhardness values obtained herein are within acceptable clinical limits for the acrylic resins.

  3. Antifungal Effect of Zataria multiflora Essence on Experimentally Contaminated Acryl Resin Plates With Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Abbas Ali; Falah Tafti, Abbas; Hoseiny, Seyed Mehdi; Kazemi, Abdolhossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adherence and colonization of Candida species particularly C. albicans on denture surfaces, forms a microbial biofilm, which may result denture stomatitis in complete denture users. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antifungal effect Zataria multiflora essence in removing of Candida albicans biofilms on experimentally contaminated resin acryl plates. Materials and Methods: In the present experimental study, 160 resin acrylic plates (10 × 10 × 1 mm) were contaminated by immersion in 1 × 103 C. albicans suspension for 24 hours to prepare experimental Candida biofilms. The total number of Candida cells, which adhered to 20 randomly selected acryl resin plates was determined as the Candia load before cleaning. The remaining 140 plates were divided to seven groups of 20 and immersed in five concentrations of Zataria multiflora essence from 50 to 3.125 mg/mL as test, 100000 IU nystatin as the positive and sterile physiologic serum as the negative control. The remaining Candida cells on each acryl plate were also enumerated and data were analyzed using the SPSS 16 software with Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests. Results: Zataria essence at concentrations of 50 and 25 mg/mL removed 100% of attached Candida cells similar to nystatine (MFC), while weaker Zataria essence solutions cleaned 88%, 60.5% and 44.7% of attached Candida cells. Kruskal-wallis test showed a statistically significant difference between all test groups (P = 0.0001). In this study 12.5 mg/mL concentration of Zataria multiflora was considered as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90). Conclusions: Zataria essence, at concentrations of 50 and 25 mg/mL, effectively removed Candida cells that had adhered to the denture surface, similar to the level of removal observed for 100000 IU nystatin. PMID:25763273

  4. Epoxy and acrylate sterolithography resins: in-situ property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Chambers, R.S.; Hinnerichs, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Stereolithography is a rapid prototyping method that is becoming an important product realization and concurrent engineering tool, with applications in advanced and agile manufacturing. During the build process, material behavior plays a significant role in the mechanics leading to internal stresses and, potentially, to distortion (curling) of parts. The goal of the ``Stereolithography Manufacturing Process Modeling and Optimization`` LDRD program was to develop engineering tools for improving overall part accuracy during the stereolithography build process. These tools include phenomenological material models of solidifying stereolithography photocurable resins and a 3D finite element architecture that incorporates time varying material behavior, laser path dependence, and structural linkage. This SAND report discusses the in situ measurement of shrinkage and force relaxation behavior of two photocurable resins, and the measurement of curl in simple cantilever beams. These studies directly supported the development of phenomenological material models for solidifying resins and provided experimental curl data to compare to model predictions.

  5. Effect of Polymerization Cycles on Gloss, Roughness, Hardness and Impact Strength of Acrylic Resins.

    PubMed

    Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Folli, Bianca L; Nogueira, Moises C F; Correr, Americo Bortolazzo; Mesquita, Marcelo F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the conventional and boiled polymerization cycles on gloss, roughness, hardness and impact strength of acrylic resins. Samples were made for each Classico and QC-20 materials (n=10) in dental stone molds obtained from rectangular metallic matrices embedded in metallic flasks. The powder-liquid ratio and manipulation of the acrylic resins' were accomplished according to manufacturers' instructions and the resins were conventionally packed in metallic flasks. After polymerization by (1) conventional: 74 °C for 9 h (Classico) and (2) boiled: 20 min (QC-20) cycles, the samples were deflasked after cooling at room temperature and conventionally finished and polished. The properties were evaluated after storage in water at 37 °C for 24 h. Gloss was verified with Multi Gloss 268 meter (Konica Minolta), surface roughness was measured with Surfcorder SE 1700 rugosimeter (Kosaka), Knoop hardness number was obtained with HMV-200 microdurometer, and impact strength was measured in an Otto Wolpert-Werke device by Charpy system (40 kpcm). Data were subjected to Student's t-test (at α=0.05). The results were: Gloss: 67.7 and 62.2 for Classico and QC-20 resins, respectively; Surface roughness: 0.874 and 1.469 Ra-µm for Classico and QC-20, respectively; Knoop hardness: 27.4 and 26.9 for Classico and QC-20, respectively; and Impact strength: 37.6 and 33.6 kgf/cm2 for Classico and QC-20, respectively. No statistically significant difference (p>0.05)were found between the resins for the evaluated properties. In conclusion, conventional and boiled polymerization cycles had similar effects on gloss, roughness, hardness and impact strength of both Classico and QC-20 resins.

  6. An ORMOSIL-containing orthodontic acrylic resin with concomitant improvements in antimicrobial and fracture toughness properties.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shi-qiang; Epasinghe, Jeevani; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Niu, Li-na; Mettenberg, Donald; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Blizzard, John D; Wu, Christine D; Mao, Jing; Drisko, Connie L; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2012-01-01

    Global increase in patients seeking orthodontic treatment creates a demand for the use of acrylic resins in removable appliances and retainers. Orthodontic removable appliance wearers have a higher risk of oral infections that are caused by the formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms on the appliance surface. Here, we present the synthetic route for an antibacterial and antifungal organically-modified silicate (ORMOSIL) that has multiple methacryloloxy functionalities attached to a siloxane backbone (quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate, or QAMS). By dissolving the water-insoluble, rubbery ORMOSIL in methyl methacrylate, QAMS may be copolymerized with polymethyl methacrylate, and covalently incorporated in the pressure-processed acrylic resin. The latter demonstrated a predominantly contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans ATCC 36558 and Actinomyces naselundii ATCC 12104 biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 on the acrylic surface. Apart from its favorable antimicrobial activities, QAMS-containing acrylic resins exhibited decreased water wettability and improved toughness, without adversely affecting the flexural strength and modulus, water sorption and solubility, when compared with QAMS-free acrylic resin. The covalently bound, antimicrobial orthodontic acrylic resin with improved toughness represents advancement over other experimental antimicrobial acrylic resin formulations, in its potential to simultaneously prevent oral infections during appliance wear, and improve the fracture resistance of those appliances.

  7. An ORMOSIL-Containing Orthodontic Acrylic Resin with Concomitant Improvements in Antimicrobial and Fracture Toughness Properties

    PubMed Central

    Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Niu, Li-na; Mettenberg, Donald; Yiu, Cynthia K. Y.; Blizzard, John D.; Wu, Christine D.; Mao, Jing; Drisko, Connie L.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2012-01-01

    Global increase in patients seeking orthodontic treatment creates a demand for the use of acrylic resins in removable appliances and retainers. Orthodontic removable appliance wearers have a higher risk of oral infections that are caused by the formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms on the appliance surface. Here, we present the synthetic route for an antibacterial and antifungal organically-modified silicate (ORMOSIL) that has multiple methacryloloxy functionalities attached to a siloxane backbone (quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate, or QAMS). By dissolving the water-insoluble, rubbery ORMOSIL in methyl methacrylate, QAMS may be copolymerized with polymethyl methacrylate, and covalently incorporated in the pressure-processed acrylic resin. The latter demonstrated a predominantly contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans ATCC 36558 and Actinomyces naselundii ATCC 12104 biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 on the acrylic surface. Apart from its favorable antimicrobial activities, QAMS-containing acrylic resins exhibited decreased water wettability and improved toughness, without adversely affecting the flexural strength and modulus, water sorption and solubility, when compared with QAMS-free acrylic resin. The covalently bound, antimicrobial orthodontic acrylic resin with improved toughness represents advancement over other experimental antimicrobial acrylic resin formulations, in its potential to simultaneously prevent oral infections during appliance wear, and improve the fracture resistance of those appliances. PMID:22870322

  8. The effect of disinfectant solutions on the hardness of acrylic resin denture teeth.

    PubMed

    Pavarina, A C; Vergani, C E; Machado, A L; Giampaolo, E T; Teraoka, M T

    2003-07-01

    This investigation studied the effects of disinfectant solutions on the hardness of acrylic resin denture teeth. The occlusal surfaces of 64 resin denture teeth were ground flat with abrasives up to 400-grit silicon carbide paper. Measurements were made after polishing and after the specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 48 h. The specimens were then divided into four groups and immersed in chemical disinfectants (4% chlorhexidine; 1% sodium hypochlorite and sodium perborate) for 10 min. The disinfection methods were performed twice to simulate clinical conditions and hardness measurements were made. Specimens tested as controls were immersed in water during the same disinfection time. Eight specimens were produced for each group. After desinfection procedures, testing of hardness was also performed after the samples were stored at 37 degrees C for 7, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days. Data were analysed using two-way analysis of variance (anova) and Tukey's test at 95% confidence level. According to the results, no significant differences were found between materials and immersion solutions (P > 0.05). However, a continuous decrease in hardness was noticed after ageing (P < 0.05). It was conclude that the surfaces of both acrylic resin denture teeth softened upon immersion in water regardless the disinfecting solution.

  9. COLOR STABILITY OF DENTURE TEETH AND ACRYLIC BASE RESIN SUBJECTED DAILY TO VARIOUS CONSUMER CLEANSERS

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Audrey; Powers, John M.; Kiat-amnuay, Sudarat

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated color stability of acrylic denture teeth and base resins after 48 weeks of commercial denture cleanser simulation. Materials and Methods Two brands of denture teeth (Trubyte Portrait IPN, TP; SR Vivodent DCL, SR) in shades A1, B1, and C1 and three acrylic base resins (Lucitone, LU; Paragon, PA; Valplast, VA) prepared to manufacturer’s specifications, were exposed 10 hours daily to four cleansers (Clorox Bleach, CB; Polident 3-minute, PO3; Efferdent, EF; and Kleenite, KL) and distilled water (DW) control, approximating consumer overnight use. Color measurements used the CIE L*a*b* color space (0, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks.) Color differences (ΔE*) at 48-weeks were subjected to 4-way analysis-of-variance (ANOVA). Mean values were compared with Fisher’s PLSD intervals (0.05 significance level). Results Mean color differences (ΔE*) demonstrated color changes in each material. ANOVA indicated color changes in teeth were significantly affected by both cleansers and teeth brand (p<0.05), but not shade. Color changes in base resins were significantly affected by cleansers (p<0.05), but not brand alone. Overall, KL produced the least color change while CB and PO3 produced the most for all materials. Conclusions After 48 weeks of daily simulation, TP teeth were more color-stable than SR in all cleansers except EF (p<0.0001). Base resin VA was less color-stable than LU and PA. Cleanser KL resulted in the lowest color changes. Clinical Significance All tested materials yield clinically acceptable color changes (ΔE*<3.5); all cleansing methods tested can be recommended, though Kleenite demonstrated the least change after 48-weeks. PMID:24980803

  10. Silver hollow optical fibers with acrylic silicone resin coating as buffer layer for sturdy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Katsumasa; Takaku, Hiroyuki; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Song; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    For sturdy silver hollow optical fibers, acrylic silicone resin is newly used as a buffer layer between an inner silver layer and a silica capillary. This acrylic silicone resin film prevents the glass surface from chemical and mechanical micro damages during silver plating process, which deteriorate mechanical strength of the hollow fibers. In addition, it keeps high adhesion of the silver layer with the glass surface. We discuss improvement of mechanical strength of the hollow glass fibers without deterioration of optical properties.

  11. Comparative evaluation of shear compressive bond strength between cross-linked acrylic resin denture base and cross-linked acrylic resin teeth with different modifcations of their ridge lap surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sadar, Leena; Dhume, Swaroop; Maniar, Neena; Prakash Patil, Jeevan; Rane, Prasad; Gandhewar, Mahesh

    2013-09-01

    A major problem commonly observed in denture wearer is the detachment of artifcial tooth/teeth from acrylic denture base. The problem was grave when porcelain teeth used along with the then available denture base materials. The bond formed was purely mechanical and hence debonding of teeth from denture base was a frequent occurrence. Inspite of chemical union between acrylic resin teeth and acrylic denture base material, detachment of teeth particularly anterior teeth is a frequent observation. The objective of the study is to study the effect of change in the surface treatment and surface confguration of ridge lap surface of the teeth on retention of cross-linked acrylic teeth on cross-linked acrylic resin denture base. Sixty specimens were tested for the shear compressive bond strength using instron universal testing machine in KN. Statistical analysis is used. The fndings were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 't' test. Slight modifcation in the ridge lap surface of artifcial teeth alters the strength of the shear compressive bond. Sand papering of ridge lap surfaces improves the shear compressive bond then the one without any modifcation. Maximum shear compressive bond strength can be increased by application of monomer.

  12. Applications of Blue Light-curing Acrylic Resin to Forensic Sample Preparation and Microtomy.

    PubMed

    Groves, Ethan; Palenik, Christopher S

    2016-03-01

    This study discusses the results of an evaluation of a one-part blue light-curing acrylic resin for embedding trace evidence prior to the preparation of thin sections with a microtome. Through a comparison to several epoxy resins, the physical properties relevant to both trace evidence examination and analytical microscopy in general, including as viscosity, clarity, color, hardness, and cure speed, were explored. Finally, thin sections from paint samples embedded in this acrylic resin were evaluated to determine if, through smearing or impregnation, the resin contributed to the infrared spectra. The results of this study show that blue light-curing acrylic resins provide the desired properties of an embedding medium, generate high-quality thin sections, and can significantly simplify the preparation of paint chips, fibers and a multitude of other types of microscopic samples in the forensic trace evidence laboratory.

  13. Applications of Blue Light-curing Acrylic Resin to Forensic Sample Preparation and Microtomy.

    PubMed

    Groves, Ethan; Palenik, Christopher S

    2016-03-01

    This study discusses the results of an evaluation of a one-part blue light-curing acrylic resin for embedding trace evidence prior to the preparation of thin sections with a microtome. Through a comparison to several epoxy resins, the physical properties relevant to both trace evidence examination and analytical microscopy in general, including as viscosity, clarity, color, hardness, and cure speed, were explored. Finally, thin sections from paint samples embedded in this acrylic resin were evaluated to determine if, through smearing or impregnation, the resin contributed to the infrared spectra. The results of this study show that blue light-curing acrylic resins provide the desired properties of an embedding medium, generate high-quality thin sections, and can significantly simplify the preparation of paint chips, fibers and a multitude of other types of microscopic samples in the forensic trace evidence laboratory. PMID:27404623

  14. An investigation of heat transfer to the implant-bone interface related to exothermic heat generation during setting of autopolymerizing acrylic resins applied directly to an implant abutment.

    PubMed

    Ormianer, Z; Laufer, B Z; Nissan, J; Gross, M

    2000-01-01

    Excessive heat generation at the implant-bone interface may cause bone damage and compromise osseointegration. Autopolymerizing acrylic resins are commonly used intraorally to join impression copings and suprastructure components for soldering. The effect of heat generation at the implant surface related to the exothermic setting reaction of autopolymerizing acrylic resins applied to an attached abutment was examined in vitro. Two brands of autopolymerizing acrylic resin, Duralay and GC Pattern Resin, were compared. Acrylic resin was applied to a titanium alloy abutment connected to a titanium alloy cylindric implant in varying controlled volumes, with both bulk application and brush paint-on techniques. The implant was embedded in an acrylic resin mandible in a 37 degrees C water bath. Temperature changes were recorded via embedded thermocouples at the cervical and apical of the implant surface. Analysis of variance for repeated measures was used to compare treatment groups. A mean maximum increase in temperature of 4 to 5 degrees C was seen at the implant cervical for both materials, with a maximum temperature increase of 6 degrees C. No difference between Duralay and GC Pattern Resin was seen, except for bulk application to medium-sized copper bands at the implant cervical (P < .05). No difference between the bulk and brush techniques was seen for all options, except for GC, where bulk application to medium-sized copper bands produced higher temperatures than the brush technique (P < .05). Spray coolant reduced temperatures for bulk application of both Duralay and GC (P < .05).

  15. Effect of an acrylic resin combined with an antimicrobial polymer on biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    MARRA, Juliê; PALEARI, André Gustavo; RODRIGUEZ, Larissa Santana; LEITE, Andressa Rosa Perin; PERO, Ana Carolina; COMPAGNONI, Marco Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of an acrylic resin combined with an antimicrobial polymer poly (2-tert-butylaminoethyl) methacrylate (PTBAEMA) to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans biofilm formation. Material and Methods Discs of a heat-polymerized acrylic resin were produced and divided according to PTBAEMA concentration: 0 (control), 10 and 25%. The specimens were inoculated (107 CFU/mL) and incubated at 37ºC for 48 h. After incubation, the wells were washed and each specimen was sonicated for 20 min. Replicate aliquots of resultant suspensions were plated at dilutions at 37ºC for 48 h. The number of colony-forming units (CFU) was counted and expressed as log (CFU+1)/mL and analyzed statistically with α=.05. Results The results showed that 25% PTBAEMA completely inhibited S. aureus and S. mutans biofilm formation. A significant reduction of log (CFU+1)/mL in count of S. aureus (control: 7.9±0.8A; 10%: 3.8±3.3B) and S. mutans (control: 7.5±0.7A; 10%: 5.1±2.7B) was observed for the group containing 10% PTBAEMA (Mann-Whitney, p<0.05). For C. albicans, differences were not significant among the groups (control: 6.6±0.2A; 10%: 6.6±0.4A; 25%: 6.4±0.1A), (Kruskal-Wallis, p>0.05, P=0.079). Conclusions Acrylic resin combined with 10 and 25% of PTBAEMA showed significant antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and S. mutans biofilm, but it was inactive against the C. albicans biofilm. PMID:23329246

  16. An in vitro study into the effect of a limited range of denture cleaners on surface roughness and removal of Candida albicans from conventional heat-cured acrylic resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Z; Johnson, A; Douglas, C W I

    2004-05-01

    This study evaluated the abrasiveness of four denture cleaners on the surface of denture base material and assessed their ability to remove Candida albicans. Acrylic resin discs 20 mm diameter and 2 mm thick were identically produced and polished. Four cleaners were evaluated: conventional toothpaste; toothpaste with stain remover; denture cleaning paste and an immersion type cleaner, and water were used as control. These were used at dilutions of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 with water. An electric toothbrush was used, and the discs cleaned to simulate 1 years' cleaning. The surface roughness of the discs were then measured, before and after cleaning, using a stylus profilometer, then inoculated with 1.2 x 10(6)C. albicans cells. The effectiveness of the denture cleaners to remove C. albicans cells was assessed following a single cleaning event. The immersion cleaner was significantly less abrasive than paste cleaners (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between any dilutions for any cleaner used (P > 0.05). Immersion and paste cleaners removed almost all recoverable C. albicans from the discs, as cleaning with water alone was less effective (P < 0.05). An immersion type cleaner was found to be the most suitable cleaner because of its low abrasivity and effective removal of organic debris. PMID:15140172

  17. Comparison of impact strength of acrylic resin reinforced with kevlar and polyethylene fibres.

    PubMed

    Kamath, G; Bhargava, K

    2002-01-01

    The present study was done to evaluate the impact strengths of heat-activated acrylic resins reinforced with Kevlar fibres, polyethylene fibres and unreinforced heat activated acrylic resin. Each of three groups had 25 specimens. Brass rods of uniform length of 40 mm and diameter of 8 mm were used to prepare the moulds. A combination of long fibres (40 mm length) and short fibres (6 mm length) were used. The total amount of fibres incorporated was limited to 2% by weight of the resin matrix. Short and long fibres of equal weight were incorporated. The short fibres were mixed with polymer and monomer and packed into the mould, while, the long axis of the specimen, perpendicular to the applied force. The specimens were then processed. Impact strength testing was done on Hounsfield's impact testing machine. Kevlar fibre reinforced heat activated acrylic resin specimens recorded higher mean impact strength of 0.8464 Joules, while polyethylene fibres reinforced heat activated acrylic resin recorded mean impact strength of 0.7596 joules. The unreinforced heat activated acrylic resin recorded mean impact strength of 0.3440 Joules.

  18. Comparison of Adhesive Resistance to Chewing Gum among Denture Base Acrylic Resin, Cobalt-Chromium Alloy, and Zirconia.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeshi; Takano, Tomofumi; Ueda, Takayuki; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the adhesiveness of chewing gum to acrylic resin, cobalt-chromium alloy, and zirconia. Test specimens were fabricated using acrylic resin (resin), cobalt-chromium alloy (Co-Cr), and Ceria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal-based nanostructured zirconia/alumina composite (zirconia). Specimens of each material were attached to the upper and lower terminals of a digital force gauge. The operator masticated chewing gum, wiped off any saliva, and placed the gum on the lower specimen. The gum was compressed to a thickness of 1 mm between the upper and lower specimens. Thereafter, traction was applied to the upper specimen at a cross-head speed of 100 mm/min under 3 different conditions (dry, wet with distilled water, and wet with artificial saliva) to determine the maximum adhesive strength of the chewing gum. The statistical analysis was performed using the Bonferroni test after a one-way analysis of variance (α=0.05). Under dry conditions, adhesive force was 14.8±6.8 N for resin, 14.0±4.8 N for Co-Cr, and 4.3±2.3 N for zirconia. Significant differences were noted between resin and zirconia, and between Co-Cr and zirconia. When distilled water was applied to the specimen surface, the adhesive strength was 16.8±1.7 N for resin, 8.3±2.1 N for Co-Cr, and 2.7±0.8 N for zirconia. Significant differences were noted between resin and Co-Cr, resin and zirconia, and Co-Cr and zirconia. When artificial saliva was applied to the specimen surface, the adhesive force was 18.5±2.8 N for resin, 5.3±0.8 N for Co-Cr, and 3.0±1.7 N for zirconia. Significant differences were noted between resin and Co-Cr, and resin and zirconia. Chewing gum adhered less strongly to zirconia than to acrylic resin or cobalt-chromium alloy. PMID:26961330

  19. Comparison of Adhesive Resistance to Chewing Gum among Denture Base Acrylic Resin, Cobalt-Chromium Alloy, and Zirconia.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeshi; Takano, Tomofumi; Ueda, Takayuki; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the adhesiveness of chewing gum to acrylic resin, cobalt-chromium alloy, and zirconia. Test specimens were fabricated using acrylic resin (resin), cobalt-chromium alloy (Co-Cr), and Ceria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal-based nanostructured zirconia/alumina composite (zirconia). Specimens of each material were attached to the upper and lower terminals of a digital force gauge. The operator masticated chewing gum, wiped off any saliva, and placed the gum on the lower specimen. The gum was compressed to a thickness of 1 mm between the upper and lower specimens. Thereafter, traction was applied to the upper specimen at a cross-head speed of 100 mm/min under 3 different conditions (dry, wet with distilled water, and wet with artificial saliva) to determine the maximum adhesive strength of the chewing gum. The statistical analysis was performed using the Bonferroni test after a one-way analysis of variance (α=0.05). Under dry conditions, adhesive force was 14.8±6.8 N for resin, 14.0±4.8 N for Co-Cr, and 4.3±2.3 N for zirconia. Significant differences were noted between resin and zirconia, and between Co-Cr and zirconia. When distilled water was applied to the specimen surface, the adhesive strength was 16.8±1.7 N for resin, 8.3±2.1 N for Co-Cr, and 2.7±0.8 N for zirconia. Significant differences were noted between resin and Co-Cr, resin and zirconia, and Co-Cr and zirconia. When artificial saliva was applied to the specimen surface, the adhesive force was 18.5±2.8 N for resin, 5.3±0.8 N for Co-Cr, and 3.0±1.7 N for zirconia. Significant differences were noted between resin and Co-Cr, and resin and zirconia. Chewing gum adhered less strongly to zirconia than to acrylic resin or cobalt-chromium alloy.

  20. Effect of sealant application and thermal cycling on bond strength of tissue conditioners to acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Francisca Neta Cruz Soares; Pinto, José Renato Ribeiro; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sealer application and thermal cycling on the bond strength between tissue conditioners and acrylic resin, and to observe the type of bond failure. Two hundred eighty-eight specimens (10x16x3 mm) were made of an acrylic resin (Lucitone 500, Dentsply) using a metal muffle. Specimens were divided into four groups according to the tissue conditioner (Coe-Comfort, GC or Dentusoft, Densell) used and whether or not a sealer (Eversoft Soft Liner Sealer, Myerson) was applied. Each of the four groups was subdivided into other six subgroups (n=12) to undergo thermocycling for 45, 90, 135, 180 or 210 cycles with a dwell time of 60 s, or to be left non thermocycled (control). Tensile bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Sealant application had no effect on the tensile bond strength of the relined acrylic resin, regardless of the tissue conditioner used (Coe-Comfort: p=0.306 and Dentusoft: p=0.1501). The number of thermal cycles had a significant effect on the tensile bond strength of the relined acrylic resin (Coe-Comfort: p=0.002 and Dentusoft: p<0.001). Both tissue conditioners presented similar bond strength to acrylic resin. For both tissue conditioners, sealer coatings had no influence on bond strength, while different numbers of thermal cycles affected that mechanical property.

  1. Preparation and properties of acrylic resin coating modified by functional graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Rui; Liu, Lili

    2016-04-01

    To improve the dispersion and the strength of filler-matrix interface in acrylic resin, the functional graphene oxide (FGO) was obtained by surface modification of graphene oxide (GO) by γ-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (KH-570) and then the acrylic nanocomposites containing different loadings of GO and FGO were prepared. The structure, morphology and dispersion/exfoliation of the FGO were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, Raman, XPS, SEM and TEM. The results demonstrated that the KH-570 was successfully grafted onto the surface of GO sheets. Furthermore, the corresponding thermal, mechanical and chemical resistance properties of the acrylic nanocomposites filled with the FGO were studied and compared with those of neat acrylic and GO/acrylic nanocomposites. The results revealed that the loading of FGO effectively enhanced various properties of acrylic resin. These findings confirmed that the dispersion and interfacial interaction were greatly improved by incorporation of FGO, which might be the result of covalent bonds between the FGO and the acrylic matrix. This work demonstrates an in situ polymerization method to construct a flexible interphase structure, strong interfacial interaction and good dispersion of FGO in acrylic nanocomposites, which can reinforce the polymer properties and be applied in research and industrial areas.

  2. Colour stability of acrylic resin denture teeth after immersion in different beverages.

    PubMed

    Arana-Correa, B E; Sepúlveda-Navarro, W F; Florez, F L E; Urban, V M; Jorge, J H; Campanha, N H

    2014-06-01

    The colour stability of acrylic resin denture teeth in beverages was investigated. A spectrophotometer measured the colour (CIE-L*a*b* system) of all specimens after storage in distilled water/for 24 h at 37 degrees C (T0). Specimens were then immersed in various beverages. After 15 days (T1) and 30 days (T2), for each material, the mean deltaE values were calculated and compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey intervals (alpha = 0.05). In the deltaT0T1 period, specimens stored in red wine were significantly discoloured, compared to distilled water (P = 0.003). There was no difference between immersion solutions in deltaET0T2 (P = 0.772) and in deltaET1T2 (P = 0.058), and no difference between materials in all immersion periods.

  3. Evaluation of shear bond strength of repair acrylic resin to Co-Cr alloy

    PubMed Central

    Külünk, Şafak; Külünk, Tolga; Saraç, Duygu; Baba, Seniha

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of different surface treatment methods and thermal ageing on the bond strength of autopolymerizing acrylic resin to Co-Cr. MATERIALS AND METHODS Co-Cr alloy specimens were divided into five groups according to the surface conditioning methods. C: No treatment; SP: flamed with the Silano-Pen device; K: airborne particle abrasion with Al2O3; Co: airborne particle abrasion with silica-coated Al2O3; KSP: flamed with the Silano-Pen device after the group K experimental protocol. Then, autopolymerized acrylic resin was applied to the treated specimen surfaces. All the groups were divided into two subgroups with the thermal cycle and water storage to determine the durability of the bond. The bond strength test was applied in an universal test machine and treated Co-Cr alloys were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the significant differences among surface treatments and thermocycling. Their interactons were followed by a multiple comparison' test performed uing a post hoc Tukey HSD test (α=.05). RESULTS Surface treatments significantly increased repair strengths of repair resin to Co-Cr alloy. The repair strengths of Group K, and Co significantly decreased after 6,000 cycles (P<.001). CONCLUSION Thermocycling lead to a significant decrease in shear bond strength for air abrasion with silica-coated aluminum oxide particles. On the contrary, flaming with Silano-Pen did not cause a significant reduction in adhesion after thermocycling. PMID:25177470

  4. Assessment of the flexural strength of two heat-curing acrylic resins for artificial eyes.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Aline Ursula Rocha; Portugal, Aline; Veloso, Letícia Rocha; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Santos, Daniela Micheline dos

    2009-01-01

    Prosthetic eyes are artificial substitutes for the eyeball, made of heat-curing acrylic resin, serving to improve the esthetic appearance of the mutilated patient and his/her inclusion in society. The aim of this study was to assess the flexural strength of two heat-curing acrylic resins used for manufacturing prosthetic eyes. Thirty-six specimens measuring 64 x 10 x 3.3 mm were obtained and divided into four groups: acrylic resin for artificial sclera N1 (Artigos Odontológicos Clássico, São Paulo, SP, Brazil), heat-cure water technique (GI) and microwave-cured (GII); colorless acrylic resin for prosthetic eyes (Artigos Odontológicos Clássico, São Paulo, SP, Brazil), heat-cure water technique (GIII) and microwave-cured (GIV). Mechanical tests using three point loads were performed in a test machine (EMIC, São José dos Pinhais, PR, Brazil). The analysis of variance and the Tukey test were used to identify significant differences (p < 0.01). Groups GII and GIV presented, respectively, the highest (98.70 +/- 11.90 MPa) and lowest means (71.07 +/- 8.93 MPa), with a statistically significant difference. The cure method used for the prosthetic eye resins did not interfere in their flexural strength. It was concluded that all the resins assessed presented sufficient flexural strength values to be recommended for the manufacture of prosthetic eyes.

  5. Using acrylic resin tooth veneers in patients with an abnormal jaw relationship: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsung-Chieh; Lan, Yi-Hao; Wang, Tong-Mei; Tu, Ching-Yu; Lin, Li-Deh

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes and evaluates a method of arranging artificial teeth in patients with an abnormal jaw relationship in which a wider maxillary arch opposes a narrower mandibular arch. First, the fossa of mandibular posterior teeth was positioned on the crest of the mandibular edentulous ridge. The maxillary posterior teeth were then placed palatally to maximize occlusal contacts with the opposing mandibular teeth. Finally, acrylic resin tooth veneers were attached on the buccal surface of posterior maxillary teeth to improve the arch discrepancy. This method addresses functional considerations with the inner aspect of teeth and esthetic considerations with acrylic resin tooth veneers.

  6. Comparative evaluation of color change between two types of acrylic resin and flexible resin after thermo cycling. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hatim, Nadira A; Al-Tahho, Omar Zeno

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of the effect of different beverages (tea with sugar, coffee with sugar, and Pepsi), and immersion time cycles (2, 4, and 12 weeks) on color change property, and dimensional change of Vertex Dental BV, Netherlands heat cured acrylic resin, recently modified Vertex Dental BV, Netherlands heat cured acrylic resin with additive (20 % banana oil), and Valplast(®) flexible resin (FR) denture base materials by using artificial saliva cycle. The total samples of this study for color, and dimensional changes were 360 samples, divided into three groups according to the type of the material, Vertex Dental BV, Netherlands heat cured acrylic resin, modified heat cured acrylic resin (Vertex with additive 20 % banana oil), and Valplast(®) FR groups, each group contains 120 samples. The thermal cycling used in this study was as follows: The samples were incubated in distilled water at 37 ± 1 °C for 2 days for conditioning. Then, the samples were immersed in beverage solutions for 10 min daily at 50 ± 1 °C temperature for tea, and coffee with sugar, while for Pepsi at 20 ± 1 °C. Then, the samples were immersed in artificial saliva at 37 ± 1 °C for 5 h, and 10 min. This cycle was repeated three times daily, and then the samples were immersed in distilled water at 22 ± 2 °C room temperature for 8 h at night. This cycle was repeated for 2, 4, and 12 weeks. At the end of each time period, the immersed samples were tested to evaluate the color change property. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and Duncan's multiple range tests were used to analyze the collected data. The results of this study showed that, in comparison between the materials at different times for colors L*a*b* properties, there were significant differences at P ≤ 0.05 except in color b* at 12 weeks, which showed no significant difference at P > 0.05 between materials. And there was a significant difference in dimensional change at P > 0.05 for different beverages

  7. Comparative evaluation of color change between two types of acrylic resin and flexible resin after thermo cycling. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hatim, Nadira A; Al-Tahho, Omar Zeno

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of the effect of different beverages (tea with sugar, coffee with sugar, and Pepsi), and immersion time cycles (2, 4, and 12 weeks) on color change property, and dimensional change of Vertex Dental BV, Netherlands heat cured acrylic resin, recently modified Vertex Dental BV, Netherlands heat cured acrylic resin with additive (20 % banana oil), and Valplast(®) flexible resin (FR) denture base materials by using artificial saliva cycle. The total samples of this study for color, and dimensional changes were 360 samples, divided into three groups according to the type of the material, Vertex Dental BV, Netherlands heat cured acrylic resin, modified heat cured acrylic resin (Vertex with additive 20 % banana oil), and Valplast(®) FR groups, each group contains 120 samples. The thermal cycling used in this study was as follows: The samples were incubated in distilled water at 37 ± 1 °C for 2 days for conditioning. Then, the samples were immersed in beverage solutions for 10 min daily at 50 ± 1 °C temperature for tea, and coffee with sugar, while for Pepsi at 20 ± 1 °C. Then, the samples were immersed in artificial saliva at 37 ± 1 °C for 5 h, and 10 min. This cycle was repeated three times daily, and then the samples were immersed in distilled water at 22 ± 2 °C room temperature for 8 h at night. This cycle was repeated for 2, 4, and 12 weeks. At the end of each time period, the immersed samples were tested to evaluate the color change property. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and Duncan's multiple range tests were used to analyze the collected data. The results of this study showed that, in comparison between the materials at different times for colors L*a*b* properties, there were significant differences at P ≤ 0.05 except in color b* at 12 weeks, which showed no significant difference at P > 0.05 between materials. And there was a significant difference in dimensional change at P > 0.05 for different beverages

  8. Effects of an acrylic resin tray on relative surface doses for 10 MV x ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.

    1980-09-01

    Relative surface doses (RSD) for 10 MV x rays were measured and analyzed with an acrylic resin block tray present in the beam. It was found that the secondary electron contamination becomes significant for large fields in isocentric set-ups. Medium and high Z filters are investigated and suggested to be used to reduce RSD.

  9. Shear bond strength between autopolymerizing acrylic resin and Co-Cr alloy using different primers.

    PubMed

    Sanohkan, Sasiwimol; Urapepon, Somchai; Harnirattisai, Choltacha; Sirisinha, Chakrit; Sunintaboon, Panya

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the shear bond strength between cobalt chromium alloy and autopolymerizing acrylic resin using experimental primers containing 5, 10, and 15 wt% of 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitic anhydride or 1, 2, and 3 wt% of 3-methacryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane comparison to 5 commercial primers (ML primers, Alloy primer, Metal/Zirconia primer, Monobond S, and Monobond plus). Sixty alloy specimens were sandblasted and treated with each primer before bonded with an acrylic resin. The control group was not primed. The shear bond strengths were tested and statistically compared. Specimens treated with commercial primers significantly increased the shear bond strength of acrylic resin to cobalt chromium alloy (p<0.05). The highest shear bond strength was found in the Alloy primer group. Among experimental group, using 10 wt% of 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitic anhydride -or 2 wt% of 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane enhanced highest shear bond strength. The experimental and commercial primers in this study all improved bonding of acrylic resin to cobalt chromium alloy.

  10. Effects of acrylic resin monomers on porcine coronary artery reactivity.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Worku; West, Daniel; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Pashley, David; Mozaffari, Mahmood S

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the reactivity of porcine coronary arteries under in vitro conditions following their exposure to methyl methacrylate (MMA) and hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) monomers. Confirming previous studies using rat aortas, both MMA and HEMA induced acute/direct relaxation of coronary ring preparations, which was partly dependent on the endothelium. With prolonged tissue exposure, both monomers caused time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of receptor-mediated contraction of the vascular smooth muscle caused by prostaglandin F2∝ (PGF2∝), with HEMA causing more inhibition than MMA. Hydroxyethyl methacrylate, but not MMA, also produced impairment of non-receptor-mediated contraction of the coronary smooth muscle induced by KCl. On the other hand, neither HEMA nor MMA altered relaxation of the smooth muscle produced by the direct-acting pharmacological agent, sodium nitroprusside (SNP). While exposure to HEMA impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation caused by bradykinin (BK), MMA markedly enhanced this endothelial-mediated response of the arteries. The enhanced endothelial response produced by MMA was linked to nitric oxide (NO) release. In conclusion, with prolonged tissue exposure, MMA causes less pronounced effects/adverse consequences on coronary smooth muscle function relative to the effect of HEMA, while enhancing vasorelaxation associated with release of NO from the endothelium. Accordingly, MMA-containing resin materials appear to be safer for human applications than materials containing HEMA.

  11. Evaluation of shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Ana Paula G. O.; Karam, Leandro Z.; Galvão, José R.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was evaluate the shrinkage polymerization and temperature of different acrylic resins used to splinting transfer copings in indirect impression technique. Two implants were placed in an artificial bone, with the two transfer copings joined with dental floss and acrylic resins; two dental resins are used. Measurements of deformation and temperature were performed with Fiber Braggs grating sensor for 17 minutes. The results revealed that one type of resin shows greater values of polymerization shrinkage than the other. Pattern resins did not present lower values of shrinkage, as usually reported by the manufacturer.

  12. The effect of flexible acrylic resin on masticatory muscle activity in implant-supported mandibular overdentures: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Background It is not yet clear from the current literature to what extent masticatory muscle activity is affected by the use of flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures. Objective To compare masticatory muscle activity between patients who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin and those who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from heat-cured conventional acrylic resin. Methods In this clinical trial, 12 completely edentulous patients were selected and randomly allocated into two equal treatment groups. Each patient in Group 1 received two implants to support a mandibular overdenture made of conventional acrylic resin. In Group 2, the patients received two implants to support mandibular overdentures constructed from “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin. The maxillary edentulous arch for patients in both groups was restored by conventional complete dentures. For all patients, masseter and temporalis muscle activity was evaluated using surface electromyography (sEMG). Results The results showed a significant decrease in masticatory muscle activity among patients with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin. Conclusion The use of “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures resulted in decreased masticatory muscle activity. PMID:26955445

  13. Coemulsion and electrodeposition properties of mixtures of cationic epoxy resin and cationic acrylic resin containing butoxymethylamide groups

    SciTech Connect

    Chinping Yang; Yahnhaur Chen . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-10-15

    Butyl acrylate, styrene, N,N-dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate, and N-(n-butoxy-methyl) acrylamide were copolymerized to prepare a cationic acrylic copolymer (I) containing butoxymethylamide groups. This copolymer can be mixed with an epoxy-amine adduct (II), acetic acid, and deionized water to form a coemulsion containing two cationic resins. The electrophoretic codeposition of the coemulsion and physical and chemical properties of the deposited film were investigated. The resin composition of film deposited from coemulsion was determined by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) quantitative analysis to study the coemulsion and electrophoretic codeposition behavior. The applicability of this two-component coemulsion in primer-surfacer (pricer) electrodeposition paint was also discussed. The results indicate that at any coemulsion resin composition the resin composition of electrodeposited film is almost equal to the coemulsion resin composition. The throwing power of emulsion increases with increasing applied voltage, as expected. However, the throwing power of coemulsion is almost equal to that of the II emulsion but greater than that of the I emulsion. Furthermore, all cured films derived from mixtures of I/II show excellent adhesive strength, good hardness, and high levels of salt spray resistance.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of a quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate-containing acrylic resin: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Si-ying; Tonggu, Lige; Niu, Li-na; Gong, Shi-qiang; Fan, Bing; Wang, Liguo; Zhao, Ji-hong; Huang, Cui; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2016-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate (QAMS)-containing acrylic resin demonstrated contact-killing antimicrobial ability in vitro after three months of water storage. The objective of the present double-blind randomised clinical trial was to determine the in vivo antimicrobial efficacy of QAMS-containing orthodontic acrylic by using custom-made removable retainers that were worn intraorally by 32 human subjects to create 48-hour multi-species plaque biofilms, using a split-mouth study design. Two control QAMS-free acrylic disks were inserted into the wells on one side of an orthodontic retainer, and two experimental QAMS-containing acrylic disks were inserted into the wells on the other side of the same retainer. After 48 hours, the disks were retrieved and examined for microbial vitality using confocal laser scanning microscopy. No harm to the oral mucosa or systemic health occurred. In the absence of carry-across effect and allocation bias (disks inserted in the left or right side of retainer), significant difference was identified between the percentage kill in the biovolume of QAMS-free control disks (3.73 ± 2.11%) and QAMS-containing experimental disks (33.94 ± 23.88%) retrieved from the subjects (P ≤ 0.001). The results validated that the QAMS-containing acrylic exhibits favourable antimicrobial activity against plaque biofilms in vivo. The QAMS-containing acrylic may also be used for fabricating removable acrylic dentures. PMID:26903314

  15. Antimicrobial activity of a quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate-containing acrylic resin: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si-ying; Tonggu, Lige; Niu, Li-na; Gong, Shi-qiang; Fan, Bing; Wang, Liguo; Zhao, Ji-hong; Huang, Cui; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2016-02-23

    Quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate (QAMS)-containing acrylic resin demonstrated contact-killing antimicrobial ability in vitro after three months of water storage. The objective of the present double-blind randomised clinical trial was to determine the in vivo antimicrobial efficacy of QAMS-containing orthodontic acrylic by using custom-made removable retainers that were worn intraorally by 32 human subjects to create 48-hour multi-species plaque biofilms, using a split-mouth study design. Two control QAMS-free acrylic disks were inserted into the wells on one side of an orthodontic retainer, and two experimental QAMS-containing acrylic disks were inserted into the wells on the other side of the same retainer. After 48 hours, the disks were retrieved and examined for microbial vitality using confocal laser scanning microscopy. No harm to the oral mucosa or systemic health occurred. In the absence of carry-across effect and allocation bias (disks inserted in the left or right side of retainer), significant difference was identified between the percentage kill in the biovolume of QAMS-free control disks (3.73 ± 2.11%) and QAMS-containing experimental disks (33.94 ± 23.88%) retrieved from the subjects (P ≤ 0.001). The results validated that the QAMS-containing acrylic exhibits favourable antimicrobial activity against plaque biofilms in vivo. The QAMS-containing acrylic may also be used for fabricating removable acrylic dentures.

  16. Evaluation of the surface roughness of three heat-cured acrylic denture base resins with different conventional lathe polishing techniques: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Duggineni Chalapathi; Kalavathy, N.; Mohammad, H. S.; Hariprasad, A.; Kumar, C. Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Surface roughness promotes adhesion and colonization of denture plaque. Therefore, it is important to know the effects of polishing and finishing on the surface roughness of various acrylic resin materials. Objectives: To evaluate and compare the effects of different conventional lathe polishing techniques on heat cured acrylic resins in producing surface roughness. Materials and Methods: Three different commercially available heat-cured acrylic resin materials namely DPI, Meliodent and Trevalon Hi were selected. 30 Specimens of each acrylic material (30 x 3 = 90, 10 x 60 x 2mm) were prepared and divided into 5 groups, each group consisted of 6 Nos. of specimens per material(6x3=18) and were grouped as Group A(unfinished), Group B (finished), Group C (Polishing Paste), Group D (Polishing Cake) and Group E (Pumice and Gold rouge). The resulted surface roughness (μm) was measured using Perthometer and observed under Scanning Electron Microscope. The values obtained were subjected statistical analyses. Results: Among the materials tested, better results were obtained with Trevalon Hi followed by Meliodent and DPI. Among the polishing methods used, superior results were obtained with universal polishing paste followed by polishing cake; Pumice and Gold rouge. Although Pumice and Gold rouge values produced greater roughness value, they were well within the threshold value of 0.2 mm. PMID:26929542

  17. Epoxy and acrylate stereolithography resins: In-situ measurements of cure shrinkage and stress relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Chambers, R.S.; Hinnerichs, T.D.; McCarty, G.D.; Shagam, R.N.

    1995-03-01

    Cross-sections of resin strands. Techniques were developed to make in situ measurements of gelled resin to determine linear shrinkage, stress-strain response and stress relaxation of single strands of SL 5170 epoxy and SL 5149 photocurable resins. Epoxy strands shrank approximately 1.4% and the acrylate strands about 1.0% after a single exposure. No forces were measured during cure shrinkage of strands following the first laser exposure. In multiple laser exposures, the acrylate continues to shrink; whereas (University of Dayton data) no additional shrinkage is observed in epoxy strands on a second hit. In force relaxation tests, a strand is drawn and then a 0.5% step strain is applied after different elapsed times. The epoxy initial modulus evolves (increases) with elapsed time following draw of the strand, and this evolution in modulus occurs after linear shrinkage has stopped. On the other hand, acrylates show no evolution of modulus with elapsed time following a single laser draw; i.e., once shrinkage stops after one laser hit, the initial modulus remains stable with elapsed time. Finally, relaxation response times of epoxy strands get larger with increasing elapsed time after laser draw. In acrylate strands there was no evolution in initial modulus with elapsed time after a single draw so relaxation times are not a function of elapsed time after a single hit with the laser.

  18. Radioluminescence of polyester resin modified with acrylic acid and its salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalińska, H.; Wypych, M.; Pietrzak, M.; Szadkowska-Nicze, M.

    Polimal-109 polyester resin and its compounds containing acrylic acid and its salts such as: sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, barium, iron, cobalt, copper and manganese acrylates were studied by the radioluminescence method, including isothermal luminescence (ITL) at a radiation temperature of 77 K, thermoluminescence (RTL) and spectral distributions of isothermal luminescence. Measurements of optical absorption at 77 K before and after irradiation of the investigated samples were also carried out. The results obtained have shown that metal ions play a significant part in the processes taking place in the polyester matrix under the influence of γ 60Co radiation.

  19. Effect of different chemical disinfectants on the flexural strength of heat-polymerized acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Savabi, O; Attar, K; Nejatidanesh, F; Goroohi, H; Badrian, H

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of chemical disinfectants on flexural strength of denture base acrylic resins. A total of 176 rectangular specimens (65x10x3 mm) were made from four heat-polymerized acrylic resins (Triplex,QC-20, Meliodent and Acropars) (n=44). The specimens were thermal cycled for 5000 cycles 5-55 degrees C and randomly divided into four groups (n=11). The specimens were immersed in 1% sodium hypochlorite, 2% glutaraldehyde, 10% Micro 10 or water for 30 minutes. The flexural strength was evaluated using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were subjected to 2-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD (alpha=0.05). The highest flexural strengths of denture base resins were achieved after immersion in water (Triplex=128.9+/-12.8, QC-20=125+/-11.8, Meliodent=96.2+/-11.4 and Acropars=78.1+/-12.3 MPa). Triplex and QC-20 showed the highest flexural strengths in all of the solutions (P<0.05). The flexural strength of denture base acrylic resins was significantly affected by immersion in disinfection solutions but the reduction in flexural strengths of Triplex, QC-20 and Meliodent after disinfection by %1 sodium hypochlorite, %2 glutaraldhyde and Micro 10 were clinically insignificant.

  20. Effect of different solutions on color stability of acrylic resin-based dentures.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Nóbrega, Adhara Smith; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Andreotti, Agda Marobo; Moreno, Amália

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermocycling and immersion in mouthwash or beverage solutions on the color stability of four different acrylic resin-based dentures (Onda Cryl, OC; QC20, QC; Classico, CL; and Lucitone, LU). The factors evaluated were type of acrylic resin, immersion time, and solution (mouthwash or beverage). A total of 224 denture samples were fabricated. For each type of resin, eight samples were immersed in mouthwashes (Plax-Colgate, PC; Listerine, LI; and Oral-B, OB), beverages (coffee, CP; cola, C; and wine, W), and artificial saliva (AS; control). The color change (DE) was evaluated before (baseline) and after thermocycling (T1), and after immersion in solution for 1 h (T2), 3 h (T3), 24 h (T4), 48 h (T5), and 96 h (T6). The CIE Lab system was used to determine the color changes. The thermocycling test was performed for 5000 cycles. Data were submitted to three-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p<0.05). When the samples were immersed in each mouthwash, all assessed factors, associated or not, significantly influenced the color change values, except there was no association between the mouthwash and acrylic resin. Similarly, when the samples were immersed in each beverage, all studied factors influenced the color change values. In general, regardless of the solution, LU exhibited the greatest DE values in the period from T1 to T5; and QC presented the greatest DE values at T6. Thus, thermocycling and immersion in the various solutions influenced the color stability of acrylic resins and QC showed the greatest color alteration.

  1. Effect of fabrication process on the bond strength between silicone elastomer and acrylic resin for maxillofacial prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Mariko; Sumita, Yuka I; Muthiah, Lovely; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Aimaijiang, Yiliyaer; Yoshi, Shigen; Taniguchi, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the fabrication process on tensile bond strength between maxillofacial silicone elastomer and acrylic resin. A common maxillofacial silicone elastomer (VST-50), two primers (Sofreliner primer and R-SI-LINE Plasticbond), and two acrylic resins (Unifast III and Palapress Vario) were selected. Silicone elastomer between primed acrylic resin plates were polymerized using a metal flask mold or a flaskless stone mold. Bond strength of the specimens was measured by a tensile test and analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey's honest significant difference test. All fracture surfaces showed interfacial fracture. Both the fabrication process and the primer-acrylic resin combination affected bond strength, and two-way ANOVA indicated a significant interaction. Bond strength was generally greater when silicone elastomer was polymerized using a flaskless stone mold.

  2. Differential scanning calorimetric study of acrylic resin powders used in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, A; Imai, Y

    2000-12-01

    The thermal behavior of eight dental acrylic resin powders was studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In addition, high performance liquid chromatography was performed to supplement the DSC analysis. The HPLC analysis revealed that the contents of residual monomers and benzoyl peroxide (BPO) in the powders were 0.01-0.97 mass% and 0.25-1.28 mass%, respectively. All the resin powders produced one broad exothermic peak, while a mixture of BPO and PMMA powders generated two peaks. One peak pattern was assigned to the decomposition of BPO included within the polymer particles. The results suggested that BPO was present inside the particles and little BPO was mixed into the resin powders. Moreover, the present study demonstrated a unique useability of DSC in characterizing resin powders.

  3. Time-related surface modification of denture base acrylic resin treated by atmospheric pressure cold plasma.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun; Pan, Hong; Li, Yinglong; Wang, Guomin; Zhang, Jue; Pan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The changes of denture base acrylic resin surface properties under cold plasma and the relationships with time were investigated. Cold plasma treated the specimens for 30 s, 60 s, 90 s, and 120 s, respectively. Water contact angles were measured immediately after the treatment, 48 h, 15 days and 30 days later. Surface roughness was measured with 3-D laser scanning microscope. Candida albicans adherence was evaluated by CFU counting. Chemical composition was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Water contact angle reduced after treated for 30 s. No changes were observed with time prolonged, except the durability. There were no differences in roughness among all groups. However, treatment groups showed significantly lower C. albicans adherence. XPS demonstrated a decrease in C/O, and this reduction was affected by treatment time. Cold plasma was an effective means of increasing hydrophilicity of acrylic resin and reducing C. albicans adherence without affecting physical properties.

  4. Loosening torque of prosthetic screws in metal-ceramic or metal-acrylic resin implant-supported dentures with different misfit levels.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Ataís; Paludo, Litiane; Ferraz Mesquita, Marcelo; Schuh, Christian; Federizzi, Leonardo; Oro Spazzin, Aloísio

    2013-04-26

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the prosthesis material (metal-acrylic resin or metal-ceramic) on loosening torque of the prosthetic screws in an implant-supported mandibular denture under two levels of vertical misfit. Ten frameworks were fabricated with commercially pure titanium, and five of them received acrylic resin and acrylic artificial teeth as veneering material and the other five were veneered with porcelain. Two levels of vertical fit were also created by fabricating 20 cast models to obtain four experimental groups according to the prosthesis material and misfit: Group 1 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a passive fit); Group 2 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a non-passive fit); Group 3 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a passive fit); and Group 4 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a non-passive fit). Two hundred prosthetic titanium-alloy screws were divided in 40 sets (five screws per set, n=10). After 24h, the loosening torque of the screws was evaluated using a digital torque meter. The results were submitted to two-way ANOVA analysis of variance followed by a Tukey's test (α=0.05). The mean values and standard deviations for each group were G1=7.05 (1.64), G2=5.52 (0.90), G3=6.46 (1.34), and G4=4.35 (0.99). Overall, the prosthesis material and misfit factors showed a statistically significant influence on the loosening torque (p<0.05). Metal-ceramic prosthesis and misfits decreased the loosening of the torque of the prosthetic screws.

  5. Fabrication of a fixed provisional restoration utilizing a light-curing acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, R D

    1992-06-01

    The properly fabricated provisional restoration must take into account the following interrelated factors: pulpal protection, periodontal health, occlusion, esthetics, and phonetics. The techniques advocated for construction of a provisional restoration include direct, indirect, and a combination of direct and indirect techniques. Two simple techniques that use light-curing acrylic resin for the fabrication of fixed provisional restorations are presented, and advantages and disadvantages of these techniques are discussed.

  6. Effect of sodium bicarbonate on Candida albicans adherence to thermally activated acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Fernando Augusto Cervantes Garcia de; Paradella, Thaís Cachuté; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 5% sodium bicarbonate on the adherence of Candida albicans to thermally activated acrylic resin. Fifty 4 mm(2) specimens of acrylic resin were obtained using a metallic matrix. The specimens received chemical polishing, were sterilized and then immersed in Sabouraud broth, inoculated with Candida albicans standardized suspension. After 24 hours of incubation at 37 degrees Celsius, the specimens were divided into four groups according to the substance used for disinfection (5% sodium bicarbonate, 0.12% digluconate chlorhexidine, vinegar and Corega Tabs). A control group was included, in which distilled water was used. The adhered microorganisms were dispersed, diluted and plated onto culture media to determine the number of colony-forming units (cfu/mL). The results were analyzed through the Mann-Whitney statistical test at the 5% level of significance. Only 0.12% digluconate chlorhexidine and 5% sodium bicarbonate presented a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0156, respectively) compared to the control group, decreasing the number of cfu/mL. However, when the different disinfecting solutions were compared with each other, only 0.12% digluconate chlorhexidine presented a statistically significant difference in the reduction of cfu/mL. It was concluded that although 0.12% digluconate chlorhexidine was more effective in the reduction of Candida albicans adherence values to thermally activated acrylic resin, 5% sodium bicarbonate also proved to be a viable alternative. PMID:20027444

  7. Synthesis and molecular characterization of acrylate liquid crystalline resin monomers (ALCRM).

    PubMed

    He, X P; Cai, W; Guo, L; Zhou, L Z; Nie, M H

    2015-01-01

    A novel biocompatible resin monomer 4—3—(acryloyloxy)—2—hydroxypropoxy) phenyl 4—(3—(acryloyloxy)—2—hydroxypropoxy) benzoate, as an oral restorative — acrylate liquid crystalline resin monomer (ALCRM) was synthesized. The intermediate product and the final product were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized optical microscope (POM), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). A resin matrix which has a potential application in dental composites was prepared by photopolymerizing ALCRM and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) as a primary and diluted monomer with a photosensitizer of camphorquinone (CQ) and 2—(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) mixture. The molar ratio of ALCRM and TEGDMA was 7:3. The properties such as the curing depth, curing time, and the volumetric shrinkage of the resin matrix were investigated and compared with a traditional composite resin matrix Bis—GMA. After photocuring polymerization, the conversion degree of the resin matrix is 68.06%, higher than Bis—GMA/TEGDMA; the curing time is 4.08±0.20min, the curing depth is 2.10±0.17mm, and the volumetric shrinkage is 3.62%±0.26%. All the properties exhibit a better performance of the prepared resin matrix than Bis—GMA. PMID:26475389

  8. Effect of light-curing, pressure, oxygen inhibition, and heat on shear bond strength between bis-acryl provisional restoration and bis-acryl repair materials

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ji-Suk; Lee, Jeong-Yol; Choi, Yeon-Jo; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to discover a way to increase the bond strength between bis-acryl resins, using a comparison of the shear bond strengths attained from bis-acryl resins treated with light curing, pressure, oxygen inhibition, and heat. MATERIALS AND METHODS Self-cured bis-acryl resin was used as both a base material and as a repair material. Seventy specimens were distributed into seven groups according to treatment methods: pressure - stored in a pressure cooker at 0.2 Mpa; oxygen inhibition- applied an oxygen inhibitor around the repaired material,; heat treatment - performed heat treatment in a dry oven at 60℃, 100℃, or 140℃. The shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine, and the shear bond strength (MPa) was calculated from the peak load of failure. A comparison of the bond strength between the repaired specimens was conducted using one-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (α=.05). RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in the shear bond strength between the control group and the light curing, pressure, and oxygen inhibition groups. However, the heat treatment groups showed statistically higher bond strengths than the groups treated without heat, and the groups treated at a higher temperature resulted in higher bond strengths. Statistically significant differences were seen between groups after different degrees of heat treatment, except in groups heated at 100℃ and 140℃. CONCLUSION Strong bonding can be achieved between a bis-acryl base and bis-acryl repair material after heat treatment. PMID:25722837

  9. Effect of Silver Nano-particles on Tensile Strength of Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Tahereh; Hamedi-rad, Fahimeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is widely used for the fabrication of removable prostheses. Silver nano-particles (AgNps) have been added to PMMA because of their antimicrobial properties, but their effect on the mechanical properties of PMMA is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AgNps on the tensile strength of PMMA. Materials and methods. For this study, 12 specimens were prepared and divided into two groups. Group 1 included PMMA without AgNps and group 2 included PMMA mixed with 5 wt% of AgNps. Tensile strength of the specimens was measured by Zwick Z100 apparatus. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS using t-test. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results. This study showed that the mean tensile strength of PMMA in group 2 was significantly lower than that in group 1. Therefore, the tensile strength decreased significantly after incorporation of silver nano-particles. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, tensile strength of acrylic resin specimens was influenced by silver nano-particles. PMID:25973153

  10. Effect of water-aging on the antimicrobial activities of an ORMOSIL-containing orthodontic acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shi-Qiang; Epasinghe, D Jeevanie; Zhou, Bin; Niu, Li-Na; Kimmerling, Kirk A; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Mao, Jing; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2013-06-01

    Quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate (QAMS), an organically modified silicate (ORMOSIL) functionalized with polymerizable methacrylate groups and an antimicrobial agent with a long lipophilic alkyl chain quaternary ammonium group, was synthesized through a silane-based sol-gel route. By dissolving QAMS in methyl methacrylate monomer, this ORMOSIL molecule was incorporated into an auto-polymerizing, powder/liquid orthodontic acrylic resin system, yielding QAMS-containing poly(methyl methacrylate). The QAMS-containing acrylic resin showed a predominant contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 35668) and Actinomyces naeslundii (ATCC 12104) biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans (ATCC 90028) on the acrylic surface. The antimicrobial activities of QAMS-containing acrylic resin were maintained after a 3month water-aging period. Bromophenol blue assay showed minimal leaching of quaternary ammonium species when an appropriate amount of QAMS (<4wt.%) was incorporated into the acrylic resin. The results suggest that QAMS is predominantly co-polymerized with the poly(methyl methacrylate) network, and only a minuscule amount of free QAMS molecules is present within the polymer network after water-aging. Acrylic resin with persistent antimicrobial activities represents a promising method for preventing bacteria- and fungus-induced stomatitis, an infectious disease commonly associated with the wearing of removable orthodontic appliances.

  11. Effect of water-aging on the antimicrobial activities of an ORMOSIL-containing orthodontic acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shi-qiang; Epasinghe, D. Jeevanie; Zhou, Bin; Niu, Li-na; Kimmerling, Kirk A.; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Mao, Jing; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate (QAMS), an organically modified silicate (ORMOSIL) functionalized with polymerizable methacrylate groups and an antimicrobial agent with a long lipophilic alkyl chain quaternary ammonium group, was synthesized through a silane-based sol–gel route. By dissolving QAMS in methyl methacrylate monomer, this ORMOSIL molecule was incorporated into an auto-polymerizing, powder/liquid orthodontic acrylic resin system, yielding QAMS-containing poly (methyl methacrylate). The QAMS-containing acrylic resin showed a predominant contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 35668) and Actinomyces naeslundii (ATCC 12104) biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans (ATCC 90028) on the acrylic surface. The antimicrobial activities of QAMS-containing acrylic resin were maintained after a 3 month water-aging period. Bromophenol blue assay showed minimal leaching of quaternary ammonium species when an appropriate amount of QAMS (<4 wt.%) was incorporated into the acrylic resin. The results suggest that QAMS is predominantly co-polymerized with the poly(methyl methacrylate) network, and only a minuscule amount of free QAMS molecules is present within the polymer network after water-aging. Acrylic resin with persistent antimicrobial activities represents a promising method for preventing bacteria- and fungus-induced stomatitis, an infectious disease commonly associated with the wearing of removable orthodontic appliances. PMID:23485857

  12. Bonding of acrylic denture teeth to resin denture bases.

    PubMed

    Geerts, G A V M; Stuhlinger, M E

    2012-07-01

    Anterior teeth debonding from dentures is a common problem. This study tested the bond strength of denture teeth to two types of denture resin, with and without grooving the ridge-lap surface. Bond strength and fracture type of three different groups were compared: 1. Teeth bonded to heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA); 2. Teeth bonded to pour-type PMMA; 3. Grooved teeth bonded to pour-type PMMA. Specimens were manufactured following ISO standard 22112. Force values at failure were analysed using one-way analysis of variance, using the mixed procedure with confidence interval of 95%. Types of failure were identified as adhesive, cohesive or combination. In descending order, mean failure forces were 418.55N (Group One), 367.55N (Group Two) and 290.05N (Group Three). There was no significant difference between the means of groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.0627). Group Three differed from both other groups (p < 0.001). Groups One and Two showed predominantly cohesive fractures wthin denture teeth (83% and 72% respectively); group Three showed predominantly cohesive fractures within the denture PMMA (75%). Without ridge-lap modification, the bond strengths of denture teeth to pour-type and heat-cured denture resin were similar. Failures were predominantly of cohesive nature within the teeth themselves. Grooving the ridge-lap reduced fracture resistance and led to breakages predominantly in denture PMMA.

  13. The effect of powder/liquid mixing ratio on the stiffness and impact strength of autopolymerising dental acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Syme, V J; Lamb, D J; Lopattananon, N; Ellis, B; Jones, F R

    2001-06-01

    The stiffness of representative cured autopolymerising dental acrylic resins was determined by calculation of a secant modulus from measurements in tension of load and extension, and related to the powder/liquid mixing ratio. The impact strengths of autopolymerising, heat-cure and commercial resins were compared. It was found that while the stiffness of autopolymerising resins was unaffected by variations in powder/liquid mixing ratio, extension to failure was greater with lower powder/liquid ratios. The impact strength of autopolymerising resins was found to be greater than that of heat-cure resins, and a tentative explanation is offered. These findings may help to explain the pattern of failure of acrylic resin denture bases.

  14. Coating compositions for solar selective absorption comprising a thermosetting acrylic resin and particles of a low molecular weight fluorocarbon polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, M.; Fukuda, H.; Sano, S.

    1984-01-17

    A coating composition for solar selective absorption comprising, in solvent, particles of an inorganic black pigment dispersed in a dissolved binder of a thermosetting acrylic resin and particles of a low molecular weight fluorocarbon resin contained in an amount of 5-15 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of the acrylic resin. The inorganic black particles have a size of 0.01-0.5 microns and are contained in an amount of 45-65 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of the acrylic resin. An article having a metal substrate and a paint film formed thereon from the composition in a dry thickness of 1.5 microns or more is also described.

  15. PERMEATION OF MULTIFUNCTIONAL ACRYLATES THROUGH SELECTED PROTECTIVE GLOVE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the Premanufacture Notification (PMN) program of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Toxic Substances, the resistance of three glove materials to permeation by multifunctional acrylate compounds was evaluated through a program for the Office of Research ...

  16. Antimicrobial properties of poly (methyl methacrylate) acrylic resins incorporated with silicon dioxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on cariogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sodagar, Ahmad; Khalil, Soufia; Kassaee, Mohammad Zaman; Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar; Pourakbari, Babak; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess the effects of adding nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) and nano-silicon dioxide (nano-SiO2) and their mixture to poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to induce antimicrobial activity in acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: Acrylic specimens in size of 20 mm × 20 mm × 1 mm of 0.5% and 1% of nano-TiO2 (21 nm) and nano-SiO2 (20 nm) and their mixture (TiO2/SiO2 nanoparticles) (1:1 w/w) were prepared from the mixture of acrylic liquid containing nanoparticles and acrylic powder. To obtain 0.5% and 1% concentration, 0.02 g and 0.04 g of the nanoparticles was added to each milliliter of the acrylic monomer, respectively. Antimicrobial properties of six specimens of these preparations, as prepared, were assessed against planktonic Lactobacillus acidophilus and Streptococcus mutans at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 min follow-up by broth dilution assay. The specimens of each group were divided into three subgroups: Dark, daylight, or ultraviolet A (UVA). The percent of bacterial reduction is found out from the counts taken at each time point. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc analysis. Results: Exposure to PMMA containing the nanoparticles reduced the bacterial count by 3.2–99%, depending on the nanoparticles, bacterial types, and light conditions. Planktonic cultures of S. mutans and L. acidophilus exposed to PMMA containing 1% of TiO2/SiO2 nanoparticles showed a significant decrease (P < 0.001) (98% and 99%, respectively) in a time-dependent manner under UVA. The S. mutans and L. acidophilus counts did not significantly decrease in PMMA containing 0.5% nano-TiO2 and PMMA containing 0.5% nano-SiO2 in the dark. No statistically significant reduction (P > 0.05) was observed in the counts of S. mutans and L. acidophilus in PMMA without the nanoparticles exposed to UVA. Conclusions: PMMA resins incorporated with TiO2/SiO2 nanoparticles showed strong antimicrobial activity against the cariogenic

  17. The Influence of Polymerization Type and Reinforcement Method on Flexural Strength of Acrylic Resin

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Kasuya, Amanda Vessoni Barbosa; Favarão, Isabella Negro; Naves, Lucas Zago; Hoeppner, Márcio Grama

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength of acrylic resin bars by varying the types of resin polymerization and reinforcement methods. Fourteen groups (N = 10) were created by the interaction of factors in study: type of resin (self-cured (SC) or heat-cured (HC)) and reinforcement method (industrialized glass fiber (Ind), unidirectional glass fiber (Uni), short glass fiber (Short), unidirectional and short glass fiber (Uni-Short), thermoplastic resin fiber (Tpl), and steel wire (SW)). Reinforced bars (25 × 2 × 2 mm) were tested in flexural strength (0.5 mm/min) and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data (MPa) were submitted to factorial analysis, ANOVA, and Tukey and T-student tests (a = 5%) showing significant interaction (P = 0.008), for SC: Uni (241.71 ± 67.77)a, Uni-Short (221.05 ± 71.97)a, Ind (215.21 ± 46.59)ab, SW (190.51 ± 31.49)abc, Short (156.31 ± 28.76)bcd, Tpl (132.51 ± 20.21)cd, Control SC (101.47 ± 19.79)d and for HC: Ind (268.93 ± 105.65)a, Uni (215.14 ± 67.60)ab, Short (198.44 ± 95.27)abc, Uni-Short (189.56 ± 92.27)abc, Tpl (161.32 ± 62.51)cd, SW (106.69 ± 28.70)cd, and Control HC (93.39 ± 39.61)d. SEM analysis showed better fiber-resin interaction for HC. Nonimpregnated fibers, irrespective of their length, tend to improve fracture strength of acrylics. PMID:25879079

  18. The influence of polymerization type and reinforcement method on flexural strength of acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Kasuya, Amanda Vessoni Barbosa; Favarão, Isabella Negro; Naves, Lucas Zago; Hoeppner, Márcio Grama

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength of acrylic resin bars by varying the types of resin polymerization and reinforcement methods. Fourteen groups (N=10) were created by the interaction of factors in study: type of resin (self-cured (SC) or heat-cured (HC)) and reinforcement method (industrialized glass fiber (Ind), unidirectional glass fiber (Uni), short glass fiber (Short), unidirectional and short glass fiber (Uni-Short), thermoplastic resin fiber (Tpl), and steel wire (SW)). Reinforced bars (25×2×2 mm) were tested in flexural strength (0.5 mm/min) and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data (MPa) were submitted to factorial analysis, ANOVA, and Tukey and T-student tests (a=5%) showing significant interaction (P=0.008), for SC: Uni (241.71±67.77)a, Uni-Short (221.05±71.97)a, Ind (215.21±46.59)ab, SW (190.51±31.49)abc, Short (156.31±28.76)bcd, Tpl (132.51±20.21)cd, Control SC (101.47±19.79)d and for HC: Ind (268.93±105.65)a, Uni (215.14±67.60)ab, Short (198.44±95.27)abc, Uni-Short (189.56±92.27)abc, Tpl (161.32±62.51)cd, SW (106.69±28.70)cd, and Control HC (93.39±39.61)d. SEM analysis showed better fiber-resin interaction for HC. Nonimpregnated fibers, irrespective of their length, tend to improve fracture strength of acrylics.

  19. Bond strength of acrylic teeth to denture base resin after various surface conditioning methods before and after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Guilherme; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Leite, Fabiola Pessoa Pereira; Amaral, Regina; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco A; Kimpara, Estevão T

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the durability of adhesion between acrylic teeth and denture base acrylic resin. The base surfaces of 24 acrylic teeth were flatted and submitted to 4 surface treatment methods: SM1 (control): No SM; SM2: application of a methyl methacrylate-based bonding agent (Vitacol); SM3: air abrasion with 30-microm silicone oxide plus silane; SM4: SM3 plus SM2. A heat-polymerized acrylic resin was applied to the teeth. Thereafter, bar specimens were produced for the microtensile test at dry and thermocyled conditions (60 days water storage followed by 12,000 cycles). The results showed that bond strength was significantly affected by the SM (P < .0001) (SM4 = SM2 > SM3 > SM1) and storage regimens (P < .0001) (dry > thermocycled). The methyl methacrylate-based adhesive showed the highest bond strength. PMID:17455445

  20. Comparative failure load values of acrylic resin denture teeth bonded to three different heat cure denture base resins: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Phukela, Sumit Singh; Dua, Amit; Dua, Mahima; Sehgal, Varun; Setya, Gaurav; Dhall, Rupinder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: Acrylic teeth are used for fabrication of dentures. Debonding of tooth – denture base bond is routine problem in dental practice. The aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate failure load of acrylic resin denture teeth bonded to three different heat resin. Materials and Methods: Four groups were created out of test samples central incisors (11). Group I: Control, whereas Group II, Group III and Group IV were experimental groups modified with diatoric hole, cingulum ledge lock and Teeth modified with both diatoric hole and cingulum ledge lock, respectively. These test specimens with 3 teeth (2 central [11, 21] and 1, lateral [12] incisors) positioned imitating arrangement of teeth in the conventional denture, prepared by three different heat cure materials (DPI, Trevalon, Acralyn-H). A shear load was applied at cingulum of central incisor (11) at 130° to its long axis using universal tester at a cross head speed of 5 mm/min until failure occurred. Failure load test was conducted and statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 16 software package (IBM Company, New York, U.S). Results: Highest failure load was seen in Group IV specimens, prepared by Trevalon but did not significantly differ from that of DPI. Conclusion: The failure load of bonding denture teeth to three different heat cure materials was notably affected by modifications of ridge lap before processing. The specimens with a combination of diatoric hole and cingulum ledge lock, prepared by Trevalon showed highest failure load but did not significantly vary from that of DPI. The control group prepared by Acralyn-H showed lowest failure load but did not significantly differ from that of DPI. PMID:27195221

  1. Effects of Sonication Conditions on Ultrasonic Dispersion of Inorganic Particles in Acrylic Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuziuti, Toru; Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-07-01

    The effects of sonication conditions on the ultrasonic dispersion of titanium dioxide particles in acrylic resin are investigated. Pulsing operation at appropriate on-off duty cycles enables us to attain a particle size smaller than that at a continuous wave (CW) at the same net time of sonication between operations. It is useful that frequency-sweep operation attains almost the same particle size as that at CW, which can provide a constant dispersion of particles even if the resonant frequency used to effectively drive an ultrasonic transducer changes with liquid conditions, such as the temperature and acoustic impedance of a liquid.

  2. The dimensional accuracy of rectangular acrylic resin specimens cured by three denture base processing methods.

    PubMed

    Salim, S; Sadamori, S; Hamada, T

    1992-06-01

    The dimensional accuracy of rectangular acrylic resin specimens was examined when they were processed by three methods: a conventional method, the SR-Ivocap system, and a microwave curing method. The dimensional accuracy was evaluated by the change of the distance vector V, which is calculated by means of measurements of the distances between fixed points on specimens. The specimen cured by the SR-Ivocap system exhibited less dimensional change (p less than 0.05) than those cured by the conventional and the microwave curing methods. The SR-Ivocap system might produce a more accurate denture base than the conventional and the microwave curing methods.

  3. Cold plasma-induced surface modification of heat-polymerized acrylic resin and prevention of early adherence of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong; Wang, Guomin; Pan, Jie; Ye, Guopin; Sun, Ke; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure cold plasma was applied to process the surface of heat-polymerized acrylic resin. Changes to the physical properties and early adherence of Candida albicans were investigated. Alternating current cold plasma with Ar/O2 as working gas was used. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to study the possible mechanism. Experimental results showed that after plasma treatment, the contact angle of acrylic resin significantly decreased. There were no significant differences in roughness, flexural strength and elasticity modulus, but microhardness was significant improved in the treated group. More importantly, the early adherence of Candida albicans on the surface was reduced after plasma treatment. Cold plasma seemed to be a promising and convenient strategy of preventing the early adherence of Candida albicans on acrylic resins, which would greatly benefit potential dental applications.

  4. A technique to splint and verify the accuracy of implant impression copings with light-polymerizing acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Ignatovic, Jevgenija

    2014-03-01

    Transferring the implant position from the mouth to the definitive cast is one of the most critical steps in implant prosthodontics. To achieve a passive fit of the prosthesis, an accurate implant impression is crucial because discrepancies can induce both biologic and technical complications. Analysis of available research data suggests that a direct (pick-up) impression technique with splinted copings is the technique of choice, particularly for multiple implants. However, the traditional method of splinting the copings with autopolymerizing acrylic resin is a technique-sensitive and time- consuming procedure. This report describes a straightforward method of splinting impression copings with light-polymerizing acrylic resin, with minimal amount of autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The method also can be used to verify splinting accuracy.

  5. To evaluate and compare the porosities in the acrylic mandibular denture bases processed by two different polymerization techniques, using two different brands of commercially available denture base resins - an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kasina, Sitaram Prasad; Ajaz, Tarannum; Attili, Sirisha; Surapaneni, Hemchand; Cherukuri, Muralikrishna; Srinath, H P

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the porosities in the mandibular acrylic denture bases processed by heat and microwave polymerization techniques, using two different brands of commercially available denture base resins. Materials & Methods: Two brands of heat activated denture base resins, DPI plain and Acralyn H cross linked denture base resins designed for conventional water bath polymerization, were used to prepare 48 test specimens of mandibular acrylic denture bases. The test specimens were processed using one cycle of conventional water bath polymerization and one cycle of microwave polymerization. The absolute density of acrylic resin was used to calculate the percent mean porosity of each mandibular acrylic denture base by use of various equations. Results: Anova analysis reveals highly significant difference between mean percent porosity values of whole denture bases of all groups. Statistics reveals that heat polymerized groups have lesser mean percent porosity values than microwave polymerized groups. It also reveals that denture bases processed with Acralyn H cross linked denture base resin have lesser mean percent porosity values than denture bases processed with DPI Plain denture base resin. Conclusion: Specimens processed with Acralyn H cross linked denture base resin by conventional heat polymerization technique has the least mean percent porosity and specimens processed with DPI Plain denture base resin by microwave polymerization technique has the highest mean percent porosity. How to cite the article: Kasina SP, Ajaz T, Attili S, Surapaneni H, Cherukuri M, Srinath HP. To evaluate and compare the porosities in the acrylic mandibular denture bases processed by two different polymerization techniques, using two different brands of commercially available denture base resins - an in vitro study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):72-7. PMID:24653607

  6. The effect of time and storage environment on dimensional changes of acrylic resin post patterns.

    PubMed

    Sabouhi, Mahmoud; Nosouhian, Saied; Dakhilalian, Mansour; Davoudi, Amin; Mehrad, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Post and core are needed to regain retentions and functions after endodontic therapies. Also, risk of cross contamination from dental prosthesis is so high. The aim of this study was to compare dimensional changes of acrylic resin patterns (ARP) in three different storing environments. Materials and methods : conventional root canal therapy was done on one first premolar tooth and the canal filled with Guttapercha. 2/3 of the filling was expelled and 30 direct APRs were prepared by Duralay. The samples were divided into 3 groups based on storing environments: water, NaOCl 5% and air. Finally dimensional changes in coronoapical length (CAL), coronal (CD) and apical diameter (AD) of APRs were measured in 7 consecutive times (immediately after polymerization, 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48 hours later). All the data were analyzed by Paired T-test and Duncon test using SPSS software ver.13 at significant level of 0.05. Results : After 24 hours, the ARPs, which were stored in air, contracted 0.07, 0.06 and 0.12 mm in AD, CD and CAL; the ARPs, which were stored in water, showed 0.03, 0.06 and 0.12 mm decrease in AD, CD and CAL; But the ARPs, which were stored in NaOCl 5%, showed significant expansion in AD, CD and CAL (0.03, 0.06 and 0.10 mm) (all P values < 0.01). Conclusion : It is better not to use NaOCl for disinfecting; also the best time for storing APRs is 8 hours for water and 2 hours for air environments after setting time.

  7. Bond of acrylic teeth to different denture base resins after various surface-conditioning methods.

    PubMed

    Lang, Reinhold; Kolbeck, Carola; Bergmann, Rainer; Handel, Gerhard; Rosentritt, Martin

    2012-02-01

    The study examined the bond between different denture base resins and highly cross-linked acrylic denture teeth with different base surface-conditioning methods. One hundred fifty highly cross-linked resin denture teeth (SR-Antaris, No. 11, Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL) were divided into five groups with different surface-conditioning methods of the base surfaces of the teeth (C = control, no surface conditioning, MM = application of methyl methacrylate monomer, SB = sand blasting, SBB = sand blasting + bonding agent, TSS = tribochemical silica coating + silanization). Teeth were bonded to either a cold-cured denture base resin (ProBase Cold, Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL) or heat-cured denture base resins (SR Ivocap Plus, Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL and Lucitone 199, Dentsply, USA). After 24 h of storage in distilled water, compressive load was applied at 90° on the palatal surface of each tooth until fracture. Median failure load ranged between 103 and 257 N for Probase Cold groups, 91 to 261 N for Lucitone 199, and 149 to 320 N for SR Ivocap Plus. For Probase Cold, significant highest failure loads resulted when teeth were treated with SB, SBB, or TSS. For Lucitone 199, significant highest failure loads has been found with MM and TSS treatment. For SR Ivocap Plus, highest failure loads resulted using SBB and TSS. Conditioning of the base surfaces of the teeth prior to denture base processing is highly recommended. Tooth bond is significantly affected by the surface-conditioning method and applied denture base resin. Tribochemical silica coating + silanization method can be recommended for pre-treatment of teeth applying either heat-cured or cold-cured denture base resin.

  8. Influence of chemical and mechanical polishing on water sorption and solubility of denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Juliana Saab; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Nóbilo, Mauro Antonio Arruda

    2004-01-01

    Influence of polishing methods on water sorption and solubility of denture base acrylic resins was studied. Eighty samples were divided into groups: Classico (CL), and QC 20 (QC) - hot water bath cured; Acron MC (AC), and Onda Cryl (ON) - microwave cured; and submitted to mechanical polishing (MP) - pumice slurry, chalk powder, soft brush and felt cone in a bench vise; or chemical polishing (CP) - heated monomer fluid in a chemical polisher. The first desiccation process was followed by storage in distilled water at 37 +/- 1 degrees C for 1 h, 1 day, 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. Concluding each period, water sorption was measured. After the fourth week, a second desiccation process was done to calculate solubility. Data were submitted to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey test (pacrylic resins; initially, water sorption values were higher for chemically polished samples, however, after 4 weeks all groups were similar. PMID:15798828

  9. Influence of chemical and mechanical polishing on water sorption and solubility of denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Juliana Saab; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Nóbilo, Mauro Antonio Arruda

    2004-01-01

    Influence of polishing methods on water sorption and solubility of denture base acrylic resins was studied. Eighty samples were divided into groups: Classico (CL), and QC 20 (QC) - hot water bath cured; Acron MC (AC), and Onda Cryl (ON) - microwave cured; and submitted to mechanical polishing (MP) - pumice slurry, chalk powder, soft brush and felt cone in a bench vise; or chemical polishing (CP) - heated monomer fluid in a chemical polisher. The first desiccation process was followed by storage in distilled water at 37 +/- 1 degrees C for 1 h, 1 day, 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. Concluding each period, water sorption was measured. After the fourth week, a second desiccation process was done to calculate solubility. Data were submitted to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey test (pacrylic resins; initially, water sorption values were higher for chemically polished samples, however, after 4 weeks all groups were similar.

  10. [The evaluation of acrylic resins for the study of nondecalcified human teeth with the light and electronic microscopes].

    PubMed

    Botti, F; Martignoni, M; Scala, C; Cocchia, D

    1995-04-01

    Resin embedding of human teeth for light and transmission electron microscopic studies becomes difficult without previous decalcification. The limited and slow infiltration of the resin into hard tissues may cause problems during preparation and observation of the samples. Moreover the type of resin that is used may affect the morphologic preservation of both tissues and cellular elements. Recently there has been an increasing number of studies on the application of acrylic resins in light and electron microscopy, in order to overcome problems encountered with the use of epoxy resins still utilized in morphologic studies. We compared different acrylic resins (Technovit 7200 VLC, LR White, LR Gold, Bioacryl) in order to understand which one was more suitable for undecalcified human dental tissues under light and transmission electron microscope. Evaluation of such resins was performed using the following criteria: ease of cutting with ultramicrotome, soft and hard tissues infiltration, uptake of tissue stains for both light and electron microscopy, morphologic preservation and stability under electron beam. This study, carried out on the pulp area comprising predentin and dentin, showed excellent quality of Bioacryl and LR Gold, the two resins presenting, by far, the best results among all the different types tested. The optimal morphologic preservation obtained with such resins is indicated for light and electron microscopic studies, allowing their application in different fields of dental research.

  11. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2016-03-29

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer resin, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  12. The effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resin: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Anasane, Nayana; Ahirrao, Yogesh; Chitnis, Deepa; Meshram, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Denture fracture is an unresolved problem in complete denture prosthodontics. However, the repaired denture often experiences a refracture at the repaired site due to poor transverse strength. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint surface contours and glass fiber reinforcement on the transverse strength of repaired acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: A total of 135 specimens of heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate resin of dimensions 64 × 10 × 2.5 mm were fabricated. Fifteen intact specimens served as the control and 120 test specimens were divided into four groups (30 specimens each), depending upon the joint surface contour (butt, bevel, rabbet and round), with two subgroups based on type of the repair. Half of the specimens were repaired with plain repair resin and the other half with glass fibers reinforced repair resin. Transverse strength of the specimens was determined using three-point bending test. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test (α= 0.05). Results: Transverse strength values for all repaired groups were significantly lower than those for the control group (P < 0.001) (88.77 MPa), with exception of round surface design repaired with glass fiber reinforced repair resin (89.92 MPa) which was significantly superior to the other joint surface contours (P < 0.001). Glass fiber reinforced resin significantly improved the repaired denture base resins as compared to the plain repair resin (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Specimens repaired with glass fiber reinforced resin and round surface design exhibited highest transverse strength; hence, it can be advocated for repair of denture base resins. PMID:23946739

  13. Using Latex Balls and Acrylic Resin Plates to Investigate the Stacking Arrangement and Packing Efficiency of Metal Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohashi, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    A high-school third-year or undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing simple-cubic, face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, and hexagonal closest packing unit cells is presented. Latex balls and acrylic resin plates are employed to make each atomic arrangement. The volume of the vacant space in each cell is…

  14. The Effect of 3-Isocyanato-1-Propene on Adhesive Properties of UV-Curing Urethane/Siloxane Acrylate Resin.

    PubMed

    Chun, J H; Cheon, J M; Jeong, B Y; Jo, N J

    2016-03-01

    We synthesized the urethane/siloxane acrylate oligomer from isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI), hydroxyl alkyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane and 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (2-HEA). UV-curable resins were formulated from the synthesized oligomer, ethylene glycol phenyl ether acrylate (PHEA), 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate (HDDA), trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) as a reactive diluent, 3-isocyanato-1-propene as an adhesion promoter and photoinitiators. The PET film was treated with plasma in order to introduce the functional group on the PET surface and the functional group was observed through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR). The adhesion strength between the PET film and the UV-cured resin were increased by using the adhesion promoter. Also, the thermal stability, the modulus and surface hardness were increased, as the adhesion promoter was added.

  15. Characterization of acrylic resins used for restoration of artworks by pyrolysis-silylation-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with hexamethyldisilazane.

    PubMed

    Osete-Cortina, Laura; Doménech-Carbó, María Teresa

    2006-09-15

    A procedure based on the technique of the pyrolysis-GC/MS has been applied, in this work, in order to determine the composition of synthetic acrylic resins employed in artworks. The method is based on the on line derivatization of these resins using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS). Results obtained have been compared with those others from direct pyrolysis and in situ thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Sensitivity using HMDS as derivatising reagent is found similar to that from direct pyrolysis and methylation with TMAH. Better resolution of the most representative peaks has been also obtained. Additionally, this method reduces the formation of free acrylic acid molecules during the pyrolysis process and, in consequence, more simplified and well-resolved chromatograms are obtained. Finally, the reported procedure has been successfully used for characterizing several acrylic-based varnishes and binding media currently used in Fine Arts and real pictorial samples from graffiti performed on a Middle Ages bridge.

  16. Comparative evaluation of different mechanical modifications of denture teeth on bond strength between high-impact acrylic resin and denture teeth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Phukela, Sumit Singh; Chintalapudi, Siddesh Kumar; Sachdeva, Harleen; Dhall, Rupinder Singh; Sharma, Neeraj; Prabhu, Allama

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objective: Acrylic teeth separates from the denture base and remains a major worry in day-to-day routine dental procedure. The present study was conducted to comparatively evaluate different mechanical modifications of acrylic teeth on bond strength between Lucitone 199 heat cure resin and cross-linked teeth. Materials and Methods: The test specimens, central incisors (21) were demarcated into four groups. Group 1 was the control group, whereas Group 2, Group 3, and Group 4 were experimental groups modified with round groove, vertical groove, and T-shaped groove, respectively. The preparation of masterpiece was done by aligning the long axis of the central incisor teeth at 45° to the base of a wax block (8 mm × 10 mm × 30 mm), with ridge lap surface contacting the base. These test specimen (21) was prepared by Lucitone 199 heat cure resin. Evaluation of bond strength of all the specimens was done using universal tester (materials testing machine). Shapiro–Wilk Test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Bonferroni test were done to do statistical investigation. Results: Group 1 specimens prepared by Lucitone 199 heat cure resin showed the lowest bond strength and Group 4 specimens prepared with T-shaped groove packed with Lucitone 199 exhibited the highest bond strength. Conclusion: The bond strength between Lucitone 199 heat cure resin and cross-linked teeth was increased when mechanical modifications was done on denture teeth. The specimens prepared with T-shaped groove packed with Lucitone 199 heat cure resin showed the highest bond strength followed by Group 3, Group 2, and lastly Group 1 prepared by Lucitone 199 heat cure resin. PMID:27114957

  17. The Effect on the Flexural Strength, Flexural Modulus and Compressive Strength of Fibre Reinforced Acrylic with That of Plain Unfilled Acrylic Resin – An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Tony C; K, Aswini Kumar; Krishnan, Vinod; Mathew, Anil; V, Manju

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the flexural strength, the flexural modulus and compressive strength of the acrylic polymer reinforced with glass, carbon, polyethylene and Kevlar fibres with that of plain unfilled resin. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 specimens were prepared and divided into 10 specimens each under 5 groups namely group 1- control group without any fibres, group 2 – carbon fibres, group 3- glass fibres, group 4 – polyethylene, group 5- Kevlar. Universal testing machine (Tinius olsen, USA) was used for the testing of these specimens. Out of each group, 5 specimens were randomly selected and testing was done for flexural strength using a three point deflection test and three point bending test for compressive strength and the modulus was plotted using a graphical method. Statistical analysis was done using statistical software. Results: The respective mean values for samples in regard to their flexural strength for PMMA plain, PMMA+ glass fibre, PMMA+ carbon, PMMA+ polyethylene and PMMA+ Kevlar were 90.64, 100.79, 102.58, 94.13 and 96.43 respectively. Scheffes post hoc test clearly indicated that only mean flexural strength values of PMMA + Carbon, has the highest mean value. One-way ANOVA revealed a non-significant difference among the groups in regard to their compressive strength. Conclusion: The study concludes that carbon fibre reinforced samples has the greatest flexural strength and greatest flexural modulus, however the compressive strength remains unchanged. PMID:25954696

  18. Morphological alteration of microwave disinfected acrylic resins used for dental prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, M. C.; Bita, B. I.; Avram, A. M.; Tucureanu, V.; Schiopu, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we aim to perform a cross section morphological characterization of an acrylic polymer used for dental prostheses subjected to microwave disinfection. The method was largely investigated and the microbiological effectiveness is well established, but there are some issues regarding the in-depth alteration of the material. In our research, the surface roughness is insignificant and the samples were not polished or refined by any means. Two groups of 7 acrylic discs (20 mm diameter, 2 mm thickness) were prepared from a heat-cured powder. Half of the samples embedded a stainless steel reinforcement, in order to observe the changes at the interfaces between the polymer and metallic wire. After the gradual wet microwave treatment, the specimens - including the controls - were frozen in liquid nitrogen and broken into pieces. Fragments were selected for gold metallization to ensure a good contrast for SEM imaging. We examined the samples in cross section employing a high resolution SEM. We have observed the alterations occurred at the surface of the acrylic sample and at the interface with the metallic wire along with the increase of the power and exposure time. The bond configuration of acrylate samples was analysed by FTIR spectrometry.

  19. Prediction of capacity factors for aqueous organic solutes adsorbed on a porous acrylic resin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.

    1978-01-01

    The capacity factors of 20 aromatic, allphatic, and allcycllc organic solutes with carboxyl, hydroxyl, amine, and methyl functional groups were determined on Amberlite XAD-8, a porous acrylic resin. The logarithm of the capacity factor, k???, correlated inversely with the logarithm of the aqueous molar solubility with significance of less than 0.001. The log k???-log solubility relationship may be used to predict the capacity of any organic solute for XAD-8 using only the solubility of the solute. The prediction is useful as a guide for determining the proper ratio of sample to column size In the preconcentration of organic solutes from water. The inverse relationship of solubility and capacity is due to the unfavorable entropy of solution of organic solutes which affects both solubility and sorption.

  20. Mechanical and biological properties of acrylic resins manipulated and polished by different methods.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Rogério Lacerda; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Carvalho, Fabiola Galbiatti; Ramos, Aretha Aliny dos Santos; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the manipulation technique and polishing method on the flexural strength and cytotoxicity of acrylic resins. Two manipulation techniques and three polishing methods were used in the fabrication of acrylic plates that were divided into 6 groups (n=10). Groups MM, MC and MW: mass technique with mechanical polishing, chemical polishing and without polishing, respectively; and Groups SM, SC and SW: Saturation technique with mechanical polishing, chemical polishing and without polishing, respectively). Flexural strength was tested in a universal testing machine and the cytotoxicity assay used cell cultures (L-929) for periods of 24 h to 168 h. Flexural strength and cytotoxicity data were assessed using two-way and three-way ANOVA, respectively (α=0.05), followed by post hoc Bonferroni test for multiple comparisons. The effect of combinations of manipulation techniques and polishing methods on flexural strength showed significant differences only between Group SC and Groups MW, MM and MC (p<0.01). Cell viability ranged from 51% (3.9%) to 87,6% (3.2) in the 24-h time interval, and from 87.8% (5.0) to 95.7% (3.1%) in the 168-h time interval. With the increase of cell viability, from the third day (72 h), there was no significant difference among the groups, except between MM and SC (p<0.01) at 72 h. In conclusion, the manipulation technique and polishing method had more influence on the cytotoxicity than on flexural strength.

  1. Effects of Laboratory Disinfecting Agents on Dimensional Stability of Three Commercially Available Heat-Cured Denture Acrylic Resins in India: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jujare, Ravikanth Haridas; Varghese, Rana Kalappattil; Singh, Vishwa Deepak; Gaurav, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental professionals are exposed to a wide variety of microorganisms which calls for use of effective infection control procedures in the dental office and laboratories that can prevent cross-contamination that could extend to dentists, dental office staff, dental technicians as well as patients. This concern has led to a renewed interest in denture sterilization and disinfection. Heat polymerized dentures exhibit dimensional change during disinfection procedure. Aim The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different types of widely used laboratory disinfecting agents on the dimensional stability of heat-cured denture acrylic resins and to compare the dimensional stability of three commercially available heat-cured denture acrylic resins in India. Materials and Methods Twelve specimens of uniform dimension each of three different brands namely Stellon, Trevalon and Acralyn-H were prepared using circular metal disc. Chemical disinfectants namely 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde, 1% povidone-iodine, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite and water as control group were used. Diameter of each specimen was measured before immersion and after immersion with time interval of 1 hour and 12 hours. The data was evaluated statistically using one way analysis of variance. Results All the specimens in three disinfectants and in water exhibited very small amount of linear expansion. Among three disinfectants, specimens in 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde exhibited least(0.005mm) and water showed highest (0.009mm) amount of dimensional change. Among resins, Trevalon showed least (0.067mm) and Acralyn-H exhibited highest (0.110mm) amount of dimensional change. Conclusion Although, all the specimens of three different brands of heat-cured denture acrylic resins exhibited increase in linear dimensional change in all the disinfectants and water, they were found to be statistically insignificant. PMID:27134996

  2. Antifungal Effect of Henna against Candida albicans Adhered to Acrylic Resin as a Possible Method for Prevention of Denture Stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Nawasrah, Amal; AlNimr, Amani; Ali, Aiman A

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting the oral mucosa of denture wearers. The aim of this study was to measure the antifungal effect of henna against Candida albicans adhered to acrylic resin as a possible method for prevention of denture stomatitis. One-hundred-eighty acrylic plates were prepared of heat-cured acrylic denture resin. The specimens were divided into six groups of 30 samples each. The first group was only polymer and monomer following the conventional manufacturer instruction for processing complete dentures. The other five groups were processed by adding different concentration of Yamani henna powder (Harazi) to the polymer in a concentration of henna: polymer 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%, respectively. Samples were incubated in artificial saliva rich with Candida albicans at 37 °C, and the effect of henna on Candida albicans was evaluated in two different methods: semi-quantitative slide count and a culture-based quantitative assay (quantitative). Variation in the number of live Candida was observed with the increase in the concentration of Yamani henna powder. It was observed that the variation in live Candida, between control group and group B (concentration of Yamani henna powder was 1%), was statistically significant with a p-value of 0.0001. Similarly, variations in live Candida were significant, when the concentration of powder was 7.5% or 10% in contrast with control group and p-values were 0.0001 and 0.001 respectively. Adding henna to acrylic resin denture could be effective in controlling Candida albicans proliferation on the denture surface; however, its effects on the physical properties of acrylic resin denture need further studies. PMID:27223294

  3. Antifungal Effect of Henna against Candida albicans Adhered to Acrylic Resin as a Possible Method for Prevention of Denture Stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Nawasrah, Amal; AlNimr, Amani; Ali, Aiman A

    2016-05-23

    Denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting the oral mucosa of denture wearers. The aim of this study was to measure the antifungal effect of henna against Candida albicans adhered to acrylic resin as a possible method for prevention of denture stomatitis. One-hundred-eighty acrylic plates were prepared of heat-cured acrylic denture resin. The specimens were divided into six groups of 30 samples each. The first group was only polymer and monomer following the conventional manufacturer instruction for processing complete dentures. The other five groups were processed by adding different concentration of Yamani henna powder (Harazi) to the polymer in a concentration of henna: polymer 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%, respectively. Samples were incubated in artificial saliva rich with Candida albicans at 37 °C, and the effect of henna on Candida albicans was evaluated in two different methods: semi-quantitative slide count and a culture-based quantitative assay (quantitative). Variation in the number of live Candida was observed with the increase in the concentration of Yamani henna powder. It was observed that the variation in live Candida, between control group and group B (concentration of Yamani henna powder was 1%), was statistically significant with a p-value of 0.0001. Similarly, variations in live Candida were significant, when the concentration of powder was 7.5% or 10% in contrast with control group and p-values were 0.0001 and 0.001 respectively. Adding henna to acrylic resin denture could be effective in controlling Candida albicans proliferation on the denture surface; however, its effects on the physical properties of acrylic resin denture need further studies.

  4. Antifungal Effect of Henna against Candida albicans Adhered to Acrylic Resin as a Possible Method for Prevention of Denture Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nawasrah, Amal; AlNimr, Amani; Ali, Aiman A.

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting the oral mucosa of denture wearers. The aim of this study was to measure the antifungal effect of henna against Candida albicans adhered to acrylic resin as a possible method for prevention of denture stomatitis. One-hundred-eighty acrylic plates were prepared of heat-cured acrylic denture resin. The specimens were divided into six groups of 30 samples each. The first group was only polymer and monomer following the conventional manufacturer instruction for processing complete dentures. The other five groups were processed by adding different concentration of Yamani henna powder (Harazi) to the polymer in a concentration of henna: polymer 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%, respectively. Samples were incubated in artificial saliva rich with Candida albicans at 37 °C, and the effect of henna on Candida albicans was evaluated in two different methods: semi-quantitative slide count and a culture-based quantitative assay (quantitative). Variation in the number of live Candida was observed with the increase in the concentration of Yamani henna powder. It was observed that the variation in live Candida, between control group and group B (concentration of Yamani henna powder was 1%), was statistically significant with a p-value of 0.0001. Similarly, variations in live Candida were significant, when the concentration of powder was 7.5% or 10% in contrast with control group and p-values were 0.0001 and 0.001 respectively. Adding henna to acrylic resin denture could be effective in controlling Candida albicans proliferation on the denture surface; however, its effects on the physical properties of acrylic resin denture need further studies. PMID:27223294

  5. Characterization and bacterial anti-adherent effect on modified PMMA denture acrylic resin containing platinum nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study characterized the synthesis of a modified PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate) denture acrylic loading platinum nanoparticles (PtN) and assessed its bacterial inhibitory efficacy to produce novel antimicrobial denture base material. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polymerized PMMA denture acrylic disc (20 mm × 2 mm) specimens containing 0 (control), 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of PtN were fabricated respectively. The obtained platinum-PMMA nanocomposite (PtNC) was characterized by TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), thermogravimetric and atomic absorption spectrophotometer analysis. In antimicrobial assay, specimens were placed on the cell culture plate, and 100 µL of microbial suspensions of S. mutans (Streptococcus mutans) and S. sobrinus (Streptococcus sobrinus) were inoculated then incubated at 37℃ for 24 hours. The bacterial attachment was tested by FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analysis after staining with fluorescent probe. RESULTS PtN were successfully loaded and uniformly immobilized into PMMA denture acrylic with a proper thermal stability and similar surface morphology as compared to control. PtNC expressed significant bacterial anti-adherent effect rather than bactericidal effect above 50 mg/L PtN loaded when compared to pristine PMMA (P=.01) with no or extremely small amounts of Pt ion eluted. CONCLUSION This is the first report on the synthesis and its antibacterial activity of Pt-PMMA nanocomposite. PMMA denture acrylic loading PtN could be a possible intrinsic antimicrobial denture material with proper mechanical characteristics, meeting those specified for denture bases. For clinical application, future studies including biocompatibility, color stability and warranting the long-term effect were still required. PMID:25006385

  6. Influence of nanoparticles on color stability, microhardness, and flexural strength of acrylic resins specific for ocular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Agda Marobo; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Moreno, Amália; Nobrega, Adhara Smith; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adding nanoparticles to N1 acrylic resin intended for artificial sclera, in terms of the color stability, microhardness, and flexural strength of the resin. Three hundred samples of N1 acrylic resin were used: 100 samples for color stability and microhardness tests (each test was performed on the opposite side of each sample), and 200 samples for flexural strength testing (100 samples before and after 1,008 hours of accelerated aging). Samples for each test were separated into ten groups (n=10), ie, without nanoparticles (control group) or with nanoparticles of zinc oxide, titanium dioxide (TiO₂), and barium sulfate at weight concentrations of 1%, 2%, and 2.5% (nanoparticle groups). Data were subjected to statistical analysis with nested analysis of variance and Tukey's test (P<0.05 significance level). Among the nanoparticle groups, the TiO₂ groups showed better color stability at all concentrations. Microhardness values increased after artificial aging, except for the control and zinc oxide groups. After aging, the 1%-2% TiO₂ groups had significantly higher microhardness values compared with the other nanoparticle groups. Before aging, there was a significant difference in flexural strength between the control and nanoparticle groups. After aging, the control and TiO₂ groups, regardless of concentration, showed the lowest flexural strength values. Incorporation of nanoparticles directly influenced the acrylic resin properties, with TiO₂ being the most influential nanoparticle in terms of the evaluated properties.

  7. Effect of toothbrushes and denture brushes on heat-polymerized acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Pontes, Karina Matthes; de Holanda, Janaína Câncio; Fonteles, Cristiane Sa Roriz; Pontes, Cassio de Barros; Lovato da Silva, Cláudia Helena; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    It is important to choose an appropriate brush for denture cleaning to prevent damage to the surface properties of prosthetic devices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasiveness of toothbrushes and denture brushes on boiled and microwave-processed acrylic resins. Specimens of 4 resin brands were prepared (n = 30). Five brands of brushes (n = 6) were used in a toothbrushing machine, first for 17,800 strokes and then for an additional 35,600 strokes (total of 53,400), at a load of 200 g. An analytical balance and a profilometer were used to assess the weight and surface roughness, respectively, before and after 17,800 and 53,400 strokes. Analysis of variance and Tukey tests were used for data analysis (α = 0.05). Weight loss increased with time, while surface roughness remained the same. There were no statistically significant differences among toothbrushes and denture brushes in the resulting weight loss (17,800 strokes, 1.83 mg; 53,400 strokes, 3.78 mg) or surface roughness (17,800 or 53,400 strokes, 0.14 µm). The weight loss values after 53,400 brush strokes indicated that Clássico (2.28 mg) and VIPI Wave (2.75 mg) presented significantly greater abrasion resistance than Lucitone 550 (3.36 mg) and Onda-Cryl (2.85 mg) (P < 0.05). The type of brush and the polymerization method did not influence resin wear after brushing.

  8. Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, Meyer

    1939-01-01

    A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

  9. Clinical applications of visible light-cured resin in maxillofacial prosthetics. Part I: Denture base and reline material.

    PubMed

    Shifman, A

    1990-11-01

    A visible light-cured resin system enables the dentist to accomplish chairside relining of removable prosthesis. The material is pliable and can be initially cured in the mouth with the regular hand-held visible light. A special unit is needed to completely cure the material, which thereafter is comparable in quality to heat-polymerized acrylic resin. The value of this system for the practice of maxillofacial prosthetics is demonstrated by the ease of relining of various devices and obturator prostheses.

  10. Indirect composite resin materials for posterior applications.

    PubMed

    Shellard, E; Duke, E S

    1999-12-01

    Indirect composite resin restorations were introduced a number of years ago as possible alternatives to traditional metallic or ceramic-based indirect restorations. However, the earlier formulations did not provide evidence of improvement in mechanical and physical properties over chairside-placed direct composite resin materials. Because they required more tooth structure removal than direct restorations, their use became unpopular and was abandoned by most clinicians. Over the past few years, a new class of composite resin indirect materials has surfaced in the profession. Various technologies have been suggested as reinforcement mechanisms. Fibers, matrix modifications, and an assortment of innovations have been proposed for enhancing indirect composite resin restorations. Applications are from inlay restorations all the way to multi-unit fixed prostheses. This manuscript summarizes some of the progress made in this area. When available, data is presented to provide clinicians with guidelines and indications for the use of these materials.

  11. Glutaraldehyde release from heat-polymerized acrylic resins after disinfection and chemical and mechanical polishing.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Iara Augusta; Andrade, Vanessa Gomes; Bonato, Pierina Sueli; Raimundo, Lariça Barbosa; Herzog, Daniella Silva; Borie, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the release of glutaraldehyde from heat-polymerized acrylic resins subjected to disinfection followed by chemical and mechanical polishing. Ninety disc-shaped specimens (15 x 4 mm), 30 per resin (Lucitone 550, QC-20 and Classico), were made and assigned to 2 groups according to the type of polishing. One side of each specimen was not polished and the other was either mechanically (n = 45) or chemically (n = 45) polished, and immersed in water at 50 °C for 1 h to allow the release of intrinsic substances and then kept in distilled water for 7 days. The specimens were disinfected by immersion in 2% glutaraldehyde for 10 min. After this period, 3 specimens from each group were immersed in water for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 min. For the 15-, 30-, 60-min immersions, 4 water exchanges were done at the end of period. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to detect and quantify the glutaraldehyde released after each period. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and multiple comparisons were done by Tukey's and Scheffé's tests (α = 0.05). No glutaraldehyde release was observed from the specimens with chemical polishing at any of the immersion periods, while the mechanically polished specimens released glutaraldehyde. In the groups with water exchanges, Lucitone released more disinfectant in the 15-min period (0.040 μg/mL), Classico in the 30-min (0.021 μg/mL) and 60-min (0.018 μg/mL) periods, and QC-20 the same amount (-1.760 μg/mL) in all periods. In the groups without water exchanges, Lucitone released the highest amount of disinfectant (-1.370 μg/mL), differing significantly from QC-20 (0022 g/mL) and Classico (0019 g/mL), which were similar. The findings of this showed that chemically polished specimens from the 3 resin brands did not release glutaraldehyde after different periods of immersion, while glutaraldehyde release was observed from the mechanically polished specimens, especially from those made of

  12. Contraction stresses of composite resin filling materials.

    PubMed

    Hegdahl, T; Gjerdet, N R

    1977-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resin filling materials and the tensile stresses developed when the shrinkage is restrained were measured in an in vitro experiment. This allows an estimation to be made of the forces exerted upon the enamel walls of cavities filled with the resin in the acid etch technique. The results indicate that the stresses acting on the enamel are low compared to the tensile strength of the enamel.

  13. In vitro adhesion of Candida glabrata to denture base acrylic resin modified by glow-discharge plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Zamperini, Camila Andrade; Carneiro, Haline de Lima; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Cruz, Nilson Cristino; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Machado, Ana Lucia

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the potential of plasma treatments to modify the surface chemistry and hydrophobicity of a denture base acrylic resin to reduce the Candida glabrata adhesion. Specimens (n = 54) with smooth surfaces were made and divided into three groups (n = 18): control - non-treated; experimental groups - submitted to plasma treatment (Ar/50 W; AAt/130 W). The effects of these treatments on chemical composition and surface topography of the acrylic resin were evaluated. Surface free energy measurements (SFE) were performed after the treatments and after 48 h of immersion in water. For each group, half (n = 9) of the specimens were preconditionated with saliva before the adhesion assay. The number of adhered C. glabrata was evaluated by cell counting after crystal violet staining. The Ar/50 W and AAt/130 W treatments altered the chemistry composition, hydrophobicity and topography of acrylic surface. The Ar/50 W group showed significantly lower C. glabrata adherence than the control group, in the absence of saliva. After preconditioning with saliva, C. glabrata adherence in experimental and control groups did not differ significantly. There were significant changes in the SFE after immersion in water. The results demonstrated that Ar/50 W treated surfaces have potential for reducing C. glabrata adhesion to denture base resins and deserve further investigation, especially to tailor the parameters to prolong the increased wettability. PMID:22809146

  14. Investigation of flexural strength and cytotoxicity of acrylic resin copolymers by using different polymerization methods

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Ali Kemal; Turgut, Mehmet; Boztug, Ali; Sumer, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to appraise the some mechanical properties of polymethyl methacrylate based denture base resin polymerized by copolymerization mechanism, and to investigate the cytotoxic effect of these copolymer resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and isobutyl methacrylate (IBMA) were added to monomers of conventional heat polymerized and injection-molded poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin contents of 2%, 3%, and 5% by volume and polymerization was carried out. Three-point bending test was performed to detect flexural strength and the elasticity modulus of the resins. To determine the statistical differences between the study groups, the Kruskall-Wallis test was performed. Then pairwise comparisons were performed between significant groups by Mann-Whitney U test. Agar-overlay test was performed to determine cytotoxic effect of copolymer resins. Chemical analysis was determined by FTIR spectrum. RESULTS Synthesis of the copolymer was approved by FTIR spectroscopy. Within the conventional heat-polymerized group maximum transverse strength had been seen in the HEMA 2% concentration; however, when the concentration ratio increased, the strength decreased. In the injection-molded group, maximum transverse strength had been seen in the IBMA 2% concentration; also as the concentration ratio increased, the strength decreased. Only IBMA showed no cytotoxic effect at low concentrations when both two polymerization methods applied while HEMA showed cytotoxic effect in the injection-molded resins. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this study, it may be concluded that IBMA and HEMA may be used in low concentration and at high temperature to obtain non-cytotoxic and durable copolymer structure. PMID:25932307

  15. Color change in acrylic resin processed in three ways after immersion in water, cola, coffee, mate and wine.

    PubMed

    Waldemarin, Renato F A; Terra, Priscila C; Pinto, Luciana R; Camacho, Fernanda Faot Guilherme B

    2013-01-01

    Denture bases may undergo color change over time induced by pigment accumulation within their body; however there is a lack of information regarding the role of yerba mate tea in this process. This work evaluated the effect of five common beverages, including yerba mate tea, on color changes of acrylic denture base resins processed in three different ways. Three different processing techniques were used (P1--microwave irradiation/microwave activated resin; P2--heat polymerization/conventional heat activated resin and P3--microwave irradiation/conventional heat polymerized resin) to make twenty five resin discs each (3.0 mm thick x 20 mm diameter), totaling seventy-five resin discs. The discs made with each technique were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5) and placed in the following solutions: G1-water; G2-cola; G3-coffee; G4-yerba mate tea; G5-red wine, for 30 days at 37 degrees C. The solutions were renewed every 3 days. Color change on the CIE-L*a*b* scale was measured with a Konica-Minolta CR-10 colorimeter and compared with original L* a* and b* values of each specimen prior to immersion. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA, and showed no difference among techniques and significant statistical differences among solutions (p < 0.05). Tukey's post-hoc test showed that the lowest color changes were for water and cola, which were undistinguishable from each other; coffee produced the second lowest color change; yerba mate tea produced second greatest color change, while the greatest color change was produced by red wine. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that almost all the solutions used can change color in acrylic resin, especially yerba mate tea, considered distinguishable by professionals, and red wine, considered distinguishable by patients and clinically unacceptable.

  16. Influence of a new denture cleaning technique based on photolysis of H(2)O(2) the mechanical properties and color change of acrylic denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Tatsuro; Harada, Akio; Yamada, Yasutomo; Odashima, Yu; Nakamura, Keisuke; Inagaki, Ryoichi; Kanno, Taro; Sasaki, Keiichi; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of a disinfection technique based on photolysis of H2O2 on the mechanical properties and color change of acrylic denture base resin. Resin specimens were immersed in 1 M H2O2 irradiated with light-emitting diode (LED) light at 400 nm for 1 week. The immersion duration of 1 week (168 h) corresponded to performing approximately 500 times of 20-min cleaning. Hydroxyl radicals are potent oxidants and they were generated via the photolysis of H2O2. Oxidative damage caused by these radicals included reduced flexural strength and altered color for the acrylic resin. Nonetheless, the degraded flexural strength and altered color of acrylic resin after 500 times of cleaning in the disinfection system would be within clinically acceptable levels.

  17. Safety and Tolerability of Essential Oil from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume Leaves with Action on Oral Candidosis and Its Effect on the Physical Properties of the Acrylic Resin.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Julyana de Araújo; da Silva, Ingrid Carla Guedes; Trindade, Leonardo Antunes; Lima, Edeltrudes Oliveira; Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite; de Castro, Ricardo Dias

    2014-01-01

    The anti-Candida activity of essential oil from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume, as well as its effect on the roughness and hardness of the acrylic resin used in dental prostheses, was assessed. The safety and tolerability of the test product were assessed through a phase I clinical trial involving users of removable dentures. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFC) were determined against twelve Candida strains. Acrylic resin specimens were exposed to artificial saliva (GI), C. zeylanicum (GII), and nystatin (GIII) for 15 days. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey posttest (α = 5%). For the phase I clinical trial, 15 healthy patients used solution of C. zeylanicum at MIC (15 days, 3 times a day) and were submitted to clinical and mycological examinations. C. zeylanicum showed anti-Candida activity, with MIC = 625.0 µg/mL being equivalent to MFC. Nystatin caused greater increase in roughness and decreased the hardness of the material (P < 0.0001), with no significant differences between GI and GII. As regards the clinical trial, no adverse clinical signs were observed after intervention. The substance tested had a satisfactory level of safety and tolerability, supporting new advances involving the clinical use of essential oil from C. zeylanicum.

  18. Safety and Tolerability of Essential Oil from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume Leaves with Action on Oral Candidosis and Its Effect on the Physical Properties of the Acrylic Resin

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Julyana de Araújo; da Silva, Ingrid Carla Guedes; Trindade, Leonardo Antunes; Lima, Edeltrudes Oliveira; Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite; de Castro, Ricardo Dias

    2014-01-01

    The anti-Candida activity of essential oil from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume, as well as its effect on the roughness and hardness of the acrylic resin used in dental prostheses, was assessed. The safety and tolerability of the test product were assessed through a phase I clinical trial involving users of removable dentures. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFC) were determined against twelve Candida strains. Acrylic resin specimens were exposed to artificial saliva (GI), C. zeylanicum (GII), and nystatin (GIII) for 15 days. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey posttest (α = 5%). For the phase I clinical trial, 15 healthy patients used solution of C. zeylanicum at MIC (15 days, 3 times a day) and were submitted to clinical and mycological examinations. C. zeylanicum showed anti-Candida activity, with MIC = 625.0 µg/mL being equivalent to MFC. Nystatin caused greater increase in roughness and decreased the hardness of the material (P < 0.0001), with no significant differences between GI and GII. As regards the clinical trial, no adverse clinical signs were observed after intervention. The substance tested had a satisfactory level of safety and tolerability, supporting new advances involving the clinical use of essential oil from C. zeylanicum. PMID:25574178

  19. Effect of nonthermal plasma treatment on surface chemistry of commercially-pure titanium and shear bond strength to autopolymerizing acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José; da Silva Vieira Marques, Isabella; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Matos, Adaias Oliveira; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; da Cruz, Nilson Cristino; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    The effect of nonthermal plasma on the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti), and on the shear bond strength between an autopolymerizing acrylic resin and cp-Ti was investigated. A total of 96 discs of cp-Ti were distributed into four groups (n=24): Po (no surface treatment), SB (sandblasting), Po+NTP and SB+NTP (methane plasma). Surface characterization was performed through surface energy, surface roughness, scanning microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction tests. Shear bond strength test was conducted immediately and after thermocycling. Surface treatment affected the surface energy and roughness of cp-Ti discs (P<.001). SEM-EDS showed the presence of the carbide thin film. XRD spectra revealed no crystalline phase changes. The SB+NTP group showed the highest bond strength values (6.76±0.70 MPa). Thermocycling reduced the bond strength of the acrylic resin/cp-Ti interface (P<.05), except for Po group. NTP is an effective treatment option for improving the shear bond strength between both materials. PMID:26706504

  20. Effect of nonthermal plasma treatment on surface chemistry of commercially-pure titanium and shear bond strength to autopolymerizing acrylic resin.

    PubMed

    Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José; da Silva Vieira Marques, Isabella; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Matos, Adaias Oliveira; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; da Cruz, Nilson Cristino; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    The effect of nonthermal plasma on the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti), and on the shear bond strength between an autopolymerizing acrylic resin and cp-Ti was investigated. A total of 96 discs of cp-Ti were distributed into four groups (n=24): Po (no surface treatment), SB (sandblasting), Po+NTP and SB+NTP (methane plasma). Surface characterization was performed through surface energy, surface roughness, scanning microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction tests. Shear bond strength test was conducted immediately and after thermocycling. Surface treatment affected the surface energy and roughness of cp-Ti discs (P<.001). SEM-EDS showed the presence of the carbide thin film. XRD spectra revealed no crystalline phase changes. The SB+NTP group showed the highest bond strength values (6.76±0.70 MPa). Thermocycling reduced the bond strength of the acrylic resin/cp-Ti interface (P<.05), except for Po group. NTP is an effective treatment option for improving the shear bond strength between both materials.

  1. Influence of nanoparticles on color stability, microhardness, and flexural strength of acrylic resins specific for ocular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Andreotti, Agda Marobo; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Moreno, Amália; Nobrega, Adhara Smith; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adding nanoparticles to N1 acrylic resin intended for artificial sclera, in terms of the color stability, microhardness, and flexural strength of the resin. Three hundred samples of N1 acrylic resin were used: 100 samples for color stability and microhardness tests (each test was performed on the opposite side of each sample), and 200 samples for flexural strength testing (100 samples before and after 1,008 hours of accelerated aging). Samples for each test were separated into ten groups (n=10), ie, without nanoparticles (control group) or with nanoparticles of zinc oxide, titanium dioxide (TiO2), and barium sulfate at weight concentrations of 1%, 2%, and 2.5% (nanoparticle groups). Data were subjected to statistical analysis with nested analysis of variance and Tukey’s test (P<0.05 significance level). Among the nanoparticle groups, the TiO2 groups showed better color stability at all concentrations. Microhardness values increased after artificial aging, except for the control and zinc oxide groups. After aging, the 1%–2% TiO2 groups had significantly higher microhardness values compared with the other nanoparticle groups. Before aging, there was a significant difference in flexural strength between the control and nanoparticle groups. After aging, the control and TiO2 groups, regardless of concentration, showed the lowest flexural strength values. Incorporation of nanoparticles directly influenced the acrylic resin properties, with TiO2 being the most influential nanoparticle in terms of the evaluated properties. PMID:25525359

  2. Photostabilization of polymeric materials by photoset acrylate coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, C.; Zahouily, K.

    2002-01-01

    Different types of polymeric materials have been made more resistant to photodegradation by protecting their surface with a UV-cured coating containing a HALS radical scavenger and a phenyltriazine UV absorber. The tridimensional polymer network formed by photopolymerization of an aliphatic polyurethane-acrylate telechelic oligomer proved to be very resistant to accelerated weathering in the presence of these light stabilizers. The chemical modifications occurring upon QUV-ageing were monitored by infrared spectroscopy, a very sensitive technique well suited for quantitative analysis at an early stage of the photodegradation.

  3. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A...

  7. In Vitro Comparison of Compressive and Tensile Strengths ofAcrylic Resins Reinforced by Silver Nanoparticles at 2% and0.2% Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Tahereh; Hamedirad, Fahimeh; Ezzati, Baharak

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA, is widely used in prosthodontics for fabrication of removable prostheses. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of adding silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to PMMA at 2% and 0.2% concentrations on compressive and tensile strengths of PMMA. Materials and methods. The silver nanoparticles were mixed with heat-cured acrylic resin in an amalgamator in two groups at 0.2 and 2 wt% of AgNPs. Eighteen 2×20×200-mm samples were prepared for tensile strength test, 12 samples containing silver nanoparticle and 6 samples for the control group. Another 18 cylindrical 25×38-mm samples were prepared for compressive strength test. Scanning electron microscopy was used to verify homogeneous distribution of particles. The powder was manually mixed with a resin monomer and then the mixture was properly blended. Before curing, the paste was packed into steel molds. After curing, the specimens were removed from the molds. One-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis, followed by multiple comparison test (Scheffé’s test). Results. This study showed that the mean compressive strength of PMMA reinforced with AgNPs was significantly higher than that of the unmodified PMMA (P<0.05). It was not statistically different between the two groups reinforced with AgNPs. The tensile strength was not significantly different between the 0.2% group and unmodified PMMA and it de-creased significantly after incorporation of 2% AgNPs (P<0.05). Conclusion. Based on the results and the desirable effect of nanoparticles of silver on improvement of compressive strength of PMMA, use of this material with proper concentration in the palatal area of maxillary acrylic resin dentures is recommended. PMID:25587381

  8. Synthesis and characterization of a sphere-like modified chitosan and acrylate resin composite for organics absorbency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, S. S.; Wang, Y. H.; Li, Q. R.; Zhang, Q.; Wang, X. P.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the chitosan (deacetylation degree >95%) was modified with vinyltriethoxysilane (A151) and became hydrophobic. The modified chitosan and acrylate resin composite can be synthesized by butyl methacrylate (BMA), butyl acrylate (BA), poly vinyl alcoho(PVA), N,N’-methylene bisacrylamide (MBA), benzoyl peroxide (BPO), and ethyl acetate under microwave irradiation. The optimal synthetic condition was as follows: the molar ratio of BA and BMA was 1.5:1, the dosage of ethyl acetate, PVA, MBA, BPO and modified chitosan were 50 wt.%, 10 wt.%, 1.5 wt.%, 2.0 wt.% and 1.0 wt.% of monomers, respectively. The adsorption capacity of the composite for CHCl3 and CCl4 were approximate to 53 g/g and 44 g/g, respectively. The organics absorbency and regeneration of the samples were also tested, and the samples were characterized by analysis of the scanning electron microscope and simultaneous thermo gravimetric/differential thermal.

  9. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings....

  11. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings....

  12. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings....

  13. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  16. Effect of sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid on the surface roughness of acrylic resin polymerized by heated water for short and long cycles

    PubMed Central

    Sczepanski, Felipe; Sczepanski, Claudia Roberta Brunnquell; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Gonini-Júnior, Alcides; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the surface roughness of acrylic resin submitted to chemical disinfection via 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) or 1% peracetic acid (C2H4O3). Materials and Methods: The disc-shaped resin specimens (30 mm diameter ×4 mm height) were polymerized by heated water using two cycles (short cycle: 1 h at 74°C and 30 min at 100°C; conventional long cycle: 9 h at 74°C). The release of substances by these specimens in water solution was also quantified. Specimens were fabricated, divided into four groups (n = 10) depending on the polymerization time and disinfectant. After polishing, the specimens were stored in distilled deionized water. Specimens were immersed in 1% NaClO or 1% C2H4O3 for 30 min, and then were immersed in distilled deionized water for 20 min. The release of C2H4O3 and NaClO was measured via visual colorimetric analysis. Roughness was measured before and after disinfection. Roughness data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results: There was no interaction between polymerization time and disinfectant in influencing the average surface roughness (Ra, P = 0.957). Considering these factors independently, there were significant differences between short and conventional long cycles (P = 0.012), but no significant difference between the disinfectants hypochlorite and C2H4O3 (P = 0.366). Visual colorimetric analysis did not detect release of substances. Conclusion: It was concluded that there was the difference in surface roughness between short and conventional long cycles, and disinfection at acrylic resins polymerized by heated water using a short cycle modified the properties of roughness. PMID:25512737

  17. The effect of mechanical and chemical polishing techniques on the surface roughness of heat-polymerized and visible light-polymerized acrylic denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kheraif, Abdul Aziz Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of mechanical polishing (MP) and chemical polishing (CP) on the average surface roughness (Ra) of heat-cured (HC) and light-cured (LC) denture base acrylic resins. Methods A total of 120 specimens (30 × 15 × 3 mm) were prepared from one HC and one LC acrylic resin. To remove nodules and gross surface irregularities, all specimens were finished with a lathe-mounted small acrylic bur and 360-grit sandpaper. Ten finished specimens of each acrylic resin were randomly assigned to each of six polishing techniques: Resilit High-luster Polishing Liquid (RHPL), Universal Polishing Paste, Abraso-star K50, pumice, Jet Seal Liquid, or Acrypoint. MP was performed with an automatic polishing machine for 2 min, under 50 rpm and 500 g of load. CP was performed by immersing the HC and LC specimens in preheated methyl methacrylate at 75 ± 1 °C for 10 s. The surface roughness of the acrylic resin specimens was measured with a contact profilometer. The Ra values were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance, post hoc Scheffe's test, and paired t-test (p ⩽ 0.05). Polished and tested acrylic resin surfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Results MP was more effective than CP. The smoothest surface was obtained with the use of the RHPL on the LC (0.05 ± 0.01 μm) or HC (0.07 ± 0.01 μm) acrylic resin. Two-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference between MP and CP. Conclusions MP produced the smoothest surface of denture base acrylic resin. The mean surface roughness values after MP and CP were not influenced by the type of acrylic resin. PMID:25408597

  18. Ethanol Postpolymerization Treatment for Improving the Biocompatibility of Acrylic Reline Resins

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Cristina B.; Lopes, Luís P.; Ferrão, Helena F.; Miranda, Joana P.; Castro, Matilde F.; Bettencourt, Ana F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of postpolymerization treatment based on ethanol-aqueous solutions on the residual monomer (RM) content, flexural strength, microhardness, and cytotoxicity of hard chairside reline resins (Kooliner, Ufi Gel Hard). Methods. After polymerization, specimens were immersed in water, 20%, 50%, or 70% ethanol solutions at 23°C or 55°C for 10 minutes. Controls were left untreated. HPLC was used for the determination of RM content. Specimens were submitted to Vickers microhardness and 3-point loading flexural strength tests. Cytotoxicity of resin eluates was determined on human fibroblasts by assessing cellular mitochondrial function and lactate dehydrogenase release. Results. Higher concentrations of ethanol promoted lower RM content at 55°C in both materials. The mechanical properties were maintained after 50% and 20% ethanol treatments in Kooliner and Ufi Gel Hard, respectively. Specimens submitted to those treatments showed significant reduction on cytotoxicity compared to immersion in hot water, the treatment of choice in the recent literature. Significance. Immersion of relined dentures in specific ethanol solutions at 55°C for 10 minutes can be considered an effective postpolymerization treatment contributing to increase materials biocompatibility. The proposed protocol is expeditious and easy to achieve with simple equipment in a dental office. PMID:23971038

  19. FDI report on adverse reactions to resin-based materials.

    PubMed

    Fan, P L; Meyer, D M

    2007-02-01

    Resin-based restorative materials are considered safe for the vast majority of dental patients. Although constituent chemicals such as monomers, accelerators and initiators can potentially leach out of cured resin-based materials after placement, adverse reactions to these chemicals are rare and reaction symptoms commonly subside after removal of the materials. Dentists should be aware of the rare possibility that patients could have adverse reactions to constituents of resin-based materials and be vigilant in observing any adverse reactions after restoration placement. Dentists should also be cognisant of patient complaints about adverse reactions that may result from components of resin-based materials. To minimise monomer leaching and any potential risk of dermatological reactions, resin-based materials should be adequately cured. Dental health care workers should avoid direct skin contact with uncured resin-based materials. Latex and vinyl gloves do not provide adequate barrier protection to the monomers in resin-based materials.

  20. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... *ABS-SAN Resins *Acrylate-Methacrylate Latexes *Acrylic Latex *Acrylic Resins *Cellulose Acetate... *Polystyrene—Acrylic Latexes Polystyrene Impact Resins Polystyrene Latex Polystyrene, Expandable Polystyrene... Copolymers *Polyvinylacetate Acrylic Copolymers *Polyvinylacetate-2-Ethylhexylacrylate...

  1. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... *ABS-SAN Resins *Acrylate-Methacrylate Latexes *Acrylic Latex *Acrylic Resins *Cellulose Acetate... *Polystyrene—Acrylic Latexes Polystyrene Impact Resins Polystyrene Latex Polystyrene, Expandable Polystyrene... Copolymers *Polyvinylacetate Acrylic Copolymers *Polyvinylacetate-2-Ethylhexylacrylate...

  2. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... *ABS-SAN Resins *Acrylate-Methacrylate Latexes *Acrylic Latex *Acrylic Resins *Cellulose Acetate... *Polystyrene—Acrylic Latexes Polystyrene Impact Resins Polystyrene Latex Polystyrene, Expandable Polystyrene... Copolymers *Polyvinylacetate Acrylic Copolymers *Polyvinylacetate-2-Ethylhexylacrylate...

  3. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... *ABS-SAN Resins *Acrylate-Methacrylate Latexes *Acrylic Latex *Acrylic Resins *Cellulose Acetate... *Polystyrene—Acrylic Latexes Polystyrene Impact Resins Polystyrene Latex Polystyrene, Expandable Polystyrene... Copolymers *Polyvinylacetate Acrylic Copolymers *Polyvinylacetate-2-Ethylhexylacrylate...

  4. Adherence of Candida albicans to denture base acrylics and silicone-based resilient liner materials with different surface finishes.

    PubMed

    Nevzatoğlu, Erdem U; Ozcan, Mutlu; Kulak-Ozkan, Yasemin; Kadir, Tanju

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness and Candida albicans adherence on denture base acrylic resins and silicone-based resilient liners with different surface finishes. Four commercial denture base acrylic resins (three heat polymerized and one room temperature polymerized) and five silicone-based liner materials (two heat polymerized and three room temperature polymerized) (10 x 10 x 2 mm) were tested in this study. The materials were processed against glass or plaster or finished with a tungsten carbide bur. Surface roughness measurements were made using a profilometer with an optical scanner probe. All specimens were ultrasonically cleaned in water for 15 s, autoclave sterilized, and contaminated with C. albicans solution for adherence assay evaluation. The materials processed against the glass surface showed significantly lower surface roughness values (0.11 +/- 0.1-1.66 +/- 1.1 microm) than those of the materials processed against the dental plaster (2.61 +/- 0.2-6.12 +/- 2.8 microm) or roughening with a bur (1.48 +/- 0.2-7.05 +/- 1.2 microm; p < 0.05, one- or two-way analysis of variance). Also, the materials processed against the glass surface showed lower C. albicans adhesion (mean ranks 120.36) than those of the materials processed against the dental plaster (mean ranks 139.77) or roughening with a bur (mean ranks 143.06), but the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney). In all types of surface finishes, C. albicans adhesion on denture base acrylics was significantly less (mean ranks 90.18-90.40) than those of silicone liners (mean ranks 119.38-205.18; p < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis).

  5. Effect of conventional water-bath and experimental microwave polymerization cycles on the flexural properties of denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Spartalis, Guilherme Kloster; Cappelletti, Lucas Kravchychyn; Schoeffel, Amanda Cristina; Michél, Milton Domingos; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini

    2015-01-01

    The effect of polymerization cycles on flexural properties of conventional (Vipi Cril(®)-VC) or microwave-processed (Vipi Wave(®)-VW) denture base acrylic resins was evaluated. Specimens (n=10) were submitted to the cycles: WB=65ºC for 1 h+1 h boiling water (VC cycle); M630/25=10 min at 270 W+5 min at 0 W+10 min at 360 W (VW cycle); M650/5=5 min at 650 W; M700/4=4 min at 700 W; and M550/3=3 min at 550 W. Specimens were submitted to a three-point bending test at 5 mm/min until fracture. Flexural strength (MPa) and elastic modulus (GPa) data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA/Tukey HSD (α=0.05). Overall, VC showed higher values than VW. The results obtained with microwave polymerization did not differ from those obtained with water-bath for both acrylic resins. The results observed when polymerization cycles using medium power and shorter time were used did not differ from those when manufacturer's recommended microwave cycle was applied. Conventional VC might be microwave-processed without compromising its flexural properties. PMID:26438986

  6. The use of acrylic resin oral prosthesis in radiation therapy of oral cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Oral, K.; Aramamy, M.A.

    1982-07-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity and the paranasal sinuses, the extent to which the tissues of the oral cavity are included in the radiation treatment portals will determine the severity of the oral discomfort during treatment. This will affect the nutritional status of the patients, and may eventually affect the total dose of radiation which the patients can receive for treatment of their cancers. In cooperation with the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Department, an acrylic resin oral prosthesis was developed. This prosthesis is easy to use and can be made for each individual patient within 24 hours. It allows for maximum sparing of the normal tissues in the oral cavity and can be modified for shielding of backscattered electrons from heavy metals in the teeth. We have also found that acrylic resin extensions can be built onto the posterior edge of post-maxillectomy obturators; this extension can be used as a carrier for radioactive sources to deliver radiation to deep seated tumor modules in the paranasal sinuses.

  7. Effect of conventional water-bath and experimental microwave polymerization cycles on the flexural properties of denture base acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Spartalis, Guilherme Kloster; Cappelletti, Lucas Kravchychyn; Schoeffel, Amanda Cristina; Michél, Milton Domingos; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Neppelenbroek, Karin Hermana; Urban, Vanessa Migliorini

    2015-01-01

    The effect of polymerization cycles on flexural properties of conventional (Vipi Cril(®)-VC) or microwave-processed (Vipi Wave(®)-VW) denture base acrylic resins was evaluated. Specimens (n=10) were submitted to the cycles: WB=65ºC for 1 h+1 h boiling water (VC cycle); M630/25=10 min at 270 W+5 min at 0 W+10 min at 360 W (VW cycle); M650/5=5 min at 650 W; M700/4=4 min at 700 W; and M550/3=3 min at 550 W. Specimens were submitted to a three-point bending test at 5 mm/min until fracture. Flexural strength (MPa) and elastic modulus (GPa) data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA/Tukey HSD (α=0.05). Overall, VC showed higher values than VW. The results obtained with microwave polymerization did not differ from those obtained with water-bath for both acrylic resins. The results observed when polymerization cycles using medium power and shorter time were used did not differ from those when manufacturer's recommended microwave cycle was applied. Conventional VC might be microwave-processed without compromising its flexural properties.

  8. Color degradation of acrylic resin denture teeth as a function of liquid diet: ultraviolet-visible reflection analysis.

    PubMed

    Hipólito, Ana Carolina; Barão, Valentim A; Faverani, Leonardo P; Ferreira, Mayara B; Assunção, Wirley G

    2013-10-01

    The effect of different beverages on acrylic resin denture teeth color degradation is evaluated. Ten acrylic resin denture teeth brands were evaluated: Art Plus (AP), Biolux (BX), Biotone IPN (BI), Magister (MG), Mondial 6 (MD), Premium 6 (PR), SR Vivodent PE (SR), Trilux (TR), Trubyte Biotone (TB), and Vipi Dent Plus (VP). Teeth were immersed in staining solutions (coffee, cola, and orange juice) or artificial saliva (control) (n=6) for 1, 7, 15, or 30 days. Specimen colors were evaluated spectrophotometrically based on the Commission Internationale d'Eclairage L*a*b* system. Color differences (ΔE) were calculated between the baseline and post-staining results. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance and Tukey test (α = 0.05). BI (1.82 ± 0.95) and TR (1.78 ± 0.72) teeth exhibited the greatest ΔE values, while BX (0.88 ± 0.43) and MD (1.09 ± 0.44) teeth were the lowest, regardless of solution and measurement period, and were different from BI and TR teeth (P < 0.05). Cola and coffee promoted higher denture teeth color alterations than orange juice and saliva (P < 0.05). Saliva generated the lowest denture teeth color alterations. Greater immersion times caused higher denture teeth color changes. The lifespan of removable dentures and the aesthetic satisfaction of several edentulous patients may be increased with the use of stain-resistant artificial denture teeth.

  9. Effect of leaching residual methyl methacrylate concentrations on in vitro cytotoxicity of heat polymerized denture base acrylic resin processed with different polymerization cycles

    PubMed Central

    BURAL, Canan; AKTAŞ, Esin; DENIZ, Günnur; ÜNLÜÇERÇI, Yeşim; BAYRAKTAR, Gülsen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) may leach from the acrylic resin denture bases and have adverse effects on the oral mucosa. This in vitro study evaluated and correlated the effect of the leaching residual MMA concentrations ([MMA]r) on in vitro cytotoxicity of L-929 fibroblasts. Material and Methods A total of 144 heat-polymerized acrylic resin specimens were fabricated using 4 different polymerization cycles: (1) at 74ºC for 9 h, (2) at 74ºC for 9 h and terminal boiling (at 100ºC) for 30 min, (3) at 74ºC for 9 h and terminal boiling for 3 h, (4) at 74ºC for 30 min and terminal boiling for 30 min. Specimens were eluted in a complete cell culture medium at 37ºC for 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. [MMA]r in eluates was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. In vitro cytotoxicity of eluates on L-929 fibroblasts was evaluated by means of cell proliferation using a tetrazolium salt XTT (sodium 3´-[1-phenyl-aminocarbonyl)-3,4-tetrazolium]bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzenesulphonic acid) assay. Differences in [MMA]r of eluates and cell proliferation values between polymerization cycles were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman and Dunn's multiple comparison tests. The correlation between [MMA]r of eluates and cell proliferation was analyzed by Pearson's correlation test (p<0.05). Results [MMA]r was significantly (p≤0.001) higher in eluates of specimens polymerized with cycle without terminal boiling after elution of 1 and 2 days. Cell proliferation values for all cycles were significantly (p<0.01) lower in eluates of 1 day than those of 2 days. The correlation between [MMA]r and cell proliferation values was negative after all elution periods, showing significance (p<0.05) for elution of 1 and 2 days. MMA continued to leach from acrylic resin throughout 7 days and leaching concentrations markedly reduced after elution of 1 and 2 days. Conclusion Due to reduction of leaching residual MMA concentrations, use of terminal boiling in the

  10. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    PubMed

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  11. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    PubMed

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum. PMID:25822408

  12. Argon Ion Laser Polymerized Acrylic Resin: A Comparative Analysis of Mechanical Properties of Laser Cured, Light Cured and Heat Cured Denture Base Resins

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, S Srinivasa; Murthy, Gargi S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dentistry in general and prosthodontics in particular is evolving at greater pace, but the denture base resins poly methyl methacrylate. There has been vast development in modifying chemically and the polymerization techniques for better manipulation and enhancement of mechanical properties. One such invention was introduction of visible light cure (VLC) denture base resin. Argon ion lasers have been used extensively in dentistry, studies has shown that it can polymerize restorative composite resins. Since composite resin and VLC resin share the same photo initiator, Argon laser is tested as activator for polymerizing VLC resin. In the Phase 1 study, the VLC resin was evaluated for exposure time for optimum polymerization using argon ion laser and in Phase 2; flexural strength, impact strength, surface hardness and surface characteristics of laser cured resin was compared with light cure and conventional heat cure resin. Materials and Methods: Phase 1; In compliance with American Dental Association (ADA) specification no. 12, 80 samples were prepared with 10 each for different curing time using argon laser and evaluated for flexural strength on three point bend test. Results were compared to established performance requirement specified. Phase 2, 10 specimen for each of the mechanical properties (30 specimen) were polymerized using laser, visible light and heat and compared. Surface and fractured surface of laser, light and heat cured resins were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: In Phase 1, the specimen cured for 7, 8, 9 and 10 min fulfilled ADA requirement. 8 min was taken as suitable curing time for laser curing. Phase 2 the values of mechanical properties were computed and subjected to statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test. The means of three independent groups showed significant differences between any two groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Triad VLC resin can be polymerized by argon ion laser with

  13. Influence of acrylamide monomer addition to the acrylic denture-base resins on mechanical and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Aydogan Ayaz, Elif; Durkan, Rukiye

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of adding acrylamide monomer (AAm) on the characterization, flexural strength, flexural modulus and thermal degradation temperature of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) denture-base resins. Specimens (n=10) were fabricated from a conventional heat-activated QC-20 (Qc-) and a microwave heat-activated Acron MC (Ac-) PMMA resins. Powder/liquid ratio followed the manufacturer's instructions for the control groups (Qc-c and Ac-c) and for the copolymer groups, the resins were prepared with 5% (-5), 10% (-10), 15% (-15) and 20% (-20) acrylamide contents, according to the molecular weight ratio, respectively. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were measured by a three-point bending test. The data obtained were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05) to determine significant differences between the groups. The chemical structures of the resins were characterized by the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Thermal stabilities were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with a heating rate of 10 °C⋅min(-1) from 35 °C to 600 °C. Control groups from both acrylic resins showed the lowest flexural strength values. Qc-15 showed significant increase in the flexural strength when compared to Qc-c (P<0.01). Ac-10 and Ac-15 showed significance when compared to Ac-c (P<0.01). Acrylamide incorporation increased the elastic modulus in Qc-10, Qc-15 and Qc-20 when compared to Qc-c (P<0.01). Also significant increase was observed in Ac-10, Ac-15 and Ac-20 copolymer groups when compared to Ac-c (P<0.01). According to the (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results, acrylamide copolymerization was confirmed in the experimental groups. TGA results showed that the thermal stability of PMMA is increased by the insertion of AAm.

  14. Influence of acrylamide monomer addition to the acrylic denture-base resins on mechanical and physical properties

    PubMed Central

    Aydogan Ayaz, Elif; Durkan, Rukiye

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of adding acrylamide monomer (AAm) on the characterization, flexural strength, flexural modulus and thermal degradation temperature of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) denture-base resins. Specimens (n=10) were fabricated from a conventional heat-activated QC-20 (Qc-) and a microwave heat-activated Acron MC (Ac-) PMMA resins. Powder/liquid ratio followed the manufacturer's instructions for the control groups (Qc-c and Ac-c) and for the copolymer groups, the resins were prepared with 5% (−5), 10% (−10), 15% (−15) and 20% (−20) acrylamide contents, according to the molecular weight ratio, respectively. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were measured by a three-point bending test. The data obtained were statistically analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis test (α=0.05) to determine significant differences between the groups. The chemical structures of the resins were characterized by the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Thermal stabilities were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with a heating rate of 10 °C⋅min−1 from 35 °C to 600 °C. Control groups from both acrylic resins showed the lowest flexural strength values. Qc-15 showed significant increase in the flexural strength when compared to Qc-c (P<0.01). Ac-10 and Ac-15 showed significance when compared to Ac-c (P<0.01). Acrylamide incorporation increased the elastic modulus in Qc-10, Qc-15 and Qc-20 when compared to Qc-c (P<0.01). Also significant increase was observed in Ac-10, Ac-15 and Ac-20 copolymer groups when compared to Ac-c (P<0.01). According to the 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results, acrylamide copolymerization was confirmed in the experimental groups. TGA results showed that the thermal stability of PMMA is increased by the insertion of AAm. PMID:24030556

  15. Fabrication of Closed Hollow Bulb Obturator Using Thermoplastic Resin Material.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bidhan; Hughes, E Richard; Kumar Singh, Raj; Suwal, Pramita; Parajuli, Prakash Kumar; Shrestha, Pragya; Sharma, Arati; Adhikari, Galav

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Closed hollow bulb obturators are used for the rehabilitation of postmaxillectomy patients. However, the time consuming process, complexity of fabrication, water leakage, and discoloration are notable disadvantages of this technique. This paper describes a clinical report of fabricating closed hollow bulb obturator using a single flask and one time processing method for an acquired maxillary defect. Hard thermoplastic resin sheet has been used for the fabrication of hollow bulb part of the obturator. Method. After fabrication of master cast conventionally, bulb and lid part of the defect were formed separately and joined by autopolymerizing acrylic resin to form one sized smaller hollow body. During packing procedure, the defect area was loaded with heat polymerizing acrylic resin and then previously fabricated smaller hollow body was adapted over it. The whole area was then loaded with heat cure acrylic. Further processes were carried out conventionally. Conclusion. This technique uses single flask which reduces laboratory time and makes the procedure simple. The thickness of hollow bulb can be controlled and light weight closed hollow bulb prosthesis can be fabricated. It also minimizes the disadvantages of closed hollow bulb obturator such as water leakage, bacterial infection, and discoloration.

  16. Fabrication of Closed Hollow Bulb Obturator Using Thermoplastic Resin Material

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bidhan; Hughes, E. Richard; Kumar Singh, Raj; Suwal, Pramita; Parajuli, Prakash Kumar; Shrestha, Pragya; Sharma, Arati; Adhikari, Galav

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Closed hollow bulb obturators are used for the rehabilitation of postmaxillectomy patients. However, the time consuming process, complexity of fabrication, water leakage, and discoloration are notable disadvantages of this technique. This paper describes a clinical report of fabricating closed hollow bulb obturator using a single flask and one time processing method for an acquired maxillary defect. Hard thermoplastic resin sheet has been used for the fabrication of hollow bulb part of the obturator. Method. After fabrication of master cast conventionally, bulb and lid part of the defect were formed separately and joined by autopolymerizing acrylic resin to form one sized smaller hollow body. During packing procedure, the defect area was loaded with heat polymerizing acrylic resin and then previously fabricated smaller hollow body was adapted over it. The whole area was then loaded with heat cure acrylic. Further processes were carried out conventionally. Conclusion. This technique uses single flask which reduces laboratory time and makes the procedure simple. The thickness of hollow bulb can be controlled and light weight closed hollow bulb prosthesis can be fabricated. It also minimizes the disadvantages of closed hollow bulb obturator such as water leakage, bacterial infection, and discoloration. PMID:26491575

  17. Candida albicans adhesion to composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Bürgers, Ralf; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    The adhesion of Candida albicans to dental restorative materials in the human oral cavity may promote the occurrence of oral candidosis. This study aimed to compare the susceptibility of 14 commonly used composite resin materials (two compomers, one ormocer, one novel silorane, and ten conventional hybrid composites) to adhere Candida albicans. Differences in the amount of adhering fungi should be related to surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the type of matrix. Cylindrical specimens of each material were made according to the manufacturers' instructions. Surface roughness R (a) was assessed by perthometer measurements and the degree of hydrophobicity by computerized contact angle analysis. Specimens were incubated with a reference strain of C. albicans (DMSZ 1386), and adhering fungi were quantified by using a bioluminometric assay in combination with an automated plate reader. Statistical differences were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to assess correlations. Median R (a) of the tested composite resin materials ranged between 0.04 and 0.23 microm, median contact angles between 69.2 degrees and 86.9 degrees . The two compomers and the ormocer showed lower luminescence intensities indicating less adhesion of fungi than all tested conventional hybrid composites. No conclusive correlation was found between surface roughness, hydrophobicity, and the amount of adhering C. albicans.

  18. Effects of Denture Cleansers on Heat-Polymerized Acrylic Resin: A Five-Year-Simulated Period of Use.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Carolina Noronha Ferraz; Sorgini, Danilo Balero; Oliveira, Viviane de Cássia; Macedo, Ana Paula; Lovato, Cláudia Helena Silva; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated color stability, surface roughness and flexural strength of acrylic resin after immersion in alkaline peroxide and alkaline hypochlorite solutions, simulating a five-year-period of use. Sixty disc-shaped (16 x 4 mm) and 60 rectangular specimens (65 x 10 x 3.3 mm) were prepared from heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Lucitone 550) and assigned to 3 groups (n = 20) of immersion (20 min): C1: distilled water; AP: warm water and one alkaline peroxide tablet; SH: 0.5% NaOCl solution. Color data (∆E) were determined by a colorimeter and also quantified according to the National Bureau of Standards units. A rugosimeter was used to measure roughness (μm) and the flexural strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine. Data were evaluated by Kruskal-Wallis followed by Dunn tests (color stability and surface roughness) and by one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni test (flexural strength). For all tests was considered α = 0.05. AP {0.79 (0.66;1.42)} caused color alteration significantly higher than C1 {0.45 (0.37;0.57)} and SH {0.34 (0.25;0.42)}. The mean ∆Ε values quantified by NBS were classified as "trace" for C1 (0.43) and SH (0.31) and "slight" for AP (0.96). SH {-0.015 (-0.023;0.003)} caused significantly higher ΔRa than the C1 {0.000 (-0.004;0.010)} and AP {0.000 (-0.009;0.008)} groups. There was no statistically significant difference among the solutions for flexural strength (C1: 84.62 ± 16.00, AP: 85.63 ± 12.99, SH: 84.22 ± 14.72). It was concluded that immersion in alkaline peroxide and NaOCl solutions simulating a five-year of 20 min daily soaking did not cause clinically significant adverse effects on the heat-polymerized acrylic resin.

  19. Surface properties of multilayered, acrylic resin artificial teeth after immersion in staining beverages

    PubMed Central

    NEPPELENBROEK, Karin Hermana; KUROISHI, Eduardo; HOTTA, Juliana; MARQUES, Vinicius Rizzo; MOFFA, Eduardo Buozi; SOARES, Simone; URBAN, Vanessa Migliorini

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of staining beverages (coffee, orange juice, and red wine) on the Vickers hardness and surface roughness of the base (BL) and enamel (EL) layers of improved artificial teeth (Vivodent and Trilux). Material and Methods Specimens (n=8) were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and then submitted to the tests. Afterwards, specimens were immersed in one of the staining solutions or distilled water (control) at 37°C, and the tests were also performed after 15 and 30 days of immersion. Data were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results Vivodent teeth exhibited a continuous decrease (p<0.0005) in hardness of both layers for up to 30 days of immersion in all solutions. For Trilux teeth, similar results were found for the EL (p<0.004), and the BL showed a decrease in hardness after 15 days of immersion (p<0.01). At the end of 30 days, this reduction was not observed for coffee and water (p>0.15), but red wine and orange juice continuously reduced hardness values (p<0.0004). Red wine caused the most significant hardness changes, followed by orange juice, coffee, and water (p<0.006). No significant differences in roughness were observed for both layers of the teeth during the immersion period, despite the beverage (p>0.06). Conclusions Hardness of the two brands of acrylic teeth was reduced by all staining beverages, mainly for red wine. Roughness of both layers of the teeth was not affected by long-term immersion in the beverages. PMID:26398509

  20. Synthesis of wheat straw cellulose-g-poly (potassium acrylate)/PVA semi-IPNs superabsorbent resin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Li, Qian; Su, Yuan; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Rui

    2013-04-15

    To better use wheat straw and minimize its negative impact on environment, a novel semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) superabsorbent resin (SAR) composed of wheat straw cellulose-g-poly (potassium acrylate) (WSC-g-PKA) network and linear polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was prepared by polymerization in the presence of a redox initiating system. The structure and morphology of semi-IPNs SAR were characterized by means of FTIR, SEM and TGA, which confirmed that WSC and PVA participated in the graft polymerization reaction with acrylic acid (AA). The factors that can influence the water absorption of the semi-IPNs SAR were investigated and optimized, including the weight ratios of AA to WSC and PVA to WSC, the content of initiator and crosslinker, neutralization degree (ND) of AA, reaction temperature and time. The semi-IPNs SAR prepared under optimized synthesis condition gave the best water absorption of 266.82 g/g in distilled water and 34.32 g/g in 0.9 wt% NaCl solution. PMID:23544572

  1. Influence of Sea Water Aging on the Mechanical Behaviour of Acrylic Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P.; Le Gac, P.-Y.; Le Gall, M.

    2016-07-01

    A new matrix resin was recently introduced for composite materials, based on acrylic resin chemistry allowing standard room temperature infusion techniques to be used to produce recyclable thermoplastic composites. This is a significant advance, particularly for more environmentally-friendly production of large marine structures such as boats. However, for such applications it is essential to demonstrate that composites produced with these resins resist sea water exposure in service. This paper presents results from a wet aging study of unreinforced acrylic and glass and carbon fibre reinforced acrylic composites. It is shown that the acrylic matrix resin is very stable in seawater, showing lower property losses after seawater aging than those of a commonly-used epoxy matrix resin. Carbon fibre reinforced acrylic also shows good property retention after aging, while reductions in glass fibre reinforced composite strengths suggest that specific glass fibre sizing may be required for optimum durability.

  2. Influence of polymerization method, curing process, and length of time of storage in water on the residual methyl methacrylate content in dental acrylic resins.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Gulsen; Guvener, Bora; Bural, Canan; Uresin, Yagiz

    2006-02-01

    This study compared the influence of different polymerization methods (heat, auto-, and microwave energy), different curing processes (in the case of heat- and autopolymerized specimens), and length of storage of the polymerized specimens in distilled water at 37 degrees C on the residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) content in dental acrylic resin specimens. Residual MMA of 120 resin specimens were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. For the heat-polymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were given a long-term terminal boil and then stored in the distilled water for at least 1 day. For the autopolymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were additionally cured in water at 60 degrees C and then stored in the distilled water at least 1 day. For the microwave-polymerized resins, the lowest residual MMA content was obtained when they were stored in the distilled water at least 1 month. The lowest overall residual MMA content was obtained from heat-polymerized specimens that were given a long-term terminal boil cure and then stored in the distilled water at least 1 day. Different polymerization methods and curing processes have different effects on residual MMA content. It is thus shown that storing a dental acrylic resin specimen in distilled water at 37 degrees C is a simple but effective method of reducing its residual MMA content.

  3. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  4. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872.3690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material....

  5. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310 Section 872.3310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin...

  6. Investigation into the effect of use of metal primer on adhesion of heat cure acrylic resin to cast titanium: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Podder, Sudipto; Goel, Preeti; Kar, Sunil; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta

    2014-09-01

    The availability of adhesive primers capable of bonding chemically to base metal alloys without well defined passive oxide surface film has been improved significantly over the last decade. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to compare and evaluate the effect of metal primer on adhesion of heat cure acrylic resin to cast titanium. Shear bond strength test was conducted on 80 commercially pure titanium cast metal heat-cure acrylic resin discs treated with different surface treatments. The first group received no surface treatment (group I); the second group was subjected to sandblasting (group II); the third group was treated with bonding agent (alloy primer) (group III) and the fourth was treated with sandblasting and alloy primer (group IV). After the samples were surface treated, acrylic resin was mixed, packed and processed over the test area of cast titanium. Ten specimens of each group were immersed in distilled water for 24 h followed by thermocycling for 20,000 cycles. Shear bond-strength between the heat cure acrylic resin and titanium was evaluated using Instron universal testing machine. Debonded specimens of all the groups were subjected to SEM analysis. The bond failure (MPa) was analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan's multiple comparison tests. Surface treatment with sandblasting, followed by the application of alloy primer showed maximum shear bond strength before and after thermocycling (24.50 ± 0.59 and 17.39 ± 1.56 MPa respectively).The bond strength values are found to be in decreasing magnitudes as group IV > group III > group II > group I. The following pretreatment to improve the shear bond strength of heat cure acrylic resin to titanium is recommended in order to attain the maximum bond strength in cast titanium frameworks for various prostheses: sandblasting, cleaning in an ultrasonic bath for 10 min and air drying followed by application of a bonding agent uniformly on the sandblasted cast titanium surface before packing with heat

  7. Investigation into the effect of use of metal primer on adhesion of heat cure acrylic resin to cast titanium: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Podder, Sudipto; Goel, Preeti; Kar, Sunil; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta

    2014-09-01

    The availability of adhesive primers capable of bonding chemically to base metal alloys without well defined passive oxide surface film has been improved significantly over the last decade. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to compare and evaluate the effect of metal primer on adhesion of heat cure acrylic resin to cast titanium. Shear bond strength test was conducted on 80 commercially pure titanium cast metal heat-cure acrylic resin discs treated with different surface treatments. The first group received no surface treatment (group I); the second group was subjected to sandblasting (group II); the third group was treated with bonding agent (alloy primer) (group III) and the fourth was treated with sandblasting and alloy primer (group IV). After the samples were surface treated, acrylic resin was mixed, packed and processed over the test area of cast titanium. Ten specimens of each group were immersed in distilled water for 24 h followed by thermocycling for 20,000 cycles. Shear bond-strength between the heat cure acrylic resin and titanium was evaluated using Instron universal testing machine. Debonded specimens of all the groups were subjected to SEM analysis. The bond failure (MPa) was analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan's multiple comparison tests. Surface treatment with sandblasting, followed by the application of alloy primer showed maximum shear bond strength before and after thermocycling (24.50 ± 0.59 and 17.39 ± 1.56 MPa respectively).The bond strength values are found to be in decreasing magnitudes as group IV > group III > group II > group I. The following pretreatment to improve the shear bond strength of heat cure acrylic resin to titanium is recommended in order to attain the maximum bond strength in cast titanium frameworks for various prostheses: sandblasting, cleaning in an ultrasonic bath for 10 min and air drying followed by application of a bonding agent uniformly on the sandblasted cast titanium surface before packing with heat

  8. The effect of acrylic latex-based polymer on cow blood adhesive resins for wood composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Lin, H. L.; Feng, G. Z.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, alkali-modified cow blood adhesive (BA) and blood adhesive/acrylic latex-based adhesive (BA/ALB) were prepared. The physicochemical and adhesion properties of cow blood adhesive such as UV- visible spectra, particle size, viscosity were evaluated; share strength, water resistance were tested. UV- visible spectra indicates that the strong bonding strength of BA/ALB appeared after incorporating; the particle size of adhesive decreased with the increase of ALB concentration, by mixing ALB and BA, hydrophilic polymer tends locate or extand the protein chains and provide stability of the particles; viscosity decreased as shear rate increased in concordance with a pseudoplastic behavior; both at dry and soak conditions, BA and ALB/BA show significant difference changes when mass fraction of ALB in blend adhesive was over 30% (p < 0.05). ALB/ BA (ALB30%) is not significant different than that of phenol formaldehyde which was used as control. A combination of cow blood and acrylic latex-based adhesive significantly increased the strength and water resistance of the resulting wood.

  9. The pH effect of solvent in silanization on fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing fluoride-releasing filler.

    PubMed

    Nakornchai, Natha; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization on the amount of fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing a silanized fluoride-releasing filler. The experimental groups were divided into 4 groups; non-silanized, acidic-adjusted pH, non-adjusted pH, and no filler as control. For fluoride measurement, each specimen was placed in deionized water which was changed every day for 7 days, every week for 7 weeks and measured. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were evaluated after aging for 48 h, 1, and 2 months. Two-way ANOVA indicated significant differences among groups, storage times, and its interaction in fluoride measurement and flexural modulus. For flexural strength, there was significant difference only among groups. Acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization enhanced the amount of fluoride released from acrylic resin, while non-adjusted pH of solvent exhibited better flexural strength of acrylic resin. PMID:27252000

  10. The pH effect of solvent in silanization on fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing fluoride-releasing filler.

    PubMed

    Nakornchai, Natha; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization on the amount of fluoride released and mechanical properties of heat-cured acrylic resin containing a silanized fluoride-releasing filler. The experimental groups were divided into 4 groups; non-silanized, acidic-adjusted pH, non-adjusted pH, and no filler as control. For fluoride measurement, each specimen was placed in deionized water which was changed every day for 7 days, every week for 7 weeks and measured. The flexural strength and flexural modulus were evaluated after aging for 48 h, 1, and 2 months. Two-way ANOVA indicated significant differences among groups, storage times, and its interaction in fluoride measurement and flexural modulus. For flexural strength, there was significant difference only among groups. Acidic-adjusted pH of solvent in silanization enhanced the amount of fluoride released from acrylic resin, while non-adjusted pH of solvent exhibited better flexural strength of acrylic resin.

  11. Composite resin: a versatile, multi-purpose restorative material.

    PubMed

    Margeas, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduced more than some 50 years ago, composite resin technology has simplified the manner in which clinicians practice restorative dentistry, offering greater predictability and improved physical properties. Decades of material science and laboratory development along with clinical trials in human subjects have culminated in composite resin being validated as a reliable, multifunctional restorative material. With a wide range of composite resins available today, clinicians can benefit from knowing the infrastructure of a given material in order to determine which type will work best in a particular clinical situation.

  12. Effect of cleanser solutions on the color of acrylic resins associated with titanium and nickel-chromium alloys.

    PubMed

    Freitas Oliveira Paranhos, Helena de; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Davi, Letícia Resende; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Silva, Cláudia Helena Lovato da; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of cleanser solutions on the color of heat-polymerized acrylic resin (HPAR) and on the brightness of dental alloys with 180 immersion trials. Disk-shaped specimens were made with I) commercially pure titanium, II) nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium, III) nickel-chromium molybdenum, and IV) nickel-chromium-molybdenum beryllium. Each cast disk was invested in the flasks, incorporating the metal disk into the HPAR. The specimens (n=5) were then immersed in solutions containing: 0.05% sodium hypochlorite, 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate, 0.500 mg cetylpyridinium chloride, a citric acid tablet, one of two different sodium perborate/enzyme tablets, and water. The color measurements (∆E) of the HPAR were determined by a colorimeter in accordance with the National Bureau of Standards. The surface brightness of the metal was visually examined for the presence of tarnish. The results (ANOVA; Tukey test-α=0.05) show that there was a significant difference between the groups (p<0.001) but not among the solutions (p=0.273). The highest mean was obtained for group III (5.06), followed by group II (2.14). The lowest averages were obtained for groups I (1.33) and IV (1.35). The color changes in groups I, II and IV were slight but noticeable, and the color change was considerable for group III. The visual analysis showed that 0.05% sodium hypochlorite caused metallic brightness changes in groups II and IV. It can be concluded that the agents had the same effect on the color of the resin and that the metallic alloys are not resistant to the action of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite.

  13. [Comparative evaluation of physical-mechanical properties and surface morphology of the samples of base self cured acrylic resin "Redont-kolir" polymerized in the silicone and alginate matrixes].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Determination of advantages of using silicone or alginate impression material as a matrix is decisive for quality of immediate and transitional dentures manufactured by the direct method using self-cured acrylic resins. The aim of this study was a comparative evaluation of physical-mechanical properties and surface morphology of the samples of base self-cured acrylic resin "Redont-kolir" polymerized in the silicone and alginate matrix. The samples were polymerized in the C-silicone - "Zeta plus-putty" ("Zhermack", Italy) and alginate -"Ypeen" ("Spofa Dental", Czech Republic) matrixes under different regimes: 1) in the pneumopolymerizer "Averon" at an air pressure of 3 atm., a temperature of 450C for 15 minutes, and 2) polymerization in water at 450C for 15 minutes. We determined the following physical and mechanical properties: bending load, toughness, bending stress at break, hardness by Heppler, conical point of fluidity and water absorption. Electron microscopy studies of the samples have been conducted on electronic raster microscope JSM-840 ("Jeol", Japan). As a result of studies, it was found that the optimum regime of polymerization for acrylate "Redont-kolir" is in the pneumopolymerizer "Averon" at an air pressure of 3 atm., a temperature of 450 C for 15 minutes. By the results of studying the surface morphology of the samples we can draw a conclusion that the use of an alginate impression material as matrix allows to obtain a qualitatively better surface of denture. But taking into account the technological properties of the alginate impression materials, namely an expressed shrinkage, their use for this purpose must be limited by the time during which the impression matrix remain stable in size, which is specified by manufacturer's recommendations.

  14. Prosthetic rehabilitation with collapsible hybrid acrylic resin and permanent silicone soft liner complete denture of a patient with scleroderma-induced microstomia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi; Gupta, Ridhimaa; Abrahm, Dex

    2014-07-01

    Scleroderma is an autoimmune multisystem rheumatic condition characterized by fibrosis of connective tissues of the body, resulting in hardening and impairment of the function of different organs. Deposition of collagen fibers in peri-oral tissues causes loss of elasticity and increased tissue stiffness, resulting in restricted mouth opening. A maximal oral opening smaller than the size of a complete denture can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Patients with microstomia who must wear removable dental prostheses (RDPs) often face the difficulty of being unable to insert or remove a conventional RDP. A sectional-collapsible denture is indicated for the prosthetic management of these patients, but reduced manual dexterity often makes intraoral manipulation of the prosthesis difficult. A single collapsible complete denture is a better choice for functional rehabilitation of these patients. This clinical report describes in detail the prosthodontic management of a maxillary edentulous patient with restricted mouth opening induced by scleroderma with a single collapsible removable complete denture fabricated with heat-polymerized silicone soft liner and heat-cured acrylic resin. The preliminary and secondary impressions were made with moldable aluminum trays by using putty and light-body poly(vinyl siloxane) elastomeric impression material. The collapsed denture can be easily inserted and removed by the patient and also provides adequate function in the mouth.

  15. Custom Metal Occlusal Surface for Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth to Enhance Wear Resistance: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shivji, Rizwan Ali; Kamble, Vaibhav D.; Khan, Mohd. Atif

    2012-01-01

    Wear of the occlusal surface of the denture is a known fact which leads to subsequent changes in jaw relation, vertical dimension, loss of aesthetics, aged looks, and decrease in masticatory efficiency. Treatment modalities includes, change of denture set after a regular interval of 4-5 years, use of wear resistant denture teeth that includes wear resistant resin or porcelain teeth, teeth with cast metal occlusal surface, and altering occlusal contact areas of denture teeth by use of silver amalgam fillings. A case report of a patient who had increased tendency of occlusal wear was treated with custom made metal occlusal surface of denture teeth to enhance wear resistance and to improve the masticatory efficiency. PMID:22997592

  16. In vitro evaluation of adherence of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Streptococcus mutans to an acrylic resin modified by experimental coatings.

    PubMed

    Izumida, Fernanda Emiko; Moffa, Eduardo Buozi; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Machado, Ana Lúcia; Jorge, Janaína Habib; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of experimental coatings, containing zwitterion or hydrophilic monomers, on the adherence of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Streptococcus mutans to an acrylic resin. Acrylic samples (smooth or rough surfaces) were left untreated (control) or coated with one of the following experimental coatings: 3-hydroxypropylmethacrylate (HP) or sulfobetaine methacrylate (S), at concentrations of 25, 30, or 35%. Half of the specimens were coated with saliva. The adhesion test was performed by incubating specimens in C. albicans, C. glabrata, and S. mutans suspensions at 37°C for 90 min. The number of adhered microorganisms was determined by metabolic activity (XTT) and by cell viability (CFU). All coated specimens exhibited lower absorbance and CFU values compared to control specimens. Saliva and roughness did not promote microorganism adherence. An XPS analysis confirmed the modification in the chemical composition of the coatings in the experimental samples. These experimental coatings significantly reduced the adherence of C. albicans, C. glabrata and S. mutans to acrylic resin.

  17. Degradation, fatigue and failure of resin dental composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, James L.

    2008-01-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle or fiber filler containing, indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed mode loading on the flexure strength and fracture toughness. Next several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading and then an examination of 3D tomography using multiaxial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection) and after that time period from secondary decay. PMID:18650540

  18. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  19. Degradation, fatigue, and failure of resin dental composite materials.

    PubMed

    Drummond, J L

    2008-08-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  20. The surface finish of light-cured composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, S K; Henderson, L J

    1993-01-01

    A necessity for any dental restorative material is its ability to take and maintain a smooth surface finish. Composite resin restorative materials with fillers and matrix of differing hardness are difficult to finish and polish. The use of aluminum trioxide discs is a popular and acceptable method of finishing composite restorative materials where the material is accessible. Burs and stones are used for finishing and polishing inaccessible areas. This study was undertaken to compare the surface finish of composite resin restorative material when finished with white stones, superfine diamond burs and aluminum trioxide discs. The finished surface was measured with a profilometer and the roughness average value used to compare the surfaces. The aluminum trioxide discs gave the best and most consistent results. It was possible to attain similar results with the superfine diamond bur. However, the results were highly variable. None of the methods used achieved the smoothness of composite resin cured against a transparent matrix.

  1. [Effects of composite resin materials on gingiva and pulp].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Ishikawa, I; Masunaga, H; Matsue, M; Matsue, I

    1989-09-01

    Composite resin materials are now widely used for dental therapy. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of composite resins on gingiva and pulp in case of application of them for temporally splint in periodontal treatment. 60 teeth in 6 female dogs ranging between 1 and 2 years of age with healty teeth and gingiva were divieded to 4 groups; (1) 12 teeth, controls; (2) 12 teeth, self-cured composite resin (Clearfil F II, CF II); (3) 18 teeth, light-cured resin (Belfel LX, BLX), curing time 20 sec. and (4) 18 teeth, BLX, 40 sec., and then 48 class V composite resins were restored supragingivally. The experimental procedure were carried out for 5 days and 30 days. Histopathological observations of 60 teeth inclusive of controls were made by applying to specimens with Hematoxylin eosin staining. For the materials and time periods in this study it was found that; 1. Light-cured composite resin was superior to self-cured composite resin on handlings. 2. There were no significant differences in periodontium between the experimentals (BLX, CF II) and controls in 5 days. At the 30 days the histologic score showed more gingivitis for the experimental teeth than for the controls (BLX-40 greater than BLX-20 greater than CF II greater than Cont.). 3. At 5 days hyperemia occurred in some cases of experimentals (both BLX and CF II). The appearance of predentin and changes of odontblastic layer were observed slightly in 30 days. But there were no significant differences between BLX and CF II. 4. The result suggested that applying to composite resin materials for temporally splint, both gingiva and pulp have to be protected.

  2. Dental fiber-post resin base material: a review

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chun; Zhang, Fu-qiang

    2014-01-01

    Teeth that have short clinical crown, which are not alone enough to support the definitive restoration can be best treated using the post and core system. The advantages of fiber post over conventional metallic post materials have led to its wide acceptance. In addition to that the combination of aesthetic and mechanical benefits of fiber post has provided it with a rise in the field of dentistry. Also the results obtained from some clinical trials have encouraged the clinicians to use the fiber posts confidently. Fiber posts are manufactured from pre-stretched fibers impregnated within a resin matrix. The fibers could that be of carbon, glass/silica, and quartz, whereas Epoxy and bis-GMA are the most widely used resin bases. But recently studies are also found to be going on for polyimide as possible material for the fiber post resin base as a substitute for the conventional materials. PMID:24605208

  3. Composite-resin materials and techniques in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Powell, L V

    1992-03-01

    Important features to consider when selecting composite resins are filler size and amount, radiopacity, and fluoride content. Submicron particles provide the best polishability, and heavily filled resins demonstrate better wear resistance. The radiopacity of the composite resin should slightly exceed that of enamel to allow visualization of the restoration and recurrent decay. Fluoride added to the matrix may arrest the progression of caries. Properly cured composite resins should not cause chronic pulpal irritation; however, infection of the cervical contraction gap resulting from poor bonding to root surfaces may cause pulpal irritation. Techniques to improve curing include incremental build-up, reflective matrices and wedges, and controlling the direction of light vectors. A surface sealant is highly recommended to reduce wear, especially in the posterior region. Porcelain veneers perform better clinically than do composite-resin veneers. Class I and II composite-resin restorations reinforce weakened tooth structure; however, problems with cervical leakage and wear prevent the recommendation of these materials for larger posterior restorations that involve occlusal contacts or that require bonding to root surfaces.

  4. Advanced composites: Environmental effects on selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects that expected space flight environment has upon the mechanical properties of epoxy and polyimide matrix composites were analyzed. Environmental phenomena covered water immersion, high temperature aging, humidity, lightning strike, galvanic action, electromagnetic interference, thermal shock, rain and sand erosion, and thermal/vacuum outgassing. The technology state-of-the-art for graphite and boron reinforced epoxy and polyimide matrix materials is summarized to determine the relative merit of using composites in the space shuttle program. Resin matrix composites generally are affected to some degree by natural environmental phenomena with polyimide resin matrix materials less affected than epoxies.

  5. Synthesis of glycerol-derived diallyl spiroorthocarbonates and the study of their antishrinking properties in acrylic dental resins.

    PubMed

    Acosta Ortiz, Ricardo; Reyna Medina, Luis Alberto; Berlanga Duarte, María Lydia; Ibarra Samaniego, Lucía; Garcia Valdez, Aida Esmeralda; García Mendez, Zaida Lucía; Mendez Gonzalez, Luis

    2013-08-01

    In this work was evaluated the efficiency of an antishrinkage additive in a dental resin. This additive was a mixture 1:1 of five and six-membered ring spiroorthocarbonates functionalized with allylic groups (SOC DA). The aim of this study was to reduce the shrinkage of a typical dental resin composed of a blend of the dimethacrylates, Glycerolate bisphenol A dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA)/2-[(3,5,5-trimethyl-6-[2-(2-methyl prop-2-enoyloxy) ethoxycarbonylamino] hexyl) carbamoyloxy] ethyl, 2-methyl prop-2-enoate, (UDMA)/triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) in a 50:30.20 molar ratio, and silicon dioxide as filler. SOC DA was added at 5, 10 and 20 mol% to the already mentioned formulation. It was found that the addition of 20 mol% of SOC DA decreased 53 % the shrinkage of the cured composite material, in comparison with a formulation where it was not added the antishrinkage additive. Besides, the kinetics of photopolymerization determined by Real-Time infrared spectroscopy, demonstrated that the addition of increasing concentration of SOC DA improved the conversion of double bonds of dimethacrylates. Additionally, the presence of SOC DA at 10 % mol, helped to increase the flexural strength and the compressive strength of the composite, as a consequence of the augment of the crosslink density, induced by the ring opening polymerization of SOC DA.

  6. Microleakage of adhesive resinous materials in root canals

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason Gilbert; Caputo, Angelo Anthony; Li, Ping; White, Shane Newport

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro micro-leakage resistance of adhesive resin materials to long-used zinc oxide-eugenol and epoxy resin sealers. Materials and Methods: Seven materials, five test (Real Seal, Real Seal XT, Panavia F 2.0, Infinity Syringeable, GCEM) and two controls (Tubliseal, AH Plus), were evaluated for micro-leakage resistance in a bovine incisor root model, with 12 roots per material. Teeth were root canal treated, stored in water, artificially aged by thermal-cycling, stained with silver nitrate, sectioned to yield eight measurement points per tooth (four coronal and four apical), giving 672 measurement points. Stain penetration was measured using digital positioners and a toolmakers microscope; then analyzed using descriptive statistics, two-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons testing (P < 0.05). Results: All modern adhesive resinous materials leaked significantly less than long-used zinc oxide-eugenol and epoxy resin sealers (P < 0.05). Mean leakage values and their associated (standard deviations) in mm were: Infinity Syringeable 2.5 (1.5), Real Seal XT 3.2 (1.4), Real Seal 3.4 (1.6), Panavia F 2.0 3.8 (2.7), GCEM 4.2 (1.8), Tubli-seal 5.4 (2.8), AH Plus 6.3 (2.3). Overall, more leakage occurred apically than coronally (P < 0.0001). Many materials exhibited dimensional instability: Marked contraction, expansion, or lack of cohesion. Conclusion: A variety of adhesive resinous materials, endodontic sealers and crown cements, reduced micro-leakage in comparison to long and widely used zinc oxide- eugenol and epoxy sealers. PMID:23833453

  7. Resin-based composite as a direct esthetic restorative material.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala; Acharya, Shashirashmi

    2011-06-01

    The search for an ideal esthetic material for tooth restoration has resulted in significant improvements in both materials and the techniques for using them. Various resin-based composite (RBC) materials have recently been introduced into the market that offer improved esthetic and physical properties. This article reviews RBCs, including their compositions, advantages, and disadvantages, that are contemporary to today's clinical practice as well as those that are under research consideration and/ or in clinical trial phase.

  8. Peel bond strength of resilient liner modified by the addition of antimicrobial agents to denture base acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    ALCÂNTARA, Cristiane S.; de MACÊDO, Allana F.C.; GURGEL, Bruno C.V.; JORGE, Janaina H.; NEPPELENBROEK, Karin H.; URBAN, Vanessa M.

    2012-01-01

    In order to prolong the clinical longevity of resilient denture relining materials and reduce plaque accumulation, incorporation of antimicrobial agents into these materials has been proposed. However, this addition may affect their properties. Objective This study evaluated the effect of the addition of antimicrobial agents into one soft liner (Soft Confort, Dencril) on its peel bond strength to one denture base (QC 20, Dentsply). Material and Methods Acrylic specimens (n=9) were made (75x10x3 mm) and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 48 h. The drug powder concentrations (nystatin 500,000U - G2; nystatin 1,000,000U - G3; miconazole 125 mg - G4; miconazole 250 mg - G5; ketoconazole 100 mg - G6; ketoconazole 200 mg - G7; chlorhexidine diacetate 5% - G8; and 10% chlorhexidine diacetate - G9) were blended with the soft liner powder before the addition of the soft liner liquid. A group (G1) without any drug incorporation was used as control. Specimens (n=9) (75x10x6 mm) were plasticized according to the manufacturers' instructions and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h. Relined specimens were then submitted to a 180-degree peel test at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min. Data (MPa) were analyzed by analysis of variance (α=0.05) and the failure modes were visually classified. Results No significant difference was found among experimental groups (p=0.148). Cohesive failure located within the resilient material was predominantly observed in all tested groups. Conclusions Peel bond strength between the denture base and the modified soft liner was not affected by the addition of antimicrobial agents. PMID:23329241

  9. Effect of Food Simulating Agents on the Hardness and Bond Strength of a Silicone Soft Liner to a Denture Base Acrylic Resin

    PubMed Central

    Khaledi, A.A.R.; Bahrani, M.; Shirzadi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Bonding failure between acrylic resin and soft liner material and also gradual loss of soft liner resiliency over time are two impending challenges frequently recognized with a denture base embraced with a resilient liner. Since patients drink various beverages, it is crucial to assess the influences of these beverages on physical characteristics of soft liners. Purpose: This in vitro study envisioned to assess the influence of food simulating agents (FSA) on the hardness of a silicone soft liner by employing a Shore A durometer test and also evaluate its bond strength to a denture base resin by using tensile bond strength test. Materials and Methods: To test the hardness of samples, 50 rectangular samples (40 mm × 10 mm × 3 mm) were prepared from a heat-polymerized polymethyl methacrylate (Meliodent). Mollosil, a commercially available silicone resilient liner, was provided and applied on the specimens following the manufacturer’s directions. In order to test tensile bond strength, 100 cylindrical specimens (30 mm × 10 mm) were fabricated. The liners were added between specimens with the thicknesses of 3 mm. The specimens were divided into 5 groups (n=10) and immersed in distilled water, heptane, citric acid, and 50% ethanol. For each test, we used 10 specimens as a baseline measurement; control group. All specimens were kept in dispersed containers at 37ºC for 12 days and all solutions were changed every day. The hardness was verified using a Shore A durometer and the tensile bond strength was examined by an Instron testing machine at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min. The records were analyzed employing one-way ANOVA, Tukey’s HSD, and LSD tests. Results: The mean tensile bond strength ± standard deviation (SD) for Mollosil was as follows for each group: 3.1 ± 0.4 (water), 1.8 ± 0.4 (citric acid), 3.0 ± 0.4 (heptane), 1.2 ± 0.3 (50% ethanol), and 3.8 ± 0.4 (control). The hardness values for each group were: 28.7 ± 2.11 (water

  10. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... fabrication of crowns, bridges, or full dentures. A preliminary plaster or stone model of the patient's...

  11. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  12. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics. PMID:27651887

  13. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    PubMed

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics. PMID:27651887

  14. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    PubMed

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  15. Comparative evaluation of effect of metal primer and sandblasting on the shear bond strength between heat cured acrylic denture base resin and cobalt-chromium alloy: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sandeep; Kharsan, Vishwas; Kalra, Nidhi Mangtani

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metal primers and sandblasting on the shear bond strength (SBS) of heat cured acrylic denture base resin to cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy. Materials and Methods: A total number of 40 disk shaped wax patterns (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were cast in Co-Cr alloy. Samples were divided into 4 groups depending on the surface treatment received. Group 1: No surface treatment was done and acts as control group. Group 2: Only sandblasting was done. Group 3: Only metal primer was applied. Group 4: Both metal primer and sandblasting were done. After surface treatment samples had been tested in Universal Testing Machine at crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min in shear mode and scanning, electron microscope evaluation was done to observe the mode of failure. Statistical Analysis: All the observations obtained were analyzed statistically using software SPSS version 17; one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey test were applied. Results: The one-way ANOVA indicated that SBS values varied according to type of surface treatment done. The SBS was highest (18.70 ± 1.2 MPa) when both sandblasting and metal primer was done when compared with no surface treatment (2.59 ± 0.32 MPa). Conclusions: It could be concluded that the use of metal primers along with sandblasting significantly improves the bonding of heat cured acrylic denture base resin with the Co-Cr alloy. PMID:26321840

  16. Nanostructured material formulated acrylic bone cements with enhanced drug release.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shou-Cang; Ng, Wai Kiong; Dong, Yuan-Cai; Ng, Junwei; Tan, Reginald Beng Hee

    2016-01-01

    To improve antibiotic properties, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based bone cements are formulated with antibiotic and nanostructured materials, such as hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanorods, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) as drug carriers. For nonporous HAP nanorods, the release of gentamicin (GTMC) is not obviously improved when the content of HAP is below 10%; while the high content of HAP shows detrimental to mechanical properties although the release of GTMC can be substantially increased. As a comparison, low content of hollow nanostructured CNT and MSN can enhance drug delivery efficiency. The presence of 5.3% of CNT in formulation can facilitate the release of more than 75% of GTMC in 80 days, however, its mechanical strength is seriously impaired. Among nanostructured drug carriers, antibiotic/MSN formulation can effectively improve drug delivery and exhibit well preserved mechanical properties. The hollow nanostructured materials are believed to build up nano-networks for antibiotic to diffuse from the bone cement matrix to surface and achieve sustained drug release. Based on MSN drug carrier in formulated bone cement, a binary delivery system is also investigated to release GTMC together with other antibiotics.

  17. Dimensional stability of denture bases following repair with microwave resin.

    PubMed

    Dyer, R A; Howlett, J A

    1994-08-01

    The dimensional stability of a commercially available acrylic resin, designed specifically for polymerization by microwave irradiation, was compared with that of a conventional water-bath-cured resin. Resin bases were processed on duplicate stone casts prepared from a cobalt chromium master die. Twenty bases were polymerized, using acrylic resin modified for rapid heat curing, in a water-bath at 100 degrees C for 22 min. A further 20 bases were polymerized using a microwave curing acrylic resin, in a conventional microwave oven at 500 W power output for 3 min. Ten bases from each group were sectioned in a parasagittal direction and repaired using the microwave curing resin. Following each curing cycle the fit of the posterior border of each base was evaluated via a silicone index formed between the base and the master die. The index was invested in stone and sectioned through the posterior palatal region to allow measurement of its thickness by means of an eyepiece micrometer. One-way analysis of variance and unpaired Student's t tests were employed to compare the differences in distortion at the initial cure and following repair. No significant differences were found in the distortion of the acrylic resin bases produced from the heat-cured or microwave-cured materials. All bases exhibited significant further distortion on repair with the microwave-cured acrylic resin.

  18. In vitro color change of three dental veneering resins in tea, coffee and tamarind extracts

    PubMed Central

    Subramanya, J.K.; Muttagi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the in vitro color changes of three dental resin veneering materials when immersed in tea, coffee and tamarind extracts. Materials and Methods The color changes of heat polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin (Stellondetrey, B, F14, DPI Dental products of India Ltd, Mumbai), auto polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin (DPI, B, QV5, DPI Dental products of India Ltd, Mumbai) and light polymerized resin composite (Herculite XRV, Enamel A2, part no. 22860, lot no. 910437, Kerr Corporation, West Collins Avenue, Orange, CA, USA) when immersed in water extracts of tea (Tata Tea Ltd. Bangalore, India), coffee (Tata Coffee Ltd. Coorg, India) and tamarind were evaluated using computer vision systems. The color images were recorded in R (red), G (green) and B (blue) form and converted into H (hue), S (saturation) and V (value). Results Significant color change occurred for auto polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin in tamarind extract, for heat polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin in tea extract and for light polymerized resin composite in coffee extract. Auto polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin samples showed an overall higher color change. However, for all the material samples coffee extract produced more color change. Conclusion These results suggest that the color stability of the resins is influenced by the presence of secondary metabolites such as tartaric acid, tannins, caffeine, saponins and phenols in tamarind, tea and coffee extracts. PMID:22457841

  19. RGD Surface Functionalization of the Hydrophilic Acrylic Intraocular Lens Material to Control Posterior Capsular Opacification

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Shiang; Bertrand, Virginie; Bozukova, Dimitriya; Pagnoulle, Christophe; Labrugère, Christine; De Pauw, Edwin; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire; Durrieu, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Posterior Capsular Opacification (PCO) is the capsule fibrosis developed on implanted IntraOcular Lens (IOL) by the de-differentiation of Lens Epithelial Cells (LECs) undergoing Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT). Literature has shown that the incidence of PCO is multifactorial including the patient's age or disease, surgical technique, and IOL design and material. Reports comparing hydrophilic and hydrophobic acrylic IOLs have shown that the former has more severe PCO. On the other hand, we have previously demonstrated that the adhesion of LECs is favored on hydrophobic compared to hydrophilic materials. By combining these two facts and contemporary knowledge in PCO development via the EMT pathway, we propose a biomimetically inspired strategy to promote LEC adhesion without de-differentiation to reduce the risk of PCO development. By surface grafting of a cell adhesion molecule (RGD peptide) onto the conventional hydrophilic acrylic IOL material, the surface-functionalized IOL can be used to reconstitute a capsule-LEC-IOL sandwich structure, which has been considered to prevent PCO formation in literature. Our results show that the innovative biomaterial improves LEC adhesion, while also exhibiting similar optical (light transmittance, optical bench) and mechanical (haptic compression force, IOL injection force) properties compared to the starting material. In addition, compared to the hydrophobic IOL material, our bioactive biomaterial exhibits similar abilities in LEC adhesion, morphology maintenance, and EMT biomarker expression, which is the crucial pathway to induce PCO. The in vitro assays suggest that this biomaterial has the potential to reduce the risk factor of PCO development. PMID:25501012

  20. Effect of the processing cycle on dimensional changes of heat-polymerized denture base resins

    PubMed Central

    Savabi, Ghazal; Savabi, Omid; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: The second processing cycle for adding the artificial teeth to heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases may result in dimensional changes of the denture bases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dimensional changes of the heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture bases with one and two-cycle processing methods. Materials and Methods: A metal edentulous maxillary arch was used for making 40 stone casts. Maxillary complete dentures were made with heat-polymerized acrylic resins (Meliodent and Acropars) with one and two stage processing methods (n = 10 for each group). Linear dimensional changes in anteroposterior and mediolateral distances and vertical changes in the first molar region were measured following each processing cycle, using a digital caliper. Mean percentage of the dimensional changes were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Tukey honest significant difference tests (α = 0.05). Results: Postpolymerization contraction occurred in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions in all studied groups; however, the vertical dimension was increased. Acropars acrylic resin showed the highest dimensional changes and the second processing cycle significantly affected the measured distances (P < 0.05). Meliodent acrylic resin was not significantly influenced by the processing method. Conclusion: Reheating of the acrylic resin denture bases for the addition of denture teeth result in linear dimensional changes, which can be clinically significant based on the acrylic resin used. PMID:26288618

  1. Photocurable bioactive bone cement based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate-poly(acrylic/maleic) acid resin and mesoporous sol gel-derived bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Hesaraki, S

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on strong and bioactive bone cement based on ternary bioactive SiO2-CaO-P2O5 glass particles and a photocurable resin comprising hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(acrylic/maleic) acid. The as-cured composite represented a compressive strength of about 95 MPa but it weakened during soaking in simulated body fluid, SBF, qua its compressive strength reached to about 20 MPa after immersing for 30 days. Biodegradability of the composite was confirmed by reducing its initial weight (~32%) as well as decreasing the molecular weight of early cured resin during the soaking procedure. The composite exhibited in vitro calcium phosphate precipitation in the form of nanosized carbonated hydroxyapatite, which indicates its bone bonding ability. Proliferation of calvarium-derived newborn rat osteoblasts seeded on top of the composite was observed during incubation at 37 °C, meanwhile, an adequate cell supporting ability was found. Consequently, it seems that the produced composite is an appropriate alternative for bone defect injuries, because of its good cell responses, high compressive strength and ongoing biodegradability, though more in vivo experiments are essential to confirm this assumption. PMID:27040248

  2. In vitro analysis of different properties of acrylic resins for ocular prosthesis submitted to accelerated aging with or without photopolymerized glaze.

    PubMed

    Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos; Nagay, Bruna Egumi; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Bonatto, Liliane da Rocha; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; Moreno, Amália; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; da Cruz, Nilson Cristino; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a photopolymerized glaze on different properties of acrylic resin (AR) for ocular prostheses submitted to accelerated aging was investigated. Forty discs were divided into 4 groups: N1 AR without glaze (G1); colorless AR without glaze (G2); N1 AR with glaze (G3); and colorless AR with glaze (G4). All samples were polished with sandpaper (240, 600 and 800-grit). In G1 and G2, a 1200-grit sandpaper was also used. In G3 and G4, samples were coated with MegaSeal glaze. Property analysis of color stability, microhardness, roughness, and surface energy, and assays of atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were performed before and after the accelerated aging (1008h). Data were submitted to the ANOVA and Tukey Test (p<0.05). Groups with glaze exhibited statistically higher color change and roughness after aging. The surface microhardness significantly decreased in groups with glaze and increased in groups without glaze. The surface energy increased after the aging, independent of the polishing procedure. All groups showed an increase of surface irregularities. Photopolymerized glaze is an inadequate surface treatment for AR for ocular prostheses and it affected the color stability, roughness, and microhardness. The accelerated aging interfered negatively with the properties of resins. PMID:27612795

  3. In vitro analysis of different properties of acrylic resins for ocular prosthesis submitted to accelerated aging with or without photopolymerized glaze.

    PubMed

    Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos; Nagay, Bruna Egumi; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Bonatto, Liliane da Rocha; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; Moreno, Amália; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; da Cruz, Nilson Cristino; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a photopolymerized glaze on different properties of acrylic resin (AR) for ocular prostheses submitted to accelerated aging was investigated. Forty discs were divided into 4 groups: N1 AR without glaze (G1); colorless AR without glaze (G2); N1 AR with glaze (G3); and colorless AR with glaze (G4). All samples were polished with sandpaper (240, 600 and 800-grit). In G1 and G2, a 1200-grit sandpaper was also used. In G3 and G4, samples were coated with MegaSeal glaze. Property analysis of color stability, microhardness, roughness, and surface energy, and assays of atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were performed before and after the accelerated aging (1008h). Data were submitted to the ANOVA and Tukey Test (p<0.05). Groups with glaze exhibited statistically higher color change and roughness after aging. The surface microhardness significantly decreased in groups with glaze and increased in groups without glaze. The surface energy increased after the aging, independent of the polishing procedure. All groups showed an increase of surface irregularities. Photopolymerized glaze is an inadequate surface treatment for AR for ocular prostheses and it affected the color stability, roughness, and microhardness. The accelerated aging interfered negatively with the properties of resins.

  4. Evaluation of adhesion of reline resins to the thermoplastic denture base resin for non-metal clasp denture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Choe, Han Cheol; Son, Mee Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tensile and transverse bond strength of chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II, Mild Rebaron LC) to a thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) used for non metal clasp denture. The results were compared with those of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20) and a thermoplastic polyamide resin (Biotone). The failure sites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the mode of failure. As results, the bond strength of reline resins to a thermoplastic acrylic resin was similar to the value of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin. However, thermoplastic polyamide resin showed the lowest value. The results of this study indicated that a thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasps denture allows chairside reline and repair. It was also found that the light-polymerized reline resin had better bond strength than the autopolymerizing reline resin in relining for a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin and a thermoplastic acrylic resin.

  5. The effect of surface treatment of denture acrylic resin on the residual monomer content and its release into water.

    PubMed

    Vallittu, P K

    1996-06-01

    The test specimens were processed by autopolymerizing poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), and their surfaces were untreated, polished in a conventional manner with a rag wheel, or coated with a light-curing resin. The residual methylmethacrylate (MMA) content and its release into water from the specimens were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography. The light-curing resin coating reduced most effectively the release of residual MMA into water during a 2-day storage, but conventional polishing of the PMMA surface had a similar effect when the mean values of groups were tested by means of one-way ANOVA (p < 0.001). The residual MMA content was lowest in the test specimens coated with a light-curing resin, whereas only a slight difference was seen when the untreated and polished test specimens were compared. This study suggests that not only light-curing resin coating but also the conventional polishing of the denture PMMA reduces residual MMA release into water in vitro.

  6. Acrylic resins: methacrylate polymers. 1964-April, 1981 (citations from the NTIS data base). Report for 1964-April 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate, polymethacrylic acid, and other methacrylate and methacrylic polymers, copolymers, and resins are covered in this bibliography. The citations include references concerning physical and chemical properties, synthesis, polymerization, and processing. (This updated bibliography contains 278 citations, 40 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  7. Degree of conversion and microhardness of dental composite resin materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marovic, D.; Panduric, V.; Tarle, Z.; Ristic, M.; Sariri, K.; Demoli, N.; Klaric, E.; Jankovic, B.; Prskalo, K.

    2013-07-01

    Dental composite resins (CRs) are commonly used materials for the replacement of hard dental tissues. Degree of conversion (DC) of CR measures the amount of the un-polymerized monomers in CR, which can cause adverse biological reactions and weakening of the mechanical properties. In the past, studies have determined the positive correlation of DC values determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and microhardness (MH) values. The aim of this study was to establish whether MH can replace FTIR for the determination of DC of contemporary CR.

  8. Characteristics of denture thermoplastic resins for non-metal clasp dentures.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Yota

    2010-08-01

    Six thermoplastic resins and conventional acrylic resin were examined to characterize their mechanical and physical properties, water sorption, solubility, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength and color stability. Thermoplastic resins for non-metal clasp dentures exhibiting low water sorption and solubility offer hygienic advantages. Since they have a low modulus of elasticity and are easily manipulated, these materials make it possible for larger undercuts to be used for retention compared to acrylic resin. Not all of the thermoplastic resins tested fractured after the bending test in contrast to the conventional denture base resin, which fractured when tested beyond its proportional limit. It was also found that clinically noticeable staining may occur on the polyamide resins and polyethylene terephtalate resins. PMID:20644329

  9. Advances in acrylic-alkyd hybrid synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziczkowski, Jamie

    2008-10-01

    In situ graft acrylic-alkyd hybrid resins were formed by polymerizing acrylic and acrylic-mixed monomers in the presence of alkyds by introduction of a free radical initiator to promote graft formation. Two-dimensional NMR, specifically gradient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (gHMQC), was used to clarify specific graft sites of the hybrid materials. Both individual and mixed-monomer systems were produced to determine any individual monomer preferences and to model current acrylic-alkyd systems. Different classes of initiators were used to determine any initiator effects on graft location. The 2D-NMR results confirm grafting at doubly allylic hydrogens located on the fatty acid chains and the polyol segment of the alkyd backbone. The gHMQC spectra show no evidence of grafting across double bonds on either pendant fatty acid groups or THPA unsaturation sites for any of the monomer or mixed monomer systems. It was also determined that choice of initiator has no effect on graft location. In addition, a design of experiments using response surface methodology was utilized to obtain a better understanding of this commercially available class of materials and relate both the chemical and physical properties to one another. A Box-Behnkin design was used, varying the oil length of the alkyd phase, the degree of unsaturation in the polyester backbone, and acrylic to alkyd ratio. Acrylic-alkyd hybrid resins were reduced with an amine/water mixture. Hydrolytic stability was tested and viscoelastic properties were obtained to determine crosslink density. Cured films were prepared and basic coatings properties were evaluated. It was found that the oil length of the alkyd is the most dominant factor for final coatings properties of the resins. Acrylic to alkyd ratio mainly influences the resin properties such as acid number, average molecular weight, and hydrolytic stability. The degree of unsaturation in the alkyd backbone has minimal effects on resin and film

  10. PETIs as High-Temperature Resin-Transfer-Molding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John N.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Compositions of, and processes for fabricating, high-temperature composite materials from phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) oligomers by resin-transfer molding (RTM) and resin infusion have been developed. Composites having a combination of excellent mechanical properties and long-term high-temperature stability have been readily fabricated. These materials are particularly useful for the fabrication of high-temperature structures for jet-engine components, structural components on highspeed aircraft, spacecraft, and missiles. Phenylethynyl-terminated amide acid oligomers that are precursors of PETI oligomers are easily made through the reaction of a mixture of aromatic diamines with aromatic dianhydrides at high stoichiometric offsets and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) as an end-capper in a polar solvent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP). These oligomers are subsequently cyclodehydrated -- for example, by heating the solution in the presence of toluene to remove the water by azeotropic distillation to form low-molecular-weight imide oligomers. More precisely, what is obtained is a mixture of PETI oligomeric species, spanning a range of molecular weights, that exhibits a stable melt viscosity of less than approximately 60 poise (and generally less than 10 poise) at a temperature below 300 deg C. After curing of the oligomers at a temperature of 371 deg C, the resulting polymer can have a glass-transition temperature (Tg) as high as 375 C, the exact value depending on the compositions.

  11. Study of the elution of fluconazole from a self-polymerizing acrylic resin and its activity against resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Rula M; Amin, Wala M; Al-Ali, Muna H; Salem, Nesreen A

    2011-08-01

    The study aimed, firstly, to monitor the release of an antifungal drug, fluconazole, from a self-polymerizing poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) denture base resin in artificial saliva and comparing it with the release in water; and secondly, to investigate the effect of the released drug on the growth of resistant and standard strains of Candida albicans. A high-performance liquid chromatography-ultra-violet (HPLC-UV) method was used in the analysis of the released eluates into distilled water from self-polymerized PMMA discs doped with the 10% fluconazole antifungal drug. The efficacy of the released drug against resistant and standard strains of C. albicans was monitored, using agar diffusion method. The results showed that fluconazole, can be successfully incorporated with the self-polymerized PMMA. The findings suggest that the drug leaches steadily out of the PMMA resin into artificial saliva and distilled water at mouth temperature and that sustained drug release continued throughout the 28 days test period. It was shown that the released drug demonstrated antifungal activity against both standard and resistant C. albicans. The findings of this investigation have a clinical value in terms of their significant contribution to the treatment of fungal infections of the oral cavity. The sustained release of antifungal drug from the PMMA resin clearly constitutes a new dosage form of the drug via the poly(methyl methacrylate) delivery system.

  12. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When..., paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins must be packaged as follows: (1) As prescribed...

  13. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When..., paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins must be packaged as follows: (1) As prescribed...

  14. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When..., paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins must be packaged as follows: (1) As prescribed...

  15. The permeability of resin based composite materials to radiolytic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, D.; Reed, R. P.

    When the insulation of a superconducting magnet is irradiated, the radiolytic gases will be produced in a condensed form and only mobilised when the magnet is warmed, following irradiation. The extent to which these gases will permeate through the resin or remain trapped within the polymer structure is not yet fully understood. Trapped gases may result in internal stress, cause swelling within the polymer and contribute to a degradation of electrical performance. The quantity of gas which remains trapped within the polymer structure is thought to be a function of the internal pressure, material thickness and the permeability of the various gases that may be formed. The study, detailed in this report, was undertaken to estimate the time scale and extent to which gases, produced and trapped following low temperature irradiation, will be lost by permeation through the insulation when it is warmed to 293 K. This work follows from an earlier report which showed that different amounts of gas were evolved when the same resin was irradiated in different geometric forms.

  16. Color stability of the artificial iris button in an ocular prosthesis before and after acrylic resin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Amália; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Oliveira, Kamila Freitas; Iyda, Mariana Garib; Haddad, Marcela Filié; de Carvalho Dekon, Stefan Fiuza; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of the ocular prosthesis fabrication technique and the paint on the color stability of the artificial iris button before and after polymerization of the colorless resin. Sixty samples simulating artificial eyes were made, including 30 samples with blue- and 30 samples with sepia-colored artificial irises. Ten samples were made by each of three techniques (i.e., conventional, prefabricated cap, and inverted painting) for each color. The color of the artificial iris button was measured through reflection spectrophotometry by the CIE L*a* b* system before and after polymerization of the prosthesis (colorless resin). Data were evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey honestly significant different (HSD) tests (α=0.05). All of the samples exhibited color changes. Samples made by the prefabricated cap technique exhibited the highest color change values for both colors (P<.05). The inverted painting technique exhibited the lowest color change values for the sepia-colored artificial irises (P<.05). Sepia-colored artificial irises exhibited lower color change values than blue-colored artificial irises for both techniques (P<.05). In conclusion, the technique used to obtain the ocular prosthesis significantly affected the stability of the artificial iris color for each color tone and the conventional technique and the painting technique inverted were considered clinically acceptable for sepia color.

  17. Investigation of the effect of resin material on impact damage to graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental program are described which establishes the feasibility and guide lines for resin development. The objective was to identify the basic epoxy neat resin properties that improve low velocity impact resistance and toughness to graphite-epoxy laminates and at the same time maintain useful structural laminate mechanical properties. Materials tests from twenty-three toughened epoxy resin matrix systems are included.

  18. Ocular prosthetics: use of a tissue conditioner material to modify a stock ocular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ow, R K; Amrith, S

    1997-08-01

    The custom-made ocular prosthesis contributes to enhanced tissue health of the anophthalmic socket. For this purpose, an acrylic resin ocular prosthesis may be modified, by using an appropriate dental impression material and being adapted closely to the anophthalmic socket. The modeling impression material is subsequently replaced by acrylic resin. This article describes the application of a viscoelastic tissue conditioner material, as an impression medium for prosthetic modification of an ocular prosthesis. The tissue conditioner material exhibits favorable tissue compatibility, adhesion to acrylic resin, and detailed surface registration. These advantages facilitate the clinical procedure and evaluation of modifications made to the ocular prosthesis.

  19. Acrylate Systemic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Maxwell B; Pratt, Melanie D

    2015-01-01

    Acrylates, the 2012 American Contact Dermatitis Society allergen of the year, are found in a range of products including the absorbent materials within feminine hygiene pads. When fully polymerized, acrylates are nonimmunogenic; however, if not completely cured, the monomers can be potent allergens.A 28-year-old woman is presented, who had her teeth varnished with Isodan (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France) containing HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) with no initial reaction. Approximately 1 month later, the patient developed a genital dermatitis secondary to her feminine hygiene pads. The initial reaction resolved, but 5 months later, the patient developed a systemic contact dermatitis after receiving a second varnishing.The patient was dramatically patch test positive to many acrylates. This case demonstrates a reaction to likely unpolymerized acrylates within a feminine hygiene pad, as well as broad cross-reactivity or cosensitivity to acrylates, and possibly a systemic contact dermatitis with systemic re-exposure to unpolymerized acrylates.

  20. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    SciTech Connect

    Laili, Zalina; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Wahab, Mohd Abdul

    2015-04-29

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins.

  1. [Current status and further prospects of dental resin-based materials with antibacterial properties].

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Lu, H B; Mao, J; Gong, S Q

    2016-09-01

    The mode of dental antibacterial resin-based materials can be divided into two types, namely, single and combined antibacterial mode. With regard to single antibacterial mode, only one kind of antibacterial agent is added into the resin, which can be released or act as contacting antibacterial agent. The single mode resin has limitation in sterilization methods and effect. As for combined antibacterial mode, it is a combination of different types of biocides and thus maximizes the sterilizing effect, including the releasing antibacterial agent incorporated with the contacting antibacterial agent or antibacterial agents combined with calcium compound possessing biological mineralization function. In this paper, current status and further prospects of dental resin-based materials with antibacterial properties are reviewed from the perspectives of single and combined antibacterial modes to provide guidance for dental antibacterial resin material research. PMID:27596349

  2. [Current status and further prospects of dental resin-based materials with antibacterial properties].

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Lu, H B; Mao, J; Gong, S Q

    2016-09-01

    The mode of dental antibacterial resin-based materials can be divided into two types, namely, single and combined antibacterial mode. With regard to single antibacterial mode, only one kind of antibacterial agent is added into the resin, which can be released or act as contacting antibacterial agent. The single mode resin has limitation in sterilization methods and effect. As for combined antibacterial mode, it is a combination of different types of biocides and thus maximizes the sterilizing effect, including the releasing antibacterial agent incorporated with the contacting antibacterial agent or antibacterial agents combined with calcium compound possessing biological mineralization function. In this paper, current status and further prospects of dental resin-based materials with antibacterial properties are reviewed from the perspectives of single and combined antibacterial modes to provide guidance for dental antibacterial resin material research.

  3. Chitosan-graft-poly(n-butyl acrylate) copolymer: Synthesis and characterization of a natural/synthetic hybrid material.

    PubMed

    Anbinder, Pablo; Macchi, Carlos; Amalvy, Javier; Somoza, Alberto

    2016-07-10

    Two chitosan polymers with different deacetylation degree and molecular weight were subjected to grafting reactions with the aim to enhance the properties of these bio-based materials. Specifically, n-butyl acrylate in different proportions was grafted onto two different deacetylation degree (DD%) chitosan using radical initiation in a surfactant free emulsion system. Infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm grafting and products grafting percentage and efficiency were evaluated against acrylate/chitosan ratio and DD%. Thermal and structural properties and the behavior against water of the raw and grafted biopolymers were studied using several experimental techniques: differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, water swelling, contact angle and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The influence of the grafting process on the morphological and physicochemical properties of the prepared natural/synthetic hybrid materials is discussed. PMID:27106155

  4. Chitosan-graft-poly(n-butyl acrylate) copolymer: Synthesis and characterization of a natural/synthetic hybrid material.

    PubMed

    Anbinder, Pablo; Macchi, Carlos; Amalvy, Javier; Somoza, Alberto

    2016-07-10

    Two chitosan polymers with different deacetylation degree and molecular weight were subjected to grafting reactions with the aim to enhance the properties of these bio-based materials. Specifically, n-butyl acrylate in different proportions was grafted onto two different deacetylation degree (DD%) chitosan using radical initiation in a surfactant free emulsion system. Infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm grafting and products grafting percentage and efficiency were evaluated against acrylate/chitosan ratio and DD%. Thermal and structural properties and the behavior against water of the raw and grafted biopolymers were studied using several experimental techniques: differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, water swelling, contact angle and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The influence of the grafting process on the morphological and physicochemical properties of the prepared natural/synthetic hybrid materials is discussed.

  5. Dielectric and insulating properties of an acrylic DEA material at high near-DC electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lillo, L.; Schmidt, A.; Bergamini, A.; Ermanni, P.; Mazza, E.

    2011-04-01

    A number of adaptive structure applications call for the generation of intense electric fields (in excess of 70 MV/m). Such intense fields across the thickness of a thin polymer dielectric layer are typically used to exploit the direct electromechanical coupling in the form of a Maxwell stress: (see manuscript) Where V/d is the applied field, ɛ0 is the permittivity of vacuum and ɛ is the relative permittivity of the material. The field that can be applied to the dielectric is limited by the dielectric strength of the material. Below the limit set by the breakdown, the material is generally assumed to have a field independent dielectric constant and to be a perfect insulator, i.e. to have an infinite volume resistivity. While extensive investigations about the mechanical properties of the materials used for electronic Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEA) are available from literature, the results of the investigation of the insulating and dielectric properties of these materials, especially under conditions (electric field and frequency) similar to the ones encountered during operation are not available. In the present contribution, we present a method and a set-up for the measurement of the electric properties of thin polymer films, such as the ones used for the fabrication of electronic DEAs, under conditions close to operations. The method and setup where developed to investigate the properties of 'stiff' thin polymer films, such as Polyimide or Polyvinylidenefluoride, used for Electro-Bonded Laminates (EBLs). The properties of the well known VHB 4910 acrylic elastomer are presented to illustrate how the permittivity and the leakage current can be measured as a function of the electric field and the deformation state, using the proposed set-up. The material properties were measured on membranes under different fixed pre-stretch conditions (λ 1, λ2=3, 4, 5), in order to eliminate effects due to the change in sample geometry, using gold sputtered electrodes, 20

  6. Use of light-cured resin to manufacture occlusal splints: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Więckiewicz, Mieszko; Miernik, Marta; Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz

    2012-01-01

    This article presents selected cases of patients with functional disorders of the stomatognathic system. This group of patients had a need to made different types of removable occlusal splints. In the past, occlusal appliances were made mostly using self-cured acrylate materials, which for many years had no replacements. The rapid development of dental materials technology led to creation of thermo-formable materials and resins, which can successfully replace traditional acrylic materials in daily clinical practice. A practical application of light-cured resin in the fabrication of the occlusal splints in two clinical cases is reported and discussed herein. PMID:23207866

  7. The Effect of Artificial Aging on The Bond Strength of Heat-activated Acrylic Resin to Surface-treated Nickel-chromium-beryllium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S.; Zinelis, Spiros; Al Taweel, Sara M.; Nagy, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The debonding load of heat-activated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin material to a nickel-chromium-beryllium (Ni-Cr-Be) alloy conditioned by three different surface treatments and utilizing two different commercial bonding systems was investigated. Materials and Methods Denture resin (Lucitone-199) was bonded to Ni-Cr-Be alloy specimens treated with Metal Primer II, the Rocatec system with opaquer and the Rocatec system without opaquer. Denture base resin specimens bonded to non-treated sandblasted Ni-Cr-Be alloy were used as controls. Twenty samples for each treatment condition (80 specimens) were tested. The 80 specimens were divided into two categories, thermocycled and non-thermocycled, containing four groups of ten specimens each. The non-thermocycled specimens were tested after 48 hours’ storage in room temperature water. The thermocycled specimens were tested after 2,000 cycles in 4°C and 55°C water baths. The debonding load was calculated in Newtons (N), and collected data were subjected by non parametric test Kruskal-Wallis One Way Analysis of Variance on Ranks and Dunn’s post hoc test at the α = 0.05. Results The Metal Primer II and Rocatec system without opaquer groups produced significantly higher bond strengths (119.9 and 67.6 N), respectively, than did the sandblasted and Rocatec system with opaquer groups, where the bond strengths were 2.6 N and 0 N, respectively. The Metal Primer II was significantly different from all other groups (P<0.05). The bond strengths of all groups were significantly decreased (P<0.05) after thermocycling. Conclusions Although thermocycling had a detrimental effect on the debonding load of all surface treatments tested, the Metal Primer II system provided higher values among all bonding systems tested, before and after thermocycling. PMID:27335613

  8. New semi-biodegradable materials from semi-interpenetrated networks of poly(ϵ-caprolactone) and poly(ethyl acrylate).

    PubMed

    Lozano Picazo, P; Pérez Garnes, M; Martínez Ramos, C; Vallés-Lluch, A; Monleón Pradas, M

    2015-02-01

    Semi-degradable materials may have many applications. Here poly(ethyl acrylate) and poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were combined as semi-interpenetrated networks, and thoroughly characterized in terms of final composition, interactions between components, wettability, and mechanical properties. PCL modulates the mechanical properties of the PEA elastomeric network. Cultures of fibroblasts and adipose-tissue derived stem cells showed excellent biological performance of the materials. The results are relevant for applications seeking materials leaving a permanent supporting skeleton after the partial degradation, as in patches for cardiac regeneration or in abdominal wall meshes.

  9. Bond strength of a resin cement to a cured composite inlay material.

    PubMed

    Latta, M A; Barkmeier, W W

    1994-08-01

    Although resin cements have been effectively bonded to mineralized tooth structures, bonding to a cured composite material has remained a challenge. This study evaluated the shear bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a cured composite inlay material by use of a variety of composite surface treatments: (1) hydrofluoric acid/60 seconds, (2) ammonium bifluoride/60 seconds, (3) resin adhesive, (4) microabrasion with 50 microns aluminum oxide, and (5) microabrasion with 50 microns aluminum oxide and application of a resin adhesive. The resin cement was also bonded to human enamel that was etched with phosphoric acid. Scanning electron microscopy examinations were completed to evaluate the effects of the composite surface treatments. The results indicated that microabrasion of a cured composite enhances bonding of a resin cement. The bond strength of a resin cement to a composite surface that was air abraded with aluminum oxide, with or without the application of a resin adhesive, was higher than surface treatments with hydrofluoric acid or ammonium bifluoride. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that an irregular surface on the composite was created with aluminum oxide air abrasion.

  10. Chemical resistance of optical plastics and resin for level detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omegna, Cicero L.; Fontes Garcia, Jonas; Ramos-Gonzáles, Roddy E.; Barbosa, Luiz C.

    2015-09-01

    A test method was developed to find the ideal optical material that supports the chemical reaction of some fuels. Optical plastics and resin were submerged for long periods of time in reservoirs of ethanol, gasoline, Diesel and biodiesel. The dimensional change and weight change of the submerged samples was measured. A special resin successfully supported the chemical attack of fuels. Samples of acrylic polymer and polycarbonate were used as type of optical plastic.

  11. Effect of a silane coupling agent on the optical and the mechanical characteristics of nanodiamond/acrylic resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Min-Gun; Chun, Yoon-Soo; Lim, Dae-Soon; Kim, Jung Youl

    2014-10-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) is a good candidate for a filler material to fabricate transparent films. This study explores a characterization of the optical and the mechanical properties of ND dispersed polymer films. An attrition milling method was adapted to break ND aggregates, and a silane coupling agent (3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane) was used to modify the ND surfaces and stabilize the dispersion. Dipentaerylthritol hexaacrylate and pentaerythritol tetraacrylate were used in the polymer matrix, and up to 3 wt.% of ND was added to improve the mechanical properties. Fabricated composites were analyzed and tested using UV-visible spectroscopy for the optical properties and a Micro-Vickers hardness tester and ball-on-disktype friction tester for the mechanical properties. Results show that the transmittance of the ND-added composite increased with decreasing aggregate size. Through the addition of small amounts of NDs, the mechanical properties were greatly improved, the material became 3.5 times as hard, and the wear rate were greatly decreased. Possible mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of the mechanical and the optical properties are discussed.

  12. Phenolic cation exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium

    DOEpatents

    Ebra, Martha A.; Wallace, Richard M.

    1983-01-01

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear waste solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs.sup.+ and Sr.sup.2+ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  13. Phenolic cation-exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Ebra, M.A.; Wallace, R.M.

    1982-05-05

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear wate solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs/sup +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  14. A theoretical study of resin flows for thermosetting materials during prepreg processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.

    1984-01-01

    A flow model which describes the process of resin consolidation during prepreg lamination was developed. The salient features of model predictions were explored. It is assumed that resin flows in all directions originate from squeezing action between two approaching adjacent fiber/fabric layers. In the horizontal direction, a squeezing flow between two nonporous parallel plates is analyzed, while in the vertical direction a poiseuille type pressure flow through porous media is assumed. Proper force and mass balance was established for the whole system which is composed of these two types of flow. A flow parameter, CF, shows to be a measure of processibility for the curing resin. For a given external load-F the responses of resin flow during prepreg lamination, as measured by CF, are categorized into three regions: (1) the low CF region where resin flows are inhibited by the high chemoviscosity during initial curing stages; (2) the median CF region where resin flows are properly controllable; and (3) the high CF region where resin flows are ceased due to fiber/fabric compression effects. Resin losses in both directions are calculated. Potential uses of this model and quality control of incoming prepreg material are discussed.

  15. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage. PMID:26966567

  16. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  17. Preliminary properties of a resin from ethynyl terminated materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.; Connell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A blend composed of an ethynyl terminated aspartimide (brittle component) and an ethynyl terminated arylene ether oligomer (tough component) was thermally cured to yield a resin which underwent preliminary evaluation to determine the potential for use in structural applications on aerospace vehicles. The blend exhibited good compression moldability, allowing for fabrication of neat moldings, adhesive specimens and composites at temperatures of 250 C under a pressure of 1.4 MPa (200 psi). Neat resin moldings and adhesive specimens provided relatively high mechanical properties. Composite specimens provided promising results in spite of fiber misalignment, fiber washout, and a small amount of panel warpage.

  18. Effect of accelerated aging on the microhardness and color stability of flexible resins for dentures.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Santos, Daniela Micheline dos; Haddad, Marcela Filie; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves

    2010-01-01

    Acrylic resins have been widely used due to their acceptable esthetics and desirable characteristics such as easy handling, good thermal conductivity, low permeability to oral fluids and color stability. Flexible resins were introduced on the market as an alternative to the use of conventional acrylic resins in the construction of complete and partial removable dentures. Although these resins present advantages in terms of esthetics and comfort, studies assessing chromatic and microhardness alterations of these materials are still scarce in the related literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chromatic and microhardness alterations of two commercial brands of flexible resins in comparison to the conventional resin Triplex when submitted to accelerated aging. The resins were manipulated according to manufacturers' instructions and inserted into a silicone matrix to obtain 21 specimens divided into 3 groups: Triplex, Ppflex and Valplast. Triplex presented the highest microhardness value (p < 0.05) for all the aging periods, which was significantly different from that of the other resins, followed by the values of Valplast and Ppflex. Comparison between the flexible resins (Ppflex and Valplast) revealed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) as regards color. The flexible resin Ppflex and the conventional resin Triplex presented no statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) as regards aging. The accelerated aging significantly increased the microhardness values of the resins, with the highest values being observed for Triplex. Valplast presented the greatest chromatic alteration after accelerated aging. PMID:20339724

  19. Synthesis of Radiation Curable Palm Oil-Based Epoxy Acrylate: NMR and FTIR Spectroscopic Investigations.

    PubMed

    Salih, Ashraf M; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been an increasing demand for bio-based polymers and resins in industrial applications, due to their potential lower cost and environmental impact compared with petroleum-based counterparts. The present research concerns the synthesis of epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) from an epoxidized palm oil product (EPOP) as environmentally friendly material. EPOP was acrylated by acrylic acid via a ring opening reaction. The kinetics of the acrylation reaction were monitored throughout the reaction course and the acid value of the reaction mixture reached 10 mg KOH/g after 16 h, indicating the consumption of the acrylic acid. The obtained epoxy acrylate was investigated intensively by means of FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, and the results revealed that the ring opening reaction was completed successfully with an acrylation yield about 82%. The UV free radical polymerization of EPOLA was carried out using two types of photoinitiators. The radiation curing behavior was determined by following the conversion of the acrylate groups. The cross-linking density and the hardness of the cured EPOLA films were measured to evaluate the effect of the photoinitiator on the solid film characteristics, besides, the thermal and mechanical properties were also evaluated. PMID:26248072

  20. Poly(amide-graft-acrylate) interfacial compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Michael Perez

    Graft copolymers with segments of dissimilar chemistries have been shown to be useful in a variety of applications as surfactants, compatibilizers, impact modifiers, and surface modifiers. The most common route to well defined graft copolymers is through the use of macromonomers, polymers containing a reactive functionality and thus capable of further polymerization. However, the majority of the studies thus far have focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of reacting with vinyl monomers to form graft copolymers. This study focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of participating in condensation polymerizations. A chain transfer functionalization method was utilized. Cysteine was evaluated as a chain transfer agent for the synthesis of amino acid functionalized poly(acrylate) and poly(methacrylate) macromonomers. Low molar mass, functionalized macromonomers were produced. These macromonomers were proven to be capable of reacting with amide precursors to form poly(amide-g-acrylate) graft copolymers. Macromonomers and graft copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis (EA), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The second part of this research involved poly(dimethacrylate) dental restorative materials. Volumetric shrinkage during the cure of these resins results in a poor interface between the resin and the remaining tooth structure, limiting the lifetime of these materials. Cyclic anhydrides were incorporated into common monomer compositions used in dental applications. Volume expansion from the ring opening hydrolysis of these anhydrides was shown to be feasible. The modified dental resins were characterized by swelling, extraction and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), and density measurements. Linear poLymers designed to model the crosslinked dental resins were

  1. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Henry, Michael P.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2011-07-12

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  2. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Henry, Michael P.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2008-11-18

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  3. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base.

    PubMed

    Gad, Mohammed; ArRejaie, Aws S; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers.

  4. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base

    PubMed Central

    ArRejaie, Aws S.; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers. PMID:27366150

  5. The Reinforcement Effect of Nano-Zirconia on the Transverse Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Base.

    PubMed

    Gad, Mohammed; ArRejaie, Aws S; Abdel-Halim, Mohamed Saber; Rahoma, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incorporation of glass fiber, zirconia, and nano-zirconia on the transverse strength of repaired denture base. Materials and Methods. Eighty specimens of heat polymerized acrylic resin were prepared and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 10): one intact group (control) and seven repaired groups. One group was repaired with autopolymerized resin while the other six groups were repaired using autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 wt% or 5 wt% glass fiber, zirconia, or nano-zirconia particles. A three-point bending test was used to measure the transverse strength. The results were analyzed using SPSS and repeated measure ANOVA and post hoc least significance (LSD) test (P ≤ 0.05). Results. Among repaired groups it was found that autopolymerized resin reinforced with 2 or 5 wt% nano-zirconia showed the highest transverse strength (P ≤ 0.05). Repairs with autopolymerized acrylic resin reinforced with 5 wt% zirconia showed the lowest transverse strength value. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with repair resin without reinforcement, 2 wt% zirconia, and glass fiber reinforced resin. Conclusion. Reinforcing of repair material with nano-zirconia may significantly improve the transverse strength of some fractured denture base polymers. PMID:27366150

  6. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... name for paint, lacquer, enamel, stain, shellac, varnish, liquid aluminum, liquid bronze, liquid gold... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a)...

  7. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... name for paint, lacquer, enamel, stain, shellac, varnish, liquid aluminum, liquid bronze, liquid gold... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a)...

  8. Properties of two composite materials made of toughened epoxy resin and high-strain graphite fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Marvin B.; Smith, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental evaluation of IM7/8551-7 and IM6/18081, two new toughened epoxy resin, high strain graphite fiber composite materials. Data include ply-level strengths and moduli, notched tension and compression strengths and compression-after-impact assessments. The measured properties are compared with those of other graphite-epoxy materials.

  9. Effects of Protective Resin Coating on the Surface Roughness and Color Stability of Resin-Based Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Tüzüner, Tamer; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Baygın, Özgül; Bağış, Yıldırım Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of nanofilled protective resin coating (RC) on the surface roughness (Ra) and color stability (ΔE) of resin-based restorative materials (RM) (compomer (C), nanofilled composite (NF), and microhybrid composite (MH)) after being submitted to the ultraviolet aging (UV) method. Thirty-six specimens were prepared (n = 6 for each group). The Ra and (ΔE) values and SEM images were obtained before and after UV. Significant interactions were found among the RM-RC-UV procedures for Ra (P < 0.001). After the specimens were submitted to UV, the Ra values were significantly increased, regardless of the RC procedure (with RC; P < 0.01 for all, without RC; C (P < 0.01), NF (P < 0.001), and MH (P < 0.001)) for each RM. Significant interactions were found between the RM-RC (P < 0.001) procedures for the ΔE values. The ΔE values were increased in each group after applying the RC procedures (P < 0.001). Protective RC usage for RM could result in material-related differences in Ra and ΔE as with used UV method. PMID:25162066

  10. Encapsulation of photocells with acrylic prepolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Avenel, M.; Evrard, P.; Leca, J.-P.

    1985-10-22

    Acrylic prepolymer comprising: from 10 to 50% by weight of units derived from at least one alkyl acrylate, the alkyl group having from 4 to 12 carbon atoms, from 30 to 60% by weight of units derived from at least one alkyl methacrylate, the alkyl group having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms, and from 10 to 40% by weight of units derived from methyl acrylate. The prepolymer is used to encapsulate photocells, connected to one another by conducting wires and positioned on a support plate, by casting a resin into the space located between the support plate and a second protective plate, the resin being obtained by mixing 100 parts of the acrylic prepolymer, from 0.1 to 4 parts of a vanadium arenesulphonate and from 0.5 to 4 parts of a free-radical initiator, at a temperature between 10 and 70 C. and for a sufficient time to solidify the polymeric resin at the temperature selected.

  11. Effect of various chemicals on the bond strength of acrylic tooth and denture base -An Invitro comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, V Pridhvi; Premalatha, Averneni; Babu, P Jithendra; Raju, D Srinivasa; Kumar, M Praveen; Rao, D Bheemalingeswara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Debonding of acrylic teeth from the denture base is a common problem. Certain clinical conditions like ridge prominence leads to excess trimming of acrylic teeth and base, resulting in a weak interface. The denture base polymer debonds adhesively in the region of the highly cross –linked matrix of the teeth. To compare the effect of different chemical surface treatments on the bond between cross-linked acrylic teeth and different types of denture base material. Materials & Methods: A total of 180 wax specimens were fabricated and divided into 3 groups: Heat-cure, high impact heat-cure, flexible denture base material bonded to acrylic teeth. Each group was further subdivided into 6 subgroups with 10 specimens each according to the surface treatment ofthe ridge lap area: control, monomer, acetone 99%, chloroform 99%, acrylic adhesive cyanoacrylate, ethyl acetate 99%. After processing, specimens were tested for bond strength using a universal testing machine. The resulting bond strengths were recorded, statistically analyzed and compared. Results: Among all the 3types of denture base resins, highimpact heat-cure denture base resin gave highest bond strength. There was no bonding of teeth with flexible denture base material. Chemical surface treatment of acrylic teeth with ethyl acetate gave highest bond strength followed by control, chloroform, acetone and cyanoacrylate groups. Conclusion: Among all the 3types of denture base materials, high-impact heat-cure denture base resin gave highest bond strength with ethyl acetate surface treatment. Simple and quick tooth chemical surface treatment with ethylacetate could be an effective option in decreasing bonding failures and also avoid repeated denture repairs improving patient satisfaction. How to cite the article: Krishna VP, Premalatha A, Babu PJ, Raju DS, Kumar MP, Rao DB. Effect of various chemicals on the bond strength of acrylic tooth and denture base -An In-vitro comparative study. J Int Oral Health

  12. Influence of temperature on styrene emission from a vinyl ester resin thermoset composite material.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Shaun; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2011-08-15

    Composite materials made with vinyl ester resins are lighter, stronger and corrosion resistant compared to most metals, and are increasingly being used as building materials and in public transportation. Styrene monomer is used as both a diluent and strengthener in the production of vinyl ester resin (VER) composites. Some researchers contend that free styrene in VER composites is available to diffuse out of the material into air, perhaps leading to adverse health effects via inhalation exposures in humans, yet there is no known data on styrene emissions from these materials in the literature. In this study, a typical VER composite made with resin containing 38% by weight styrene, reinforced with E-glass fiber and formed using a vacuum assisted resin transfer method was characterized for styrene emissions by environmental test chamber (ETC) methodology. Styrene concentrations in the ETC were measured over a temperature range of 10 to 50 °C. Initial evaporative styrene emissions increase with increasing temperature. There is a nearly linear relationship in the total mass of styrene emitted and emission factor as emissions increase with increasing temperature. Styrene emission factors appear to vary for different materials, which could indicate more complex processes or the influence of material physical properties on emission rates. These results can be used to validate and improve mass transfer emission models for the prediction of volatile organic compound concentrations in indoor environments.

  13. Evaluation of chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified resin denture base material.

    PubMed

    Song, Rong; Zhong, Zhaohua; Lin, Lexun

    2016-04-01

    Chitosan quaternary ammonium salt displays good antioxidant and antibacterial characteristics and it shows appreciable solubility in water. When added to the traditional denture material to form a resin base, it could promote good oral health by improving the oral environment. In this study, chitosan quaternary ammonium salt was added to the denture material following two different methods. After three months of immersion in artificial saliva, the specimens were tested for tensile strength and were scanned by electron microscope. The murine fibroblast cytotoxicity and antibacterial properties were also tested. The result showed no significant differences in the tensile strength and in the proliferation of murine L929 fibroblast cells. The two structures of chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified denture material had different degrees of corrosion resistance and antimicrobial properties. These results indicate that chitosan quaternary ammonium salt-modified resin denture base material has the potential to become a new generation oral denture composite material.

  14. Photoacoustics study of the degree of polimerization of resins and restoration materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Reis Coloiano, Elaine C.; Abrahao Martin, Airton; Dias da Silva, Marcos; Roxo Barja, Paulo; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel

    2003-06-01

    In this work is presented the use of Photoacoustic as an alternative technique to monitor the curing process of odontological materials, emphasizing the resins chemically activated (RCA). Through photoacoustic measurements, it is possible to study optical and thermal properties of samples, and to obtain information on the characteristic times involved in the curing processes. For this study the samples were analyzed to evaluate the polymerization of the RCA for different temperature. The results obtained show the viability of applying the Photoacoustic Techinques to monitor the polyermization kinetic of odontological resins, allowing for a qualitative and quantitative interpretation.

  15. Epoxy resin synthesis using low molecular weight lignin separated from various lignocellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Asada, Chikako; Basnet, Sunita; Otsuka, Masaya; Sasaki, Chizuru; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2015-03-01

    A low molecular weight lignin from various lignocellulosic materials was used for the synthesis of bio-based epoxy resins. The lignin extracted with methanol from steam-exploded samples (steaming time of 5 min at steam pressure of 3.5 MPa) from different biomasses (i.e., cedar, eucalyptus, and bamboo) were functionalized by the reaction with epichlorohydrin, catalyzed by a water-soluble phase transfer catalyst tetramethylammonium chloride, which was further reacted with 30 wt% aqueous NaOH for ring closure using methyl ethyl ketone as a solvent. The glycidylated products of the lignin with good yields were cured to epoxy polymer networks with bio-based curing agents i.e., lignin itself and a commercial curing agent TD2131. Relatively good thermal properties of the bio-based epoxy network was obtained and thermal decomposition temperature at 5% weight loss (Td5) of cedar-derived epoxy resin was higher than that derived from eucalyptus and bamboo. The bio-based resin satisfies the stability requirement of epoxy resin applicable for electric circuit boards. The methanol-insoluble residues were enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce glucose. This study indicated that the biomass-derived methanol-soluble lignin may be a promising candidate to be used as a substitute for petroleum-based epoxy resin derived from bisphenol A, while insoluble residues may be processed to give a bioethanol precursor i.e., glucose.

  16. Epoxy resin synthesis using low molecular weight lignin separated from various lignocellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Asada, Chikako; Basnet, Sunita; Otsuka, Masaya; Sasaki, Chizuru; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2015-03-01

    A low molecular weight lignin from various lignocellulosic materials was used for the synthesis of bio-based epoxy resins. The lignin extracted with methanol from steam-exploded samples (steaming time of 5 min at steam pressure of 3.5 MPa) from different biomasses (i.e., cedar, eucalyptus, and bamboo) were functionalized by the reaction with epichlorohydrin, catalyzed by a water-soluble phase transfer catalyst tetramethylammonium chloride, which was further reacted with 30 wt% aqueous NaOH for ring closure using methyl ethyl ketone as a solvent. The glycidylated products of the lignin with good yields were cured to epoxy polymer networks with bio-based curing agents i.e., lignin itself and a commercial curing agent TD2131. Relatively good thermal properties of the bio-based epoxy network was obtained and thermal decomposition temperature at 5% weight loss (Td5) of cedar-derived epoxy resin was higher than that derived from eucalyptus and bamboo. The bio-based resin satisfies the stability requirement of epoxy resin applicable for electric circuit boards. The methanol-insoluble residues were enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce glucose. This study indicated that the biomass-derived methanol-soluble lignin may be a promising candidate to be used as a substitute for petroleum-based epoxy resin derived from bisphenol A, while insoluble residues may be processed to give a bioethanol precursor i.e., glucose. PMID:25572718

  17. The effectiveness of four methods for stain removal from direct resin-based composite restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nahedh, Hend Nahedh; Awliya, Wedad Yassin

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose Few studies investigated the best method for removing stains from different types of resin-based composite restorations and compared them to the more recently introduced nanocomposites. This study compared the effect of four methods for stain removal from composite resins; finishing with Sof-lex disks, using pumice and brush, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and methods Twenty disk specimens were prepared. Specimens were immersed in a staining solution for 3 weeks. The stained surfaces of five specimens from each RBC material were treated with one of the treatment procedures. Colorimetric measurements were taken using spectrophotometer prior to and after staining, and then repeated after surface treatments. Color difference values were calculated. Results One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences in color change of the three composite resin materials following staining. Filtek Z250 showed the least susceptibility to discoloration followed by Renamel, Filtek Supreme was the material most prone to discoloration. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s Post Hoc showed that all stain removing procedures except polishing with pumice, were able to return Filtek Z250 to clinically acceptable color difference. While bleaching with 38% carbamide peroxide was not effective with Renamel. Only pumice and 10% carbamide peroxide were able to return Renamel to clinically acceptable color difference. Conclusion Compositions of resin-based composite resins play an important role in their susceptibility to stain and their amenability to stain removal procedures. Home bleaching showed good results for the three materials, while office bleach was the least effective. PMID:24748758

  18. Bond strength of denture teeth to acrylic bases.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, J L

    1993-10-01

    The literature relating to the determination of the bond strength of plastic denture teeth to acrylic resin denture material is reviewed. The papers are presented in chronological order with information on specimen preparation, batch sizes and methods of testing. The lack of uniformity in experimental techniques and the diverse range of products assessed makes recommendations for laboratory practice difficult to formulate. One consistent observation is that tooth surface contamination with wax decreases the bond strength between the teeth and the denture base material. A universal testing method needs to be formulated to replace the various techniques now employed.

  19. Resinous perforation-repair materials inhibit the growth, attachment, and proliferation of human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Tai, Kuo-Wei; Chou, Ming-Yung; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2002-04-01

    The choice of repair material is one of the important factors in the prognosis of the endodontically treated tooth with a perforation defect. The cytotoxicity of perforation-repair materials must be investigated to ensure a safe biological response. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of resin-modified, glass-ionomer cement, compomer, and resin on human-gingival fibroblasts. Human gingival fibroblasts from crown lengthening surgery were cultured by using an explant technique with the consent of the patient. Cytotoxicity was judged by using an assay of tetrazolium bromide reduction. The results showed that resin-modified, glass-ionomer cement Fuji II LC, compomer Compoglass, and resin SpectrumTPH (TPH) were cytotoxic to primary human gingival fibroblast cultures by inhibiting cell growth and proliferation. TPH alone had an effect on cell attachment. It was found that TPH was the most cytotoxic repair material among those tested in all cultures. The toxicity decreased in the order of TPH>FLC>CG.

  20. Properties of photocured epoxy resin materials for application in piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer matching layers.

    PubMed

    Trogé, Alexandre; O'Leary, Richard L; Hayward, Gordon; Pethrick, Richard A; Mullholland, Anthony J

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes the acoustic properties of a range of epoxy resins prepared by photocuring that are suitable for application in piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer matching layers. Materials, based on blends of diglycidyl ether of Bisphenol A and 1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol diglycidyl ether, are described. Furthermore, in order to vary the elastic character of the base resin, samples containing polymer microspheres or barium sulfate particles are also described. The acoustic properties of the materials are determined by a liquid coupled through transmission methodology, capable of determining the velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear waves propagating in an isotropic layer. Measured acoustic properties are reported which demonstrate materials with specific acoustic impedance varying in the range 0.88-6.25 MRayls. In the samples comprising blends of resin types, a linear variation in the acoustic velocities and density was observed. In the barium sulfate filled samples, acoustic impedance showed an approximately linear variation with composition, reflecting the dominance of the density variation. While such variations can be predicted by simple mixing laws, relaxation and scattering effects influence the attenuation in both the blended and filled resins. These phenomena are discussed with reference to dynamic mechanical thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry of the samples.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of amphoteric resins and its use for treatment of radioactive liquid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Siyam, T.; El-Naggar, I.M.; Aly, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Amphoteric resins such as poly (acrylamide-acrylic acid-diallylamine-hydrochloride) {open_quotes}P(AH-AA-DAA){sup +}Cl{close_quotes} and poly (acrylamide-acrylic acid-dially-ethylamine-hydrochloride) {open_quotes}P(AM-AA-DAEA){sup +} Cl{close_quotes} were prepared by gamma radiation-induced polymerization of acrylic acid {open_quotes}AA{close_quotes} in the presence of poly(amidoamines) such as poly(acryl-amide-diallyamine-hydrochloride) {open_quotes}P(AM- DAAH){sup +}Cl{close_quotes} and poly(acrylamide-dially-ethylamine-hydrochloride){close_quotes}P(AM-DAEAH){sup +} Cl{sup -}{close_quotes} it as template polymers using a template polymerization technique. Spectroscopic studies showed that resins contain both amide- and carboxylic groups, and the peak of {r_angle}NH of amine salts at (3000-2700 cm{sup {minus}1}) and (2700-2500 cm{sup {minus}1}) is disappeared. This indicates that the addition of acrylic acid monomer on ammonium groups. These ammonium groups in template polymers are converted into acrylic acid chain ends in the obtained resins accordingly, the probability of the polymer degradation of decreases may be attributed to the high radiation stability of these chain ends of acrylic acid units. The capacities of the obtained resins increase by increasing the absorbed doses of about {approximately}20 kGy, but at high doses the capacities decrease. On increasing the amines ratio in template polymers the capacities of resins for cation decreased but increased for anions. The capacities of the product materials to some heavy metal ions decrease with increasing the hydrogen ion concentrations and the selectivity is decreased in the order Cu{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+} > Cs{sup +}.

  2. Amorphous polymeric anode materials from poly(acrylic acid) and tin(II) oxide for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Shinji; Iba, Hideki; Itoh, Takahito

    2015-02-01

    The reaction of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and tin oxide (II) (SnO) provides an amorphous product (PSnA), which was found to be a promising precursor of an anode material for lithium ion batteries. The anode electrode composed of PSnA as the active material and polyimide as the binder showed a better cycling performance than the anode electrode using SnO as the active material. It is considered that the organic polymer chain present in PSnA might act as a buffer to the volume change in the active material during the charge-discharge cycles. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results of the electrode after delithiation revealed that nano-sized cubic tin (α-Sn) and tetragonal tin (β-Sn) particles are formed in the active material. Therefore, it is concluded that these nano-sized tin particles in the polymer matrix were effective for the storage and release of Li ions.

  3. Composite resin in medicine and dentistry.

    PubMed

    Stein, Pamela S; Sullivan, Jennifer; Haubenreich, James E; Osborne, Paul B

    2005-01-01

    Composite resin has been used for nearly 50 years as a restorative material in dentistry. Use of this material has recently increased as a result of consumer demands for esthetic restorations, coupled with the public's concern with mercury-containing dental amalgam. Composite is now used in over 95% of all anterior teeth direct restorations and in 50% of all posterior teeth direct restorations. Carbon fiber reinforced composites have been developed for use as dental implants. In medicine, fiber-reinforced composites have been used in orthopedics as implants, osseous screws, and bearing surfaces. In addition, hydroxyapatite composite resin has become a promising alternative to acrylic cement in stabilizing fractures and cancellous screw fixation in elderly and osteoporotic patients. The use of composite resin in dentistry and medicine will be the focus of this review, with particular attention paid to its physical properties, chemical composition, clinical applications, and biocompatibility.

  4. Characterization of natural resin materials using water adsorption and various advanced techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favvas, Evangelos P.; Kouvelos, Evangelos P.; Papageorgiou, Sergios K.; Tsanaktsidis, Constantinos G.; Mitropoulos, Athanasios Ch.

    2015-05-01

    A physicochemical characterization of natural raw resin material was evaluated and reported. The studied material is a natural resin, a natural product from pinus halepensis trees which is collected from the forests of Chalkidiki region of North Greece. The plurality of this product combined with its special property of removing water from commercial liquid fuels commands the detailed physicochemical characterization of this material. In particular, various techniques, such as water adsorption at 22 °C, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, were used in order to evaluate the structural and surface properties of the material. The water adsorption isotherm was also measured and fitted using the Guggenheim, Anderson and De Boer model in order to correlate the water activity characteristics. In addition, the kinetics of the adsorption was also fitted with good accuracy using the exponential Chapman model. Furthermore, as the results show, the natural resin presents good thermal characteristics. Finally, the studied material presents efficient water adsorption properties, up to 246.8 mmol/g, and it can be proposed as a promising dehydration material.

  5. Advanced composites: Fabrication processes for selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    This design note is based on present state of the art for epoxy and polyimide matrix composite fabrication technology. Boron/epoxy and polyimide and graphite/epoxy and polyimide structural parts can be successfully fabricated. Fabrication cycles for polyimide matrix composites have been shortened to near epoxy cycle times. Nondestructive testing has proven useful in detecting defects and anomalies in composite structure elements. Fabrication methods and tooling materials are discussed along with the advantages and disadvantages of different tooling materials. Types of honeycomb core, material costs and fabrication methods are shown in table form for comparison. Fabrication limits based on tooling size, pressure capabilities and various machining operations are also discussed.

  6. Materials Characterisation and Analysis for Flow Simulation of Liquid Resin Infusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirtautas, J.; Pickett, A. K.; George, A.

    2015-06-01

    Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI) processes including VARI and VARTM have received increasing attention in recent years, particularly for infusion of large parts, or for low volume production. This method avoids the need for costly matched metal tooling as used in Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM) and can provide fast infusion if used in combination with flow media. Full material characterisation for LRI analysis requires models for three dimensional fabric permeability as a function of fibre volume content, fabric through-thickness compliance as a function of resin pressure, flow media permeability and resin viscosity. The characterisation of fabric relaxation during infusion is usually determined from cyclic compaction tests on saturated fabrics. This work presents an alternative method to determine the compressibility by using LRI flow simulation and fitting a model to experimental thickness measurements during LRI. The flow media is usually assumed to have isotropic permeability, but this work shows greater simulation accuracy from combining the flow media with separation plies as a combined orthotropic material. The permeability of this combined media can also be determined by fitting the model with simulation to LRI flow measurements. The constitutive models and the finite element solution were validated by simulation of the infusion of a complex aerospace demonstrator part.

  7. Antibacterial properties of amalgam and composite resin materials used as cores under crowns.

    PubMed

    Al Ghadban, A; Al Shaarani, F

    2012-06-01

    The Aim of this Study was to compare the bacterial growth in the bulk of both amalgam and fluoridated composite resin materials used as cores under crowns at core's surface (in the superficial area of the bulk) and depth levels. With 24 lower premolars, 12 of them were restored with metal posts and amalgam cores (group 1). The rest were restored with glass Fiber-reinforced Composite (FRC) posts and fluoridated composite resin cores (group 2). All specimens were covered with aluminium crowns cemented with resin cement, and then they were soaked in natural saliva for three months. Excoriations abraded from the superficial and the depth areas of the core materials were cultured under aerobic conditions on blood agar plates. After incubation for 2 days, colonies formed on the plates were identified, and the CFU mg(-1) counts were recorded accordingly. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent sample T test. The mean values of CFU mg(-1) counts in group 2 excoriations (surface 39.75, and depth 9.75) were higher than the group 1 excoriations (surface 1.67, and depth 0.42). This study supports the use of amalgam for building up cores due to its antibacterial properties. Composite resin, however, enhanced sizable bacterial growth despite the presence of fluoride. PMID:22852523

  8. Antibacterial properties of amalgam and composite resin materials used as cores under crowns.

    PubMed

    Al Ghadban, A; Al Shaarani, F

    2012-06-01

    The Aim of this Study was to compare the bacterial growth in the bulk of both amalgam and fluoridated composite resin materials used as cores under crowns at core's surface (in the superficial area of the bulk) and depth levels. With 24 lower premolars, 12 of them were restored with metal posts and amalgam cores (group 1). The rest were restored with glass Fiber-reinforced Composite (FRC) posts and fluoridated composite resin cores (group 2). All specimens were covered with aluminium crowns cemented with resin cement, and then they were soaked in natural saliva for three months. Excoriations abraded from the superficial and the depth areas of the core materials were cultured under aerobic conditions on blood agar plates. After incubation for 2 days, colonies formed on the plates were identified, and the CFU mg(-1) counts were recorded accordingly. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent sample T test. The mean values of CFU mg(-1) counts in group 2 excoriations (surface 39.75, and depth 9.75) were higher than the group 1 excoriations (surface 1.67, and depth 0.42). This study supports the use of amalgam for building up cores due to its antibacterial properties. Composite resin, however, enhanced sizable bacterial growth despite the presence of fluoride.

  9. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-08-10

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  10. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Black, Stuart K.; Diebold, James P.; Kreibich, Roland E.

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  11. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulkfill flowable material and a resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Isufi, Almira; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Ioppolo, Pietro; Testarelli, Luca; Bedini, Rossella; Al-Sudani, Dina; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aim To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulk fill flowable material (SDR) and a traditional resin composite. Methods Thirty maxillary and 30 mandibular first molars were selected based on similar dimensions. After cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canals and adhesive procedures, specimens were assigned to 3 subgroups for each tooth type (n=10): Group A: control group, including intact teeth; Group B: access cavities were restored with a traditional resin composite (EsthetX; Dentsply-Italy, Rome, Italy); Group C: access cavities were restored with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR; Dentsply-Italy), except 1.5 mm layer of the occlusal surface that was restored with the same resin composite as Group B. The specimens were subjected to compressive force in a material static-testing machine until fracture occurred, the maximum fracture load of the specimens was measured (N) and the type of fracture was recorded as favorable or unfavorable. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni tests (P<0.05). Results No statistically significant differences were found among groups (P<0.05). Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a traditional resin composite and with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR) was similar in both maxillary and mandibular molars and showed no significant decrease in fracture resistance compared to intact specimens. Conclusions No significant difference was observed in the mechanical fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with traditional resin composite restorations compared to bulk fill flowable composite restorations. PMID:27486505

  12. Multiplexed fibre optic sensors for monitoring resin infusion, flow, and cure in composite material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehura, Edmon; Jarzebinska, Renata; Da Costa, Elisabete F. R.; Skordos, Alexandros A.; James, Stephen W.; Partridge, Ivana K.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2013-04-01

    The infusion, flow and cure of RTM6 resin in a carbon fibre reinforced composite preform have been monitored using a variety of multiplexed fibre optic sensors. Optical fibre Fresnel sensors and tilted fibre Bragg grating (TFBG) sensors were configured to monitor resin infusion/flow in-plane of the component. The results obtained from the different sensors were in good agreement with visual observations. The degree of cure was monitored by Fresnel sensors via a measurement of the refractive index of the resin which was converted to degree of cure using a calibration determined from Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Fibre Bragg grating sensors fabricated in highly linearly birefringent fibre were used to monitor the development of transverse strain during the cure process, revealing through-thickness material shrinkage of about 712 μɛ and residual strain of 223 μɛ. An alternative approach to infusion monitoring, based on an array of multiplexed tapered optical fibre sensors interrogated using optical frequency domain reflectometry, was also investigated in a separate carbon fibre preform that was infused with RTM6 resin.

  13. Influence of compliance of the substrate materials on polymerization contraction stress in thin resin composite layers.

    PubMed

    Alster, D; Venhoven, B A; Feilzer, A J; Davidson, C L

    1997-02-01

    The present study determined in a laboratory set-up the influence of compliance of the substrate material on polymerisation contraction stress for various thicknesses of bonded dental resin composite films. When the compliance of the tensilometer set-up was increased from 0.029 micron MPa-1 to 0.150 micron MPa-1, the contraction stress in films with a thickness of 100 microns and a diameter of 5.35 mm decreased from 22 to 7 MPa. For the 700 microns samples the stress decreased from 12 to 11 MPa. It was concluded that if compliance from the substrate materials is possible, a thinner resin composite film may effect a more reliable bond.

  14. Starch graft poly(methyl acrylate) loose-fill foam: preparation, properties and degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Gordon, S H; Imam, S H

    2004-01-01

    Starch graft poly(methyl acrylate) (S-g-PMA) was prepared by ceric ion initiation of methyl acrylate in an aqueous corn starch slurry (prime starch) which maximized the accessibility of the starch for graft polymerization. A new ceric ion reaction sequence was established as starch-initiator-methyl acrylate followed by addition of a small amount of ceric ion solution when the graft polymerization was almost complete to quench the reaction. As a result of this improved procedure, no unreacted methyl acrylate monomer remained, and thus, essentially no ungrafted poly(methyl acrylate) homopolymer was formed in the final grafted product. Quantities of the high purity S-g-PMA so prepared in pilot scale were converted to resin pellets and loose-fill foam by single screw and twin screw extrusion. The use of prime starch significantly improved the physical properties of the final loose-fill foam, in comparison to foam produced from regular dry corn starch. The S-g-PMA loose-fill foam had compressive strength and resiliency comparable to expanded polystyrene but higher bulk density. The S-g-PMA loose-fill foam also had better moisture and water resistance than other competitive starch-based materials. Studies indicated that the starch portion in S-g-PMA loose-fill foam biodegraded rapidly, whereas poly(methyl acrylate) remained relatively stable under natural environmental conditions.

  15. Lateral Chain Length in Polyalkyl Acrylates Determines the Mobility of Fibronectin at the Cell/Material Interface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cells, by interacting with surfaces indirectly through a layer of extracellular matrix proteins, can respond to a variety of physical properties, such as topography or stiffness. Polymer surface mobility is another physical property that is less well understood but has been indicated to hold the potential to modulate cell behavior. Polymer mobility is related to the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the system, the point at which a polymer transitions from an amorphous solid to a more liquid-like state. This work shows that changes in polymer mobility translate to interfacial mobility of extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed on the material surface. This study has utilized a family of polyalkyl acrylates with similar chemistry but different degrees of mobility, obtained through increasing length of the side chain. These materials are used, in conjunction with fluorescent fibronectin, to determine the mobility of this interfacial layer of protein that constitutes the initial cell–material interface. Furthermore, the extent of fibronectin domain availability (III9, III10, - the integrin binding site), cell-mediated reorganization, and cell differentiation was also determined. A nonmonotonic dependence of fibronectin mobility on polymer surface mobility was observed, with a similar trend noted in cell-mediated reorganization of the protein layer by L929 fibroblasts. The availability of the integrin-binding site was higher on the more mobile surfaces, where a similar organization of the protein into networks at the material interface was observed. Finally, differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts was seen to be highly sensitive to surface mobility upon inhibition of cell contractility. Altogether, these findings show that polymer mobility is a subtle influence that translates to the cell/material interface through the protein layer to alter the biological activity of the surface. PMID:26715432

  16. Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum pressure only. The two materials selected for this study are MR50/LTM25, and CFS003/LTM25 with Amoco T300 fiber; both prepregs are manufactured by The Advanced Composites Group. MR50/LTM25 is a unidirectional prepreg tape using Mitsubishi MR50 carbon fiber impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. CRS003/LTM25 is a 2 by 2 twill fabric using Amoco T300 fiber and impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. Among the properties presented in this report are strength, stiffness, bolt bearing, and damage tolerance. Many of these properties were obtained at three environmental conditions: cold temperature/dry (CTD), room temperature/dry (RTD), and elevated temperature/wet (ETW). A few properties were obtained at room temperature/wet (RTW), and elevated temperature/dry (ETD). The cold and elevated temperatures used for testing were -125 F and 180 F, respectively. In addition, several properties related to processing are presented.

  17. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  18. Methyl acrylate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl acrylate ; CASRN 96 - 33 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  19. Influence of Curing Light Attenuation Caused by Aesthetic Indirect Restorative Materials on Resin Cement Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Pick, Bárbara; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Junior, Washington Steagall; Kawano, Yoshio; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To verify the effect of interposing different indirect restorative materials on degree of conversion (DC), hardness, and flexural strength of a dual-cure resin cement. Methods: Discs (2 mm-thick, n=5) of four indirect restorative materials were manufactured: a layered glass-ceramic (GC); a heat-pressed lithium disilicate-based glass-ceramic veneered with the layered glass-ceramic (LD); a micro-hybrid (MH); and a micro-filled (MF) indirect composite resin. The light transmittance of these materials was determined using a double-beam spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Bar-shaped specimens of a dual-cure resin cement (Nexus 2/SDS Kerr), with (dual-cure mode) and without the catalyst paste (light-cure mode), were photoactivated through the discs using either a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) or a light-emitting diode (LED) unit. As a control, specimens were photoactivated without the interposed discs. Specimens were stored at 37ºC for 24h before being submitted to FT-Raman spectrometry (n=3), Knoop microhardness (n=6) and three-point bending (n=6) tests. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results: MH presented the highest transmittance. The DC was lower in light-cure mode than in dual-cure mode. All restorative materials reduced the cement microhardness in light-cure mode. GC and LD with QTH and GC with LED decreased the strength of the cement for both activation modes compared to the controls. Curing units did not affect DC or microhardness, except when the dual-cure cement was photoactivated through LD (LED>QTH). Flexural strength was higher with QTH compared to LED. Conclusions: Differences in transmittance among the restorative materials significantly influenced cement DC and flexural strength, regardless of the activation mode, as well as the microhardness of the resin cement tested in light-cure mode. Microhardness was not impaired by the interposed materials when the resin cement was used in dual-cure mode. PMID:20613921

  20. Adjustable degradation properties and biocompatibility of amorphous and functional poly(ester-acrylate)-based materials.

    PubMed

    Undin, Jenny; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Albertsson, Ann-Christine

    2014-07-14

    Tuning the properties of materials toward a special application is crucial in the area of tissue engineering. The design of materials with predetermined degradation rates and controlled release of degradation products is therefore vital. Providing a material with various functional groups is one of the best ways to address this issue because alterations and modifications of the polymer backbone can be performed easily. Two different 2-methylene-1,3-dioxepane/glycidyl methacrylate-based (MDO/GMA) copolymers were synthesized with different feed ratios and immersed into a phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4 and in deionized water at 37 °C for up to 133 days. After different time intervals, the molecular weight changes, mass loss, pH, and degradation products were determined. By increasing the amount of GMA functional groups in the material, the degradation rate and the amount of acidic degradation products released from the material were decreased. As a result, the composition of the copolymers greatly affected the degradation rate. A rapid release of acidic degradation products during the degradation process could be an important issue for biomedical applications because it might affect the biocompatibility of the material. The cytotoxicity of the materials was evaluated using a MTT assay. These tests indicated that none of the materials demonstrated any obvious cytotoxicity, and the materials could therefore be considered biocompatible.

  1. The histological effects of composite resin materials on the pulps of monkey teeth.

    PubMed

    Heys, R J; Heys, D R; Cox, C F; Avery, J K

    1977-03-01

    Pulpal response of three bis glycol methacrylate composite resins, Smile, Simulate and Experimental Composite no. 2 were tested on primary and permanent monkey teeth using zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and silicate as controls. All materials were placed in Class V cavity preparations in Rhesus monkey teeth and evaluated at 3 days and 5 and 8 weeks. The materials were randomly placed in anterior and posterior teeth utilizing 75 primary and 75 permanent teeth. Following perfusion the teeth were prepared by routine histological procedures. The 3 day response of the composite resins was moderate, characterized by disruption of the odontoblasts, vacuolization and mild inflammatory response underlying the cavity. At 5 weeks the formation of reparative dentin and a decrease in the inflammatory response was similar for all resins observed. At 8 weeks a slight increase in reparative dentin and continued decrease in inflammation was noted when compared to the 5 weeks responses. At all time intervals ZOE produced the least pulpal response while silicate produced the most severe response.

  2. New Anion-Exchange Resins for Improved Separations of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, Richard A.; Barr, Mary E.

    2001-04-30

    Improved separations of nuclear materials will have a significant impact upon a broad range of DOE activities. DOE-EM Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have identified improved methods for the extraction and recovery of radioactive metal ions from process, waste, and environmental waters as critical needs for the coming years. We propose to develop multifunctional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. Our new ion-exchange resins interface the field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion-exchange technology to provide materials which exhibit superior selectivity and kinetics of sorption and desorption. The following Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have described needs that would be favorably impacted by the new material: Efficient Separations and Processing - radionuclide removal from aqueous phases; Plutonium - Pu, Am or total alpha removal to meet regulatory requirement s before discharge to the environment; Plumes - U and Tc in groundwater, U, Pu, Am, and Tc in soils; Mixed Waste - radionuclide partitioning; High-Level Tank Waste - actinide and Tc removal from supernatants and/or sludges. The basic scientific issues which need to be addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. Synthesis of multifunctionalized extractants and ion-exchange materials that implement key features of the optimized binding site, and testing of these materials, will provide feedback to the modeling and design activities. Resin materials which actively facilitate the uptake of actinide complexes from solution should display both improved selectivity and kinetic properties. The long-range implications of this research, however, go far beyond the nuclear complex. This new methodology of ''facilitated uptake'' could revolutionize ion-exchange technology

  3. Application of Targeted Molecular and Material Property Optimization to Bacterial Attachment-Resistant (Meth)acrylate Polymers.

    PubMed

    Adlington, Kevin; Nguyen, Nam T; Eaves, Elizabeth; Yang, Jing; Chang, Chien-Yi; Li, Jianing; Gower, Alexandra L; Stimpson, Amy; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Davies, Martyn C; Hook, Andrew L; Williams, Paul; Alexander, Morgan R; Irvine, Derek J

    2016-09-12

    Developing medical devices that resist bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation is highly desirable. In this paper, we report the optimization of the molecular structure and thus material properties of a range of (meth)acrylate copolymers which contain monomers reported to deliver bacterial resistance to surfaces. This optimization allows such monomers to be employed within novel coatings to reduce bacterial attachment to silicone urinary catheters. We show that the flexibility of copolymers can be tuned to match that of the silicone catheter substrate, by copolymerizing these polymers with a lower Tg monomer such that it passes the flexing fatigue tests as coatings upon catheters, that the homopolymers failed. Furthermore, the Tg values of the copolymers are shown to be readily estimated by the Fox equation. The bacterial resistance performance of these copolymers were typically found to be better than the neat silicone or a commercial silver containing hydrogel surface, when the monomer feed contained only 25 v% of the "hit" monomer. The method of initiation (either photo or thermal) was shown not to affect the bacterial resistance of the copolymers. Optimized synthesis conditions to ensure that the correct copolymer composition and to prevent the onset of gelation are detailed. PMID:27461341

  4. Preservation-based approaches to restore posterior teeth with amalgam, resin or a combination of materials.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Ziad D

    2002-02-01

    This review is a systematic assessment, from the literature, of the status quo of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer restorations for carious lesions as it applies to new concepts, coupled with clinical research. Scientifically based and practical new materials and techniques are recommended to include in contemporary practice throughout the world. Clinical and laboratory studies which have been carried out in light of modern conservative principles, and in light of the current emphasis of treating dental caries as a disease process were reviewed and discussed. An approach to managing carious lesions based upon selected advantages of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer technology applied to what is termed "preservation-based" approaches to restoring teeth has been synthesized. Researched evidence contradicts the notion of "extension for prevention" in favor of maintaining sound tooth structure which would translate into more patients with healthy dentitions for entire lifetimes. PMID:12074231

  5. In vitro microleakage of glass-ionomer composite resin hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J A; De Magalhães, C S; Serra, M C; Rodrigues Júnior, A L

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of six glass-ionomer composite resin hybrid materials compared with a glass-ionomer cement and a composite resin. Standardized class 5 dentin cavities were prepared on root surfaces of 240 extracted human teeth that were randomly assigned to eight groups and restored using the following restorative systems: (I) Vitremer, (II) Compoglass, (III) Photac-Fil Aplicap, (IV) Variglass, (V) Dyract, (VI) Fuji II LC, (VII) Ketac-Fil Aplicap, and (VIII) Z100. The teeth were thermocycled, placed in a 2% methylene blue solution, and sectioned with diamond disks. Dye penetration was scored on a scale of 0-3. Results showed no significant differences among groups VIII, IV, I, V, VI, III, and II. There were also no significant differences among groups VI, III, II, and VII.

  6. Fluid flow modeling of resin transfer molding for composite material wind turbine blade structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, Douglas S.; Rossel, Scott M.

    2004-06-01

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a closed mold process for making composite materials. It has the potential to produce parts more cost effectively than hand lay-up or other methods. However, fluid flow tends to be unpredictable and parts the size of a wind turbine blade are difficult to engineer without some predictive method for resin flow. There were five goals of this study. The first was to determine permeabilities for three fabrics commonly used for RTM over a useful range of fiber volume fractions. Next, relations to estimate permeabilities in mixed fabric lay-ups were evaluated. Flow in blade substructures was analyzed and compared to predictions. Flow in a full-scale blade was predicted and substructure results were used to validate the accuracy of a full-scale blade prediction.

  7. NASA/aircraft industry standard specification for graphite fiber toughened thermoset resin composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A standard specification for a selected class of graphite fiber/toughened thermoset resin matrix material was developed through joint NASA/Aircraft Industry effort. This specification was compiled to provide uniform requirements and tests for qualifying prepreg systems and for acceptance of prepreg batches. The specification applies specifically to a class of composite prepreg consisting of unidirectional graphite fibers impregnated with a toughened thermoset resin that produce laminates with service temperatures from -65 F to 200 F when cured at temperatures below or equal to 350 F. The specified prepreg has a fiber areal weight of 145 g sq m. The specified tests are limited to those required to set minimum standards for the uncured prepreg and cured laminates, and are not intended to provide design allowable properties.

  8. Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

  9. Immediate post-traumatic upper incisor reconstruction using composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Panduric, Vlatko; Gabric, Dragana; Negovetic-Mandic, Visnja

    2008-02-01

    Single visit reconstruction of the fractured crown can be completed with composite resins if there is no bleeding due to the soft tissue injury. Clinical inspection revealed a complex crown fracture of the central incisor as well as a simple horizontal fracture of the lateral incisor crown of the enamel-dentin type. Vertical fracture separated the palatal enamel wall from the rest of the lateral incisor crown. After the completion of the endodontic sanitation, root canals were prepared for prefabricated composite posts and crown reconstructions were performed with the Finger Tip Technique by using composite resin materials. The advantage of this kind of reconstruction is preservation of the hard dental crown tissue removed in case of prosthetic therapy, especially in younger patients. Reconstruction can be finished in one visit, without the need for a dental technician and laboratory.

  10. Effect of chemical composition on corneal cellular response to photopolymerized materials comprising 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and acrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jui-Yang

    2013-10-01

    Characterization of corneal cellular response to hydrogel materials is an important issue in ophthalmic applications. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the feed composition of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)/acrylic acid (AAc) and material compatibility towards corneal stromal and endothelial cells. The monomer solutions of HEMA and AAc were mixed at varying volume ratios of 92:0, 87:5, 82:10, 77:15, and 72:20, and were subjected to UV irradiation. Results of electrokinetic measurements showed that an increase in absolute zeta potential of photopolymerized membranes is observed with increasing the volume ratios of AAc/HEMA. Following 4 days of incubation with various hydrogels, the primary rabbit corneal stromal and endothelial cell cultures were examined for viability, proliferation, and pro-inflammatory gene expression. The samples prepared from the solution mixture containing 0-10 vol.% AAc displayed good cytocompatibility. However, with increasing volume ratio of AAc and HEMA from 15:77 to 20:72, the decreased viability, inhibited proliferation, and stimulated inflammation were noted in both cell types, probably due to the stronger charge-charge interactions. On the other hand, the ionic pump function of corneal endothelial cells exposed to photopolymerized membranes was examined by analyzing the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit (ATP1A1) expression level. The presence of material samples having higher anionic charge density (i.e., zeta potential of -38 to -56 mV) may lead to abnormal transmembrane transport. It is concluded that the chemical composition of HEMA/AAc has an important influence on the corneal stromal and endothelial cell responses to polymeric biomaterials. PMID:23910267

  11. Through-hole optimization using plasma desmearing system. [Removal of resin

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, F.L.

    1986-12-01

    To assure a reliable multilayer printed wiring product, all traces of resin smear must be removed from interconnect holes prior to electroplating. Plasma processing will remove this resin smear from the new laminates being introduced to our industry as well as the standard epoxy materials. Plasma desmearing also has the potential of eliminating many of the negative aspects associated with ''wet'' chemical processing. This report describes the full characterization of a production plasma etchback/desmear system (PEDS), as used in a prototype fabrication environment. Processing parameters were established for epoxy, polyimide, and acrylic resin systems.

  12. Optical Absorption of Epoxy Resin and its Role in the Laser Ultrasonic Generation Mechanism in Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratoudaki, T.; Edwards, C.; Dixon, S.; Palmer, S. B.

    2003-03-01

    Epoxy resins are used in various applications and are essential to the fabrication of carbon fibre reinforced composite materials (CFRCs). This paper investigates laser generated ultrasound in epoxy resins using three different lasers, a TEA CO2, a Nd:YAG and a XeCl excimer. In these partially transparent materials the ultrasonic generation mechanism is directly related to the optical absorption depth which can therefore be measured directly from the ultrasonic waveforms using for example a Michelson interferometer as detector. The present work aims firstly to relate the observed amplitude of the longitudinal wave to the optical absorption depth of the epoxy and secondly to evaluate the role of the epoxy resin to the generation of the ultrasound in CFRCs. For the latter, comparative results of generation efficiency between the three wavelengths are presented and an attempt is made to understand the way that the resin matrix influences the generation mechanism of ultrasound in composite materials.

  13. Acrylic coatings compositions containing polymer-bound hindered amine light stabilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Callais, P.A.

    1993-12-31

    Unique acrylic coatings resins with attached hindered amine light stabilizer (HALS) groups have been developed. They are readily prepared by reacting a hydrazide functionalized HALS with an acrylic polyol resin containing anhydride and/or epoxy groups or with a peroxide functionalized HALS as the polymerization initiator. As a result, the HALS moiety is rendered nonvolatile and nonextractable. Acrylic melamine and acrylic urethane coatings prepared from the polymer-bound light stabilizer resins exhibit outstanding weatherability and durability in both accelerated and outdoor weathering.

  14. Effect of chemical composition on corneal tissue response to photopolymerized materials comprising 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and acrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jui-Yang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between the feed composition of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)/acrylic acid (AAc) and hydrogel material compatibility towards ocular anterior segment tissues, particularly the corneal endothelium. The monomer solutions of HEMA and AAc were mixed at varying volume ratios of 92:0, 87:5, 82:10, 77:15, and 72:20, and were subjected to UV irradiation. Then, the 7-mm-diameter membrane implants made from photopolymerized materials were placed into the ocular anterior chamber for 4days and assessed by biomicroscopic examinations, corneal thickness measurements, and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses. The poly(HEMA-co-AAc) implants prepared from the solution mixture containing 0-10vol.% AAc displayed good biocompatibility. However, with increasing volume ratio of AAc and HEMA from 15:77 to 20:72, the enhanced inflammatory response, decreased endothelial cell density, and increased ocular score and corneal thickness were observed, probably due to the influence of surface charge of copolymer membranes. On the other hand, the ionic pump function of corneal endothelium exposed to photopolymerized membranes was examined by analyzing the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit (ATP1A1) expression level. The presence of the implants having higher amount of AAc incorporated in the copolymers (i.e., 15.1 to 24.7μmol) and zeta potential (i.e., -38.6 to -56.5mV) may lead to abnormal transmembrane transport. It is concluded that the chemical composition of HEMA/AAc has an important influence on the corneal tissue responses to polymeric biomaterials. PMID:24268266

  15. Thermo-Optic Coefficient of Different Photosensitive Acrylate Polymers for Optical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, N.; Mohamed, R.; Ehsan, A. A.; Kuang, C. S.; Shaari, S.

    Thermo-optic (TO) effect in materials can be exploited in the fabrication of optical devices such as optical switches and couplers. These optical devices play a key function in communication networks because by changing the temperature they have control over the optical path. Recently, polymer materials have begun to receive attention for the application of the TO switch in integrated optics. The polymers exploited for the variation of refractive index with temperature in our work involve the use of cyclomer acrylate, which is compared to the fluorinated acrylate available in the market. We focus the on cyclomer acrylate resin potential to be employed in fabricating optical devices especially the optical waveguide and optical switch. Formerly, this polymer is used as an adhesive and coating only. Different acrylate formulations from cyclomer acrylates have been exploited. Both acrylates show negative TO effects with temperature i.e. decrease of refractive index result in the increase in temperature. This is expected as the refractive index of the polymers are reduced, as density typically decreases with increasing temperature. This is in accordance to the dependence of polarizability and density of a particular material, to its refractive index. For both types of polymers, the change of the refractive index as a function of temperature is linear. The slope can give the dn/dT of the film. The dn/dT of polymers are as high as the order of 10-4, which is comparable to those of optical polymers. Higher values are shown by the cyclomer acrylate compared to the fluorinated type.

  16. Effects of Light Curing Method and Exposure Time on Mechanical Properties of Resin Based Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Alpöz, A. Riza; Ertuḡrul, Fahinur; Cogulu, Dilsah; Ak, Asli Topaloḡlu; Tanoḡlu, Metin; Kaya, Elçin

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate microhardness and compressive strength of composite resin (Tetric-Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent), compomer (Compoglass, Ivoclar, Vivadent), and resin modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, GC Corp) polymerized using halogen light (Optilux 501, Demetron, Kerr) and LED (Bluephase C5, Ivoclar Vivadent) for different curing times. Methods Samples were placed in disc shaped plastic molds with uniform size of 5 mm diameter and 2 mm in thickness for surface microhardness test and placed in a diameter of 4 mm and a length of 2 mm teflon cylinders for compressive strength test. For each subgroup, 20 samples for microhardness (n=180) and 5 samples for compressive strength were prepared (n=45). In group 1, samples were polymerized using halogen light source for 40 seconds; in group 2 and 3 samples were polymerized using LED light source for 20 seconds and 40 seconds respectively. All data were analyzed by two way analysis of ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc tests. Results Same exposure time of 40 seconds with a low intensity LED was found similar or more efficient than a high intensity halogen light unit (P>.05), however application of LED for 20 seconds was found less efficient than 40 seconds curing time (P=.03). Conclusions It is important to increase the light curing time and use appropriate light curing devices to polymerize resin composite in deep cavities to maximize the hardness and compressive strength of restorative materials. PMID:19212507

  17. Penetration of resin-based materials into initial erosion lesion: A confocal microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Ionta, Franciny Querobim; Boteon, Ana Paula; Moretto, Marcelo Juliano; Júnior, Odair Bim; Honório, Heitor Marques; Silva, Thiago Cruvinel; Wang, Linda; Rios, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The application of resin-based materials is an alternative of treatment for eroded lesions. Nevertheless, there are no studies about the penetration of these materials into eroded lesion, which might affect its adhesion. Therefore, this study evaluated the penetration of four resin-based materials, with and without enamel etching. By using an in vitro protocol, types of treatment were studied at five levels (AdheSE(®) , Tetric N-Bond(®) , Single Bond 2(®) , Helioseal Clear(®) , Icon(®) ) and types of enamel etching in two levels (with and without). Materials were stained with 0.02 mg/mL ethanolic solution of tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate. Bovine enamel samples (4 × 4 mm) were immersed in 0.01 M HCl, pH 2.3, for 30 seconds to produce initial eroded lesions. Afterward, the materials were applied on half of sample enamel surface following the manufacturer's instructions. On the other half of sample, the materials were applied without etching the enamel. Materials penetration into the enamel was assessed by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy on reflection and fluorescence modes. The penetration depth (PD) was measured using ImageJ software. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05). Regardless of the material, etched enamel resulted in higher PD than non-etched (P < 0.05). Icon(®) showed the highest PD in enamel followed by Helioseal Clear(®) (P < 0.05), with significant difference between them (P < 0.05) and no difference was found among AdheSE(®) , Tetric N-Bond(®) , and Single Bond 2(®) (P > 0.05). It can be concluded that prior enamel etching increased the materials penetration into eroded enamel and the Icon(®) -infiltrant presented highest penetration.

  18. Optimal Composite Material for Low Cost Fabrication of Large Composite Aerospace Structures using NASA Resins or POSS Nanoparticle Modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamontia, Mark A.; Gruber, Mark B.; Jensen, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    Thermoplastic laminates in situ consolidated via tape or tow placement require full mechanical properties. Realizing full properties requires resin crystallinity to be controlled - partial crystallinity leads to unacceptably low laminate compression properties. There are two approaches: utilize an amorphous matrix resin; or place material made from a semi-crystalline resin featuring kinetics faster than the process. In this paper, a matrix resin evaluation and trade study was completed with commercial and NASA amorphous polyimides on the one hand, and with PEKK mixed with POSS nanoparticles for accelerated crystallinity growth on the other. A new thermoplastic impregnated material, 6 mm wide (0.25-in) AS-4 carbon/LaRC(TradeMark)8515 dry polyimide tow, was fabricated. Since LaRC(TradeMark)8515 is fully amorphous, it attains full properties following in situ consolidation, with no post processing required to build crystallinity. The tow in situ processing was demonstrated via in situ thermoplastic filament winding it into rings.

  19. Evaluation of fracture resistance of indirect composite resin crowns by cyclic impact test: influence of crown and abutment materials.

    PubMed

    Sakoguchi, Kenji; Minami, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of abutment materials on the fracture resistance of composite crowns for premolars. Composite crowns were fabricated using two different indirect composite resin materials (Meta Color Prime Art or Estenia C&B) and cemented onto either a metal (Castwell M.C. 12) or composite resin (Build-It FR and FibreKor) abutment with resin cement (Panavia F2.0). Twenty-four specimens were fabricated for four groups (n=6 each) and subjected to 280-N cyclic impact loading at 1.0 Hz. The number of cycles which caused the composite crown to fracture was defined as its fracture resistance. All data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and the Bonferroni test (α=0.05). Composite crowns cemented onto resin abutments showed higher fracture resistance than those cemented onto metal abutments.

  20. Calcium and phosphate release from resin-based materials containing different calcium orthophosphate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcela C; Natale, Livia C; Arana-Chaves, Victor E; Braga, Roberto R

    2015-11-01

    The study compared ion release from resin-based materials containing calcium orthophosphates. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and surface area (nitrogen adsorption isotherms, BET method). Nanoparticles were added to a dimethacrylate-based resin and materials were tested for degree of conversion (DC) and calcium/phosphate release up to 28 days under pH 5.5 and 7.0. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey test (alpha: 0.05).The crystallinity of DCPA, DCPD, and β-TCP were confirmed, as well as the ACP amorphous nature. DCPD and β-TCP presented larger agglomerates than DCPA and ACP. The surface area of ACP was 5-11 times higher than those of the other nanoparticles. Materials showed similar DC. The material containing ACP released significantly more ions than the others, which released similar amounts of calcium and, in most cases, phosphate. Ion release was not affected by pH. Calcium release decreased between 7 and 21 days, while phosphate levels remained constant after 14 days. In conclusion, ACP higher ion release can be ascribed to its high surface area. DCPA, DCPD, and β-TCP had similar performances as ion-releasing fillers.

  1. Effects of different solutions on the surface hardness of composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Yanikoğlu, Nuran; Duymuş, Zeynep Yeşil; Yilmaz, Baykal

    2009-05-01

    In this study, the surface hardness of five light-cured composite resins were evaluated, namely: filled (Estelite), nanofil (AElite), unfilled (Valux Plus), hybrid (Tetric ceram), and Ormocer-based (Admira) composite resins. The microhardness values of composite specimens were measured at the top and bottom surfaces after 24 hours or 30 days of immersion in different solutions (tea, coffee, Turkish coffee, mouthwash, cola, and distilled water). Comparisons were made with univariate analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test. It was found that rough specimens of reinforced nano-hybrid composite material immersed in cola for 30 days had the lowest surface hardness (33.20), whereas rough specimens of hybrid composite material immersed in cola for 24 hours had the highest surface hardness (156.00). In both tea and coffee, the top surfaces tended to be harder than the bottom ones. In conclusion, the five different materials exhibited different hardnesses, and that the hardness values of composite materials were statistically different in different immersion solutions.

  2. Infiltration/cure modeling of resin transfer molded composite materials using advanced fiber architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loos, Alfred C.; Weideman, Mark H.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Kranbuehl, David E.; Kinsley, Philip J.; Hart, Sean M.

    1991-01-01

    A model was developed which can be used to simulate infiltration and cure of textile composites by resin transfer molding. Fabric preforms were resin infiltrated and cured using model generated optimized one-step infiltration/cure protocols. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing (FDEMS) was used to monitor in situ resin infiltration and cure during processing. FDEMS measurements of infiltration time, resin viscosity, and resin degree of cure agreed well with values predicted by the simulation model. Textile composites fabricated using a one-step infiltration/cure procedure were uniformly resin impregnated and void free. Fiber volume fraction measurements by the resin digestion method compared well with values predicted using the model.

  3. On-line mass spectrometric monitoring of the polymerization of a phenolic-resin-based material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikens, D. A.; Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    Polymerization of phenolic-resin-based materials requires elevated temperatures. The low thermal conductivity of these materials has led to the use of dielectric heating techniques in lieu of standard convection oven heating to obtain a satisfactory cure. The curing rate and therefore the quality of the cured material depends on the heating rate and maximum temperature attained, parameters which are extremely difficult to measure in dielectric heating units. The dielectric curing of these materials was monitored by using a mass spectrometer to measure the partial pressure of phenol in the gas evolved during polymerization. The resulting plots of phenol partial pressure as a function of time have a characteristic shape, and these may be used to indicate the attainment of complete curing. The validity of the mass spectrometric technique was confirmed by chemical analysis of the polymerized samples.

  4. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  5. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  6. Effect of curing mode on the hardness of dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials.

    PubMed

    Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Kasaz, Aline de Cerqueira; Albino, Luís Gustavo Barrote; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Reis, Andre Figueiredo

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the Knoop Hardness (KHN) values of two dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials and one resin cement exposed to different curing conditions. Two dual-cured core build-up composite resins (LuxaCore-Dual, DMG; and FluoroCore2, Dentsply Caulk), and one dual-cured resin cement (Rely X ARC, 3M ESPE) were used in the present study. The composite materials were placed into a cylindrical matrix (2 mm in height and 3 mm in diameter), and the specimens thus produced were either light-activated for 40 s (Optilux 501, Demetron Kerr) or were allowed to self-cure for 10 min in the dark (n = 5). All specimens were then stored in humidity at 37 degrees C for 24 h in the dark and were subjected to KHN analysis. The results were submitted to 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test at a pre-set alpha of 5%. All the light-activated groups exhibited higher KHN values than the self-cured ones (p = 0.00001), regardless of product. Among the self-cured groups, both composite resin core build-up materials showed higher KHN values than the dual-cured resin cement (p = 0.00001). LuxaCore-Dual exhibited higher KHN values than FluoroCore2 (p = 0.00001) when they were allowed to self-cure, while no significant differences in KHN values were observed among the light-activated products. The results suggest that dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials may be more reliable than dual-cured resin cements when curing light is not available.

  7. Testing Penetration of Epoxy Resin and Diamine Hardeners through Protective Glove and Clothing Materials.

    PubMed

    Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Mäkelä, Erja A; Suuronen, Katri

    2015-10-01

    Efficient, comfortable, yet affordable personal protective equipment (PPE) is needed to decrease the high incidence of allergic contact dermatitis arising from epoxy resin systems (ERSs) in industrial countries. The aim of this study was to find affordable, user-friendly glove and clothing materials that provide adequate skin protection against splashes and during the short contact with ERS that often occurs before full cure. We studied the penetration of epoxy resin and diamine hardeners through 12 glove or clothing materials using a newly developed test method. The tests were carried out with two ERS test mixtures that had a high content of epoxy resin and frequently used diamine hardeners of different molar masses. A drop (50 µl) of test mixture was placed on the outer surface of the glove/clothing material, which had a piece of Fixomull tape or Harmony protection sheet attached to the inner surface as the collection medium. The test times were 10 and 30 min. The collecting material was removed after the test was finished and immersed into acetone. The amounts of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), isophorone diamine (IPDA), and m-xylylenediamine (XDA) in the acetone solution were determined by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The limit for acceptable penetration of XDA, IPDA, and DGEBA through glove materials was set at 2 µg cm(-2). Penetration through the glove materials was 1.4 µg cm(-2) or less. The three tested chemical protective gloves showed no detectable penetration (<0.5 µg cm(-2)). Several affordable glove and clothing materials were found to provide adequate protection during short contact with ERS, in the form of, for example, disposable gloves or clothing materials suitable for aprons and as additional protective layers on the most exposed parts of clothing, such as the front of the legs and thighs and under the forearms. Every ERS combination in use should be tested separately to find the best skin protection material

  8. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Khalid A. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244). PMID:27143970

  9. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Khalid A O

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244).

  10. Use of temporary filling material for index fabrication in Class IV resin composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun-Young; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Duck-Su; Choi, Kyoung-Kyu

    2013-05-01

    When a patient with a fractured anterior tooth visits the clinic, clinician has to restore the tooth esthetically and quickly. For esthetic resin restoration, clinician can use 'Natural Layering technique' and an index for palatal wall may be needed. In this case report, we introduce pre-restoration index technique on a Class IV defect, in which a temporary filling material is used for easy restoration. Chair-side index fabrication for Class IV restoration is convenient and makes a single-visit treatment possible.

  11. Microwave behaviour comparison between different carbon based materials in epoxy resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorcelli, M.; Savi, P.; Guastella, S.; Tagliaferro, A.

    2016-05-01

    Because of their low weight and high performance, polymer composites are important materials for new applications. Their properties (electrical, mechanical, …) can in fact be tuned using different kind of filler and percentage. Carbon fillers are among the most used in composites when tuning electrical proprieties is the target. Different carbon fillers can be used. From cheaper (e.g. carbon black), to eco-friendly (e.g. Biochar) or more sophisticate (e.g. carbon nanotubes). In this work, we studied the microwave performance of these different kinds of carbon filler dispersed in Epoxy resin.

  12. DCPD resin catalyzed with Grubbs catalysts for reinforcing pothole patching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Yuan, Kuo-Yao; Zou, Linhua; Yang, Jenn-Ming; Ju, Jiann-Wen; Kao, Wei; Carlson, Larry; Edgecombe, Brian; Stephen, Tony

    2012-04-01

    The potholes and alligator cracks in the asphalt pavement of our country's roadways have become an annoying part of our daily life. In order to reinstate and maintain our pavement infrastructure integrity and durability, we have identified dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) resin for this purpose due to its unique properties - low cost, low viscosity at beginning and ultra-toughness after curing, chemical compatibility with tar, tunable curing profile due to catalyst design. DCPD resin can penetrate into high porous pavement area to reinforce them and block water or moisture seeping channels. It also can strongly bond the pothole patches with original pavement, and hold them together for a whole. With the catalyst design, DCPD could apply for all the weather, cold or hot, wet or dry. In this paper, we will investigate the DCPD reinforcement for cold mix and hot mix for pothole repair, as well as the bonding strength improvement between repair materials and original pavement, and show that DCPD is promising materials for application in reinforced pothole patching materials.

  13. Evaluation of surface finish and polish of eight provisional restorative materials using acrylic bur and abrasive disk with and without pumice.

    PubMed

    Maalhagh-Fard, Ahmad; Wagner, Warren C; Pink, Frank E; Neme, Ann Marie

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of two finishing techniques and pumice polishing on the surface roughness of eight different provisional materials. Provisional materials included polymethylmethacrylate-based Alike, Snap, Trim and Jetand composite-based provisional materials Temphase, Protemp 3 Garant, Luxatemp and Integrity. Baseline surface roughness was measured by a profilometer, then the provisional materials were finished using extra fine acrylic burs or medium abrasive disks. The surface roughness of each sample was measured following finishing using a profilometer as previously stated. Each surface was then polished with pumice and the surface roughness was measured again. The data were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons (alpha = 0.05). The results indicated that with composite provisional materials, the unfinished surfaces are smoother than with bur or abrasive-disk finished surfaces. Pumice application did not smooth the surface finish for all materials. The different types of provisional materials required different finishing techniques to produce the smoothest finishes.

  14. Evaluation of Flexural Strength of Thermocycled Interim Resin Materials Used in Prosthetic Rehabilitation- An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyala, Krishna Kishore; Anne, Gopinadh; Anche, Sampath Chowdary; Chiramana, Sandeep; Muvva, Suresh Babu; Zakkula, Srujana; Jyothula, Ravi Rakesh Dev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Provisional restoration is an analytical component of fixed prosthodontics serving as a ground plan for the design of fixed dental prosthesis. Flexural strength is critical in case of long standing fixed dental prosthesis, to appreciate success of full mouth rehabilitation cases and temporomandibular joint dysfunction therapies. Aim The present study was to evaluate the flexural strength of different provisional restorative resins used for prosthetic rehabilitation. Materials and Methods Forty identical samples (n=10 for each material) measuring 25mm×2mm×2mm according to ADA/ANSI specification no. 27 were fabricated using autopolymerizing Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) (Group A); heat activated PMMA (Group B); autopolymerizing Bis-GMA composite resin (Group C) and light activated Urethane Dimethacrylate Resin (UDMA) (Group D). For 14 days all these samples were stored in artificial saliva. Ten samples from each material were subjected to thermal cycling for 2500 cycles (5°C to 55°C). Later, a standard three point bending test was conducted on all the specimens with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.75mm/min. Statistical analysis used included Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Results The mean flexural strength of specimens confirmed higher flexural strength for Group C (102.98 Mpa) followed by Group B (91.86 Mpa), Group A (79.13 Mpa) and Group D (60.01 Mpa). There were significant differences between any two materials tested (p <0.05). Comparison between mean flexural strength values between four groups revealed significant difference between the interim materials (p <0.05). Conclusion The greatest flexural strength was observed for Bis-GMA composite resins followed by heat cure methacrylate resins, autopolymerizing methacrylate resins and was least for light cure resins. While fabricating provisional restorations, these greater values should be considered for better outcome of the treatment. PMID:27790588

  15. Validity of wax and acrylic as soft-tissue simulation materials used in in vitro radiographic studies

    PubMed Central

    Schropp, L; Alyass, N S; Wenzel, A; Stavropoulos, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the thickness of wax and acrylic that provides a radiographic density similar to that of the human cheek. Methods An intraoral film radiograph of the human cheek including a 40 × 30 × 3 mm reference aluminium block was recorded under standardized conditions in 61 subjects. Radiographic density was measured by a densitometer in ten randomly selected sites of the film to serve as the gold standard for density values of the cheek soft tissues. Thereafter, the density of series of radiographs of two tissue-simulating materials—wax and acrylic—in systematically increasing thicknesses (wax, 1.5–30 mm; acrylic, 2–40 mm) plus the reference block were measured and compared with the gold-standard values. Results The radiographic density of wax with a thickness of 13–17 mm or acrylic with a thickness of 14.5 mm corresponded to the average density of the human cheek. Conclusion The soft tissues of the average human cheek can be simulated with 13–17 mm wax or 14.5 mm acrylic in in vitro radiographic studies. PMID:22933536

  16. Hand/face/neck localized pattern: sticky problems--resins.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lauren Y; Sood, Apra; Taylor, James S

    2009-07-01

    Plastic resin systems have an increasingly diverse array of applications but also induce health hazards, the most common of which are allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. Contact urticaria, pigmentary changes, and photoallergic contact dermatitis may occasionally occur. Other health effects, especially respiratory and neurologic signs and symptoms, have also been reported. These resin systems include epoxies, the most frequent synthetic resin systems to cause contact dermatitis, (meth)acrylics, polyurethanes, phenol-formaldehydes, polyesters, amino resins (melamine-formaldehydes, urea-formaldehydes), polyvinyls, polystyrenes, polyolefins, polyamides and polycarbonates. Contact dermatitis usually occurs as a result of exposure to the monomers and additives in the occupational setting, although reports from consumers, using the raw materials or end products periodically surface. Resin- and additive-induced direct contact dermatitis usually presents on the hands, fingers, and forearms, while facial, eyelid, and neck involvement may occur through indirect contact, eg, via the hands, or from airborne exposure. Patch testing with commercially available materials, and in some cases the patient's own resins, is important for diagnosis. Industrial hygiene prevention techniques are essential to reduce contact dermatitis when handling these resin systems.

  17. Evaluation of Light-Activated Provisional Resin Materials for Periodontal Soft Tissue Management

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine mechanical properties using a compressive test with cylinder specimen (h = 6 mm and ϕ = 4 mm) as well as cytotoxicity using elutes from disk specimen (ϕ = 10 mm and h = 2 mm) against human gingival fibroblasts and oral keratinocytes with light-activated provisional resin materials (Revotek LC and Luxatemp Solar) compared to chemically activated counterpart (Snap, Trim II, and Jet). Significantly increased compressive strength (210~280 MPa) was detected in light-activated products compared to chemically activated ones (20~65 MPa, P < 0.05) and similar compressive modulus was detected in both types (0.8~1.5 and 0.5~1.3 GPa). Simultaneously, the light-activated products showed less adverse effects on the periodontal soft tissue cells in any polymerization stage compared to the chemically activated products. Particularly, chemically activated products had significantly greater adverse effects during the “polymerizing” phase compared to those that were “already set” (P < 0.05), as shown in confocal microscopic images of live and dead cells. In conclusion, light-activated provisional resin materials have better mechanical properties as well as biocompatibility against two tested types of oral cells compared to the chemically activated counterpart, which are considered as more beneficial choice for periodontal soft tissue management. PMID:27672651

  18. New Advanced Materials for High Performance at the Resin-Dentine Interface.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a tool for the integration of new concepts and biomaterials related with the resin-dentine interface. The principles of dentine demineralisation and remineralisation that shape modern restorative dentistry practices, as well as considerations for the selection of new materials for different restorative approaches, are emphasised. Re-incorporation of mineral into the demineralised dentine matrix is important since the mineral precipitated may work as a constant site for further nucleation, and the remineralised subsurface of the tissue may be more resistant to subsequent acid attack. This deposition of minerals may be due to both spontaneous precipitation induced by local supersaturation of Ca and P in the presence of non-specific tissue alkaline phosphatase or through heterogeneous nucleation sites provided by phosphoproteins within the dentine collagen matrix. Nucleation is a multistep process involving both protein and mineral transition and suggests a temporally synchronised process. Dentine provides both structural and chemical frameworks, acting as a scaffold for mineral deposition at specific sites. The ultimate goal in the design and improvement of new materials for high performance at the resin-dentine interface is to render a stronger and durable adhesion to dental tissues despite the severe conditions in the oral environment. In the present chapter, glass ionomers, calcium-phosphate cements and doped dental adhesives have been selected to represent the cutting edge biomaterials at the interface. PMID:26201275

  19. Evaluation of Light-Activated Provisional Resin Materials for Periodontal Soft Tissue Management

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine mechanical properties using a compressive test with cylinder specimen (h = 6 mm and ϕ = 4 mm) as well as cytotoxicity using elutes from disk specimen (ϕ = 10 mm and h = 2 mm) against human gingival fibroblasts and oral keratinocytes with light-activated provisional resin materials (Revotek LC and Luxatemp Solar) compared to chemically activated counterpart (Snap, Trim II, and Jet). Significantly increased compressive strength (210~280 MPa) was detected in light-activated products compared to chemically activated ones (20~65 MPa, P < 0.05) and similar compressive modulus was detected in both types (0.8~1.5 and 0.5~1.3 GPa). Simultaneously, the light-activated products showed less adverse effects on the periodontal soft tissue cells in any polymerization stage compared to the chemically activated products. Particularly, chemically activated products had significantly greater adverse effects during the “polymerizing” phase compared to those that were “already set” (P < 0.05), as shown in confocal microscopic images of live and dead cells. In conclusion, light-activated provisional resin materials have better mechanical properties as well as biocompatibility against two tested types of oral cells compared to the chemically activated counterpart, which are considered as more beneficial choice for periodontal soft tissue management.

  20. New Advanced Materials for High Performance at the Resin-Dentine Interface.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a tool for the integration of new concepts and biomaterials related with the resin-dentine interface. The principles of dentine demineralisation and remineralisation that shape modern restorative dentistry practices, as well as considerations for the selection of new materials for different restorative approaches, are emphasised. Re-incorporation of mineral into the demineralised dentine matrix is important since the mineral precipitated may work as a constant site for further nucleation, and the remineralised subsurface of the tissue may be more resistant to subsequent acid attack. This deposition of minerals may be due to both spontaneous precipitation induced by local supersaturation of Ca and P in the presence of non-specific tissue alkaline phosphatase or through heterogeneous nucleation sites provided by phosphoproteins within the dentine collagen matrix. Nucleation is a multistep process involving both protein and mineral transition and suggests a temporally synchronised process. Dentine provides both structural and chemical frameworks, acting as a scaffold for mineral deposition at specific sites. The ultimate goal in the design and improvement of new materials for high performance at the resin-dentine interface is to render a stronger and durable adhesion to dental tissues despite the severe conditions in the oral environment. In the present chapter, glass ionomers, calcium-phosphate cements and doped dental adhesives have been selected to represent the cutting edge biomaterials at the interface.

  1. Influence of dental resin material composition on cross-polarization-optical coherence tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lammeier, Carmen; Li, YuPing; Lunos, Scott; Fok, Alex; Rudney, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. The purpose of this study was to investigate cross-polarization-optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) signal attenuation through different resin material compositions. Four distinct composite systems were used: Filtek supreme ultra (FSU) (3M ESPE), IPS empress direct (EMD) (Ivoclar Vivadent), estelite sigma quick (SQK) (Tokuyama Dental), and Z100 (3M ESPE). Cross-sectional images of different composite-demineralized phantoms (n=108) were collected using a 1310-nm intraoral cross-polarization swept source OCT (CP-OCT) imaging system. %T quantified the CP-OCT signal attenuation. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer chemical analysis was utilized to determine how different matrix/filler compositions affected attenuation of the near infrared (NIR) signal. CP-OCT imaging of dental resin composites showed enormous variation in signal attenuation. For each of our composite systems, there was not a consistent attenuation difference in the NIR signal for A to D shades. The four composites had similar measured backscattering values but attenuated the overall signal to different degrees. When comparing the A2 shades between the four different composite systems, the order of highest to lowest of %T was EMD>Z100, FSU>SQK (ANOVA, Tukey, p<0.0001). As a result, we demonstrate the importance of understanding how the constituents of composite materials affect CP-OCT signal attenuation. PMID:23224001

  2. Influence of dental resin material composition on cross-polarization-optical coherence tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Lammeier, Carmen; Li, YuPing; Lunos, Scott; Fok, Alex; Rudney, Joel; Jones, Robert S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cross-polarization-optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) signal attenuation through different resin material compositions. Four distinct composite systems were used: Filtek supreme ultra (FSU) (3M ESPE), IPS empress direct (EMD) (Ivoclar Vivadent), estelite sigma quick (SQK) (Tokuyama Dental), and Z100 (3M ESPE). Cross-sectional images of different composite-demineralized phantoms (n=108) were collected using a 1310-nm intraoral cross-polarization swept source OCT (CP-OCT) imaging system. %T quantified the CP-OCT signal attenuation. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer chemical analysis was utilized to determine how different matrix/filler compositions affected attenuation of the near infrared (NIR) signal. CP-OCT imaging of dental resin composites showed enormous variation in signal attenuation. For each of our composite systems, there was not a consistent attenuation difference in the NIR signal for A to D shades. The four composites had similar measured backscattering values but attenuated the overall signal to different degrees. When comparing the A2 shades between the four different composite systems, the order of highest to lowest of %T was EMD>Z100, FSU>SQK (ANOVA, Tukey, p<0.0001). As a result, we demonstrate the importance of understanding how the constituents of composite materials affect CP-OCT signal attenuation.

  3. Influence of dental resin material composition on cross-polarization-optical coherence tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammeier, Carmen; Li, YuPing; Lunos, Scott; Fok, Alex; Rudney, Joel; Jones, Robert S.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cross-polarization-optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) signal attenuation through different resin material compositions. Four distinct composite systems were used: Filtek supreme ultra (FSU) (3M ESPE), IPS empress direct (EMD) (Ivoclar Vivadent), estelite sigma quick (SQK) (Tokuyama Dental), and Z100 (3M ESPE). Cross-sectional images of different composite-demineralized phantoms (n=108) were collected using a 1310-nm intraoral cross-polarization swept source OCT (CP-OCT) imaging system. %T quantified the CP-OCT signal attenuation. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer chemical analysis was utilized to determine how different matrix/filler compositions affected attenuation of the near infrared (NIR) signal. CP-OCT imaging of dental resin composites showed enormous variation in signal attenuation. For each of our composite systems, there was not a consistent attenuation difference in the NIR signal for A to D shades. The four composites had similar measured backscattering values but attenuated the overall signal to different degrees. When comparing the A2 shades between the four different composite systems, the order of highest to lowest of %T was EMD>Z100, FSU>SQK (ANOVA, Tukey, p<0.0001). As a result, we demonstrate the importance of understanding how the constituents of composite materials affect CP-OCT signal attenuation.

  4. The Use of Micro and Nano Particulate Fillers to Modify the Mechanical and Material Properties of Acrylic Bone Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Joshua A.

    Acrylic bone cement (polymethyl methacrylate) is widely used in total joint replacements to provide long-term fixation of implants. In essence, bone cement acts as a grout by filling in the voids left between the implant and the patient's bone, forming a mechanical interlock. While bone cement is considered the `gold standard' for implant fixation, issues such as mechanical failure of the cement mantle (aseptic loosening) and the development of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) still plague joint replacement procedures and often necessitate revision arthroplasty. In an effort to address these failures, various modifications are commonly made to bone cement such as mechanical reinforcement with particles/fibers and the addition of antibiotics to mitigate PJI. Despite these attempts, issues such as poor particle interfacial adhesion, inadequate drug release, and the development of multidrug resistant bacteria limit the effectiveness of bone cement modifications. Therefore, the overall goal of this work was to use micro and nanoparticles to enhance the properties of acrylic bone cement, with particular emphasis placed on improving the mechanical properties, cumulative antibiotic release, and antimicrobial properties. An acrylic bone cement (Palacos R) was modified with three types of particles in various loading ratios: mesoporous silica nanoparticles (for mechanical reinforcement), xylitol microparticles (for increased antibiotic release), and silver nanoparticles (as an antimicrobial agent). These particles were used as sole modifications, not in tandem with one another. The resulting cement composites were characterized using a variety of mechanical (macro to nano, fatigue, fracture, and dynamic), imaging, chemical, thermal, biological, and antimicrobial testing techniques. The primary outcomes of this dissertation demonstrate that: (1) mesoporous silica, as used in this work, is a poor reinforcement phase for acrylic bone cement, (2) xylitol can significantly

  5. Effects of intra- and inter-laminar resin content on the mechanical properties of toughened composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grande, Dodd H.; Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Avery, William B.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1991-01-01

    Composite materials having multiphase toughened matrix systems and laminate architectures characterized by resin-rich interlaminar layers (RIL) have been the subject of much recent attention. Such materials are likely to find applications in thick compressively loaded structures such as the keel area of commercial aircraft fuselages. The effects of resin content and its interlaminar and intralaminar distribution on mechanical properties were investigated with test and analysis of two carbon-epoxy systems. The RIL was found to reduce the in situ strengthening effect for matrix cracking in laminates. Mode 2 fracture toughness was found to increase with increasing RIL thickness over the range investigated, and Mode 1 interlaminar toughness was negligibly affected. Compressive failure strains were found to increase with increasing resin content for specimens having no damage, holes, and impact damage. Analytical tools for predicting matrix cracking of off-axis plies and damage tolerance in compression after impact (CAI) were successfully applied to materials with RIL.

  6. Application of light-cured dental adhesive resin for mounting electrodes or microdialysis probes in chronic experiments.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Tetsu; Okanoya, Kazuo; Tani, Jun

    2007-01-01

    In chronic recording experiments, self-curing dental acrylic resins have been used as a mounting base of electrodes or microdialysis-probes. Since these acrylics do not bond to the bone, screws have been used as anchors. However, in small experimental animals like finches or mouse, their craniums are very fragile and can not successfully hold the anchors. In this report, we propose a new application of light-curing dental resins for mounting base of electrodes or microdialysis probes in chronic experiments. This material allows direct bonding to the cranium. Therefore, anchor screws are not required and surgical field can be reduced considerably. Past experiences show that the bonding effect maintains more than 2 months. Conventional resin's window of time when the materials are pliable and workable is a few minutes. However, the window of working time for these dental adhesives is significantly wider and adjustable.

  7. Robust synthesis of epoxy resin-filled microcapsules for application to self-healing materials.

    PubMed

    Bolimowski, Patryk A; Bond, Ian P; Wass, Duncan F

    2016-02-28

    Mechanically and thermally robust microcapsules containing diglycidyl ether bisphenol A-based epoxy resin and a high-boiling-point organic solvent were synthesized in high yield using in situ polymerization of urea and formaldehyde in an oil-in-water emulsion. Microcapsules were characterized in terms of their size and size distribution, shell surface morphology and thermal resistance to the curing cycles of commercially used epoxy polymers. The size distribution of the capsules and characteristics such as shell thickness can be controlled by the specific parameters of microencapsulation, including concentrations of reagents, stirrer speed and sonication. Selected microcapsules, and separated core and shell materials, were analysed using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. It is demonstrated that capsules lose minimal 2.5 wt% at temperatures no higher than 120°C. These microcapsules can be applied to self-healing carbon fibre composite structural materials, with preliminary results showing promising performance. PMID:26755765

  8. Advanced Composites: Mechanical Properties and Hardware Programs for Selected Resin Matrix Materials. [considering space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    This design note presents typical mechanical properties tabulated from industrial and governmental agencies' test programs. All data are correlated to specific products and all of the best known products are presented. The data include six epoxies, eight polyimides and one polyquinoxaline matrix material. Bron and graphite are the fiber reinforcements. Included are forty-two summaries of advanced (resin matrix) composite programs in existence in the United States. It is concluded that the selection of appropriate matrices, the geometric manner in which the fibers are incorporated in the matrix and the durability of the bond between fiber and matrix establish the end properties of the composite material and the performance of the fabricated structure.

  9. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  10. Standard test evaluation of graphite fiber/resin matrix composite materials for improved toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Andrew J.

    1984-01-01

    Programs sponsored by NASA with the commercial transport manufacturers to develop a technology data base are required to design and build composite wing and fuselage structures. To realize the full potential of composite structures in these strength critical designs, material systems having improved ductility and interlaminar toughness are being sought. To promote systematic evaluation of new materials, NASA and the commercial transport manufacturers have selected and standardized a set of five common tests. These tests evaluate open hole tension and compression performance, compression performance after impact at an energy level of 20 ft-lb, and resistance to delamination. Ten toughened resin matrix/graphite fiber composites were evaluated using this series of tests, and their performance is compared with a widely used composite system.

  11. Effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of resin composite bonded to CAD/CAM resin-ceramic hybrid materials

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, Merve Bankoğlu; Bal, Bilge Turhan; Ünver, Senem; Doğan, Aylin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of resin composite bonded to thermocycled and non-thermocycled CAD/CAM resin-ceramic hybrid materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS 120 specimens (10×10×2 mm) from each material were divided into 12 groups according to different surface treatments in combination with thermal aging procedures. Surface treatment methods were airborne-particle abrasion (abraded with 50 micron alumina particles), dry grinding (grinded with 125 µm grain size bur), and hydrofluoric acid (9%) and silane application. According to the thermocycling procedure, the groups were assigned as non-thermocycled, thermocycled after packing composites, and thermocycled before packing composites. The average surface roughness of the non-thermocycled specimens were measured after surface treatments. After packing composites and thermocycling procedures, shear bond strength (SBS) of the specimens were tested. The results of surface roughness were statistically analyzed by 2-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and SBS results were statistically analyzed by 3-way ANOVA. RESULTS Surface roughness of GC were significantly lower than that of LU and VE (P<.05). The highest surface roughness was observed for dry grinding group, followed by airborne particle abraded group (P<.05). Comparing the materials within the same surface treatment method revealed that untreated surfaces generally showed lower SBS values. The values of untreated LU specimens showed significantly different SBS values compared to those of other surface treatment groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION SBS was affected by surface treatments. Thermocycling did not have any effect on the SBS of the materials except acid and silane applied GC specimens, which were subjected to thermocycling before packing of the composite resin. PMID:27555894

  12. In-situ property measurements on laser-drawn strands of SL 5170 epoxy and SL 5149 acrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Chambers, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    Material behavior plays a significant role in the mechanics leading to internal stresses and, potentially, to distortion (curling) of parts as they are built by stereolithography processes that utilize photocuring resins. A study is underway to generate material properties that can be used to develop phenomenological material models of epoxy and acrylate resins. Strand tests are performed in situ in a 3D System`s SLA-250 machine; strands are drawn by either single or multiple exposures of the resin to a laser beam. Linear shrinkage, cross-sectional areas, cure shrinkage forces and stress-strain data are presented. Also, the curl in cantilever beam specimens, built with different draw patterns, are compared.

  13. Survey on the teaching and use in dental schools of resin-based materials for restoring posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Liew, Zunliang; Nguyen, Edward; Stella, Rita; Thong, Irene; Yip, Natalia; Zhang, Felix; Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J

    2011-02-01

    A survey was conducted of 100 dental schools worldwide to investigate the current teaching of posterior resin composite restorations. A 20 multi-part question questionnaire was emailed to the selected schools. Schools were selected by ability to understand and respond in English. The questionnaire consisted of four open-ended questions and 16 closed questions on topics such as material selection for restoring posterior teeth, preclinical teaching of resin composite for posterior teeth, restoration size, contraindications, matrix placement methods, lining use, adhesive selection and finishing. Forty-six schools responded. The outcomes showed all schools included the teaching of resin composite for posterior restorations but varied. The majority of schools (63%) no longer taught amalgam as the preferred posterior restorative material. Half of the schools surveyed set numerical clinical requirements for restoration placement. Australian schools had no requirements whilst 92% of Asian schools did. There was a consensus that larger restorations were less suitable for resin composite. Selection of adhesives depended on region. Generally, the schools surveyed showed minor variations philosophically in teaching of the use and placement of resin composite restorations.

  14. Applicability of cranial models in urethane resin and foam as a substitute for bone: are synthetic materials reliable?

    PubMed

    Muccino, Enrico; Porta, Davide; Magli, Francesca; Cigada, Alfredo; Sala, Remo; Gibelli, Daniele; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2013-09-01

    As literature is poor in functional synthetic cranial models, in this study, synthetic handmade models of cranial vaults were produced in two different materials (a urethane resin and a self-hardening foam), from multiple bone specimens (eight original cranial vaults: four human and four swine), in order to test their resemblance to bone structure in behavior, during fracture formation. All the vaults were mechanically tested with a 2-kg impact weight and filmed with a high-speed camera. Fracture patterns were homogeneous in all swine vaults and heterogeneous in human vaults, with resin fractures more similar to bone fractures. Mean fracture latency time extrapolated by videos were of 0.75 msec (bone), 1.5 msec (resin), 5.12 msec (foam) for human vaults and of 0.625 msec (bone), 1.87 msec (resin), 3.75 msec (foam) for swine vaults. These data showed that resin models are more similar to bone than foam reproductions, but that synthetic material may behave quite differently from bone as concerns fracture latency times.

  15. Light-curing considerations for resin-based composite materials: a review. Part I.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2010-09-01

    There has been a continual advent of improved technologies in dentistry. Among these are the material sciences of resin-based composites (RBCs). Since the introduction of light-cured RBCs, the problem of polymerization shrinkage and the methods used to overcome this have concerned clinicians and researchers. Types of curing light and modes of curing have been shown to affect the degree of polymerization and related shrinkage of RBCs. This review, which is divided into two parts, discusses the contemporary light-curing units. Part I explores the evolution in light-curing units and different curing modes. Part II highlights the clinical considerations regarding light curing of RBCs that are important for achieving optimal curing and maximum polymerization of RBCs in a clinical setting. PMID:20879203

  16. Light-curing considerations for resin-based composite materials: a review. Part II.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2010-10-01

    As discussed in Part I, the type of curing light and curing mode impact the polymerization kinetics of resin-based composite (RBC) materials. Major changes in light-curing units and curing modes have occurred. The type of curing light and mode employed affects the polymerization shrinkage and associated stresses, microhardness, depth of cure, degree of conversion, and color change of RBCs. These factors also may influence the microleakage in an RBC restoration. Apart from the type of unit and mode used, the polymerization of RBCs is also affected by how a light-curing unit is used and handled, as well as the aspects associated with RBCs and the environment. Part II discusses the various clinical issues that should be considered while curing RBC restorations in order to achieve the best possible outcome. PMID:20960988

  17. Restoration of endodontically treated anterior teeth: an evaluation of coronal microleakage of glass ionomer and composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Arnold, A M; Wilcox, L R

    1990-12-01

    A glass ionomer material was evaluated for coronal microleakage in permanent lingual access restorations of endodontically treated anterior teeth. The material was tested as a restoration, placed over a zinc oxide-eugenol base, and as a base with an acid-etched composite resin veneer and a dentinal bonding agent. Restored teeth were thermocycled, immersed in silver nitrate, developed, and sectioned to assess microleakage. Significant coronal leakage was observed with all materials used.

  18. Resin-Impregnated Carbon Ablator: A New Ablative Material for Hyperbolic Entry Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Lengowski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Ablative materials are required to protect a space vehicle from the extreme temperatures encountered during the most demanding (hyperbolic) atmospheric entry velocities, either for probes launched toward other celestial bodies, or coming back to Earth from deep space missions. To that effect, the resin-impregnated carbon ablator (RICA) is a high-temperature carbon/phenolic ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material designed to use modern and commercially viable components in its manufacture. Heritage carbon/phenolic ablators intended for this use rely on materials that are no longer in production (i.e., Galileo, Pioneer Venus); hence the development of alternatives such as RICA is necessary for future NASA planetary entry and Earth re-entry missions. RICA s capabilities were initially measured in air for Earth re-entry applications, where it was exposed to a heat flux of 14 MW/sq m for 22 seconds. Methane tests were also carried out for potential application in Saturn s moon Titan, with a nominal heat flux of 1.4 MW/sq m for up to 478 seconds. Three slightly different material formulations were manufactured and subsequently tested at the Plasma Wind Tunnel of the University of Stuttgart in Germany (PWK1) in the summer and fall of 2010. The TPS integrity was well preserved in most cases, and results show great promise.

  19. Effect of SiO2-acryl nanohybrid coating layers on transparent conducting oxide-poly(ethylene terephthalate) superstrate.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y T; Kang, D P; Kang, D J; Chung, I D

    2013-05-01

    SiO2-acryl nanohybrid coating layers were produced by hybridizing acrylic resin and surface-modified colloidal silica (CS) nanoparticles. First, CS nanoparticles were modified with methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) and vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS) by a sol-gel process. The surface-modified CS nanoparticles were then solvent-exchanged to be homogeneous in acrylic resin. The Hybrid materials were mixed in variation with the amount of surface-modified CS nanoparticles, coated with poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), then finally cured by UV light to obtain a hybrid coating layer. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), particle size analysis (using a Zetasizer), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were performed to determine the morphology of the hybrid thin-films. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to investigate the thermal properties. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible (UVNis) spectroscopies, and pencil hardness were used to obtain the details of chemical structures, optical properties, and hardness, respectively. The hybrid thin films had shown to be enhanced properties compared to their urethane acrylate prepolymer (UAP) coating film. PMID:23858925

  20. Effect of SiO2-acryl nanohybrid coating layers on transparent conducting oxide-poly(ethylene terephthalate) superstrate.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y T; Kang, D P; Kang, D J; Chung, I D

    2013-05-01

    SiO2-acryl nanohybrid coating layers were produced by hybridizing acrylic resin and surface-modified colloidal silica (CS) nanoparticles. First, CS nanoparticles were modified with methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) and vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS) by a sol-gel process. The surface-modified CS nanoparticles were then solvent-exchanged to be homogeneous in acrylic resin. The Hybrid materials were mixed in variation with the amount of surface-modified CS nanoparticles, coated with poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), then finally cured by UV light to obtain a hybrid coating layer. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), particle size analysis (using a Zetasizer), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were performed to determine the morphology of the hybrid thin-films. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to investigate the thermal properties. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible (UVNis) spectroscopies, and pencil hardness were used to obtain the details of chemical structures, optical properties, and hardness, respectively. The hybrid thin films had shown to be enhanced properties compared to their urethane acrylate prepolymer (UAP) coating film.

  1. Reduction of polyester resin shrinkage by means of epoxy resin—I. Epoxy resin modified with acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, M.; Brzostowski, A.

    An attempt was made to decrease the shrinkage of unsaturated polyester resin, taking place during radiation-induced curing, by the addition of epoxy resin. In order to combine chemically both resins, the epoxy component was modified with cinnamic and acrylic acids. A composition of 90 parts of polyesster resin, 10 parts of epoxy resin modified with cinnamic acid, and 150 parts of a silica filler showed a volume shrinkage of 1.2%.

  2. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  3. Bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer restorative materials using a no-rinse conditioner.

    PubMed

    Suihkonen, Rian W; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Dossett, Jon M

    2012-01-01

    A paste-paste resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) restorative material has been introduced recently with a new conditioner that requires no rinsing. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of an encapsulated RMGI (Fuji II LC) and a new paste-paste RMGI (Fuji Filling LC) to dentin conditioned with 20% polyacrylic acid (Cavity Conditioner), a new no-rinse conditioner (Self Conditioner,), or no conditioner. Mounted human third molars were flattened and the dentin surface was conditioned. The RMGI restorative materials were mixed and incrementally inserted into a mold and photocured. The specimens were loaded until failure in a universal testing machine after 24 hours of storage in distilled water. Fuji II LC had significantly greater bond strength to dentin than Fuji Filling LC. The use of Cavity Conditioner or Self Conditioner resulted in bond strengths that were not significantly different from each other; however, both produced greater bond strengths than those in the non-conditioned groups. PMID:23220322

  4. Surface roughness of flowable and packable composite resin materials after finishing with abrasive discs.

    PubMed

    Uçtaşli, M B; Bala, O; Güllü, A

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare surface roughness of flowable (Admira Flow, Filtek Flow, Tetric Flow) and packable (Admira, Filtek P60, Tetric HB) composite resin restorative materials finishing with Sof-Lex discs by means of average surface roughness (Ra) measurement using a surface profilometer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For each test group five specimens were prepared and roughness was measured in five different positions using a profilometer with a traversing distance of 4 mm and a cut-off value of 0.8 mm. The radius of the tracing diamond tip was 5 microm and measuring force and speed was 4 mN and 0.5 mm/s, respectively. The surface roughness of each individual disk was taken as the arithmetic mean of the Ra values measured in five different positions. Additionally, one specimen of each test group after finishing was observed under SEM with the magnification of x800 and x2500. Before finishing with Sof-Lex discs, flowable composite materials showed a smoother surface than packable composites restoratives (P < 0.05). However, after the finishing procedures similar surface textures were observed both from packable and flowable composites (P > 0.05).

  5. Fracture resistance of Kevlar-reinforced poly(methyl methacrylate) resin: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Berrong, J M; Weed, R M; Young, J M

    1990-01-01

    The reinforcing effect of Kevlar fibers incorporated in processed poly(methyl methacrylate) resin samples was studied using 0% (controls), 0.5%, 1%, and 2% by weight of the added fibers. The samples were subjected to impact testing to determine fracture resistance, and sample groups were statistically compared using an ANOVA. Each reinforced sample had significantly greater fracture resistance (P less than 0.05) than the control, and no difference was found either within or between control groups. The use of reinforcing Kevlar fibers appears to enhance the fracture resistance of acrylic resin denture base materials.

  6. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin. Part II: Material properties and clinical features of non-metal clasp dentures.

    PubMed

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Aita, Hideki; Ono, Takahiro; Kondo, Hisatomo; Tamaki, Katsushi; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Tsukasaki, Hiroaki; Fujisawa, Masanori; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-04-01

    This position paper reviews physical and mechanical properties of thermoplastic resin used for non-metal clasp dentures, and describes feature of each thermoplastic resin in clinical application of non-metal clasp dentures and complications based on clinical experience of expert panels. Since products of thermoplastic resin have great variability in physical and mechanical properties, clinicians should utilize them with careful consideration of the specific properties of each product. In general, thermoplastic resin has lower color-stability and higher risk for fracture than polymethyl methacrylate. Additionally, the surface of thermoplastic resin becomes roughened more easily than polymethyl methacrylate. Studies related to material properties of thermoplastic resin, treatment efficacy and follow-up are insufficient to provide definitive conclusions at this time. Therefore, this position paper should be revised based on future studies and a clinical guideline should be provided. PMID:24746524

  7. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin. Part II: Material properties and clinical features of non-metal clasp dentures.

    PubMed

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Aita, Hideki; Ono, Takahiro; Kondo, Hisatomo; Tamaki, Katsushi; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Tsukasaki, Hiroaki; Fujisawa, Masanori; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-04-01

    This position paper reviews physical and mechanical properties of thermoplastic resin used for non-metal clasp dentures, and describes feature of each thermoplastic resin in clinical application of non-metal clasp dentures and complications based on clinical experience of expert panels. Since products of thermoplastic resin have great variability in physical and mechanical properties, clinicians should utilize them with careful consideration of the specific properties of each product. In general, thermoplastic resin has lower color-stability and higher risk for fracture than polymethyl methacrylate. Additionally, the surface of thermoplastic resin becomes roughened more easily than polymethyl methacrylate. Studies related to material properties of thermoplastic resin, treatment efficacy and follow-up are insufficient to provide definitive conclusions at this time. Therefore, this position paper should be revised based on future studies and a clinical guideline should be provided.

  8. Evaluation of Adhesive Bonding of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Material with Duel Cured Resin Luting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gundawar, Sham M.; Radke, Usha M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the adhesive bonding of dual cured resin luting agents with lithium disilicate ceramic material. Materials and Methods: Porcelain laminate veneers were prepared with lithium disilicate ceramic material i.e. IPS Empress II( E-Max Press). These laminates were bonded with RelyX ARC, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, Duolink and Nexus NX3.The porcelain laminates were etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (Pulpdent Corporation) for one minute, washed for 15 sec with three way syringe and dried for 15 sec with air syringe. The silane (Ultradent) was applied with the help of applicator tip in a single coat and kept undisturbed for one minute. The prepared surfaces of the premolars were treated with 37% phosphoric acid (Prime dent) for 15 sec, thoroughly rinsed and dried as per manufactures instructions. The shear bond test was carried out on all samples with the Universal testing machine (Instron U.S.A.) The scanning electron microscopic study was performed at the fractured interface of representative samples from each group of luting agents. Result: In this study, the highest value of shear bond strength was obtained for NEXUS NX3 and the lowest for VARIOLINK II. Conclusion: The difference in bond strength can be interpreted as the difference in fracture resistance of luting agents, to which shearing load was applied during the shear bond strength test. It is inferred from this study that the composition of the luting agent determines the adhesive characteristics in addition to surface treatment and bonding surface area. PMID:25859514

  9. Effect of glycine pretreatment on the shear bond strength of a CAD/CAM resin nano ceramic material to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, Matteo; Pigozzo, Marco; Scribante, Andrea; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of glycine pretreatment on the shear bond strength between dentin and a CAD/CAM resin nano ceramic material (LavaTM Ultimate Restorative), bonded together with adhesive cements using three different luting protocols (total-etch; self-etch; self-adhesive). Material and Methods Thirty cylinders were milled from resin nano ceramic blocks with CAD/CAM technology. The cylinders were subsequently cemented to the exposed dentin of 30 bovine permanent mandibular incisors. The specimens were assigned into six groups of five teeth each according to luting procedure and dentin pretreatment. In the first two groups (A1, A2) 10 cylinders were cemented using a total-etch protocol; in groups B1 and B2, 10 cylinders were cemented using a self-etch protocol; in groups C1 and C2, 10 cylinders were cemented using a self-adhesive protocol; in groups A1, B1 and C1 the dentinal surface was also treated with glycine powder. All cemented specimens were submitted to a shear bond strength test. Statistical analysis was performed with Stata 9.0 software. Results ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various groups (P <0.0001). Conclusions Glycine did not change the different bond strength demonstrated by the various luting protocols tested. Conventional resin composite cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values. However the use of glycine seems to increase the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements. Key words:Adhesive cements, CAD/CAM, glycine, luting system, resin nano ceramic, shear bond strength. PMID:27034754

  10. A new double L-shaped multiband patch antenna on a polymer resin material substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, M. Habib; Islam, M. T.; Mandeep, J. S.; Misran, N.

    2013-01-01

    The design and prototyping of a new double L-shaped patch antenna on substrate of available low cost polymer resin composite material is presented. The designed microstrip line fed compact antenna consists of a planar double L-shaped slotted radiating patch, 1.6 mm thick substrate and ground plane. The proposed small antenna was designed and analyzed using a finite-element method-based, commercially available, high frequency structure simulator, and fabricated on a printed circuit board. The measured -10 dB return loss bandwidths were 220 MHz and 650 MHz at 4.85 GHz and 8.10 GHz center frequencies. The corresponding symmetric and almost steady radiation patterns have peak gains of 7.6 dBi and 4.1 dBi, making the proposed antenna suitable for C and × band wireless applications, especially for WLANs, mobiles and satellites. The radiation efficiency, input impedance and current distribution of the proposed antenna were also analyzed.

  11. Improvement of solid material for affinity resins by application of long PEG spacers to capture the whole target complex of FK506.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, Miyuki; Shimizu, Tadashi; Ueda, Masahiro; Mitamura, Kuniko; Ikegawa, Shigeo; Tanaka, Akito

    2015-07-15

    Solid materials for affinity resins bearing long PEG spacers between a functional group used for immobilization of a bio-active compound and the solid surface were synthesized to capture not only small target proteins but also large and/or complex target proteins. Solid materials with PEG1000 or PEG2000 as spacers, which bear a benzenesulfonamide derivative, exhibited excellent selectivity between the specific binding protein carbonic anhydrase type II (CAII) and non-specific ones. These materials also exhibited efficacy in capturing a particular target at a maximal amount. Affinity resins using solid materials with PEG1000 or PEG2000 spacers, bear a FK506 derivative, successfully captured the whole target complex of specific binding proteins at the silver staining level, while all previously known affinity resins with solid materials failed to achieve this objective. These novel affinity resins captured other specific binding proteins such as dynamin and neurocalcin δ as well. PMID:26025877

  12. Development of highly-filled, bioactive acrylic-based composite bone cements for orthopedic and craniofacial surgery: Tuning of material properties after incorporation of calcium phosphate and antimicrobial fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Lucas Carlos

    Bone cements are used in a variety of healthcare specialties ranging from orthopedics to dentistry to craniofacial surgery to spinal disc reconstruction. These materials need characteristics which mimic their surrounding tissues. Currently available materials have struggled to maintain these necessary characteristics. Poly (methyl methacrylate) is a very high strength bio-inert polymer which has been utilized in healthcare since the 1940's. Calcium phosphate cements are well established as being bone mimicking, but cannot sustain the compressive loads in a weight bearing application. This study sought to solve the problem of currently available bone cements by filling calcium phosphates and antimicrobials into an acrylic polymer matrix. The intended outcome was a material capable of retaining high mechanical stability from the acrylic polymer phase, while becoming sufficiently bone mimicking and antimicrobial. This thesis work presented, characterizes the material properties of the developed materials and eventually isolates a material of interest for future studies.

  13. Bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material with a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, T; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M

    1996-07-01

    Adhesive bonding of a mica-based castable ceramic material (Olympus Castable Ceramics, OCC) was evaluated in vitro with the use of a silane primer in conjunction with an adhesive luting material. The primer contained a silane coupler and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), while the methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based luting agent was initiated with a tri-n-butylborane derivative (TBB) and contained 4-META (4-META/MMA-TBB resin). Ceramic specimens were sanded with No. 600 silicon carbide paper followed by blasting with alumina and/or etching with ammonium bifluoride. The specimens were bonded with various combinations and shear bond strengths were determined. Both priming and alumina blasting enhanced the bond between 4-META resin and OCC. Although etching with ammonium bifluoride roughened the ceramic surface, this procedure did not improve the bond strength. Electron probe microanalysis of the ceramic surface revealed a decrease in silicon and aluminium elements after etching with ammonium bifluoride.

  14. Dependence of demagnetizing fields in Fe-based composite materials on magnetic particle size and the resin content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, Peter; Birčáková, Zuzana; Vojtek, Vladimír; Füzer, Ján; Bureš, Radovan; Fáberová, Mária

    2015-08-01

    Demagnetizing fields are in general produced by the volume and surface magnetic poles. The structure of soft magnetic composite materials, where the ferromagnetic particles are insulated from each other, causes the formation of demagnetizing fields produced by the particle surfaces. These fields depend on the amount of insulation and on the shapes, clustering and distribution of ferromagnetic particles. In this work the demagnetizing fields in iron-phenolphormaldehyde resin composite samples were investigated experimentally using the method for determining the demagnetization factor from the anhysteretic magnetization curve measurement. The initial magnetization curves were calculated for an ideal composite with 100% filler content using the values of the demagnetization factor. The results on the "ideal" permeability show differences between the samples with different resin content for each granulometric class, which tells about the internal stresses introduced into ferromagnetic material during the compaction process.

  15. Composite resins.

    PubMed

    Leinfelder, K F

    1985-04-01

    The interest in posterior composite resins has grown rapidly during the last several years. Much of the interest has been initiated by a demand for esthetic dentistry. Some has developed as a result of a concern by some for mercury sensitivity. Despite their growing popularity, a number of major problems persist. Some of these deal with the restorative material, whereas others relate to the clinical techniques associated with their use. Before the clinician considers the use of composite resins in posterior teeth, he or she should be familiar with conditions that strongly influence clinical behavior.

  16. Thermal expansion and swelling of cured epoxy resin used in graphite/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents results of experiments in which the thermal expansion and swelling behavior of an epoxy resin system and two graphite/epoxy composite systems exposed to water were measured. It was found that the cured epoxy resin swells by an amount slightly less than the volume of the absorbed water and that the swelling efficiency of the water varies with the moisture content of the polymer. Additionally, the thermal expansion of cured epoxy resin that is saturated with water is observed to be more than twice that of dry resin. Results also indicate that cured resin that is saturated with 7.1% water at 95 C will rapidly increase in moisture content to 8.5% when placed in 1 C water. The mechanism for this phenomenon, termed reverse thermal effect, is described in terms of a slightly modified free-volume theory in conjunction with the theory of polar molecule interaction. Nearly identical behavior was observed in two graphite/epoxy composite systems, thus establishing that this behavior may be common to all cured epoxy resins.

  17. Numerical simulations of mechanical properties of innovative pothole patching materials featuring high toughness, low viscosity nano-molecular resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, K. Y.; Yuan, W.; Ju, J. W.; Yang, J. M.; Kao, W.; Carlson, L.

    2012-04-01

    As asphalt pavements age and deteriorate, recurring pothole repair failures and propagating alligator cracks in the asphalt pavements have become a serious issue to our daily life and resulted in high repairing costs for pavement and vehicles. To solve this urgent issue, pothole repair materials with superior durability and long service life are needed. In the present work, revolutionary pothole patching materials with high toughness, high fatigue resistance that are reinforced with nano-molecular resins have been developed to enhance their resistance to traffic loads and service life of repaired potholes. In particular, DCPD resin (dicyclopentadiene, C10H12) with a Rhuthinium-based catalyst is employed to develop controlled properties that are compatible with aggregates and asphalt binders. In this paper, a multi-level numerical micromechanics-based model is developed to predict the mechanical properties of these innovative nanomolecular resin reinforced pothole patching materials. Coarse aggregates in the finite element analysis are modeled as irregular shapes through image processing techniques and randomly-dispersed coated particles. The overall properties of asphalt mastic, which consists of fine aggregates, asphalt binder, cured DCPD and air voids are theoretically estimated by the homogenization technique of micromechanics. Numerical predictions are compared with suitably designed experimental laboratory results.

  18. The impact of three strains of oral bacteria on the surface and mechanical properties of a dental resin material.

    PubMed

    Gregson, Karen S; Shih, Han; Gregory, Richard L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if three strains of bacteria could impact the mechanical or surface properties of a dental resin material. Resin material specimens were incubated at 37°C in sterile saline, tryptic soy broth supplemented with sucrose (TSBS), or TSBS inoculated with Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus gordonii, or Streptococcus sanguis. The specimens were subjected to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after incubation. The flexural strength test was performed once a week for 6 weeks. Microhardness and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed on specimens at 1 and 6 weeks. Differences in the area under the carbonyl peak were statistically significant for the specimens incubated in the media inoculated with either S. mutans or S. gordonii. To determine why S. sanguis did not produce changes as the other bacteria did, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, methacrylic acid, and triethylene glycol were added to bacterial cultures at increasing concentrations. Both methacrylic acid and triethylene glycol reduced the number of colony-forming units of S. sanguis. Specimens incubated in TSBS, saline or in culture with S. sanguis demonstrated a decrease in peak stress in week 1 of the flexure strength test. SEM demonstrated that surface topology changed for those specimens incubated in culture with S. mutans or S. gordonii. The changes in surface topology demonstrated here could contribute to the secondary caries and changes in esthetic properties seen clinically with the use of resin materials in dental restorations.

  19. Microtensile bond strength of resin-resin interfaces after 24-hour and 2-month soaking.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, Curry; Boberick, Kenneth G; Winkler, Sheldon

    2007-01-01

    Evaluate the bond strengths of denture base-repair materials to minimize recurrent failure rate. Use microtensile bond strength (muTBS) testing to evaluate the interfacial bonding strength of 6 commercial denture repair materials after 24-hour and 12-month soaking. Blocks of poly(methyl metacrylate) (PMMA) and Triad were fabricated, fractured, and repaired. Twenty bars (1 x 1 x 30 mm) per group were sectioned from each block parallel to the long axis and approximately 90 degrees to the resin-resin repair interface and stored before muTBS testing in a servo-hydraulic tensile-testing machine. Intact PMMA and Triad bars that had been soaked for 24 hours and 12 months were tested for reference. The 24-hour repair strengths for PMMA ranged from 52% to 84% of original strength. Soaking for 12 months resulted in a 20% decrease in strength for the PMMA control. The 12-month repair strengths for PMMA ranged from 43% to 74% of the 12-month soaked material strength. Triad repair tested 35% of original strength after soaking for 24 hours. Permabond (cyanoacrylate) to PMMA tested 47% of original strength after 24 hours of soaking and 26% of the 12-month soaked material strength. Permabond to Triad tested 30% of original strength after 24 hours of soaking. Permabond and Triad showed a 100% adhesive mode of failure. All other materials tested exhibited either an adhesive mode of failure at the denture base-repair-material interface or a complex cohesive failure within the repair-material interface. The muTBS approach can be used to analyze the resin-resin interface of repaired acrylics. The relatively small standard deviations make the muTBS approach attractive. In this study, muTBS was used to evaluate the repair strength of 6 denture repair materials enabling clinicians to make clinical judgments regarding the strongest repair bond available. PMID:17987865

  20. Evaluation of polymethyl methacrylate resin mechanical properties with incorporated halloysite nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study inspects the effect of incorporating halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) into polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin on its flexural strength, hardness, and Young's modulus. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four groups of acrylic resin powder were prepared. One group without HNTs was used as a control group and the other three groups contained 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 wt% HNTs. For each one, flexural strength, Young's modulus and hardness values were measured. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were used for comparison (P<.05). RESULTS At lower concentration (0.3 wt%) of HNT, there was a significant increase of hardness values but no significant increase in both flexural strength and Young's modulus values of PMMA resin. In contrast, at higher concentration (0.6 and 0.9 wt%), there was a significant decrease in hardness values but no significant decrease in flexural strength and Young's modulus values compared to those of the control group. CONCLUSION Addition of lower concentration of halloysite nanotubes to denture base materials could improve some of their mechanical properties. Improving the mechanical properties of acrylic resin base material could increase the patient satisfaction. PMID:27350849

  1. Large Acrylic Spherical Windows In Hyperbaric Underwater Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lones, Joe J.; Stachiw, Jerry D.

    1983-10-01

    Both acrylic plastic and glass are common materials for hyperbaric optical windows. Although glass continues to be used occasionally for small windows, virtually all large viewports are made of acrylic. It is easy to uderstand the wide use of acrylic when comparing design properties of this plastic with those of glass, and glass windows are relatively more difficult to fabricate and use. in addition there are published guides for the design and fabrication of acrylic windows to be used in the hyperbaric environment of hydrospace. Although these procedures for fabricating the acrylic windows are somewhat involved, the results are extremely reliable. Acrylic viewports are now fabricated to very large sizes for manned observation or optical quality instrumen tation as illustrated by the numerous acrylic submersible vehicle hulls for hu, an occupancy currently in operation and a 3600 large optical window recently developed for the Walt Disney Circle Vision under-water camera housing.

  2. Effect of Nanosilver on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Acrylic Base Complete Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Hamedi-Rad, Fahimeh; Ghaffari, Tahereh; Rezaii, Farzad; Ramazani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), widely used as a prosthodontic base, has many disadvantages, including a high thermal expansion coefficient and low thermal conductivity, a low elasticity coefficient, low impact strength and low resistance to fatigue. This study aimed to make an in vitro comparison of the thermal conductivity, compressive strength, and tensile strength of the acrylic base of complete dentures with those of acrylic reinforced with nanosilver. Materials and Methods: For this study, 36 specimens were prepared. The specimens were divided into three groups of 12; which were further divided into two subgroups of control (unmodified PMMA) and test (PMMA mixed with 5 weight% nanosilver).The results were analysed by Independent t-test. Results: This study showed that the mean thermal conductivity and compressive strength of PMMA reinforced with nanosilver were significantly higher than the unmodified PMMA (P<0.05), while the tensile strength decreased significantly after the incorporation of nanosilver (P<0.05). Conclusion: Considering our results suggesting the favorable effect of silver nanoparticles on improving the thermal conductivity and compressive strength of PMMA, use of this material in the palatal area of maxillary acrylic resin dentures is recommended. PMID:25628675

  3. Effect of five commercial mouth rinses on the microhardness of a nanofilled resin composite restorative material: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jyothi, KN; Crasta, Shanol; Venugopal, P

    2012-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: This in vitro study was designed to comparatively evaluate the effect of five commercial mouth rinses on the micro hardness of a nanofilled resin based restorative material. Materials and Methods: Fifty specimens of resin composite material (Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE, St.Paul, MN USA) were prepared and immersed in artificial saliva for 24 h. The base line micro hardness of specimens was recorded using Vicker's micro hardness tester (MMT – X7 Matsuzawa, Japan). The specimens were randomly distributed into five groups, each containing 10 specimens (n=10) as follows – Group I Listerine (alcohol based), Group II Periogard (alcohol based), Group III Colgate plax (alcohol based), Group IV C- prev (alcohol free), Group V Hiora(alcohol free). The specimens were immersed in 20 ml of mouth rinses and incubated for 24 h at 37°C. The post immersion micro hardness values of the specimens were recorded and the data was tabulated for statistical analysis. Kruskal–Wallis test was used for inter group comparison followed by pair wise comparison of groups using Mann–Whitney U test. The level of significance was set at P=0.05. Results: Significant reduction in the mean VHN (Vicker's micro hardness number) was observed in all the groups after exposure to the tested mouth rinses (P<0.01) and the reduction in mean VHN values were as follows: Group I 12.09, Group II 3.42, Group II 1.51, Group IV 1.03, Group V 0.57. Inter group comparison showed statistically significant reduction in micro hardness in Groups I and II compared to all other groups with P<0.001. There was no significant difference between Groups III, IV and V. Conclusion: All the mouth rinses showed a reduction in the microhardness of nanofilled resin composite material with listerine (Group I) containing maximum amount of alcohol, showing highest reduction in micro hardness value. PMID:22876004

  4. The stability of new transparent polymeric materials: The epoxy trimethoxyboroxine system. Part 1: The preparation, characterization and curing of epoxy resins and their copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, E.; Lin, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of resin composition, curing conditions fillers, and flame retardant additives on the flammability of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) as measured by the oxygen index is examined. The oxygen index of DGEBA cured with various curing agents was between 0.198 to 0.238. Fillers and flame retardant additives can increase the oxygen index dependent on the material and the amount used. Changes in the basic cured resin properties can be anticipated with the addition of noncompatible additives. High flame resistant epoxy resins with good stability and mechanical properties are investigated.

  5. Development of high-toughness low-viscosity nano-molecular resins for reinforcing pothole patching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Yuan, Matt; Zou, Linhua; Yang, Jenn-Ming; Ju, Woody; Kao, Wei; Carlson, Larry; Edgecombe, Brian; Stephen, Tony; Villacorta, Ricardo; Solamon, Ray

    2011-04-01

    As the nation's asphalt pavements age and deteriorate, the need for corrective measures to restore safety and rideability increases. The potholes and alligator cracks in the asphalt pavement of our country's roadways have become an annoying part of our daily life and no innovative technologies are available to improve the safety of US drivers, reduce the cost of road maintenance. We have identified a polymeric material, dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) resin, which can be cured by Grubb's catalyst and other commercially available catalysts to become an ultratough material with all the desired properties for pothole repair. We have characterized DCPD infiltration characteristics using non-destructive CT scan, and the mechanical properties using indirect tensile test under hot, cold or wet conditions. The preliminary results show that DCPD is a promising material for applications in reinforced pothole patching materials.

  6. Effect of different adhesives combined with two resin composite cements on shear bond strength to polymeric CAD/CAM materials.

    PubMed

    Bähr, Nora; Keul, Christine; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different adhesives and resin composite cements on shear bond strength (SBS) to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)- and composite-based CAD/CAM materials. SBS specimens were fabricated and divided into five main groups (n=30/group) subject to conditioning: 1. Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), 2. Visio.link (VL), 3. Ambarino P60 (AM), 4. exp. VP connect (VP), and 5. no conditioning-control group (CG). All cemented specimens using a. Clearfil SA Cement and b. Variolink II were stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, one half of the specimens were thermocycled for 5,000 cycles (5 °C/55 °C, dwell time 20 s). SBS was measured; data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, four- and one-way ANOVA, unpaired two-sample t-test and Chi(2)-test. CAD/CAM materials without additional adhesives showed no bond to resin composite cements. Highest SBS showed VL with Variolink II on composite-based material, before and after thermocycling.

  7. The effect of post-curing on Vickers Hardness of four light-cure resin composite materials.

    PubMed

    Marais, J T; Dannheimer, M F; Oosthuizen, M P; Booyse, A

    1999-03-01

    The use of post-curing ovens to post-cure light-cured resin composite restorations leads to a decrease in the negative effects of polymerization shrinkage and an increase in the hardness and wear resistance of the material. The aim of this study was to compare the Vickers Hardness (VH) of four different light-cure resin composite materials. In one group, samples of the four materials, Z100, Tetric Ceram, F2000 and Heliomolar were light-cured only, and in the other group a similar set of samples were light-cured and also post-cured in a DI 500 post-curing oven. VH vests were then carried out on the samples. All samples in the post-cured group had higher VH values (p = 0.000) than the corresponding samples in the light-cured only group. Z100 and F2000 had, in both groups, significantly higher VH values (p = 0.000) than Tetric Ceram and Heliomolar.

  8. pH- and ionic-strength-induced structural changes in poly(acrylic acid)-lipid-based self-assembled materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Crisci, A.; Hay, D. N. T.; Seifert, S.; Firestone, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of a polyanion introduced as a lipid conjugate (poly(acrylic acid)- dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine, PAA-DMPE) on the structure of a self-assembled, biomembrane mimetic has been evaluated using synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). At high grafting density (8-11 mol.%), the PAA chains were found to produce significant changes in structure in response to changes in pH and electrolyte composition. At low pH and in the absence of salt (NaCl), the neutral PAA chains adopt a coil conformational state that leads to the formation of a swollen lamellar structure. Upon the addition of salt at low to intermediate pH values, two lamellar phases, a collapsed and an expanded structure, coexist. Finally, when the polymer is fully ionized (at high pH), the extended conformation of the polymer generates a cubic phase. The results of this study contribute to an understanding of how polyelectrolytes may ultimately be harnessed for the preparation of self-assembling materials responsive to external stimuli.

  9. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  10. Correlative imaging of fluorescent proteins in resin-embedded plant material.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen; Mitchell, Steve; Paultre, Danae; Posch, Markus; Oparka, Karl

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) were developed for live-cell imaging and have revolutionized cell biology. However, not all plant tissues are accessible to live imaging using confocal microscopy, necessitating alternative approaches for protein localization. An example is the phloem, a tissue embedded deep within plant organs and sensitive to damage. To facilitate accurate localization of FPs within recalcitrant tissues, we developed a simple method for retaining FPs after resin embedding. This method is based on low-temperature fixation and dehydration, followed by embedding in London Resin White, and avoids the need for cryosections. We show that a palette of FPs can be localized in plant tissues while retaining good structural cell preservation, and that the polymerized block face can be counterstained with cell wall probes. Using this method we have been able to image green fluorescent protein-labeled plasmodesmata to a depth of more than 40 μm beneath the resin surface. Using correlative light and electron microscopy of the phloem, we were able to locate the same FP-labeled sieve elements in semithin and ultrathin sections. Sections were amenable to antibody labeling, and allowed a combination of confocal and superresolution imaging (three-dimensional-structured illumination microscopy) on the same cells. These correlative imaging methods should find several uses in plant cell biology.

  11. Correlative imaging of fluorescent proteins in resin-embedded plant material.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen; Mitchell, Steve; Paultre, Danae; Posch, Markus; Oparka, Karl

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) were developed for live-cell imaging and have revolutionized cell biology. However, not all plant tissues are accessible to live imaging using confocal microscopy, necessitating alternative approaches for protein localization. An example is the phloem, a tissue embedded deep within plant organs and sensitive to damage. To facilitate accurate localization of FPs within recalcitrant tissues, we developed a simple method for retaining FPs after resin embedding. This method is based on low-temperature fixation and dehydration, followed by embedding in London Resin White, and avoids the need for cryosections. We show that a palette of FPs can be localized in plant tissues while retaining good structural cell preservation, and that the polymerized block face can be counterstained with cell wall probes. Using this method we have been able to image green fluorescent protein-labeled plasmodesmata to a depth of more than 40 μm beneath the resin surface. Using correlative light and electron microscopy of the phloem, we were able to locate the same FP-labeled sieve elements in semithin and ultrathin sections. Sections were amenable to antibody labeling, and allowed a combination of confocal and superresolution imaging (three-dimensional-structured illumination microscopy) on the same cells. These correlative imaging methods should find several uses in plant cell biology. PMID:23457228

  12. Polyester Resin Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.

    1963-01-01

    Polyester resins are being increasingly used in industry. These resins require the addition of catalysts and accelerators. The handling of polyester resin system materials may give rise to skin irritations, allergic reactions, and burns. The burns are probably due to styrene and organic peroxides. Atmospheric pollution from styrene and explosion and fire risks from organic peroxides must be prevented. Where dimethylaniline is used scrupulous cleanliness and no-touch technique must be enforced. Handling precautions are suggested. Images PMID:14014495

  13. Identification through X-ray fluorescence analysis of dental restorative resin materials: a comprehensive study of noncremated, cremated, and processed-cremated individuals.

    PubMed

    Bush, Mary A; Miller, Raymond G; Prutsman-Pfeiffer, Jennifer; Bush, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    Tooth-colored restorative materials are increasingly being placed in the practice of modern dentistry, replacing traditional materials such as amalgam. Many restorative resins have distinct elemental compositions that allow identification of brand. Not only are resins classifiable by elemental content, but they also survive extreme conditions such as cremation. This is of significance to the forensic odontologist because resin uniqueness adds another level of certainty in victim identification, especially when traditional means are exhausted. In this three-part study, unique combinations of resins were placed in six human cadavers (total 70 restorations). Simulated ante-mortem dental records were created. In a blind experiment, a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) unit was used to locate and identify the resin brands placed in the dentition. The technique was successful in location and brand identification of 53 of the restorations, which was sufficient to enable positive victim identification among the study group. This part of the experiment demonstrated the utility of portable XRF in detection and analysis of restorative materials for victim identification in field or morgue settings. Identification of individuals after cremation is a more difficult task, as the dentition is altered by shrinkage and fragmentation, and may not be comparable with a dental chart. Identification of processed cremains is a much greater challenge, as comminution obliterates all structural relationships. Under both circumstances, it is the nonbiological artifacts that aid in identification. Restorative resin fillings can survive these conditions, and can still be named by brand utilizing elemental analysis. In a continuation of the study, the cadavers were cremated in a cremation retort under standard mortuary conditions. XRF was again used to analyze retrieved resins and to identify the individuals based on restorative materials known to exist from dental records. The cremains were

  14. Identification through X-ray fluorescence analysis of dental restorative resin materials: a comprehensive study of noncremated, cremated, and processed-cremated individuals.

    PubMed

    Bush, Mary A; Miller, Raymond G; Prutsman-Pfeiffer, Jennifer; Bush, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    Tooth-colored restorative materials are increasingly being placed in the practice of modern dentistry, replacing traditional materials such as amalgam. Many restorative resins have distinct elemental compositions that allow identification of brand. Not only are resins classifiable by elemental content, but they also survive extreme conditions such as cremation. This is of significance to the forensic odontologist because resin uniqueness adds another level of certainty in victim identification, especially when traditional means are exhausted. In this three-part study, unique combinations of resins were placed in six human cadavers (total 70 restorations). Simulated ante-mortem dental records were created. In a blind experiment, a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) unit was used to locate and identify the resin brands placed in the dentition. The technique was successful in location and brand identification of 53 of the restorations, which was sufficient to enable positive victim identification among the study group. This part of the experiment demonstrated the utility of portable XRF in detection and analysis of restorative materials for victim identification in field or morgue settings. Identification of individuals after cremation is a more difficult task, as the dentition is altered by shrinkage and fragmentation, and may not be comparable with a dental chart. Identification of processed cremains is a much greater challenge, as comminution obliterates all structural relationships. Under both circumstances, it is the nonbiological artifacts that aid in identification. Restorative resin fillings can survive these conditions, and can still be named by brand utilizing elemental analysis. In a continuation of the study, the cadavers were cremated in a cremation retort under standard mortuary conditions. XRF was again used to analyze retrieved resins and to identify the individuals based on restorative materials known to exist from dental records. The cremains were

  15. Preparation and properties of UV curable acrylic PSA by vinyl bonded graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Beili; Ryu, Chong-Min; Jin, Xin; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2013-11-01

    Acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) with higher thermal stability for thin wafer handling were successfully prepared by forming composite with the graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles modified to have vinyl groups via subsequent reaction with isophorone diisocyanate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The acrylic copolymer was synthesized as a base resin for PSAs by solution radical polymerization of ethyl acrylate, 2-ethylhexyl acrylate, and acrylic acid followed by further modification with GMA to have the vinyl groups available for UV curing. The peel strength of PSA decreased with the increase of gel content which was dependent on both modified GO content and UV dose. Thermal stability of UV-cured PSA was improved noticeably with increasing the modified GO content mainly due to the strong and extensive interfacial bonding formed between the acrylic copolymer matrix and GO fillers

  16. Improved resins and novel materials and methods for solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Freeze, R.

    1997-10-08

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) has grown to be one of the most widely used methods for isolation and preconcentration of a vast range of compounds from aqueous solutions. By modifying polymeric SPE resins with chelating functional groups, the selective uptake of metals was accomplished. The resin, along with adsorbed metals, was vaporized in the ICP and detection of the metals was then possible using either mass or emission spectroscopy. Drug analyses in biological fluids have received heightened attention as drug testing is on the increase both in sports and in the work environment. By using a direct-injection technique, biological fluids can be injected directly into the liquid chromatographic system with no pretreatment. A new surfactant, a sulfonated form of Brij-30 (Brij-S) is shown to prevent the uptake of serum proteins on commercial HPLC columns by forming a thin coating on the silica C18 surface. Excellent separations of eight or more drugs with a wide range of retention times were obtained. The separations had sharper peaks and lower retention times than similar separations performed with the surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). Quantitative recovery of a number of drugs with limits of detection near 1 ppm with a 5 {micro}l injection volume were obtained. Finally, a method for solid-phase extraction in a syringe is introduced. The system greatly reduced the volume of solvent required to elute adsorbed analytes from the SPE bed while providing a semi-automated setup. SPE in a syringe consists of a very small bed of resin-loaded membrane packed into a GC or HPLC syringe. After extraction, elution was performed with just a few {micro}l of solvent. This small elution volume allowed injection of the eluent directly from the syringe into the chromatographic system, eliminating the handling problems associated with such small volumes.

  17. Comparison of XAD macroporous resins for the concentration of fulvic acid from aqueous solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Five macroreticular, nonlonlc AmberlHe XAD resins were evaluated for concentration and Isolation of fulvlc acid from aqueous solution. The capacity of each resin for fulvlc acid was measured by both batch and column techniques. Elution efficiencies were determined by desorptlon with 0.1 N NaOH. Highest recoveries were obtained with the acrylic ester resins which proved to be most efficient for both adsorption and elution of fulvlc acid. Compared to the acrylic ester resins, usefulness of the styrene dvlnybenzene resins to remove fulvlc acid is limited because of slow diffusion-controlled adsorption and formation of charge-transfer complexes, which hinders elution. ?? 1979 American Chemical Society.

  18. Erosion of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Powers, J M; Fan, P L

    1980-05-01

    The surface degradation of composite resins caused by accelerated aging was studied. Accelerated aging for 900 hours caused erosion of the resin matrices and exposure of filler particles. Differences in surface profiles after aging suggest that the materials eroded at different rates. Accelerated aging may model erosive wear of composites.

  19. Incombustible resin composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Incombustible resin compositions composed of aromatic compounds were obtained through (1) combustion polymer material and (2) bisphenol A or halogenated bisphenol A and bisphenol A diglycidl ether or halogenated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether. The aromatic compound is an adduct of bifunctional phenols and bifunctional epoxy resins.

  20. PSP resins, new materials which can be hardened by thermal treatment for use in composite materials resistant to heat and fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ropars, M.; Bloch, B.; Malassine, B.

    1979-01-01

    A class of easy-to-prepare heterocyclic-aromatic polymers which can be used for matrices in reinforced laminates is described. These polymers can be cured after B-staging with very little evolution of volatile materials, and they retain a low melt-viscosity which leads to low-void laminates. Resins are stable at temperatures below 150 C. Properties of composites with various reinforcements, in particular carbon-fiber unidirectional laminates, are described, and the fire behavior of PSP-glass laminates is reported.

  1. Glucose and water diffusion kinetics study in a fluorosilicone acrylate contact lens material by positron lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Deepa Urs, M V; Ranganathaiah, C

    2007-01-01

    A comparative study of water and glucose sorption in a rigid gas-permeable contact lens polymer, Fluoroperm 92, has been carried out using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, gravimetric analysis and refractive index measurements. The water sorption in FP92 is non-Fickian, whereas for glucose sorption it changes to Fickian. Glucose molecules reduce the interaction of water molecules with the polymer, resulting in more free water than bound water. It is observed that lenses which contain more bulk-water are prone to lens dehydration and corneal desiccation. The present results indicate that, in case of diabetics, as the glucose level increases in the aqueous humor, there would be more free water than bound water, which increases the propensity for corneal desiccation. The change in refractive index with increase in glucose content indicates decrease in optical transparency of the material.

  2. Compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer restorative material: effect of P/L ratio and storage time.

    PubMed

    Aratani, Mônica; Pereira, Antônio Carlos; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Consani, Simonides

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement Fuji II LC and Vitremer, in powder/liquid ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3, at three periods (24 hours, 7 and 28 days) of storage in distilled water at 37ºC. For each material, P/L ratio and storage time, 5 cylindrical specimens were prepared, with 4mm diameter and 6mm height, in silicon moulds. Specimens were light-cured for 40 seconds at each extremity, removed from the moulds and laterally light-cured (perpendicular to long axis) for 40 seconds, protected as recommended by the manufacturers and immersed for the time tested. The specimens were submitted to compressive strength testing in an Instron machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min until failure. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%), and showed that the compressive strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement was reduced when P/L ratio was reduced and that the storage in water had little influence on compressive strength.

  3. FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF WEAKENED TEETH RESTORED WITH CONDENSABLE RESIN WITH AND WITHOUT CUSP COVERAGE

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; de Oliveira, Otávio; Mondelli, José

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study evaluated the fracture resistance of weakened human premolars (MOD cavity preparation and pulp chamber roof removal) restored with condensable resin composite with and without cusp coverage. Material and Methods: Thirty human maxillary premolars were divided into three groups: Group A (control), sound teeth; Group B, wide MOD cavities prepared and the pulp chamber roof removed and restored with resin composite without cusp coverage; Group C, same as Group B with 2.0 mm of buccal and palatal cusps reduced and restored with the same resin. The teeth were included in metal rings with self-curing acrylic resin, stored in water for 24 h and thereafter subjected to a compressive axial load in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Results: The mean fracture resistance values ± standart deviation (kgf) were: group A: 151.40 ± 55.32, group B: 60.54 ± 12.61, group C: 141.90 ± 30.82. Statistically significant differences were found only between Group B and the other groups (p<0.05). The condensable resin restoration of weakened human premolars with cusp coverage significantly increased the fracture resistance of the teeth as compared to teeth restored without cusp coverage. Conclusion: The results showed that cusp coverage with condensable resin might be a safe option for restoring weakened endodontically treated teeth. PMID:19466244

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Water Absorption on the Surface Properties of Heat Cure Acrylic: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Chandu, G S; Asnani, Pooja; Gupta, Siddarth; Faisal Khan, Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Use of alkaline peroxide denture cleanser with different temperature of water could cause a change in surface hardness of the acrylic denture and also has a bleaching effect. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of increased water content during thermal cycling of hot water-treated acrylic on the surface hardness of acrylic denture base when compared to warm water treated acrylic. And to compare the bleaching effect of alkaline peroxide solution on the acrylic denture base on hot water and warm water treated acrylic. Materials and Methods: Forty samples (10 mm × 10 mm × 2.5 mm) were prepared. After the calculation of the initial hardness 40 samples, each was randomly assigned to two groups. Group A: 20 samples were immersed in 250 ml of warm distilled water at 40°C with alkaline peroxide tablet. Group B: 20 samples were immersed in 250 ml of hot distilled water at 100°C with alkaline peroxide tablet. The surface hardness of each test sample was obtained using the digital hardness testing machine recording the Rockwell hardness number before the beginning of the soaking cycles and after completion of 30 soak cycles and compared. Values were analyzed using paired t-test. Five samples from the Group A and five samples from Group B were put side by side and photographed using a Nikon D 40 digital SLR Camera and the photographs were examined visually to assess the change in color. Results: Acrylic samples immersed in hot water showed a statistically significant decrease of 5.8% in surface hardness. And those immersed in warm water showed a statistically insignificant increase of 0.67% in surface hardness. Samples from the two groups showed clinically insignificant difference in color when compared to each other on examination of the photographs. Conclusion: Thermocycling of the acrylic resin at different water bath temperature at 40°C and 100°C showed significant changes in the surface hardness. PMID:25954074

  5. Comparative study of water sorption and solubility of soft lining materials in the different solutions.

    PubMed

    Dinçkal Yanikoglu, Nuran; Yeşil Duymuş, Zeynep

    2004-06-01

    In this study, two acrylic based materials and three silicone rubber soft lining materials were investigated to determine the percentage of absorption and solubility in artificial saliva, distilled water, and denture cleanser. In addition, the effect of denture cleanser on surface properties of soft lining materials was also evaluated. For sorption and solubility testing, 75 discs (50 mm x 0.5 mm) were prepared and divided into 5 groups with 15 samples in each group. The specimens were stored in different solutions, and tested after 1, 4, and 16 weeks. Analysis of variance was used to find the significant differences between the materials at all time intervals. The acrylic resin soft lining materials had higher solubility (3.432% Visco-gel in artificial saliva) and absorption (3.349% Visco-gel in distilled water) than Molloplast-B after 16 weeks of aging. The greatest hardness and color change were shown in the acrylic soft lining materials.

  6. [Application of cranioplasty materials in the past 60 years in China].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiang-Rong; Li, Jiang

    2011-07-01

    Cranioplasty is one of the oldest and most common surgeries. Cranioplasty materials developed with this surgery. Many kinds of material have been applied to cranioplasty such as gold, silver, aluminum, lead, platinum, titanium, autogenous bone, allograft, acrylic resin, polyethylene, silicone rubber, carol, ceramic, hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate cement. In the past 60 years, autogenous bone, acrylic resin, silicone rubber, hydroxyapatite, phosphate cement, titanium sheet and computer-designed plastic ti-alloy plate are the most commonly used materials. Among the materials, computer-designed plastic ti-alloy plate is the preferred material. It is ideal cranioplasty material with high histocompatibility, plasticity and chemical stability, and which has not been found until now to be cytotoxic or immunogenic. PMID:22169491

  7. Adhesion of elastomeric impression materials to trays.

    PubMed

    Bindra, B; Heath, J R

    1997-01-01

    The tensile and shear adhesive bond strengths of two addition cured silicones (Provil and Express) and a polyether (Impregum) impression material to brass, poly(methylmethacrylate) and visible light-cured (VLC) tray resin were determined. Adhesive application significantly increased the bond strength; Provil and Express adhered most strongly to brass; whilst the Impregum-VLC combination produced the strongest bond. Indeed, VLC resin generated greater adhesion than acrylic resin. Exchanging the adhesives specified for each silicone material generally resulted in higher bond strengths. No correlation was established between speed of separation of the test surfaces and bond strength. For optimum clinical performance, the impression material (adhesive) tray material giving the highest bond strength should be utilized.

  8. Six-month evaluation of a resin/dentin interface created by methacrylate and silorane-based materials

    PubMed Central

    SAMPAIO, Renata Kirita Doi; WANG, Linda; de CARVALHO, Rodrigo Varella; GARCIA, Eugenio José; de ANDRADE, Andréa Mello; KLEIN-JÚNIOR, Celso Afonso; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda; MOURA, Sandra Kiss

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the micro-tensile bond strength of methacrylate resin systems to a silorane-based restorative system on dentin after 24 hours and six months water storage. Material and Methods: The restorative systems Adper Single Bond 2/Filtek Z350 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond/Z350 (CF), Adper SE Plus/Z350 (ASEP) and P90 Adhesive System/Filtek P90 (P90) were applied on flat dentin surfaces of 20 third molars (n=5). The restored teeth were sectioned perpendicularly to the bonding interface to obtain sticks (0.8 mm2) to be tested after 24 hours (24 h) and 6 months (6 m) of water storage, in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. The data was analyzed via two-way Analysis of Variance/Bonferroni post hoc tests at 5% global significance. Results: Overall outcomes did not indicate a statistical difference for the resin systems (p=0.26) nor time (p=0.62). No interaction between material x time was detected (p=0.28). Mean standard-deviation in MPa at 24 h and 6 m were: ASB 31.38 (4.53) and 30.06 (1.95), CF 34.26 (3.47) and 32.75 (4.18), ASEP 29.54 (4.14) and 33.47 (2.47), P90 30.27 (2.03) and 31.34 (2.19). Conclusions: The silorane-based system showed a similar performance to methacrylate-based materials on dentin. All systems were stable in terms of bond strength up to 6 month of water storage. PMID:23559117

  9. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Pigozzo, Marco; Ceci, Matteo; Scribante, Andrea; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin nanoceramic (RNC) material to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 30 disks were milled from RNC blocks (Lava Ultimate/3M ESPE) with CAD/CAM technology. The disks were subsequently cemented to the exposed dentin of 30 recently extracted bovine permanent mandibular incisors. The specimens were randomly assigned into 3 groups of 10 teeth each. In Group 1, disks were cemented using a total-etch protocol (Scotchbond™ Universal Etchant phosphoric acid + Scotchbond Universal Adhesive + RelyX™ Ultimate conventional resin cement); in Group 2, disks were cemented using a self-etch protocol (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive + RelyX™ Ultimate conventional resin cement); in Group 3, disks were cemented using a self-adhesive protocol (RelyX™ Unicem 2 Automix self-adhesive resin cement). All cemented specimens were placed in a universal testing machine (Instron Universal Testing Machine 3343) and submitted to a shear bond strength test to check the strength of adhesion between the two substrates, dentin, and RNC disks. Specimens were stressed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey's test at a level of significance of 0.05. Results: Post-hoc Tukey testing showed that the highest shear strength values (P < 0.001) were reported in Group 2. The lowest data (P < 0.001) were recorded in Group 3. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, conventional resin cements (coupled with etch and rinse or self-etch adhesives) showed better shear strength values compared to self-adhesive resin cements. Furthermore, conventional resin cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values of adhesion. PMID:27076822

  10. EFFECT OF FLUORIDE-CONTAINING DESENSITIZING AGENTS ON THE BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN-BASED CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Saraç, Duygu; Külünk, Safak; Saraç, Y. Sinasi; Karakas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents containing different amounts of fluoride on the shear bond strength of a dual polymerized resin cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Material and Methods: One hundred human molars were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and prepared until the dentin surface was exposed. The specimens were treated with one of four desensitizing agents: Bifluorid 12, Fluoridin, Thermoline and PrepEze. The remaining 20 specimens served as untreated controls. All groups were further divided into 2 subgroups in which a dual polymerized resin cement (Bifix QM) or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (AVANTO) was used. The shear bond strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically with a 2-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and regression analysis (α=0.05). The effect of the desensitizing agents on the dentin surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results: The fluoride-containing desensitizing agents affected the bond strength of the resin-based cements to dentin (p<0.001). PrepEze showed the highest bond strength values in all groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: Regression analysis showed a reverse relation between bond strength values of resin cements to dentin and the amount of fluoride in the desensitizing agent (p<0.05). PMID:19936532

  11. The Chemical Nature of the Fiber/resin Interface in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diefendorf, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites are considered. The nature of the fiber structure and the interaction that occurs at the interface between fiber and matrix are emphasized. Composite toughness can be improved by increased axial tensile and compressive strengths in the fibers. The structure of carbon fibers indicates that the fiber itself can fail transversely, and different transverse microstructures could provide better transverse strengths. The higher surface roughness of lower modulus and surface-treated carbon fibers provides better mechanical interlocking between the fiber and matrix. The chemical nature of the fiber surface was determined, and adsorption of species on this surface can be used to promote wetting and adhesion. Finally, the magnitude of the interfacial bond strength should be controlled such that a range of composites can be made with properties varying from relatively brittle and high interlaminar shear strength to tougher but lower interlaminar shear strength.

  12. Atmospheric pressure gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry as a powerful tool for identification of non intentionally added substances in acrylic adhesives used in food packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Canellas, E; Vera, P; Domeño, C; Alfaro, P; Nerín, C

    2012-04-27

    Acrylic adhesives are used to manufacture multilayer laminates that are used in food packaging to form the geometric shape of the package as well as to stick labels on the packages. Once applied on the packaging adhesives can supply potential migrants that could endanger the packaged food. Adhesives are complex matrices where intentionally and non intentionally added substances are present, but the identification of the migrants is required by law. In this study atmospheric pressure gas chromatography coupled to a quadrupole hyphenated to a time of flight mass spectrometer (APGC-MS/Q-TOF) has been explored for identification of unknowns coming from three different acrylic adhesives. The results are compared to those obtained by conventional GC-MS-Q (quadrupole). Sixteen compounds were identified by GC-MS/Q and five of them were confirmed by APGC-MS/Q-TOF as their molecular ions were found. Moreover, additional three new compounds were identified and their structure was elucidated working with the spectra obtained by APGC-MS/Q-TOF. This finding was very relevant as these compounds were biocides suspected to be allergenic and cytotoxic in humans. Migration studies were carried out using Tenax as solid food simulant and the results showed that the three acrylic adhesives tested in this work were safe for being used in food packaging materials since the migration of compounds previously identified was below the limit established in the current legislation.

  13. Effect of Long-time Heating for Polyvinyl Chloride and Polypropylene Resin Pellet Certified Reference Materials for Heavy Metal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The effect of long-time heating for both polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polypropylene (PP) resin pellet certified reference materials (CRMs) for heavy metal analysis, which contained Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb, was examined in the present study. The temperature of the drying oven was 80°C, which was used for drying these CRMs before analysis, and the long-time heating was carried out for up to 480 h. As a result, a relative decrease in mass of ca. 0.3% was observed for both CRMs. Moreover, a decrease in concentration of ca. 10% was observed for Cr, even though the concentrations for other elements did not change during the long-time heating. Since the chemical form of Cr was an organometallic compound with lower melting point, it was considered that concentration decreased due to the heat. PMID:27682407

  14. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of a Novel Resin-Based Pulp Capping Material Containing the Quaternary Ammonium Salt MAE-DB and Portland Cement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongchen; Zhou, Wei; Ban, Jinghao; Wei, Jingjing; Liu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Background Vital pulp preservation in the treatment of deep caries is challenging due to bacterial infection. The objectives of this study were to synthesize a novel, light-cured composite material containing bioactive calcium-silicate (Portland cement, PC) and the antimicrobial quaternary ammonium salt monomer 2-methacryloxylethyl dodecyl methyl ammonium bromide (MAE-DB) and to evaluate its effects on Streptococcus mutans growth in vitro. Methods The experimental material was prepared from a 2∶1 ratio of PC mixed with a resin of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, bisphenol glycerolate dimethacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (4∶3∶1) containing 5 wt% MAE-DB. Cured resin containing 5% MAE-DB without PC served as the positive control material, and resin without MAE-DB or PC served as the negative control material. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (Dycal) served as commercial controls. S. mutans biofilm formation on material surfaces and growth in the culture medium were tested according to colony-forming units (CFUs) and metabolic activity after 24 h incubation over freshly prepared samples or samples aged in water for 6 months. Biofilm formation was also assessed by Live/Dead staining and scanning electron microscopy. Results S. mutans biofilm formation on the experimental material was significantly inhibited, with CFU counts, metabolic activity, viability staining, and morphology similar to those of biofilms on the positive control material. None of the materials affected bacterial growth in solution. Contact-inhibition of biofilm formation was retained by the aged experimental material. Significant biofilm formation was observed on MTA and Dycal. Conclusion The synthesized material containing HEMA-BisGMA-TEGDMA resin with MAE-DB as the antimicrobial agent and PC to support mineralized tissue formation inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation even after aging in water for 6 months, but had no inhibitory effect on bacteria in solution

  15. Evaluation of the effect of various beverages and food material on the color stability of provisional materials – An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Gaurav; Gupta, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the color stability of four provisional materials: 1) Poly-methyl methacrylates (DPI); 2) Bis-acryl composite (ProtempTM II – 3M ESPE); 3) Bis-acryl composite (Systemp® c and b – Ivoclar Vivadent) and 4) Light polymerized composite resin (Revotek LC- GC). Materials and Methods: The color and color difference of each specimen after immersion in different staining solutions i.e. 1) tea and artificial saliva, 2) coffee and artificial saliva, 3) Pepsi and artificial saliva, 4) turmeric solution and artificial saliva was measured using reflectance spectrophotometer with CIELAB system before immersion and after immersion at 2, 5 ,7 , 10 and 15 days. Results: Revotek LC- GC (light polymerized composite resin) was found to be the most color stable provisional restorative material followed by Protemp II (Bis-acryl composite), Systemp (Bis-acryl composite) and DPI (Methylmethacrylate resin). Turmeric solution had the maximum staining potential followed by coffee, tea and Pepsi. PMID:22025835

  16. ICI/BASF PP for acrylics swap

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-01-27

    ICI (London) and BASF (Ludwigshafen) have announced their long-awaited polypropylene (PP) for acrylics swap deal. ICI is buying BASF's European acrylic resin business, and the German firm will acquire ICI's European PP operations. The deal is due for completion by mid-1993, subject to regulatory approvals. BASF, hitherto a small-scale PP producer, doubles capacity to 600,000 m.t./year and moves up the European PP league to number three, behind Himont and Shell. BASF, whose process is used in the plants, secures a foothold in the UK PP market, where Shell - planning a merger with Himont - is the only other producer, with 170,000 m.t./year. ICI's purchase involves BASF's Resart GmbH and Critesa SA subsidiaries, located at Mainz, Germany and near Barcelona, Spain, respectively. The business - which will add about [Brit pounds]60 million ($93 million) to ICI Acrylics [Brit pounds]300-million revenues - employs 400 people, who will transfer to ICI.

  17. Acrylic vessel cleaning tests

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, D.; Hahn, R.L.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.

    1997-02-26

    The acrylic vessel as constructed is dirty. The dirt includes blue tape, Al tape, grease pencil, gemak, the glue or residue form these tapes, finger prints and dust of an unknown composition but probably mostly acrylic dust. This dirt has to be removed and once removed, the vessel has to be kept clean or at least to be easily cleanable at some future stage when access becomes much more difficult. The authors report on the results of a series of tests designed: (a) to prepare typical dirty samples of acrylic; (b) to remove dirt stuck to the acrylic surface; and (c) to measure the optical quality and Th concentration after cleaning. Specifications of the vessel call for very low levels of Th which could come from tape residues, the grease pencil, or other sources of dirt. This report does not address the concerns of how to keep the vessel clean after an initial cleaning and during the removal of the scaffolding. Alconox is recommended as the cleaner of choice. This acrylic vessel will be used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  18. Acrylic purification and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuźniak, Marcin

    2011-04-01

    Radon (Rn) and its decay daughters are a well-known source of background in direct WIMP detection experiments, as either a Rn decay daughter or an alpha particle emitted from a thin inner surface layer of a detector could produce a WIMP-like signal. Different surface treatment and cleaning techniques have been employed in the past to remove this type of contamination. A new method of dealing with the problem has been proposed and used for a prototype acrylic DEAP-1 detector. Inner surfaces of the detector were coated with a layer of ultra pure acrylic, meant to shield the active volume from alphas and recoiling nuclei. An acrylic purification technique and two coating techniques are described: a solvent-borne (tested on DEAP-1) and solvent-less (being developed for the full scale DEAP-3600 detector).

  19. Acrylic purification and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzniak, Marcin

    2011-04-27

    Radon (Rn) and its decay daughters are a well-known source of background in direct WIMP detection experiments, as either a Rn decay daughter or an alpha particle emitted from a thin inner surface layer of a detector could produce a WIMP-like signal. Different surface treatment and cleaning techniques have been employed in the past to remove this type of contamination. A new method of dealing with the problem has been proposed and used for a prototype acrylic DEAP-1 detector. Inner surfaces of the detector were coated with a layer of ultra pure acrylic, meant to shield the active volume from alphas and recoiling nuclei. An acrylic purification technique and two coating techniques are described: a solvent-borne (tested on DEAP-1) and solvent-less (being developed for the full scale DEAP-3600 detector).

  20. Photopolymerization of dental resin as restorative material using an argon laser.

    PubMed

    Khosroshahi, M E; Atai, M; Nourbakhsh, M S

    2008-10-01

    The effect of the 488-nm wavelength of argon laser at different power densities and irradiation times on the degree of conversion (DC), temperature rise, water sorption, solubility, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and microhardness of bisphenole A glycol dimethacrylate and triethylen glycol dimethacrylate with a mass ratio of 75:25 was studied. Camphorquinone and N,N'-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate were added to the monomer as a photo initiator system. The DC% of the resin was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The maximum DC% (50%), which was reached in 20 s, and temperature rise because of the reaction (13.5 degrees C) were both higher at 1075 than 700 mW/cm(2). Water sorption and solubility were measured according to ISO4049, which in our case were 23.7 and 2.20 microg/mm(3) at 1075 mW/cm(2), respectively. A flexural modulus of 1.1 GPa and microhardness of 19.6 kg/mm(2) were achieved above the power density. No significant difference was observed (i.e., p>0.05) for water sorption and flexural strength at 700 and 1075 mW/cm(2).

  1. Photopolymerization of dental resin as restorative material using an argon laser.

    PubMed

    Khosroshahi, M E; Atai, M; Nourbakhsh, M S

    2008-10-01

    The effect of the 488-nm wavelength of argon laser at different power densities and irradiation times on the degree of conversion (DC), temperature rise, water sorption, solubility, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and microhardness of bisphenole A glycol dimethacrylate and triethylen glycol dimethacrylate with a mass ratio of 75:25 was studied. Camphorquinone and N,N'-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate were added to the monomer as a photo initiator system. The DC% of the resin was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The maximum DC% (50%), which was reached in 20 s, and temperature rise because of the reaction (13.5 degrees C) were both higher at 1075 than 700 mW/cm(2). Water sorption and solubility were measured according to ISO4049, which in our case were 23.7 and 2.20 microg/mm(3) at 1075 mW/cm(2), respectively. A flexural modulus of 1.1 GPa and microhardness of 19.6 kg/mm(2) were achieved above the power density. No significant difference was observed (i.e., p>0.05) for water sorption and flexural strength at 700 and 1075 mW/cm(2). PMID:17934770

  2. Distribution of calcium ions at the interface between resin bonding materials and tooth dentin. Use of commercially available adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Hanaizumi, Y; Maeda, T; Takano, Y

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that calcium ions play a key role in chemical (chelate) binding between the adhesive resin and dentin surface. However, no data is available concerning how calcium ions are distributed at the binding sites. The aim of this study is to demonstrate calcium ions at the resin-dentin interface by means of X-ray microanalysis and calcium ion-sensitive histochemical staining. The dentin surface in human teeth was ground by use of 240 grit silicon carbide abrasive paper under running water and treated with the dentin-primer and adhesive resin in Clearfil Liner Bond System or IMPERVA Bond System according to the manufacturer's instructions. After removing dentin matrix and isolating adhesive resin by the KOH-digestion method, one half of the samples were processed for scanning electron microscopy. The rest were embedded in Epon 812 and processed either for glyoxal bis (2-hydroxyanil) (GBHA) staining or transmission electron microscopy combined with X-ray microanalysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed Ca-phosphate deposits at the bottom of the resin-impregnated layer. The adhesive resin above the resin-impregnated layer was amorphous and showed no precipitates of Ca-phosphate. GBHA displayed intense calcium reactions throughout the resin-impregnated layer and also moderate ones in the 10 microns (Clearfil Liner Bond System) or 30 microns (IMPERVA Bonding System) thick boundary zone of the adhesive resin as well as in the resin tags. These data are the first to offer a distinct localization of calcium ions within the adhesive resin at the dentin-resin interface.

  3. In vitro comparison of the biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate, 4META/MMA-TBB resin, and intermediate restorative material as root-end-filling materials.

    PubMed

    Yoshimine, Yoshito; Ono, Makiko; Akamine, Akifumi

    2007-09-01

    This study compared the effects of three root-end-filling materials: mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (Super-bond), and intermediate restorative material (IRM) on osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and matrix formation. MC3T3-E1 cells were inoculated on set material specimens, and the number of cells adhered to each material was assessed at 6 hours and at 3 days of incubation by using Hoechst 33258 staining under a fluorescence microscope. Furthermore, on day 21 of culture, areas in contact with each material surface were observed at light and electron microscopic levels. Cultured cells that adhered to MTA and Super-bond proliferated significantly between 6 hours and 3 days of culture. In addition, on day 21, they produced a thick matrix layer directly on the material surfaces. In contrast, the number of cells that adhered to IRM significantly decreased with time. These cells appeared round in shape, and no matrix formation was found. These results suggest that MTA and Super-bond have good biocompatibility and allow hard-tissue forming cells to create a matrix layer, which might enhance apical tissue regeneration.

  4. Immunomicroscopy: resin techniques and on-section labelling with immunocolloidal gold or immunoperoxidase--planning a protocol.

    PubMed

    Hobot, J A; Newman, G R

    1996-01-01

    On-section immunocytochemistry is divided into two parts: (i) processing of biological tissue for section microscopy and (ii) immunolabelling of sections. Many of the more successful microscopical methods employ delicate aldehyde fixation of biological tissue followed by "sympathetic" processing into an acrylic resin. Processing regimens do not have to be complicated. Simple and cost effective room temperature protocols utilising partial dehydration have been devised and they can be as effective as the more complex low temperature techniques in preserving both ultrastructure and antigenic reactivity. The embedded material can be investigated by either light or electron microscopy. Frozen sections can be cut and immunolabelled but only if the tissue is chemically fixed first, as in resin embedding. Fixation with low concentrations of aldehyde will normally better preserve tissue immunoreactivity but this may be at the expense of good ultrastructure with these protocols. If so, low temperature resin embedding methods or rapid freezing and cryosubstitution can be tried. The choice of processing protocol will determine which acrylic resin to use, as will the preference for subsequent immunolabelling with either colloidal gold or peroxidase/diaminobenzidine (DAB). Both types of labelling system offer advantages to localisation studies and can be used in combination for double or even triple labelling. Silver enhancement of the colloidal gold or DAB allows for improved observation by light microscopy.

  5. Comparison of Effect of C-Factor on Bond Strength to Human Dentin Using Different Composite Resin Materials

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Jaya Prakash; Raju, RVS Chakradhar; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Jyotsna, SV; Bhutani, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Background The study was planned to assess the use of low shrinkage composites for restoring cavities with high configuration factor (C-factor) which are subjected to high stresses. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of C- factor on tensile bond strength to human dentin using methacrylate based nanohybrid and low shrinkage silorane composite. Materials and Methods In this study 40 non carious human molar teeth were selected and assigned into two main groups - cavity (Class I cavity with high C-factor) and flat group (flat surface with low C-factor). Two different composite materials- methacrylate based and silorane low shrinkage composite were used to restore the teeth. Dentin surface was treated, adhesive application was done and composite was applied as per manufacturer’s instructions. Samples were stored in distilled water then subjected to tensile bond strength measurement using universal testing machine. Results Statistical analysis was done using Independent sample t-test. The mean bond strength in methacrylate based and silorane composite was significantly higher in flat preparation (Low C-factor) than cavity preparation. The mean bond strength in both cavity (High C-factor) and flat preparation(Low C-factor) was significantly higher in silorane than in conventional methacrylate based composite. Conclusion The bond strength of composites to dentin is strongly influenced by C-factor and type of composite resin material used. PMID:26436056

  6. Heatshield material selection for advanced ballistic reentry vehicles. [rayon fiber cloth impregnated with phenolic resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legendre, P. J.; Holtz, T.; Sikra, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The Performance of staple rayon fiber and AVTEX continuous rayon fiber was evaluated as precursor materials for heatshields. The materials studied were referenced to the IRC FM5055A heatshield materials flown during the past decade. Three different arc jet facilities were used to simulate portions of the reentry environment. The IRC FM5055A and the AVTEX FM5055G, both continuous rayon fiber woven materials having the phenolic impregnant filled with carbon particles were compared. The AVTEX continuous fiber, unfilled material FM5822A was also examined to a limited extent. Test results show that the AVTEX FM5055G material provided a close substitute for the IRC FM5055A material both in terms of thermal protection and roll torque performance.

  7. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resin Bonded to Resin-Modified Glass-ionomer Containing Micro- and Nano-hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Moradian, Marzie; Motamedi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) to composite resin has a very important role in the durability of sandwich restorations. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent candidate as a filler material for improving the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cement. Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adding micro- and nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) powder to RMGI on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nanofilled and silorane-based composite resins bonded to RMGI containing micro- and nano-HA. Materials and Method Sixty cylindrical acrylic blocks containing a hole of 5.5×2.5 mm (diameter × height) were prepared and randomly divided into 6 groups as Group 1 with RMGI (Fuji II LC) plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 2 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group3 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group 4 with RMGI plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 5 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90Filtek composite resin; and Group 6 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin. The specimens were stored in water (37° C, 1 week) and subjected to 1000 thermal cycles (5°C/55°C). SBS test was performed by using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0.05). Results There were significant differences between groups 1 and 4 (RMGI groups, p= 0.025), and groups 3 and 6 (RMGI+ nano-HA groups, p= 0.012). However, among Z350 and P90 specimens, no statistically significant difference was detected in the SBS values (p= 0.19, p= 0.083, respectively). Conclusion RMGI containing HA can improve the bond strength to methacrylate-based in comparison to silorane-based composite resins. Meanwhile, RMGI

  8. Formaldehyde resins in building materials. December 1973-October 1989 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for December 1973-October 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning regulations, standards, safety, and applications of formaldehyde-resin compositions in the building industry. Urea formaldehyde is emphasized; however, phenol formaldehyde and melamine formaldehyde are also considered for such applications as thermal insulation, bonding agents, and composite construction materials. Ramifications of state and federal legislation, substitute materials, and toxicology studies are included. (This updated bibliography contains 376 citations, 46 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Bond Strength of Dual-Cured Resin Cements: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, R Veena; Poluri, Ramya Krishna; Nagaraj, Hema; Siddaruju, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare the microtensile bond strength of resin cements to enamel and dentin and to determine the type of bond failure using stereomicroscope. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study 40 teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and divided into two main groups i.e., Group A for enamel and Group B for dentin. Each group is again subdivided into four subgroups, which are as follows; Subgroup 1 for Calibra resin cement, Subgroup 2 for Paracem, Subgroup 3 for Variolink II and Subgroup 4 for Rely X ARC. These resin cements were applied on enamel and dentin according to manufacturer’s instructions followed by incremental build-up of composite resin on the top of resin cements. Each tooth was sectioned perpendicular to the resin-substrate interface with a slow speed diamond saw under water cooling yielding sections of approximately 1 mm2. On an average, three sections from each tooth were used for testing. The beams obtained after sectioning were stressed to failure under tension in a custom made stainless steel forceps held in a universal testing machine (Lloyd) at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Results were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance, independent t-test, and Tukey’s HSD post-hoc test. Results: Cements bonded to enamel substrates showed higher mean bond strength compared to dentin, which is statistically significant. Rely X ARC showed highest mean bond strength to both the substrates. Conclusion: There was a significant difference between the bond strength to enamel and dentin and, Rely X ARC resin cement showed higher bond strength compared with the other groups. PMID:26225104

  10. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  11. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert,George W.; Hand,Thomas E.; Delaurentiis,Gary M.

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  12. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  13. Acrylic mechanical bond tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.

    1991-02-01

    The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  14. Toughened epoxy resins: Preformed particles as tougheners for adhesives and matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Riew, C.K.; Siebert, A.R.; Smith, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    Free-flowing,preformed,rigid,multilayer acrylic core-shell polymers were used to enhance the toughness of epoxy resins. The glass transition temperatures of the cured epoxys were over 190 degrees centigrade.

  15. In vitro comparison of flexural strength and elastic modulus of three provisional crown materials used in fixed prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Poonacha, Seema; Salagundi, Basavaraj; Rupesh, P L.; Raghavan, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare the flexural strength and the elastic moduli of three provisional crown materials (methyl methacrylate based autopolymerized resin, bis acryl composite based autopolymerized resin and urethane dimethacrylate based light polymerized resin) after storing in artificial saliva and testing at intervals of 24 hours and 7 days. Study design: A metal master mould with four slots of dimensions 25x2x2 mm was fabricated to obtain samples of standard dimensions. A total of 135 specimens were thus obtained with 45 each of three provisional materials. Further 15 samples of each group were tested after storing for one hour at room temperature and again at intervals of 24 hours and 7 days after storing in artificial saliva. Three point flexural tests were carried out in the universal testing machine to calculate the flexural strength and the elastic modulus. The changes were calculated and data was analyzed with Fisher’s test and ANOVA. Results: The flexural strength of the methyl methacrylate resin reduced significantly while bis-acrylic composite resin showed a significant increase in its flexural strength after storing in artificial saliva for 24 hours and the values of both remained constant thereafter. Contrary to these findings, light polymerized resin showed a significant decrease in flexural strength after storing in artificial saliva for 24 hours and then significantly increased in flexural strength after 7 days. However the changes in the values for elastic modulus of respective materials were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Methacrylate based autopolymerizing resin showed the highest flexural strength and elastic moduli after fabrication and after storing in artificial saliva and for 24 hours and 7 days. Bis-acrylic composite resin showed the least flexural strength and elastic moduli. Key words:Provisional restorations, interim restorations, Methyl Methacrylate, composite restoration, flexural strength, elastic moduli

  16. Phenolic resin-grafted reduced graphene oxide as a highly stable anode material for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Mochen; Song, Huaihe; Chen, Xiaohong; Zhou, Jisheng; Ma, Zhaokun

    2015-02-01

    A novel and effective route for preparing phenol formaldehyde resin grafted reduced graphene oxide (rGO-g-PF) electrode materials with highly enhanced electrochemical properties is reported. In order to prepare rGO-g-PF, hydroxymethyl-terminated PF is initially grafted to graphene oxide (GO) via esterification reaction. Subsequently, the grafted GO is reduced by the carbonization process under an inert gas atmosphere. The covalent linkage, morphology, thermal stability and electrochemical properties of rGO-g-PF are systematically investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and a variety of electrochemical testing techniques. In the constructed architecture, the amorphous carbon shell can inhibit the co-intercalation of solvated lithium ion and avoid partial exfoliation of the graphene layers, thus effectively reducing the irreversible capacity and preserving the structural integrity. Meanwhile, the carbon coating layer leading to a decreased thickness of SEI film can improve the conductivity of electrode materials. As a result, the rGO-g-PF electrode exhibits impressive high cycling stability at various large current densities (376.5 mA h g(-1) at 50 mA g(-1) for 250 cycles, 337.8 mA h g(-1) at 200 mA g(-1) and 267.8 mA h g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) for 200 cycles), in combination with high rate capability.

  17. Penetration of a resin-based filling material into lateral root canals and quality of obturation by different techniques.

    PubMed

    Michelotto, André Luiz da Costa; Moura-Netto, Cacio; Araki, Angela Toshie; Akisue, Eduardo; Sydney, Gilson Blitzkow

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the penetration of a resin/polyester polymer-based material (Resilon Real Seal; SybronEndo Corp., Orange, USA) into simulated lateral canals, and the quality of obturations by different techniques. A total of 30 standardized simulated canals were divided into three groups according to the technique of obturation used: MS (McSpadden), SB (SystemB/Obtura II), and LC (Lateral Condensation). To analyze the penetration of the filling material, the simulated canals were digitalized and the images were analyzed using the Leica QWIN Pro v2.3 software. The data of the middle and apical thirds were separately submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by the Tukey's test for the comparison of the techniques. Results showed a significant difference (p < 0.05) between groups (LC < SB) in the middle third, and a significant difference (p < 0.05) between groups (LC < SB and MS < SB) in the apical third. To analyze the quality of the obturations, the canals were radiographed and evaluated by three examiners. The Kappa test on interexaminer agreement and the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test indicated no significant difference between filling techniques. It was concluded that Resilon achieves greater levels of penetration when associated with thermoplastic obturation techniques.

  18. Penetration of a resin-based filling material into lateral root canals and quality of obturation by different techniques.

    PubMed

    Michelotto, André Luiz da Costa; Moura-Netto, Cacio; Araki, Angela Toshie; Akisue, Eduardo; Sydney, Gilson Blitzkow

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the penetration of a resin/polyester polymer-based material (Resilon Real Seal; SybronEndo Corp., Orange, USA) into simulated lateral canals, and the quality of obturations by different techniques. A total of 30 standardized simulated canals were divided into three groups according to the technique of obturation used: MS (McSpadden), SB (SystemB/Obtura II), and LC (Lateral Condensation). To analyze the penetration of the filling material, the simulated canals were digitalized and the images were analyzed using the Leica QWIN Pro v2.3 software. The data of the middle and apical thirds were separately submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by the Tukey's test for the comparison of the techniques. Results showed a significant difference (p < 0.05) between groups (LC < SB) in the middle third, and a significant difference (p < 0.05) between groups (LC < SB and MS < SB) in the apical third. To analyze the quality of the obturations, the canals were radiographed and evaluated by three examiners. The Kappa test on interexaminer agreement and the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test indicated no significant difference between filling techniques. It was concluded that Resilon achieves greater levels of penetration when associated with thermoplastic obturation techniques. PMID:25466332

  19. Methods and preliminary findings of a cost-effectiveness study of glass-ionomer-based and composite resin sealant materials after 2 yr.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Ann S; Chen, Xi; Fan, Mingwen; Frencken, Jo E

    2014-06-01

    The cost-effectiveness of glass-carbomer, conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (HVGIC) [without or with heat (light-emitting diode (LED) thermocuring) application], and composite resin sealants were compared after 2 yr in function. Estimated net costs per sealant were obtained from data on personnel time (measured with activity sampling), transportation, materials, instruments and equipment, and restoration costs for replacing failed sealants from a community trial involving 7- to 9-yr-old Chinese children. Cost data were standardized to reflect the placement of 1,000 sealants per group. Outcomes were the differences in the number of dentine caries lesions that developed between groups. The average sealant application time ranged from 5.40 min (for composite resin) to 8.09 min (for LED thermocured HVGIC), and the average cost per sealant for 1,000 performed per group (simulation sample) ranged from $US3.73 (for composite resin) to $US7.50 (for glass-carbomer). The incremental cost-effectiveness of LED thermocured HVGIC to prevent one additional caries lesion per 1,000 sealants performed was $US1,106 compared with composite resin. Sensitivity analyses showed that differences in the cost of materials across groups had minimal impact on the overall cost. Cost and effectiveness data enhance policymakers' ability to address issues of availability, access, and compliance associated with poor oral-health outcomes, particularly when large numbers of children are excluded from care, in economies where oral health services are still developing.

  20. Novel nano-particles as fillers for an experimental resin-based restorative material.

    PubMed

    Rüttermann, S; Wandrey, C; Raab, W H-M; Janda, R

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the properties of two experimental materials, nano-material (Nano) and Microhybrid, and two trade products, Clearfil AP-X and Filtek Supreme XT. The flexural strength and modulus after 24h water storage and 5000 thermocycles, water sorption, solubility and X-ray opacity were determined according to ISO 4049. The volumetric behavior (DeltaV) after curing and after water storage was investigated with the Archimedes principle. ANOVA was calculated with p<0.05. Clearfil AP-X showed the highest flexural strength (154+/-14 MPa) and flexural modulus (11,600+/-550 MPa) prior to and after thermocycling (117+/-14 MPa and 13,000+/-300 MPa). The flexural strength of all materials decreased after thermocycling, but the flexural modulus decreased only for Filtek Supreme XT. After thermocycling, there were no significant differences in flexural strength and modulus between Filtek Supreme XT, Microhybrid and Nano. Clearfil AP-X had the lowest water sorption (22+/-1.1 microg mm(-3)) and Nano had the highest water sorption (82+/-2.6 microg mm(-3)) and solubility (27+/-2.9 microg mm(-3)) of all the materials. No significant differences occurred between the solubility of Clearfil AP-X, Filtek Supreme XT and Microhybrid. Microhybrid and Nano provided the highest X-ray opacity. Owing to the lower filler content, Nano showed higher shrinkage than the commercial materials. Nano had the highest expansion after water storage. After thermocycling, Nano performed as well as Filtek Supreme XT for flexural strength, even better for X-ray opacity but significantly worse for flexural modulus, water sorption and solubility. The performances of microhybrids were superior to those of the nano-materials. PMID:18635411