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Sample records for acs slacs survey

  1. Survey and Alignment of SLAC's B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Pietryka, Matthew J.; Gaydosh, Michael L.; /SLAC

    2011-09-08

    The survey and alignment of SLAC's B-factory injector and high energy ring will be complete in March 1997. Modern digital electronic surveying tools are contributing to new, efficient alignment procedures. A laser tracker was used to fiducialize almost 300 quadrupole magnets. Digital levels were used to pre-set base plate elevations. Theodolites with very accurate co-axial distance meters were used for everything from layout to 3D magnet positioning to network surveys, all in free stationing mode. A number of procedures and measurement results are outlined.

  2. Survey of SLAC lands for San Francisco garter snake

    SciTech Connect

    Seib, R.L.; Papenfuss, T.J.

    1981-11-01

    The San Francisco garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis tetrataenia) is protected under the endangered species act by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the California Department of Fish and Game. The snake is restricted to the San Francisco peninsula and all known populations are in San Mateo County. In southeastern San Mateo County and northwestern Santa Clara County T. s. tetrataenia intergrades with T. s. infernalis. The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) lands are located in this area of intergradation. SLAC contracted Robert Seib and Ted Papenfuss to survey SLAC lands during September and early November 1981, to determine the possibility of occurrence of the San Francisco garter snake on their lands. Results of this investigation and management recommendations are presented here.

  3. ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne

    2006-07-01

    Existing HST observations of nearby galaxies comprise a sparse and highly non-uniform archive, making comprehensive comparative studies among galaxies essentially impossible. We propose to secure HST's lasting impact on the study of nearby galaxies by undertaking a systematic, complete, and carefully crafted imaging survey of ALL galaxies in the Local Universe outside the Local Group. The resulting images will allow unprecedented measurements of: {1} the star formation history {SFH} of a >100 Mpc^3 volume of the Universe with a time resolution of Delta[log{t}]=0.25; {2} correlations between spatially resolved SFHs and environment; {3} the structure and properties of thick disks and stellar halos; and {4} the color distributions, sizes, and specific frequencies of globular and disk clusters as a function of galaxy mass and environment. To reach these goals, we will use a combination of wide-field tiling and pointed deep imaging to obtain uniform data on all 72 galaxies within a volume-limited sample extending to 3.5 Mpc, with an extension to the M81 group. For each galaxy, the wide-field imaging will cover out to 1.5 times the optical radius and will reach photometric depths of at least 2 magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch throughout the limits of the survey volume. One additional deep pointing per galaxy will reach SNR 10 for red clump stars, sufficient to recover the ancient SFH from the color-magnitude diagram. This proposal will produce photometric information for 100 million stars {comparable to the number in the SDSS survey} and uniform multi-color images of half a square degree of sky. The resulting archive will establish the fundamental optical database for nearby galaxies, in preparation for the shift of high-resolution imaging to the near-infrared.

  4. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. I. A Large Spectroscopically Selected Sample of Massive Early-Type Lens Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2006-01-01

    The Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey is an efficient Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Snapshot imaging survey for new galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses. The targeted lens candidates are selected spectroscopically from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database of galaxy spectra for having multiple nebular emission lines at a redshift significantly higher than that of the SDSS target galaxy. The SLACS survey is optimized to detect bright early-type lens galaxies with faint lensed sources in order to increase the sample of known gravitational lenses suitable for detailed lensing, photometric, and dynamical modeling. In this paper, the first in a series on the current results of our HST Cycle 13 imaging survey, we present a catalog of 19 newly discovered gravitational lenses, along with nine other observed candidate systems that are either possible lenses, nonlenses, or nondetections. The survey efficiency is thus >=68%. We also present Gemini 8 m and Magellan 6.5 m integral-field spectroscopic data for nine of the SLACS targets, which further support the lensing interpretation. A new method for the effective subtraction of foreground galaxy images to reveal faint background features is presented. We show that the SLACS lens galaxies have colors and ellipticities typical of the spectroscopic parent sample from which they are drawn (SDSS luminous red galaxies and quiescent MAIN sample galaxies), but are somewhat brighter and more centrally concentrated. Several explanations for the latter bias are suggested. The SLACS survey provides the first statistically significant and homogeneously selected sample of bright early-type lens galaxies, furnishing a powerful probe of the structure of early-type galaxies within the half-light radius. The high confirmation rate of lenses in the SLACS survey suggests consideration of spectroscopic lens discovery as an explicit science goal of future spectroscopic galaxy surveys.

  5. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. I. A Large Spectroscopically Selected Sample of Massive Early-Type Lens Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2006-01-01

    The Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey is an efficient Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Snapshot imaging survey for new galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses. The targeted lens candidates are selected spectroscopically from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database of galaxy spectra for having multiple nebular emission lines at a redshift significantly higher than that of the SDSS target galaxy. The SLACS survey is optimized to detect bright early-type lens galaxies with faint lensed sources in order to increase the sample of known gravitational lenses suitable for detailed lensing, photometric, and dynamical modeling. In this paper, the first in a series on the current results of our HST Cycle 13 imaging survey, we present a catalog of 19 newly discovered gravitational lenses, along with nine other observed candidate systems that are either possible lenses, nonlenses, or nondetections. The survey efficiency is thus >=68%. We also present Gemini 8 m and Magellan 6.5 m integral-field spectroscopic data for nine of the SLACS targets, which further support the lensing interpretation. A new method for the effective subtraction of foreground galaxy images to reveal faint background features is presented. We show that the SLACS lens galaxies have colors and ellipticities typical of the spectroscopic parent sample from which they are drawn (SDSS luminous red galaxies and quiescent MAIN sample galaxies), but are somewhat brighter and more centrally concentrated. Several explanations for the latter bias are suggested. The SLACS survey provides the first statistically significant and homogeneously selected sample of bright early-type lens galaxies, furnishing a powerful probe of the structure of early-type galaxies within the half-light radius. The high confirmation rate of lenses in the SLACS survey suggests consideration of spectroscopic lens discovery as an explicit science goal of future spectroscopic galaxy surveys.

  6. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D<4Mpc). The survey volume encompasses 69 galaxies in diverse environments, including close pairs, small & large groups, filaments, and truly isolated regions. The galaxies include a nearly complete range of morphological types spanning a factor of 104 in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consists of images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, supplemented with archival data and new Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC2) imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. We will discuss the many ways in which this data set is being used to reconstruct the star formation history of galaxies within the local volume.

  7. 7 CFR 1737.31 - Area Coverage Survey (ACS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Area Coverage Survey (ACS). 1737.31 Section 1737.31... Studies-Area Coverage Survey and Loan Design § 1737.31 Area Coverage Survey (ACS). (a) The Area Coverage Survey (ACS) is a market forecast of service requirements of subscribers in a proposed service area....

  8. 7 CFR 1737.31 - Area Coverage Survey (ACS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Area Coverage Survey (ACS). 1737.31 Section 1737.31... Studies-Area Coverage Survey and Loan Design § 1737.31 Area Coverage Survey (ACS). (a) The Area Coverage Survey (ACS) is a market forecast of service requirements of subscribers in a proposed service area....

  9. 7 CFR 1737.31 - Area Coverage Survey (ACS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Area Coverage Survey (ACS). 1737.31 Section 1737.31... Studies-Area Coverage Survey and Loan Design § 1737.31 Area Coverage Survey (ACS). (a) The Area Coverage Survey (ACS) is a market forecast of service requirements of subscribers in a proposed service area....

  10. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Holtzman, Jon; Rosema, Keith; Skillman, Evan D.; Cole, Andrew; Girardi, Léo; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Olsen, Knut; Weisz, Daniel; Christensen, Charlotte; Freeman, Ken; Gilbert, Karoline; Gallart, Carme; Harris, Jason; Hodge, Paul; de Jong, Roelof S.; Karachentseva, Valentina; Mateo, Mario; Stetson, Peter B.; Tavarez, Maritza; Zaritsky, Dennis; Governato, Fabio; Quinn, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D < 4 Mpc). The survey volume encompasses 69 galaxies in diverse environments, including close pairs, small and large groups, filaments, and truly isolated regions. The galaxies include a nearly complete range of morphological types spanning a factor of ~104 in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consist of images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), supplemented with archival data and new Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. The new wide field imaging in ANGST reaches median 50% completenesses of m F475W = 28.0 mag, m F606W = 27.3 mag, and m F814W = 27.3 mag, several magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). The deep fields reach magnitudes sufficient to fully resolve the structure in the red clump. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly accessible and contain over 34 million photometric measurements of >14 million stars. In this paper we present the details of the sample selection, imaging, data reduction, and the resulting photometric catalogs, along with an analysis of the photometric uncertainties (systematic and random), for both ACS and WFPC2 imaging. We also present uniformly derived relative distances measured from the apparent magnitude of the TRGB.

  11. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY

    SciTech Connect

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rosema, Keith; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Christensen, Charlotte; Gilbert, Karoline; Hodge, Paul; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Holtzman, Jon; Skillman, Evan D.; Weisz, Daniel; Cole, Andrew; Girardi, Leo; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Olsen, Knut; Freeman, Ken; Gallart, Carme; De Jong, Roelof S. E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu E-mail: stephanie@astro.washington.edu E-mail: fabio@astro.washington.edu E-mail: aseth@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-07-15

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D < 4 Mpc). The survey volume encompasses 69 galaxies in diverse environments, including close pairs, small and large groups, filaments, and truly isolated regions. The galaxies include a nearly complete range of morphological types spanning a factor of {approx}10{sup 4} in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consist of images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), supplemented with archival data and new Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. The new wide field imaging in ANGST reaches median 50% completenesses of m {sub F475W} = 28.0 mag, m {sub F606W} = 27.3 mag, and m {sub F814W} = 27.3 mag, several magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). The deep fields reach magnitudes sufficient to fully resolve the structure in the red clump. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly accessible and contain over 34 million photometric measurements of >14 million stars. In this paper we present the details of the sample selection, imaging, data reduction, and the resulting photometric catalogs, along with an analysis of the photometric uncertainties (systematic and random), for both ACS and WFPC2 imaging. We also present uniformly derived relative distances measured from the apparent magnitude of the TRGB.

  12. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne; Williams, B.; Gogarten, S.; Weisz, D.; Skillman, E.; Seth, A.; ANGST Team

    2007-12-01

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury program (ANGST) is a program to measure photometry for millions of stars in a volume limited sample of 70 nearby galaxies. With this data set, we are deriving spatially resolved star formation histories for both dwarfs and spirals in the local volume. I will highlight initial results from the survey, including ancient star formation histories for massive spirals, halos around dwarf galaxies, spatially-resolved star formation histories in dwarfs and spirals, and the detection of variable stars. I will also discuss the ANGST involved with switching to WFPC2. This program is funded by NASA grant HST GO-10915, administered by STScI.

  13. SLAC site design aesthetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.F.

    1985-10-01

    Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a single mission laboratory dedicated to basic research in high energy particle physics. SLAC site also houses Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) which is a multi-mission laboratory for research using beams of ultraviolet light and low energy photons as emitted tangentially from SLAC colliding beam facilities. This paper discusses various aspects of SLAC site design aesthetics under the following headings: (1) imposed footprint of SLAC, (2) description of selected site, (3) use of earth cover for radiation and sight screens, (4) use of landscaping for cosmetic purposes, (5) use of exterior paint colors to soften SLAC impact on neighbors, (6) relocation of SLAC main entrance, (7) relocation of SLAC collider arcs and experimental hall, (8) parking lots and storage yards, and (9) land use zoning at SLAC.

  14. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. I. Introduction to the Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, Patrick; Blakeslee, John P.; Ferrarese, Laura; Jordán, Andrés; Mei, Simona; Merritt, David; Milosavljević, Miloš; Peng, Eric W.; Tonry, John L.; West, Michael J.

    2004-07-01

    The Virgo Cluster is the dominant mass concentration in the Local Supercluster and the largest collection of elliptical and lenticular galaxies in the nearby universe. In this paper, we present an introduction to the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey: a program to image, in the F475W and F850LP bandpasses (~Sloan g and z), 100 early-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. We describe the selection of the program galaxies and their ensemble properties, the choice of filters, the field placement and orientation, the limiting magnitudes of the survey, coordinated parallel observations of 100 ``intergalactic'' fields with WFPC2, and supporting ground-based spectroscopic observations of the program galaxies. In terms of depth, spatial resolution, sample size, and homogeneity, this represents the most comprehensive imaging survey to date of early-type galaxies in a cluster environment. We briefly describe the main scientific goals of the survey, which include the measurement of luminosities, metallicities, ages, and structural parameters for the many thousands of globular clusters associated with these galaxies, a high-resolution isophotal analysis of galaxies spanning a factor of ~450 in luminosity and sharing a common environment, the measurement of accurate distances for the full sample of galaxies using the method of surface brightness fluctuations, and a determination of the three-dimensional structure of Virgo itself. ID="FN1"> 1Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  15. GPS Activities at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Behrend, Dirk

    2002-11-19

    The Alignment Engineering Group of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) started to use RTK (real-time kinematic) GPS equipment in order to perform structure mapping and GIS-related tasks on the SLAC campus. In a first step a continuously observing GPS station (SLAC M40) was set up. This station serves as master control station for all differential GPS activities on site and its coordinates have been determined in the well-defined global geodetic datum ITRF2000 at a given reference epoch. Some trials have been performed to test the RTK method. The tests have proven RTK to be very fast and efficient.

  16. SLAC All Access: FACET

    ScienceCinema

    Hogan, Mark

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests, or FACET, is a test-bed where researchers are developing the technologies required for particle accelerators of the future. Scientists from all over the world come to explore ways of improving the power and efficiency of the particle accelerators used in basic research, medicine, industry and other areas important to society. In this video, Mark Hogan, head of SLAC's Advanced Accelerator Research Department, offers a glimpse into FACET, which uses part of SLAC's historic two-mile-long linear accelerator.

  17. 7 CFR 1737.31 - Area Coverage Survey (ACS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Design. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0572-0079) ... Survey (ACS) is a market forecast of service requirements of subscribers in a proposed service area. (b... identification of future establishments are also recorded on the maps. (2) A forecast of the number of...

  18. THE BOSS EMISSION-LINE LENS SURVEY. II. INVESTIGATING MASS-DENSITY PROFILE EVOLUTION IN THE SLACS+BELLS STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENS SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Shu Yiping; Arneson, Ryan A.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Schlegel, David J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wake, David A.; Connolly, Natalia; Maraston, Claudia; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-09-20

    We present an analysis of the evolution of the central mass-density profile of massive elliptical galaxies from the SLACS and BELLS strong gravitational lens samples over the redshift interval z Almost-Equal-To 0.1-0.6, based on the combination of strong-lensing aperture mass and stellar velocity-dispersion constraints. We find a significant trend toward steeper mass profiles (parameterized by the power-law density model with {rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -{gamma}}) at later cosmic times, with magnitude d < {gamma} > /dz = -0.60 {+-} 0.15. We show that the combined lens-galaxy sample is consistent with a non-evolving distribution of stellar velocity dispersions. Considering possible additional dependence of <{gamma} > on lens-galaxy stellar mass, effective radius, and Sersic index, we find marginal evidence for shallower mass profiles at higher masses and larger sizes, but with a significance that is subdominant to the redshift dependence. Using the results of published Monte Carlo simulations of spectroscopic lens surveys, we verify that our mass-profile evolution result cannot be explained by lensing selection biases as a function of redshift. Interpreted as a true evolutionary signal, our result suggests that major dry mergers involving off-axis trajectories play a significant role in the evolution of the average mass-density structure of massive early-type galaxies over the past 6 Gyr. We also consider an alternative non-evolutionary hypothesis based on variations in the strong-lensing measurement aperture with redshift, which would imply the detection of an 'inflection zone' marking the transition between the baryon-dominated and dark-matter halo-dominated regions of the lens galaxies. Further observations of the combined SLACS+BELLS sample can constrain this picture more precisely, and enable a more detailed investigation of the multivariate dependences of galaxy mass structure across cosmic time.

  19. Recent GPS Results at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Behrend, Dirk; Imfeld, Hans L.; /SLAC

    2005-08-17

    The Alignment Engineering Group (AEG) makes use of GPS technology for fulfilling part of its above ground surveying tasks at SLAC since early 2002. A base station (SLAC M40) has been set up at a central location of the SLAC campus serving both as master station for real-time kinematic (RTK) operations and as datum point for local GPS campaigns. The Leica RS500 system is running continuously and the GPS data are collected both externally (logging PC) and internally (receiver flashcard). The external logging is facilitated by a serial to Ethernet converter and an Ethernet connection at the station. Internal logging (ring buffer) is done for data security purposes. The weatherproof boxes for the instrumentation are excellent shelters against rain and wind, but do heat up considerably in sun light. Whereas the GPS receiver showed no problems, the Pacific Crest PDL 35 radio shut down several times due to overheating disrupting the RTK operations. In order to prevent heat-induced shutdowns, a protection against direct sun exposure (shading) and a constant air circulation system (ventilation) were installed. As no further shutdowns have occurred so far, it appears that the two measures successfully mended the heat problem.

  20. Polarization at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.

    1995-01-01

    A highly polarized electron beam is a key feature. for the Current physics program at SLAC. An electron beam polarization of 80% can now be routinely achieved for typically 5000 hours of machine operation per year. Two main Physics programs utilize the polarized beam. Fixed target experiments in End Station A study the collision of polarized electrons with polarized nuclear targets to elucidate the spin structure of the nucleon and to provide an important test of QCD. Using the SLAC Linear Collider, collisions of polarized electrons with unpolarized positrons allow precise measurements of parity violation in the Z-fermion couplings and provide a very precise measurement of tile weak mixing angle. This paper discusses polarized beam operation at SLAC, and gives an overview of the polarized physics program.

  1. The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey: Imaging with ACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giavalisco, Mauro

    2002-07-01

    We propose a Treasury program of ACS imaging as part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey {GOODS}, covering 320{square}', or 32* the area of the two original WFPC2 HDFs, to within 0.5-0.8 mag of their depth in four ACS bands, BViz. The two GOODS fields, the Hubble Deep Field North and Chandra Deep Field South, are the premier deep survey areas from X- ray to radio wavelengths. ACS data will provide unique angular resolution, sensitivity, and wavelength coverage to close the gap between the deepest Chandra and SIRTF observations. Supported by extensive imaging and spectroscopy from the VLT, Keck, Subaru, NOAO, Gemini, VLA, JCMT, and other facilities, the combined GOODS data set will make it possible to map the evolution of the Hubble sequence with redshift, reconstruct the history of galaxy mass assembly, star formation and nuclear activity from the epoch of reionization to the present, trace the growth of density perturbations via cosmic shear, and, with properly phased z-band observations, detect 12 Type Ia supernovae at 1.2

  2. Final Report for the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    ACS was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia just before dawn on March 1, 2002. At the time of liftoff, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was reflecting the early morning sun as it moved across the sky. After successfully docking with HST, several components were replaced. One of the components was the Advanced Camera for Surveys built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (BATC) in Boulder, Colorado. Over the life of the HST contract at BATC, hundreds of employees had the pleasure of working on the concept, design, fabrication, assembly, and test of ACS. Those employees thank NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center and the science team at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) for the opportunity to participate in building a great science instrument for HST.

  3. SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1985-12-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The status of the machine and the detectors are discussed and an overview is given of the physics which can be done at this new facility. Some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built are given.

  4. FACET: SLAC___s New User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.-J.; England, R.J.; Erickson, R.A.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.D.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seeman, J.T.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The first User Run started in spring 2012 with 20 GeV, 3 nC electron beams. The facility is designed to provide short (20 {micro}m) bunches and small (20 {micro}m wide) spot sizes, producing uniquely high power beams. FACET supports studies from many fields but in particular those of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration. The creation of drive and witness bunches and shaped bunch profiles is possible with 'Notch' Collimation. FACET is also a source of THz radiation for material studies. Positrons will be available at FACET in future user runs. We present the User Facility and the available tools and opportunities for future experiments.

  5. ACS Pure Parallel Lyman-Alpha Emission Survey {APPLES}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, James

    2002-07-01

    Ly-alpha line emission is an efficient tool for identifying young galaxies at high redshift, because it is strong in galaxies with young stars and little or no dust -- properties expected in galaxies undergoing their first burst of star- formation. Slitless spectroscopy with the ACS Wide-Field Camera and G800L grism allows an unmatched search efficiency for such objects over the uninterrupted range 4 < z < 7. We propose the ACS Pure Parallel Ly-alpha Emission Survey {``APPLES''}, to exploit this unique HST capability and so obtain the largest and most uniform sample of high redshift Ly-alpha emitters yet. Parallel observations will allow this survey to be conducted with minimal impact on HST resources, and we will place reduced images and extracted spectra in the public domain within three months of observation. We aim to find 1000 Ly-alpha emitters, 5 times the biggest current sample of Ly-alpha emitters. This unprecedented sample will provide robust statistics on the populations and evolution of Ly-alpha emitters between redshifts 4-7; a robust measurement of the reionization redshift completely independent of the Gunn-Peterson trough; spatial clustering information for Ly-alpha emitters which would let us probe their bias function and hence halo mass as a function of redshift; many galaxies at redshift exceeding 6; and lower redshift serendipitous discoveries.

  6. Sleepless at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Dement, William

    2006-01-23

    Feeling tired? More than 30 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders. Nevertheless, as a society we remain largely ignorant of the significance of sleep in determining the quality of our waking lives. Dr. William Dement, Stanford Professor and one of the world's foremost experts on sleep and sleep deprivation, joins SLAC's Colloquium Series to present exciting new findings in the field of sleep research. You'll never sleep the same again!

  7. Sleepless at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Dement, William

    2006-01-23

    Feeling tired? More than 30 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders. Nevertheless, as a society we remain largely ignorant of the significance of sleep in determining the quality of our waking lives. Dr. William Dement, Stanford Professor and one of the world's foremost experts on sleep and sleep deprivation, joins SLAC's Colloquium Series to present exciting new findings in the field of sleep research. You'll never sleep the same again!

  8. The SLAC lasertron project

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1986-10-01

    SLAC has a program underway to develop an efficient high power microwave source for accelerator applications employing a photoemission cathode, the so-called lasertron. After a brief discussion of the lasertron idea, the various elements of the current program are reviewed. A proof-of-principle experiment to build a 35 MW, 70% efficiency, S-band microwave source is nearing completion. Actual RF power testing is expected to begin in late 1986 or early 1987.

  9. SLAC B Factory computing

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, P.F.

    1992-02-01

    As part of the research and development program in preparation for a possible B Factory at SLAC, a group has been studying various aspects of HEP computing. In particular, the group is investigating the use of UNIX for all computing, from data acquisition, through analysis, and word processing. A summary of some of the results of this study will be given, along with some personal opinions on these topics.

  10. SLAC synchronous condenser

    SciTech Connect

    Corvin, C.

    1995-06-01

    A synchronous condenser is a synchronous machine that generates reactive power that leads real power by 90{degrees} in phase. The leading reactive power generated by the condenser offsets or cancels the normal lagging reactive power consumed by inductive and nonlinear loads at the accelerator complex. The quality of SLAC`s utility power is improved with the addition of the condenser. The inertia of the condenser`s 35,000 pound rotor damps and smoothes voltage excursions on two 12 kilovolt master substation buses, improving voltage regulation site wide. The condenser absorbs high frequency transients and noise in effect ``scrubbing`` the electric system power at its primary distribution source. In addition, the condenser produces a substantial savings in power costs. Federal and investor owned utilities that supply electric power to SLAC levy a monthly penalty for lagging reactive power delivered to the site. For the 1993 fiscal year this totaled over $285,000 in added costs for the year. By generating leading reactive power on site, thereby reducing total lagging reactive power requirements, a substantial savings in electric utility bills is achieved. Actual savings of $150,000 or more a year are possible depending on experimental operations.

  11. THE SLOAN LENS ACS SURVEY. XI. BEYOND HUBBLE RESOLUTION: SIZE, LUMINOSITY, AND STELLAR MASS OF COMPACT LENSED GALAXIES AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W.; Gavazzi, Raphaeel; Bolton, Adam S.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2011-06-20

    We exploit the strong lensing effect to explore the properties of intrinsically faint and compact galaxies at intermediate redshift (z{sub s} {approx_equal} 0.4-0.8) at the highest possible resolution at optical wavelengths. Our sample consists of 46 strongly lensed emission line galaxies (ELGs) discovered by the Sloan Lens ACS Survey (SLACS). The galaxies have been imaged at high resolution with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in three bands (V{sub HST} , I{sub 814}, and H{sub 160}), allowing us to infer their size, luminosity, and stellar mass using stellar population synthesis models. Lens modeling is performed using a new fast and robust code, KLENS, which we test extensively on real and synthetic non-lensed galaxies, and also on simulated galaxies multiply imaged by SLACS-like galaxy-scale lenses. Our tests show that our measurements of galaxy size, flux, and Sersic index are robust and accurate, even for objects intrinsically smaller than the HST point-spread function. The median magnification is 8.8, with a long tail that extends to magnifications above 40. Modeling the SLACS sources reveals a population of galaxies with colors and Sersic indices (median n {approx} 1) consistent with the galaxies detected with HST in the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs (GEMS) and Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) surveys, but that are (typically) {approx}2 mag fainter and {approx}5 times smaller in apparent size than GEMS and {approx}4 mag brighter than but similar in size to HUDF. The size-stellar-mass and size-luminosity relations for the SLACS sources are offset to smaller sizes with respect to both comparison samples. The closest analog are ultracompact ELGs identified by HST grism surveys. The lowest mass galaxies in our sample are comparable to the brightest Milky Way satellites in stellar mass (10{sup 7} M{sub sun}) and have well-determined half-light radii of 0.''05 ({approx}0.3 kpc).

  12. Luminosity enhancements at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Several ideas are discussed that have been proposed to improve the luminosity at the SPEAR and PEP electron-positron storage rings and to insure good luminosity at the SLAC Linear Collider. There have been two proposals studied recently for SPEAR: a Microbeta insertion using Samarium Cobalt permanent magnets, and a Minibeta insertion using conventional quadrupole magnets. The notations Microbeta and minibeta used here are somewhat arbitrary since the front faces of the first quadrupole magnets for both insertions are at nearly the same distance from the interaction point.

  13. The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. VII. Relative Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín-Franch, Antonio; Aparicio, Antonio; Piotto, Giampaolo; Rosenberg, Alfred; Chaboyer, Brian; Sarajedini, Ata; Siegel, Michael; Anderson, Jay; Bedin, Luigi R.; Dotter, Aaron; Hempel, Maren; King, Ivan; Majewski, Steven; Milone, Antonino P.; Paust, Nathaniel; Reid, I. Neill

    2009-04-01

    The ACS Survey of Galactic globular clusters is a Hubble Space Telescope Treasury program designed to provide a new large, deep, and homogeneous photometric database. Based on observations from this program, we have measured precise relative ages for a sample of 64 Galactic globular clusters by comparing the relative position of the clusters' main-sequence (MS) turnoffs, using MS fitting to cross-compare clusters within the sample. This method provides relative ages to a formal precision of 2%-7%. We demonstrate that the calculated relative ages are independent of the choice of theoretical model. We find that the Galactic globular cluster sample can be divided into two groups—a population of old clusters with an age dispersion of ~5% and no age-metallicity relation, and a group of younger clusters with an age-metallicity relation similar to that of the globular clusters associated with the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. These results are consistent with the Milky Way halo having formed in two phases or processes. The first one would be compatible with a rapid (<0.8 Gyr) assembling process of the halo, in which the clusters in the old group were formed. Also these clusters could have been formed before re-ionization in dwarf galaxies that would later merge to build the Milky Way halo as predicted by ΛCDM cosmology. However, the galactocentric metallicity gradient shown by these clusters seems difficult to reconcile with the latter. As for the younger clusters, it is very tempting to argue that their origin is related to their formation within Milky Way satellite galaxies that were later accreted, but the origin of the age-metallicity relation remains unclear. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, under program GO-10775 (PI: A. Sarajedini).

  14. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2013-03-01

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  15. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2016-07-12

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  16. Trends in the Chemical Industry. 1987 Survey of ACS Corporation Associates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1987

    In July, 1986, the American Chemical Society (ACS) initiated a study which was intended to address future trends in the chemical industry. A survey was developed by and distributed to the member companies of Corporation Associates, which is the formal link between ACS and the chemical industry. The Executive Summary of the report, which makes up…

  17. Pure Parallel Near-UV Observations with WFPC2 within High-Latitude ACS Survey Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jonathan

    2002-07-01

    In anticipation of the allocation of ACS high-latitude imaging survey{s}, we request a modification of the default pure parallel program for those WFPC2 parallels that fall within the ACS survey field. Rather than duplicate the red bands which will be done much better with ACS, we propose to observe in the near-ultraviolet F300W filter. These data will enable study of the rest-frame ultraviolet morphology of galaxies at 0ACS.

  18. SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    2010-02-15

    SLAC does not have a test beam for the HEP detector development at present. We have therefore created a cosmic ray telescope (CRT) facility, which is presently being used to test the FDIRC prototype. We have used it in the past to debug this prototype with the original SLAC electronics before going to the ESA test beam. Presently, it is used to test a new waveform digitizing electronics developed by the University of Hawaii, and we are also planning to incorporate the new Orsay TDC/ADC electronics. As a next step, we plan to put in a full size DIRC bar box with a new focusing optics, and test it together with a final SuberB electronics. The CRT is located in building 121 at SLAC. We anticipate more users to join in the future. This purpose of this note is to provide an introductory manual for newcomers.

  19. ACS after SM4: On-orbit Verification of the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golimowski, David A.; Cheng, E. S.; Loose, M.; Sirianni, M.; Lupie, O. L.; Smith, L. J.; Arslanian, S.; Boyce, K. R.; Chapman, G.; Chiaberge, M.; Desjardins, T.; Dye, D.; Ellis, T.; Grogin, N. A.; Lim, P.; Lucas, R. A.; Maybhate, A.; Mil, K. J.; Mutchler, M.; Ricardo, R.; Scott, B.; Serrano, B.; Suchkov, A.; Waczynski, A.; Welty, A. D.; Wheeler, T.; Wilson, E.

    2010-01-01

    The newly replaced CCD electronics box (CEB-R) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) features a programmable SIDECAR ASIC manufactured by Teledyne. The CEB-R not only restores the functionality of the ACS Wide Field Camera (WFC), but it allows optimization of the WFC's imaging performance via on-orbit adjustment of CCD bias and clock voltages and serial-data transmission timing. We describe the strategy, preparation, execution, and results of the ACS Optimization Campaign, an unprecedented on-orbit extension of ground-based integration and testing that was conducted during the HST Servicing Mission Observatory Verification period.

  20. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e[plus]e[minus] collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point.

  1. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e{plus}e{minus} collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point.

  2. SLAC Linac Preparations for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Bentson, L.; Kharakh, D.; Owens, A.; Schuh, P.; Seeman, J.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stanek, M.; Wittmer, W.; Yocky, G.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been cut at the two-thirds point to provide beams to two independent programs. The last third provides the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), leaving the first two-thirds available for FACET, the new experimental facility for accelerator science and test beams. In this paper, we describe this separation and projects to prepare the linac for the FACET experimental program.

  3. GLAST beam test at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Engovatov, D.; Anthony, P.; Atwood, W.

    1996-10-01

    In May and June, a beam test for GLAST calorimeter technologies was conducted. A parasitic low intensity electron/tagged photon beam line into the End Station A at SLAC was commissioned and used. The preliminary stage of the test was devoted to measuring the performance of the parasitic beam. In the main test we studied the response of GLAST prototype CsI and scintillating fiber calorimeters to the electrons and photons. Results of this work are discussed.

  4. Field of Bachelor's Degree in the United States: 2009. American Community Survey Reports. ACS-18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebens, Julie; Ryan, Camille L.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information on fields of bachelor's degrees in the United States using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). It includes estimates of fields of bachelor's degree by demographic characteristics including age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, nativity, and educational attainment. This report also looks at geographic and…

  5. Final Report for the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) from Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volmer, Paul; Sullivan, Pam (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys ACS was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia just before dawn on March 1, 2002. After successfully docking with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), several components were replaced. One of the components was the Advanced Camera for Surveys built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (BATC) in Boulder, Colorado. Over the life of the HST contract at BATC hundreds of employees had the pleasure of working on the concept, design, fabrication, assembly and test of ACS. Those employees thank NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center and the science team at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) for the opportunity to participate in building a great science instrument for HST. After installation in HST a mini-functional test was performed and later a complete functional test. ACS performed well and has continued performing well since then. One of the greatest rewards for the BATC employees is a satisfied science team. Following is an excerpt from the JHU final report, "The foremost promise of ACS was to increase Hubble's capability for surveys in the near infrared by a factor of 10. That promise was kept. "

  6. Review of trigger and on-line processors at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, A.J.

    1984-07-01

    The role of trigger and on-line processors in reducing data rates to manageable proportions in e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics experiments is defined not by high physics or background rates, but by the large event sizes of the general-purpose detectors employed. The rate of e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation is low, and backgrounds are not high; yet the number of physics processes which can be studied is vast and varied. This paper begins by briefly describing the role of trigger processors in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ context. The usual flow of the trigger decision process is illustrated with selected examples of SLAC trigger processing. The features are mentioned of triggering at the SLC and the trigger processing plans of the two SLC detectors: The Mark II and the SLD. The most common on-line processors at SLAC, the BADC, the SLAC Scanner Processor, the SLAC FASTBUS Controller, and the VAX CAMAC Channel, are discussed. Uses of the 168/E, 3081/E, and FASTBUS VAX processors are mentioned. The manner in which these processors are interfaced and the function they serve on line is described. Finally, the accelerator control system for the SLC is outlined. This paper is a survey in nature, and hence, relies heavily upon references to previous publications for detailed description of work mentioned here. 27 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  7. The SLAC polarized electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.; Frisch, J.

    1995-06-01

    The SLAC polarized electron source employs a photocathode DC high voltage gun with a loadlock and a YAG pumped Ti:sapphire laser system for colliding beam experiments or a flash lamp pumped Ti:sapphire laser for fixed target experiments. It uses a thin, strained GaAs(100) photocathode, and is capable of producing a pulsed beam with a polarization of {ge}80% and a peak current exceeding 10 A. Its operating efficiency has reached 99%. The physics and technology of producing high polarization electron beams from a GaAs photocathode will be reviewed. The prospects of realizing a polarized electron source for future linear colliders will also be discussed.

  8. Recent Upgrade of the Klystron Modulator at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Burkhart, C.P.; Lam, B.K.; Morris, B.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory employs 244 klystron modulators on its two-mile-long linear accelerator that has been operational since the early days of the SLAC establishment in the sixties. Each of these original modulators was designed to provide 250 kV, 262 A and 3.5 {mu}S at up to 360 pps using an inductance-capacitance resonant charging system, a modified type-E pulse-forming network (PFN), and a pulse transformer. The modulator internal control comprised of large step-start resistor-contactors, vacuum-tube amplifiers, and 120 Vac relays for logical signals. A major, power-component-only upgrade, which began in 1983 to accommodate the required beam energy of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project, raised the modulator peak output capacity to 360 kV, 420 A and 5.0 {mu}S at a reduced pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. In an effort to improve safety, performance, reliability and maintainability of the modulator, this recent upgrade focuses on the remaining three-phase AC power input and modulator controls. The upgrade includes the utilization of primary SCR phase control rectifiers, integrated fault protection and voltage regulation circuitries, and programmable logic controllers (PLC) -- with an emphasis on component physical layouts for safety and maintainability concerns. In this paper, we will describe the design and implementation of each upgraded component in the modulator control system. We will also report the testing and present status of the modified modulators.

  9. The SLAC P2 Marx

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Mark; Benwell, Andrew; Burkhart, Craig; MacNair, David; Nguyen1, Minh; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    A proposed high energy physics accelerator, the International Linear Collider, will require greater than five hundred rf stations. Each station is composed of a klystron driven by a modulator. Recently, the SLAC P2 Marx was designated the baseline modulator for the ILC. This paper describes some key features of this modulator and presents recent experimental results. The P2 Marx is presently being transported to another facility for lifetime testing. Here, we will gain understanding of how the Marx performs into a klystron load and gain experience operating the Marx for longer periods. Long term plans include the possibility of using this rf station for L-band technology demonstration at SLAC. While the Marx was designed with the ILC in mind, the topology can be readily applied to several different applications. We are currently evaluating the use of the topology for ESS, CLIC, and upgrades for systems at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Because of the modular nature of the cell and the robustness of the control system, many different combinations of series and parallel operation are possible along with different load currents and pulse shapes.

  10. Wakefields in SLAC linac collimators

    DOE PAGES

    Novokhatski, A.; Decker, F. -J.; Smith, H.; ...

    2014-12-02

    When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible formore » the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. We also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.« less

  11. SLAC Linear Collider waveguide valve

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, N.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoyt, M.W.; Schwarz, H.D.; Tillmann, E.F.

    1987-03-01

    A waveguide valve with a peak rf power handling capability of 70 MW and a reliable vacuum seal was needed for changing the new SLC klystrons. The original SLAC indium seal valve experienced rf breakdown above 35 MW and did not make a reliable vacuum seal. A new design was developed which incorporates the old valve housing but employs a new concept. The indium-knife edge seal has been replaced by an O-ring seal mechanism, which is transported to an rf-free environment during high power operation. The O-ring ''garage door'' seal rf currents are reduced to a manageable level through the use of an rf choke plunger which has a rejection capability in excess of 20 dB. The isolation between the high power rf and the O-ring chamber exceeds 100 dB.

  12. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. III. CEPHEIDS IN THE OUTER DISK OF M81

    SciTech Connect

    McCommas, Les P.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Davis, Matthew R.; Yoachim, Peter; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu E-mail: mrdavis@astro.washington.edu E-mail: adolphin@ratheon.com

    2009-06-15

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) has acquired deep ACS imaging of a field in the outer disk of the large spiral galaxy M81. These data were obtained over a total of 20 Hubble Space Telescope orbits, providing a baseline long enough to reliably identify Cepheid variable stars in the field. Fundamental mode and first overtone types have been distinguished through comparative fits with corresponding Cepheid light curve templates derived from principal component analysis of confirmed Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud, and Milky Way. A distance modulus of 27.78 {+-} 0.05 {sub r} {+-} 0.14 {sub s} with a corresponding distance of 3.60 {+-} 0.23 Mpc has been calculated from a sample of 11 fundamental mode and two first overtone Cepheids (assuming an LMC distance modulus of {mu}{sub LMC} = 18.41 {+-} 0.10 {sub r} {+-} 0.13 {sub s})

  13. SLAC All Access: Vacuum Microwave Device Department

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Andy

    2012-10-09

    The Vacuum Microwave Device Department (VMDD) builds the devices that make SLAC's particle accelerators go. These devices, called klystrons, generate intense waves of microwave energy that rocket subatomic particles up to nearly the speed of light.

  14. SLAC All Access: Vacuum Microwave Device Department

    ScienceCinema

    Haase, Andy

    2016-07-12

    The Vacuum Microwave Device Department (VMDD) builds the devices that make SLAC's particle accelerators go. These devices, called klystrons, generate intense waves of microwave energy that rocket subatomic particles up to nearly the speed of light.

  15. New generation control system at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.

    1981-03-01

    The proposed SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project will require an Instrumentation and Control system that provides integrated automatic monitoring and control functions. The present SLAC LINAC Instrumentation and Control system will be totally revamped and it will be expanded to include the support of all of the additional accelerator components that will be required for the whole SLC project. This paper describes the functional operation of the new system.

  16. SLC Energy Upgrade Program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, G.A.; Allen, M.A.; Cassel, R.L.; Dean, N.R.; Konrad, G.T.; Koontz, R.F.; Lebacqz, J.V.

    1985-03-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) must reach a nominal center-of-mass energy of 100 GeV to fulfill its high energy physics goals. This paper describes the energy upgrade program that is being implemented on the SLAC linear accelerator to meet these goals. It includes a discussion of the design requirements and available technical options, the rationale for the adopted solution, and the technical problems involved in the engineering and production of klystrons and modulators.

  17. Recent progress in electron scattering at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, R.G.

    1984-09-01

    A new experiment on ep elastic scattering at large momentum transfer, Experiment E136, has recently completed data taking. A new measurement of deep inelastic electron scattering from nuclear targets, Experiment E139, has been completed and preliminary results are available. A new program of experiments has begun, called Nuclear Physics at SLAC (NPAS), that will use a new injector on the SLAC linac to provide high intensity beams in the energy range from 0.5 to 6 GeV.

  18. X-BAND KLYSTRON DEVELOPMENT AT SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold E.; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    The development of X-band klystrons at SLAC originated with the idea of building an X-band Linear Collider in the late 1980's. Since then much effort has been expended in developing a reliable X-band Power source capable of delivering >50 MW RF power in pulse widths >1.5 {micro}s. I will report on some of the technical issues and design strategies which have led to the current SLAC klystron designs.

  19. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. II. DATA DESCRIPTION AND SOURCE CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, Derek; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Hoyos, Carlos; Balcells, Marc; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Jogee, Shardha; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.

    2010-11-15

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers {approx}50% of the core high-density region in Coma. Observations were performed for 25 fields that extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii ({approx}1.75 Mpc or 1{sup 0}) with a total coverage area of 274 arcmin{sup 2}. The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the southwest region of the cluster. In this paper, we present reprocessed images and SEXTRACTOR source catalogs for our survey fields, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for {approx}73,000 unique objects; approximately one-half of our detections are brighter than the 10{sigma} point-source detection limit at F814W = 25.8 mag (AB). The slight majority of objects (60%) are unresolved or only marginally resolved by ACS. We estimate that Coma members are 5%-10% of all source detections, which consist of a large population of unresolved compact sources (primarily globular clusters but also ultra-compact dwarf galaxies) and a wide variety of extended galaxies from a cD galaxy to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The red sequence of Coma member galaxies has a color-magnitude relation with a constant slope and dispersion over 9 mag (-21 < M {sub F814W} < -13). The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in 2008

  20. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Derek; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzmán, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Chiboucas, Kristin; Davies, Jonathan I.; del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jenkins, Leigh; Karick, Arna; Khosroshahi, Habib; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Marzke, Ronald O.; Marinova, Irina; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Percival, Sue; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Price, James; Sharples, Ray M.; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin

    2010-11-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ~50% of the core high-density region in Coma. Observations were performed for 25 fields that extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (~1.75 Mpc or 1°) with a total coverage area of 274 arcmin2. The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the southwest region of the cluster. In this paper, we present reprocessed images and SEXTRACTOR source catalogs for our survey fields, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for ~73,000 unique objects; approximately one-half of our detections are brighter than the 10σ point-source detection limit at F814W = 25.8 mag (AB). The slight majority of objects (60%) are unresolved or only marginally resolved by ACS. We estimate that Coma members are 5%-10% of all source detections, which consist of a large population of unresolved compact sources (primarily globular clusters but also ultra-compact dwarf galaxies) and a wide variety of extended galaxies from a cD galaxy to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The red sequence of Coma member galaxies has a color-magnitude relation with a constant slope and dispersion over 9 mag (-21 < M F814W < -13). The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in 2008 August. The images and catalogs described in

  1. The ACS Fornax Cluster Survey. XII. Diffuse Star Clusters in Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiqing; Peng, Eric W.; Lim, Sungsoon; Jordán, Andrés; Blakeslee, John; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara

    2016-10-01

    Diffuse star clusters (DSCs) are old and dynamically hot stellar systems that have lower surface brightness and more extended morphology than globular clusters (GCs). Using the images from Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/ACS Fornax Cluster Survey, we find that 12 out of 43 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the Fornax Cluster host significant numbers of DSCs. Together with literature data from the HST/ACS Virgo Cluster Survey, where 18 out of 100 ETGs were found to host DSCs, we systematically study the relationship of DSCs with GCs and their host galaxy environment. Two DSC hosts are post-merger galaxies, with most of the other hosts either having low mass or showing clear disk components. We find that while the number ratio of DSCs to GCs is nearly constant in massive galaxies, the DSC-to-GC ratio becomes systematically higher in lower-mass hosts. This suggests that DSCs may be more efficient at forming (or surviving) in low-density environments. DSC hosts are not special either in their position in the cluster or in the galactic color-magnitude diagram. Why some disk and low-mass galaxies host DSCs while others do not is still a puzzle, however. The mean ages of DSC hosts and nonhosts are similar at similar masses, implying that formation efficiency rather than survival is the reason behind different DSC number fractions in ETGs.

  2. S-Band Loads for SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, A.; Decker, F.-J.; LeClair, R.; /INTA Technologies, Santa Clara

    2012-08-28

    The S-Band loads on the current SLAC linac RF system were designed, in some cases, 40+ years ago to terminate 2-3 MW peak power into a thin layer of coated Kanthal material as the high power absorber [1]. The technology of the load design was based on a flame-sprayed Kanthal wire method onto a base material. During SLAC linac upgrades, the 24 MW peak klystrons were replaced by 5045 klystrons with 65+ MW peak output power. Additionally, SLED cavities were introduced and as a result, the peak power in the current RF setup has increased up to 240 MW peak. The problem of reliable RF peak power termination and RF load lifetime required a careful study and adequate solution. Results of our studies and three designs of S-Band RF load for the present SLAC RF linac system is discussed. These designs are based on the use of low conductivity materials.

  3. Investigating the Cores of Early-Type Galaxies Using the ACS Virgo and Fornax Cluster Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Lisa; Ferrarese, L.; Côté, P.; Jordán, A.; Peng, E.; Blakeslee, J.; Chen, C.; Infante, L.; Mei, S.; Tonry, J.; West, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the processes that shape and influence the centers of galaxies is crucial to understanding galaxies as a whole. In particular, data suggests nuclear star clusters are three times more common than previously thought and there is evidence to suggest that they may be the low-mass analogues to the supermassive black holes found in more luminous galaxies. My research focuses on the cores of early-type galaxies and how they relate, influence, and respond to processes occurring in the rest of the galaxy. I will present new results from the ACS Virgo and Fornax Cluster Surveys that shed light on these questions. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from NSERC though the Discovery and Postgraduate Scholarship programs, as well as from the University of Victoria through their fellowship program.

  4. THE ACS SURVEY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. XIII. PHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION IN COMPARISON WITH STETSON STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hempel, Maren; Sarajedini, Ata; Anderson, Jay; Reid, I. Neill E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu E-mail: inr@stsci.edu; and others

    2014-03-01

    In this study we compare the photometric data of 34 Milky Way globular clusters, observed within the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Treasury Program (PI: A. Sarajedini) with the corresponding ground-based data, provided by the Photometric Standard Field Catalogs of Stetson. We focus on the transformation between the Hubble Space Telescope/ACS F606W to V-band and F814W to I-band only. The goal is to assess the validity of the filter transformation equations by Sirianni et al. with respect to their dependence on metallicity, horizontal branch morphology, mass, and integrated (V – I) color of the various globular clusters. The transformation equations as recommended by Sirianni et al. are based on synthetic photometry, were mostly tested on NGC 2419, and may introduce additional uncertainties when applied to different stellar populations. Such a dependence is expected due to the fact that the transformation equations are based on the observations of only one globular cluster, i.e., NGC 2419. Surprisingly, the correlation between offset and metallicity is found to be weak, with a low level significance. The correlation between offset and horizontal branch structure, as well as total cluster mass is still weaker. Based on the available data we do not find the photometric offset to be linked to multiple stellar populations, e.g., as found in NGC 0288, NGC 1851, and NGC 5139. The results of this study show that there are small systematic offsets between the transformed ACS- and observed ground-based photometry, and that these are only weakly correlated, if at all, with various cluster parameters and their underlying stellar populations. As a result, investigators wishing to transform globular cluster photometry from the Sirianni et al. ground-based V, I system onto the Stetson system simply need to add –0.040 (±0.012) to the V magnitudes and –0.047 (±0.011) to the I magnitudes. This in turn means that the transformed ACS V – I colors match the ground

  5. ACS Grism Parallel Survey of Emission- line Galaxies at Redshift z Apl 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin

    2002-07-01

    We propose an ACS grism parallel survey to search for emission-line galaxies toward 50 random lines of sight over the redshift interval 0 < z Apl 7. We request ACS parallel observations of duration more than one orbit at high galactic latitude to identify 300 HAlpha emission-line galaxies at 0.2 Apl z Apl 0.5, 720 O IILambda3727 emission-line galaxies at 0.3 Apl z Apl 1.68, and Apg 1000 Ly-alpha emission-line galaxies at 3 Apl z Apl 7 with total emission line flux f Apg 2* 10^-17 ergs s^-1 cm^-2 over 578 arcmin^2. We will obtain direct images with the F814W and F606W filters and dispersed images with the WFC/G800L grism at each position. The direct images will serve to provide a zeroth order model both for wavelength calibration of the extracted 1D spectra and for determining extraction apertures of the corresponding dispersed images. The primary scientific objectives are as follows: {1} We will establish a uniform sample of HAlpha and O II emission-line galaxies at z<1.7 in order to obtain accurate measurements of co-moving star formation rate density versus redshift over this redshift range. {2} We will study the spatial and statistical distribution of star formation rate intensity in individual galaxies using the spatially resolved emission-line morphology in the grism images. And {3} we will study high-redshift universe using Ly-alpha emitting galaxies identified at z Apl 7 in the survey. The data will be available to the community immediately as they are obtained.

  6. Computer control of rf at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, H.D.

    1985-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator is presently upgraded for the SLAC Linear Collider project. The energy is to be increased from approximately 31 GeV to 50 GeV. Two electron beams and one positron beam are to be accelerated with high demands on the quality of the beams. The beam specifications are shown. To meet these specifications, all parameters influencing the beams have to be under tight control and continuous surveillance. This task is accomplished by a new computer system implemented at SLAC which has, among many other functions, control over rf accelerating fields. 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; Den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Davies, Jonathan I.; Del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of a HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially-completed survey still covers approximately 50% of the core high density region in Coma. Observations were performed for twenty-five fields with a total coverage area of 274 aremin(sup 2), and extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (approximately 1.75 Mpe or 1 deg). The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the south-west region of the cluster. In this paper we present SEXTRACTOR source catalogs generated from the processed images, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for 76,000 objects that consist of roughly equal numbers of extended galaxies and unresolved objects. Approximately two-thirds of all detections are brighter than F814W=26.5 mag (AB), which corresponds to the 10sigma, point-source detection limit. We estimate that Coma members are 5-10% of the source detections, including a large population of compact objects (primarily GCs, but also cEs and UCDs), and a wide variety of extended galaxies from cD galaxies to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in August 2008. The images and catalogs described in this study relate to our second data release.

  8. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2012-08-14

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  9. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    ScienceCinema

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2016-07-12

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  10. Recent Ground Motion Studies at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei

    2000-06-28

    Studies of slow ground motion have recently been performed at SLAC using the linac laser alignment system over a period of one month. Two significant effects responsible for the observed motion have been identified, namely tidal forces and variation of external atmospheric pressure. The latter is of particular interest as it may result in misalignments with rather short wavelength.

  11. Future Proof for Physics: Preserving the Record of SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Deken, Jean M

    2003-05-14

    Paper provides a brief introduction to SLAC, discusses the origins of the SLAC Archives and History Office, its present-day operations, and the present and future challenges it faces in attempting to preserve an accurate historical record of SLAC's activities.

  12. The sluggs survey: HST/ACS mosaic imaging of the NGC 3115 globular cluster system

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Strader, Jay; Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Wong, Ka-Wah; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2014-08-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) g and z photometry and half-light radii R {sub h} measurements of 360 globular cluster (GC) candidates around the nearby S0 galaxy NGC 3115. We also include Subaru/Suprime-Cam g, r, and i photometry of 421 additional candidates. The well-established color bimodality of the GC system is obvious in the HST/ACS photometry. We find evidence for a 'blue tilt' in the blue GC subpopulation, wherein the GCs in the blue subpopulation get redder as luminosity increases, indicative of a mass-metallicity relationship. We find a color gradient in both the red and blue subpopulations, with each group of clusters becoming bluer at larger distances from NGC 3115. The gradient is of similar strength in both subpopulations, but is monotonic and more significant for the blue clusters. On average, the blue clusters have ∼10% larger R {sub h} than the red clusters. This average difference is less than is typically observed for early-type galaxies but does match that measured in the literature for the Sombrero Galaxy (M104), suggesting that morphology and inclination may affect the measured size difference between the red and blue clusters. However, the scatter on the R {sub h} measurements is large. We also identify 31 clusters more extended than typical GCs, which we term ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) candidates. Many of these objects are actually considerably fainter than typical UCDs. While it is likely that a significant number will be background contaminants, six of these UCD candidates are spectroscopically confirmed as NGC 3115 members. To explore the prevalence of low-mass X-ray binaries in the GC system, we match our ACS and Suprime-Cam detections to corresponding Chandra X-ray sources. We identify 45 X-ray-GC matches: 16 among the blue subpopulation and 29 among the red subpopulation. These X-ray/GC coincidence fractions are larger than is typical for most GC systems, probably due to the increased depth of

  13. Design and Specification of Optical Bandpass Filters for Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Tsevetanov, Zlatan; Woodruff, Bob; Mooney, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced optical bandpass filters for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) have been developed on a filter-by-filter basis through detailed studies which take into account the instrument's science goals, available optical filter fabrication technology, and developments in ACS's charge-coupled-device (CCD) detector technology. These filters include a subset of filters for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are optimized for astronomical photometry using today's charge-coupled-devices (CCD's). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements for these filters include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, a high degree of parfocality, and immunity to environmental degradation. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The highly successful paradigm in which final specifications for flight filters were derived through interaction amongst the ACS Science Team, the instrument designer, the lead optical engineer, and the filter designer and vendor is described. Examples of iterative design trade studies carried out in the context of science needs and budgetary and schedule constraints are presented. An overview of the final design specifications for the ACS bandpass and ramp filters is also presented.

  14. Design and Specification of Optical Bandpass Filters for Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Tsevetanov, Zlatan; Woodruff, Bob; Mooney, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced optical bandpass filters for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) have been developed on a filter-by-filter basis through detailed studies which take into account the instrument's science goals, available optical filter fabrication technology, and developments in ACS's charge-coupled-device (CCD) detector technology. These filters include a subset of filters for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which are optimized for astronomical photometry using today's charge-coupled-devices (CCD's). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements for these filters include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, a high degree of parfocality, and immunity to environmental degradation. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The highly successful paradigm in which final specifications for flight filters were derived through interaction amongst the ACS Science Team, the instrument designer, the lead optical engineer, and the filter designer and vendor is described. Examples of iterative design trade studies carried out in the context of science needs and budgetary and schedule constraints are presented. An overview of the final design specifications for the ACS bandpass and ramp filters is also presented.

  15. An overview of the SLAC results

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1996-03-01

    The history of nucleon spin-structure measurements goes back to the early days of inelastic electron scattering at SLAC, when Vernon Hughes came with a proposal to accelerate polarized electrons to high energy and to study inelastic scattering from a polarized proton target. The quark model of the proton was new at the time, and the spin-dependent structure functions were an excellent testing ground for that model. The proposal developed into an experiment which became SLAC experiment E80. Subsequent experiments followed those early studies, leading to E130 at SLAC, then EMC at CERN, and a host of later experiments. In 1988 the EMC Collaboration published the first data to reach low x. The asymmetries EMC observed fell below quark model expectations, and the experimentally measured proton sum rule indicated that the spin of the quarks contributed little to the proton spin. The subject of nucleon spin-dependent structure functions was stimulated by this surprising result from EMC. The continuation of the spin-structure studies at SLAC, which have been very active in recent years, was stimulated by the successful development of high-intensity beams of polarized electrons. Table 1 lists the past, present, and planned programs and experiments that grew out of the early work. The rest of the report is divided into the following topics: polarized electrons; polarimetry; the SLAC spectrometers; radiative corrections; the proton measurements; neutron targets; the deuterium and {sup 3}He data; the g{sub 2} structure function; and the 50 GeV upgrade of the SLC.

  16. Slac2-c (synaptotagmin-like protein homologue lacking C2 domains-c), a novel linker protein that interacts with Rab27, myosin Va/VIIa, and actin.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Mitsunori; Kuroda, Taruho S

    2002-11-08

    Slac2-a (synaptotagmin-like protein (Slp) homologue lacking C2 domains-a)/melanophilin is a melanosome-associated protein that links Rab27A on melanosomes with myosin Va, an actin-based motor protein, and formation of the tripartite protein complex (Rab27A.Slac2-a.myosin Va) has been suggested to regulate melanosome transport (Fukuda, M., Kuroda, T. S., and Mikoshiba, K. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 12432-12436). Here we report the structure of a novel form of Slac2, named Slac2-c, that is homologous to Slac2-a. Slac2-a and Slac2-c exhibit the same overall structure, consisting of a highly conserved N-terminal Slp homology domain (about 50% identity) and a less conserved C-terminal myosin Va-binding domain (about 20% identity). As with other Slac2 members and the Slp family, the Slp homology domain of Slac2-c was found to interact specifically with the GTP-bound form of Rab27A/B both in vitro and in intact cells, and the C-terminal domain of Slac2-c interacted with myosin Va and myosin VIIa. In addition, we discovered that the most C-terminal conserved region of Slac2-a (amino acids 400-590) and Slac2-c (amino acids 670-856), which is not essential for myosin Va binding, directly binds actin and that expression of these regions in PC12 cells and melanoma cells colocalized with actin filaments at the cell periphery, suggesting a novel role of Slac2-a/c in capture of Rab27-containing organelles in the actin-enriched cell periphery.

  17. Technical Aspects of the Advanced Camera For Surveys Repair (ACS-R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen; Cheng, Edward S.; Sirianni, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The ACS Repair (ACS-R) team includes contributors from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Ball Aerospace, and Teledyne Imaging Sensors; It determined that all of the capabilities of the ACS could be restored and created a concept for the ACS-R component of SN4. ACSR will restore the WFC of ACS by replacing the existing CCD Electronics Box (CEB) with the CEB-Replacement (CEB-R) and providing power from a new Low Voltage Power Supply Replacement (LVPS-8). The new LVPS-R will also attempt to restore the HRC function by providing power through the original power bus. In this presentation, we faeus on the concept and technical aspects of the ACS-R.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis and survey of Apis cerana strain of sacbrood virus (AcSBV) in Taiwan suggests a recent introduction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Fone; Mehmood, Shahid; Huang, Shaokang; Chen, Yue-Wen; Ko, Chong-Yu; Su, Songkun

    2017-04-05

    The Sacbrood virus (SBV) is widely distributed in European honey bees, Apis mellifera. AcSBV, a distinct SBV strain in Asian honey bees (A. cerana) causes larva death before pupation and often depopulates colonies, leading to collapse. It is the most severe disease in A. cerana beekeeping. AcSBV infects A. cerana in most natural habitats, yet occurrences were not reported in Taiwan before 2015 and were not a concern for local beekeepers. However, in 2016, A. cerana beekeepers in central Taiwan reported SBV-like symptoms. We screened samples of larvae using RT-PCR and surveyed asymptomatic apiaries in north Taiwan. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that AcSBV isolates from central Taiwan were introduced; all isolates had high similarity in sequences to AcSBV genomes identified in mainland China, Vietnam, and Korea and distinct differences to SBV sequence identified in Taiwan. The overall prevalence in symptomatic colonies was low. No latent infections were detected in asymptomatic colonies. The AcSBV epizootic may not yet have reached its highest potential.

  19. Channeling and radiation experiments at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienands, U.; Gessner, S.; Hogan, M. J.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Smith, T.; Sheppard, J.; Uggerhøj, U. I.; Hansen, J. L.; Wistisen, T. N.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Mazzolari, A.; Guidi, V.; Sytov, A.; Holtzapple, R. L.; McArdle, K.; Tucker, S.; Benson, B.

    2017-07-01

    Over the last years, a SLAC-Aarhus-Ferrara-CalPoly collaboration (augmented by members of ANL and MIT) has performed channeling experiments using bent silicon crystals at the SLAC End Station A Test Beam as well as the FACET accelerator test facility. These experiments have revealed a remarkable channeling efficiency of about 24% under our conditions, as well as shown the dechanneling rate to be independent of the beam energy; an unexpected result. Volume reflection appears to be even more efficient with almost the whole beam taking part in the reflection process. In our most recent experiment we have attempted to measure the spectrum of channeling and volume-reflection gamma radiation. The goal of this series of experiments is to develop a crystalline undulator capable of producing narrow-band gamma rays with electron beams. Such a device could have applications in gamma-ray radiography as well as spectroscopic applications.

  20. A New Control Room for SLAC Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Roger; Guerra, E.; Stanek, M.; Hoover, Z.Van; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-04

    We are planning to construct a new control room at SLAC to unify and improve the operation of the LCLS, SPEAR3, and FACET accelerator facilities, and to provide the space and flexibility needed to support the LCLS-II and proposed new test beam facilities. The existing control rooms for the linac and SPEAR3 have been upgraded in various ways over the last decade, but their basic features have remained unchanged. We propose to build a larger modern Accelerator Control Room (ACR) in the new Research Support Building (RSB) which is currently under construction at SLAC. Shifting the center of control for the accelerator facilities entails both technical and administrative challenges. In this paper, we describe the history, concept, and status of this project.

  1. LLRF System Upgrade for the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Bo; Akre, Ron; Pacak, Vojtech; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is in full user operation and has met the stability goals for stable lasing. The 250pC bunch can be compressed to below 100fS before passing through an undulator. In a new mode of operation a 20pC bunch is compressed to about 10fS. Experimenters are regularly using this shorter X-ray pulse and getting pristine data. The 10fS bunch has timing jitter on the order of 100fS. Physicists are requesting that the RF system achieve better stability to reduce timing jitter. Drifts in the RF system require longitudinal feedbacks to work over large ranges and errors result in reduced performance of the LCLS. A new RF system is being designed to help diagnose and reduce jitter and drift in the SLAC linac.

  2. THE ACS SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. IX. HORIZONTAL BRANCH MORPHOLOGY AND THE SECOND PARAMETER PHENOMENON

    SciTech Connect

    Dotter, Aaron; Sarajedini, Ata; Anderson, Jay; Bedin, Luigi R.; Paust, Nathaniel; Reid, I. Neill; Aparicio, Antonio; MarIn-Franch, A.; Rosenberg, Alfred; Majewski, Steven; Milone, Antonino; Piotto, Giampaolo; Siegel, Michael E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.ed

    2010-01-01

    The horizontal branch (HB) morphology of globular clusters (GCs) is most strongly influenced by metallicity. The second parameter phenomenon, first described in the 1960s, acknowledges that metallicity alone is not enough to describe the HB morphology of all GCs. In particular, astronomers noticed that the outer Galactic halo contains GCs with redder HBs at a given metallicity than are found inside the solar circle. Thus, at least a second parameter was required to characterize HB morphology. While the term 'second parameter' has since come to be used in a broader context, its identity with respect to the original problem has not been conclusively determined. Here we analyze the median color difference between the HB and the red giant branch, hereafter denoted as DELTA(V - I), measured from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) photometry of 60 GCs within approx20 kpc of the Galactic center. Analysis of this homogeneous data set reveals that, after the influence of metallicity has been removed from the data, the correlation between DELTA(V - I) and age is stronger than that of any other parameter considered. Expanding the sample to include HST ACS and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 photometry of the six most distant Galactic GCs lends additional support to the correlation between DELTA(V - I) and age. This result is robust with respect to the adopted metallicity scale and the method of age determination, but must bear the caveat that high-quality, detailed abundance information is not available for a significant fraction of the sample. Furthermore, when a subset of GCs with similar metallicities and ages is considered, a correlation between DELTA(V - I) and central luminosity density is exposed. With respect to the existence of GCs with anomalously red HBs at a given metallicity, we conclude that age is the second parameter and central density is most likely the third. Important problems related to HB morphology in GCs, notably multi

  3. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. X. Stellar, Dynamical, and Total Mass Correlations of Massive Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M. W.; Treu, T.; Bolton, A. S.; Gavazzi, R.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Marshall, P. J.; Moustakas, L. A.; Burles, S.

    2010-11-01

    We use stellar masses, surface photometry, strong-lensing masses, and stellar velocity dispersions (σ e/2) to investigate empirical correlations for the definitive sample of 73 early-type galaxies (ETGs) that are strong gravitational lenses from the SLACS survey. The traditional correlations (fundamental plane (FP) and its projections) are consistent with those found for non-lens galaxies, supporting the thesis that SLACS lens galaxies are representative of massive ETGs (dimensional mass M dim = 1011-1012 M sun). The addition of high-precision strong-lensing estimates of the total mass allows us to gain further insights into their internal structure: (1) the average slope of the total mass-density profile ( ρ_tot∝ r^{-γ'}) is langγ'rang = 2.078 ± 0.027 with an intrinsic scatter of 0.16 ± 0.02; (2) γ' correlates with effective radius (re ) and central mass density, in the sense that denser galaxies have steeper profiles; (3) the dark matter (DM) fraction within re /2 is a monotonically increasing function of galaxy mass and size (due to a mass-dependent central cold DM distribution or due to baryonic DM—stellar remnants or low-mass stars—if the initial mass function is non-universal and its normalization increases with mass); (4) the dimensional mass M dim ≡ 5re σ2 e/2/G is proportional to the total (lensing) mass M _{r_{e}/2}, and both increase more rapidly than stellar mass M * (M _* ∝ {M}_{r_{e}/2}^{0.8}); (5) the mass plane (MP), obtained by replacing surface brightness with surface mass density in the FP, is found to be tighter and closer to the virial relation than the FP and the M*P, indicating that the scatter of those relations is dominated by stellar population effects; (6) we construct the fundamental hyper-plane by adding stellar masses to the MP and find the M * coefficient to be consistent with zero and no residual intrinsic scatter. Our results demonstrate that the dynamical structure of ETGs is not scale invariant and that it is

  4. A Look Inside SLAC's Battery Lab

    ScienceCinema

    Wei Seh, Zhi

    2016-07-12

    In this video, Stanford materials science and engineering graduate student Zhi Wei Seh shows how he prepares battery materials in SLAC's energy storage laboratory, assembles dime-sized prototype "coin cells" and then tests them to see how many charge-discharge cycles they can endure without losing their ability to hold a charge. Results to date have already set records: After 1,000 cycles, they retain 70 percent of their original charge.

  5. Progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, J.

    1986-06-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider project (SLC) is reported as being near completion. The performance specifications are tabulated both for the initial form and for eventual goals. Various parts of the SLC are described and the status of their construction is reported, including the front end electron gun and booster, the linac, damping ring, positron source, SLC arcs, and conventional facilities. 5 refs., 12 figs. (LEW)

  6. A Look Inside SLAC's Battery Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Seh, Zhi

    2014-07-17

    In this video, Stanford materials science and engineering graduate student Zhi Wei Seh shows how he prepares battery materials in SLAC's energy storage laboratory, assembles dime-sized prototype "coin cells" and then tests them to see how many charge-discharge cycles they can endure without losing their ability to hold a charge. Results to date have already set records: After 1,000 cycles, they retain 70 percent of their original charge.

  7. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury. I. The Star Formation History of the M81 Outer Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Seth, Anil C.; Weisz, Daniel; Dolphin, Andrew; Skillman, Evan; Harris, Jason; Holtzman, Jon; Girardi, Léo; de Jong, Roelof S.; Olsen, Knut; Cole, Andrew; Gallart, Carme; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Mateo, Mario; Rosema, Keith; Stetson, Peter B.; Quinn, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury is a large Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/ACS treasury program to obtain resolved stellar photometry for a volume-limited sample of galaxies out to 4 Mpc. As part of this program, we have obtained deep ACS imaging of a field in the outer disk of the large spiral galaxy M81. The field contains the outskirts of a spiral arm as well as an area containing no current star formation. Our imaging results in a color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaching to m F814W = 28.8 and m F606W = 29.5, one magnitude fainter than the red clump. Through detailed modeling of the full CMD, we quantify the age and metallicity distribution of the stellar populations contained in the field. The mean metallicity in the field is -1 < [M/H] < 0 and only a small fraction of stars have ages lsim 1 Gyr. The results show that most of the stars in this outer disk field were formed by z ~ 1 and that the arm structure at this radius has a lifetime of gsim 100 Myr. We discuss the measured evolution of the M81 disk in the context of surveys of high redshift disk galaxies and deep stellar photometry of other nearby galaxies. All of these indicate that massive spiral disks are mostly formed by z ~ 1 and that they have experienced rapid metal enrichment.

  8. Optical Metrology for the Filter Set for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Content, David A.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Krebs, Carolyn A.; Miner, Linda A.; Norton, Todd A.; Mehalick, Kimberly; Petrone, Peter; Bush, Frank D.; Puc, Bernard; Standley, Clive; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; Kral, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) will employ a wide variety of spectral filtration components including narrow band, medium band, wide band, and far ultraviolet (FUV) long pass filters, spatially- variable filters (ramp filters), VIS/IR polarizers, NUV polarizers, FUV prisms, and a grism. These components are spread across ACS's Wide Field, High Resolution, and Solar Blind channels which provide diffraction-limited imaging of astronomical targets using aberration-correcting optics which remove most aberrations from HST's Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements which these filters must meet include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, and a high degree of parfocality. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The development of optical metrology stations used to demonstrate that each ACS filter will meet its design specifications is discussed. Of particular note are specially-designed spectral transmissometers and interferometers.

  9. Optical Metrology for the Filter Set for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Content, David A.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Krebs, Carolyn A.; Miner, Linda A.; Norton, Todd A.; Mehalick, Kimberly; Petrone, Peter; Bush, Frank D.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) will employ a wide variety of spectral filtration components including narrow band, medium band, wide band, and far ultraviolet (FUV) long pass filters, spatially- variable filters (ramp filters), VIS/IR polarizers, NUV polarizers, FUV prisms, and a grism. These components are spread across ACS's Wide Field, High Resolution, and Solar Blind channels which provide diffraction-limited imaging of astronomical targets using aberration-correcting optics which remove most aberrations from HST's Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA). In order for ACS to be truly advanced, these filters must push the state-of-the-art in performance in a number of key areas at the same time. Important requirements which these filters must meet include outstanding transmitted wavefront, high transmittance, uniform transmittance across each filter, spectrally structure-free bandpasses, exceptionally high out of band rejection, and a high degree of parfocality. These constitute a very stringent set of requirements indeed, especially for filters which are up to 90 mm in diameter. The development of optical metrology stations used to demonstrate that each ACS filter will meet its design specifications is discussed. Of particular note are specially-designed spectral transmissometers and interferometers.

  10. The SLAC Comparator for the Calibration of Digital Leveling Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, G.L.; Ruland, R.E.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07

    At SLAC digital levels are used for precise leveling, both for setting out and monitoring. A very high precision of 30 {micro}m is required, which can only be achieved by regularly calibrating the leveling equipment. The calibration facility is also used for detailed investigations to refine the SLAC leveling procedure. In this paper the setup of the SLAC vertical comparator is described. In order to also perform traditional staff calibration a CCD camera was integrated into the SLAC comparator. Finally an overview of further investigations of our leveling equipment is presented.

  11. SLAC-Linac-Collider (SLC) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-02-01

    The proposed SLAC Linear Collider Project (SLC) and its features are described in this paper. In times of ever increasing costs for energy the electron storage ring principle is about to reach its practical limit. A new class of colliding beam beam facilities, the Linear Colliders, are getting more and more attractive and affordable at very high center-of-mass energies. The SLC is designed to be a poineer of this new class of colliding beam facilities and at the same time will serve as a valuable tool to explore the high energy physics at the level of 100 GeV in the center-of-mass system.

  12. SLAC RF Source Research at X Band

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, Daryl W

    2003-09-04

    X-band klystrons capable of 75 MW and utilizing either solenoidal or Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing are undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The klystron development is part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). SLAC has developed a solenoidal-focused X-band klystron which is currently the workhorse of high power component testing for the NLC. A state-of-the-art modulator will drive eight of these tubes which, in turn, will power an rf distribution system referred to as the ''8-pack'' in order to test these modulators and waveguide components. Eventually, in an interest to save millions of dollars per year in the operational cost of the NLC, these tubes will be replaced by PPM klystrons. The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan), and industry. These tubes follow from the successful 50 MW PPM design of 1996. Recent testing of this particular tube at wider pulsewidths has reached 50 MW at 55% efficiency, 2.4 {micro}s and 60 Hz. Two 50 MW PPM klystrons produced by industry have been delivered to SLAC. One of these devices arrived with a vacuum suitable for test. Testing during 2001 revealed a serious, but curious, vacuum response which limited the operation to an rf output of {approx}40 MW. A 75 MW PPM klystron prototype was first constructed in 1997 and later modified in 1999 to eliminate oscillations. This tube has reached the NLC design target of 75 MW at 1.5 {micro}s though at a significantly reduced rep rate. Two new 75 MW PPM klystrons were constructed and tested in 2002 after a diode was successfully tested in 2001. The new design was aimed at reducing the cost and increasing the reliability of such high-energy devices. The rf circuit and beam focusing for one of these devices was built by industry and incorporated into one

  13. Mo/ller polarimetry at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Band, H.R.

    1995-09-01

    Four Mo/ller polarimeters have been constructed and run at SLAC in the past three years and a fifth is planned for operation in 1995. Typical parameters and operational details are discussed. The analyzing power for all the polarimeters have been modeled, including effects due to the atomic motion of the target electrons. These corrections are sensitive to the geometry of the polarimeter design and vary in magnitude from {le}1{percent} for the E-143 double arm detector to {approx_equal}15{percent} for the Linac polarimeter. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Møller polarimetry at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, H. R.

    1995-09-01

    Four Mo/ller polarimeters have been constructed and run at SLAC in the past three years and a fifth is planned for operation in 1995. Typical parameters and operational details are discussed. The analyzing power for all the polarimeters have been modeled, including effects due to the atomic motion of the target electrons. These corrections are sensitive to the geometry of the polarimeter design and vary in magnitude from ≤1% for the E-143 double arm detector to ≊15% for the Linac polarimeter.

  15. X-ray Astronomy at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P

    2005-04-06

    The USA (Unconventional Stellar Aspect) experiment was launched in February of 1999 and operated for approximately 18 months. Group K at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) participated in this experiment along with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The author discusses the USA experiment and the data accumulated, along with some of the results obtained from the observations of such objects as the extragalactic BL Lac object 1ES1959+65, the Black Hole Candidate (BHC) XTE J1118+480, and the eccentric X-ray binary system Circinus X-1.

  16. Network resource and applications management at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Logg, C.A.; Cottrell, R.L.A.

    1996-02-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has a heterogeneous networked computing environment with a variety of transmission media, protocols, equipment from multiple vendors, Local Areas Network (LAN) and Wide Area Network (WAN) connections, workstations, servers, legacy mainframes, operating systems, network services and applications, and users of various skill levels. New technologies are continually being deployed as they become available. All of these components work together (most of the time) but result in a complex distributed computing environment (henceforth referred to as the system) which requires automated monitoring and management for the maintenance of high quality performance with limited personnel and budgets. There is no Network Management Station (NMS) product which comes close to doing the job of monitoring and managing the LAN and WAN for SLAC. However, by making use of Ping, Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) and its Management Information Bases (MIBs), as well as network applications (trace-route, File Transfer Protocol (FTP), Remote Procedure Calls (RPCs), Remote Shell (rsh), et.al.), an NMS (Netview for AIX), and the accounting and monitoring facilities provided by the server operating systems, the challenge is surmountable.

  17. Wake fields in SLAC Linac Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; Decker, F. -J.; Smith, H.; Sullivan, M.

    2014-12-02

    When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. In addition, we also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  18. THE ACS FORNAX CLUSTER SURVEY. VI. THE NUCLEI OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES IN THE FORNAX CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Monica L.; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Blakeslee, John P.; Jordan, Andres; Mei, Simona; Peng, Eric W.; West, Michael J.

    2012-11-15

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Fornax Cluster Survey is a Hubble Space Telescope program to image 43 early-type galaxies in the Fornax cluster, using the F475W and F850LP bandpasses of the ACS. We employ both one-dimensional and two-dimensional techniques to characterize the properties of the stellar nuclei in these galaxies, defined as the central 'luminosity excesses', relative to a Sersic model fitted to the underlying host. We find 72% {+-} 13% of our sample (31 galaxies) to be nucleated, with only three of the nuclei offset by more than 0.''5 from their galaxy photocenter, and with the majority of nuclei having colors bluer than their hosts. The nuclei are observed to be larger, and brighter, than typical Fornax globular clusters and to follow different structural scaling relations. A comparison of our results to those from the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey reveals striking similarities in the properties of the nuclei belonging to these different environments. We briefly review a variety of proposed formation models and conclude that, for the low-mass galaxies in our sample, the most important mechanism for nucleus growth is probably infall of star clusters through dynamical friction, while for higher mass galaxies, gas accretion triggered by mergers, accretions, and tidal torques is likely to dominate, with the relative importance of these two processes varying smoothly as a function of galaxy mass. Some intermediate-mass galaxies in our sample show a complexity in their inner structure that may be the signature of the 'hybrid nuclei' that arose through parallel formation channels.

  19. R&D of Accelerator Structures at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; /SLAC

    2007-01-17

    The research activities for accelerator structures at SLAC are reviewed including the achievement via the main linac design for the Next Linear Collider (NLC), the program adjustment after the decision of the International Linear Collider (ILC) to be based on superconducting technology, and the work progress for the ILC, photon science at SLAC and basic accelerator structure studies.

  20. Pulse modulator developments in support of klystron testing at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.; Cassel, R.; de Lamare, J.; Ficklin, D.; Gold, S.; Harris, K.

    1993-04-01

    Several families of high power klystrons in S- and X-Band are being developed in the Klystron Laboratory at SLAC. To support these developments, a number of new pulse modulators are being designed from scratch, or upgraded from existing laboratory test modulators. This paper outlines the modulator parameters available in the SLAC Klystron Laboratory, and discusses two new modulators that are under construction.

  1. SLAC workshop on high energy electroproduction and spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    These Proceedings contain copies of the transparencies presented at the Workshop on High Energy Electroproduction and Spin Physics held at SLAC on February 5--8, 1992. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring people together to discuss the possibilities for new experiments using the SLAC high intensity electron and photon beams and the facilities of End Station A.

  2. SLAC workshop on high energy electroproduction and spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    These Proceedings contain copies of the transparencies presented at the Workshop on High Energy Electroproduction and Spin Physics held at SLAC on February 5--8, 1992. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring people together to discuss the possibilities for new experiments using the SLAC high intensity electron and photon beams and the facilities of End Station A.

  3. THE SLOAN LENS ACS SURVEY. X. STELLAR, DYNAMICAL, AND TOTAL MASS CORRELATIONS OF MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M. W.; Treu, T.; Marshall, P. J.; Bolton, A. S.; Gavazzi, R.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Moustakas, L. A.

    2010-11-20

    We use stellar masses, surface photometry, strong-lensing masses, and stellar velocity dispersions ({sigma}{sub e/2}) to investigate empirical correlations for the definitive sample of 73 early-type galaxies (ETGs) that are strong gravitational lenses from the SLACS survey. The traditional correlations (fundamental plane (FP) and its projections) are consistent with those found for non-lens galaxies, supporting the thesis that SLACS lens galaxies are representative of massive ETGs (dimensional mass M{sub dim} = 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} M{sub sun}). The addition of high-precision strong-lensing estimates of the total mass allows us to gain further insights into their internal structure: (1) the average slope of the total mass-density profile ({rho}{sub tot}{proportional_to}r{sup -}{gamma}') is ({gamma}') = 2.078 {+-} 0.027 with an intrinsic scatter of 0.16 {+-} 0.02; (2) {gamma}' correlates with effective radius (r{sub e}) and central mass density, in the sense that denser galaxies have steeper profiles; (3) the dark matter (DM) fraction within r{sub e} /2 is a monotonically increasing function of galaxy mass and size (due to a mass-dependent central cold DM distribution or due to baryonic DM-stellar remnants or low-mass stars-if the initial mass function is non-universal and its normalization increases with mass); (4) the dimensional mass M{sub dim} {identical_to} 5r{sub e} {sigma}{sup 2}{sub e/2}/G is proportional to the total (lensing) mass M{sub r{sub e/2}}, and both increase more rapidly than stellar mass M{sub *} (M{sub *{proportional_to}}M{sub r{sub e/2}{sup 0.8}); (5) the mass plane (MP), obtained by replacing surface brightness with surface mass density in the FP, is found to be tighter and closer to the virial relation than the FP and the M{sub *}P, indicating that the scatter of those relations is dominated by stellar population effects; (6) we construct the fundamental hyper-plane by adding stellar masses to the MP and find the M{sub *} coefficient to be

  4. Commissioning of SLAC SLD 45-Degree Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Eschenburg, Vance O.

    2002-07-19

    The SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center had a significant gap in its muon tracking coverage, provided by the Warm Iron Calorimeter. Supplemental planes of limited streamer tube chambers were added to improve the coverage in the vicinity of the gap at 0.65 < |cos{theta}| < 0.85. A software effort to upgrade the tracking software for this system is detailed. The commissioning of the forty-five degree chamber region of the SLAC SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter is presented. This task involved the completion of the forty-five degree chamber region geometry for the Warm Iron Calorimeter's fitter and swimmer and the changing of the way multiple scattering effects are treated in the fitter algorithm.

  5. Lattice Design for ERL Options at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri; Cai, Yunhai; Huang, Xiaobiao; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    SLAC is investigating long-range options for building a high performance light source machine while reusing the existing linac and PEP-II tunnels. One previously studied option is the PEP-X low emittance storage ring. The alternative option is based on a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and the PEP-X design. The ERL advantages are the low beam emittance, short bunch length and small energy spread leading to better qualities of the X-ray beams. Two ERL configurations differed by the location of the linac have been studied. Details of the lattice design and the results of beam transport simulations with the coherent synchrotron radiation effects are presented.

  6. Microprocessors in physics experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rochester, L.S.

    1981-04-01

    The increasing size and complexity of high energy physics experiments is changing the way data are collected. To implement a trigger or event filter requires complex logic which may have to be modified as the experiment proceeds. Simply to monitor a detector, large amounts of data must be processed on line. The use of microprocessors or other programmable devices can help to achieve these ends flexibly and economically. At SLAC, a number of microprocessor-based systems have been built and are in use in experimental setups, and others are now being developed. This talk is a review of existing systems and their use in experiments, and of developments in progress and future plans.

  7. Accelerator Structure Bead Pull Measurement at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, J.R.; Bowden, G.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, J.W.; /SLAC

    2005-05-13

    Microwave measurement and tuning of accelerator structures are important issues for the current and next generation of high energy physics machines. Application of these measurements both before and after high power processing can reveal information about the structure but may be misinterpreted if measurement conditions are not carefully controlled. For this reason extensive studies to characterize the microwave measurements have been made at SLAC. For the bead pull a reproducible measurement of less than 1 degree of phase accuracy in total phase drift is needed in order to resolve issues such as phase changes due to structure damage during high power testing. Factors contributing to measurement errors include temperature drift, mechanical vibration, and limitations of measurement equipment such as the network analyzer. Results of this continuing effort will be presented.

  8. Performance of the SLAC Linear Collider klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Fowkes, W.R.; Koontz, R.F.; Schwarz, H.D.; Seeman, J.T.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    There are now 200 new, high power 5045 klystrons installed on the two-mile Stanford Linear Accelerator. Peak power per klystron averages over 63 MW. Average energy contribution is above 240 MeV per station. Electron beam energy has been measured as high as 53 GeV. Energy instability due to klystron malfunction is less than 0.2%. The installed klystrons have logged over one million operating hours with close to 20,000 klystron hours cumulative operating time between failures. Data are being accumulated on klystron operation and failure modes with failure signatures starting to become apparent. To date, no wholesale failure modes have surfaced that would impair the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) program.

  9. Network management and performance monitoring at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Logg, C.A.; Cottrell, R.L.A.

    1995-08-01

    The physical network plant and everything attached to it, including the software running on ``computers`` and other peripheral devices is the {bold system}. Subjectively, the ultimate measurers of {bold system} performance are the users and their perceptions of the performance of their networked applications. The performance of a {bold system} is affected by the physical network plant (routers, bridges, hubs, etc.) as well as by every ``computer`` and peripheral device that is attached to it, and the software running on the computers and devices. Performance monitoring of a network must therefore include computer systems and services monitoring as well as monitoring of the physical network plant. This paper will describe how this challenge has been tackled at SLAC, and how, via the World Wide Web, this information is made available for quick perusal by concerned personnel and users.

  10. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM/sub 010/ caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 ..mu..s) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible.

  11. ILC Linac R&D at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; /SLAC

    2006-08-09

    Since the ITRP recommendation in August 2004 to use superconducting rf technology for a next generation linear collider, the former NLC Group at SLAC has been actively pursuing a broad range of R&D for this collider (the ILC). In this paper, the programs concerning linac technology are reviewed. Current activities include the development of a Marx-style modulator and a 10 MW sheet-beam klystron, operation of an L-band (1.3 GHz) rf source using an SNS HVCM modulator and commercial klystrons, design of a more efficient and less costly rf distribution system, construction of a coupler component test stand, fabrication of a prototype positron capture cavity, beam tests of prototype S-band linac beam position monitors and preparations for magnetic center stability measurements of a prototype SC linac quad.

  12. Resonant Kicker System Development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Beukers, Tony; Krzaszczak, John; Larrus, Marc; Lira, Antonio de; /SLAC

    2009-04-27

    The design and installation of the Linear Coherent Light Source [1] at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has included the development of a kicker system for selective beam bunch dumping. The kicker is based on an LC resonant topology formed by the 50 uF energy storage capacitor and the 64 uH air core magnet load which has a sinusoidal pulse period of 400us. The maximum magnet current is 500 A. The circuit is weakly damped, allowing most of the magnet energy to be recovered in the energy storage capacitor. The kicker runs at a repetition rate of 120Hz. A PLC-based control system provides remote control and monitoring of the kicker via EPICS protocol. Fast timing and interlock signals are converted by discrete peak-detect and sample-hold circuits into DC signals that can be processed by the PLC. The design and experimental characterization of the system are presented.

  13. FACET: The New User Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.J.; Erikson, R.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Li, S.Z.; Nosochkov, Y.; Phinney, N.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; Seryi, A.; Wittmer, W.; /Michigan State U.

    2011-12-13

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Its high power electron and positron beams make it a unique facility, ideal for beam-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration studies. The first 2 km of the SLAC linac produce 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron and positron beams with short bunch lengths of 20 {mu}m. A final focusing system can produce beam spots 10 {mu}m wide. User-aided Commissioning took place in summer 2011 and FACET will formally come online in early 2012. We present the User Facility, the current features, planned upgrades and the opportunities for further experiments. Accelerators are our primary tool for discovering the fundamental laws to the universe. Each new frontier we probe requires a new, more powerful method. Accelerators are therefore increasing in size and cost. The future of this field requires new accelerating techniques that can reach the high energies required over shorter distances. New concepts for high gradient acceleration include utilizing the wakes in plasma and dielectric and metallic structures. FACET was built to provide a test bed for novel accelerating concepts with its high charge and highly compressed beams. As a test facility unlike any other, it has also attracted groups interested in beam diagnostic techniques and terahertz studies. The first phase of the construction was completed in May 2011. Beam commissioning began in June and was interleaved with the installation of five experiments. Users were invited to aid with the commissioning for the month of August during which time experimental hardware and software were checked out and some first measurements were taken. FACET is currently in the process of becoming a Department of Energy User Facility for High Energy Physics.

  14. SLAC pulsed x-ray facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ipe, N.E.; McCall, R.C.; Baker, E.D.

    1986-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) operates a high energy (up to 33 GeV) linear accelerator delivering pulses up to a few microseconds wide. The pulsed nature of the electron beam creates problems in the detection and measurement of radiation both from the accelerator beam and the klystrons that provide the rf power for the accelerator. Hence, a pulsed x-ray facility has been built at SLAC mainly for the purpose of testing the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed radiation fields. The x-ray tube consists of an electron gun with a control grid. This provides a stream of pulsed electrons that can be accelerated towards a confined target-window. The window is made up of aluminium 0.051 cm (20 mils) thick, plated on the vacuum side with a layer of gold 0.0006 cm (1/4 mil) thick. The frequency of electron pulses can be varied by an internal pulser from 60 to 360 pulses per second with pulse widths of 360 ns to 5 ..mu..s. The pulse amplitude can be varied over a wide range of currents. An external pulser can be used to obtain other frequencies or special pulse shapes. The voltage across the gun can be varied from 0 to 100 kV. The major part of the x-ray tube is enclosed in a large walk-in-cabinet made of 1.9 cm (3/4 in) plywood and lined with 0.32 cm (1/8 in) lead to make a very versatile facility. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  15. The ACS survey of Galactic globular clusters - XIV. Bayesian single-population analysis of 69 globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Kaiser, R.; Sarajedini, A.; von Hippel, T.; Stenning, D. C.; van Dyk, D. A.; Jeffery, E.; Robinson, E.; Stein, N.; Anderson, J.; Jefferys, W. H.

    2017-06-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging from the ACS Treasury Survey to determine fits for single population isochrones of 69 Galactic globular clusters. Using robust Bayesian analysis techniques, we simultaneously determine ages, distances, absorptions and helium values for each cluster under the scenario of a 'single' stellar population on model grids with solar ratio heavy element abundances. The set of cluster parameters is determined in a consistent and reproducible manner for all clusters using the Bayesian analysis suite BASE-9. Our results are used to re-visit the age-metallicity relation. We find correlations with helium and several other parameters such as metallicity, binary fraction and proxies for cluster mass. The helium abundances of the clusters are also considered in the context of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances and the multiple population scenario.

  16. Frequentist Analysis of SLAC Rosenbluth Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higinbotham, Douglas; McClellan, Evan; Shamaiengar, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of the SLAC NE-11 elastic electron-proton scattering data typically assumes that the 1.6 GeV spectrometer has a systematic normalization offset as compared to the well-known 8 GeV spectrometer, yet such an offset should have been observed globally. A review of doctoral theses from the period finds that analysis with high statistics, inelastic data saw no significant normalization difference. Moreover, the unique kinematics utilized to match the two spectrometers for normalization required the 8 GeV to be rotated beyond it's well-understood angular range. We try to quantify the confidence level of rejecting the null hypothesis, i.e. that the 1.6 GeV spectrometer normalization is correct, and will show the result of simply analyzing the cross section data as obtained. This is a critical study, as the 1.6 GeV spectrometer data drives the epsilon lever arm in Rosenbluth extractions, and therefore can have a significant impact on form factor extractions at high momentum transfer.

  17. The Search for Millicharged Particles at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Prinz, Alyssa A

    2002-04-01

    Quantization of electric charge has been probed to a high degree of precision using a variety of experimental techniques. However, the theoretical underpinning of charge quantization has yet to be determined, leaving open the possibility that quantization is not a fundamental law of nature, and that free particles with fractional electric charge may one day be encountered. This dissertation describes a search for particles with very small (10{sup -3}e or below) electric charge, carried out at an electron accelerator (SLAC). The particles sought were assumed to be long lived or stable and to participate primarily in electromagnetic interactions. The search relied upon a large (1.3-meter) scintillation counter to detect low levels of ionization generated by relativistic fractionally charged particles produced in the collision of a 29.5-GeV electron beam with a six radiation length tungsten target. The data reveal no evidence of fractional charge, and allow for the exclusion of a portion of charge-mass parameter space spanning roughly 10{sup -7} to 10{sup 2} MeV/c{sup 2} and 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -5} e.

  18. Separators for SLAC B-Factory

    SciTech Connect

    MacNair, Dave

    2002-08-21

    In order to separate the beams during injection, a closed vertical bump will be introduced in the B-Factory High Energy Ring (HER) using four dedicated, pulsed magnets. The design field in the magnets is B{sub 0} = 660 G; the field integrals of the magnets are nominally: {integral} Hdl = 0.0450 T{center_dot}m; {integral} Hdl = 0.0420 T{center_dot}m; {integral} Hdl = 0.0756 T{center_dot}m; {integral} Hdl = 0.0832 T{center_dot}m. The magnet apertures are 15 cm horizontal along the field direction and 10 cm in the vertical direction. The beams will be separated with a rise time of about 200 ms at the end of a coast and brought back into collision within about 1 ms. A good-field-region of {+-} 4.1 cm in the horizontal and {+-} 2.1 cm in the vertical direction with field non-uniformity less than 0.2% is aimed for, and fast magnetic field switch-off even through the present steel vacuum pipe of about 4 mm thickness. A 15% variation in each magnet current is done with variable shunts to allow tuning of the bump for different lattice configurations. The magnets have to fit into the existing constrained space of the B-factory. The magnets have been made and tested successfully at BINP and at SLAC. The whole system including pulsed power supply and shunts were also tested successfully.

  19. COSMIC - The SLAC Control System Migration Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, Ronald R.

    2002-01-18

    The current SLC control system was designed and constructed over 20 years ago. Many of the technologies on which it was based are obsolete and difficult to maintain. The VMS system that forms the core of the Control System is still robust but third party applications are almost non-existent and its long-term future is in doubt. The need for a Control System at SLAC that can support experiments for the foreseeable future is not in doubt. The present B-Factory or PEPII experiment is projected to run at least 10 years. An FEL laser of unprecedented intensity plus an ongoing series of fixed target experiments is also in our future. The Next Linear Collider or NLC may also be in our future although somewhat farther distant in time. The NLC has performance requirements an order of magnitude greater than anything we have built to date. In addition to large numbers of IOCs and process variables, Physicists would like to archive everything all the time. This makes the NLC Control System a bit like a detector system as well. The NLC Control System will also need the rich suite of accelerator applications that are available with the current SLC Control System plus many more that are now only a glimmer in the eyes of Accelerator Physicists. How can we migrate gradually away from the current SLC Control System towards a design that will scale to the NLC while keeping everything operating smoothly for the ongoing experiments?

  20. Search milli-charged particles at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, W.G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

  1. RF Gun Photocathode Research at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Jongewaard, E.; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Corbett, J.; Gilevich, S.; Grouev, K.; Hering, P.; P.Krejcik,; Lewandowski, J.; Loos, H.; Montagne, T.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stefan, P.; Vlieks, A.; Weathersby, S.; Zhou, F.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    LCLS is presently operating with a third copper photocathode in the original rf gun, with a quantum efficiency (QE) of {approx}1 x 10{sup -4} and projected emittance {gamma}{var_epsilon}{sub x,y} = 0.45 {micro}m at 250 pC bunch charge. The spare LCLS gun is installed in the SLAC Accelerator Structure Test Area (ASTA), fully processed to high rf power. As part of a wider photocathode R and D program, a UV laser system and additional gun diagnostics are being installed at ASTA to measure QE, QE lifetime, and electron beam emittance under a variety of operating conditions. The near-term goals are to test and verify the spare photocathode production/installation sequence, including transfer from the final holding chamber to the rf gun. Mid- and longer-term goals include development of a rigorous understanding of plasma and laser-assisted surface conditioning and investigation of new, high-QE photocathode materials. In parallel, an x-ray photoemission spectroscopy station is nearing completion, to analyze Cu photocathode surface chemistry. In this paper we review the status and anticipated operating parameters of ASTA and the spectroscopy test chamber.

  2. Wide-band cable systems at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Struven, W.

    1983-01-01

    SLAC's first cable TV system was installed in 1979 to remotely monitor a narrow pulse which was generated in the west end of the klystron gallery. When Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) experimental work started at the west end of the accelerator, the original 1979 cable was upgraded to a bidirectional system so that 2 MBaud point-to-point data and several video and 9600 baud channels could be transmitted. The implementation of the SLC requires a complete upgrading of the accelerator control system. The system is based on a distributed processing configuration using a PDP11/780 VAX in the Main Control Center (MCC) and Intel single-board computers in a multibus configuration along the accelerator. The high-speed data linking is supplied by a 1 MBaud Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) Network. The same cable is used to provide video, low-speed data, voice and high-speed point-to-point data services. The transmission system will utilize a wideband midsplit cable facility to collect and distribute signals to all parts of the network.

  3. Unique radiation problems associated with the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, T.M.; Nelson, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is a variation of a new class of linear colliders whereby two linear accelerators are aimed at each other to collide intense bunches of electrons and positrons together. Conventional storage rings are becoming ever more costly as the energy of the stored beams increases such that the cost of two linear colliders per GeV is less than that of electron-positron storage rings at cm energies above about 100 GeV. The SLC being built at SLAC is designed to achieve a center-of-mass energy of 100 GeV by accelerating intense bunches of particles, both electrons and positrons, in the SLAC linac and transporting them along two different arcs to a point where they are focused to a small radius and made to collide head on. The SLC has two main goals. The first is to develop the physics and technology of linear colliders. The other is to achieve center-of-mass energies above 90 GeV in order to investigate the unification of the weak and electromagnetic interactions in the energy range above 90 GeV; (i.e., Z/sup 0/, etc.). This note discusses a few of the special problems that were encountered by the Radiation Physics group at SLAC during the design and construction of the SLAC Linear Collider. The nature of these problems is discussed along with the methods employed to solve them.

  4. The HST/ACS+WFC3 Survey for Lyman Limit Systems. II. Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gabor; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Madau, Piero

    2013-03-01

    We present the first science results from our Hubble Space Telescope survey for Lyman limit absorption systems (LLS) using the low dispersion spectroscopic modes of the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3. Through an analysis of 71 quasars, we determine the incidence frequency of LLS per unit redshift and per unit path length, l(z) and l(X), respectively, over the redshift range 1 < z < 2.6, and find a weighted mean of l(X) =0.29 ± 0.05 for 2.0 < z < 2.5 through a joint analysis of our sample and that of Ribaudo et al. Through stacked spectrum analysis, we determine a median (mean) value of the mean free path to ionizing radiation at z = 2.4 of λ912 mfp = 243(252) h -1 72 Mpc, with an error on the mean value of ±43 h -1 72 Mpc. We also re-evaluate the estimates of λ912 mfp from Prochaska et al. and place constraints on the evolution of λ912 mfp with redshift, including an estimate of the "breakthrough" redshift of z = 1.6. Consistent with results at higher z, we find that a significant fraction of the opacity for absorption of ionizing photons comes from systems with N H I <=1017.5 cm-2 with a value for the total Lyman opacity of τLyman eff = 0.40 ± 0.15. Finally, we determine that at minimum, a 5-parameter (4 power law) model is needed to describe the column density distribution function f(N H I , X) at z ~ 2.4, find that f(N H I , X) undergoes no significant change in shape between z ~ 2.4 and z ~ 3.7, and provide our best fit model for f(N H I , X).

  5. THE HST/ACS+WFC3 SURVEY FOR LYMAN LIMIT SYSTEMS. II. SCIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Meara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gabor; Madau, Piero

    2013-03-10

    We present the first science results from our Hubble Space Telescope survey for Lyman limit absorption systems (LLS) using the low dispersion spectroscopic modes of the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3. Through an analysis of 71 quasars, we determine the incidence frequency of LLS per unit redshift and per unit path length, l(z) and l(X), respectively, over the redshift range 1 < z < 2.6, and find a weighted mean of l(X) =0.29 {+-} 0.05 for 2.0 < z < 2.5 through a joint analysis of our sample and that of Ribaudo et al. Through stacked spectrum analysis, we determine a median (mean) value of the mean free path to ionizing radiation at z = 2.4 of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} = 243(252) h {sup -1}{sub 72} Mpc, with an error on the mean value of {+-}43 h {sup -1}{sub 72} Mpc. We also re-evaluate the estimates of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} from Prochaska et al. and place constraints on the evolution of {lambda}{sup 912}{sub mfp} with redshift, including an estimate of the ''breakthrough'' redshift of z = 1.6. Consistent with results at higher z, we find that a significant fraction of the opacity for absorption of ionizing photons comes from systems with N{sub H{sub I}} {<=}10{sup 17.5} cm{sup -2} with a value for the total Lyman opacity of {tau}{sup Lyman}{sub eff} = 0.40 {+-} 0.15. Finally, we determine that at minimum, a 5-parameter (4 power law) model is needed to describe the column density distribution function f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X) at z {approx} 2.4, find that f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X) undergoes no significant change in shape between z {approx} 2.4 and z {approx} 3.7, and provide our best fit model for f(N{sub H{sub I}}, X).

  6. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. VIII. BARRED DISK GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Kleijn, Gijs V.; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Balcells, Marc; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Peng, Eric W. E-mail: sj@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-02-20

    We use high-resolution ({approx}0.''1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z {approx} 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M{sub V} {approx}< -18, M{sub *} > 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% {+-} 11%, 65% {+-} 11%, and 60% {+-} 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of {+-}11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n {approx} 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc{sup -3}) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to low

  7. The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. VIII. Effects of Environment on Globular Cluster Global Mass Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paust, Nathaniel E. Q.; Reid, I. Neill; Piotto, Giampaolo; Aparicio, Antonio; Anderson, Jay; Sarajedini, Ata; Bedin, Luigi R.; Chaboyer, Brian; Dotter, Aaron; Hempel, Maren; Majewski, Steven; Marín-Franch, A.; Milone, Antonino; Rosenberg, Alfred; Siegel, Michael

    2010-02-01

    We have used observations obtained as part of the Hubble Space Telescope/ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters to construct global present-day mass functions for 17 globular clusters utilizing multi-mass King models to extrapolate from our observations to the global cluster behavior. The global present-day mass functions for these clusters are well matched by power laws from the turnoff, ≈0.8 M sun, to 0.2-0.3 M sun on the lower main sequence. The slopes of those power-law fits, α, have been correlated with an extensive set of intrinsic and extrinsic cluster properties to investigate which parameters may influence the form of the present-day mass function. We do not confirm previous suggestions of correlations between α and either metallicity or Galactic location. However, we do find a strong statistical correlation with the related parameters central surface brightness, μ V , and inferred central density, ρ0. The correlation is such that clusters with denser cores (stronger binding energy) tend to have steeper mass functions (a higher proportion of low-mass stars), suggesting that dynamical evolution due to external interactions may have played a key role in determining α. Thus, the present-day mass function may owe more to nurture than to nature. Detailed modeling of external dynamical effects is therefore a requisite for determining the initial mass function for Galactic globular clusters.

  8. THE ACS SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. VIII. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENT ON GLOBULAR CLUSTER GLOBAL MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paust, Nathaniel E. Q.; Reid, I. Neill; Anderson, Jay E-mail: inr@stsci.edu

    2010-02-15

    We have used observations obtained as part of the Hubble Space Telescope/ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters to construct global present-day mass functions for 17 globular clusters utilizing multi-mass King models to extrapolate from our observations to the global cluster behavior. The global present-day mass functions for these clusters are well matched by power laws from the turnoff, {approx}0.8 M {sub sun}, to 0.2-0.3 M {sub sun} on the lower main sequence. The slopes of those power-law fits, {alpha}, have been correlated with an extensive set of intrinsic and extrinsic cluster properties to investigate which parameters may influence the form of the present-day mass function. We do not confirm previous suggestions of correlations between {alpha} and either metallicity or Galactic location. However, we do find a strong statistical correlation with the related parameters central surface brightness, {mu} {sub V}, and inferred central density, {rho}{sub 0}. The correlation is such that clusters with denser cores (stronger binding energy) tend to have steeper mass functions (a higher proportion of low-mass stars), suggesting that dynamical evolution due to external interactions may have played a key role in determining {alpha}. Thus, the present-day mass function may owe more to nurture than to nature. Detailed modeling of external dynamical effects is therefore a requisite for determining the initial mass function for Galactic globular clusters.

  9. THE ACS VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XVII. THE SPATIAL ALIGNMENT OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS WITH EARLY-TYPE HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiushi; Peng, Eric W.; Blakeslee, John P.; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Jordan, Andres; Mei, Simona; West, Michael J.

    2013-06-01

    We study the azimuthal distribution of globular clusters (GCs) in early-type galaxies and compare them to their host galaxies using data from the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. We find that in host galaxies with visible elongation ({epsilon} > 0.2) and intermediate to high luminosities (M{sub z} < -19), the GCs are preferentially aligned along the major axis of the stellar light. The red (metal-rich) GC subpopulations show strong alignment with the major axis of the host galaxy, which supports the notion that these GCs are associated with metal-rich field stars. The metal-rich GCs in lenticular galaxies show signs of being more strongly associated with disks rather than bulges. Surprisingly, we also find that the blue (metal-poor) GCs can also show the same correlation. If the metal-poor GCs are part of the early formation of the halo and built up through mergers, then our results support a picture where halo formation and merging occur anisotropically, and that the present-day major axis is an indicator of the preferred merging axis.

  10. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. XI. THE REMARKABLY UNDISTURBED NGC 2403 DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Stilp, Adrienne; Radburn-Smith, David; Dolphin, Andrew; Skillman, Evan D. E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu E-mail: dolphin@raytheon.com

    2013-03-10

    We present detailed analysis of color-magnitude diagrams of NGC 2403, obtained from a deep (m {approx}< 28) Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observation of the outer disk of NGC 2403, supplemented by several shallow (m {approx}< 26) HST Advanced Camera for Surveys fields. We derive the spatially resolved star formation history of NGC 2403 out to 11 disk scale lengths. In the inner portions of the galaxy, we compare the recent star formation rates (SFRs) we derive from the resolved stars with those measured using GALEX FUV + Spitzer 24{mu} fluxes, finding excellent agreement between the methods. Our measurements also show that the radial gradient in recent SFR mirrors the disk exponential profile to 11 scale lengths with no break, extending to SFR densities a factor of {approx}100 lower than those that can be measured with GALEX and Spitzer ({approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}). Furthermore, we find that the cumulative stellar mass of the disk was formed at similar times at all radii. We compare these characteristics of NGC 2403 to those of its ''morphological twins'', NGC 300 and M 33, showing that the structure and age distributions of the NGC 2403 disk are more similar to those of the relatively isolated system NGC 300 than to those of the Local Group analog M 33. We also discuss the environments and HI morphologies of these three nearby galaxies, comparing them to integrated light studies of larger samples of more distant galaxy disks. Taken together, the physical properties and evolutionary history of NGC 2403 suggest that the galaxy has had no close encounters with other M 81 group members and may be falling into the group for the first time.

  11. PEP 2: SLAC-based Asymmetric B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.

    1992-09-01

    The proposal for upgrading the existing PEP collider at SLAC to enable the copious production of boosted B mesons is the result of several years of collaborative study by groups representing LBL, LLNL and SLAC. The PEP II design has evolved in a considered fashion from its initial conceptualization to a very advanced level of understanding, well-substantiated by R&D results on the key design issues. We describe the proposed upgrade, review the early conceptual decisions, outline the significant remaining questions, and briefly describe current results from the ongoing R&D effort which have shown these questions to be tractable and the initial concepts to be sound.

  12. PEP 2: SLAC-based Asymmetric B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.

    1992-09-01

    The proposal for upgrading the existing PEP collider at SLAC to enable the copious production of boosted B mesons is the result of several years of collaborative study by groups representing LBL, LLNL and SLAC. The PEP II design has evolved in a considered fashion from its initial conceptualization to a very advanced level of understanding, well-substantiated by R D results on the key design issues. We describe the proposed upgrade, review the early conceptual decisions, outline the significant remaining questions, and briefly describe current results from the ongoing R D effort which have shown these questions to be tractable and the initial concepts to be sound.

  13. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. XIII. SBF Distance Catalog and the Three-dimensional Structure of the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Simona; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Tonry, John L.; West, Michael J.; Ferrarese, Laura; Jordán, Andrés; Peng, Eric W.; Anthony, André; Merritt, David

    2007-01-01

    The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey consists of HST ACS imaging for 100 early-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, observed in the F475W (~SDSS g) and F850LP (~SDSS z) filters. We derive distances for 84 of these galaxies using the method of surface brightness fluctuations (SBFs), present the SBF distance catalog, and use this database to examine the three-dimensional distribution of early-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. The SBF distance moduli have a mean (random) measurement error of 0.07 mag (0.5 Mpc), or roughly 3 times better than previous SBF measurements for Virgo Cluster galaxies. Five galaxies lie at a distance of d~23 Mpc and are members of the W' cloud. The remaining 79 galaxies have a narrow distribution around our adopted distance of =16.5+/-0.1 (random mean error) +/-1.1 Mpc (systematic). The rms distance scatter of this sample is σ(d)=0.6+/-0.1 Mpc, with little or no dependence on morphological type or luminosity class (i.e., 0.7+/-0.1 and 0.5+/-0.1 Mpc for the giants and dwarfs, respectively). The back-to-front depth of the cluster measured from our sample of early-type galaxies is 2.4+/-0.4 Mpc (i.e., +/-2 σ of the intrinsic distance distribution). The M87 (cluster A) and M49 (cluster B) subclusters are found to lie at distances of 16.7+/-0.2 and 16.4+/-0.2 Mpc, respectively. There may be a third subcluster associated with M86. A weak correlation between velocity and line-of-sight distance may be a faint echo of the cluster velocity distribution not having yet completely virialized. In three dimensions, Virgo's early-type galaxies appear to define a slightly triaxial distribution, with axis ratios of (1:0.7:0.5). The principal axis of the best-fit ellipsoid is inclined ~20°-40° from the line of sight, while the galaxies belonging to the W' cloud lie on an axis inclined by ~10°-15°. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the association of

  14. SLAC: A Tool for Addressing Chaos in the Ecology Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, A. J.

    2005-01-01

    Until the early 1970s, ecologists generally assumed that erratic fluctuations observed in natural populations were a product of stochastic noise. It is now known that extremely complex dynamics can arise from basic deterministic processes. This field of study is generally called chaos theory. Here, a computer program, SLAC (Stability, Limits, And…

  15. Plasma Source Design for the PWFA Experiments at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, K. A.; Muggli, P.

    2002-12-01

    We discuss the design issues associated with producing a plasma source for the plasma wake field accelerator (PWFA) experiments at SLAC. There are many possible sources, but for our purposes uv, single photon ionized, lithium vapor, in a heat pipe oven, is our best option. Optimum parameters are derived and the plasma decay rate is estimated.

  16. Where do we stand on the SLC (SLAC Linear Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozanecki, W.

    1989-02-01

    This paper reviews the current performance of the SLAC Linear Collider, as well as the issues, problems and prospects facing the project. A few of the original accelerator physics results achieved in the last year are described in detail. 36 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Development of the Virtual Visitor Center at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    McDunn, Ruth

    1999-11-17

    The Virtual Visitor Center (VVC) web site (www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc) is a ''virtual'' version of the Visitor Center, a mini science museum that opened at SLAC in 1996. The VVC was made public in December 1998. Both centers contribute to SLAC mission regarding education of the next generation and increasing scientific awareness of the public. The site is designed to mimic the real visitor center and allow a larger audience to the information. The intent was to reach the 8th-12th grade audience. Considerable effort was made to organize the content, including color-coding graphical elements for each main topic area. Tables of contents, a search tool, several photo tours, as well as graphical and non-graphical menu bars allow users many methods of navigating the site. The site was developed over almost two years using an estimated .95 FTE, split between a program manager, graphic designer, content provider (theoretical physicist), and a summer intern (high school teacher). As of November 1999, the site consists of 1,147 files, 935 images, 3,080 internal hyperlinks, and 190 external hyperlinks. The site has had over 1 million hits between January and mid-October 1999 and averages about 600 page views each day. Future plans include bringing the web site into compliance with the W3Cs Web Content Accessibility guidelines, thoroughly integrating the glossary terms, continued incorporation of current research at SLAC, and adding more interactivity.

  18. SLAC electron-positron colliders: present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1986-09-01

    Stanford University's colliding beam program is outlined, including the SPEAR and PEP colliders and the SLAC linear collider. The accelerator developments to be pursued on these facilities are discussed, as well as advanced accelerator research and development. The items covered in the advanced accelerator research include beamstrahlung, stability requirements, breakdown limits, and power sources. (LEW)

  19. SLAC Users Bulletin No. 102, November 1985-April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, L. P.; Edminster, D.

    1986-01-01

    The status experimental activities at SLAC is reported, including the long-range schedule and a list of approved high-energy experiments. Work on PEP, SPEAR, and the SLC is included, as well as computing. Such operational data as operating hours and experimental hours are given. (LEW)

  20. SLAC linear collider: the machine, the physics, and the future

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1981-11-01

    The SLAC linear collider, in which beams of electrons and positrons are accelerated simultaneously, is described. Specifications of the proposed system are given, with calculated preditions of performance. New areas of research made possible by energies in the TeV range are discussed. (GHT)

  1. Laser Safety for the Experimental Halls at SLAC_s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Michael; Anthony, Perry; Barat, Ken; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Greg; White, William E.; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    The LCLS at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be the world's first source of an intense hard x-ray laser beam, generating x-rays with wavelengths of 1nm and pulse durations less than 100fs. The ultrafast x-ray pulses will be used in pump-probe experiments to take stop-motion pictures of atoms and molecules in motion, with pulses powerful enough to take diffraction images of single molecules, enabling scientists to elucidate fundamental processes of chemistry and biology. Ultrafast conventional lasers will be used as the pump. In 2009, LCLS will deliver beam to the Atomic Molecular and Optical (AMO) Experiment, located in one of 3 x-ray Hutches in the Near Experimental Hall (NEH). The NEH includes a centralized Laser Hall, containing up to three Class 4 laser systems, three x-ray Hutches for experiments and vacuum transport tubes for delivering laser beams to the Hutches. The main components of the NEH laser systems are a Ti:sapphire oscillator, a regen amplifier, green pump lasers for the oscillator and regen, a pulse compressor and a harmonics conversion unit. Laser safety considerations and controls for the ultrafast laser beams, multiple laser controlled areas, and user facility issues are discussed.

  2. Homogeneous UGRIZ Photometry for ACS Virgo Cluster Survey Galaxies: A Non-parametric Analysis from SDSS Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chin-Wei; Côté, Patrick; West, Andrew A.; Peng, Eric W.; Ferrarese, Laura

    2010-11-01

    We present photometric and structural parameters for 100 ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) galaxies based on homogeneous, multi-wavelength (ugriz), wide-field SDSS (DR5) imaging. These early-type galaxies, which trace out the red sequence in the Virgo Cluster, span a factor of nearly ~103 in g-band luminosity. We describe an automated pipeline that generates background-subtracted mosaic images, masks field sources and measures mean shapes, total magnitudes, effective radii, and effective surface brightnesses using a model-independent approach. A parametric analysis of the surface brightness profiles is also carried out to obtain Sérsic-based structural parameters and mean galaxy colors. We compare the galaxy parameters to those in the literature, including those from the ACSVCS, finding good agreement in most cases, although the sizes of the brightest, and most extended, galaxies are found to be most uncertain and model dependent. Our photometry provides an external measurement of the random errors on total magnitudes from the widely used Virgo Cluster Catalog, which we estimate to be σ(BT )≈ 0.13 mag for the brightest galaxies, rising to ≈ 0.3 mag for galaxies at the faint end of our sample (BT ≈ 16). The distribution of axial ratios of low-mass ("dwarf") galaxies bears a strong resemblance to the one observed for the higher-mass ("giant") galaxies. The global structural parameters for the full galaxy sample—profile shape, effective radius, and mean surface brightness—are found to vary smoothly and systematically as a function of luminosity, with unmistakable evidence for changes in structural homology along the red sequence. As noted in previous studies, the ugriz galaxy colors show a nonlinear but smooth variation over a ~7 mag range in absolute magnitude, with an enhanced scatter for the faintest systems that is likely the signature of their more diverse star formation histories.

  3. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. IX. CONSTRAINING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH EVOLUTION WITH OLD METAL-POOR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Girardi, Leo; Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Rosenfield, Philip; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Marigo, Paola; Boyer, Martha L.; Dolphin, Andrew; Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan; Melbourne, Jason; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Seth, Anil C.

    2010-12-01

    In an attempt to constrain evolutionary models of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase at the limit of low masses and low metallicities, we have examined the luminosity functions and number ratios between AGB and red giant branch (RGB) stars from a sample of resolved galaxies from the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury. This database provides Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry together with maps of completeness, photometric errors, and star formation histories for dozens of galaxies within 4 Mpc. We select 12 galaxies characterized by predominantly metal-poor populations as indicated by a very steep and blue RGB, and which do not present any indication of recent star formation in their color-magnitude diagrams. Thousands of AGB stars brighter than the tip of the RGB (TRGB) are present in the sample (between 60 and 400 per galaxy), hence, the Poisson noise has little impact in our measurements of the AGB/RGB ratio. We model the photometric data with a few sets of thermally pulsing AGB (TP-AGB) evolutionary models with different prescriptions for the mass loss. This technique allows us to set stringent constraints on the TP-AGB models of low-mass, metal-poor stars (with M < 1.5 M{sub sun}, [Fe/H]{approx}< -1.0). Indeed, those which satisfactorily reproduce the observed AGB/RGB ratios have TP-AGB lifetimes between 1.2 and 1.8 Myr, and finish their nuclear burning lives with masses between 0.51 and 0.55 M{sub sun}. This is also in good agreement with recent observations of white dwarf masses in the M4 old globular cluster. These constraints can be added to those already derived from Magellanic Cloud star clusters as important mileposts in the arduous process of calibrating AGB evolutionary models.

  4. HOMOGENEOUS UGRIZ PHOTOMETRY FOR ACS VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY GALAXIES: A NON-PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS FROM SDSS IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chin-Wei; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; West, Andrew A.; Peng, Eric W.

    2010-11-15

    We present photometric and structural parameters for 100 ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) galaxies based on homogeneous, multi-wavelength (ugriz), wide-field SDSS (DR5) imaging. These early-type galaxies, which trace out the red sequence in the Virgo Cluster, span a factor of nearly {approx}10{sup 3} in g-band luminosity. We describe an automated pipeline that generates background-subtracted mosaic images, masks field sources and measures mean shapes, total magnitudes, effective radii, and effective surface brightnesses using a model-independent approach. A parametric analysis of the surface brightness profiles is also carried out to obtain Sersic-based structural parameters and mean galaxy colors. We compare the galaxy parameters to those in the literature, including those from the ACSVCS, finding good agreement in most cases, although the sizes of the brightest, and most extended, galaxies are found to be most uncertain and model dependent. Our photometry provides an external measurement of the random errors on total magnitudes from the widely used Virgo Cluster Catalog, which we estimate to be {sigma}(B{sub T}){approx} 0.13 mag for the brightest galaxies, rising to {approx} 0.3 mag for galaxies at the faint end of our sample (B{sub T} {approx} 16). The distribution of axial ratios of low-mass ('dwarf') galaxies bears a strong resemblance to the one observed for the higher-mass ('giant') galaxies. The global structural parameters for the full galaxy sample-profile shape, effective radius, and mean surface brightness-are found to vary smoothly and systematically as a function of luminosity, with unmistakable evidence for changes in structural homology along the red sequence. As noted in previous studies, the ugriz galaxy colors show a nonlinear but smooth variation over a {approx}7 mag range in absolute magnitude, with an enhanced scatter for the faintest systems that is likely the signature of their more diverse star formation histories.

  5. Mass decomposition of SLACS lens galaxies in Weyl conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexander A.; Izmailov, Ramil N.; Nandi, Kamal K.

    2016-06-01

    We study here, using the Mannheim-Kazanas solution of Weyl conformal theory, the mass decomposition in the representative subsample of 57 early-type elliptical lens galaxies of the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys (SLACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We begin by showing that the solution need not be an exclusive solution of conformal gravity but can also be viewed as a solution of a class of f (R ) gravity theories coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics thereby rendering the ensuing results more universal. Since lensing involves light bending, we shall first show that the solution adds to Schwarzschild light bending caused by the luminous mass (M*) a positive contribution +γ R contrary to the previous results in the literature, thereby resolving a long-standing problem. The cause of the error is critically examined. Next, applying the expressions for light bending together with an input equating Einstein and Weyl angles, we develop a novel algorithm for separating the luminous component from the total lens mass (luminous+dark ) within the Einstein radius. Our results indicate that the luminous mass estimates differ from the observed total lens masses by a linear proportionality factor across the subsample, which qualitatively agrees with the common conclusion from a number of different simulations in the literature. In quantitative detail, we observe that the ratios of luminous over total lens mass (f*) within the Einstein radius of individual galaxies take on values near unity, many of which remarkably fall inside or just marginally outside the specified error bars obtained from a simulation based on the Bruzual-Charlot stellar population synthesis model together with the Salpeter initial mass function favored on the ground of metallicity [Grillo et al., Astron. Astrophys. 501, 461 (2009)]. We shall also calculate the average dark matter density ⟨ρ⟩ av of individual galaxies within their respective Einstein spheres. To our knowledge, the present

  6. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2015 (ASER) for the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sabba, Dellilah

    2016-09-01

    This report, prepared by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), SLAC Site Office (SSO), provides a comprehensive summary of the environmental program activities at SLAC for calendar year 2015. Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) are prepared for all DOE sites with significant environmental activities, and distributed to relevant external regulatory agencies and other interested organizations or individuals. To the best of my knowledge, this report accurately summarizes the results of the 2015 environmental monitoring, compliance, and restoration programs at SLAC. This assurance can be made based on SSO and SLAC review of the ASER, and quality assurance protocols applied to monitoring and data analyses at SLAC.

  7. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey - III. Structural parameters of galaxies using single Sérsic fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Guzmán, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Graham, Alister W.; Hammer, Derek; Karick, Arna M.; Lucey, John R.; Matković, Ana; Merritt, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Valentijn, Edwin

    2011-03-01

    We present a catalogue of structural parameters for 8814 galaxies in the 25 fields of the Hubble Space Telescope/ACS Coma Treasury Survey. Parameters from Sérsic fits to the two-dimensional surface brightness distributions are given for all galaxies from our published Coma photometric catalogue with mean effective surface brightness brighter than 26.0 mag arcsec-2 and brighter than 24.5 mag (equivalent to absolute magnitude -10.5), as given by the fits, all in F814W(AB). The sample comprises a mixture of Coma members and background objects; 424 galaxies have redshifts and of these 163 are confirmed members. The fits were carried out using both the GIM2D and GALFIT codes. We provide the following parameters: galaxy ID, RA, Dec., the total corrected automatic magnitude from the photometric catalogue, the total magnitude of the model (F814WAB), the geometric mean effective radius Re, the mean surface brightness within the effective radius <μ>e, the Sérsic index n, the ellipticity and the source position angle. The selection limits of the catalogue and the errors listed for the Sérsic parameters come from extensive simulations of the fitting process using synthetic galaxy models. The agreement between GIM2D and GALFIT parameters is sensitive to details of the fitting procedure; for the settings employed here the agreement is excellent over the range of parameters covered in the catalogue. We define and present two goodness-of-fit indices which quantify the degree to which the image can be approximated by a Sérsic model with concentric, coaxial elliptical isophotes; such indices may be used to objectively select galaxies with more complex structures such as bulge-disc, bars or nuclear components. We make the catalogue available in electronic format at ASTRO-WISE and MAST. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in

  8. SLAC E144 Plots, Simulation Results, and Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The 1997 E144 experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) utilitized extremely high laser intensities and collided huge groups of photons together so violently that positron-electron pairs were briefly created, actual particles of matter and antimatter. Instead of matter exploding into heat and light, light actually become matter. That accomplishment opened a new path into the exploration of the interactions of electrons and photons or quantum electrodynamics (QED). The E144 information at this website includes Feynmann Diagrams, simulation results, and data files. See also aseries of frames showing the E144 laser colliding with a beam electron and producing an electron-positron pair at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e144/focpic/focpic.html and lists of collaborators' papers, theses, and a page of press articles.

  9. The Prototype Solid State Induction Modulator for SLAC NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, Richard

    2002-08-21

    The Next Linear Collider accelerator proposal at SLAC requires a high efficiency, highly reliable, and low cost pulsed power modulator to drive the X band klystrons. The present NLC envisions a solid-state induction modulator design to drive up to 8 klystrons to 500kV for 3{micro}S at 120 PPS with one modulator (>1,000 megawatt pulse, 500kW average). A prototype modulator is presently under construction, which well power 4 each 5045 SLAC klystron to greater than 380 kV for 3{micro}S (>600 megawatt pulse, >300 kW Ave.). The modulator will be capable of driving the 8 each X band klystrons when they become available. The paper covers the design, construction, fabrication and preliminary testing of the prototype modulator.

  10. Scaphoidectomy and Capsulodesis for SNAC or SLAC Stage II

    PubMed Central

    Trumble, Thomas E.; Rafijah, Gregory; Alexander, Hayley; Waitayawinyu, Thanapong

    2012-01-01

    Two common types of wrist arthritis are scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC). In stage II SLAC or SNAC, there is arthritis between the scaphoid and the radius, sparing the cartilage between the capitate and the lunate and between the lunate and the radius. When nonsurgical treatment failed, scaphoidectomy plus capsulorrhaphy was used in 8 patients to provide pain relief without requiring an arthrodesis or compromising the radiolunate articulation. After surgery the pain scores improved from 8.5 preoperatively to 2.4 postoperatively. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score averaged 21, and the grip strength improved from 18 to 28 kg (81% of the contralateral side). PMID:24179716

  11. An X-Band Gun Test Area at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Chu, T.S.; Dunning, M.P.; Jobe, R.K.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Hast, C.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, F.; Walz, D.R.; Marsh, R.A.; Anderson, S.G.; Hartemann, F.V.; Houck, T.L.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-09-07

    The X-Band Test Area (XTA) is being assembled in the NLCTA tunnel at SLAC to serve as a test facility for new RF guns. The first gun to be tested will be an upgraded version of the 5.6 cell, 200 MV/m peak field X-band gun designed at SLAC in 2003 for the Compton Scattering experiment run in ASTA. This new version includes some features implemented in 2006 on the LCLS gun such as racetrack couplers, increased mode separation and elliptical irises. These upgrades were developed in collaboration with LLNL since the same gun will be used in an injector for a LLNL Gamma-ray Source. Our beamline includes an X-band acceleration section which takes the electron beam up to 100 MeV and an electron beam measurement station. Other X-Band guns such as the UCLA Hybrid gun will be characterized at our facility.

  12. Laser Tracker Test Facility at SLAC - Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, G.L.; Ruland, R.E.; /SLAC

    2008-02-22

    Physics experiments at SLAC require high accuracy positioning, e. g. 100 {micro}m over a distance of 150 m or 25 {micro}m in a 10 x 10 x 3 meter volume. Laser Tracker measurement systems have become one of the most important tools for achieving these accuracies when mapping components. In order to improve and get a better understanding of laser tracker measurement tolerances we extended our laboratory with a rotary calibration table (Kugler GmbH) providing an accuracy of better than 0.2 arcsec. This paper gives an overview of the calibration table and its evaluation. Results of tests on two of our Laser Trackers utilizing the new rotary table as well as the SLAC interferometer bench are presented.

  13. Determination of Longitudinal Phase Space in SLAC Main Accelerator Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; O'Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2005-06-07

    In the E164 Experiment at that Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we drive plasma wakes for electron acceleration using 28.5 GeV bunches from the main accelerator. These bunches can now be made with an RMS length of 12 microns, and accurate direct measurement of their lengths is not feasible shot by shot. Instead, we use an indirect technique, measuring the energy spectrum at the end of the linac and comparing with detailed simulations of the entire machine. We simulate with LiTrack, a 2D particle tracking code developed at SLAC. Understanding the longitudinal profile allows a better understanding of acceleration in the plasma wake, as well as investigation of related effects. We discuss the method and validation of our phase space determinations.

  14. The X-band klystron program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1996-04-01

    The X-band rf source development at SLAC can be considered a qualified success. A total of twelve klystrons were built. Six of them are still in use. The latest tube, XL4, produced 75 MW at an efficiency of 47.5 percent. However, victory cannot be declared as yet, since an NLC prototype has not been fully designed and the decision between permanent magnet focusing and a super-conducting solenoid has not been formally made. Daryl Sprehn`s paper will present the status of the PPM klystron development. The authors believe that a PPM X-band source will work, at 50 as well as at 75 megawatts. But they are prepared to adapt the XL4 design to a super-conducting solenoid, should the PPM klystron develop unexpected problems. The SLAC program is now in its seventh year. It may well be the longest and most expensive microwave tube development on record, in a government laboratory or in industry. Direct and related costs for the total effort are probably of the order of $10 million. In these circumstances it is perhaps not surprising that it has been possible to produce a klystron with the performance of XL4. At the same time, it must be said that the necessary leap in technology from the SLAC 60-megawatt S-band production klystrons to a klystron of comparable performance at four times the frequency could not be realized without some very careful experimentation and, most importantly, without the infrastructure for tube fabrication and testing available at SLAC. The design of an 11.4 GHz 50--100 MW klystron, with microsecond pulses and a pulse repetition frequency of 180 Hz presents a number of technical challenges which are listed here.

  15. Preliminary results of the echo-seeding experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Ding, Y.; Dunning, M.; Frederico, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Corlett, J.; Qiang, J.; Penn, G.; Prestemon, S.; Schlueter, R.; Venturini, M.; Wan, W.; Pernet, P-L.

    2010-05-23

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment aims to generate coherent radiation at 318 nm and 227 nm, which are the 5th and 7th harmonic of the infrared seed laser. In this paper we present the preliminary results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  16. The SLAC E-154 {sup 3}He polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Romalis, M. V.; Bogorad, P. L.; Cates, G. D.; Kumar, K. S.; Chupp, T. E.; Coulter, K. P.; Smith, T. B.; Welsh, R.; Hughes, E. W.; Johnson, J. R.; Thompson, A. K.

    1998-01-20

    We describe the NMR and Rb Zeeman frequency shift polarimeters used for determining the {sup 3}He polarization in a recent precision measurement of the neutron spin structure function g{sub 1} at SLAC (E-154). We performed a detailed study of the systematic errors associated with the calibration of the NMR polarimeter. A new technique was used for determining the {sup 3}He polarization from the frequency shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance.

  17. Status of the SLAC SNOOP diagnostic module for FASTBUS

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, H.V.; Gustavson, D.B.

    1983-03-01

    A SNOOP Diagnostic Module for FASTBUS is under development at SLAC. The SNOOP Module resides on a FASTBUS crate segment and provides diagnostic monitoring and testing capability. It consists of a high-speed ECL front-end to monitor and single-step segment operations, a simple master interface, and a control processor with two serial communication ports. Module features and specifications are summrized, and prototype hardware is shown.

  18. The SLAC Vertical Comparator for the Calibration of Digital Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Woschitz, Helmut; Gassner, Georg; Ruland, Robert; /SLAC

    2006-12-06

    Digital levels replaced spirit levels in most fields of precise height measurements because of the automation of the height readings. Three manufacturers offer digital levels with a single reading resolution of 10 {micro}m, and for all of them systematic effects are known. In Europe several facilities for system calibration of digital levels using vertical comparators were established within the last decade. However, there still was no system calibration facility in North America. In order to guarantee the accuracy required for the alignment of experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a calibration facility for the system calibration of digital levels was built. In this paper the setup of the SLAC vertical comparator is described in detail and its standard uncertainty is derived. In order to perform traditional rod calibration of conventional line-scaled rods, a CCD camera was integrated into the SLAC comparator. The CCD camera setup is also briefly described. To demonstrate the capabilities of the comparator, results of system and rod calibration are shown.

  19. Latest Results in SLAC 75-MW PPM Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; /SLAC

    2006-03-06

    75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed.

  20. Compliance of SLAC_s Laser Safety Program with OSHA Requirements for the Control of Hazardous Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Michael; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    SLAC's COHE program requires compliance with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, 'The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)'. This regulation specifies lockout/tagout requirements during service and maintenance of equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment, or release of stored energy, could cause injury to workers. Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE consideration. This paper describes how COHE is achieved at SLAC to protect workers against unexpected Class 3B or Class 4 laser radiation, independent of whether the mode of operation is normal, service, or maintenance.

  1. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Tyson K.; Walden, Anna L.; Wilt, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column (ARARC) for arthroscopic stage II through stage IIIB SLAC wrists and to describe an arthroscopic staging classification of the radiocarpal joint for patients with SLAC wrist. Patients and Methods Data were collected prospectively on 17 patients presenting with radiographic stage I through III SLAC wrist who underwent ARARC in lieu of scaphoidectomy and 4CF or PRC. Fourteen patients (12 men and 2 women) subject to 1-year follow-up were included. The average age was 57 years (range 41 to 78). The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 12 to 61). Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column is described for varying stages of arthritic changes of the radioscaphoid joint. Midcarpal resection was not performed. Results The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 66 preoperatively and 28 at final follow-up. The mean satisfaction (0 = not satisfied, 5 = completely satisfied) at final follow-up was 4.5 (range 3 to 5). The pain level (on 0–10 scale) improved from 6.6 to 1.3. The total arc of motion changed from 124° preoperatively to 142° postoperatively following an ARARC. Grip was 16 kg preoperatively and 18 kg postoperatively. Radiographic stages typically underestimated arthroscopic staging. Although four of our patients appeared to be radiographic stage I, all were found to have arthritis involving some or all of the radioscaphoid articulation at the time of arthroscopy. Clinical Relevance

  2. Waveform magnetic field survey in Russian DC and Swiss AC powered trains: a basis for biologically relevant exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Ptitsyna, N G; Kopytenko, Y A; Villoresi, G; Pfluger, D H; Ismaguilov, V; Iucci, N; Kopytenko, E A; Zaitzev, D B; Voronov, P M; Tyasto, M I

    2003-12-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a link between transport magnetic fields (MF) and certain adverse health effects. We performed measurements in workplaces of engineers on Russian DC and Swiss AC powered (16.67 Hz) electric trains using a computer based waveform capture system with a 200 Hz sampling rate. MF in DC and AC trains show complex combinations of static and varying components. The most probable levels of quasistatic MF (0.001-0.03 Hz) were in the range 40 microT. Maximum levels of 120 microT were found in DC powered locomotives. These levels are much higher than the geomagnetic field at the site of measurements. MF encountered both in DC and AC powered rail systems showed irregular temporal variability in frequency composition and amplitude characteristics across the whole frequency range studied (0-50 Hz); however, more than 90% of the magnetic field power was concentrated in frequencies AC locomotives, such as the most popular engine Re 4/4 II, the major energy falls around the fundamental frequency 16.67 Hz, with an average magnetic field intensity of about 44 microT; moreover, a significant contribution (about 15%) is due to components below the fundamental frequency. In Russian DC powered trains amplitudes of field variations sharply decrease from static to approximately 3-4 Hz fields; for higher frequencies a tendency of slow decrease is observed up to 50 Hz. For frequencies higher than 1 Hz average amplitudes of magnetic field variations are less than 1 microT; maximum levels reach tens of microtesla. At frequencies lower than 15 Hz, the average magnetic field generated by Swiss AC powered locomotives was approximately 10 times greater than fields observed in Russian DC powered trains. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury. VIII. The Global Star Formation Histories of 60 Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Skillman, Evan D.; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Holtzman, Jon; Rosema, Keith; Cole, Andrew; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2011-09-01

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 60 nearby (D <~ 4 Mpc) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations from images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope and analyzed as part of the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury program (ANGST). This volume-limited sample contains 12 dwarf spheroidal (dSph)/dwarf elliptical (dE), 5 dwarf spiral, 28 dwarf irregular (dI), 12 dSph/dI (transition), and 3 tidal dwarf galaxies. The sample spans a range of ~10 mag in MB and covers a wide range of environments, from highly interacting to truly isolated. From the best-fit SFHs, we find three significant results for dwarf galaxies in the ANGST volume: (1) the majority of dwarf galaxies formed the bulk of their mass prior to z ~ 1, regardless of current morphological type; (2) the mean SFHs of dIs, transition dwarf galaxies (dTrans), and dSphs are similar over most of cosmic time, and only begin to diverge a few Gyr ago, with the clearest differences between the three appearing during the most recent 1 Gyr and (3) the SFHs are complex and the mean values are inconsistent with simple SFH models, e.g., single bursts, constant star formation rates (SFRs), or smooth, exponentially declining SFRs. The mean SFHs show clear divergence from the cosmic SFH at z <~ 0.7, which could be evidence that low-mass systems have experienced delayed star formation relative to more massive galaxies. The sample shows a strong density-morphology relationship, such that the dSphs in the sample are less isolated than the dIs. We find that the transition from a gas-rich to gas-poor galaxy cannot be solely due to internal mechanisms such as stellar feedback, and instead is likely the result of external mechanisms, e.g., ram pressure and tidal stripping and tidal forces. In terms of their environments, SFHs, and gas fractions, the majority of the dTrans appear to be low-mass dIs that simply lack Hα emission, similar to Local Group (LG) dTrans DDO 210

  4. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. XII. The Luminosity Function of Globular Clusters in Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, Andrés; McLaughlin, Dean E.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Peng, Eric W.; Mei, Simona; Villegas, Daniela; Merritt, David; Tonry, John L.; West, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    We analyze the luminosity function of the globular clusters (GCs) belonging to the early-type galaxies observed in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. We have obtained maximum likelihood estimates for a Gaussian representation of the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF) for 89 galaxies. We have also fit the luminosity functions with an ``evolved Schechter function'', which is meant to reflect the preferential depletion of low-mass GCs, primarily by evaporation due to two-body relaxation, from an initial Schechter mass function similar to that of young massive clusters in local starbursts and mergers. We find a highly significant trend of the GCLF dispersion σ with galaxy luminosity, in the sense that the GC systems in smaller galaxies have narrower luminosity functions. The GCLF dispersions of our Galaxy and M31 are quantitatively in keeping with this trend, and thus the correlation between σ and galaxy luminosity would seem more fundamental than older notions that the GCLF dispersion depends on Hubble type. We show that this narrowing of the GCLF in a Gaussian description is driven by a steepening of the cluster mass function above the classic turnover mass, as one moves to lower luminosity host galaxies. In a Schechter function description, this is reflected by a steady decrease in the value of the exponential cutoff mass scale. We argue that this behavior at the high-mass end of the GC mass function is most likely a consequence of systematic variations of the initial cluster mass function rather than long-term dynamical evolution. The GCLF turnover mass MTO is roughly constant, at MTO~=(2.2+/-0.4)×105 Msolar in bright galaxies, but it decreases slightly (by ~35% on average, with significant scatter) in dwarf galaxies with MB,gal>~-18. It could be important to allow for this effect when using the GCLF as a distance indicator. We show that part, although perhaps not all, of the variation could arise from the shorter dynamical friction timescales in less

  5. THE BOSS EMISSION-LINE LENS SURVEY (BELLS). I. A LARGE SPECTROSCOPICALLY SELECTED SAMPLE OF LENS GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT {approx}0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Brownstein, Joel R.; Bolton, Adam S.; Pandey, Parul; Schlegel, David J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Connolly, Natalia; Maraston, Claudia; Seitz, Stella; Wake, David A.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Brinkmann, Jon; Schneider, Donald P.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a catalog of 25 definite and 11 probable strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lens systems with lens redshifts 0.4 {approx}< z {approx}< 0.7, discovered spectroscopically by the presence of higher-redshift emission lines within the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of luminous galaxies, and confirmed with high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of 44 candidates. Our survey extends the methodology of the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys survey (SLACS) to higher redshift. We describe the details of the BOSS spectroscopic candidate detections, our HST ACS image processing and analysis methods, and our strong gravitational lens modeling procedure. We report BOSS spectroscopic parameters and ACS photometric parameters for all candidates, and mass-distribution parameters for the best-fit singular isothermal ellipsoid models of definite lenses. Our sample to date was selected using only the first six months of BOSS survey-quality spectroscopic data. The full five-year BOSS database should produce a sample of several hundred strong galaxy-galaxy lenses and in combination with SLACS lenses at lower redshift, strongly constrain the redshift evolution of the structure of elliptical, bulge-dominated galaxies as a function of luminosity, stellar mass, and rest-frame color, thereby providing a powerful test for competing theories of galaxy formation and evolution.

  6. The structure of early-type galaxies from the ACS Virgo and Fornax cluster surveys: cores, nuclei and supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    The core structure of early-type galaxies is revisited in light of recent results from the ACS Virgo and Fornax Cluster Surveys. These surveys are comprised of HST/ACS g, z band images for a representative sample of 143 early-type galaxies, spanning a factor 720 in B-band luminosity. The data indicates a clear transition in the core structure going from the brightest to the faintest galaxies. In contrast to previous claims, however, this transition is found to be a continuous function of galaxy magnitude. We characterize the core structure in terms of deviations of the observed surface brightness profile measured within ~ 2% of the galaxy effective radius relative to the inner extrapolation of the Sérsic law that best fits the profiles on larger scales. Virtually all galaxies fainter than MB ~ -20 mag contain distinct stellar nuclei, and are described by surface brightness profiles that lie above the Sérsic extrapolation, while the reverse is true for brighter galaxies. The latter are also known to host supermassive black holes. A relation between SBHs and stellar nuclei is suggested by the fact that both types of “central massive objects” contain the same fraction, 0.2% of the total mass of the host galaxy.

  7. Linear collider research and development at SLAC, LBL and LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Mattison, T.S.

    1988-10-01

    The study of electron-positron (e/sup +/e/sup /minus//) annihilation in storage ring colliders has been very fruitful. It is by now well understood that the optimized cost and size of e/sup +/e/sup /minus// storage rings scales as E(sub cm//sup 2/ due to the need to replace energy lost to synchrotron radiation in the ring bending magnets. Linear colliders, using the beams from linear accelerators, evade this scaling law. The study of e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collisions at TeV energy will require linear colliders. The luminosity requirements for a TeV linear collider are set by the physics. Advanced accelerator research and development at SLAC is focused toward a TeV Linear Collider (TLC) of 0.5--1 TeV in the center of mass, with a luminosity of 10/sup 33/--10/sup 34/. The goal is a design for two linacs of less than 3 km each, and requiring less than 100 MW of power each. With a 1 km final focus, the TLC could be fit on Stanford University land (although not entirely within the present SLAC site). The emphasis is on technologies feasible for a proposal to be framed in 1992. Linear collider development work is progressing on three fronts: delivering electrical energy to a beam, delivering a focused high quality beam, and system optimization. Sources of high peak microwave radio frequency (RF) power to drive the high gradient linacs are being developed in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Beam generation, beam dynamics and final focus work has been done at SLAC and in collaboration with KEK. Both the accelerator physics and the utilization of TeV linear colliders were topics at the 1988 Snowmass Summer Study. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Using the SLAC VHF and UHF radio systems

    SciTech Connect

    Struven, W.

    1987-02-01

    The use of the SLAC VHF and UHF Radio Systems and the Tunnel Antenna Systems as they are presently configured is described. The original radio system was built in 1966 and has grown in scope over the years. The Tunnel Antenna Systems were developed for, and first installed in, the PEP ring, and later added to other tunnels and redesigned to cover the UHF range, as well as VHF. The UHF radio system was designed and built for SLC use, and was first used in the SLC Arcs. The three radio systems will be described and the capabilities of each system will be defined.

  9. Experiments with very-high-power RF pulses at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, H.A.; Loew, G.A.; Price, V.G.

    1983-03-01

    Experiments in which the powers of two SLAC klystrons were combined and fed into a resonant cavity pulse-compression system (SLED) are described. Pulse powers up to 65 MW into SLED were reached. The corresponding instantaneous peak power out of SLED was 390 MW. After normal initial aging, no persistent RF breakdown problems were encountered. X-radiation at the SLED cavities was generally less than 400 mR/h after aging. The theoretical relationship between x-radiation intensity and RF electric field strength is discussed.

  10. Commissioning the Echo-Seeding Experiment Echo-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.a E.Colby; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Woodley, M.; Xiang, D.; Pernet, P-L.; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne

    2011-06-02

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment is intended to test the EEHG principle at low electron beam energy, 120 MeV, and determine the sensitivities and limitations to understand the expected performance at the higher energy scales and harmonic numbers required for x-ray FELs. In this paper we present the experimental results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  11. SLAC RF Source Research at X-Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprehn, D.

    2003-12-01

    X-band klystrons capable of 75 MW and utilizing either solenoidal or Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing are undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The klystron development is part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). SLAC has developed a solenoidal-focused X-band klystron which is currently the workhorse of high power component testing for the NLC. A state-of-the-art modulator will drive eight of these tubes which, in turn, will power an rf distribution system referred to as the "8-pack" in order to test these modulators and waveguide components. Eventually, in an interest to save millions of dollars per year in the operational cost of the NLC, these tubes will be replaced by PPM klystrons. The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan ), and industry. These tubes follow from the successful 50 MW PPM design of 1996. Recent testing of this particular tube at wider pulsewidths has reached 50 MW at 55 % efficiency, 2.4 μs and 60 Hz. Two 50 MW PPM klystrons produced by industry have been delivered to SLAC. One of these devices arrived with a vacuum suitable for test. Testing during 2001 revealed a serious, but curious, vacuum response which limited the operation to an rf output of ˜40 MW. A 75 MW PPM klystron prototype was first constructed in 1997 and later modified in 1999 to eliminate oscillations. This tube has reached the NLC design target of 75 MW at 1.5 μs though at a significantly reduced rep rate. Two new 75 MW PPM klystrons were constructed and tested in 2002 after a diode was successfully tested in 2001. The new design was aimed at reducing the cost and increasing the reliability of such high-energy devices. The rf circuit and beam focusing for one of these devices was built by industry and incorporated into one of the tubes

  12. Development of X-band klystron technology at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1997-05-01

    The SLAC design for a 1-TeV collider (NLC) requires klystrons with a performance which is well beyond the state-of-the-art for microwave tubes in the United States or abroad. The electrical specifications for the NLC klystrons are not fully established, but they are approximately as follows: Frequency, 11.4 GHz; Peak Power, 75 MW; Pulse Length, 1.5 {mu}s; Repetition Rate, 180 Hz; Gain, 50 dB; Efficiency, (including beam focusing) 50%. SLAC is in the seventh year of a program to develop these klystrons. The choice of X-band as the operating frequency, along with the sheer size of the NLC, have resulted in some new, most demanding standards for the klystrons which may power this future machine. These are related to the overall efficiency required, to the high rf gradients that must be supported at the output circuit without vacuum breakdown, and to the manufacturing cost of the 5,000-10,000 klystrons needed for the collider.

  13. Searching for light dark matter with the SLAC millicharge experiment.

    PubMed

    Diamond, M; Schuster, P

    2013-11-27

    New sub-GeV gauge forces ("dark photons") that kinetically mix with the photon provide a promising scenario for MeV-GeV dark matter and are the subject of a program of searches at fixed-target and collider facilities around the world. In such models, dark photons produced in collisions may decay invisibly into dark-matter states, thereby evading current searches. We reexamine results of the SLAC mQ electron beam dump experiment designed to search for millicharged particles and find that it was strongly sensitive to any secondary beam of dark matter produced by electron-nucleus collisions in the target. The constraints are competitive for dark photon masses in the ~1-30 MeV range, covering part of the parameter space that can reconcile the apparent (g-2)(μ) anomaly. Simple adjustments to the original SLAC search for millicharges may extend sensitivity to cover a sizable portion of the remaining (g-2)(μ) anomaly-motivated region. The mQ sensitivity is therefore complementary to ongoing searches for visible decays of dark photons. Compared to existing direct-detection searches, mQ sensitivity to electron-dark-matter scattering cross sections is more than an order of magnitude better for a significant range of masses and couplings in simple models.

  14. RESULTS AND INTERPRETATIONS OF THE SPIN STRUCTURE EXPERIMENTS AT SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomensky, Yury G

    2003-05-21

    In the recent experiments E154 and E155 at SLAC the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1}{sup n}, g{sub 1}{sup p}, and g{sub 1}{sup d} of the neutron, proton, and deuteron were measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48:3 GeV electrons off longitudinally polarized targets. We report on the measurement of g{sub 1}{sup n} by E154, and on the preliminary results on g{sub 1}{sup 0} from E155. The SLAC results provide the most precise determination to date of the polarized structure functions. We observe relatively large values of g{sub 1}{sup n} at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x -> 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. We perform a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin-dependent structure functions. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, we evolve the data to Q{sup 2} = 5 GeV{sup 2}, determine the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and find agreement with the Bjorken sum rule.

  15. Recording PEP2 Ring Beam Losses at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelazny, M.; Gromme, T.; Himel, T.; Hendrickson, L.; Krauter, K.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    The PEP2 (e+)(e-) storage rings contain many complex interrelated systems. When the beam aborts, examining a record of the orbit from the time just before the abort can help identify the root cause. At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a system has been developed to continuously record beam orbits from Beam Position Monitors (BPMS) into a circular buffer. When the beam is aborted the buffers are frozen and their contents are stored for later analysis. BPM orbits are saved on a turn by turn basis for 2800 turns in both the high energy ring (HER) and the low energy ring (LER). Each BPM Processor (BPMP) can either monitor the HER or the LER, but not both as the readout of the two rings is multiplexed into a single readout channel. Tools exist as part of the SLAC Control Program (SCP) to collect, display, and save the data. A physicist or operator can choose a few BPMS in which to view all 2800 turns to identify the turn in which the beam went awry; then ask for that specific orbit from all of the BPMS in the storage ring to determine the root cause of the abort.

  16. Loss‐of‐function mutation of rice SLAC7 decreases chloroplast stability and induces a photoprotection mechanism in rice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaolei; Wu, Jiemin; Chen, Taiyu; Tie, Weiwei; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plants absorb sunlight to power the photochemical reactions of photosynthesis, which can potentially damage the photosynthetic machinery. However, the mechanism that protects chloroplasts from the damage remains unclear. In this work, we demonstrated that rice (Oryza sativa L.) SLAC7 is a generally expressed membrane protein. Loss‐of‐function of SLAC7 caused continuous damage to the chloroplasts of mutant leaves under normal light conditions. Ion leakage indicators related to leaf damage such as H2O2 and abscisic acid levels were significantly higher in slac7‐1 than in the wild type. Consistently, the photosynthesis efficiency and Fv/Fm ratio of slac7‐1 were significantly decreased (similar to photoinhibition). In response to chloroplast damage, slac7‐1 altered its leaf morphology (curled or fused leaf) by the synergy between plant hormones and transcriptional factors to decrease the absorption of light, suggesting that a photoprotection mechanism for chloroplast damage was activated in slac7‐1. When grown in dark conditions, slac7‐1 displayed a normal phenotype. SLAC7 under the control of the AtSLAC1 promoter could partially complement the phenotypes of Arabidopsis slac1 mutants, indicating a partial conservation of SLAC protein functions. These results suggest that SLAC7 is essential for maintaining the chloroplast stability in rice. PMID:25739330

  17. Two-klystron Binary Pulse Compression at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.

    1993-04-01

    The Binary Pulse Compression system installed at SLAC was tested using two klystrons, one with 10 MW and the other with 34 MW output. By compressing 560 ns klystron pulses into 70 ns, the measured BPC output was 175 MW, limited by the available power from the two klystrons. This output was used to provide 100-MW input to a 30-cell X-band structure in which a 100-MV/m gradient was obtained. This system, using the higher klystron outputs expected in the future has the potential to deliver the 350 MW needed to obtain 100 MV/m gradients in the 1.8-m NLC prototype structure. This note describes the timing, triggering, and phase coding used in the two-klystron experiment, and the expected and measured net-work response to three- or two-stage modulation.

  18. SLC status and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1989-08-01

    In this presentation, I shall discuss the linear collider program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as it is now, and as we hope to see it evolve over the next few years. Of greatest interest to the high energy accelerator physics community gathered here is the development of the linear collider concept, and so I shall concentrate most of this paper on a discussion of the present status and future evolution of the SLC. I will also briefly discuss the research and development program that we are carrying out aimed at the realization of the next generation of high-energy linear colliders. SLAC had a major colliding-beam storage-ring program as well, including present rings and design studies on future high-luminosity projects, but time constraints preclude a discussion of them. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. The ILC Marx Modulator Development Program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Leyh, G.E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    The International Linear Collider [ILC] baseline design requires 576 L-band klystron stations, each supplying 10MW peak RF power to the accelerating structures. Each klystron requires a modulator capable of delivering 120kV, 140A 1.6ms pulses, at 5Hz. Solid-state Marx modulator topologies are rapidly becoming feasible with the advent of PC-board-level 4500V IGBTs, fast single junction HV diodes, high density capacitors, and sophisticated modeling software. Making full use of recent technology advances, the ILC Marx Modulator program at SLAC plans to pursue a 120kV solid-state Marx design, which appears to offer significantly higher efficiency, availability, and cost savings than existing modulator options.

  20. Computing and data handling recent experiences at Fermilab and SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.S.

    1990-04-09

    Computing has become evermore central to the doing of high energy physics. There are now major second and third generation experiments for which the largest single cost is computing. At the same time the availability of cheap'' computing has made possible experiments which were previously considered infeasible. The result of this trend has been an explosion of computing and computing needs. I will review here the magnitude of the problem, as seen at Fermilab and SLAC, and the present methods for dealing with it. I will then undertake the dangerous assignment of projecting the needs and solutions forthcoming in the next few years at both laboratories. I will concentrate on the offline'' problem; the process of turning terabytes of data tapes into pages of physics journals. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Electron Bunch Length Measurement for LCLS at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelazny, M.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, Sergei; Emma, P.; Kotturi, K.d.; Loos, H.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Straumann, T.; /SLAC

    2007-10-04

    At Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) a Bunch Length Measurement system has been developed to measure the length of the electron bunch for its new Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This destructive measurement uses a transverse-mounted RF deflector (TCAV) to vertically streak the electron beam and an image taken with an insertable screen and a camera. The device control software was implemented with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) toolkit. The analysis software was implemented in Matlab{trademark} using the EPICS/Channel Access Interface for Scilab{trademark} and Matlab{trademark} (labCA). This architecture allowed engineers and physicists to develop and integrate their control and analysis without duplication of effort.

  2. SLAC Model A, B, and C rf loads (Engineering Materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    These three drawing lists and the drawings listed thereon provide the information and specifications for constructing the three types of high power rf loads used on the SLAC Linear Accelerator waveguide system. Drawing List DL-767-304-00-R1 Model B rf Load contains the largest number of drawings with Model A and C using some common parts therefrom. Model B load is used in other places requiring only a high power capability (water cooling) and the Model C load is used on the output of the 3 dB hybrid couplers used as power dividers and are not water cooled. Not all referenced drawings are included, however, all that are needed to construct the basic load assemblies are included.

  3. PEP-II Large Power Supplies Rebuild Program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Bellomo, P.; Lipari, J.J.; de Lira, A.C.; Rafael, F.S.; /SLAC

    2005-05-17

    Seven large power supplies (LGPS) with output ratings from 72kW to 270kW power PEP-II quad magnets in the electron-positron collider region. These supplies have posed serious maintenance and reliability problems since they were installed in 1997, resulting in loss of accelerator availability. A redesign/rebuild program was undertaken by the SLAC Power Conversion Department. During the 2004 summer shutdown all the control circuits in these supplies were redesigned and replaced. A new PWM control board, programmable logic controller, and touch panel have been installed to improve LGPS reliability, and to make troubleshooting easier. In this paper we present the details of this rebuilding program and results.

  4. Thermal stress analysis of the SLAC moveable mask. Addendum 2

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.L.

    1985-10-15

    X-ray beams emerging from the new SLAC electron-positron storage ring (PEP) can impinge on the walls of tangential divertor channels. A moveable mask made of 6061-T6 aluminum is installed in the channel to limit wall heating. The mask is cooled with water flowing axially at 30/sup 0/C. Beam strikes on the mask cause highly localized heating in the channel structure. Analyses were completed to determine the temperatures and thermally-induced stresses due to this heating. The current design and operating conditions should result in the entrance to the moveable mask operating at a peak temperature of 88/sup 0/C with a peak thermal stress at 19% of the yield of 6061-T6 aluminum.

  5. SLAC All Access: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, John

    2013-11-05

    John Bozek, a staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser who manages the LCLS Soft X-ray Department, takes us behind the scenes at the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument, the first of six experimental stations now operating at LCLS. Samples used in AMO experiments include atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoscale objects such as protein crystals or viruses. Science performed at AMO includes fundamental studies of light-matter interactions in the extreme X-ray intensity of the LCLS pules, time-resolved studies of increasingly charged states of atoms and molecules, X-ray diffraction imaging of nanocrystals, and single-shot imaging of a variety of objects.

  6. The SLAC linac as used in the SLC collider

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Abrams, G.; Adolphsen, C.; Atwood, W.; Bane, K.L.F.; Iverson, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Himel, T.M.; Jobe, R.K.; Lavine, T.L.

    1989-06-01

    The linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) must accelerate three high intensity bunches on each linac pulse from 1.2 GeV to 50 GeV with minimal increase of the small transverse emittance. The procedures and adjustments used to obtain this goal are outlined. Some of the accelerator parameters and components which interact are the beam energy, transverse position, component alignment, RF manipulation, feedback systems, quadrupole lattice, BNS damping, energy spectra, phase space matching, collimation, instrumentation and modelling. The method to bring these interdependent parameters collectively into specification has evolved over several years. This review is ordered in the sequence which is used to turn on the linac from a cold start and produce acceptable beams for the final focus and collisions. Approximate time estimates for the various activities are given. 21 refs.

  7. SLAC All Access: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science Instrument

    ScienceCinema

    Bozek, John

    2016-07-12

    John Bozek, a staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser who manages the LCLS Soft X-ray Department, takes us behind the scenes at the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument, the first of six experimental stations now operating at LCLS. Samples used in AMO experiments include atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoscale objects such as protein crystals or viruses. Science performed at AMO includes fundamental studies of light-matter interactions in the extreme X-ray intensity of the LCLS pules, time-resolved studies of increasingly charged states of atoms and molecules, X-ray diffraction imaging of nanocrystals, and single-shot imaging of a variety of objects.

  8. Physics prospects for the SLAC B-Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, D.H.

    1996-11-01

    CP violation has been an enigma since its discovery in the decays of neutral kaons in 1964. The present version of the Standard Model can accommodate CP violation by means of a non-zero phase in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. However, CP violation in the kaon system occurs at the part per mille level and the Standard Model`s predictions for CP violation have not been conclusively tested. In contrast to the kaon system, B-mesons decay into a variety of final states, many of which could exhibit CP violation and therefore offer multiple tests of the Standard Model. Several large efforts currently are in progress to create dedicated experiments or factories which will provide large quantities of B-mesons which, in turn, should give large numbers of CP-violating decays. Here, a very brief presentation of the physics prospects for the SLAC B-Factory, now under construction, is presented.

  9. SLAC modulator operation and reliability in the SLC Era

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.R.; Ashton, J.R.

    1992-06-01

    A discussion of the operation and reliability of the 244 modulators in the SLAC linac with an emphasis on the past three years of operation. The linac modulators were designed and built in the 60`s, upgraded for the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) in the mid 80s, and despite their age are still reliable accelerator components. The 60s modulator operated at 65 MW peak and 83 kW average power. The upgrade resulted in 150 MW peak output at an average power of 87 kW, a modest increase since the repetition rate was dropped from 360 to 120 Hz. In the present accelerator configuration, the Linac operates as a source of electrons and positrons to a single pass coillider. The classic collider is a storage ring filled with oppositely charged, counter-rotating particles which are allowed to collide until an accelerator fault occurs and the stored beams are aborted. A reasonable storage ring can store and collide particles for as long as eight hours with a 10 or 20 minute filling time. A single pass collider, + on the other hand, can only produce e{sup {minus}} and e{sup +} collisions at whatever rate the source operates. To be effective the SLC must operate at 120 Hz with a very high degree of reliability and on a continuous basis. Fortunately, the linac has a modest excess of modulator/klystron systems which allows some measure of redundancy and hence some freedom from the constraint that all 244 modulator/klystrons operate simultaneously. Nonetheless, high importance is placed on modulator MTBF and MTRR or, in the parlance of reliability experts and accelerator physicists, availability. This is especially true of the modulators associated with the fundamental requirements of a collider such as injection, compression and positron production.

  10. SLAC modulator operation and reliability in the SLC Era

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.R.; Ashton, J.R.

    1992-06-01

    A discussion of the operation and reliability of the 244 modulators in the SLAC linac with an emphasis on the past three years of operation. The linac modulators were designed and built in the 60's, upgraded for the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) in the mid 80s, and despite their age are still reliable accelerator components. The 60s modulator operated at 65 MW peak and 83 kW average power. The upgrade resulted in 150 MW peak output at an average power of 87 kW, a modest increase since the repetition rate was dropped from 360 to 120 Hz. In the present accelerator configuration, the Linac operates as a source of electrons and positrons to a single pass coillider. The classic collider is a storage ring filled with oppositely charged, counter-rotating particles which are allowed to collide until an accelerator fault occurs and the stored beams are aborted. A reasonable storage ring can store and collide particles for as long as eight hours with a 10 or 20 minute filling time. A single pass collider, + on the other hand, can only produce e{sup {minus}} and e{sup +} collisions at whatever rate the source operates. To be effective the SLC must operate at 120 Hz with a very high degree of reliability and on a continuous basis. Fortunately, the linac has a modest excess of modulator/klystron systems which allows some measure of redundancy and hence some freedom from the constraint that all 244 modulator/klystrons operate simultaneously. Nonetheless, high importance is placed on modulator MTBF and MTRR or, in the parlance of reliability experts and accelerator physicists, availability. This is especially true of the modulators associated with the fundamental requirements of a collider such as injection, compression and positron production.

  11. Documenting the Physical Universe:Preserving the Record of SLAC from 1962 to 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Deken, Jean Marie; /SLAC

    2006-03-10

    Since 1905, Albert Einstein's ''miraculous year'', modern physics has advanced explosively. In 2005, the World Year of Physics, a session at the SAA Annual meeting discusses three institutional initiatives--Einstein's collected papers, an international geophysical program, and a research laboratory--to examine how physics and physicists are documented and how that documentation is being collected, preserved, and used. This paper provides a brief introduction to the research laboratory (SLAC), discusses the origins of the SLAC Archives and History Office, its present-day operations, and the present and future challenges it faces in attempting to preserve an accurate historical record of SLAC's activities.

  12. The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. XI. The Three-dimensional Orientation of the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy and Its Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Michael H.; Majewski, Steven R.; Law, David R.; Sarajedini, Ata; Dotter, Aaron; Marín-Franch, A.; Chaboyer, Brian; Anderson, Jay; Aparicio, Antonio; Bedin, Luigi R.; Hempel, Maren; Milone, Antonino; Paust, Nathaniel; Piotto, Giampaolo; Reid, I. Neill; Rosenberg, Alfred

    2011-12-01

    We use observations from the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) study of Galactic globular clusters to investigate the spatial distribution of the inner regions of the disrupting Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr). We combine previously published analyses of four Sgr member clusters located near or in the Sgr core (M54, Arp 2, Terzan 7, and Terzan 8) with a new analysis of diffuse Sgr material identified in the background of five low-latitude Galactic bulge clusters (NGC 6624, 6637, 6652, 6681, and 6809) observed as part of the ACS survey. By comparing the bulge cluster color-magnitude diagrams to our previous analysis of the M54/Sgr core, we estimate distances to these background features. The combined data from four Sgr member clusters and five Sgr background features provide nine independent measures of the Sgr distance and, as a group, provide uniformly measured and calibrated probes of different parts of the inner regions of Sgr spanning 20° over the face of the disrupting dwarf. This allows us, for the first time, to constrain the three-dimensional orientation of Sgr's disrupting core and globular cluster system and compare that orientation to the predictions of an N-body model of tidal disruption. The density and distance of Sgr debris are consistent with models that favor a relatively high Sgr core mass and a slightly greater distance (28-30 kpc, with a mean of 29.4 kpc). Our analysis also suggests that M54 is in the foreground of Sgr by ~2 kpc, projected on the center of the Sgr dSph. While this would imply a remarkable alignment of the cluster and the Sgr nucleus along the line of sight, we cannot identify any systematic effect in our analysis that would falsely create the measured 2 kpc separation. Finally, we find that the cluster Terzan 7 has the most discrepant distance (25 kpc) among the four Sgr core clusters, which may suggest a different dynamical history than the other Sgr core clusters.

  13. Transport of LCLS-II 1.3 Ghz cryomodule to SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M. W.; Arkan, T.; Peterson, T.; Tang, Z.; Boo, S.; Carrasco, M.; Daly, E.; Huque, N.

    2016-06-30

    In a partnership with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and Jefferson Lab, Fermilab will assemble and test 17 of the 35 total 1.3 GHz cryomodules for the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Project. These include a prototype built and delivered by each Lab. Another two 3.9 GHz cryomodules will be built, tested and transported by Fermilab to SLAC. Each assembly will be transported over-the-road from Fermilab or Jefferson Lab using specific routes to SLAC. The transport system consists of a base frame, isolation fixture and upper protective truss. The strongback cryomodule lifting fixture is described along with other supporting equipment used for both over-the-road transport and local (on-site) transport at Fermilab. Initially, analysis of fragile components and stability studies will be performed in order to assess the risk associated with over-the-road transport of a fully assembled cryomodule.

  14. Homologue Structure of the SLAC1 Anion Channel for Closing Stomata in Leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Y Chen; L Hu; M Punta; R Bruni; B Hillerich; B Kloss; B Rost; J Love; S Siegelbaum; W Hendrickson

    2011-12-31

    The plant SLAC1 anion channel controls turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells of plant stomata, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought or high levels of carbon dioxide. Here we determine the crystal structure of a bacterial homologue (Haemophilus influenzae) of SLAC1 at 1.20 {angstrom} resolution, and use structure-inspired mutagenesis to analyse the conductance properties of SLAC1 channels. SLAC1 is a symmetrical trimer composed from quasi-symmetrical subunits, each having ten transmembrane helices arranged from helical hairpin pairs to form a central five-helix transmembrane pore that is gated by an extremely conserved phenylalanine residue. Conformational features indicate a mechanism for control of gating by kinase activation, and electrostatic features of the pore coupled with electrophysiological characteristics indicate that selectivity among different anions is largely a function of the energetic cost of ion dehydration.

  15. A Possible CO2 Conducting and Concentrating Mechanism in Plant Stomata SLAC1 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qi-Shi; Fan, Xina-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Hua; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2011-01-01

    Background The plant SLAC1 is a slow anion channel in the membrane of stomatal guard cells, which controls the turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought, high levels of carbon dioxide, and bacterial invasion. Recent study demonstrated that bicarbonate is a small-molecule activator of SLAC1. Higher CO2 and HCO3– concentration activates S-type anion channel currents in wild-type Arabidopsis guard cells. Based on the SLAC1 structure a theoretical model is derived to illustrate the activation of bicarbonate to SLAC1 channel. Meanwhile a possible CO2 conducting and concentrating mechanism of the SLAC1 is proposed. Methodology The homology structure of Arabidopsis thaliana SLAC1 (AtSLAC1) provides the structural basis for study of the conducting and concentrating mechanism of carbon dioxide in SLAC1 channels. The pKa values of ionizable amino acid side chains in AtSLAC1 are calculated using software PROPKA3.0, and the concentration of CO2 and anion HCO3– are computed based on the chemical equilibrium theory. Conclusions The AtSLAC1 is modeled as a five-region channel with different pH values. The top and bottom layers of channel are the alkaline residue-dominated regions, and in the middle of channel there is the acidic region surrounding acidic residues His332. The CO2 concentration is enhanced around 104 times by the pH difference between these regions, and CO2 is stored in the hydrophobic region, which is a CO2 pool. The pH driven CO2 conduction from outside to inside balances the back electromotive force and maintain the influx of anions (e.g. Cl– and NO3–) from inside to outside. SLAC1 may be a pathway providing CO2 for photosynthesis in the guard cells. PMID:21931667

  16. Experimental Tests of the GDH and Other Sum Rules at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.E.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2005-06-14

    Recent measurements from SLAC of the polarized nucleon structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} have been used to experimentally test the Bjorken, Ellis-Jaffe, Burkhardt-Cottingham, and Efremov-Leader-Teryaev sum rules. In the future, the SLAC E159 experiment will extend structure function measurements using real photons to 40 GeV, enabling a definitive test of the high energy convergence of the GDH sum rule for both proton and deuteron targets.

  17. A Sub-Picosecond Photon Pulse Facility for SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, Max

    2001-08-28

    It is possible to generate very bright sub-picosecond pulses of spontaneous x-ray radiation utilizing the electron beam from the SLAC linear accelerator and an undulator. The present injection-damping ring system used to inject into the PEP-II B-Factory can be used for this purpose, without any modification to the linear accelerator except for a sequence of 4 bending magnets to compress the electron bunch. With a charge of 3.4 nC per bunch accelerated to 28 GeV and a 10 m long undulator it is quite feasible to generate pulses of x-rays of 8.3 kV energy (in a spectrum extending to over 1 MeV), 80 fsec long (full-width-half-maximum), with a peak brightness of the order of 10{sup 25} photons/(sec x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bandwidth), and 10{sup 8} photons per pulse in a 0.1% bandwidth. This facility could be built and operated ahead of the LCLS schedule and would provide both a powerful tool for research in its own right, as well as a way to conduct critical accelerator and x-ray optics R and D for the LCLS.

  18. SLAC P2 Marx Control System and Regulation Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    MacNair, David; Kemp, Mark A.; Macken, Koen; Nguyen, Minh N.; Olsen, Jeff; /SLAC

    2011-05-20

    The SLAC P2 MARX Modulator consists of 32 cells charged in parallel by a -4 kV supply and discharged in series to provide a -120 kV 140 amp 1.7 millisecond pulse. Each cell has a 350 uF main storage capacitor. The voltage on the capacitor will droop approximately 640 volts during each pulse. Each cell will have a boost supply that can add up to 700 V to the cell output. This allows the output voltage of the cell to remain constant within 0.1% during the pulse. The modulator output voltage control is determined by the -4 kV charging voltage. A voltage divider will measure the modulator voltage on each pulse. The charging voltage will be adjusted by the data from previous pulses to provide the desired output. The boost supply in each cell consists of a 700 V buck regulator in series with the main capacitor. The supply uses a lookup table for PWM control. The lookup table is calculated from previous pulse data to provide a constant cell output. The paper will describe the modulator and cell regulation used by the MARX modulator. Measured data from a single cell and three cell string will be included.

  19. Biology of SLAC1-type anion channels - from nutrient uptake to stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Hedrich, Rainer; Geiger, Dietmar

    2017-10-01

    Contents 46 I. 46 II. 47 III. 50 IV. 53 V. 56 VI. 57 58 58 References 58 SUMMARY: Stomatal guard cells control leaf CO2 intake and concomitant water loss to the atmosphere. When photosynthetic CO2 assimilation is limited and the ratio of CO2 intake to transpiration becomes suboptimal, guard cells, sensing the rise in CO2 concentration in the substomatal cavity, deflate and the stomata close. Screens for mutants that do not close in response to experimentally imposed high CO2 atmospheres identified the guard cell-expressed Slowly activating anion channel, SLAC1, as the key player in the regulation of stomatal closure. SLAC1 evolved, though, before the emergence of guard cells. In Arabidopsis, SLAC1 is the founder member of a family of anion channels, which comprises four homologues. SLAC1 and SLAH3 mediate chloride and nitrate transport in guard cells, while SLAH1, SLAH2 and SLAH3 are engaged in root nitrate and chloride acquisition, and anion translocation to the shoot. The signal transduction pathways involved in CO2 , water stress and nutrient-sensing activate SLAC/SLAH via distinct protein kinase/phosphatase pairs. In this review, we discuss the role that SLAC/SLAH channels play in guard cell closure, on the one hand, and in the root-shoot continuum on the other, along with the molecular basis of the channels' anion selectivity and gating. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. The BOSS Emission-Line Lens Survey (BELLS). I. A Large Spectroscopically Selected Sample of Lens Galaxies at Redshift ~0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownstein, Joel R.; Bolton, Adam S.; Schlegel, David J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Connolly, Natalia; Maraston, Claudia; Pandey, Parul; Seitz, Stella; Wake, David A.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Brinkmann, Jon; Schneider, Donald P.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a catalog of 25 definite and 11 probable strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lens systems with lens redshifts 0.4 <~ z <~ 0.7, discovered spectroscopically by the presence of higher-redshift emission lines within the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of luminous galaxies, and confirmed with high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of 44 candidates. Our survey extends the methodology of the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys survey (SLACS) to higher redshift. We describe the details of the BOSS spectroscopic candidate detections, our HST ACS image processing and analysis methods, and our strong gravitational lens modeling procedure. We report BOSS spectroscopic parameters and ACS photometric parameters for all candidates, and mass-distribution parameters for the best-fit singular isothermal ellipsoid models of definite lenses. Our sample to date was selected using only the first six months of BOSS survey-quality spectroscopic data. The full five-year BOSS database should produce a sample of several hundred strong galaxy-galaxy lenses and in combination with SLACS lenses at lower redshift, strongly constrain the redshift evolution of the structure of elliptical, bulge-dominated galaxies as a function of luminosity, stellar mass, and rest-frame color, thereby providing a powerful test for competing theories of galaxy formation and evolution. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program 12209. Based on spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III.

  1. Final Design of the SLAC P2 Marx Klystron Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, M.A.; Benwell, A.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; MacNair, D.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    The SLAC P2 Marx has been under development for two years, and follows on the P1 Marx as an alternative to the baseline klystron modulator for the International Linear Collider. The P2 Marx utilizes a redundant architecture, air-insulation, a control system with abundant diagnostic access, and a novel nested droop correction scheme. This paper is an overview of the design of this modulator. There are several points of emphasis for the P2 Marx design. First, the modulator must be compatible with the ILC two-tunnel design. In this scheme, the modulator and klystron are located within a service tunnel with limited access and available footprint for a modulator. Access to the modulator is only practical from one side. Second, the modulator must have high availability. Robust components are not sufficient alone to achieve availability much higher than 99%. Therefore, redundant architectures are necessary. Third, the modulator must be relatively low cost. Because of the large number of stations in the ILC, the investment needed for the modulator components is significant. High-volume construction techniques which take advantage of an economy of scale must be utilized. Fourth, the modulator must be simple and efficient to maintain. If a modulator does become inoperable, the MTTR must be small. Fifth, even though the present application for the modulator is for the ILC, future accelerators can also take advantage of this development effort. The hardware, software, and concepts developed in this project should be designed such that further development time necessary for other applications is minimal.

  2. Experimental beam dynamics in the SLC (SLAC Linear Collier) linac

    SciTech Connect

    Steeman, J.T.; Campisi, I.E.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.; Lee, M.

    1987-01-01

    The component installation for the upgrade of the three-kilometer linac for the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) was completed in late summer 1986. The system status and measurements of beam properties made during commissioning are described in this paper. In summary, a low-emittance electron beam from a damping ring has been accelerated through the linac and injected into the north SLC Arc with negligible loss. The maximum bunch intensity is 2.9 x 10 electrons/pulse. A peak particle energy of 53 GeV has been reached. Operation at 47 GeV is now routine. The energy and energy spectrum of the electron beam can be rapidly measured nondestructively at high energy. These signals will be used in a fast feedback system nearing completion. The electron beam can be centered in the accelerator to about 200 m rms. Slow feedback of the injection position and angle into the linac and injection into the north Arc are operational. Longitudinal and transverse wakefields have been measured and appear to be near expectations. Transverse position measurements at the end of the linac show a 120 m horizontal and a 30 m vertical (rms) jitter from pulse to pulse. The spot shape, including the transverse tails, also shows some jitter. The transverse position and shape fluctuations have several sources involving launch instabilities, chromatic effects, RF deflections and lattice mismatches. Continued improvements are expected. These parameter jitters would not preclude collisions. The measured invariant transverse emittances of the beam at 47 GeV are 2 x 10 V rm vertically and 12-25 x 10 V rm horizontally at 1 x 10 e . The horizontal emittance increases with beam intensity. Damped positrons have been injected into the linac, and trajectory correction is underway.

  3. THE CLUSTER LENSING AND SUPERNOVA SURVEY WITH HUBBLE (CLASH): STRONG-LENSING ANALYSIS OF A383 FROM 16-BAND HST/WFC3/ACS IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Zitrin, A.; Broadhurst, T.; Coe, D.; Postman, M.; Bradley, L.; Koekemoer, A.; Umetsu, K.; Benitez, N.; Molino, A.; Meneghetti, M.; Medezinski, E.; Zheng, W.; Ford, H.; Lemze, D.; Jouvel, S.; Lahav, O.; Merten, J.; Kelson, D.; Nonino, M.; Donahue, M.; and others

    2011-12-01

    We examine the inner mass distribution of the relaxed galaxy cluster A383 (z = 0.189), in deep 16 band Hubble Space Telescope/ACS+WFC3 imaging taken as part of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) multi-cycle treasury program. Our program is designed to study the dark matter distribution in 25 massive clusters, and balances depth with a wide wavelength coverage, 2000-16000 A, to better identify lensed systems and generate precise photometric redshifts. This photometric information together with the predictive strength of our strong-lensing analysis method identifies 13 new multiply lensed images and candidates, so that a total of 27 multiple images of nine systems are used to tightly constrain the inner mass profile gradient, dlog {Sigma}/dlog r {approx_equal} -0.6 {+-} 0.1 (r < 160 kpc). We find consistency with the standard distance-redshift relation for the full range spanned by the lensed images, 1.01 < z < 6.03, with the higher-redshift sources deflected through larger angles as expected. The inner mass profile derived here is consistent with the results of our independent weak-lensing analysis of wide-field Subaru images, with good agreement in the region of overlap ({approx}0.7-1 arcmin). Combining weak and strong lensing, the overall mass profile is well fitted by a Navarro-Frenk-White profile with M{sub vir} = (5.37{sup +0.70}{sub -0.63} {+-} 0.26) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} h{sup -1} and a relatively high concentration, c{sub vir} = 8.77{sup +0.44}{sub -0.42} {+-} 0.23, which lies above the standard c-M relation similar to other well-studied clusters. The critical radius of A383 is modest by the standards of other lensing clusters, r{sub E} {approx_equal} 16 {+-} 2'' (for z{sub s} = 2.55), so the relatively large number of lensed images uncovered here with precise photometric redshifts validates our imaging strategy for the CLASH survey. In total we aim to provide similarly high-quality lensing data for 25 clusters

  4. Measurements of the proton and neutron spin structure at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rondon, O.A.

    1994-10-26

    The deep inelastic polarized structure fimctions g{sub 1}{sup p,d} and g{sub 2}{sup g,d} have been recently measured at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) End Station A facility by the E143 Collaboration using 29.1 GeV, 16.2 and 9.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident on longitudinally and transversally polarized ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and deuterated ammonia (ND{sub 3}) targets. Polarized electrons were produced by photemission from a strained GaAs cathode that produced beam polarizations of 85%, measured using a Moller spectrometer with coincidence and single arm detectors. The polarized target operated in a 5 T magnetic field at 1 K. Average dynamic nuclear target polarizations (at 80 nA average beam current) of 60% for protons and 30% for deuterons have been attained. The scattered electrons were detected in two spectrometers placed at 4.5{degrees} and -7{degrees} with respect to the incident beam.The range of the kinematic scaling variables x{sub Bjorken} and momentum transfer Q{sup 2} covered at 29.1 GeV is 0.03 to 0.76 for X{sub B} and 1.25 GeV{sup 2} to 9.7 GeV{sup 2} for Q{sup 2}, for invariant masses W > 2 GeV/c{sup 2} in the deep inelastic region. The 29.1 GeV longitudinal data has been analyzed`for protons and deuterons, and combined to extract the neutron structure. The results indicate that the extrapolated integrals of the structure functions {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p} and{Gamma}{sub 1}{sup d} evaluated at the fixed Q{sup 2} = 3 GeV{sup 2} are not in agreement with the theoretical predictions by Ellis and Jaffe. The combined integral {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p} - {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} agrees with the Bjorken Sum Rule prediction when 3rd. order I QCD corrections are included. The methods used to evaluate the structure fimctions at a common Q{sup 2} are being filrther investigated.

  5. Essay: Bob Siemann-SLC Days at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, Tor O.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    Bob Siemann was a great experimentalist and an excellent teacher.We will greatly miss him. Bob came to SLAC in early 1991 to work on the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The SLC was a challenging accelerator which began operating in the late 1980's but still had numerous obstacles to be overcome years into operation. One of the compounding difficulties was making reproducible measurements, since the stability of the collider was poor and the diagnostics were insufficient. Bob dove into this challenge and helped design experiments and diagnostics that provided further clarity. I first got to know Bob while I was still a graduate student, trying to finish my thesis and performing some experimental studies on the SLC, which, at the time, was proving to be very difficult. Most of my expertise had been in beam theory and simulation. Dealing with the real issues of the accelerator was challenging. Bob helped me understand the difference between systematic and statistical errors, and separate operational issues from the fundamental physics. His way of teaching was not to provide an explanation but to ask enough questions so that I could find the answer on my own - this was the best way to learn. I later asked Bob to be a reader on my thesis. As in all things, he took this role extremely seriously. He read through the draft and marked every page to the point where I was regretting my decision. However, his questions again helped me understand my own work better and greatly improved my thesis. Bob was also the de facto leader of an effort focused on the damping rings and the bunch compressors. He was great to work with. He made people think for themselves and refused to simply provide answers. He also worked hard himself, expressing real interest and curiosity. After the studies of the SLC damping rings identified a sawtooth instability due to the vacuum chamber impedance as a source of many downstream fluctuations, Bob took charge of upgrading the rings. As part of this

  6. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. III. Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries and Globular Clusters in M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, Andrés; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Blakeslee, John P.; Mei, Simona; Merritt, David; Milosavljević, Miloš; Peng, Eric W.; Tonry, John L.; West, Michael J.

    2004-09-01

    The ACIS instrument on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory has been used to carry out the first systematic study of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in M87, the giant elliptical galaxy near the dynamical center of the Virgo Cluster. These images-with a total exposure time of 154 ks-are the deepest X-ray observations yet obtained of M87. We identify 174 X-ray point sources, of which ~150 are likely LMXBs. This LMXB catalog is combined with deep F475W and F850LP images taken with ACS on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) (as part of the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey) to examine the connection between LMXBs and globular clusters in M87. Of the 1688 globular clusters in our catalog, fX=3.6%+/-0.5% contain an LMXB. Dividing the globular cluster sample by metallicity, we find that the metal-rich clusters are 3+/-1 times more likely to harbor an LMXB than their metal-poor counterparts. In agreement with previous findings for other galaxies based on smaller LMXB samples, we find the efficiency of LMXB formation to scale with both cluster metallicity Z and luminosity, in the sense that brighter, more metal-rich clusters are more likely to contain an LMXB. For the first time, however, we are able to demonstrate that the probability pX that a given cluster will contain an LMXB depends sensitively on the dynamical properties of the host cluster. Specifically, we use the HST images to measure the half-light radius, concentration index, and central density ρ0 for each globular and define a parameter Γ, which is related to the tidal capture and binary-neutron star exchange rate. Our preferred form for pX is then pX~Γρ-0.42+/-0.110(Z/Zsolar)0.33+/-0.1. We argue that if the form of pX is determined by dynamical processes, then the observed metallicity dependence is a consequence of an increased number of neutron stars per unit mass in metal-rich globular clusters. Finally, we present a critical examination of the LMXB luminosity function in M87 and reexamine the published LMXB

  7. Initial Testing of the Mark-0 X-Band RF Gun at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold; Adolphsen, C.; Dolgashev, V.; Lewandowski, J.; Limborg, Cecile; Weathersby, S.; /SLAC

    2012-06-06

    A new X-band RF gun (Mark-0) has been assembled, tuned and was tested in the ASTA facility at SLAC. This gun has been improved from an earlier gun used in Compton-scattering experiments at SLAC by the introduction of a racetrack dual-input coupler to reduce quadrupole fields. Waveguide-to-coupler irises were also redesigned to reduce surface magnetic fields and therefore peak pulse surface heating. Tests of this photocathode gun will allow us to gain early operational experience for beam tests of a new gun with further improvements (Mark-1) being prepared for SLAC's X-Band Test Area (XTA) program and the LLNL MEGa-ray program. Results of current testing up to {approx} 200 MV/m peak surface Electric fields are presented.

  8. Polarization studies of strained GaAs photocathodes at the SLAC Gun Test Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, P.; Alley, R.; Clendenin, J.; Frisch, J.; Kirby, R.; Mair, R.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R.; Mulhollan, G.; Prescott, C.

    1995-08-01

    The SLAC Gun Test Laboratory apparatus, the first two meters of which is a replica of the SLAC injector, is used to study the production of intense, highly-polarized electron beams required for the Stanford Linear Collider and future linear colliders. The facility has been upgraded with a Mott polarimeter in order to characterize the electron polarization from photocathodes operating in a DC gun. In particular, SLAC utilizes p-type, biaxially strained GaAs photocathodes which have produced longitudinal electron polarizations greater than 80% while yielding pulses of 5 A/sq cm at an operating voltage of 120 kV. Among the experiments performed include studying the influences of the active layer thickness, temperature, quantum efficiency and cessation on the polarization. The results might help to develop strained photocathodes with higher polarization.

  9. Two-dimensional kinematics of SLACS lenses - IV. The complete VLT-VIMOS data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czoske, Oliver; Barnabè, Matteo; Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Bolton, Adam S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the full Very Large Telescope (VLT)/VIMOS-IFU data set and related data products from an ESO Large Programme with the observational goal of obtaining two-dimensional kinematic data of early-type lens galaxies, out to one effective radius. The sample consists of 17 early-type galaxies (ETGs) selected from the SLACS gravitational-lens survey. The galaxies cover the redshift range from 0.08 to 0.35 and have stellar velocity dispersions between 200 and 350 km s-1. This programme is complemented by a similar observational programme on Keck, using long-slit spectroscopy. In combination with multi-band imaging data, the kinematic data provide stringent constraints on the inner mass profiles of ETGs beyond the local Universe. Our Large Programme thus extends studies of nearby ETGs (e.g. SAURON/ATLAS3D) by an order of magnitude in distance and towards higher masses. We provide an overview of our observational strategy, the data products (luminosity-weighted spectra and Hubble Space Telescope images) and derived products (i.e. two-dimensional fields of velocity dispersions and streaming motions) that have been used in a number of published and forthcoming lensing, kinematic and stellar-population studies. These studies also pave the way for future studies of ETGs at z ≈ 1 with the upcoming extremely large telescopes. In fact, one system, J1250B, was downgraded to grade B ('possible lens') in Bolton et al. (2008). The SLACR package can be obtained from the first author on request.

  10. Development of operator requested control system applications: Experience with the SLC control system at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Stanek, M.

    1995-12-01

    The SLC Control system at SLAC has evolved into a powerful tool for operation of the accelerator and for troubleshooting the unique problems encountered in extracting maximum performance from the SLC. The evolution has included the development of many custom applications and user interface features generated from accelerator operator and accelerator physicist requests. These applications are written and maintained primarily by the Controls Software Engineering group, and not by the users themselves. The process of developing and supporting user requested control systems applications at SLAC is described, including the effects of organizational structure, formal and informal procedures, and control system architecture.

  11. Electroweak Radiative Corrections to the Parity-violating Asymmetry for SLAC Experiment E158

    SciTech Connect

    Zykunov, Vladimir A.; /Gomel State Tech. U.

    2012-04-04

    Electroweak radiative corrections to observable quantities of Moeller scattering of polarized particles are calculated. We emphasize the contribution induced by infrared divergent parts of cross section. The covariant method is used to remove infrared divergences, so that our results do not involve any unphysical parameters. When applied to the kinematics of SLAC E158 experiment, these corrections reduce the parity violating asymmetry by about -6.5% at E = 48 GeV and y = 0.5, and kinematically weighted 'hard' bremsstrahlung effect for SLAC E158 is {approx} 1%.

  12. SLAC High Gradient Testing of a KEK X-Band Accelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, Rod

    2000-03-30

    The high accelerating gradients required for future linear colliders demands a better study of field emission and RF breakdown in accelerator structures. Changes in structure geometry, vacuum pumping, fabrication methods, and surface finish can all potentially impact the conditioning process, dark current emission, and peak RF power handling capability. Recent tests at SLAC of KEK's ``M2'' travelling wave x-band accelerator section provides an opportunity to investigate some of these effects by comparing its performance to previously high power tested structures at SLAC. In addition to studying ultimate power limitations, this test also demonstrates the use of computer automated conditioning to reach practical, achievable gradients.

  13. Operation of a Ti:Sapphire laser for the SLAC polarized electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, J.; Alley, R.; Browne, M.; Woods, M.

    1993-04-01

    A new laser system has been developed as the light source for the SLAC polarized electron source for the 1993 SLD physics run. A Q-switched and cavity-dumped Ti:Sapphire laser, pumped by a doubled YAG laser is used. This laser delivers typically 5O{mu}J to the photocathode with the required 2 nanosecond, double pulse, 12OHz time structure. The laser operates at wavelengths between 760nm and 870nm. The laser was installed on the SLAC linac in January 1993, and is currently in use.

  14. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. VII. THE NGC 4214 STARBURST AND THE EFFECTS OF STAR FORMATION HISTORY ON DWARF MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Seth, Anil C.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu E-mail: dweisz@astro.washington.edu E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu

    2011-07-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 optical observations obtained as part of the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury as well as early release Wide Field Camera 3 ultraviolet and infrared observations of the nearby dwarf starbursting galaxy NGC 4214. Our data provide a detailed example of how covering such a broad range in wavelength provides a powerful tool for constraining the physical properties of stellar populations. The deepest data reach the ancient red clump at M{sub F814W} {approx} - 0.2. All of the optical data reach the main-sequence turnoff for stars younger than {approx}300 Myr and the blue He-burning sequence for stars younger than 500 Myr. The full color-magnitude diagram (CMD) fitting analysis shows that all three fields in our data set are consistent with {approx}75% of the stellar mass being older than 8 Gyr, in spite of showing a wide range in star formation rates at present. Thus, our results suggest that the scale length of NGC 4214 has remained relatively constant for many gigayears. As previously noted by others, we also find the galaxy has recently ramped up production consistent with its bright UV luminosity and its population of UV-bright massive stars. In the central field we find UV point sources with F336W magnitudes as bright as -9.9. These are as bright as stars with masses of at least 52-56 M{sub sun} and ages near 4 Myr in stellar evolution models. Assuming a standard initial mass function, our CMD is well fitted by an increase in star formation rate beginning 100 Myr ago. The stellar populations of this late-type dwarf are compared with those of NGC 404, an early-type dwarf that is also the most massive galaxy in its local environment. The late-type dwarf appears to have a similar high fraction of ancient stars, suggesting that these dominant galaxies may form at early epochs even if they have low total mass and very different present-day morphologies.

  15. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  16. High Frequency, High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at SLAC and BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Hogan, Mark; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-07-05

    Given the recent success of >GV/m dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) breakdown experiments at SLAC, and follow-on coherent Cerenkov radiation production at the UCLA Neptune, a UCLA-USC-SLAC collaboration is now implementing a new set of experiments that explore various DWA scenarios. These experiments are motivated by the opportunities presented by the approval of FACET facility at SLAC, as well as unique pulse-train wakefield drivers at BNL. The SLAC experiments permit further exploration of the multi-GeV/m envelope in DWAs, and will entail investigations of novel materials (e.g. CVD diamond) and geometries (Bragg cylindrical structures, slab-symmetric DWAs), and have an over-riding goal of demonstrating >GeV acceleration in {approx}33 cm DWA tubes. In the nearer term before FACET's commissioning, we are planning measurements at the BNL ATF, in which we drive {approx}50-200 MV/m fields with single pulses or pulse trains. These experiments are of high relevance to enhancing linear collider DWA designs, as they will demonstrate potential for efficient operation with pulse trains.

  17. Structure Loaded Vacuum Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration Experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.; Lincoln, M.R.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-04-09

    We present an overview of the future laser-driven particle acceleration experiments. These will be carried out at the E163 facility at SLAC. Our objectives include a reconfirmation of the proof-of-principle experiment, a staged buncher laser-accelerator experiment, and longer-term future experiments that employ dielectric laser-accelerator microstructures.

  18. Beam-beam studies for the proposed SLAC/LBL/LLNL B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    We present a summary of beam-beam dynamics studies that have been carried out to date for the proposed SLAC/LBL/LLNL B Factory. Most of the material presented here is contained in the proposal's Conceptual Design Report, although post-CDR studies are also presented. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Molecular Evolution of Slow and Quick Anion Channels (SLACs and QUACs/ALMTs)

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Ingo; Gomez-Porras, Judith Lucia; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Hedrich, Rainer; Geiger, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Electrophysiological analyses conducted about 25 years ago detected two types of anion channels in the plasma membrane of guard cells. One type of channel responds slowly to changes in membrane voltage while the other responds quickly. Consequently, they were named SLAC, for SLow Anion Channel, and QUAC, for QUick Anion Channel. Recently, genes SLAC1 and QUAC1/ALMT12, underlying the two different anion current components, could be identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of the gene products in Xenopus oocytes confirmed the quick and slow current kinetics. In this study we provide an overview on our current knowledge on slow and quick anion channels in plants and analyze the molecular evolution of ALMT/QUAC-like and SLAC-like channels. We discovered fingerprints that allow screening databases for these channel types and were able to identify 192 (177 non-redundant) SLAC-like and 422 (402 non-redundant) ALMT/QUAC-like proteins in the fully sequenced genomes of 32 plant species. Phylogenetic analyses provided new insights into the molecular evolution of these channel types. We also combined sequence alignment and clustering with predictions of protein features, leading to the identification of known conserved phosphorylation sites in SLAC1-like channels along with potential sites that have not been yet experimentally confirmed. Using a similar strategy to analyze the hydropathicity of ALMT/QUAC-like channels, we propose a modified topology with additional transmembrane regions that integrates structure and function of these membrane proteins. Our results suggest that cross-referencing phylogenetic analyses with position-specific protein properties and functional data could be a very powerful tool for genome research approaches in general. PMID:23226151

  20. An organizational survey of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-11-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, an Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Stanford Accelerator Center (SLAC). The OS measured employees` opinions on subjects such as organizational culture, communication, commitment, group cohesion, coordination, safety, environmental issues, and job satisfaction. The result of this work was a quantitative measure of the notion of culture at the SLAC site. This report presents these results and discusses their interpretation.

  1. Organizational cultural survey of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, an Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Stanford Accelerator Center (SLAC). The OS measured employees' opinions on subjects such as organizational culture, communication, commitment, group cohesion, coordination, safety, environmental issues, and job satisfaction. The result of this work was a quantitative measure of the notion of culture at the SLAC site. This report presents these results and discusses their interpretation.

  2. Organizational cultural survey of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, an Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The OS measured employees' opinions on subjects such as organizational culture, communication, commitment, group cohesion, coordination, safety, environmental issues, and job satisfaction. The result of this work was a quantitative measure of the notion of culture at the SLAC site. This report presents these results and discusses their interpretation.

  3. An organizational survey of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-11-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, an Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Stanford Accelerator Center (SLAC). The OS measured employees' opinions on subjects such as organizational culture, communication, commitment, group cohesion, coordination, safety, environmental issues, and job satisfaction. The result of this work was a quantitative measure of the notion of culture at the SLAC site. This report presents these results and discusses their interpretation.

  4. Activity of guard cell anion channel SLAC1 is controlled by drought-stress signaling kinase-phosphatase pair

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Dietmar; Scherzer, Sönke; Mumm, Patrick; Stange, Annette; Marten, Irene; Bauer, Hubert; Ache, Peter; Matschi, Susanne; Liese, Anja; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Romeis, Tina; Hedrich, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    In response to drought stress the phytohormone ABA (abscisic acid) induces stomatal closure and, therein, activates guard cell anion channels in a calcium-dependent as well as-independent manner. Two key components of the ABA signaling pathway are the protein kinase OST1 (open stomata 1) and the protein phosphatase ABI1 (ABA insensitive 1). The recently identified guard cell anion channel SLAC1 appeared to be the key ion channel in this signaling pathway but remained electrically silent when expressed heterologously. Using split YFP assays, we identified OST1 as an interaction partner of SLAC1 and ABI1. Upon coexpression of SLAC1 with OST1 in Xenopus oocytes, SLAC1-related anion currents appeared similar to those observed in guard cells. Integration of ABI1 into the SLAC1/OST1 complex, however, prevented SLAC1 activation. Our studies demonstrate that SLAC1 represents the slow, deactivating, weak voltage-dependent anion channel of guard cells controlled by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. PMID:19955405

  5. The Actin-Binding Domain of Slac2-a/Melanophilin Is Required for Melanosome Distribution in Melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Taruho S.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2003-01-01

    Melanosomes containing melanin pigments are transported from the cell body of melanocytes to the tips of their dendrites by a combination of microtubule- and actin-dependent machinery. Three proteins, Rab27A, myosin Va, and Slac2-a/melanophilin (a linker protein between Rab27A and myosin Va), are known to be essential for proper actin-based melanosome transport in melanocytes. Although Slac2-a directly interacts with Rab27A and myosin Va via its N-terminal region (amino acids 1 to 146) and the middle region (amino acids 241 to 405), respectively, the functional importance of the putative actin-binding domain of the Slac2-a C terminus (amino acids 401 to 590) in melanosome transport has never been elucidated. In this study we showed that formation of a tripartite protein complex between Rab27A, Slac2-a, and myosin Va alone is insufficient for peripheral distribution of melanosomes in melanocytes and that the C-terminal actin-binding domain of Slac2-a is also required for proper melanosome transport. When a Slac2-a deletion mutant (ΔABD) or point mutant (KA) that lacks actin-binding ability was expressed in melanocytes, the Slac2-a mutants induced melanosome accumulation in the perinuclear region, possibly by a dominant negative effect, the same as the Rab27A-binding-defective mutant of Slac2-a or the myosin Va-binding-defective mutant. Our findings indicate that Slac2-a organizes actin-based melanosome transport in cooperation with Rab27A, myosin Va, and actin. PMID:12861011

  6. Final Report: BaBar Detector and Experimental at SLAC, September 30, 1998 - September 29, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Dennis J.

    2000-01-20

    The Prairie View A&M University High Energy Physics Group with its contingent of three undergraduates physics majors, joined the BaBar Collaboration at SLAC in September 1994. BaBar is the experiment and detector running in the PEP-II ring at SLAC as part of the Asymmetric B Factory project there to study CP violation and heavy flavor physics. The focus of our effort before this year was with the Muon/Neutral Hadron Detector/Instrumented Flux Return (IFD) subgroup within the BaBar collaboration, and particularly with the GEANT simulation of the IFR. With the GEANT3 simulation essentially frozen, and the GEANT4 full simulation of the IFR done, we have decided to redirect our efforts toward other areas.

  7. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Weathersby, S P; Brown, G; Centurion, M; Chase, T F; Coffee, R; Corbett, J; Eichner, J P; Frisch, J C; Fry, A R; Gühr, M; Hartmann, N; Hast, C; Hettel, R; Jobe, R K; Jongewaard, E N; Lewandowski, J R; Li, R K; Lindenberg, A M; Makasyuk, I; May, J E; McCormick, D; Nguyen, M N; Reid, A H; Shen, X; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Vecchione, T; Vetter, S L; Wu, J; Yang, J; Dürr, H A; Wang, X J

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  8. Lattice design and optimization for the PEP-X ultra low emittance storage ring at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Min-Huey; Nosochkov, Yuri; Bane, Karl; Cai, Yunhai; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Xiaobiao; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    SLAC is developing a long-range plan to transfer the evolving scientific programs at SSRL from the SPEAR3 light source to a much higher performing photon source. One of the possibilities is a new PEP-X 4.5 GeV storage ring that would be housed in the 2.2 km PEP-II tunnel. The PEP-X is designed to produce photon beams having brightness near 10{sup 22} (ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW) at 10 keV with 3.5 m undulator at beam current of 1.5 A. This report presents an overview of the PEP-X baseline lattice design and describes the lattice optimization procedures in order to maximize the beam dynamic aperture. The complete report of PEP-X baseline design is published in SLAC report.

  9. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Centurion, M.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; Nguyen, M. N.; Reid, A. H.; Shen, X.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Vecchione, T.; Vetter, S. L.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Dürr, H. A.; Wang, X. J.

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  10. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K. Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  11. A 2--4 nm Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the use of the SLAC linac to drive a unique, powerful. short wavelength Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Operating as an FEL, lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a high peak current electron beam through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The main components are a high-brightness rf photocathode electron gun; pulse compressors; about 1/5 of the SLAC linac; and a long undulator with a FODO quadrupole focussing system. Using electrons below 8 GeV, the system would operate at wavelengths down to about 3 nm, producing {ge}10 GW peak power in sub-ps pulses. At a 120 Hz rate the average power is {approx} 1 W.

  12. Proposal for a one GeV plasma wakefield acceleration experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.; Chen, P.; Decker, F.J.

    1998-04-01

    A plasma-based wakefield acceleration experiment E-157 has been approved at SLAC to study acceleration of parts of an SLC bunch by up to 1 GeV/m over a length of 1 m. A single SLC bunch is used to both induce wakefields in the one meter long plasma and to witness the resulting beam acceleration. The experiment will explore and further development the techniques that are needed to apply high-gradient plasma wakefield acceleration to large scale accelerators. The one meter length of the experiment is about two orders of magnitude larger than other high gradient plasma wakefield acceleration experiments and the 1 GeV/m accelerating gradient is roughly ten times larger than that achieved with conventional metallic structures. Using existing SLAC facilities, the experiment will study high gradient acceleration at the forefront of advanced accelerator research.

  13. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Taiee

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  14. Gas system Upgrade for the BaBar IFR Detector at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Foulkes, S

    2004-07-29

    A new gas distribution and monitoring system was installed as part of an upgrade of the forward endcap muon detection system (IFR) of the BaBar detector at SLAC. Over 300 gas circuits are controlled and monitored. The return gas flow is monitored by digital bubblers which use photo-gate electronics to count the bubbling rate. The rates are monitored in real time and recorded in a history database allowing studies of flow rate versus chamber performance.

  15. Preliminary Results of the Echo-Seeding Experiment ECHO-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Ding, Y.; Dunning, M.; Frederico, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Corlett, J.; Qiang, J.; Penn, G.; Prestemon, S.; /LBL, Berkeley /LPHE, Lausanne

    2010-06-15

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment aims to generate coherent radiation at 318 nm and 227 nm, which are the 5th and 7th harmonic of the infrared seed laser. In this paper we present the preliminary results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  16. Nucleon resonance electroproduction at high momentum transers: Results from SLAC and suggestions for CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, C.

    1994-04-01

    Nucleon resonance electroproduction results from SLAC Experiment E14OX are presented. A CEBAF facility with doubled energy would enable similar high momentum transfer measurements to be made with greater accuracy. Of particular interest are the Delta P{sub 33}(1232) resonance form factor and R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T}, the ratio of the longitudinal and transverse components of the cross section. A suggestion is made to study these quantities in conjunction with Bloom-Gilman duality.

  17. The analog processing system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter for SLD at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.M.; Nelson, D.; Freytag, D.R.

    1986-09-01

    The analog processing system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter for the SLD project at SLAC is described. Amplification, storage of the analog information, and multiplexing is realized on specially developed hybrids, which will be mounted directly on the detector. This leads to a substantial reduction of the cable plant. Test results for the amplifier and for the sampling and multiplexing hybrid (CDU hybrid) are presented. The latter hybird contains a custom monolithic device, the Calorimeter Data Unit (CDU).

  18. Evaluation and measurements of radioactive air emission and off-site doses at SLAC.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ivy; Liu, James; Tran, Henry

    2013-08-01

    SLAC, a high-energy (GeV) electron accelerator facility, performs experimental and theoretical research using high-energy electron and/or positron beams that can produce secondary neutron and gamma radiation when beam losses occur. Radioactive gas production (mainly C, N, O, Ar) and release is one of the environmental protection program issues. U.S. DOE Order 458.1 requires that 40 CFR 61 Subpart H's NESHAP requirements be followed. These regulations prescribe a total dose limit of 0.1 mSv y to the Maximally Exposed Individual (MEI) of the general public, a requirement for a continuous air monitoring system if a release point within a facility can cause > 1 × 10 mSv y to the MEI, and a requirement for periodic confirmatory measurements for minor sources which give releases that contribute ≤ 1 × 10 mSv y to the MEI. At SLAC, all air release points for current operations are evaluated to be minor sources. This paper describes SLAC's evaluation following NESHAP requirements; measurements using the Air Monitoring Station (AMS) as periodic confirmatory measurements are also discussed.

  19. Germline Mutation in EXPH5 Implicates the Rab27B Effector Protein Slac2-b in Inherited Skin Fragility

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, John A.; Stone, Kristina L.; Begum, Rumena; Simpson, Michael A.; Dopping-Hepenstal, Patricia J.; Liu, Lu; McMillan, James R.; South, Andrew P.; Pourreyron, Celine; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Martinez, Anna E.; Mellerio, Jemima E.; Parsons, Maddy

    2012-01-01

    The Rab GTPase Rab27B and one of its effector proteins, Slac2-b (also known as EXPH5, exophilin-5), have putative roles in intracellular vesicle trafficking but their relevance to human disease is not known. By using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in EXPH5 in three siblings with inherited skin fragility born to consanguineous Iraqi parents. All three individuals harbor the mutation c.5786delC (p.Pro1929Leufs∗8) in EXPH5, which truncates the 1,989 amino acid Slac2-b protein by 52 residues. The clinical features comprised generalized scale-crusts and occasional blisters, mostly induced by trauma, as well as mild diffuse pigmentary mottling on the trunk and proximal limbs. There was no increased bleeding tendency, no neurologic abnormalities, and no increased incidence of infection. Analysis of an affected person's skin showed loss of Slac2-b immunostaining (C-terminal antibody), disruption of keratinocyte adhesion within the lower epidermis, and an increased number of perinuclear vesicles. A role for Slac2-b in keratinocyte biology was supported by findings of cytoskeletal disruption (mainly keratin intermediate filaments) and decreased keratinocyte adhesion in both keratinocytes from an affected subject and after shRNA knockdown of Slac2-b in normal keratinocytes. Slac2-b was also shown to colocalize with Rab27B and β4 integrin to early adhesion initiation sites in spreading normal keratinocytes. Collectively, our findings identify an unexpected role for Slac2-b in inherited skin fragility and expand the clinical spectrum of human disorders of GTPase effector proteins. PMID:23176819

  20. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-09-06

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE{sub 01}-TE{sub 10} mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ({ge} 1 {mu}s) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 {mu}s pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated

  1. Progress in L-Band Power Distribution System R&D at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; Wang, Faya; /SLAC

    2008-10-20

    We report on the L-band RF power distribution system (PDS) developed at SLAC for Fermilab's NML superconducting test accelerator facility. The makeup of the system, which allows tailoring of the power distribution to cavities by pairs, is briefly described. Cold test measurements of the system and the results of high power processing are presented. We also investigate the feasibility of eliminating the expensive, lossy circulators from the PDS by pair-feeding cavities through custom 3-dB hybrids. A computational model is used to simulate the impact on cavity field stability due to the reduced cavity-to-cavity isolation.

  2. Requirements for use of nonmedical x-ray generators at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Busick, D.D.

    1984-09-01

    The risks associated with use of x-ray equipment have long been recognized. While the relative frequency of x-ray damage is small, machine produced x-rays and large radiography sources continue to account for a large percentage of preventable radiation injuries reported worldwide. The intent of this report is to formalize SLAC's radiation safety program as it applies to radiation producing equipment (diffraction, fluorescence analysis and nondestructive testing). It does not apply to the two-mile linac, experimental areas or other x-ray producing equipment directly related to the high energy physics program. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Status of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL B-Factory and the BaBar detector

    SciTech Connect

    Oddone, P.

    1994-08-01

    The primary motivation of the Asymmetric B-Factory is the study of CP violation. The decay of B mesons and, in particular, the decay of neutral B mesons, offers the possibility of determining conclusively whether CP violation is part and parcel of the Standard Model with three generations of quarks and leptons. Alternatively, the authors may discover that CP violation lies outside the present framework. In this paper the authors briefly describe the physics reach of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL Asymmetric B-Factory, the progress on the machine design and construction, the progress on the detector design, and the schedule to complete both projects.

  4. Spin-structure function of the neutron ({sup 3}He): SLAC results

    SciTech Connect

    Meziani, Z.E.; E-142 Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    A first measurement of the longitudinal asymmetry of deep-inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target at energies ranging from 19 to 26 GeV has been performed at SLAC. The spin-structure function of the neutron g{sub 1}{sup n} has been extracted from the measured asymmetries allowing for a test of the Ellis-Jaffe and Bjorken sum rules. The Quark Parton Model (QPM) interpretation of the nucleon spin-structure function is examined in light of the new results.

  5. A 4 to 0.1 nm FEL Based on the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2012-06-05

    The author show that using existing electron gun technology and a high energy linac like the one at SLAC, it is possible to build a Free Electron Laser operating around the 4 nm water window. A modest improvement in the gun performance would further allow to extend the FEL to the 0.1 nm region. Such a system would produce radiation with a brightness many order of magnitude above that of any synchrotron radiation source, existing or under construction, with laser power in the multigawatt region and subpicosecond pulse length.

  6. TOSCA calculations and measurements for the SLAC SLC damping ring dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Early, R.A.; Cobb, J.K.

    1985-04-01

    The SLAC damping ring dipole magnet was originally designed with removable nose pieces at the ends. Recently, a set of magnetic measurements was taken of the vertical component of induction along the center of the magnet for four different pole-end configurations and several current settings. The three dimensional computer code TOSCA, which is currently installed on the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center's Cray X-MP, was used to compute field values for the four configurations at current settings near saturation. Comparisons were made for magnetic induction as well as effective magnetic lengths for the different configurations. 1 ref., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  8. The optical design of the spin manipulation system for the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.H.

    1989-03-01

    The optical design of the beam transport lines between the SLAC Linac and the electron damping ring and the design of part of the Linac lattice itself will be modified to accommodate three superconducting solenoids for the purpose of manipulating the polarization of the electron beam. In order to allow arbitrary orientation of the polarization vector, this design will be capable of compensating the fields of two independent solenoids for arbitrary strengths ranging to 7.0 T-m. The method of dealing with the coupling of the betatron functions and the method of handling both the electron and positron beams in the common region are discussed. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  9. The proposed alignment system for the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.; Fischer, G.E.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the current state of work in progress with respect to the geometry, alignment requirements, scenarios, and hardware for meeting the tolerances of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at SLAC. The methods and systems proposed acknowledge that component motion at the micron level, from whatever cause (ground motion, thermal effects, etc.) must be measured on-line and compensated for on relatively short time scales. To provide an integrated alignment/positioning package, some unique designs for reference systems, calibration of effect electric and magnetic centers, and component movers are introduced. 24 refs., 28 figs.

  10. Biology of the Mi-2/NuRD Complex in SLAC (Stemness, Longevity/Ageing, and Cancer)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic chromatin activities of Mi-2/Nucleosome Remodeling and Histone deacetylation (Mi-2/NuRD) complexes in mammals are at the basis of current research on stemness, longevity/ageing, and cancer (4-2-1/SLAC), and have been widely studied over the past decade in mammals and the elegant model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. Interestingly, a common emergent theme from these studies is that of distinct coregulator-recruited Mi-2/NuRD complexes largely orchestrating the 4-2-1/SLAC within a unique paradigm by maintaining genome stability via DNA repair and controlling three types of transcriptional programs in concert in a number of cellular, tissue, and organism contexts. Thus, the core Mi-2/NuRD complex plays a central role in 4-2-1/SLAC. The plasticity and robustness of 4-2-1/SLAC can be interpreted as modulation of specific coregulator(s) within cell-specific, tissue-specific, stage-specific, or organism-specific niches during stress induction, ie, a functional module and its networking, thereby conferring differential responses to different environmental cues. According to “Occam’s razor”, a simple theory is preferable to a complex one, so this simplified notion might be useful for exploring 4-2-1/SLAC with a holistic view. This thought could also be valuable in forming strategies for future research, and could open up avenues for cancer prevention and antiageing strategies. PMID:21523247

  11. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

    The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is a collection of stellar evolution tracks and isochrones that spans a range of [Fe/H] from -2.5 to +0.5, [a/Fe] from -0.2 to +0.8 (for [Fe/H]<=0) or +0.2 (for [Fe/H]>0), and initial He mass fractions from Y=0.245 to 0.40. Stellar evolution tracks were computed for masses between 0.1 and 4 Msolar, allowing isochrones to be generated for ages as young as 250 Myr. For the range in masses where the core He flash occurs, separate He-burning tracks were computed starting from the zero age horizontal branch. The tracks and isochrones have been transformed to the observational plane in a variety of photometric systems including standard UBV(RI)C, Stromgren uvby, SDSS ugriz, 2MASS JHKs, and HST ACS/WFC and WFPC2. The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is accessible through a Web site at http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/ where all tracks, isochrones, and additional files can be downloaded. [Copied from online abstract of paper titled "Darmouth Stellar Evolution Database" authored by Dotter, Chaboyer, Jevremovic, Kostov, Baron, Ferguson, and Jason. Abstract is located at http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ApJS..178...89D] Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

  12. ACS: ALMA Common Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, Gianluca; Šekoranja, Matej

    2013-02-01

    ALMA Common Software (ACS) provides a software infrastructure common to all ALMA partners and consists of a documented collection of common patterns and components which implement those patterns. The heart of ACS is based on a distributed Component-Container model, with ACS Components implemented as CORBA objects in any of the supported programming languages. ACS provides common CORBA-based services such as logging, error and alarm management, configuration database and lifecycle management. Although designed for ALMA, ACS can and is being used in other control systems and distributed software projects, since it implements proven design patterns using state of the art, reliable technology. It also allows, through the use of well-known standard constructs and components, that other team members whom are not authors of ACS easily understand the architecture of software modules, making maintenance affordable even on a very large project.

  13. Performance of the SLC polarized electron source and injector with the SLAC 3 km linac configured for fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Alley, R.K.; Clendenin, J.E.

    1993-03-01

    The SLC polarized electron source (PES) can be modified to produce {mu}sec-long pulses for injection into the un-SLEDed SLAC 3 km linac, with a duty factor considerably higher than for SLC. Such beams are desirable for fixed target experiments at SLAC requiring polarized electron beams of up to 50 mA within an energy spread of 0.5%, at energies of up to 26 GeV. During the fall of 1992, the SLAC linac was operated continuously for two months unSLEDed with the PES dye laser (715 nm) modified to produce a 1{mu}ec pulse at 120Hz. An AlGaAs photocathode was installed in the electron gun to achieve 40% polarization, and a prebuncher was added to the SLC injector to improve capture for long pulse beams. We discuss the performance eo the polarized electron beam for long pulse operation.

  14. Production of high intensity electron bunches for the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.B.

    1987-08-01

    This thesis describes the design and performance of a high intensity electron injecfor for the SLAC Linear Collider. Motivation for the collider and the specifications for the injector are discussed. An analytic theory of the bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields is discussed in the limit of low space charge and small signal. The design and performance of SLAC's main injector are described to illustrate a successful application of this theory. The bunching and capture of electrons by rf fields are then discussed in the limit of high space charge and large signal, and a description of the design of the collider injector follows. In the limit of high space charge forces and large rf signals, the beam dynamics are considerably more complex and numerical simulations are required to predict particle motion. A computer code which models the longitudinal dynamics of electrons in the presence of space charge and rf fields is described. The results of the simulations, the resulting collider injector design and the various components which make up the collider injector are described. These include the gun, subharmonic bunchers, traveling-wave buncher and velocity-of-light accelerator section. Finally, the performance of the injector is described including the beam intensity, bunch length, transverse emittance and energy spectrum. While the final operating conditions differ somewaht from the design, the performance of the collider injector is in good agreement with the numerical simulations and meets all of the collider specifications. 28 refs.

  15. Ground motion measurements at the LBL Light Source site, the Bevatron and at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Majer, E.I.; More, V.D.; O'Connell, D.R.; Shilling, R.C.

    1986-12-01

    This report describes the technique for measuring ground motion at the site of the 1.0 to 2.0 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Facility which was known as the Advanced Light Source (in 1983 when the measurements were taken). The results of ground motion measurements at the Light Source site at Building 6 at LBL are presented. As comparison, ground motion measurements were made at the Byerly Tunnel, the Bevatron, Blackberry Canyon, and SLAC at the Spear Ring. Ground Motion at the Light Source site was measured in a band from 4 to 100 Hz. The measured noise is primarily local in origin and is not easily transported through LBL soils. The background ground motion is for the most part less than 0.1 microns. Localized truck traffic near Building 6 and the operation of the cranes in the building can result in local ground motions of a micron or more for short periods of time. The background motion at Building 6 is between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude higher than ground motion in a quiet seismic tunnel, which is representative of quiet sites worldwide. The magnitude of the ground motions at SLAC and the Bevatron are comparable to ground motions measured at the Building 6 Light Source site. However, the frequency signature of each site is very different.

  16. Technical Design Report for the FACET-II Project at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-08-26

    Electrons can “surf” on waves of plasma – a hot gas of charged particles – gaining very high energies in very short distances. This approach, called plasma wakefield acceleration, has the potential to dramatically shrink the size and cost of particle accelerators. Research at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has demonstrated that plasmas can provide 1,000 times the acceleration in a given distance compared with current technologies. Developing revolutionary and more efficient acceleration techniques that allow for an affordable high-energy collider has been the focus of FACET, a National User Facility at SLAC. FACET used part of SLAC’s two-mile-long linear accelerator to generate high-density beams of electrons and their antimatter counterparts, positrons. Research into plasma wakefield acceleration was the primary motivation for constructing FACET. In April 2016, FACET operations came to an end to make way for the second phase of SLAC’s x-ray laser, the LCLS-II, which will use part of the tunnel occupied by FACET. FACET-II is a new test facility to provide the unique capability to develop advanced acceleration and coherent radiation techniques with high-energy electron and positron beams. FACET-II represents a major upgrade over current FACET capabilities and the breadth of the potential research program makes it truly unique.

  17. From the {psi} to charmed mesons: Three years with the SLAC-LBL detector at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, G.

    1992-06-01

    As I look back at the first three years or so at SPEAR, I consider this one of the most revolutionary or perhaps the most revolutionary, experiment in the 60 year history of particle physics. It certainly was the most exciting time, in a laboratory that is, that I have ever experienced. In my talk I will cover the period 1973--1976 which saw the discoveries of the {psi} and {psi}{prime} resonances the {chi} states and most of the Psion spectroscopy, the D{degree}, D{sup +}* charmed meson doublet as well as the D{degree}* and D{sup +}* doublet. I will also refer briefly to some more recent results. Most of the discoveries I will mention were made with the SLAC-LBL Magnetic Detector or ``MARK I`` which we operated at SPEAR from 1973 to 1976. In 1976 the MARK I was modified to include a ``Lead Glass Wall`` (LGW) for improved photon and electron detection. This involved a new physics group from LBL, who built the LGW, Lina Barbaro-Galtieri et al. as well as a continuing group from SLAC, Martin Perl and Gary Feldman et al. to provide continuity in the running of the MARK I and to continue the study of the anomalous e{mu}events which Martin found earlier and which eventually were identified as the signature of the {tau} lepton.

  18. Parameters for the PEP-II B-Factory at SLAC in 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.; Akre, R.; Bellomo, P.; Bertsche, Kirk J.; Chai, Y.; Chestnut, R.; Clendenin, J.; DeBarger, S.; Decker, F.J.; Dorfan, J.; Ecklund, S.; Erickson, R.; Fisher, A.; Fox, J.; Heifets, S.; Himel, T.; Iverson, R.; Humphrey, R.; Irwin, J.; Klaisner, L.; Kharakh, D.; /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley /Frascati

    2011-11-22

    The PEP-II B-Factory at SLAC (3.1 GeV e{sup +} x 9.0 GeV e{sup -}) operated from 1999 to 2008, delivering luminosity to the BaBar experiment. The design luminosity was reached after one and a half years of operation. In the end PEP-II surpassed, by four times, its design luminosity reaching 1.21 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. It also set world stored beam current records of 2.1 A e{sup -} and 3.2 A e{sup +}. Continuous injection was implemented with BaBar successfully taking data. The total delivered luminosity to the BaBar detector was 557.4 fb{sup -1} spanning five upsilon resonances. PEP-II was constructed by SLAC, LBNL, and LLNL with help from BINP, IHEP, the BaBar collaboration, and the US DOE OHEP.

  19. Measurements of ultimate accelerating gradients in the SLAC disk-loaded structure. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The work reported here describes measurements made to study the maximum attainable accelerating gradients in a conventional SLAC disk-loaded accelerator section of the constant-gradient type running at 2856 MHz. The objective was to reach an accelerating gradient of at least 100 MV/m. The accelerating gradient at which the SLAC disk-loaded waveguide runs routinely is approx. 9 MV/m (36 MW tubes without SLED) and approx. 12 MV/m with SLED I (2.5 ..mu..sec pulse). To reach 100 MV/m in a conventional 3 m constant-gradient section, one would need a klystron with a peak power output of 900 MW. since such a tube is not available, we decided to use a short standing-wave section in which the resonant fields would be allowed to build up. The design criteria for this section, the fabrication, matching and tuning, the experimental set-up and the results are described below.

  20. Results of the SLAC LCLS Gun High-Power RF Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Jongewaard, E.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; Wang, J.; Lewandowski, J.; Vlieks, A.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    The beam quality and operational requirements for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) currently being constructed at SLAC are exceptional, requiring the design of a new RF photocathode gun for the electron source. Based on operational experience at SLAC's GTF and SDL and ATF at BNL as well as other laboratories, the 1.6cell s-band (2856MHz) gun was chosen to be the best electron source for the LCLS, however a significant redesign was necessary to achieve the challenging parameters. Detailed 3-D analysis and design was used to produce near-perfect rotationally symmetric rf fields to achieve the emittance requirement. In addition, the thermo-mechanical design allows the gun to operate at 120Hz and a 140MV/m cathode field, or to an average power dissipation of 4kW. Both average and pulsed heating issues are addressed in the LCLS gun design. The first LCLS gun is now fabricated and has been operated with high-power RF. The results of these high-power tests are presented and discussed.

  1. Advocacy for the Archives and History Office of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: Stages and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Deken, Jean Marie; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Advocating for the good of the SLAC Archives and History Office (AHO) has not been a one-time affair, nor has it been a one-method procedure. It has required taking time to ascertain the current and perhaps predict the future climate of the Laboratory, and it has required developing and implementing a portfolio of approaches to the goal of building a stronger archive program by strengthening and appropriately expanding its resources. Among the successful tools in the AHO advocacy portfolio, the Archives Program Review Committee has been the most visible. The Committee and the role it serves as well as other formal and informal advocacy efforts are the focus of this case study My remarks today will begin with a brief introduction to advocacy and outreach as I understand them, and with a description of the Archives and History Office's efforts to understand and work within the corporate culture of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. I will then share with you some of the tools we have employed to advocate for the Archives and History Office programs and activities; and finally, I will talk about how well - or badly - those tools have served us over the past decade.

  2. Reconstitution of abscisic acid activation of SLAC1 anion channel by CPK6 and OST1 kinases and branched ABI1 PP2C phosphatase action.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Benjamin; Brodsky, Dennis E; Xue, Shaowu; Negi, Juntaro; Iba, Koh; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Ghassemian, Majid; Stephan, Aaron B; Hu, Honghong; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-06-26

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is produced in response to abiotic stresses and mediates stomatal closure in response to drought via recently identified ABA receptors (pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor; PYR/RCAR). SLAC1 encodes a central guard cell S-type anion channel that mediates ABA-induced stomatal closure. Coexpression of the calcium-dependent protein kinase 21 (CPK21), CPK23, or the Open Stomata 1 kinase (OST1) activates SLAC1 anion currents. However, reconstitution of ABA activation of any plant ion channel has not yet been attained. Whether the known core ABA signaling components are sufficient for ABA activation of SLAC1 anion channels or whether additional components are required remains unknown. The Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase CPK6 is known to function in vivo in ABA-induced stomatal closure. Here we show that CPK6 robustly activates SLAC1-mediated currents and phosphorylates the SLAC1 N terminus. A phosphorylation site (S59) in SLAC1, crucial for CPK6 activation, was identified. The group A PP2Cs ABI1, ABI2, and PP2CA down-regulated CPK6-mediated SLAC1 activity in oocytes. Unexpectedly, ABI1 directly dephosphorylated the N terminus of SLAC1, indicating an alternate branched early ABA signaling core in which ABI1 targets SLAC1 directly (down-regulation). Furthermore, here we have successfully reconstituted ABA-induced activation of SLAC1 channels in oocytes using the ABA receptor pyrabactin resistant 1 (PYR1) and PP2C phosphatases with two alternate signaling cores including either CPK6 or OST1. Point mutations in ABI1 disrupting PYR1-ABI1 interaction abolished ABA signal transduction. Moreover, by addition of CPK6, a functional ABA signal transduction core from ABA receptors to ion channel activation was reconstituted without a SnRK2 kinase.

  3. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury. II. Young Stars and their Relation to Hα and UV Emission Timescales in the M81 Outer Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Weisz, Daniel; Skillman, Evan; Holtzman, Jon; Cole, Andrew; Girardi, Leo; de Jong, Roelof S.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Olsen, Knut; Rosema, Keith

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained resolved stellar photometry from Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of a field in the outer disk of M81 as part of ANGST. Motivated by the recent discovery of extended UV disks around many nearby spiral galaxies, we use the observed stellar population to derive the recent star formation histories of five ~ 0.5 kpc-sized regions within this field. These regions were selected on the basis of their UV luminosity from GALEX and include two H II regions, two regions that are UV-bright but Hα-faint, and one "control" region faint in both UV and Hα. We estimate our effective star formation rate detection limit at ~2 × 10-4 M sun yr-1, which is lower than that of GALEX for regions of this size. As expected, the H II regions contain massive main-sequence stars (in the mass range 18-27 M sun, based on our best extinction estimates), while similar massive main-sequence stars are lacking in the UV-bright/Hα-faint regions. The observations are consistent with stellar ages lsim 10 Myr in the H II regions, and gsim 16 Myr in the UV-bright/Hα-faint regions. All regions but the control have formed ~ 104 M sun of stars over the past ~ 65 Myr. Thus, our results, for at least one small area in the outer disk of M81, are consistent with an age difference being sufficient to explain the observed discrepancy between star forming regions detected in Hα and those detected exclusively in UV. However, our data cannot conclusively rule out other explanations, such as a strongly truncated initial mass function.

  4. A summary of ground motion effects at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) resulting from the Oct 17th 1989 earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1990-08-01

    Ground motions resulting from the October 17th 1989 (Loma Prieta) earthquake are described and can be correlated with some geologic features of the SLAC site. Recent deformations of the linac are also related to slow motions observed over the past 20 years. Measured characteristics of the earthquake are listed. Some effects on machine components and detectors are noted. 18 refs., 16 figs.

  5. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.T.; Wang, X.J.; Miller, R.H.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pellegrini, C.; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; Winick, H.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  6. Highlights of the SLD Physics Program at the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Willocq, Stephane

    2001-09-07

    Starting in 1989, and continuing through the 1990s, high-energy physics witnessed a flowering of precision measurements in general and tests of the standard model in particular, led by e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments operating at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Key contributions to this work came from the SLD collaboration at the SLAC Linear Collider. By exploiting the unique capabilities of this pioneering accelerator and the SLD detector, including a polarized electron beam, exceptionally small beam dimensions, and a CCD pixel vertex detector, SLD produced a broad array of electroweak, heavy-flavor, and QCD measurements. Many of these results are one of a kind or represent the world's standard in precision. This article reviews the highlights of the SLD physics program, with an eye toward associated advances in experimental technique, and the contribution of these measurements to our dramatically improved present understanding of the standard model and its possible extensions.

  7. Analysis of the Wakefield Effects in the PEP-II SLAC B-FACTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    We present the history and analysis of different wake field effects throughout the operational life of the PEP-II SLAC B-factory. Although the impedance of the high and low energy rings is small, the intense high current beams generated a lot of power. The effects from these wake fields are: heating and damage of vacuum beam chamber elements like RF seals, vacuum valves , shielded bellows, BPM buttons and ceramic tiles; vacuum spikes, vacuum instabilities and high detector background; beam longitudinal and transverse instabilities. We also discuss the methods used to eliminate these effects. Results of this analysis and the PEP-II experience may be very useful in the design of new storage rings and light sources.

  8. A New High Power Klystron for the SLAC B-Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Heinz D.

    2003-05-28

    A new klystron for driving the SLAC B-Factory is currently under development at Philips. Detailed numerical analysis has been carried out in order to meet all the requirements. Particular attention is paid to the bandwidth and phase behavior of the tube because the upper limit in group delay is given by the control system of the B-Factory. Although bandwidth and efficiency are competing demands--not easily met by the same design--the simulation predicts very high efficiency. Another important aspect which is being taken into account for the design is operational stability of the tube. The design concept and numerical as well as measurement results will be presented.

  9. Lattice design for the high energy ring of the SLAC B-Factory (PEP-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R.; Cai, Y.; Irwin, J.

    1995-04-01

    The design of the lattice for the High Energy Ring (HER) of the SLAC B-Factory has several special features, notably provision for octupole compensation of amplitude dependent tune shift effects and a beta-beat scheme for semi-local chromaticity correction. In the arcs adjacent to the interaction point (IP) the beta functions are enhanced to allow the use of non-interlaced sextupoles to compensate the chromaticity of the interaction region. A closed bump of beta {open_quotes}mismatch{close_quotes} is generated by two vertically focusing quadrupoles spaced 2 betatron wavelengths apart. The beta-beat has two advantages: it enhances the ratio between the horizontal and vertical beta functions at the sextupoles and, because of the locally higher beta function, allows weaker sextupoles to be used. The standard design uses a 60 degree/cell lattice but a 90 degree/cell lattice may also be used if lower emittances and momentum compaction factor are desired.

  10. Measurements of ultimate accelerating gradients in the SLAC disk-loaded structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.

    1985-03-01

    This paper is a status report on an on-going program at SLAC to study accelerator structures under high-gradient electric field conditions. The study is a part of a much broader program dealing with future linear colliders. The accelerating gradient that might be achievable in such machines is a crucial parameter because once the beam energy is selected, the gradient determines the length of the linac and directly or indirectly affects the choice of many other parameters. To reach 100 MV/m in a conventional 3 m constant-gradient section without SLED, one would need a klystron with a peak power output of 900 MW. Since such a tube is not available, we decided to use a short standing-wave section in which the resonant fields can build up. The design criteria for this section, the fabrication, matching and tuning, the experimental set-up and the results are described. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. SLAC T-510: Radio emission from particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulrey, Katharine

    2017-03-01

    Cosmic ray induced particle cascades radiate in radio frequencies in the Earth's atmosphere. Geomagnetic and Askaryan emission provide an effective way to detect ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The SLAC T-510 experiment was the first to measure magnetically induced radiation from particle cascades in a controlled laboratory setting. An electron beam incident upon a dense dielectric target produced a particle cascade in the presence of a variable magnetic field. Antennas covering a band of 30-3000 MHz sampled RF emission in vertical and horizontal polarizations. Results from T-510 are compared to particle-level RF-emission simulations which are critical for reconstructing the energy and composition of detected ultra-high energy cosmic ray air showers. We discuss the experimental set up, the data processing, the systematic errors and the main results of the experiment, which we found in a good agreement with the simulations.

  12. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC and its Radiological Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, X.S.; Leitner, M.Santana; Vollaire, J.

    2011-08-22

    Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) in SLAC will be used to study plasma wakefield acceleration. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design a maze wall to separate FACET project and LCLS project to allow persons working in FACET side during LCLS operation. Also FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design the shielding for FACET dump to get optimum design for shielding both prompt and residual doses, as well as reducing environmental impact. FACET will be an experimental facility that provides short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons to excite plasma wakefields and study a variety of critical issues associated with plasma wakefield acceleration [1]. This paper describes the FACET beam parameters, the lay-out and its radiological issues.

  13. Committee Report of the BEPC-II Project Design Review May 13-15, 2002, SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Traci M.

    2002-08-26

    As part of the US-China Cooperative Program in High Energy Physics for the year 2002, a BEPC-II Upgrade Review meeting was held at SLAC, May 13-15, 2002. The upgrade is aimed at improving the luminosity and performance of the BEPC facility at IHEP in Beijing, China with major upgrades to the injector linac, storage ring, and detector. This review addresses mainly the accelerator related issues. Prior to the review, an updated Draft Design Report was made available to the review team. Most important technical change since April 2001 has been a change from a single-ring configuration to a doublering. The goal of the review is to determine whether BEPC-II, if built as described, will meet the operations and physics goals. The charge to the review team is attached as Appendix A.

  14. 3D Modeling Activity for Novel High Power Electron Guns at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2003-07-29

    The next generation of powerful electronic devices requires new approaches to overcome the known limitations of existing tube technology. Multi-beam and sheet beam approaches are novel concepts for the high power microwave devices. Direct and indirect modeling methods are being developed at SLAC to meet the new requirements in the 3D modeling. The direct method of solving of Poisson's equations for the multi-beam and sheet beam guns is employed in the TOPAZ 3D tool. The combination of TOPAZ 2D and EGUN (in the beginning) with MAFIA 3D and MAGIC 3D (at the end) is used in an indirect method to model the high power electron guns. Both methods complement each other to get reliable representation of the beam trajectories. Several gun ideas are under consideration at the present time. The collected results of these simulations are discussed.

  15. An Ultra-High Gradient Cherenkov Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at SLAC FFTB

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Hoover, S.; Hogan, M.J.; Muggli, P.; Thompson, M.; Travish, G.; Yoder, R.; /UCLA /SLAC /Southern California U.

    2005-08-02

    The creation of ultra-high current, ultra-short pulse beams Q=3 nC, {sigma}{sub z} = 20{micro}m at the SLAC FFTB has opened the way for very high gradient plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. We study here the use of these beams in a proposed Cherenkov wakefield experiment, where one may excite electromagnetic wakes in a simple dielectric tube with inner diameter of few 100 microns that exceed the GV/m level. We discuss the scaling of the fields with design geometric design parameters, and choice of dielectric. We also examine measurable aspects of the experiment, such as the total coherent Cerenkov radiation energy one may collect, and the expected aspects of dielectric breakdown at high fields.

  16. Measurement of the Left-Right Asymmetry in Z0 Events at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Szumilo, A

    2004-01-05

    Recent results from the 1992 and 1993 left-right asymmetry cross section measurements at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center are presented. Measurements made with SLAC running with a center-of-mass energy at the Z{sup 0}-pole (91.2 GeV) by the SLD detector and an average electron beam polarization of 22.4 {+-} 0.7% for 1992 and 62.6 {+-} 1.2% for 1993. The asymmetry measured was A{sub LR} = 0.100 {+-} 0.044 and A{sub LR} = 0.1656 {+-} 0.0073 for the 1992 and 1993 runs, respectively. This in turn allows them to calculate the weak mixing angle value of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} = 0.2378 {+-} 0.0056 and sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} = 0.2288 {+-} 0.0009 for the two data sets.

  17. Computer modelling of bunch-by-bunch feedback for the SLAC B-factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, D.; Fox, J.D.; Hosseini, W.; Klaisner, L.; Morton, P.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Thompson, K.A. ); Lambertson, G. )

    1991-05-01

    The SLAC B-factory design, with over 1600 high current bunches circulating in each ring, will require a feedback system to avoid coupled-bunch instabilities. A computer model of the storage ring, including the RF system, wave fields, synchrotron radiation loss, and the bunch-by-bunch feedback system is presented. The feedback system model represents the performance of a fast phase detector front end (including system noise and imperfections), a digital filter used to generate a correction voltage, and a power amplifier and beam kicker system. The combined ring-feedback system model is used to study the feedback system performance required to suppress instabilities and to quantify the dynamics of the system. Results are presented which show the time development of coupled bunch instabilities and the damping action of the feedback system. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. 600 kV modulator design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.; de Lamare, J.; Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1992-07-01

    Preliminary design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) requires a pulse power source to produce a 600 kV, 600 A, 1.4 {mu}s, 0.1% flat top pulse with rise and fall times of approximately 100 ns to power an X-Band klystron with a microperveance of 1.25 at {approx} 100 MW peak RF power. The design goals for the modulator, including those previously listed, are peak modulator pulse power of 340 MW operating at 120 Hz. A three-stage darlington pulse-forming network, which produces a >100 kV, 1.4 {mu}s pulse, is coupled to the klystron load through a 6:1 pulse transformer. Careful consideration of the transformer leakage inductance, klystron capacitance, system layout, and component choice is necessary to produce the very fast rise and fall times at 600 kV operating continuously at 120 Hz.

  19. SLAC E155 and E155x Numeric Data Results and Data Plots: Nucleon Spin Structure Functions

    DOE Data Explorer

    The nucleon spin structure functions g1 and g2 are important tools for testing models of nucleon structure and QCD. Experiments at CERN, DESY, and SLAC have measured g1 and g2 using deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons on polarized nucleon targets. The results of these experiments have established that the quark component of the nucleon helicity is much smaller than naive quark-parton model predictions. The Bjorken sum rule has been confirmed within the uncertainties of experiment and theory. The experiment E155 at SLAC collected data in March and April of 1997. Approximately 170 million scattered electron events were recorded to tape. (Along with several billion inclusive hadron events.) The data were collected using three independent fixed-angle magnetic spectrometers, at approximately 2.75, 5.5, and 10.5 degrees. The momentum acceptance of the 2.75 and 5.5 degree spectrometers ranged from 10 to 40 GeV, with momentum resolution of 2-4%. The 10.5 degree spectrometer, new for E155, accepted events of 7 GeV to 20 GeV. Each spectrometer used threshold gas Cerenkov counters (for particle ID), a segmented lead-glass calorimeter (for energy measurement and particle ID), and plastic scintillator hodoscopes (for tracking and momentum measurement). The polarized targets used for E155 were 15NH3 and 6LiD, as targets for measuring the proton and deuteron spin structure functions respectively. Experiment E155x recently concluded a successful two-month run at SLAC. The experiment was designed to measure the transverse spin structure functions of the proton and deuteron. The E155 target was also recently in use at TJNAF's Hall C (E93-026) and was returned to SLAC for E155x. E155x hopes to reduce the world data set errors on g2 by a factor of three. [Copied from http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e155/e155_nickeltour.html, an information summary linked off the E155 home page at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e155/e155_home.html. The extension run, E155x, also makes

  20. Radiation Safety Aspects of the Linac Coherent Light Source Project At SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Mao, S.; Vincke, H.; /SLAC /LCLS

    2005-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission based Free Electron Laser (FEL) that is being designed and built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) by a multilaboratory collaboration. This facility will provide ultra-short pulses of coherent x-ray radiation with the fundamental harmonic energy tunable over the energy range of 0.82 to 8.2 keV. One-third of the existing SLAC LINAC will compress and accelerate the electron beam to energies ranging from 4.5 GeV to 14.35 GeV. The beam will then be transported through a 130-meter long undulator, emit FEL and spontaneous radiation. After passing through the undulator, the electron beam is bent to the main electron dump. The LCLS will have two experiment halls as well as x-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to make use of the FEL for research and development in a variety of scientific fields. The facility design will incorporate features that would make it possible to expand in future such that up to 6 independent undulators can be used. While some of the radiation protection issues for the LCLS are similar to those encountered at both high-energy electron linacs and synchrotron radiation facilities, LCLS poses new challenges as well. Some of these new issues include: the length of the facility and of the undulator, the experimental floor in line with the electron beam and the occupancy near zero degrees, and the very high instantaneous intensity of the FEL. The shielding design criteria, methodology, and results from Monte Carlo and analytical calculations are presented.

  1. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  2. A Proof-Of-Principle Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Michael; Colby, Eric; Ding, Yuantao; Frederico, Joel; Gilevich, Sasha; Hast, Carsten; Jobe, R.; McCormick, Douglas; Nelson, Janice; Raubenheimer, Tor; Soong, Ken; Stupakov, Gennady; Szalata, Zenon; Walz, Dieter; Weathersby, Stephen; Woodley, Mark; Xiang, Dao; Corlett, John; Penn, Gregory; Prestemon, Soren; Qiang, Ji; /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /LPHE, Lausanne

    2011-05-20

    In this paper we describe the technical design of an ongoing proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) experiment at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC.We present the design considerations and the technical details of the experiment. Recently a new method, entitled echo-enabled harmonic generation, was proposed for generation of high harmonics using the beam echo effect. In an EEHG free electron laser (FEL), an electron beam is energy modulated in a modulator and then sent through a dispersive section with a high dispersion strength. After this first stage, the modulation obtained in the modulator is macroscopically washed out, while simultaneously introducing complicated fine structure (separated energy bands) into the phase space of the beam. A second laser is used to further modulate the beam energy in a second modulator. After passing through a second dispersive section, the separated energy bands will be converted into current modulation and the echo signal then occurs as a recoherence effect caused by the mixing of the correlations between the modulation in the second modulator and the fine structures in the beam. The EEHG scheme has a remarkable up-frequency conversion efficiency; it has been shown that the EEHG FEL scheme may allow generation of soft x-rays directly from a UV seed laser in a single stage. In order to confirm the physics behind the EEHG technique and benchmark the theory, a proof-of-principleEEHG experimentwas planned at SLAC. The experiment is now in a commissioning stage and the preliminary results are reported in a separate paper of these proceedings. In this paper we present the design considerations and the details of the experiment setup.

  3. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  4. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  5. ACS Symposium Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Jordan

    2010-02-20

    The funds from this DOE grant were used to help cover the travel costs of five students and postdoctoral fellows who attended a symposium on 'Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solutions' held at the Fall 2007 American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23. The Symposium was sponsored by the Physical Chemistry Division, ACS. The technical program for the meeting is available at http://phys-acs.org/fall2007.html.

  6. Site- and kinase-specific phosphorylation-mediated activation of SLAC1, a guard cell anion channel stimulated by abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Tobias; Diekmann, Marion; Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Lind, Christof; Bauer, Hubert; Hashimoto, Kenji; S Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Luan, Sheng; Kudla, Jörg; Geiger, Dietmar; Hedrich, Rainer

    2014-09-09

    Under drought stress, abscisic acid (ABA) triggers closure of leaf cell pores called stomata, which are formed by two specialized cells called guard cells in plant epidermis. Two pathways downstream of ABA stimulate phosphorylation of the S-type anion channels SLAC1 (slow anion channel associated 1) and SLAH3 (SLAC1 homolog 3), which causes these channels to open, reducing guard cell volume and triggering stomatal closure. One branch involves OST1 (open stomata 1), a calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase, and the other branch involves calcium-dependent protein kinases of the CPK (calcium-dependent protein kinase) family. We used coexpression analyses in Xenopus oocytes to show that the calcineurin B-like (CBL) calcium sensors CBL1 and CBL9 and their interacting protein kinase CIPK23 also triggered SLAC1 and SLAH3 opening. We analyzed whether regulation of SLAC1 opening by these different families of kinases involved the same or different sites on SLAC1 by measuring channel conductance of SLAC1 with mutations in the putative phosphorylation sites in the amino or carboxyl termini coexpressed with specific kinases in Xenopus oocytes. SLAC1 mutants lacking the OST1-phosphorylated site were still activated by CPK or by CBL/CIPK complexes. Phosphorylation and activation of SLAC1 by any of the kinases were inhibited by the phosphatase ABI1 (ABA insensitive 1), which is inactivated in response to ABA signaling. These findings identified CBL/CIPK complexes as potential regulators of stomatal aperture through S-type anion channels and indicated that phosphorylation at distinct sites enables SLAC1 activation by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent pathways downstream of ABA.

  7. Preliminary Conceptual Design Report for the FACET-II Project at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark

    2016-04-22

    Plasma wakefield acceleration has the potential to dramatically shrink the size and cost of particle accelerators. Research at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has demonstrated that plasmas can provide 1,000 times the acceleration in a given distance compared with current technologies. Developing revolutionary and more efficient acceleration techniques that allow for an affordable high-energy collider is the focus of FACET, a National User Facility at SLAC. The existing FACET National User Facility uses part of SLAC’s two-mile-long linear accelerator to generate high-density beams of electrons and positrons. FACET-II is a new test facility to develop advanced acceleration and coherent radiation techniques with high-energy electron and positron beams. It is the only facility in the world with high energy positron beams. FACET-II provides a major upgrade over current FACET capabilities and the breadth of the potential research program makes it truly unique. It will synergistically pursue accelerator science that is vital to the future of both advanced acceleration techniques for High Energy Physics, ultra-high brightness beams for Basic Energy Science, and novel radiation sources for a wide variety of applications. The design parameters for FACET-II are set by the requirements of the plasma wakefield experimental program. To drive the plasma wakefield requires a high peak current, in excess of 10kA. To reach this peak current, the electron and positron design bunch size is 10μ by 10μ transversely with a bunch length of 10μ. This is more than 200 times better than what has been achieved at the existing FACET. The beam energy is 10 GeV, set by the Linac length available and the repetition rate is up to 30 Hz. The FACET-II project is scheduled to be constructed in three major stages. Components of the project discussed in detail include the following: electron injector, bunch compressors and linac, the positron system, the Sector 20 sailboat and W chicanes

  8. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  9. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  10. Studies of Hadronic Physics with the BaBar Detector at SLAC and the Atlas Detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, David Norvil

    2016-06-30

    The University of Louisville High Energy Physics group contributed significantly to the success of the BaBar Experiment at SLAC and the Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab. In particular, they have contributed to understanding hadronic processes in electron-positron annihilation and charged lepton flavor violation in a very rare muon conversion process. Both are high-precision undertakings at the Intensity Frontier of High Energy Physics.

  11. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  12. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  13. ACS CCDs daily monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirianni, Marco

    2006-07-01

    This program consists of a set of basic tests to monitor, the read noise, thedevelopment of hot pixels and test for any source of noise in ACS CCDdetectors. The files, biases and dark will be used to create referencefiles for science calibration. This programme will be for the entire lifetime of ACS.For cycle 15 the program will cover 18 months 12.1.06->05.31.08and it has been divied into three different proposal each covering six months.The three poroposal are 11041-11042-11043.

  14. ILC @ SLAC R&D Program for a Polarized RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Brachman, A.; Dowell, D.H.; Garwin, E.L.; Ioakemidi, K.; Kirby, R.E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R.A.; Prescott, C.Y.; Wang, J.W.; Lewellen, J.W.; Prepost, R.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-01-25

    Photocathode rf guns produce high-energy low-emittance electron beams. DC guns utilizing GaAs photocathodes have proven successful for generating polarized electron beams for accelerators, but they require rf bunching systems that significantly increase the transverse emittance of the beam. With higher extraction field and beam energy, rf guns can support higher current densities at the cathode. The source laser system can then be used to generate the high peak current, relatively low duty-factor micropulses required by the ILC without the need for post-extraction rf bunching. The net result is that the injection system for a polarized rf gun can be identical to that for an unpolarized rf gun. However, there is some uncertainty as to the survivability of an activated GaAs cathode in the environment of an operating rf gun. Consequently, before attempting to design a polarized rf gun for the ILC, SLAC plans to develop an rf test gun to demonstrate the rf operating conditions suitable for an activated GaAs cathode.

  15. A Proof-of-Principle Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Pernet, Pierre-Louis

    2010-06-24

    With the advent of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs), new methods have been developed to extend capabilities at short wavelengths beyond Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). In particular, seeding of a FEL allows for temporal control of the radiation pulse and increases the peak brightness by orders of magnitude. Most recently, Gennady Stupakov and colleagues at SLAC proposed a new technique: Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG). Here a laser microbunches the beam in an undulator and the beam is sheared in a chicane. This process is repeated with a second laser, undulator and chicane. The interplay between these allows a seeding of the X-ray laser up to the 100th harmonic of the first laser. After introducing the physics of FELs and the EEHG seeding technique, we describe contributions to the experimental effort. We will present detailed studies of the experiment including the choice of parameters and their optimization, the emittance effect, spontaneous emission in the undulators, the second laser phase effect, and measurements of the jitter between RF stations. Finally, the status and preliminary results of the Echo-7 experiment will be outlined.

  16. Development of Modulator Pulse Stability Measurement Device and Test Results at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.; Morris, B.; Beukers, T.; Ciprian, R.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In this paper, the development of a pulse stability measurement device is presented. The measurement accuracy is better than 250uV, about 4.2ppm of a typical 60V input pulse. Pulse signals up to +/- 80V peak can be measured. The device works together with an oscilloscope. The primary function of the measurement device is to provide a precision offset, such that variations in the flattop of the modulator voltage pulse can be accurately resolved. The oscilloscope records the difference between the pulse flattop and the reference for a series of waveforms. The scope math functions are utilized to calculate the rms variations over the series. The frequency response of the device is characterized by the measured cutoff frequency of about 6.5MHz. In addition to detailing the design and calibration of the precision pulse stability device, measurements of SLAC line-type linac modulators and recently developed induction modulators will be presented. Factors affecting pulse stability will be discussed.

  17. Reproducibility of X-rays and CT arthrography in SLAC, SNAC, SCAC wrists.

    PubMed

    Belhaouane, R; Lebeau, N; Maes-Clavier, C; Hustin, C; Krief, E; Bonnaire, B; Warin, M; Rotari, V; David, E

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility of the interpretation of CT arthrography and plain X-rays for scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC), scaphoid non-union advanced collapse (SNAC) and scaphoid chondrocalcinosis advanced collapse (SCAC) wrist conditions, as well as the clinical relevance of these imaging modalities. The CT and X-rays images were reviewed twice in a blinded and randomized manner by two experienced orthopedic surgeons specialized in hand surgery, two orthopedic surgery residents and two experienced radiologists specialized in bone and joint imaging. Cohen's kappa and Fleiss' kappa coefficients were used to analyze the reproducibility of interpretation of the radiological examinations. With CT arthrography, the overall diagnosis was often a problem, in terms of both inter- or intra-observer reproducibility. The assessment of the joint line appeared to be fairly reproducible for each observer but was poorly reproducible between different observers. Plain X-rays are not sufficient to assess cartilage quality in degenerative wrist disease. CT arthrography is a reliable examination, but its interpretation is not always standardized. Diagnostic arthroscopy may be justified in doubtful cases.

  18. Two-body photodisintegration of the deutron at high energy: Experiment NE17 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.; Jackson, H.E.; Hansen, J.O.

    1995-08-01

    Experiment NE17 was granted three days of beam time during the last NPAS run at SLAC. During that time, the cross section data for the {gamma}d {yields} pn reaction were extended up to 2.8 GeV at {theta}{sub cm} = 90{degrees} and up to 4.2 GeV at {theta}{sub cm} = 37{degrees}. Data were also taken at {theta}{sub cm} = 37{degrees} 53{degrees}, and 90{degrees} at E{gamma} = 1.6 GeV so that a complete angular distribution would be available at this energy where an Enhancement at a large angle (143{degrees}) was found during experiment NE8. The results indicate the surprising feature that the cross sections at 90{degrees} and 53{degrees} follow the quark counting rule prediction, while those at 37{degrees} do not. Perhaps this indicates that p{sub T}{sup 2} is a controlling variable in the approach to asymptotic scaling. A manuscript was accepted for publication.

  19. Preliminary Results from the UCLA/SLAC Ultra-High Gradient CerenkovWakefield Accelerator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.; /Manhattan Coll., Riverdale

    2008-02-06

    The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. This experiment takes advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its demonstrated ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam has been successfully focused down and sent through varying lengths of fused silica capillary tubing with two different sizes: ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m and ID = 100 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m. The pulse length of the electron beam was varied in the range 20 {micro}m < {sigma}{sub z} < 100 {micro}m which produced a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments we plan to collect and measure coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube to gain more information about the strength of the accelerating fields.

  20. High-power rf pulse compression with SLED-II at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, C.; Kroll, N.M.; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1993-04-01

    Increasing the peak rf power available from X-band microwave tubes by means of rf pulse compression is envisioned as a way of achieving the few-hundred-megawatt power levels needed to drive a next-generation linear collider with 50--100 MW klystrons. SLED-II is a method of pulse compression similar in principal to the SLED method currently in use on the SLC and the LEP injector linac. It utilizes low-los resonant delay lines in place of the storage cavities of the latter. This produces the added benefit of a flat-topped output pulse. At SLAC, we have designed and constructed a prototype SLED-II pulse-compression system which operates in the circular TE{sub 01} mode. It includes a circular-guide 3-dB coupler and other novel components. Low-power and initial high-power tests have been made, yielding a peak power multiplication of 4.8 at an efficiency of 40%. The system will be used in providing power for structure tests in the ASTA (Accelerator Structures Test Area) bunker. An upgraded second prototype will have improved efficiency and will serve as a model for the pulse compression system of the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator).

  1. Passive Performance Monitoring and Traffic Characteristics on the SLAC Internet Border

    SciTech Connect

    Logg, Connie A

    2002-05-01

    Understanding how the Internet is used by HEP is critical to optimizing the performance of the inter-lab computing environment. Typically use requirements have been defined by discussions between collaborators. However, later analysis of the actual traffic has shown this is often misunderstood and actual use is significantly different to that predicted. Passive monitoring of the real traffic provides insight into the true communications requirements and the performance of a large number of inter-communicating nodes. It may be useful in identifying performance problems that are due to factors other than Internet congestion, especially when compared to other methods such as active monitoring where traffic is generated specifically to measure its performance. Controlled active monitoring between dedicated servers often gives an indication of what can be achieved on a network. Passive monitoring of the real traffic gives a picture of the true performance. This paper will discuss the method and results of collecting and analyzing flows of data obtained from the SLAC Internet border. The unique nature of HEP traffic and the needs of the HEP community will be highlighted. The insights this has brought to understanding the network will be reviewed and the benefit it can bring to engineering networks will be discussed.

  2. Availability Performance and Considerations for LCLS X-Ray FEL at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, W.B.; Brachmann, A.; Colocho, W.; Stanek, M.; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. LCLS has been in operation since spring 2009, and it has completed its 3rd user run. LCLS is the first in its class of X-ray FEL user facilities, and presents different availability challenges compared to storage ring light sources. This paper presents recent availability performance of the FEL as well as factors to consider when defining the operational availability figure of merit for user runs. During LCLS [1] user runs, an availability of 95% has been set as a goal. In run III, LCLS photon and electron beam systems achieved availabilities of 94.8% and 96.7%, respectively. The total availability goal can be distributed among subsystems to track performance and identify areas that need attention in order to maintain and improve hardware reliability and operational availability. Careful beam time accounting is needed to understand the distribution of down time. The LCLS complex includes multiple experimental hutches for X-ray science, and each user program has different requirements of a set of parameters that the FEL can be configured to deliver. Since each user may have different criteria for what is considered 'acceptable beam', the quality of the beam must be considered to determine the X-ray beam availability.

  3. Beam dynamics, efficiency and power of the SLAC lasertron: simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1986-05-01

    Results are described for the computer simulation of the SLAC proof of principle lasertron device with a conventional single gap output cavity, using the 2D relativistic field and particle code called MASK. The rf to beam power efficiency is calculated for different power levels, dc voltages and optical pulse lengths. The calculated efficiency at the initial operating point of 50 MW beam power, 400 kV, and with 60 picosecond optical pulse duration, is 66%. The maximum rf power at 400 kV is about 50 MW. At 600 kV the maximum power increases to about 110 MW, but the efficiency at low power is not much changed from what it was at 400 kV. The simulation calculation does not take into account loss of rf power due to backscattered electrons nor the full effects of the impedance of the accelerating gap. A calculation of the efficiency of the lasertron with a double output cavity has been carried out, and generally yields efficiencies about 10 percentage points higher than the single cavity simulation.

  4. Strong constraints on sub-GeV dark sectors from SLAC beam dump E137.

    PubMed

    Batell, Brian; Essig, Rouven; Surujon, Ze'ev

    2014-10-24

    We present new constraints on sub-GeV dark matter and dark photons from the electron beam-dump experiment E137 conducted at SLAC in 1980-1982. Dark matter interacting with electrons (e.g., via a dark photon) could have been produced in the electron-target collisions and scattered off electrons in the E137 detector, producing the striking, zero-background signature of a high-energy electromagnetic shower that points back to the beam dump. E137 probes new and significant ranges of parameter space and constrains the well-motivated possibility that dark photons that decay to light dark-sector particles can explain the ∼3.6σ discrepancy between the measured and standard model value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. It also restricts the parameter space in which the relic density of dark matter in these models is obtained from thermal freeze-out. E137 also convincingly demonstrates that (cosmic) backgrounds can be controlled and thus serves as a powerful proof of principle for future beam-dump searches for sub-GeV dark-sector particles scattering off electrons in the detector.

  5. Progress report on new rf breakdown studies in an S-band structure at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.

    1987-02-01

    This paper gives a progress report on RF breakdown studies carried out at SLAC on an S-band standing-wave disk-loaded accelerator structure. The structure is the same as described at two earlier conferences but it has been equipped with eight new radial probes and one output port to observe the emission of light, which has not yet been used. The earlier breakdown limit of 144 MV/m equivalent traveling-wave accelerating gradient and 312 MV/m peak surface field has been reached again and possibly exceeded slightly even though the disk iris edges are severely pitted from earlier tests. Using the new probes it has become possible to monitor field emission as a function of azimuthal direction as well as to record the signals generated at the instant of breakdown. Results are given together with some information on the condition of the structure, chemical cleaning and RF processing. The paper ends with the presentation of some speculations and future plans.

  6. Radio frequency pulse compression experiments at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center)

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Spalek, G.; Wilson, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed future positron-electron linear colliders would be capable of investigating fundamental processes of interest in the 0.5--5 TeV beam-energy range. At the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) gradient of about 20 MV/m this would imply prohibitive lengths of about 50--250 kilometers per linac. We can reduce the length by increasing the gradient but this implies high peak power, on the order of 400-- to 1000-MW at X-Band. One possible way to generate high peak power is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a short pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before DC to RF conversion, as is done using magnetic switching for induction linacs, or after DC to RF conversion, as is done for the SLC. Using RF pulse compression it is possible to boost the 50-- to 100-MW output that has already been obtained from high-power X-Band klystrons the levels required by the linear colliders. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered.

  7. The Physics Program of a High-Luminosity Asymmetric B Factory at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Eisner, A.; Mandelkern, M.; Morrison, R.; Witherell, M.; Burchat, P.; Kent, J.; Erbacher, R.; Vernon, W.; Eigen, G.; Hitlin, D.; Porter, F.; Weinstein, A.; Wisniewski, W.; Wagner, S.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, M.; Averill, D.; Snyder, A.; Goldhaber, G.; Oddone, P.; Roe, N.; Ronan, M.; Spahn, M.; MacFarlane, D.; Bartelt, J.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Cords, D.; Dib, C.; Dorfan, J.; Dunietz, I.; Gilman, F.; Godfrey, G.; Hyer, T.; Jensen, G.; Leith, D.; Marsiske, H.; Nir, Y.; Lee-Franzini, J.

    1989-10-01

    A high-luminosity asymmetric energy B Factory, proposed as an upgrade to the PEP storage ring at SLAC, provides the best opportunity to study CP violation as a means of testing the consistency of the Standard Model. If the phenomenon of CP violation is xplained by the Standard Model simply through the non-zero angles and phase of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, then there are precise relations between the K-M parameters and the various measurable CP-violating asymmetries in B meson decay. Should these onsistency relations fail, the origin of CP violation must lie outside the Standard Model framework. Our measurements would then lead to the first experiment-driven extensions of the Standard Model. The B Factory will also carry out a varied, high-quality program of studies f other aspects of the physics of b quarks, as well as high-precision measurements in r and charm physics. We describe a detailed series of measurements to be carried out in the first few years at a peak luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1}, the initial luminosity goal of the B Factory, as well as the program accessible to a larger data sample.

  8. Salary Survey: Inflation Undercuts Chemists' Salaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Reports survey results from the American Chemical Society (ACS) that indicate an erosion of chemists' salaries by soaring living costs. Numerous tables provide information regarding the employment status of industrial and academic ACS members and their salaries. (CS)

  9. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  10. AC/DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Praveen K.

    1992-08-01

    In a system such as a 20 kHz space station primary electrical power distribution system, power conversion from AC to DC is required. Some of the basic requirements for this conversion are high efficiency, light weight and small volume, regulated output voltage, close to unity input power factor, distortionless input current, soft-starting, low electromagnetic interference, and high reliability. An AC-to-DC converter is disclosed which satisfies the main design objectives of such converters for use in space. The converter of the invention comprises an input transformer, a resonant network, a current controller, a diode rectifier, and an output filter. The input transformer is for connection to a single phase, high frequency, sinusoidal waveform AC voltage source and provides a matching voltage isolating from the AC source. The resonant network converts this voltage to a sinusoidal, high frequency bidirectional current output, which is received by the current controller to provide the desired output current. The diode rectifier is connected in parallel with the current controller to convert the bidirectional current into a unidirectional current output. The output filter is connected to the rectifier to provide an essentially ripple-free, substantially constant voltage DC output.

  11. Updated MDRIZTAB Parameters for ACS/WFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, S. L.; Avila, R. J.

    2017-03-01

    The Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) pipeline performs geometric distortion corrections, associated image combinations, and cosmic ray rejections with AstroDrizzle. The MDRIZTAB reference table contains a list of relevant parameters that controls this program. This document details our photometric analysis of Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel (ACS/WFC) data processed by AstroDrizzle. Based on this analysis, we update the MDRIZTAB table to improve the quality of the drizzled products delivered by MAST.

  12. Survey of beam instrumentation used in SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Ecklund, S.D.

    1991-03-01

    A survey of beam instruments used at SLAC in the SLC machine is presented. The basic utility and operation of each device is briefly described. The various beam instruments used at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), can be classified by the function they perform. Beam intensity, position and size are typical of the parameters of beam which are measured. Each type of parameter is important for adjusting or tuning the machine in order to achieve optimum performance. 39 refs.

  13. Design of the SLAC RCE Platform: A General Purpose ATCA Based Data Acquisition System

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, R.; Claus, R.; Freytag, M.; Haller, G.; Huffer, M.; Maldonado, S.; Nishimura, K.; O'Grady, C.; Panetta, J.; Perazzo, A.; Reese, B.; Ruckman, L.; Thayer, J. G.; Weaver, M.

    2015-01-23

    The SLAC RCE platform is a general purpose clustered data acquisition system implemented on a custom ATCA compliant blade, called the Cluster On Board (COB). The core of the system is the Reconfigurable Cluster Element (RCE), which is a system-on-chip design based upon the Xilinx Zynq family of FPGAs, mounted on custom COB daughter-boards. The Zynq architecture couples a dual core ARM Cortex A9 based processor with a high performance 28nm FPGA. The RCE has 12 external general purpose bi-directional high speed links, each supporting serial rates of up to 12Gbps. 8 RCE nodes are included on a COB, each with a 10Gbps connection to an on-board 24-port Ethernet switch integrated circuit. The COB is designed to be used with a standard full-mesh ATCA backplane allowing multiple RCE nodes to be tightly interconnected with minimal interconnect latency. Multiple shelves can be clustered using the front panel 10-gbps connections. The COB also supports local and inter-blade timing and trigger distribution. An experiment specific Rear Transition Module adapts the 96 high speed serial links to specific experiments and allows an experiment-specific timing and busy feedback connection. This coupling of processors with a high performance FPGA fabric in a low latency, multiple node cluster allows high speed data processing that can be easily adapted to any physics experiment. RTEMS and Linux are both ported to the module. The RCE has been used or is the baseline for several current and proposed experiments (LCLS, HPS, LSST, ATLAS-CSC, LBNE, DarkSide, ILC-SiD, etc).

  14. Reconstitution of CO2 Regulation of SLAC1 Anion Channel and Function of CO2-Permeable PIP2;1 Aquaporin as CARBONIC ANHYDRASE4 Interactor

    PubMed Central

    Zeise, Brian; Xu, Danyun; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Boron, Walter F.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Dark respiration causes an increase in leaf CO2 concentration (Ci), and the continuing increases in atmospheric [CO2] further increases Ci. Elevated leaf CO2 concentration causes stomatal pores to close. Here, we demonstrate that high intracellular CO2/HCO3− enhances currents mediated by the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell S-type anion channel SLAC1 upon coexpression of any one of the Arabidopsis protein kinases OST1, CPK6, or CPK23 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Split-ubiquitin screening identified the PIP2;1 aquaporin as an interactor of the βCA4 carbonic anhydrase, which was confirmed in split luciferase, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. PIP2;1 exhibited CO2 permeability. Mutation of PIP2;1 in planta alone was insufficient to impair CO2- and abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing, likely due to redundancy. Interestingly, coexpression of βCA4 and PIP2;1 with OST1-SLAC1 or CPK6/23-SLAC1 in oocytes enabled extracellular CO2 enhancement of SLAC1 anion channel activity. An inactive PIP2;1 point mutation was identified that abrogated water and CO2 permeability and extracellular CO2 regulation of SLAC1 activity. These findings identify the CO2-permeable PIP2;1 as key interactor of βCA4 and demonstrate functional reconstitution of extracellular CO2 signaling to ion channel regulation upon coexpression of PIP2;1, βCA4, SLAC1, and protein kinases. These data further implicate SLAC1 as a bicarbonate-responsive protein contributing to CO2 regulation of S-type anion channels. PMID:26764375

  15. Reconstitution of CO2 Regulation of SLAC1 Anion Channel and Function of CO2-Permeable PIP2;1 Aquaporin as CARBONIC ANHYDRASE4 Interactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cun; Hu, Honghong; Qin, Xue; Zeise, Brian; Xu, Danyun; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Boron, Walter F; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-02-01

    Dark respiration causes an increase in leaf CO2 concentration (Ci), and the continuing increases in atmospheric [CO2] further increases Ci. Elevated leaf CO2 concentration causes stomatal pores to close. Here, we demonstrate that high intracellular CO2/HCO3 (-) enhances currents mediated by the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell S-type anion channel SLAC1 upon coexpression of any one of the Arabidopsis protein kinases OST1, CPK6, or CPK23 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Split-ubiquitin screening identified the PIP2;1 aquaporin as an interactor of the βCA4 carbonic anhydrase, which was confirmed in split luciferase, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. PIP2;1 exhibited CO2 permeability. Mutation of PIP2;1 in planta alone was insufficient to impair CO2- and abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing, likely due to redundancy. Interestingly, coexpression of βCA4 and PIP2;1 with OST1-SLAC1 or CPK6/23-SLAC1 in oocytes enabled extracellular CO2 enhancement of SLAC1 anion channel activity. An inactive PIP2;1 point mutation was identified that abrogated water and CO2 permeability and extracellular CO2 regulation of SLAC1 activity. These findings identify the CO2-permeable PIP2;1 as key interactor of βCA4 and demonstrate functional reconstitution of extracellular CO2 signaling to ion channel regulation upon coexpression of PIP2;1, βCA4, SLAC1, and protein kinases. These data further implicate SLAC1 as a bicarbonate-responsive protein contributing to CO2 regulation of S-type anion channels. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  16. 75 FR 57254 - American Community Survey 5-Year Data Product Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... releases American Community Survey (ACS) data products in the form of 1-year estimates and 3-year estimates. Most recently, the 2008 ACS 1-year estimates were released in September 2009, and the 2006-2008 ACS 3... release of ACS 5-year data products covering the period of 2005-2009. The release of the ACS...

  17. Observation and Characterization of Coherent Optical Radiation and Microbunching Instability in the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.; Dunning, M.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Xiang, D.; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC is currently configured for a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) experiment using an 120 MeV beam. During commissioning, unexpected coherent optical undulator radiation (CUR) and coherent optical transition radiation (COTR) was observed when beam is accelerated off-crest and compressed after the chicanes. The CUR and COTR is likely due to a microbunching instability where the initial small ripples in cathode drive laser is compressed and amplified. In this paper we present the observation and characterization of the CUR, COTR and microbunching instability at NLCTA.

  18. [Acrocephalosyndactyly (ACS) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fajardo Carmona, A V; Pascual Castroviejo, I

    1975-01-01

    13 cases of ACS are presented: seven of them were identified as Apert's syndrome; two as Chotzen's syndrome; three as Carpenter's syndrome, and one as Pfeiffer's syndrome. These disorders have no known ethiology. However, it is necessary to look for diabetic antecedents and dermatogliphus alterations, both in the patient and the parents. An attempt to give an explanation of their hereditary penetrance is made. Frequency of associated abnormalities, mental retardation, therapeutics, prognosis, and recent encouraging results of plastic surgery of the face are reviewed.

  19. AC Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-04

    In this work, we have implemented and developed the simulation software to implement the mathematical model of an AC Optimal Power Flow (OPF) problem. The objective function is to minimize the total cost of generation subject to constraints of node power balance (both real and reactive) and line power flow limits (MW, MVAr, and MVA). We have currently implemented the polar coordinate version of the problem. In the present work, we have used the optimization solver, Knitro (proprietary and not included in this software) to solve the problem and we have kept option for both the native numerical derivative evaluation (working satisfactorily now) as well as for analytical formulas corresponding to the derivatives being provided to Knitro (currently, in the debugging stage). Since the AC OPF is a highly non-convex optimization problem, we have also kept the option for a multistart solution. All of these can be decided by the user during run-time in an interactive manner. The software has been developed in C++ programming language, running with GCC compiler on a Linux machine. We have tested for satisfactory results against Matpower for the IEEE 14 bus system.

  20. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  1. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  2. Research and Development Toward a 4.5-1.5 {Angstrom} Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M.

    1995-08-01

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at SLAC to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 A) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self- Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation in a minimal time include: (1) a peak current in the 7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of {lt}0.05%, and (3) a transverse emittance, {epsilon}[r-m], approximating the diffraction limit condition {epsilon} = {lambda} / 4{pi}, where lambda(m) is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.02% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 8 m/rad for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress has been made in developing individual components and beam processing techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to approx. 20 A, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 A LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas.

  3. SLAC's Polarized Electron Source LaserSystem and Minimization of Helicity Correlations for the E-158 Parity Violation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Humensky, Thomas B

    2002-09-06

    SLAC E-158 is an experiment designed to make the first measurement of parity violation in Moeller scattering. E-158 will measure the right-left cross-section asymmetry, A{sub LR}{sup Moeller}, in the elastic scattering of a 45-GeV polarized electron beam off unpolarized electrons in a liquid hydrogen target. E-158 plans to measure the expected Standard Model asymmetry of {approx} 10{sup -7} to an accuracy of better than 10{sup -8}. To make this measurement, the polarized electron source requires for operation an intense circularly polarized laser beam and the ability to quickly switch between right- and left-helicity polarization states with minimal right-left helicity-correlated asymmetries in the resulting beam parameters (intensity, position, angle, spot size, and energy), {sup beam}A{sub LR}'s. This laser beam is produced by a unique SLAC-designed flashlamp-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser and is propagated through a carefully designed set of polarization optics. We analyze the transport of nearly circularly polarized light through the optical system and identify several mechanisms that generate {sup beam}A{sub LR}'s. We show that the dominant effects depend linearly on particular polarization phase shifts in the optical system. We present the laser system design and a discussion of the suppression and control of {sup beam}A{sub LR}'s. We also present results on beam performance from engineering and physics runs for E-158.

  4. Identification of /sup 233/Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1983-09-01

    We report in this paper identification of the new isotope /sup 233/Ac. Uranium targets were irradiated with 28 GeV protons; after rapid retrieval of the target and separation of actinium from thorium, /sup 233/Ac was allowed to decay into the known /sup 233/Th daughter. Exhaustive chemical purification was employed to permit the identification of /sup 233/Th via its characteristic ..gamma.. radiations. The half-life derived for /sup 233/Ac from several experiments is 2.3 +- 0.3 min. The production cross section for /sup 233/Ac is 100 ..mu..b.

  5. A Precision Measurement of the Spin Structure of the Proton at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Erbacher, Robin D

    1999-09-22

    E143 at SLAC Endstation A performed deep-inelastic scattering measurements of polarized electrons from polarized protons and deuterons within cryogenic {sup 15}NH{sub 3} and {sup 15}ND{sub 3}, respectively. Data were taken at incident energies of 29.1, 16.2 and 9.7 GeV, and covered the kinematical range x > 0:03 and 0:3 < Q{sup 2} < 12 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The scattered electrons were detected by two spectrometers at angles of 4.5{sup o} and 7.0{sup o}. From these data, the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p}(x; Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 1}{sup d}(x; Q{sup 2}) were determined. This dissertation describes the experiment, with emphasis on the results on the proton spin structure. The integral of g{sub 1} over the range 0 < x < 1 was found to be {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p} = 0.130 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.008 for the proton and {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup d} = 0.044 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.004 for the deuteron. Both values are in agreement with world data, and violate the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule by more than 3 standard deviations. The neutron structure function was obtained by combining proton and deuteron results, giving {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} = [0.035 {+-} 0.007 {+-} 0.010]. From this the integral {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p}-{Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} followed, yielding 0.165 {+-} 0.009 {+-} 0.016 at Q{sup 2} = 3 (GeV/c){sup 2}, in agreement with the Bjorken sum rule to within one standard deviation. The Q{sup 2}-dependence of the ratio g{sub 1}/F{sub 1} was determined to be small for Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, validating the assumption of no Q{sup 2}-dependence used in obtaining the integrals. A small rise with increasing Q{sup 2} was seen in the ratio for Q{sup 2} < 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, however. The total quark contribution to the spin was found to be {Delta}q = 0.28 {+-} 0.09 for the proton, and {Delta}q = 0.32 {+-} 0.05 for the deuteron. Furthermore, a large negative spin contribution from the strange sea quarks was measured for both nucleons, giving {Delta}s = 0.10 {+-} 0.03 and {Delta}s = -0

  6. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer. 24 figs.

  7. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.

  8. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  9. Phylogenetic ecology of the freshwater Actinobacteria acI lineage.

    PubMed

    Newton, Ryan J; Jones, Stuart E; Helmus, Matthew R; McMahon, Katherine D

    2007-11-01

    The acI lineage of freshwater Actinobacteria is a cosmopolitan and often numerically dominant member of lake bacterial communities. We conducted a survey of acI 16S rRNA genes and 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions from 18 Wisconsin lakes and used standard nonphylogenetic and phylogenetic statistical approaches to investigate the factors that determine acI community composition at the local scale (within lakes) and at the regional scale (across lakes). Phylogenetic reconstruction of 434 acI 16S rRNA genes revealed a well-defined and highly resolved phylogeny. Eleven previously unrecognized monophyletic clades, each with > or =97.9% within-clade 16S rRNA gene sequence identity, were identified. Clade community similarity positively correlated with lake environmental similarity but not with geographic distance, implying that the lakes represent a single biotic region containing environmental filters for communities that have similar compositions. Phylogenetically disparate clades within the acI lineage were most abundant at the regional scale, and local communities were comprised of more closely related clades. Lake pH was a strong predictor of the community composition, but only when lakes with a pH below 6 were included in the data set. In the remaining lakes (pH above 6) biogeographic patterns in the landscape were instead a predictor of the observed acI community structure. The nonrandom distribution of the newly defined acI clades suggests potential ecophysiological differences between the clades, with acI clades AI, BII, and BIII preferring acidic lakes and acI clades AII, AVI, and BI preferring more alkaline lakes.

  10. Automated ac galvanomagnetic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, F. R.; Espy, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    An automated, ac galvanomagnetic measurement system is described. Hall or van der Pauw measurements in the temperature range 10-300 K can be made at a preselected magnetic field without operator attendance. Procedures to validate sample installation and correct operation of other system functions, such as magnetic field and thermometry, are included. Advantages of ac measurements are discussed.

  11. Thermionic triode generates ac power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniazzeh, A. G. F.; Scharz, F. C.

    1970-01-01

    Electrostatic grid controls conduction cycle of thermionic diode to convert low dc output voltages to high ac power without undesirable power loss. An ac voltage applied to the grid of this new thermionic triode enables it to convert heat directly into high voltage electrical power.

  12. A New Green's Function for the Wake Potential Calculation of the SLAC S-band Constant Gradient Accelerating Section

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A,; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    The behavior of the longitudinal wake fields excited by a very short bunch in the SLAC S-band constant gradient accelerating structures has been studied. Wake potential calculations were performed for a bunch length of 10 microns using the author's code to obtain a numerical solution of Maxwell's equations in the time domain. We have calculated six accelerating sections in the series (60-ft) to find the stationary solution. While analyzing the computational results we have found a new formula for the Green's function. Wake potentials, which are calculated using this Green's function are in amazingly good agreement with numerical results over a wide range of bunch lengths. The Green's function simplifies the wake potential calculations and can be easily incorporated into the tracking codes. This is very useful for beam dynamics studies of the linear accelerators of LCLS and FACET.

  13. Complete Genomes of Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, Two Phylogenetically Distinct Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Ramya, T. N. C.; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Several spore-forming strains of Bacillus are marketed as probiotics due to their ability to survive harsh gastrointestinal conditions and confer health benefits to the host. We report the complete genomes of two commercially available probiotics, Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, and compare them with the genomes of other Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The taxonomic position of both organisms was established with a maximum-likelihood tree based on twenty six housekeeping proteins. Analysis of all probiotic strains of Bacillus and Lactobacillus reveal that the essential sporulation proteins are conserved in all Bacillus probiotic strains while they are absent in Lactobacillus spp. We identified various antibiotic resistance, stress-related, and adhesion-related domains in these organisms, which likely provide support in exerting probiotic action by enabling adhesion to host epithelial cells and survival during antibiotic treatment and harsh conditions. PMID:27258038

  14. First Measurements of the Longitudinal Bunch Profile at SLAC Using Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation at 28GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmore, V.; Doucas, G.; Ottewell, B.; Perry, C.; Kimmitt, M.F.; Arnold, R.; Molloy, S.; Woods, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation has been demonstrated as a technique for measuring the longitudinal profile of charged particles bunches in the low to intermediate energy range. However, with the advent of the International Linear Collider, the need has arisen for a non-invasive method of measuring the bunch profile at extremely high energies. Smith-Purcell radiation has been used for the first time in the multi-GeV regime to measure the longitudinal profile of the 28GeV SLAC beam. The experiment has both successfully determined the bunch length, and has also demonstrated its sensitivity to bunch profile changes. The challenges associated with this technique, and its prospects as a diagnostic tool are reported here.

  15. Complete Genomes of Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, Two Phylogenetically Distinct Probiotics.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Indu; Sharma, Shailza; Ramya, T N C; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Several spore-forming strains of Bacillus are marketed as probiotics due to their ability to survive harsh gastrointestinal conditions and confer health benefits to the host. We report the complete genomes of two commercially available probiotics, Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, and compare them with the genomes of other Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The taxonomic position of both organisms was established with a maximum-likelihood tree based on twenty six housekeeping proteins. Analysis of all probiotic strains of Bacillus and Lactobacillus reveal that the essential sporulation proteins are conserved in all Bacillus probiotic strains while they are absent in Lactobacillus spp. We identified various antibiotic resistance, stress-related, and adhesion-related domains in these organisms, which likely provide support in exerting probiotic action by enabling adhesion to host epithelial cells and survival during antibiotic treatment and harsh conditions.

  16. Research and development toward a 4.5-1.5{angstrom} linac coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the theoretical and technical feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 {Angstrom}) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation include: (1) a peak current in the 3-7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of <0.05%, ad (3) a transverse emittance, {epsilon}{le}{lambda}/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.1-0.2% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 4-8 m for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to {approximately}20 {angstrom}, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 {angstrom} LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas. These include the construction and operation of a linac test stand for developing laser-driven photocathode rf guns with normalized emittances approaching 1 mm-mr; development of advanced beam compression, stability, an emittance control techniques at multi-GeV energies; the construction and operation of a FEL Amplifier Test Experiment (FATE) for theoretical and experimental studies of SASE at IR wavelengths; an undulator development program to investigate superconducting, hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM), and pulsed-Cu technologies; theoretical and computational studies of high-gain FEL physics and LCLS component designs.

  17. Layoff Handling Still Lags ACS Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Reviews termination procedures of professional chemists and the compliance of these terminations to the American Chemical Society's (ACS's) Professional Employment Guidelines. Provides the ACS guidelines. (DS)

  18. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  19. RHIC VERTICAL AC DIPOLE COMMISSIONING.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; DELONG,J.; HOFF,L.; PAI,C.; PEGGS,S.; PIACENTINO,J.; OERTER,B.; ODDO,P.; ROSER,T.; SATOGATA,T.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2002-06-02

    The RHIC vertical ac dipole was installed in the summer of 2001. The magnet is located in the interaction region between sector 3 and sector 4 common to both beams. The resonant frequency of the ac dipole was first configured to be around half of the beam revolution frequency to act as a spin flipper. At the end of the RHIC 2002 run, the ac dipole frequency was reconfigured for linear optics studies. A 0.35 mm driven betatron oscillation was excited with the vertical ac dipole and the vertical betatron functions and phase advances at each beam position monitor (BPM) around the RHIC yellow ring were measured using the excited coherence. We also recorded horizontal turn-by-turn beam positions at each BPM location to investigate coupling effects. Analysis algorithms and measurement results are presented.

  20. HVDC-AC system interaction from AC harmonics. Volume 1. Harmonic impedance calculations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, G D; Chow, J H; Lindh, C B; Miller, N W; Numrich, F H; Price, W W; Turner, A E; Whitney, R R

    1982-09-01

    Improved methods are needed to characterize ac system harmonic behavior for ac filter design for HVDC systems. The purpose of this General Electric Company RP1138 research is to evaluate the present filter design practice and to investigate methods for calculating system harmonic impedances. An overview of ac filter design for HVDC systems and a survey of literature related to filter design have been performed. Two methods for calculating system harmonic impedances have been investigated. In the measurement method, an instrumentation system for measuring system voltage and current has been assembled. Different schemes of using the measurements to calculate system harmonic impedances have been studied. In the analytical method, a procedure to include various operating conditions has been proposed. Computer programs for both methods have been prepared, and the results of the measurement and analytical methods analyzed. A conclusion of the project is that the measurement and analytical methods both provided reasonable results. There are correlations between the measured and analytical results for most harmonics, although there are discrepancies between the assumptions used in the two methods. A sensitivity approach has been proposed to further correlate the results. From the results of the analysis, it is recommended that both methods should be tested further. For the measurement method, more testing should be done to cover different system operating conditions. In the analytical method, more detailed models for representing system components should be studied. In addition, alternative statistical and sensitivity approaches should be attempted.

  1. NONLINEAR DIAGNOSTICS USING AC DIPOLES.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.

    1999-03-29

    There are three goals in the accurate nonlinear diagnosis of a storage ring. First, the beam must be moved to amplitudes many times the natural beam size. Second, strong and long lasting signals must be generated. Third, the measurement technique should be non-destructive. Conventionally, a single turn kick moves the beam to large amplitudes, and turn-by-turn data are recorded from multiple beam position monitors (BPMs) [1-6]. Unfortunately, tune spread across the beam causes the center of charge beam signal to ''decohere'' on a time scale often less than 100 turns. Filamentation also permanently destroys the beam emittance (in a hadron ring). Thus, the ''strong single turn kick'' technique successfully achieves only one out of the three goals. AC dipole techniques can achieve all three. Adiabatically excited AC dipoles slowly move the beam out to large amplitudes. The coherent signals then recorded last arbitrarily long. The beam maintains its original emittance if the AC dipoles are also turned off adiabatically, ready for further use. The AGS already uses an RF dipole to accelerate polarized proton beams through depolarizing resonances with minimal polarization loss [7]. Similar AC dipoles will be installed in the horizontal and vertical planes of both rings in RHIC [8]. The RHIC AC dipoles will also be used as spin flippers, and to measure linear optical functions [9].

  2. Data Plots of Run I - III Results from SLAC E-158: A precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    DOE Data Explorer

    Three physics runs were made in 2002 and 2003 by E-158. As a result, the E-158 Collaboration announced that it had made "the first observation of Parity Violation in electron-electron (Moller) scattering). This precise Parity Violation measurement gives the best determination of the electron's weak charge at low energy (low momentum transfer between interacting particles). E158's measurement tests the predicted running (or evolution) of this weak charge with energy, and searches for new phenomena at TeV energy scales (one thousand times the proton-mass energy scale).[Copied from the experiment's public home page at http://www-project slac.stanford.edu/3158/Default.htm] See also the E158 page for collaborators at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e158/. Both websites provide data and detailed information.

  3. Two member of the S-lac lectin gene family, LGALS1 and LGALS2, reside in close proximity on human chromosome 22q12-q13

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrabian, M.; Sparkes, R.S.; Lusis, A.J. ); Gitt, M.A.; Leffler, H.; Barondes, S.H. )

    1993-02-01

    S-lac lectins are a family of soluble lactose-binding proteins thought to function in the control of cell growth. We now report the chromosomal mapping of two members of the family, termed L-14-I and L-14-II, to the q12-q13 region of human chromosome 22, suggesting the possibility of a cluster of genes for lactose-binding proteins. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Sink Pixels in ACS/WFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryon, J. E.; Grogin, N.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the properties of sink pixels in the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) detector. These pixels likely contain extra charge traps and therefore appear anomalously low in images with relatively high backgrounds. We identify sink pixels in the average short (0.5-second) dark image from each monthly anneal cycle, which, since January 2015, have been post-flashed to a background of about 60 e-. Sink pixels can affect the pixels immediately above and below them in the same column, resulting in high downstream pixels and low trails of upstream pixels. We determine typical trail lengths for sink pixels of different depths at various background levels. We create a reference image, one for each anneal cycle since January 2015, that will be used to flag sink pixels and the adjacent affected pixels in science images.

  5. Electrothermal ac electro-osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Zachary R.; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2009-01-01

    Two ac polarization mechanisms, charge accumulation due to electrode double layer charging and bulk permittivity/conductivity gradients generated by Joule heating, are combined in the double layer by introducing zwitterions to produce a new ac electrokinetic pump with the largest velocity (>1 mm/s) and flow penetration depth (100 μm) reported for low-conductivity fluids. The large fluid velocity is due to a quartic scaling with respect to voltage, as is true of electrothermal flow, but exhibits a clear maximum at a frequency corresponding to the electrode double layer inverse RC time.

  6. Design optimization and transverse coherence analysis for an x-ray free electron laser driven by SLAC LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.

    1995-12-31

    I present a design study for an X-ray Free Electron Laser driven by the SLAC linac, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The study assumes the LCLS is based on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). Following a brief review of the fundamentals of SASE, I will provide without derivation a collection of formulas relating SASE performance to the system parameters. These formulas allow quick evaluation of FEL designs and provide powerful tools for optimization in multi-dimensional parameter space. Optimization is carried out for the LCLS over all independent system parameters modeled, subjected to a number of practical constraints. In addition to the optimizations concerning gain and power, another important consideration for a single pass FEL starting from noise is the transverse coherence property of the amplified radiation, especially at short wavelength. A widely used emittance criteria for FELs requires that the emittance is smaller than the radiation wavelength divided by 4{pi}. For the LCLS the criteria is violated by a factor of 5, at a normalized emittance of 1.5 mm-mrad, wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, and beam energy of 15 GeV. Thus it is important to check quantitatively the emittance effect on the transverse coherence. I will examine the emittance effect on transverse coherence by analyzing different transverse modes and show that full transverse coherence can be obtained even at the LCLS parameter regime.

  7. Final report for the 1996 DOE grant supporting research at the SLAC/LBNL/LLNL B factory

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D.; Wright, D.

    1997-08-08

    This final report discusses Department of Energy-supported research funded through Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) which was performed as part of a collaboration between LLNL and Prairie View A and M University to develop part of the BaBar detector at the SLAC B Factory. This work focuses on the Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) subsystem of BaBar and involves a full range of detector development activities: computer simulations of detector performance, creation of reconstruction algorithms, and detector hardware R and D. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a leading role in the IFR subsystem and has established on-site computing and detector facilities to conduct this research. By establishing ties with the existing LLNL Research Collaboration Program and leveraging LLNL resources, the experienced Prairie View group was able to quickly achieve a more prominent role within the BaBar collaboration and make significant contributions to the detector design. In addition, this work provided the first entry point for Historically Black Colleges and Universities into the B Factory collaboration, and created an opportunity to train a new generation of minority students at the premier electron-positron high energy physics facility in the US.

  8. A precise measurement of the left-right asymmetry of Z Boson production at the SLAC linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    We present a precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry of Z boson production (A{sub LR}) observed in 1993 data at the SLAC linear collider. The A{sub LR} experiment provides a direct measure of the effective weak mixing angle through the initial state couplings of the electron to the Z. During the 1993 run of the SLC, the SLD detector recorded 49,392 Z events produced by the collision of longitudinally polarized electrons on unpolarized positrons at a center-of-mass energy of 91.26 GeV. A Compton polarimeter measured the luminosity-weighted electron polarization to be (63.4{+-}1.3)%. ALR was measured to be 0.1617{+-}0.0071(stat.){+-}0.0033(syst.), which determines the effective weak mixing angle to be sin {sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2292{+-}0.0009(stat.){+-}0.0004(syst.). This measurement of A{sub LR} is incompatible at the level of two standard deviations with the value predicted by a fit of several other electroweak measurements to the Standard Model.

  9. ACS from development to operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caproni, Alessandro; Colomer, Pau; Jeram, Bogdan; Sommer, Heiko; Chiozzi, Gianluca; Mañas, Miguel M.

    2016-08-01

    The ALMA Common Software (ACS), provides the infrastructure of the distributed software system of ALMA and other projects. ACS, built on top of CORBA and Data Distribution Service (DDS) middleware, is based on a Component- Container paradigm and hides the complexity of the middleware allowing the developer to focus on domain specific issues. The transition of the ALMA observatory from construction to operations brings with it that ACS effort focuses primarily on scalability, stability and robustness rather than on new features. The transition came together with a shorter release cycle and a more extensive testing. For scalability, the most problematic area has been the CORBA notification service, used to implement the publisher subscriber pattern because of the asynchronous nature of the paradigm: a lot of effort has been spent to improve its stability and recovery from run time errors. The original bulk data mechanism, implemented using the CORBA Audio/Video Streaming Service, showed its limitations and has been replaced with a more performant and scalable DDS implementation. Operational needs showed soon the difference between releases cycles for Online software (i.e. used during observations) and Offline software, which requires much more frequent releases. This paper attempts to describe the impact the transition from construction to operations had on ACS, the solution adopted so far and a look into future evolution.

  10. The ac53, ac78, ac101, and ac103 Genes Are Newly Discovered Core Genes in the Family Baculoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Garavaglia, Matías Javier; Miele, Solange Ana Belén; Iserte, Javier Alonso; Belaich, Mariano Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    The family Baculoviridae is a large group of insect viruses containing circular double-stranded DNA genomes of 80 to 180 kbp, which have broad biotechnological applications. A key feature to understand and manipulate them is the recognition of orthology. However, the differences in gene contents and evolutionary distances among the known members of this family make it difficult to assign sequence orthology. In this study, the genome sequences of 58 baculoviruses were analyzed, with the aim to detect previously undescribed core genes because of their remote homology. A routine based on Multi PSI-Blast/tBlastN and Multi HaMStR allowed us to detect 31 of 33 accepted core genes and 4 orthologous sequences in the Baculoviridae which were not described previously. Our results show that the ac53, ac78, ac101 (p40), and ac103 (p48) genes have orthologs in all genomes and should be considered core genes. Accordingly, there are 37 orthologous genes in the family Baculoviridae. PMID:22933288

  11. Simple Equipment for Imaging AC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Anayama, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    Presents an effective way to demonstrate the difference between direct current and alternating current using red and green LEDs. Describes how to make a tool that shows how an AC voltage changes with time using the afterimage effect of the LEDs. (Author/NB)

  12. Simple Equipment for Imaging AC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Anayama, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    Presents an effective way to demonstrate the difference between direct current and alternating current using red and green LEDs. Describes how to make a tool that shows how an AC voltage changes with time using the afterimage effect of the LEDs. (Author/NB)

  13. Modeling and Correcting the Time-Dependent ACS PSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Albert, Justin; Taylor, James E.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Leauthaud, Alexie

    2006-01-01

    The ability to accurately measure the shapes of faint objects in images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) depends upon detailed knowledge of the Point Spread Function (PSF). We show that thermal fluctuations cause the PSF of the ACS Wide Field Camera (WFC) to vary over time. We describe a modified version of the TinyTim PSF modeling software to create artificial grids of stars across the ACS field of view at a range of telescope focus values. These models closely resemble the stars in real ACS images. Using 10 bright stars in a real image, we have been able to measure HST s apparent focus at the time of the exposure. TinyTim can then be used to model the PSF at any position on the ACS field of view. This obviates the need for images of dense stellar fields at different focus values, or interpolation between the few observed stars. We show that residual differences between our TinyTim models and real data are likely due to the effects of Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) degradation. Furthermore, we discuss stochastic noise that is added to the shape of point sources when distortion is removed, and we present MultiDrizzle parameters that are optimal for weak lensing science. Specifically, we find that reducing the MultiDrizzle output pixel scale and choosing a Gaussian kernel significantly stabilizes the resulting PSF after image combination, while still eliminating cosmic rays/bad pixels, and correcting the large geometric distortion in the ACS. We discuss future plans, which include more detailed study of the effects of CTE degradation on object shapes and releasing our TinyTim models to the astronomical community.

  14. Voltage controller/current limiter for ac

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T. T.

    1980-01-01

    Circuit protects ac power systems for overload failures, limits power surge and short-circuit currents to 150 percent of steady state level, regulates ac output voltage, and soft starts loads. Limiter generates dc error signal in response to line fluctuations and dumps power when overload is reached. Device is inserted between ac source and load.

  15. ARC-1987-AC87-0191

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1987-03-11

    NASA Ames Graphics of LARGE-SCALE TILTING PROP ROTOR HOVER PERFORMANCE TESTS AMES OARF COMPOSITE. (ref: XV-15 Metal Rotor AC84-0176-13, XV-15 Composite Rotor from AC84-0498 series, V-22 Osprey AC84-0059-11 testing at OARF)

  16. ac-resistance-measuring instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Hof, P.J.

    1981-04-22

    An auto-ranging ac resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an ac excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance.

  17. The Basis of Generalized Equation E = Ac2M, its Application in Various Physical Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ajay

    2007-08-01

    The basis of generalized equation E = Ac2M, its application in various physical phenomena. Complete paper (in pdf) at www.ajayonline.us Einstein's (Sep. 1905) derivation theorizes that when light energy (L) is emanated by luminous body then its mass diminishes as m =L/c2 and this equation is speculative origin (without proof) of E = c2m. This derivation is true under special conditions only, not in general. Einstein's derivation L = mc2 involves four variables e.g. magnitude of energy of light waves, number of light waves, angle at which light waves are emitted and velocity of observer, v. Einstein derived L = mc2 choosing special values of variables. If general values of variables are considered then Einstein's derivation predicts that as body emits light energy, then its mass must increase, which is inconsistent result. Alternate equation E = Ac2M has been suggested, which implies that energy emitted on annihilation of mass (or vice versa) can be equal, less and more than predicted by E = mc2. E = c2m is yet unconfirmed in the most abundant chemical re actions. The total kinetic energy of fission fragments of U235 or Pu239 is found experimentally 20-60 MeV less than Q-value predicted by mc2, it is explainable with E = Ac2M with value of A less than one. Energy emitted by Gamma Ray Bursts (most energetic event after Big Bang) in duration 0.1-100s, is 10^45J, can be explained with help of E = Ac2M. The mass of particle Ds (2317) discovered at SLAC, have mass lower than current estimates; it can be explained with value of A more than one. E = Ac2M, explains that mass of universe 10^55kg was created from dwindling amount of energy (10-50 J or less) i.e. expceptionally-2 small and A is 1.11 10-122 J or less. This perception implies gravitational energy is another form of mass (like other energies) and has been originated simultaneously with mass.

  18. Simultaneous distribution of AC and DC power

    DOEpatents

    Polese, Luigi Gentile

    2015-09-15

    A system and method for the transport and distribution of both AC (alternating current) power and DC (direct current) power over wiring infrastructure normally used for distributing AC power only, for example, residential and/or commercial buildings' electrical wires is disclosed and taught. The system and method permits the combining of AC and DC power sources and the simultaneous distribution of the resulting power over the same wiring. At the utilization site a complementary device permits the separation of the DC power from the AC power and their reconstruction, for use in conventional AC-only and DC-only devices.

  19. A Test Facility for the International Linear Collider at SLAC End Station A, for Prototypes of Beam Delivery and IR Components

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.; Erickson, R.; Frisch, J.; Hast, C.; Jobe, R.K.; Keller, L.; Markiewicz, T.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Nelson, T.; Phinney, N.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Seryi, A.; Smith, S.; Szalata, Z.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Beard, C.; /Daresbury /CERN /DESY /KEK, Tsukuba /LLNL, Livermore /Lancaster U. /Manchester U. /Notre Dame U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /Birmingham U. /Bristol U. /UC, Berkeley /Cambridge U. /University Coll. London /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Oregon U.

    2005-05-23

    The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference.

  20. Geant4-based Simulation Study of PEP-II Beam Backgrounds in the BABAR Detector at the SLAC B-Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Lockman, W.S.; Kozanecki, W.; Campbell, B.; Robertson, S.H.; Bondioli, M.; Calderini, G.; Barlow, N.; Edgar, C.L.; Aston, D.; Bower, G.; Cristinziani, M.; Fieguth, T.; Wright, D.H.; Petersen, B.A.; Blount, N.L.; Strom, D.; /Oregon U.

    2005-06-07

    To improve the understanding of accelerator-induced backgrounds at the SLAC B-Factory, we simulate lost particle backgrounds in the BABAR detector originating from beam-gas interactions and radiative Bhabha scatters. We have extended the GEANT4-based BABAR detector simulation to include beam-line components and magnetic fields up to 8.5 m away from the interaction point. We describe the simulation model and then compare preliminary predicted background levels with measurements from dedicated single- and colliding-beam experiments.

  1. Phase detector and phase feedback for a single bunch in a two-bunch damping ring for the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, H.D.; Judkins, J.G.

    1987-03-01

    The synchronous phase of a bunch of positrons or electrons being damped in a SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) damping ring is dependent on beam intensity. Injection for alternate bunches into the SLC linac from the damping rings should occur at a constant phase. A phase detector was developed allowing the measurement of phase of a single-stored bunch in the presence of a second bunch in reference to the phase of the linac. The single-bunch phase is derived from beam position monitor signals using a switching scheme to separate the two bunches circulating in each damping ring. The hardware is described including feedback loops to stabilize the extraction phase.

  2. Report on Proton and Ion Beam measurements at the Matter in Extreme Condition (MCC) end station at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, Maxence

    2016-02-16

    We report on MeV ion beams produced with high-repetition rates of 1 Hz at the MEC end station at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. These data were obtained during the commissioning beam time of the new 30TW laser. After describing the experimental set-up, the laser conditions and the target diagnostics, ion beam spectra measured for different foil thicknesses and laser intensities will be presented and discussed. These results are subsequently compared with results from cryogenic hydrogen jets at MEC in January 2015.

  3. HST/ACS Associations: the Next Step after WFPC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, R.; Durand, D.; Simard, L.; Schade, D.; Koekemoer, A.; Corbin, M.; Micol, A.

    2004-07-01

    After the release of the successful WFPC2 associations, the CADC, ST-ECF and STScI are now working on joint pipeline software to produce associations of images from the HST's Advanced Camera for Surveys instrument. Although the basic approach is very similar to the WFPC2 associations (Durand et al., 2004) there are some fundamental differences because of the high level of geometric distortion of the ACS optics. The core of the ACS association pipeline will perform image combination using the Drizzle method and hence there will be no need to constrain the position angle of associated observations as was done with WFPC2. Our goals are the production of high quality products for the HST archive users and eventual `publication' of these products within the Virtual Observatory.

  4. AC electrothermal technique in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Alinaghi; Navi, Maryam; Dalton, Colin

    2017-02-01

    Electrokinetic techniques have a wide range of applications in droplet, particle, and fluid manipulation systems. In general, they can be categorized into different subgroups including electroosmosis, electrothermal, electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis, etc. The AC electrothermal (ACET) technique has been shown to be very effective in applications which involve high conductivity fluids, such as blood, which are typically used in biomedical applications. In the past few years, the ACET effect has received considerable attention. Unlike AC electroosmosis (ACEO), the ACET effect shows plateaus in force in a wide frequency range. In other words, with electrothermal force, velocity is more steady and predictable at different frequencies, compared to ACEO and dielectrophoresis (DEP). Although electrothermal microflows form as a result of Joule heating in the fluid, due to high conduction of heat to the ambience, the temperature rise in the fluid is not so high as to threaten the nature of the biofluids. The average temperature rise resulting from the ACET effect is below 5 °K. In order to generate high strength AC electric fields, microfabricated electrode arrays are commonly used in microchannels. For pumping applications, it is essential to create asymmetry in the electric field, typically by having asymmetrical electrode pairs. There is no defined border between many electrokinetic techniques, and as such the point where electrothermal processes interferes with other electrokinetic techniques is not clear in the literature. In addition, there have been comprehensive reviews on micropumps, electrokinetics, and their subcategories, but the literature lacks a detailed up-to-date review on electrothermal microdevices. In this paper, a brief review is made specifically on electric fields in ACET devices, in order to provide an insight for the reader about the importance of this aspect of ACET devices and the improvements made to date.

  5. Effect of the magnetic material on AC losses in HTS conductors in AC magnetic field carrying AC transport current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xing-Xing; Huang, Chen-Guang; Yong, Hua-Dong; Zhou, You-He

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the AC losses in several typical superconducting composite conductors using the H-formulation model. A single superconducting strip with ferromagnetic substrate or cores and a stack of coated conductors with ferromagnetic substrates are studied. We consider all the coated conductors carrying AC transport currents and simultaneously exposed to perpendicular AC magnetic fields. The influences of the amplitude, frequency, phase difference and ferromagnetic materials on the AC losses are investigated. The results show that the magnetization losses of single strip and stacked strips have similar characteristics. The ferromagnetic substrate can increase the magnetization loss at low magnetic field, and decrease the loss at high magnetic field. The ferromagnetic substrate can obviously increase the transport loss in stacked strips. The trends of total AC losses of single strip and stacked strips are similar when they are carrying current or exposed to a perpendicular magnetic field. The effect of the frequency on the total AC losses of single strip is related to the amplitude of magnetic field. The AC losses decrease with increasing frequency in low magnetic field region while increase in high magnetic field region. As the phase difference changes, there is a periodic variation for the AC losses. Moreover, when the strip is under only the transport current and magnetic field, the ferromagnetic cores will increase the AC losses for large transport current or field.

  6. ac electroosmosis in rectangular microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campisi, Michele; Accoto, Dino; Dario, Paolo

    2005-11-01

    Motivated by the growing interest in ac electroosmosis as a reliable no moving parts strategy to control fluid motion in microfluidic devices for biomedical applications, such as lab-on-a-chip, we study transient and steady-state electrokinetic phenomena (electroosmosis and streaming currents) in infinitely extended rectangular charged microchannels. With the aid of Fourier series and Laplace transforms we provide a general formal solution of the problem, which is used to study the time-dependent response to sudden ac applied voltage differences in case of finite electric double layer. The Debye-Hückel approximation has been adopted to allow for an algebraic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann problem in Fourier space. We obtain the expressions of flow velocity profiles, flow rates, streaming currents, as well as expressions of the complex hydraulic and electrokinetic conductances. We analyze in detail the dependence of the electrokinetic conductance on the extension of linear dimensions relative to the Debye length, with an eye on finite electric double layer effects.

  7. ACS PSF Variations with Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Lallo, Matt; Makidon, Russ

    2007-09-01

    We have used the HST ACS/WFC observations of a Galactic bulge field taken over a continuous interval of 7 days (Prop 9750) to investigate the possible dependence of the ACS focus with the external temperatures. This dataset allows us to investigate possible focus variations over timescales of a few hours to a few days. The engineering data related to the external temperatures for this duration show that the maximum temperature change occurred over the first 1.5 days. Among all the different temperatures recorded, the truss diametric differential and the truss axial temperatures are the only two temperatures which have the same timescale of variation as the PSFwidth variations. The PSF-widths also strongly correlate with these two temperatures during this time interval. We empirically fit the PSF-width variations with these 2 temperature sensor values. This suggests that the focus has a similar dependence, and we recommend that this finding be followed up with the determination of actual focus values to check if the focus values indeed have the same correlation. If so, the temperature data can be useful in estimating the focus values, which can then be used to predict the PSFs to a first order.

  8. ac electroosmosis in rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Michele; Accoto, Dino; Dario, Paolo

    2005-11-22

    Motivated by the growing interest in ac electroosmosis as a reliable no moving parts strategy to control fluid motion in microfluidic devices for biomedical applications, such as lab-on-a-chip, we study transient and steady-state electrokinetic phenomena (electroosmosis and streaming currents) in infinitely extended rectangular charged microchannels. With the aid of Fourier series and Laplace transforms we provide a general formal solution of the problem, which is used to study the time-dependent response to sudden ac applied voltage differences in case of finite electric double layer. The Debye-Huckel approximation has been adopted to allow for an algebraic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann problem in Fourier space. We obtain the expressions of flow velocity profiles, flow rates, streaming currents, as well as expressions of the complex hydraulic and electrokinetic conductances. We analyze in detail the dependence of the electrokinetic conductance on the extension of linear dimensions relative to the Debye length, with an eye on finite electric double layer effects.

  9. RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

  10. Integration and verification testing of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Travis; Bond, Tim; Chiang, James; Gilmore, Kirk; Digel, Seth; Dubois, Richard; Glanzman, Tom; Johnson, Tony; Lopez, Margaux; Newbry, Scott P.; Nordby, Martin E.; Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Reil, Kevin A.; Roodman, Aaron J.

    2016-08-01

    We present an overview of the Integration and Verification Testing activities of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Camera at the SLAC National Accelerator Lab (SLAC). The LSST Camera, the sole instrument for LSST and under construction now, is comprised of a 3.2 Giga-pixel imager and a three element corrector with a 3.5 degree diameter field of view. LSST Camera Integration and Test will be taking place over the next four years, with final delivery to the LSST observatory anticipated in early 2020. We outline the planning for Integration and Test, describe some of the key verification hardware systems being developed, and identify some of the more complicated assembly/integration activities. Specific details of integration and verification hardware systems will be discussed, highlighting some of the technical challenges anticipated.

  11. AC polarographic determination of cloxacillin.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Vergara, L J; Silva, M M; Squella, J A

    1982-11-01

    Hydrolysis of cloxacillin at pH 4.0 yields an electroactive product which can be determined by polarography. Depending on the concentration of cloxacillin, one of 2 peaks was obtained: The potential ac peaks for a 4.36 mM cloxacillin solution were peak I, -0.23 V and peak II, -0.13 V. For analytical purposes, the first peak was used. A linear relationship was established for levels of cloxacillin between 2.2 X 10(-5) and 2.2 X 10(-3)M. Average recovery was 98.8% (SD 1.8), indicating satisfactory accuracy for the method. Individual capsule and composite assays as well as interference tests are described.

  12. Phylogenetic Ecology of the Freshwater Actinobacteria acI Lineage▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Ryan J.; Jones, Stuart E.; Helmus, Matthew R.; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2007-01-01

    The acI lineage of freshwater Actinobacteria is a cosmopolitan and often numerically dominant member of lake bacterial communities. We conducted a survey of acI 16S rRNA genes and 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions from 18 Wisconsin lakes and used standard nonphylogenetic and phylogenetic statistical approaches to investigate the factors that determine acI community composition at the local scale (within lakes) and at the regional scale (across lakes). Phylogenetic reconstruction of 434 acI 16S rRNA genes revealed a well-defined and highly resolved phylogeny. Eleven previously unrecognized monophyletic clades, each with ≥97.9% within-clade 16S rRNA gene sequence identity, were identified. Clade community similarity positively correlated with lake environmental similarity but not with geographic distance, implying that the lakes represent a single biotic region containing environmental filters for communities that have similar compositions. Phylogenetically disparate clades within the acI lineage were most abundant at the regional scale, and local communities were comprised of more closely related clades. Lake pH was a strong predictor of the community composition, but only when lakes with a pH below 6 were included in the data set. In the remaining lakes (pH above 6) biogeographic patterns in the landscape were instead a predictor of the observed acI community structure. The nonrandom distribution of the newly defined acI clades suggests potential ecophysiological differences between the clades, with acI clades AI, BII, and BIII preferring acidic lakes and acI clades AII, AVI, and BI preferring more alkaline lakes. PMID:17827330

  13. 76 FR 12935 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; The American Community Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... needs and expectations of the country, the Census Bureau developed the American Community Survey (ACS... decennial census. After years of development and testing, the ACS began full implementation in households in... through the ACS has had a profound effect on the census design plan. The collection of long- form data...

  14. The AC Approach to Liquid Spill Cleanup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Norman S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the absorption and containment (AC) approach to laboratory chemical-spill cleanup. Discusses currently recommended chemical-spill cleanup procedures and evaluates commercially available cleanup materials. Promotes the use of the AC method in terms of its relative safety, availability of materials, and ease of instruction. (TW)

  15. Two-dimensional kinematics of SLACS lenses - I. Phase-space analysis of the early-type galaxy SDSSJ2321-097 at z ~ 0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czoske, Oliver; Barnabè, Matteo; Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Bolton, Adam S.

    2008-03-01

    We present the first results of a combined VLT VIMOS integral-field unit and Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/ACS study of the early-type lens galaxy SDSSJ2321-097 at z = 0.0819, extending kinematic studies to a look-back time of 1Gyr. This system, discovered in the Sloan Lens ACS Survey, has been observed as part of a VLT Large Programme with the goal of obtaining two-dimensional stellar kinematics of 17 early-type galaxies to z ~ 0.35 and Keck spectroscopy of an additional dozen lens systems. Bayesian modelling of both the surface brightness distribution of the lensed source and the two-dimensional measurements of velocity and velocity dispersion has allowed us, under the only assumptions of axisymmetry and a two-integral stellar distribution function (DF) for the lens galaxy, to dissect this galaxy in three dimensions and break the classical mass-anisotropy, mass-sheet and inclination-oblateness degeneracies. Our main results are that the galaxy (i) has a total density profile well described by a single power law with γ' = 2.06+0.03-0.06 (ii) is a very slow rotator (specific stellar angular momentum parameter λR = 0.075); (iii) shows only mild anisotropy (δ ~ 0.15); and (iv) has a dark matter contribution of ~30 per cent inside the effective radius. Our first results from this large combined imaging and spectroscopic effort with the VLT, Keck and HST show that the structure of massive early-type galaxies beyond the local Universe can now be studied in great detail using the combination of stellar kinematics and gravitational lensing. Extending these studies to look-back times where evolutionary effects become measurable holds great promise for the understanding of formation and evolution of early-type galaxies. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla or Paranal Observatories under programme IDs 075.B-0226 and 177.B-0682 and on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute

  16. Design and testing of the 1.5 T superconducting solenoid for the BABAR detector at PEP-II in SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, T G; Shen, S; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Musenich, R; Priano, C; Bell, R A; Brendt, M; Burgess, W; Craddock, W; Keller, L; Dormicchi, O; Moreschi, P; Penco, R; Valente, P; Valle, N

    2001-01-26

    The 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid is part of the BABAR Detector located in the PEP-II B-Factory machine at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The solenoid has a 2.8 m bore and is 3.7 m long. The two layer solenoid is wound with an aluminum stabilized conductor which is graded axially to produce a {+-} 3% field uniformity in the tracking region. The 24 month fabrication, 3 month installation and 1 month commissioning of the solenoid were completed on time and budget. This paper summarizes the culmination of a 3 year design, fabrication and testing program of the BABAR superconducting solenoid. The work was completed by an international collaboration between Ansaldo, INFN, LLNL, and SLAC. Critical current measurements of the superconducting strand, cable and conductor, cool-down, operation with the thermo-siphon cooling, fast and slow discharges, and magnetic forces are discussed in detail.

  17. Single shot spatial and temporal coherence properties of the SLAC linac coherent light source in the hard x-ray regime

    SciTech Connect

    Gutt, C.; Wochner, P.; Fischer, B.; Conrad, H.; Castro-Colin, M.; Lee, S.; Lehmkuhler, F.; Steinke, I.; Sprung, M.; Roseker, W.; Zhu, D.; Lemke, H.; Bogle, S.; Fuoss, P. H.; Stephenson, G. B.; Cammarata, M.; Fritz, D. M.; Robert, A.; Grubel, G.

    2012-01-01

    We measured the transverse and longitudinal coherence properties of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC in the hard x-ray regime at 9 keV photon energy on a single shot basis. Speckle patterns recorded in the forward direction from colloidal nanoparticles yielded the transverse coherence properties of the focused LCLS beam. Speckle patterns from a gold nanopowder recorded with atomic resolution allowed us to measure the shot-to-shot variations of the spectral properties of the x-ray beam. The focused beam is in the transverse direction fully coherent with a mode number close to 1. The average number of longitudinal modes behind the Si(111) monochromator is about 14.5 and the average coherence time {tau}{sub c} = (2.0 {+-} 1.0) fs. The data suggest a mean x-ray pulse duration of (29 {+-} 14) fs behind the monochromator for (100 {+-} 14) fs long electron pulses.

  18. A Precise Measurement of the Spin Structure Functions G**P(2) G**D(2) from SLAC Experiment E155X

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, D

    2003-12-18

    A precision measurement of the deep inelastic polarized structure functions g{sub 2}{sup p} (x, Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 2}{sup d} (x, Q{sup 2}) and the virtual photon asymmetries A{sub 2}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}) and A{sub 2}{sup d}(x, Q{sup 2}) has been made by the E155x collaboration in the ranges 0.02 < x < 0.8 and 0.7 (GeV/c){sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 20 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The transverse asymmetry (A{sub {perpendicular}}) was measured at SLAC using 29.1 and 32.3 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident on transversely polarized target protons and deuterons; the scattered electrons were detected by three fixed angle spectrometers at 2.75{sup o}, 5.5{sup o}, and 10.5{sup o} from the beam line. g{sub 2} was extracted using the measured A{sub {perpendicular}}, an E155 phenomenological fit to g{sub 1}/F{sub 1}, and the SLAC fit to R(x, Q{sup 2}); the function F{sub 1} was obtained from the most recent NMC fit to F{sub 2}(x, Q{sup 2}). The errors on g{sub 2} for both proton and deuteron are more than three times smaller than those of the previously existing world data set, thus enabling the data to resolve clearly between g{sub 2}{sup ww} and zero as well as make distinctions between various models. In addition, the Burkhardt-Cottingham and Efremov-Leader-Teryaev sum rules were evaluated over the measured kinematic region, as well as the d{sub 2} twist-3 matrix element for the proton and neutron.

  19. Here Be Dragons: Characterization of ACS/WFC Scattered Light Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porterfield, B.; Coe, D.; Gonzaga, S.; Anderson, J.; Grogin, N.

    2016-11-01

    We present a study characterizing scattered light anomalies that occur near the edges of Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) images. We inspected all 8,573 full-frame ACS/WFC raw images with exposure times longer than 350 seconds obtained in the F606W and F814W filters from 2002 to October 2013. We visually identified two particular scattered light artifacts known as "dragon's breath" and edge glow. Using the 2MASS point source catalog and Hubble Guide Star Catalog (GSC II), we identified the stars that caused these artifacts. The stars are all located in narrow bands ( 3" across) just outside the ACS/WFC field of view (2" - 16" away). We provide a map of these risky areas around the ACS/WFC detectors - users should avoid positioning bright stars in these regions when designing ACS/WFC imaging observations. We also provide interactive webpages which display all the image artifacts we identified, allowing users to see examples of the severity of artifacts they might expect for a given stellar magnitude at a given position relative to the ACS/WFC field of view. On average, 10th (18th) magnitude stars produce artifacts about 1,000 (100) pixels long. But the severity of these artifacts can vary strongly with small positional shifts (∼ 1"). The results are similar for both filters (F606W and F814W) when expressed in total fluence, or flux multiplied by exposure time.

  20. Here There Be Dragons: Characterization of ACS/WFC Scattered Light Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porterfield, Blair; Coe, Dan A.; ACS

    2016-01-01

    We present a study characterizing scattered light anomalies that occur around the edge of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC). The study is based on all full-frame WFC raw images ever produced by ACS. Using the 2MASS catalog, we identified stars outside of the ACS/WFC field of view which cause two particular scattered light artifacts known as "dragon's breath" and edge glow. We determined which regions around the chip the stars must fall in to cause dragons breath to occur and characterized the amount of stellar flux received during an integration (expressed in instrumental magnitudes) needed to cause scattering. We have completed this study for the ACS F606W and F814W filters. We provide a map of risky areas around the ACS chips and an upper limit of magnitudes to be concerned about. We will use these results to develop interactive tools that will aid the astronomical community in the proposal process for ACS/WFC.

  1. Three phase AC motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael; Wright, Maynard K.; Burkett, John P.

    1984-03-20

    A motor controller for a three phase AC motor (10) which is adapted to operate bidirectionally from signals received either from a computer (30) or a manual control (32). The controller is comprised of digital logic circuit means which implement a forward and reverse command signal channel (27, 29) for the application of power through the forward and reverse power switching relays (16, 18, 20, 22). The digital logic elements are cross coupled to prevent activation of both channels simultaneously and each includes a plugging circuit (65, 67) for stopping the motor upon the removal of control signal applied to one of the two channels (27, 29) for a direction of rotation desired. Each plugging circuit (65, 67) includes a one-shot pulse signal generator (88, 102) which outputs a single pulse signal of predetermined pulsewidth which is adapted to inhibit further operation of the application of power in the channel which is being activated and to apply a reversal command signal to the other channel which provides a reversed phase application of power to the motor for a period defined by the pulse-width output of the one-shot signal generator to plug the motor (10) which will then be inoperative until another rotational command signal is applied to either of the two channels.

  2. Aircraft Control and Warning (AC & W) Radar Career Ladder AFSC 303X2. Electronics Principles Inventory (EPI).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    UNCLASSIFIED N EEEh EE-E I flffl~f~fl.flfllflf i. UNITED STATES AIR FORCE NMI ELECTRONICS PRINCIPLES INVENTORY (EPI), -AIRCRAFT CONTROL AND WARNING (AC & W...Air Force Electronics Principles Survey of the Aircraft Control and Warning (AC & W) Radar career ladder (AFSC 303X2). The project was undertaken at the...request of Mr. James R. Haupt, Training Manager, Keesler AFB, MS. Authority for con- ducting electronics principles inventories is contained in AER

  3. A Survey of Techniques for Approximate Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2016-03-18

    Approximate computing trades off computation quality with the effort expended and as rising performance demands confront with plateauing resource budgets, approximate computing has become, not merely attractive, but even imperative. Here, we present a survey of techniques for approximate computing (AC). We discuss strategies for finding approximable program portions and monitoring output quality, techniques for using AC in different processing units (e.g., CPU, GPU and FPGA), processor components, memory technologies etc., and programming frameworks for AC. Moreover, we classify these techniques based on several key characteristics to emphasize their similarities and differences. Finally, the aim of this paper is to provide insights to researchers into working of AC techniques and inspire more efforts in this area to make AC the mainstream computing approach in future systems.

  4. A Survey of Techniques for Approximate Computing

    DOE PAGES

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2016-03-18

    Approximate computing trades off computation quality with the effort expended and as rising performance demands confront with plateauing resource budgets, approximate computing has become, not merely attractive, but even imperative. Here, we present a survey of techniques for approximate computing (AC). We discuss strategies for finding approximable program portions and monitoring output quality, techniques for using AC in different processing units (e.g., CPU, GPU and FPGA), processor components, memory technologies etc., and programming frameworks for AC. Moreover, we classify these techniques based on several key characteristics to emphasize their similarities and differences. Finally, the aim of this paper is tomore » provide insights to researchers into working of AC techniques and inspire more efforts in this area to make AC the mainstream computing approach in future systems.« less

  5. Superconductor coil geometry and ac losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. V., Jr.; Zapata, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    An empirical relation is presented which allows simple computation of volume-averaged winding fields from central fields for coils of small rectangular cross sections. This relation suggests that, in certain applications, ac-loss minimization can be accomplished by use of low winding densities, provided that hysteresis losses are independent of winding density. The ac-loss measurements on coils wound of twisted multifilamentary composite superconductors show no significant dependence on ac losses on winding density, thus permitting the use of winding density as an independent design parameter in loss minimization.

  6. AC Loss Measurements with a Cryocooled Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S.W.

    2001-02-15

    A new cryostat cooled by a closed-cycle Cryomech GB-37 cryocooler for superconductor measurements at temperatures down to 20 K is described. The sample is conductively coupled to the cold stage so as to minimize vibration and thermal stresses. AC losses have been measured calorimetrically in several HTSC coils that have been wound to simulate sub-scale transformer winding pairs. Stable temperatures down to 20 K were reached on these coils, allowing measurements at practical levels of ac current and I{sub c}. By using short ac current pulses, losses on individual turns could be resolved. Results are reported mainly to showcase the apparatus, measurement procedure and analytical approach.

  7. Memory effect in ac plasma displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlenk, K.; Obuchowicz, E.

    1993-10-01

    The bistable or `memory' mode of operation of an ac plasma display panel is presented. The difference between dc and ac plasma panel operation from the point of view of memory function is discussed. The graphic ac plasma display with thin film Cr-Cu-Cr electrodes was developed in OBREP and its basic parameters are described. It consists of 36 X 59 picture elements, its outer dimensions are: 76 X 52 mm2 and the screen size is: 49 X 30 mm2. The different dielectric glass materials were applied as dielectric layers and the influence of the properties of these materials on display parameters and memory function was investigated.

  8. Exenatide: AC 2993, AC002993, AC2993A, exendin 4, LY2148568.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Exenatide [AC002993, AC2993A, AC 2993, LY2148568, exendin 4], a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist, is a synthetic exendin 4 compound under development with Amylin Pharmaceuticals for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Both exendin 4 and its analogue, exendin 3, are 39-amino acid peptides isolated from Heloderma horridum lizard venom that have different amino acids at positions 2 and 3, respectively. Exendins are able to stimulate insulin secretion in response to rising blood glucose levels, and modulate gastric emptying to slow the entry of ingested sugars into the bloodstream. Amylin Pharmaceuticals acquired exclusive patent rights for the two exendin compounds (exendin 3 and exendin 4) from the originator, Dr John Eng (Bronx, NY, US). On 20 September 2002, Amylin and Eli Lilly signed a collaborative agreement for the development and commercialisation of exenatide for type 2 diabetes. Under the terms of the agreement, Eli Lilly has paid Amylin a licensing fee of 80 million US dollars and bought Amylin's stock worth 30 million US dollars at 18.69 US dollars a share. After the initial payment, Eli Lilly will pay Amylin up to 85 US dollars million upon reaching certain milestones and also make an additional payment of up to 130 million US dollars upon global commercialisation of exenatide. Both companies will share the US development and commercialisation costs, while Eli Lilly will pick up up to 80% of development costs and all commercialisation costs outside the US. Amylin and Eli Lilly will equally share profit from sales in the US, while Eli Lilly will get 80% of the profit outside the US and Amylin will get the rest. This agreement has also enabled Amylin to train its sales force to co-promote Lilly's human growth hormone Humatrope. Alkermes will receive research and development funding and milestone payments, and also a combination of royalty payments and manufacturing fees based on product sales. Alkermes undertakes the responsibility for the development

  9. A survey of surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    A new era for the field of Galactic structure is about to be opened with the advent of wide-area digital sky surveys. In this article, the author reviews the status and prospects for research for 3 new ground-based surveys: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Deep Near-Infrared Survey of the Southern Sky (DENIS) and the Two Micron AU Sky Survey (2MASS). These surveys will permit detailed studies of Galactic structure and stellar populations in the Galaxy with unprecedented detail. Extracting the information, however, will be challenging.

  10. Tevatron optics measurements using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to study beam optics of hadron synchrotrons. It can produce sustained large amplitude oscillations with virtually no emittance growth. A vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is recently implemented and a maximum oscillation amplitude of 2{sigma} (4{sigma}) at 980 GeV (150 GeV) is achieved [1]. When such large oscillations are measured with the BPM system of the Tevatron (20 {micro}m resolution), not only linear but even nonlinear optics can be directly measured. This paper shows how to measure {beta} function using an AC dipole and the result is compared to the other measurement. The paper also shows a test to detect optics changes when small changes are made in the Tevatron. Since an AC dipole is nondestructive, it allows frequent measurements of the optics which is necessary for such an test.

  11. The AC-120: The advanced commercial transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duran, David; Griffin, Ernest; Mendoza, Saul; Nguyen, Son; Pickett, Tim; Noernberg, Clemm

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this design was to fulfill a need for a new airplane to replace the aging 100 to 150 passenger, 1500 nautical mile range aircraft such as the Douglas DC9 and Boeing 737-100 airplanes. After researching the future aircraft market, conducting extensive trade studies, and analysis on different configurations, the AC-120 Advanced Commercial Transport final design was achieved. The AC-120's main design features include the incorporation of a three lifting surface configuration which is powered by two turboprop engines. The AC-120 is an economically sensitive aircraft which meets the new FM Stage Three noise requirements, and has lower NO(x) emissions than current turbofan powered airplanes. The AC-120 also improves on its contemporaries in passenger comfort, manufacturing, and operating cost.

  12. Stable ac phase and amplitude comparator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, H. P.

    1967-01-01

    Stable ac phase and amplitude comparator detects excessive vehicle maneuvering or vibration. It has phase demodulation, low-pass filter, and multiple threshold-setting capability designed specifically for low drifts over a wide range of temperatures.

  13. High School Teachers Win ACS Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Editorial Staff, Jce

    2009-07-01

    William E. Snyder is the 2009 winner of the ACS Division of Chemical Education Central Region Award for Excellence in High School Teaching; Sally Mitchell is the winner of the 2009 James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching.

  14. Phase protection system for ac power lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, W. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The system described provides protection for phase sensitive loads from being or remaining connected to ac power lines whenever a phase reversal occurs. It comprises a solid state phase detection circuit, a dc power relay circuit, an ac-to-dc converter for energizing the relay circuit, and a bistable four terminal transducer coupled between the phase detection circuit and the power relay circuit, for controlling both circuits.

  15. Three-phase-to-two-phase direct AC-AC converter with three leg structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, S.-S.

    2014-05-01

    A three-phase-to-two-phase ac-ac converter is, along with a modulation strategy based on the space vector scheme, introduced to directly drive two-phase output ac systems with high input power quality. The converter is capable of synthesising two sinusoidal output voltages with variable output frequency and arbitrary magnitude in quadrature phase-shift as well as sinusoidal input currents.

  16. Microtubule alignment and manipulation using AC electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Uppalapati, Maruti; Huang, Ying-Ming; Jackson, Thomas N; Hancock, William O

    2008-09-01

    The kinesin-microtubule system plays an important role in intracellular transport and is a model system for integrating biomotor-driven transport into microengineered devices. AC electrokinetics provides a novel tool for manipulating and organizing microtubules in solution, enabling new experimental geometries for investigating and controlling the interactions of microtubules and microtubule motors in vitro. By fabricating microelectrodes on glass substrates and generating AC electric fields across solutions of microtubules in low-ionic-strength buffers, bundles of microtubules are collected and aligned and the electrical properties of microtubules in solution are measured. The AC electric fields result in electro-osmotic flow, electrothermal flow, and dielectrophoresis of microtubules, which can be controlled by varying the solution conductivity, AC frequency, and electrode geometry. By mapping the solution conductivity and AC frequency over which positive dielectrophoresis occurs, the apparent conductivity of taxol-stabilized bovine-brain microtubules in PIPES buffer is measured to be 250 mS m(-1). By maximizing dielectrophoretic forces and minimizing electro-osmotic and electrothermal flow, microtubules are assembled into opposed asters. These experiments demonstrate that AC electrokinetics provides a powerful new tool for kinesin-driven transport applications and for investigating the role of microtubule motors in development and maintenance of the mitotic spindle.

  17. Surveying for Dollars: The Role of the American Community Survey in the Geographic Distribution of Federal Funds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reamer, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    The American Community Survey (ACS) is a Census Bureau program that provides annually updated information on demographic, social, economic, and housing characteristics of U.S. households at every level of geography, from the nation to the neighborhood. ACS data are used by public and business decision-makers to more clearly identify issues and…

  18. Surveying Future Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlstrom, John E.

    2016-06-01

    The now standard model of cosmology has been tested and refined by the analysis of increasingly sensitive, large astronomical surveys, especially with statistically significant millimeter-wave surveys of the cosmic microwave background and optical surveys of the distribution of galaxies. This talk will offer a glimpse of the future, which promises an acceleration of this trend with cosmological information coming from new surveys across the electromagnetic spectrum as well as particles and even gravitational waves.

  19. Surveying the cosmos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-19

    The object in the middle of this image, sitting alone within a star-studded cosmos, is a galaxy known as ESO 486-21. ESO 486-21 is a spiral galaxy — albeit with a somewhat irregular and ill-defined structure — located some 30 million light-years from Earth. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observed this object while performing a survey — the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) — of 50 nearby star-forming galaxies. The LEGUS sample was selected to cover a diverse range of galactic morphologies, star formation rates, galaxy masses, and more. Astronomers use such data to understand how stars form and evolve within clusters, and how these processes affect both their home galaxy and the wider Universe. ESO 486-21 is an ideal candidate for inclusion in such a survey as it is known to be in the process of forming new stars, which are created when large clouds of gas and dust (seen here in pink) within the galaxy crumple inwards upon themselves. LEGUS made use of Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The WFC3 obtained detailed observations of the target objects while the ACS obtained what are known as parallel fields — instead of leaving ACS idle, it was instead trained on a small patch of sky just offset from the target field itself, allowing it to gather additional valuable information while the primary target was being observed by WFC3. Parallel fields played an important role in Hubble’s Frontier Fields programme, which used the magnifying power of large galaxy clusters (via a phenomenon known as gravitational lensing) to explore objects in the distant Universe.

  20. 21 CFR 888.1240 - AC-powered dynamometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered dynamometer. 888.1240 Section 888.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1240 AC-powered dynamometer. (a) Identification. An AC-powered dynamometer is an AC-powered device intended for medical purposes to...

  1. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  2. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  3. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  4. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  5. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  6. 78 FR 39345 - ACS Wireless, Inc.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... No. 812-14066] ACS Wireless, Inc.; Notice of Application AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission... (``Act''). Summary of Application: ACS Wireless, Inc. (``ACS Wireless'') seeks an order under section 3(b..., reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities. ACS Wireless is primarily engaged in providing...

  7. 21 CFR 886.1630 - AC-powered photostimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered photostimulator. 886.1630 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1630 AC-powered photostimulator. (a) Identification. An AC-powered photostimulator is an AC-powered device intended to provide light stimulus...

  8. 21 CFR 886.1630 - AC-powered photostimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false AC-powered photostimulator. 886.1630 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1630 AC-powered photostimulator. (a) Identification. An AC-powered photostimulator is an AC-powered device intended to provide light stimulus...

  9. 21 CFR 886.1850 - AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. 886.1850... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1850 AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. (a) Identification. An AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope is an AC-powered device that is...

  10. 21 CFR 886.1850 - AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. 886.1850... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1850 AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. (a) Identification. An AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope is an AC-powered device that is...

  11. 21 CFR 888.1240 - AC-powered dynamometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false AC-powered dynamometer. 888.1240 Section 888.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1240 AC-powered dynamometer. (a) Identification. An AC-powered dynamometer is an AC-powered device intended for medical purposes to...

  12. AC Electrokinetics of Physiological Fluids for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Tingting; Lamanda, Ariana C.; Sin, Mandy L Y; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    AC electrokinetics is a collection of processes for manipulating bulk fluid mass and embedded objects with AC electric fields. The ability of AC electrokinetics to implement the major microfluidic operations, such as pumping, mixing, concentration and separation, makes it possible to develop integrated systems for clinical diagnostics in non-traditional healthcare settings. The high conductivity of physiological fluids presents new challenges and opportunities for AC electrokinetics based diagnostic systems. In this review, AC electrokinetic phenomena in conductive physiological fluids are described followed by a review of the basic microfluidic operations and the recent biomedical applications of AC electrokinetics. The future prospects of AC electrokinetics for clinical diagnostics are presented. PMID:25487557

  13. AC Electrokinetics of Physiological Fluids for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Tingting; Lamanda, Ariana C; Sin, Mandy L Y; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-12-01

    Alternating current (AC) electrokinetics is a collection of processes for manipulating bulk fluid mass and embedded objects with AC electric fields. The ability of AC electrokinetics to implement the major microfluidic operations, such as pumping, mixing, concentration, and separation, makes it possible to develop integrated systems for clinical diagnostics in nontraditional health care settings. The high conductivity of physiological fluids presents new challenges and opportunities for AC electrokinetics-based diagnostic systems. In this review, AC electrokinetic phenomena in conductive physiological fluids are described followed by a review of the basic microfluidic operations and the recent biomedical applications of AC electrokinetics. The future prospects of AC electrokinetics for clinical diagnostics are presented.

  14. Quercetin interacts with Cry1Ac protein to affect larval growth and survival of Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Guan, Xiumin; Michaud, J P; Zhang, Qingwen; Liu, Xiaoxia

    2016-07-01

    Bt cotton has been widely planted in China for over a decade to control H. armigera, but field surveys indicate increasing resistance in the pest. It has been speculated that accumulating plant secondary compounds in mature cotton may interact with Bt toxins and affect the toxicity of Bt to H. armigera. Both quercetin, one of the main flavonoids in cotton, and the Bt toxin Cry1Ac protein had significant negative effects on the growth, development and survival of H. armigera when added singly to artificial diet, but their effects were inhibited when added in combination. Quercetin was antagonistic to Cry1Ac toxicity at all tested concentrations. The accumulation of quercetin might be one factor contributing to the reduced toxicity of mature Bt cotton plants to H. armigera, and could partially explain the reduced efficacy of Cry1Ac in controlling this pest in the field. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. 78 FR 49318 - Availability of Draft Advisory Circular (AC) 90-106A and AC 20-167A

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Availability of Draft Advisory Circular (AC) 90-106A and AC 20- 167A...: This notice announces the availability of draft Advisory Circular (AC) 90-106A, Enhanced Flight Vision Systems and draft AC 20- 167A, Airworthiness Approval of Enhanced Vision System, Synthetic Vision...

  16. The Response AC/A Ratio Before and After the Onset of Myopia.

    PubMed

    Mutti, Donald O; Mitchell, G Lynn; Jones-Jordan, Lisa A; Cotter, Susan A; Kleinstein, Robert N; Manny, Ruth E; Twelker, J Daniel; Zadnik, Karla

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the ratio of accommodative convergence per diopter of accommodative response (AC/A ratio) before, during, and after myopia onset. Subjects were 698 children aged 6 to 14 years who became myopic and 430 emmetropic children participating in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error. Refractive error was measured using cycloplegic autorefraction, near work by parent survey, and the AC/A ratio by simultaneously monitoring convergence and accommodative response. The response AC/A ratios of children who became myopic were compared with age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched model estimates for emmetropic children from 5 years before through 5 years after the onset of myopia. The response AC/A ratio was not significantly different between the two groups 5 years before onset, then increased monotonically in children who became myopic until reaching a plateau at myopia onset of about 7 Δ/D compared to about 4 Δ/D for children who remained emmetropic (differences between groups significant at P < 0.01 from 4 years before onset through 5 years after onset). A higher AC/A ratio was associated with greater accommodative lag but not with the rate of myopia progression regardless of the level of near work. An increasing AC/A ratio is an early sign of becoming myopic, is related to greater accommodative lag, but does not affect the rate of myopia progression. The association with accommodative lag suggests that the AC/A ratio increase is from greater neural effort needed per diopter of accommodation rather than change in the accommodative convergence crosslink gain relationship.

  17. The Response AC/A Ratio Before and After the Onset of Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Donald O.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Cotter, Susan A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Manny, Ruth E.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Zadnik, Karla

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the ratio of accommodative convergence per diopter of accommodative response (AC/A ratio) before, during, and after myopia onset. Methods Subjects were 698 children aged 6 to 14 years who became myopic and 430 emmetropic children participating in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error. Refractive error was measured using cycloplegic autorefraction, near work by parent survey, and the AC/A ratio by simultaneously monitoring convergence and accommodative response. The response AC/A ratios of children who became myopic were compared with age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched model estimates for emmetropic children from 5 years before through 5 years after the onset of myopia. Results The response AC/A ratio was not significantly different between the two groups 5 years before onset, then increased monotonically in children who became myopic until reaching a plateau at myopia onset of about 7 Δ/D compared to about 4 Δ/D for children who remained emmetropic (differences between groups significant at P < 0.01 from 4 years before onset through 5 years after onset). A higher AC/A ratio was associated with greater accommodative lag but not with the rate of myopia progression regardless of the level of near work. Conclusions An increasing AC/A ratio is an early sign of becoming myopic, is related to greater accommodative lag, but does not affect the rate of myopia progression. The association with accommodative lag suggests that the AC/A ratio increase is from greater neural effort needed per diopter of accommodation rather than change in the accommodative convergence crosslink gain relationship. PMID:28291868

  18. From Beamline to Scanner with 225Ac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Andrew K. H.; Ramogida, Caterina F.; Kunz, Peter; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Cristina; Schaffer, Paul; Sossi, Vesna

    2016-09-01

    Due to the high linear energy transfer and short range of alpha-radiation, targeted radiation therapy using alpha-emitting pharmaceuticals that successfully target small disease clusters will kill target cells with limited harm to healthy tissue, potentially treating the most aggressive forms of cancer. As the parent of a decay chain with four alpha- and two beta-decays, 225Ac is a promising candidate for such a treatment. However, this requires retention of the entire decay chain at the target site, preventing the creation of freely circulating alpha-emitters that reduce therapeutic effect and increase toxicity to non-target tissues. Two major challenges to 225Ac pharmaceutical development exist: insufficient global supply, and the difficulty of preventing toxicity by retaining the entire decay chain at the target site. While TRIUMF works towards large-scale (C i amounts) production of 225Ac, we already use our Isotope Separation On-Line facility to provide small (< 1 mCi) quantities for in-house chemistry and imaging research that aims to improve and assess 225Ac radiopharmaceutical targeting. This presentation provides an overview of this research program and the journey of 225Ac from the beamline to the scanner. This research is funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  19. Design and synthesis of 225Ac radioimmunopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Michael R; Ma, Dangshe; Simon, Jim; Frank, R Keith; Scheinberg, David A

    2002-12-01

    The alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides 213Bi, 211At, 224Ra are under investigation for the treatment of leukemias, gliomas, and ankylosing spondylitis, respectively. 213Bi and 211At were attached to monoclonal antibodies and used as targeted immunotherapeutic agents while unconjugated 224Ra chloride selectively seeks bone. 225Ac possesses favorable physical properties for radioimmunotherapy (10d half-life and 4 net alpha particles), but has a history of unfavorable radiolabeling chemistry and poor metal-chelate stability. We selected functionalized derivatives of DOTA as the most promising to pursue from out of a group of potential 225Ac chelate compounds. A two-step synthetic process employing either MeO-DOTA-NCS or 2B-DOTA-NCS as the chelating moiety was developed to attach 225Ac to monoclonal antibodies. This method was tested using several different IgG systems. The chelation reaction yield in the first step was 93+/-8% radiochemically pure (n=26). The second step yielded 225Ac-DOTA-IgG constructs that were 95+/-5% radiochemically pure (n=27) and the mean percent immunoreactivity ranged from 25% to 81%, depending on the antibody used. This process has yielded several potential novel targeted 225Ac-labeled immunotherapeutic agents that may now be evaluated in appropriate model systems and ultimately in humans.

  20. Internal Color Properties of early-type galaxies on HST/ACS ERO UCG10214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menanteau, F.; Ford, H. C.; Clampin, M.; Illingworth, G. D.; Hartig, G.; Ardila, D. R.; Bartko, F.; Benítez, N.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Bouwens, R.; Broadhurst, T. J.; Brown, R. A.; Burrows, C.; Cheng, E.; Cross, N.; Feldman, P. D.; Franx, M.; Golimowski, D. A.; Gronwall, C.; Infante, L.; Kimble, R. A.; Krist, J. E.; Lesser, M.; Martel, A. R.; Meurer, G. R.; Miley, G.; Postman, M.; Rosati, P.; Sirianni, M.; Sparks, W. B.; Tran, H. D.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; White, R. L.; Zheng, W.; ACS Science Team

    2002-12-01

    In this paper/poster we study the internal color properties of a morphologically selected sample of spheroidal galaxies taken from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) ERO program of UGC 10214. We take advantage of the unprecedented ability of ACS deep images to resolve galaxies at faint limits in order to analyze the internal color properties of spheroids at pixel-scales. We use the B475W, V606W and I814W --band multicolor information to construct V-I and B-V color maps and extract color gradients for spheroids at I814W < 24 mag. We asses the ability of ACS to study galaxies at pixel-scale by comparing it with the results from similar analysis on the the best multicolor data available for this purpose from the Hubble Deep Fields (HDFs) North and South. We find that ACS data requires ~ 10 times less exposure time to obtain 1/2 the amount of data obtained previously with HST. We find a similar fraction of early-type systems ( ~30%) with inverse color gradients and blue centers as well as perturbed color maps comparable to those reported in the HDFs. We discuss the implication of this in the context of spheroidal formation. ACS was developed under NASA contract NAS 5-32864, and this research is supported by NASA grant NAG5-7697.

  1. The American Community Survey and Health Insurance Coverage Estimates: Possibilities and Challenges for Health Policy Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Davern, Michael; Quinn, Brian C; Kenney, Genevieve M; Blewett, Lynn A

    2009-01-01

    Objective To introduce the American Community Survey (ACS) and its measure of health insurance coverage to researchers and policy makers. Data Sources/Study Setting We compare the survey designs for the ACS and Current Population Survey (CPS) that measure insurance coverage. Study Design We describe the ACS and how it will be useful to health policy researchers. Principal Findings Relative to the CPS, the ACS will provide more precise state and substate estimates of health insurance coverage at a point-in-time. Yet the ACS lacks the historical data and detailed state-specific coverage categories seen in the CPS. Conclusions The ACS will be a critical new resource for researchers. To use the new data to the best advantage, careful research will be needed to understand its strengths and weaknesses. PMID:19040425

  2. Perfecting the Photometric Calibration of the ACS CCD Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, Ralph C.

    2016-09-01

    Newly acquired data and improved data reduction algorithms mandate a fresh look at the absolute flux calibration of the charge-coupled device cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The goals are to achieve a 1% accuracy and to make this calibration more accessible to the HST guest investigator. Absolute fluxes from the CALSPEC1 database for three primary hot 30,000-60,000K WDs define the sensitivity calibrations for the Wide Field Channel (WFC) and High Resolution Channel (HRC) filters. The external uncertainty for the absolute flux is ˜1%, while the internal consistency of the sensitivities in the broadband ACS filters is ˜0.3% among the three primary WD flux standards. For stars as cool as K type, the agreement with the CALSPEC standards is within 1% at the WFC1-1K subarray position, which achieves the 1% precision goal for the first time. After making a small adjustment to the filter bandpass for F814W, the 1% precision goal is achieved over the full F814W WFC field of view for stars of K type and hotter. New encircled energies and absolute sensitivities replace the seminal results of Sirianni et al. that were published in 2005. After implementing the throughput updates, synthetic predictions of the WFC and HRC count rates for the average of the three primary WD standard stars agree with the observations to 0.1%.

  3. ac propulsion system for an electric vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geppert, S.

    1980-01-01

    It is pointed out that dc drives will be the logical choice for current production electric vehicles (EV). However, by the mid-80's, there is a good chance that the price and reliability of suitable high-power semiconductors will allow for a competitive ac system. The driving force behind the ac approach is the induction motor, which has specific advantages relative to a dc shunt or series traction motor. These advantages would be an important factor in the case of a vehicle for which low maintenance characteristics are of primary importance. A description of an EV ac propulsion system is provided, taking into account the logic controller, the inverter, the motor, and a two-speed transmission-differential-axle assembly. The main barrier to the employment of the considered propulsion system in EV is not any technical problem, but inverter transistor cost.

  4. Numerical simulation of ac plasma arc thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han-Ming; Carey, G. F.; Oakes, M. E.

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model and approximate analysis for the energy distribution of an ac plasma arc with a moving boundary is developed. A simplified electrical conductivity function is assumed so that the dynamic behavior of the arc may be determined, independent of the gas type. The model leads to a reduced set of non-linear partial differential equations which governs the quasi-steady ac arc. This system is solved numerically and it is found that convection plays an important role, not only in the temperature distribution, but also in arc disruptions. Moreover, disruptions are found to be influenced by convection only for a limited frequency range. The results of the present studies are applicable to the frequnecy range of 10-10(exp 2) Hz which includes most industry ac arc frequencies.

  5. Numerical Simulation of AC Plasma Arc Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han-Ming; Carey, G. F.; Oakes, M. E.

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model and approximate analysis for the energy distribution of an ac plasma arc with a moving boundary is developed. A simplified electrical conductivity function is assumed so that the dynamic behavior of the arc may be determined, independent of the gas type. The model leads to a reduced set of non-linear partial differential equations which governs the quasi-steady ac arc. This system is solved numerically and it is found that convection plays an important role, not only in the temperature distribution, but also in arc disruptions. Moreover, disruptions are found to be influenced by convection only for a limited frequency range. The results of the present studies are applicable to the frequency range of 10-102 Hz which includes most industry ac arc frequencies.

  6. Linking stomatal traits and expression of slow anion channel genes HvSLAH1 and HvSLAC1 with grain yield for increasing salinity tolerance in barley.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohui; Mak, Michelle; Babla, Mohammad; Wang, Feifei; Chen, Guang; Veljanoski, Filip; Wang, Gang; Shabala, Sergey; Zhou, Meixue; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Soil salinity is an environmental and agricultural problem in many parts of the world. One of the keys to breeding barley for adaptation to salinity lies in a better understanding of the genetic control of stomatal regulation. We have employed a range of physiological (stomata assay, gas exchange, phylogenetic analysis, QTL analysis), and molecular techniques (RT-PCR and qPCR) to investigate stomatal behavior and genotypic variation in barley cultivars and a genetic population in four experimental trials. A set of relatively efficient and reliable methods were developed for the characterization of stomatal behavior of a large number of varieties and genetic lines. Furthermore, we found a large genetic variation of gas exchange and stomatal traits in barley in response to salinity stress. Salt-tolerant cultivar CM72 showed significantly larger stomatal aperture under 200 mM NaCl treatment than that of salt-sensitive cultivar Gairdner. Stomatal traits such as aperture width/length were found to significantly correlate with grain yield under salt treatment. Phenotypic characterization and QTL analysis of a segregating double haploid population of the CM72/Gairdner resulted in the identification of significant stomatal traits-related QTLs for salt tolerance. Moreover, expression analysis of the slow anion channel genes HvSLAH1 and HvSLAC1 demonstrated that their up-regulation is linked to higher barley grain yield in the field.

  7. The Role of Research Universities in Helping Solve our Energy Challenges: A Case Study at Stanford and SLAC (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema

    Hennessey, John (President, Stanford University)

    2016-07-12

    The first speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research" was John Hennessey, President of Stanford University. He discussed the important role that the academic world plays as a partner in innovative energy research by presenting a case study involving Stanford and SLAC. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  8. The Role of Research Universities in Helping Solve our Energy Challenges: A Case Study at Stanford and SLAC (2011 EFRC Summit)

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessey, John

    2011-05-25

    The first speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research" was John Hennessey, President of Stanford University. He discussed the important role that the academic world plays as a partner in innovative energy research by presenting a case study involving Stanford and SLAC. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  9. Beam Dynamics Enhancement due to Accelerating Field Symmetrization in the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-Band Photocathode RF Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. T.; Wang, X. J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Miller, R. H.

    1997-05-01

    A 1.6 cell photocathode S-Band gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). One of the main features of this RF gun is the symmetrization of the RF coupling iris with a identical vacuum pumping port located in the full cell. The effects of the asymmetry caused by the RF coupling iris were experimentally investigated by positioning a metallic plunger at the back wall of the vacuum port iris. The higher order modes produced were studied using electron beamlets with n-fold symmetry. The n-fold beamlets were produced by masking the laser beam. These experimental results indicate that the integrated electrical center and the geometrical center of the gun are within 175 μm. Which is within the laser alignment tolerance of 250 μm. Comparing these results to previous generations of BNL type RF guns, there has been an order of magnitude decrease in the dipole field components of the longitudinal accelerating field E_z. Low power RF cold tests measurements of the guns full cell are consistent with the experimental beam dynamics transport studies.

  10. SLAH1, a homologue of the slow type anion channel SLAC1, modulates shoot Cl− accumulation and salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jiaen; Henderson, Sam W; Tester, Mark; Roy, Stuart J; Gilliham, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Salinity tolerance is correlated with shoot chloride (Cl–) exclusion in multiple crops, but the molecular mechanisms of long-distance Cl– transport are poorly defined. Here, we characterize the in planta role of AtSLAH1 (a homologue of the slow type anion channel-associated 1 (SLAC1)). This protein, localized to the plasma membrane of root stelar cells, has its expression reduced by salt or ABA, which are key predictions for a protein involved with loading Cl– into the root xylem. Artificial microRNA knockdown mutants of AtSLAH1 had significantly reduced shoot Cl− accumulation when grown under low Cl–, whereas shoot Cl– increased and the shoot nitrate/chloride ratio decreased following AtSLAH1 constitutive or stelar-specific overexpression when grown in high Cl–. In both sets of overexpression lines a significant reduction in shoot biomass over the null segregants was observed under high Cl– supply, but not low Cl– supply. Further in planta data showed AtSLAH3 overexpression increased the shoot nitrate/chloride ratio, consistent with AtSLAH3 favouring nitrate transport. Heterologous expression of AtSLAH1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to no detectible transport, suggesting the need for post-translational modifications for AtSLAH1 to be active. Our in planta data are consistent with AtSLAH1 having a role in controlling root-to-shoot Cl– transport. PMID:27340232

  11. Linking stomatal traits and expression of slow anion channel genes HvSLAH1 and HvSLAC1 with grain yield for increasing salinity tolerance in barley

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohui; Mak, Michelle; Babla, Mohammad; Wang, Feifei; Chen, Guang; Veljanoski, Filip; Wang, Gang; Shabala, Sergey; Zhou, Meixue; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Soil salinity is an environmental and agricultural problem in many parts of the world. One of the keys to breeding barley for adaptation to salinity lies in a better understanding of the genetic control of stomatal regulation. We have employed a range of physiological (stomata assay, gas exchange, phylogenetic analysis, QTL analysis), and molecular techniques (RT-PCR and qPCR) to investigate stomatal behavior and genotypic variation in barley cultivars and a genetic population in four experimental trials. A set of relatively efficient and reliable methods were developed for the characterization of stomatal behavior of a large number of varieties and genetic lines. Furthermore, we found a large genetic variation of gas exchange and stomatal traits in barley in response to salinity stress. Salt-tolerant cultivar CM72 showed significantly larger stomatal aperture under 200 mM NaCl treatment than that of salt-sensitive cultivar Gairdner. Stomatal traits such as aperture width/length were found to significantly correlate with grain yield under salt treatment. Phenotypic characterization and QTL analysis of a segregating double haploid population of the CM72/Gairdner resulted in the identification of significant stomatal traits-related QTLs for salt tolerance. Moreover, expression analysis of the slow anion channel genes HvSLAH1 and HvSLAC1 demonstrated that their up-regulation is linked to higher barley grain yield in the field. PMID:25505473

  12. Nonequilibrium depinning transition of ac driven vortices with random pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Y.; Moriya, S.; Ienaga, K.; Kaneko, S.; Okuma, S.

    2017-09-01

    We study the critical behavior associated with transient dynamics of vortices near the depinning transition by an ac drive. From {I}{{ac},{{e}}}–{V}{{ac},{{e}}} curves at different frequencies f, where {I}{{ac},{{e}}} and {V}{{ac},{{e}}} are the effective current and voltage of sinusoidal waveform, respectively, we clearly identify the characteristic voltage separating linear and nonlinear regimes, from which we can estimate the mean diameter of the pinning potential. We also measure the time evolution of the voltage V ac(t) for a disordered initial vortex configuration in response to the ac drive I ac(t) of square waveform, and find a gradual increase in the amplitude | {V}{{ac}}(t)| towards the steady-state voltage, indicative of dynamic ordering. The relaxation time τ (f) against | {I}{{ac}}(f)| shows a power-law divergence at the f-dependent depinning threshold {I}{{ac},{{d}}}(f). When plotted against | {I}{{ac}}(f)| -{I}{{ac},{{d}}}(f), all τ (f)'s collapse on a single line with a critical exponent of 1.4, which almost coincides with the value for the dc depinning transition. These results indicate that the critical behavior of the depinning transition is observed not only for the dc drive but also for the ac drive, further demonstrating the universality of the nonequilibrium depinning transition.

  13. Brazilian Angiostrongylus cantonensis haplotypes, ac8 and ac9, have two different biological and morphological profiles

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Tainá CC; Gentile, Rosana; Garcia, Juberlan; Mota, Ester; Santos, Jeannie N; Maldonado, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the etiologic agent of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in humans. Cases have been recorded in many parts of the world, including Brazil. The aim of this study was to compare the differences in the biology and morphology of two different Brazilian haplotypes of A. : ac8 and ac9. A significantly larger number of L1 larvae eliminated in the faeces of rodents at the beginning of the patent period was observed for ac9 haplotype and compared to the total of L1 larvae eliminated, there was a significant difference between the two haplotypes. The ac9 haplotype showed a significant difference in the proportion of female and male specimens (0.6:1), but the same was not observed for ac8 (1.2:1). The morphometric analysis showed that male and female specimens isolated from ac8 haplotype were significantly larger with respect to body length, oesophagus length, spicule length (male) and distance from the anus to the rear end (female) compared to specimens from ac9. The morphological analysis by light microscopy showed little variation in the level of bifurcations at the lateral rays in the right lobe of the copulatory bursa between the two haplotypes. The biological, morphological and morphometric variations observed between the two haplotypes agree with the observed variation at the molecular level using the cytochrome oxidase subunit I marker and reinforce the possible influence of geographical isolation on the development of these haplotypes. PMID:25591110

  14. Exothermic reaction in zeolite hemostatic dressings: QuikClot ACS and ACS+.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Françoise; Tomori, Toshiki; Carr, Walter; McKeague, Anne; Teranishi, Kohsuke; Prusaczyk, Keith; McCarron, Richard

    2008-10-01

    Zeolites have hemostatic properties used to stop bleeding in severe hemorrhage. Manufactured QuikClot is an approved zeolite-based hemostatic agent for battlefield use. The exothermic reaction associated with QuikClot as loose granules or as granules packaged in a mesh bag has potential burn effects; this led to the development of a formulation of "cooler" non-exothermic QuikClot. The goal of this study was to compare the elevation of temperature of these formulations upon contact with blood. Following full transection of the femoral vasculature, anesthetized Yorkshire pigs (n = 15) (28.8 +/- 1.5 kg) were hemorrhaged for 2 min and treated with 100 g of bagged QuikClot (Advanced Clotting Sponge (ACS) (n = 4)) or a modified non-exothermic formulation (ACS+ (n = 11)). Vital signs and temperature at the dressing/tissue interface were continuously recorded for 3 h. Additional procedures were used to examine effects of different ratios of blood to zeolite on temperature elevation. Total post-treatment blood loss was comparable for ACS+_E and ACS_E groups (overall average: 18.6 +/- 10.5% EBV). Temperature recorded at the dressing/tissue interface was significantly lower with ACS+ vs. ACS (40.3 +/- 1.8 vs. 61.4 +/- 10.7 degrees C, respectively, p < 0.01) and was 3.2 +/- 2.6 degrees C higher than rectal temperature (38.0 +/- 0.7 degrees C, p < 0.01). Survival at endpoint (7/11 vs. 4/4) and average survival time (134 +/- 64 vs. 180 min) were greater for both ACS+ and ACS in comparison to Standard Dressing. The wound temperature with ACS was reduced with greater blood to product ratios and this pattern was paralleled with in vitro measurements. The lower heat release with ACS+ compared to ACS was confirmed in an animal model and ACS+ had similar efficacy in arresting bleeding when compared to Standard Dressing.

  15. AC Losses of Prototype HTS Transmission Cables

    SciTech Connect

    Demko, J.A.; Dresner, L.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Olsen, S.K.; Sinha, U.; Tolbert, J.C.

    1998-09-13

    Since 1995 Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have jointly designed, built, and tested nine, l-m long, high temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cable prototypes. This paper summarizes the AC loss measurements of five of the cables not reported elsewhere, and compares the losses with each other and with theory developed by Dresner. Losses were measured with both a calorimetric and an electrical technique. Because of the broad resistive transition of the HTS tapes, the cables can be operated stably beyond their critical currents. The AC losses were measured in this region as well as below critical currents. Dresner's theory takes into account the broad resistive transition of the HTS tapes and calculates the AC losses both below and above the critical current. The two sets of AC 10SS data agree with each other and with the theory quite welL In particular, at low currents of incomplete penetration, the loss data agree with the theoretical prediction of hysteresis loss based on only the outer two Iayers carrying the total current.

  16. AC power generation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Wang, Heming; Forrestal, Casey; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) directly convert biodegradable substrates to electricity and carry good potential for energy-positive wastewater treatment. However, the low and direct current (DC) output from MFC is not usable for general electronics except small sensors, yet commercial DC-AC converters or inverters used in solar systems cannot be directly applied to MFCs. This study presents a new DC-AC converter system for MFCs that can generate alternating voltage in any desired frequency. Results show that AC power can be easily achieved in three different frequencies tested (1, 10, 60 Hz), and no energy storage layer such as capacitors was needed. The DC-AC converter efficiency was higher than 95% when powered by either individual MFCs or simple MFC stacks. Total harmonic distortion (THD) was used to investigate the quality of the energy, and it showed that the energy could be directly usable for linear electronic loads. This study shows that through electrical conversion MFCs can be potentially used in household electronics for decentralized off-grid communities.

  17. ARC-1978-AC78-1040-172

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-11-14

    Lockheed YO-3A (USA 69-18010 NASA 718) A/C & BELL COBRA HELICOPTER FLIGHT & GROUND TESTS AT EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE. Rotorcraft Research. NASA SP-1998-3300 Flight Research at Ames: 57 Years of Development and Validation of Aeronautical Technology Fig. 143

  18. Organic magnetoresistance under resonant ac drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Raikh, M. E.

    2013-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment, we develop a theory of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in the presence of a resonant ac drive. To this end, we perform a thorough analysis of the dynamics of ac-driven electron-hole polaron pair in magnetic field, which is a sum of external and random hyperfine fields. Resonant ac drive affects the OMAR by modifying the singlet content of the eigenmodes. This, in turn, leads to the change of recombination rate, and ultimately, to the change of the spin-blocking that controls the current. Our analysis demonstrates that, upon increasing the drive amplitude, the blocking eigenmodes of the triplet type acquire a singlet admixture and become unblocking. Most surprisingly, the opposite process goes in parallel: new blocking modes emerge from nonblocking precursors as the drive increases. These emergent blocking modes are similar to subradiant modes in the Dicke effect. A nontrivial evolution of eigenmodes translates into a nontrivial behavior of OMAR with the amplitude of the ac drive: it is initially linear, then passes through a maximum, drops, and finally saturates.

  19. A dry-cooled AC quantum voltmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.; Starkloff, M.; Peiselt, K.; Anders, S.; Knipper, R.; Lee, J.; Behr, R.; Palafox, L.; Böck, A. C.; Schaidhammer, L.; Fleischmann, P. M.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper describes a dry-cooled AC quantum voltmeter system operated up to kilohertz frequencies and 7 V rms. A 10 V programmable Josephson voltage standard (PJVS) array was installed on a pulse tube cooler (PTC) driven with a 4 kW air-cooled compressor. The operating margins at 70 GHz frequencies were investigated in detail and found to exceed 1 mA Shapiro step width. A key factor for the successful chip operation was the low on-chip power consumption of 65 mW in total. A thermal interface between PJVS chip and PTC cold stage was used to avoid a significant chip overheating. By installing the cryocooled PJVS array into an AC quantum voltmeter setup, several calibration measurements of dc standards and calibrator ac voltages up to 2 kHz frequencies were carried out to demonstrate the full functionality. The results are discussed and compared to systems with standard liquid helium cooling. For dc voltages, a direct comparison measurement between the dry-cooled AC quantum voltmeter and a liquid-helium based 10 V PJVS shows an agreement better than 1 part in 1010.

  20. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  1. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  2. Evaluation of modern IGBT-modules for hard-switched AC/DC/AC converters

    SciTech Connect

    Blaabjerg, F.; Pedersen, J.K.; Jaeger, U.

    1995-12-31

    The development of IGBT devices is still producing faster devices with lower losses. The applications become more advanced like a complete hard-switched AC/DC/AC converter with almost clean input current and regenerating capabilities. This paper will first focus on a detailed characterization and comparison of eight different IGBT-modules representing state-of-the-art for both PT and NPT technologies. The voltage level of the devices is 1,200V and 1,600V/1,700V. The characterization is done on an advanced measurement system which is briefly described. The characterization is based on static and dynamic tests for both IGBT and the diodes in the IGBT-modules at a junction temperature at 125 C. The comparison is first done directly based on conduction losses and switching losses, and later the measurements are used in a loss model for a complete AC/DC/AC converter application. In the AC/DC/AC converter the power losses are modelled, and different operating conditions are compared like different voltage levels in the DC-link. It is concluded dependent on operation conditions different devices will be preferable, but the high voltage devices have the highest losses even at a high operating voltage.

  3. AC losses in a HTS coil carrying DC current in AC external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, J.; Zushi, Y.; Fukushima, M.; Tsukamoto, O.; Suzuki, E.; Hirakawa, M.; Kikukawa, K.

    2003-10-01

    We electrically measured AC losses in a Bi2223/Ag-sheathed pancake coil excited by a DC current in AC external magnetic field. Losses in the coil contain two kinds of loss components that are the magnetization losses and dynamic resistance losses. In the measurement, current leads to supply a current to the coil were specially arranged to suppress electromagnetic coupling between the coil current and the AC external magnetic field. A double pick-up coils method was used to suppress a large inductive voltage component contained in voltage signal for measuring the magnetization losses. It was observed that the magnetization losses were dependent on the coil current and that a peak of a curve of the loss factor vs. amplitude of the AC external magnetic field shifted to lower amplitude of the AC magnetic field as the coil current increased. This result suggests the full penetration magnetic field of the coil tape decreases as the coil current increases. The dynamic resistance losses were measured by measuring a DC voltage appearing between the coil terminals. It was observed that the DC voltage appearing in the coil subject to the AC external magnetic field was much larger than that in the coil subject to DC magnetic field.

  4. Application of GPS in a high precision engineering survey network

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.; Leick, A.

    1985-04-01

    A GPS satellite survey was carried out with the Macrometer to support construction at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The network consists of 16 stations of which 9 stations were part of the Macrometer network. The horizontal and vertical accuracy of the GPS survey is estimated to be 1 to 2 mm and 2 to 3 mm respectively. The horizontal accuracy of the terrestrial survey, consisting of angles and distances, equals that of the GPS survey only in the ''loop'' portion of the network. All stations are part of a precise level network. The ellipsoidal heights obtained from the GPS survey and the orthometric heights of the level network are used to compute geoid undulations. A geoid profile along the linac was computed by the National Geodetic Survey in 1963. This profile agreed with the observed geoid within the standard deviation of the GPS survey. Angles and distances were adjusted together (TERRA), and all terrestrial observations were combined with the GPS vector observations in a combination adjustment (COMB). A comparison of COMB and TERRA revealed systematic errors in the terrestrial solution. A scale factor of 1.5 ppM +- .8 ppM was estimated. This value is of the same magnitude as the over-all horizontal accuracy of both networks. 10 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Methods for Addressing Missing Data with Applications from ACS Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandriet, Alexandra; Holme, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ACS Examinations Institute (ACS-EI) national norming process, student performance data sets are collected from professors at colleges and universities from around the United States. Because the data sets are collected on a volunteer basis, the ACS-EI often receives data sets with only students' total scores and without the students'…

  6. Methods for Addressing Missing Data with Applications from ACS Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandriet, Alexandra; Holme, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ACS Examinations Institute (ACS-EI) national norming process, student performance data sets are collected from professors at colleges and universities from around the United States. Because the data sets are collected on a volunteer basis, the ACS-EI often receives data sets with only students' total scores and without the students'…

  7. The X-Shooter Lens Survey - I. Dark matter domination and a Salpeter-type initial mass function in a massive early-type galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiniello, C.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Trager, S. C.; Czoske, O.; Treu, T.

    2011-11-01

    -derived mass limit. We conclude that this very massive early-type galaxy is dark-matter-dominated inside one effective radius, consistent with the trend recently found from massive Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) galaxies, with a total density slope shallower than isothermal and an IMF normalization consistent with Salpeter.

  8. Manipulation of carbon nanotubes using AC dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingqi; Zhang, Qing; Peng, Ning; Zhu, Qi

    2005-04-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) suspended in isopropyl alcohol are placed between two cross-structured electrodes using an ac dielectrophoresis technique. The SWNTs are found to attach to the electrodes along the direction of the ac external electric field. The SWNTs predominately bridge the shortest gap between the two electrodes and the spatial distribution of the tubes becomes wider for a long manipulation time (say, greater than 300 s). The observed phenomenon is analyzed in terms of the dielectrophoresis-induced torque and force on the SWNTs. Our simulation shows that the time for rotating SWNTs to the direction of the electric field is much smaller than that for translating SWNTs. We also found that metallic SWNTs are forced along the gradient direction of spacial distribution of the electric field strength while semiconducting SWNTs are forced in the opposite direction.

  9. Modelling series capacitor reinsertion in ac studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.R.; Achilles, R.A.

    1989-04-01

    Varistor fundamental frequency models are introduced for its use in AC Studies of series compensated systems. First, a numerically fast physical model founded on a related generalized EMTP work is proposed to simulate Metal Oxide Varistor (MOV) protected capacitors located remotely from the point of fault application; secondly mathematical iterative model is developed for MOV protected capacitor banks exhibiting higher degree of sensitivity of the rms voltage, current and varistor energy parameters, such as banks subject to close-in faults. Per-case CPU-time reductions of up to 1:300 within a 4 per cent energy comparison agreement with the equivalent time-domain analysis, are attained in a parametric application example where the modeling concepts introduced are incorporated in a regular AC Studies program.

  10. RHIC AC DIPOLE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; METH,M.; PAI,C.; PARKER,B.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; SANDERS,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2001-06-18

    Two ac dipoles with vertical and horizontal magnetic field have been proposed at RHIC for applications in linear and non-linear beam dynamics and spin manipulations. A magnetic field amplitude of 380 Gm is required to produce a coherent oscillation of 5 times the rms beam size at the top energy. We take the ac dipole frequency to be 1.0% of the revolution frequency away from the betatron frequency. To achieve the strong magnetic field with minimum power loss, an air-core magnet with two seven turn winding of low loss Litz wire resonating at 64 kHz is designed. The system is also designed to allow one to connect the two magnet winding in series to resonate at 37 kHz for the spin manipulation. Measurements of a half length prototype magnet are also presented.

  11. Large screen AC Plasma Display Technology overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hairabedian, B.; Lorenzen, J.; Perry, C.; Pleshko, P.; Rita, R.

    This article describes IBMs newest 581 AC Plasma Display Technology which was developed to provide a large screen, multiple image-format capability. An overview of the construction features of this large screen display is given, followed by a discussion of aspects of the technology which had to be developed to satisfy manufacturability and quality requirements. Discussed are the process considerations which were satisfied to obtain a high yield high volume fabrication process, the development of new low temperature glasses for the dielectric and seal materials, and the development of a new spacer technology. The methods used to obtain the panel design with the best possible combination of operating characteristics are described, followed by discussion of a panel reliability model which predicts that the panel will operate reliably for over 350,000 hours. Finally, the logical areas of potential technology extension for large screen AC Plasma devices are presented.

  12. AC plasma anemometer—characteristics and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Curtis; Matlis, Eric; Corke, Thomas; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2015-08-01

    The characteristics and design of a high-bandwidth flow sensor that uses an AC glow discharge (plasma) as the sensing element is presented. The plasma forms in the air gap between two protruding low profile electrodes attached to a probe body. The output from the anemometer is an amplitude modulated version of the AC voltage input that contains information about the mean and fluctuating velocity components. The anemometer circuitry includes resistance and capacitance elements that simulate a dielectric-barrier to maintain a diffuse plasma, and a constant-current feedback control that maintains operation within the desired glow discharge regime over an extended range of air velocities. Mean velocity calibrations are demonstrated over a range from 0 to 140 m s-1. Over this velocity range, the mean output voltage varied linearly with air velocity, providing a constant static sensitivity. The effect of the electrode gap and input AC carrier frequency on the anemometer static sensitivity and dynamic response are investigated. Experiments are performed to compare measurements obtained with a plasma sensor operating at two AC carrier frequencies against that of a constant-temperature hot-wire. All three sensors were calibrated against the same known velocity reference. An uncertainty based on the standard deviation of the velocity calibration fit was applied to the mean and fluctuating velocity measurements of the three sensors. The motivation is not to replace hot-wires as a general measurement tool, but rather as an alternative to hot-wires in harsh environments or at high Mach numbers where they either have difficulty in surviving or lack the necessary frequency response.

  13. Graphs for Isotopes of 89-Ac (Actinium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides a graphic representation of nucleon separation energies and residual interaction parameters for isotopes of the chemical element 89-Ac (Actinium, atomic number Z = 89).

  14. Large aperture ac interferometer for optical testing.

    PubMed

    Moore, D T; Murray, R; Neves, F B

    1978-12-15

    A 20-cm clear aperture modified Twyman-Green interferometer is described. The system measures phase with an AC technique called phase-lock interferometry while scanning the aperture with a dual galvanometer scanning system. Position information and phase are stored in a minicomputer with disk storage. This information is manipulated with associated software, and the wavefront deformation due to a test component is graphically displayed in perspective and contour on a CRT terminal.

  15. Channel model for AC electric arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, H. L.

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the results from calculations of free-burning AC electric arcs in argon. In order to calculate the arc current and arc voltage, the external electric circuit must be taken into consideration. The external circuit is modeled by an equivalent circuit consisting of an ideal AC voltage source, a loss resistance, and an inductance. The qualitative behavior of the current-voltage characteristic is in agreement with observed characteristics, but experimental data are necessary in order to check whether the calculated power loss is reasonable. Non-symmetry was modeled by introducing different anode and cathode falls in the two half periods. An attempt at taking into account different cathode current densities in the two half periods, depending on whether the electrode or silicon melt is cathode, did not give satisfactory results. Thermionic emission was assumed in both half periods, but this may not be the right mechanism when the silicon melt is cathode. The time delay of the AC arc compared to the DC case is modeled by a time constant. It was shown that this preset time constant must be in agreement with the mean 'mechanical' relaxation time in the arc in order to fulfill the energy balance. By updating the time constant until this is achieved, the time constant is eliminated as a parameter that must be chosen a priori.

  16. Cryocooled Josephson standards for AC voltage metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandetto, P.; Sosso, A.; Monticone, E.; Trinchera, B.; Fretto, M.; Lacquaniti, V.

    2017-05-01

    The Josephson effect is worldwide used as a basis for constant reference voltages in national metrological institutes and in calibration laboratories of industry. Research on Josephson voltage standards is aiming at a fundamental change also in the metrology of the volt for AC and arbitrary waveforms: programmable Josephson voltage standards converting a digital code into a quantum-accurate stepwise waveform are already available in primary laboratories and even more advanced standards for converting sub-nanosecond binary coded pulses into any arbitrary signal with quantum accuracy are now actively developed and tested. A new experimental setup based on a two-stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler has been developed at INRiM for the operation of AC-Josephson voltage standards. Among its distinct features, the possibility of employing both the aforementioned techniques (programmable and pulsed Josephson voltage standards) is particularly interesting. Quantum-based AC voltage sine waves have been synthesized with both programmable and pulse-driven arrays, although their accuracy is still limited by thermal oscillations due to the cryocooler piston motion.

  17. Level structure and reflection asymmetric shape in sup 223 Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K.; Liang, C.F.; Paris, P. )

    1990-07-20

    Mass separated sources of {sup 227}Pa (separated as PaF{sub 4}{sup +} ions) were used to study the level structure of {sup 223}Ac following alpha decay. The levels in {sup 223}Ac are interpreted as K = 5/2{sup {plus minus}} parity doublet bands which occur naturally in reflection asymmetric models and the multiphonon octupole model. The anomalous structure of the K = 3/2{sup {minus}} band is explained in terms of Coriolis coupling. The low lying parity doublet bands in {sup 223}Ac, {sup 225}Ac, and {sup 227}Ac are compared and contrasted.

  18. Orbital Constraints for Fomalhaut b from ACS and STIS Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, James R.; Fitzgerald, M. P.; Kalas, P.; Clampin, M.

    2013-01-01

    High contrast imaging observations with the Hubble Space Telescope in 2004 and 2006 using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) show that the nearby star Fomalhaut is accompanied by a faint companion orbiting within the star’s dusty debris belt. Initial measurements show that motion of the companion—Fomalhaut b—is approximately parallel to the inner edge of the belt. We have now observed Fomalhaut b at two additional epochs (2010 & 2012) with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). We have combined the measurements from these two instruments to yield reliable differential astrometry of Fomalhaut b relative to its parent star with typical uncertainties of 20-40 milli-arcseconds (one-axis rms); astrometry of Fomalhaut itself relative to the stellar background confirms that any uncorrected systematic errors between the ACS and STIS reference frames are smaller than the statistical measurement errors. These data provide significant constraints on the orbital motion of Fomalhaut b, even though the current eight-year observation span corresponds to only 11% of the Keplerian period at a projected separation of 100 AU. The direction of Fomalhaut b is now clear—the motion not tangential to the inner edge of the scattered-light belt. The observed kinematics also imply that Fomalhaut b must be on an elliptical orbit that will cross the belt in projection. Because of the limited time span and astrometric precision, further conclusions require adoption some assumptions regarding the orientation of the orbit in space. Moreover, the problem of inferring the orbital elements is not amenable to conventional chi-squared minimization techniques as the chi-squared hypersurface has many local minima. Consequently, we have developed an adaptive Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method to estimate the Keplerian orbital elements and their posterior probability distributions. We report on this analysis and the implications for the nature and origin of Fomalhaut b.

  19. Annual Site Environmental Report Prepared for the Department of Energy,under contract number DE-AC03-76SF00515 January - December 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Russak, Hillary M.

    2003-05-06

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2001 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Also included are seasonal activities that cross calendar-year divisions. Production of the annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is federally-funded, research development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed to meet the ISMS goals: Worker safety and health are protected; The environment is protected; and Compliance is assured. Throughout 2001, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems. These systems were also the ways SLAC approached implementing the ''Greening of the Government'' initiatives (such as Executive Order 13148). The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC did not receive any notices of violation during 2001. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2001, including improvements in the storm drain system, improved ground water monitoring capabilities, and enhancements to the system to manage the generation of mixed wastes. Environmental program-specific summary details are shown below.

  20. Total AC losses in twisted and untwisted multifilamentary Bi-2223 superconducting tapes carrying AC transport current in AC longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Naoyuki; Jin, Feng; Jiang, Zhenan; Shirai, Shunsuke; ten Haken, Bennie; Rabbers, Jan-Jaap; Ayai, Naoki; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2003-03-01

    In some electrical apparatuses, superconducting tapes are exposed to the longitudinal magnetic field. In this work, AC losses were measured in twisted and untwisted Bi-2223 tapes carrying AC transport current in the AC longitudinal magnetic field. In twisted tapes, the transport, magnetization and total losses depend on the relative direction of the longitudinal magnetic field to the direction of the transport current, while the field direction does not influence the AC loss characteristics in untwisted tapes. In the Z-twisted tapes, the total AC loss is larger in the longitudinal magnetic field that is anti-parallel to the transport current than in the longitudinal magnetic field of another direction. Numerical analysis shows that this field direction dependence of the total AC loss results from the change in the current distribution. In the longitudinal magnetic field that is anti-parallel to the transport current, the total AC loss in the Z-twisted tape is more than that in the untwisted tape. This dependence on the field direction is reversed in S-twisted tapes. It is to be noted that the twist increases the total AC loss in a longitudinal magnetic field of a certain direction, while it reduces the AC loss in the transverse magnetic field.

  1. The Hubble Legacy Archive ACS grism data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kümmel, M.; Rosati, P.; Fosbury, R.; Haase, J.; Hook, R. N.; Kuntschner, H.; Lombardi, M.; Micol, A.; Nilsson, K. K.; Stoehr, F.; Walsh, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    A public release of slitless spectra, obtained with ACS/WFC and the G800L grism, is presented. Spectra were automatically extracted in a uniform way from 153 archival fields (or "associations") distributed across the two Galactic caps, covering all observations to 2008. The ACS G800L grism provides a wavelength range of 0.55-1.00 μm, with a dispersion of 40 Å/pixel and a resolution of ~80 Å for point-like sources. The ACS G800L images and matched direct images were reduced with an automatic pipeline that handles all steps from archive retrieval, alignment and astrometric calibration, direct image combination, catalogue generation, spectral extraction and collection of metadata. The large number of extracted spectra (73,581) demanded automatic methods for quality control and an automated classification algorithm was trained on the visual inspection of several thousand spectra. The final sample of quality controlled spectra includes 47 919 datasets (65% of the total number of extracted spectra) for 32 149 unique objects, with a median iAB-band magnitude of 23.7, reaching 26.5 AB for the faintest objects. Each released dataset contains science-ready 1D and 2D spectra, as well as multi-band image cutouts of corresponding sources and a useful preview page summarising the direct and slitless data, astrometric and photometric parameters. This release is part of the continuing effort to enhance the content of the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) with highly processed data products which significantly facilitate the scientific exploitation of the Hubble data. In order to characterize the slitless spectra, emission-line flux and equivalent width sensitivity of the ACS data were compared with public ground-based spectra in the GOODS-South field. An example list of emission line galaxies with two or more identified lines is also included, covering the redshift range 0.2 - 4.6. Almost all redshift determinations outside of the GOODS fields are new. The scope of science projects

  2. AC loss measurements of twisted and untwisted BSCCO multifilamentary tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Nishioka, Takamasa; Oh, Sang-Soo

    2005-01-01

    AC losses in twisted and untwisted BSCCO multifilamentary superconducting tapes with Ag matrix developed in DAPAS program were measured by an electrical method. Magnetization and transport losses were measured by a pick-up coil and by a voltage taps. Total AC loss during simultaneous application of AC transport current and an AC transverse magnetic field was given by the sum of the magnetization and transport losses measured during this simultaneous application. The magnetization loss without transport current of untwisted and twisted tapes was measured first to evaluate the effect of twisting to decouple filaments. Then, the total AC loss of the twisted tape was measured in transverse magnetic fields with various amplitudes and orientations, while the amplitude of the transport current was fixed. The measured total AC loss in a parallel transverse magnetic field was compared with some theoretical models to study the detailed characteristics of the measured total AC loss of the sample.

  3. Development of a hardware-based AC microgrid for AC stability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Robert R.

    As more power electronic-based devices enable the development of high-bandwidth AC microgrids, the topic of microgrid power distribution stability has become of increased interest. Recently, researchers have proposed a relatively straightforward method to assess the stability of AC systems based upon the time-constants of sources, the net bus capacitance, and the rate limits of sources. In this research, a focus has been to develop a hardware test system to evaluate AC system stability. As a first step, a time domain model of a two converter microgrid was established in which a three phase inverter acts as a power source and an active rectifier serves as an adjustable constant power AC load. The constant power load can be utilized to create rapid power flow transients to the generating system. As a second step, the inverter and active rectifier were designed using a Smart Power Module IGBT for switching and an embedded microcontroller as a processor for algorithm implementation. The inverter and active rectifier were designed to operate simultaneously using a synchronization signal to ensure each respective local controller operates in a common reference frame. Finally, the physical system was created and initial testing performed to validate the hardware functionality as a variable amplitude and variable frequency AC system.

  4. Deletion of the AcMNPV core gene ac109 results in budded virions that are non-infectious

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Minggang; Nie, Yingchao; Theilmann, David A.

    2009-06-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac109 is a core gene and its function in the virus life cycle is unknown. To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac109 deletion virus (vAc{sup 109KO}). Fluorescence and light microscopy showed that transfection of vAc{sup 109KO} results in a single-cell infection phenotype. Viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in vAc{sup 109KO}-transfected cells evidenced progression to the very late phases of viral infection. Western blot and confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that AC109 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection. In addition, AC109 is a structural protein as it was detected in both budded virus (BV) and occlusion derived virus in both the envelope and nucleocapsid fractions. Titration assays by qPCR and TCID{sub 50} showed that vAc{sup 109KO} produced BV but the virions are non-infectious. The vAc{sup 109KO} BV were indistinguishable from the BV of repaired and wild type control viruses as determined by negative staining and electron microscopy.

  5. Spin Physics Experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, Peter

    2002-03-20

    Some recent results on the g1 and g2 spin structure functions of the proton and neutron are presented. New data on the inclusive photoproduction of negative hadrons from transversely polarized protons and deuterons are shown for the first time. Plans for future experiments using polarized photon beams are discussed.

  6. Scanning AC Nanocalorimetry and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Kechao

    This thesis presents an AC nanocalorimetry technique that enables calorimetry measurements on very small quantities of materials over a wide range of scanning rates (from isothermal to 3x10. 3 K/s), temperatures(up to 1200 K), and environments. Such working range bridges the gap between traditional scanning calorimetry of bulk materials and nanocalorimetry. The method relies on a micromachined nanocalorimeter with negligible thermal lags between heater, thermometer, and sample. The ability to perform calorimetry measurements over such a broad range of scanning rates makes it an ideal tool to characterize the kinetics of phase transformations, reactions at elevated temperatures or to explore the behavior of materials far from equilibrium. We demonstrate the technique by performing measurements on thin-film samples of Sn, In, and Bi with thicknesses ranging from 100 to 300 nm. The experimental heat capacities and melting temperatures agree well with literature values. The measured heat capacities are insensitive to the applied AC frequency, scan rate, and heat loss to the environment over a broad range of experimental conditions. The dynamic range of scanning AC nanocalorimetry enables the combination of nanocalorimetry with in-situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) to facilitate interpretation of the calorimetry measurements. Time-resolved XRD during in-situ operation of nanocalorimetry sensors using intense, high-energy synchrotron radiation allows unprecedented characterization of thermal and structural material properties. We demonstrate this experiment with detailed characterization of the melting and solidification of elemental Bi, In and Sn thin-film samples, using heating and cooling rates up to 300 K/s. By combining scanning DC and AC nano-calorimetry techniques, we study the nucleation behavior of undercooled liquid Bi at cooling rates ranging from 10. 1 to 10. 4 K/s. Upon initial melting, the Bi thin-film sample breaksup into isolated islands. The number of islands

  7. HST/ACS DIRECT AGES OF THE DWARF ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES NGC 147 AND NGC 185

    SciTech Connect

    Geha, M.; Weisz, D.; Grocholski, A.; Dolphin, A.; Marel, R. P. van der; Guhathakurta, P.

    2015-10-01

    We present the deepest optical photometry for any dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxy based on Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) observations of the Local Group dE galaxies NGC 147 and NGC 185. Our F606W and F814W color–magnitude diagrams are the first to reach below the oldest main sequence turnoff in a dE galaxy, allowing us to determine full star formation histories in these systems. The ACS fields are located roughly ∼1.5 effective radii from the galaxy center to avoid photometric crowding. While both ACS fields show unambiguous evidence for old and intermediate age stars, the mean age of NGC 147 is ∼4–5 Gyr younger as compared to NGC 185. In NGC 147, only 40% of stars were in place 12.5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 5), with the bulk of the remaining stellar population forming between 5 to 7 Gyr. In contrast, 70% of stars were formed in NGC 185 prior to 12.5 Gyr ago with the majority of the remaining population forming between 8 to 10 Gyr ago. Star formation has ceased in both ACS fields for at least 3 Gyr. Previous observations in the central regions of NGC 185 show evidence for star formation as recent as 100 Myr ago, and a strong metallicity gradient with radius. This implies a lack of radial mixing between the center of NGC 185 and our ACS field. The lack of radial gradients in NGC 147 suggests that our inferred SFHs are more representative of its global history. We interpret the inferred differences in star formation histories to imply an earlier infall time into the M31 environment for NGC 185 as compared to NGC 147.

  8. Field-evolved resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in the pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), from India.

    PubMed

    Dhurua, Sanyasi; Gujar, Govind T

    2011-08-01

    The pink bollworm is one of the most destructive pests of cotton. Transgenic cotton producing Bt toxin Cry1Ac or a combination of Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab2 has been used effectively against this pest. However, some other insects have evolved resistance to Bt toxins in the field. During the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 seasons, pink bollworm populations in India were surveyed to evaluate their responses to Cry1Ac and seed powder containing Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab2. The results provide evidence that resistance to Cry1Ac had evolved by 2008 in a population sampled from non-Bt cotton in the Amreli district of Gujarat in western India. The median lethal concentration of Cry1Ac for five-day-old larvae (LC50 ) was significantly higher for insects derived in 2008 from Amreli than for any of the other field populations tested from four locations in India. For Cry1Ac, the mean LC50 for the strain derived from Amreli in 2008 was 44 times higher than for the most susceptible population. However, for seed powder of Bollgard II containing primarily Cry2Ab2, the 2008 Amreli population was only slightly less susceptible than the most susceptible population. The data reported here constitute the first evidence of field-evolved resistance of pink bollworm to Cry1Ac. This initial evidence spurred more extensive evaluations during the 2009-2010 growing season, which confirmed field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac in Amreli. The lack of cross-resistance to Cry2Ab2 suggests that plants producing this toxin are likely to be more effective against resistant populations than plants producing only Cry1Ac. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. A.C. Susceptometry Utilizing GMR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Daniel; Shivaram, Bellave

    2001-11-01

    Superconducting quantum interference (SQUID) magnetometers remain as the most sensitive instruments to measure magnetic properties. However, the ready availability and rapid improvements in the sensitivity of magnetic field sensors based on giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect combined with their low cost and ability to operate at room temperature opens up opportunities to exploit these new devices where the utmost sensitivity of SQUID based detection is not needed. In this article we present one such application of GMR sensors and demonstrate how they can enhance the signals obtained in a simple a.c. magnetic susceptibility apparatus.

  10. Expert system supports optimal AC motors application

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, N.F.

    1997-06-01

    Having been invented more than a hundred years ago three-phase squirrel-cage induction motors still play a leading role in electromechanical energy conversion process and have miscellaneous applications in all modern technologies converting more than 60 per cent of electric energy into mechanical work. Standard general purpose AC motors have a very simple and highly optimized construction, perfectly organized production and amazingly low cost. Problems arise mainly in the application area so far as general purpose motors are produced as standard series but ambient, operating, feeding and loading conditions can drastically vary even in very regular cases of application.

  11. Nonlinear studies of AC electrokinetic micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruus, Henrik; Olesen, Laurits H.; Ajdari, Armand

    2006-03-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that AC electrokinetic micropumps permit integrable, local, and fast pumping (velocities ˜ mm/s) with low driving voltage of a few volts only. However, they also displayed many quantitative and qualitative discrepancies with existing theories. We therefore extend the latter theories to account for three experimentally relevant effects: (i) vertical confinement of the pumping channel, (ii) Faradaic currents from electrochemical reactions at the electrodes, and (iii) nonlinear surface capacitance of the Debye layer. We report here that these effects indeed affect the pump performance in a way that we can rationalize by physical arguments.

  12. Inverse ac Josephson effect at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danchi, W. C.; Golightly, W. J.; Sutton, E. C.

    1989-04-01

    Using the Werthamer (1966) theory of superconducting tunnel junctions, it is shown that zero-crossing ac Josephson steps can occur at frequencies much higher than those expected previously, as long as the voltage waveform is nearly sinusoidal. Limits on the amount of permitted rounding of the Riedel (1964) peak were derived from analytical calculations, and numerical frequency-domain and time-domain computations for realistic junctions were carried out, yielding support for these limits. It is shown that previous arguments that zero-crossing steps could never be observed above the value of half the gap voltage are incorrect, due to the neglect of the Riedel peak.

  13. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Camera

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-12-02

    Ranked as the top ground-based national priority for the field for the current decade, LSST is currently under construction in Chile. The U.S. Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is leading the construction of the LSST camera – the largest digital camera ever built for astronomy. SLAC Professor Steven M. Kahn is the overall Director of the LSST project, and SLAC personnel are also participating in the data management. The National Science Foundation is the lead agency for construction of the LSST. Additional financial support comes from the Department of Energy and private funding raised by the LSST Corporation.

  14. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Camera

    SciTech Connect

    2016-11-01

    Ranked as the top ground-based national priority for the field for the current decade, LSST is currently under construction in Chile. The U.S. Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is leading the construction of the LSST camera – the largest digital camera ever built for astronomy. SLAC Professor Steven M. Kahn is the overall Director of the LSST project, and SLAC personnel are also participating in the data management. The National Science Foundation is the lead agency for construction of the LSST. Additional financial support comes from the Department of Energy and private funding raised by the LSST Corporation.

  15. THE GHOSTS SURVEY. I. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Radburn-Smith, D. J.; Dalcanton, J. J.; De Jong, R. S.; Streich, D.; Vlajic, M.; Seth, A. C.; Bailin, J.; Bell, E. F.; Brown, T. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Goudfrooij, P.; Holfeltz, S.; Bullock, J. S.; Courteau, S.; Sick, J.; Holwerda, B. W.; Purcell, C.; Zucker, D. B.

    2011-08-01

    We present an overview of the GHOSTS survey, the largest study to date of the resolved stellar populations in the outskirts of disk galaxies. The sample consists of 14 disk galaxies within 17 Mpc, whose outer disks and halos are imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). In the first paper of this series, we describe the sample, explore the benefits of using resolved stellar populations, and discuss our ACS F606W and F814W photometry. We use artificial star tests to assess completeness and use overlapping regions to estimate photometric uncertainties. The median depth of the survey at 50% completeness is 2.7 mag below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). We comprehensively explore and parameterize contamination from unresolved background galaxies and foreground stars using archival fields of high-redshift ACS observations. Left uncorrected, these would account for 10{sup 0.65xF814W-19.0} detections per mag per arcsec{sup 2}. We therefore identify several selection criteria that typically remove 95% of the contaminants. Even with these culls, background galaxies are a significant limitation to the surface brightness detection limit which, for this survey, is typically V {approx} 30 mag arcsec{sup -2}. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly available and contain some 3.1 million stars across 76 ACS fields, predominantly of low extinction. The uniform magnitudes of TRGB stars in these fields enable galaxy distance estimates with 2%-7% accuracy.

  16. High-frequency ac power distribution in Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Fu-Sheng; Lee, Fred C. Y.

    1990-01-01

    A utility-type 20-kHz ac power distribution system for the Space Station, employing resonant power-conversion techniques, is presented. The system converts raw dc voltage from photovoltaic cells or three-phase LF ac voltage from a solar dynamic generator into a regulated 20-kHz ac voltage for distribution among various loads. The results of EASY5 computer simulations of the local and global performance show that the system has fast response and good transient behavior. The ac bus voltage is effectively regulated using the phase-control scheme, which is demonstrated with both line and load variations. The feasibility of paralleling the driver-module outputs is illustrated with the driver modules synchronized and sharing a common feedback loop. An HF sinusoidal ac voltage is generated in the three-phase ac input case, when the driver modules are phased 120 deg away from one another and their outputs are connected in series.

  17. Ac irreversibility line of bismuth-based high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdaoui, A.; Beille, J.; Berling, D.; Loegel, B.; Noudem, J.G.; Tournier, R.

    1997-09-01

    We discuss the magnetic properties of lead doped Bi-2223 bulk samples obtained through combined magnetic melt texturing and hot pressing (MMTHP). The ac complex susceptibility measurements are achieved over a broad ac field range (1 Oe{lt}h{sub ac}{lt}100 Oe) and show highly anisotropic properties. The intergranular coupling is improved in the direction perpendicular to the applied stress and magnetic field direction, and an intragranular loss peak is observed for the first time. A comparison is made with other bismuth-based compounds and it is shown that the MMTHP process shifts the ac irreversibility line (ac IL) toward higher fields. It is also shown that all the ac IL{close_quote}s for quasi 2D bismuth-based compounds show a nearly quadratic temperature dependence and deviate therefore strongly from the linear behavior observed in quasi 3D compounds and expected from a critical state model.{copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  18. Analysis of the ac free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tae Hung; Lee, Jin Hyun

    1990-06-01

    An ac free-electron laser (FEL) with a superconductor cavity and a FEL with a plasma wave wiggler are analyzed. The ac FEL has a small effective wiggler wavelength and higher wiggler strength. Therefore, it can supply high-power coherent radiation with a short wavelength. From the linear fluid theory and Maxwell's equations, the dispersion relation is derived. When the coupling term is much less than unity, the growth rate of electromagnetic instability is calculated. The intrinsic efficiency of radiation production is also estimated. For the small-signal gain regime, the gain coefficient is formulated. In a FEL with a plasma wiggler, the electron beam passing through the wiggler plasma might begin to thermalize due to various particle-particle and wave-particle interactions. To avoid such interactions, the electron beam should be bunched and narrower than the skin depth. It has been found that the growth rate has a linear dependence on the amplitude of the electric wiggler and decreases with increasing beam energy. The intrinsic efficiency of radiation production decreases with increasing beam energy. In a FEL with a plasma wiggler, the efficiency is enhanced by an increase in the electron beam density.

  19. AC impedance analysis of polypyrrole thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Reginald M.; Martin, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The AC impedance spectra of thin polypyrrole films were obtained at open circuit potentials from -0.4 to 0.4 V vs SCE. Two limiting cases are discussed for which simplified equivalent circuits are applicable. At very positive potentials, the predominantly nonfaradaic AC impedance of polypyrrole is very similar to that observed previously for finite porous metallic films. Modeling of the data with the appropriate equivalent circuit permits effective pore diameter and pore number densities of the oxidized film to be estimated. At potentials from -0.4 to -0.3 V, the polypyrrole film is essentially nonelectronically conductive and diffusion of polymer oxidized sites with their associated counterions can be assumed to be linear from the film/substrate electrode interface. The equivalent circuit for the polypyrrole film at these potentials is that previously described for metal oxide, lithium intercalation thin films. Using this model, counterion diffusion coefficients are determined for both semi-infinite and finite diffusion domains. In addition, the limiting low frequency resistance and capacitance of the polypyrrole thin fims was determined and compared to that obtained previously for thicker films of the polymer. The origin of the observed potential dependence of these low frequency circuit components is discussed.

  20. Electrothermally driven flows in ac electrowetting.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Pablo; Ramos, Antonio; Mugele, Frieder

    2010-01-01

    Mixing within sessile drops can be enhanced by generating internal flow patterns using ac electrowetting. While for low ac frequencies, the flow patterns have been attributed to oscillations of the drop surface, we provide here the driving mechanism of the hitherto unexplained high-frequency flows. We show that: (1) the electric field in the liquid bulk becomes important, leading to energy dissipation due to Joule heating and a temperature increase of several degrees Celsius, and (2) the fluid flow at these frequencies is generated by electrothermal effect, i.e., gradients in temperature give rise to gradients in conductivity and permittivity, the electric field acting on these inhomogeneities induces an electrical body force that generates the flow. We solved numerically the equations for the electric, temperature and flow fields. The temperature is obtained from a convection-diffusion equation where Joule heating is introduced as a source term. From the solution of the electric field and the temperature, we compute the electrical force that acts as a body force in Stokes equations. Our numerical results agree with previous experimental observations.

  1. Amorphous force transducers in ac applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meydan, T.; Overshott, K. J.

    1982-11-01

    The high stress sensitivity and high yield stress properties of amorphous ribbon materials make them suitable for magnetic sensors and tranducer applications. Recently the authors have shown that ac systems eliminate the offset voltage and drift problems of the previously published dc systems. Further investigations proved that these transducers could be operated with a linear characteristic up to 1000 g in multiwrap toroidal configurations. The cause of the transducing behavior of the materials was proved to be variation of permeability with stress. It was previously suggested that the optimum operating frequency of the ac transducers is dependent on the physical configuration of the core. Further investigations have shown that the optimum operating frequency is linearly dependent on the amplitude of the input signal to the transducer. Double-core systems have been previously described in the literature where one core acts as a dummy core and the force is applied to the active core. The disadvantage of the double-core system is that aging of the active core changes the performance of the transducer by as much as 10%. A new system will be presented which uses an accurate analog memory to reduce the ageing effect to a fraction of one percent.

  2. Cascading failures in ac electricity grids.

    PubMed

    Rohden, Martin; Jung, Daniel; Tamrakar, Samyak; Kettemann, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Sudden failure of a single transmission element in a power grid can induce a domino effect of cascading failures, which can lead to the isolation of a large number of consumers or even to the failure of the entire grid. Here we present results of the simulation of cascading failures in power grids, using an alternating current (AC) model. We first apply this model to a regular square grid topology. For a random placement of consumers and generators on the grid, the probability to find more than a certain number of unsupplied consumers decays as a power law and obeys a scaling law with respect to system size. Varying the transmitted power threshold above which a transmission line fails does not seem to change the power-law exponent q≈1.6. Furthermore, we study the influence of the placement of generators and consumers on the number of affected consumers and demonstrate that large clusters of generators and consumers are especially vulnerable to cascading failures. As a real-world topology, we consider the German high-voltage transmission grid. Applying the dynamic AC model and considering a random placement of consumers, we find that the probability to disconnect more than a certain number of consumers depends strongly on the threshold. For large thresholds the decay is clearly exponential, while for small ones the decay is slow, indicating a power-law decay.

  3. Cascading failures in ac electricity grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohden, Martin; Jung, Daniel; Tamrakar, Samyak; Kettemann, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Sudden failure of a single transmission element in a power grid can induce a domino effect of cascading failures, which can lead to the isolation of a large number of consumers or even to the failure of the entire grid. Here we present results of the simulation of cascading failures in power grids, using an alternating current (AC) model. We first apply this model to a regular square grid topology. For a random placement of consumers and generators on the grid, the probability to find more than a certain number of unsupplied consumers decays as a power law and obeys a scaling law with respect to system size. Varying the transmitted power threshold above which a transmission line fails does not seem to change the power-law exponent q ≈1.6 . Furthermore, we study the influence of the placement of generators and consumers on the number of affected consumers and demonstrate that large clusters of generators and consumers are especially vulnerable to cascading failures. As a real-world topology, we consider the German high-voltage transmission grid. Applying the dynamic AC model and considering a random placement of consumers, we find that the probability to disconnect more than a certain number of consumers depends strongly on the threshold. For large thresholds the decay is clearly exponential, while for small ones the decay is slow, indicating a power-law decay.

  4. AC-Induced Bias Potential Effect on Corrosion of Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-05

    to AC current Pourbaix Diagram (Nielsen) AC corrosion is promoting a strong cathode behavior which pulls out hydrogen ions out of pits and... Pourbaix - diagram showing dangerous region in respect to AC induced corrosion (as proposed by Neilsen, et al., 2006) Alkalization Model 1 • DC stray...lines derived from the Nernst equation: Pourbaix - diagram (potential vs. pH) showing shift in boundary lines due to a shift in potential resulting

  5. Widespread retinal degenerative disease mutation (rdAc) discovered among a large number of popular cat breeds.

    PubMed

    Menotti-Raymond, M; David, V A; Pflueger, S; Roelke, M E; Kehler, J; O'Brien, S J; Narfström, K

    2010-10-01

    The recent discovery of a mutational variant in the CEP290 gene (CEP290: IVS50+9T>G), conferring recessive retinal degeneration in Abyssinian and Somali (long-haired Abyssinian) cats (rdAc) prompted a survey among 41 cat breeds (846 individuals) to assess the incidence, frequency and clinical consequence of rdAc. The rdAc allele displayed widespread distribution, observed in 16/43 (37%) breeds, exhibiting a high allele frequency (∼33%) in North American and European Siamese populations. Clinical evaluations demonstrated high concordance between rdAc pathology and the CEP290 (IVS50+9T>G) homozygous genotype (P=1.1E-6), with clinical disease similar to affected Abyssinians/Somalis. This retinal degeneration has not been reported in breeds other than the Abyssinian/Somali and poses a significant health risk particularly in the Siamese breed group. Alertness of the veterinary community and the present availability of commercial diagnostic testing could synergistically enable breeders to reduce the incidence of rdAc blindness in pure-bred cat populations.

  6. Global Survey of Anthropogenic Neighborhood Threats to Conservation of Grass-Shrub and Forest Vegetation

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report a survey of land cover patterns focusing on forest, grassland, and shrubland for the United States. To provide information for a national resource assessment, an integrated survey of patterns was conducted using a circa 2001 land cover map. The survey was designed to ac...

  7. Global Survey of Anthropogenic Neighborhood Threats to Conservation of Grass-Shrub and Forest Vegetation

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report a survey of land cover patterns focusing on forest, grassland, and shrubland for the United States. To provide information for a national resource assessment, an integrated survey of patterns was conducted using a circa 2001 land cover map. The survey was designed to ac...

  8. Fabrication of alumina films with laminated structures by ac anodization.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Hiroyo; Okano, Hironaga; Wada, Kenji; Inoue, Satoru

    2014-02-01

    Anodization techniques by alternating current (ac) are introduced in this review. By using ac anodization, laminated alumina films are fabricated. Different types of alumina films consisting of 50-200 nm layers were obtained by varying both the ac power supply and the electrolyte. The total film thickness increased with an increase in the total charge transferred. The thickness of the individual layers increased with the ac voltage; however, the anodization time had little effect on the film thickness. The laminated alumina films resembled the nacre structure of shells, and the different morphologies exhibited by bivalves and spiral shells could be replicated by controlling the rate of increase of the applied potentials.

  9. Study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms in an epoxy polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilani, Wissal; Mzabi, Nissaf; Gallot-Lavallée, Olivier; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Zerrouki, Rachida; Guermazi, Hajer

    2015-11-01

    The AC conductivity of an epoxy resin was investigated in the frequency range 10^{-1} - 106 Hz at temperatures ranging from -100 to 120 °C. The frequency dependence of σ_{ac} was described by the law: σ_{ac}=ω \\varepsilon0\\varepsilon^''_{HN}+Aωs. The study of temperature variation of the exponent (s) reveals two conduction models: the AC conduction dependence upon temperature is governed by the small polaron tunneling mechanism (SPTM) at low temperature (-100 -60 °C) and the correlated barrier hopping (CHB) model at high temperature (80-120 °C).

  10. Fabrication of alumina films with laminated structures by ac anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Hiroyo; Okano, Hironaga; Wada, Kenji; Inoue, Satoru

    2014-02-01

    Anodization techniques by alternating current (ac) are introduced in this review. By using ac anodization, laminated alumina films are fabricated. Different types of alumina films consisting of 50-200 nm layers were obtained by varying both the ac power supply and the electrolyte. The total film thickness increased with an increase in the total charge transferred. The thickness of the individual layers increased with the ac voltage; however, the anodization time had little effect on the film thickness. The laminated alumina films resembled the nacre structure of shells, and the different morphologies exhibited by bivalves and spiral shells could be replicated by controlling the rate of increase of the applied potentials.

  11. AcsA-AcsB: The core of the cellulose synthase complex from Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769.

    PubMed

    McManus, John B; Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Kao, Teh-Hui; Tien, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium, Gluconacetobacter hansenii, produces cellulose of exceptionally high crystallinity in comparison to the cellulose of higher plants. This bacterial cellulose is synthesized and extruded into the extracellular medium by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). The catalytic component of this complex is encoded by the gene AcsAB. However, several other genes are known to encode proteins critical to cellulose synthesis and are likely components of the bacterial CSC. We have purified an active heterodimer AcsA-AcsB from G. hansenii ATCC23769 to homogeneity by two different methods. With the purified protein, we have determined how it is post-translationally processed, forming the active heterodimer AcsA-AcsB. Additionally, we have performed steady-state kinetic studies on the AcsA-AcsB complex. Finally through mutagenesis studies, we have explored the roles of the postulated CSC proteins AcsC, AcsD, and CcpAx. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ac45 silencing mediated by AAV-sh-Ac45-RNAi prevents both bone loss and inflammation caused by periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Chen, Wei; Hao, Liang; Zhu, Guochun; Lu, Yun; Li, Sheng; Wang, Lin; Li, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aim Periodontitis induced by oral pathogens leads to severe periodontal tissue damage and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption caused by inflammation. Based on the importance of Ac45 in osteoclast formation and function, we performed this study to evaluate the therapeutic potential of periodontitis by local adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Ac45 gene knockdown. Material and Methods We used AAV-mediated short hairpin RNAi knockdown of Ac45 gene expression (AAV-sh-Ac45) to inhibit bone erosion and gingival inflammation simultaneously in a well-established periodontitis mouse model induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis W50. Histological studies were performed to evaluate the bone protection of AAV-sh-Ac45. Immunochemistry, ELISA and qRT-PCR were performed to reveal the role of Ac45 knockdown on inflammation, immune response and expression of cytokine. Results We found that Ac45 knockdown impaired osteoclast-mediated extracellular acidification and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, local administration of AAV-sh-Ac45 protected mice from bone erosion by >85% and attenuated inflammation and decreased infiltration of T-cells, dendritic cells and macrophages in the periodontal lesion. Notably, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was also reduced. Conclusions Local AAV-sh-Ac45 gene therapy efficiently protects against periodontal tissue damage and bone erosion through both inhibition of osteoclast function and attenuating inflammation, and may represent a powerful new treatment strategy for periodontitis. PMID:25952706

  13. Counting Uninsurance and Means-Tested Coverage in the American Community Survey: A Comparison to the Current Population Survey

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, Michel; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y; Graven, Peter; Davern, Michael; Blewett, Lynn A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare health insurance coverage estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) to the Current Population Survey (CPS-ASEC). Data Sources/Study Setting The 2008 ACS and CPS-ASEC, 2009. Study Design We compare age-specific national rates for all coverage types and state-level rates of uninsurance and means-tested coverage. We assess differences using t-tests and p-values, which are reported at <.05, <.01, and <.001. An F-test determines whether differences significantly varied by state. Principal Findings Despite substantial design differences, we find only modest differences in coverage estimates between the surveys. National direct purchase and state-level means-tested coverage levels for children show the largest differences. Conclusions We suggest that the ACS is well poised to become a useful tool to health services researchers and policy analysts, but that further study is needed to identify sources of error and to quantify its bias. PMID:21029089

  14. Uncovering the Catalytic Direction of Chondroitin AC Exolyase

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Feng-Xin; Wang, Feng-Shan; Sheng, Ju-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are polysaccharides that play vital functional roles in numerous biological processes, and compounds belonging to this class have been implicated in a wide variety of diseases. Chondroitin AC lyase (ChnAC) (EC 4.2.2.5) catalyzes the degradation of various GAGs, including chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid, to give the corresponding disaccharides containing an Δ4-unsaturated uronic acid at their non-reducing terminus. ChnAC has been isolated from various bacteria and utilized as an enzymatic tool for study and evaluating the sequencing of GAGs. Despite its substrate specificity and the fact that its crystal structure has been determined to a high resolution, the direction in which ChnAC catalyzes the cleavage of oligosaccharides remain unclear. Herein, we have determined the structural cues of substrate depolymerization and the cleavage direction of ChnAC using model substrates and recombinant ChnAC protein. Several structurally defined oligosaccharides were synthesized using a chemoenzymatic approach and subsequently cleaved using ChnAC. The degradation products resulting from this process were determined by mass spectrometry. The results revealed that ChnAC cleaved the β1,4-glycosidic linkages between glucuronic acid and glucosamine units when these bonds were located on the reducing end of the oligosaccharide. In contrast, the presence of a GlcNAc-α-1,4-GlcA unit at the reducing end of the oligosaccharide prevented ChnAC from cleaving the GalNAc-β1,4-GlcA moiety located in the middle or at the non-reducing end of the chain. These interesting results therefore provide direct proof that ChnAC cleaves oligosaccharide substrates from their reducing end toward their non-reducing end. This conclusion will therefore enhance our collective understanding of the mode of action of ChnAC. PMID:26742844

  15. Demonstration of an ac Josephson junction laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, M. C.; Bruno, A.; Rubbert, S.; Irfan, M.; Kammhuber, J.; Schouten, R. N.; Akhmerov, A. R.; Kouwenhoven, L. P.

    2017-03-01

    Superconducting electronic devices have reemerged as contenders for both classical and quantum computing due to their fast operation speeds, low dissipation, and long coherence times. An ultimate demonstration of coherence is lasing. We use one of the fundamental aspects of superconductivity, the ac Josephson effect, to demonstrate a laser made from a Josephson junction strongly coupled to a multimode superconducting cavity. A dc voltage bias applied across the junction provides a source of microwave photons, and the circuit’s nonlinearity allows for efficient down-conversion of higher-order Josephson frequencies to the cavity’s fundamental mode. The simple fabrication and operation allows for easy integration with a range of quantum devices, allowing for efficient on-chip generation of coherent microwave photons at low temperatures.

  16. Boston ACS Meeting, Chemical Education Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeman, Thomas R.; Torre, Frank; Smist, Julianne

    1998-11-01

    For those of us who had not been to Boston since the last ACS meeting it was surprising to see how vibrant the city was. The shops, restaurants, parks, and other attractions throughout the large inner city area made the meeting most enjoyable. Again, our banquet cruise of the harbor was blessed with excellent weather. The ship went out far enough so that we landlocked people could feel the waves. The entire program had a celebratory tone-two sessions marking the 70th birthday of Glenn Crosby, a memorial symposium celebrating the teaching innovations of Hubert Alyea, and the 75th anniversary of the Journal of Chemical Education (>p 1360). Content issues in upper division chemistry courses as well as general chemistry took up a large portion of the program. Some of the symposia are discussed in this article.

  17. Dielectric relaxation in AC powder electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Su, Haibin; Tan, Chuan Seng; Wong, Terence Kin Shun; Teo, Ronnie Jin Wah

    2017-01-01

    The dielectric properties of AC powder electroluminescent devices were measured and analyzed using complex impedance spectroscopy to determine the relaxation processes occurring within the devices. The relaxation processes identified were ascribed to the electrode polarization caused by ion accumulation at the electrode/resin interfaces, the Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars effects at the (ZnS or BaTiO3) particle/resin interfaces, and the dipolar reorientation of polymer chains in the resin matrix. Each relaxation process was represented by its corresponding equivalent circuit component. Space charge polarization at the electrodes were represented by a Warburg element, a resistor, and a constant phase element. The resin matrix, ZnS/resin and BaTiO3/resin interfaces could each be modeled by a resistor and a capacitor in parallel. The simulated equivalent circuits for three different printed structures showed good fitting with their experimental impedance results.

  18. Public Understanding of Chemistry, ACS National Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettys, Nancy S.

    2000-06-01

    Three public events for area school-aged children were held on Saturday, March 25, 2000, prior to the opening of the 219th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. All took place at the Moscone Convention Center in downtown San Francisco. The photographs tell the story: the programs were successful and a good time was had by all. Readers may be encouraged to try these ideas in their own area. If so, the local organizers of Carver Kidvention have additional information at www.scvacs.org/Carver/index.html or contact Howard Peters (Santa Clara Valley Section, ACS), peters4pa@aol.com. Additional photos of the Kidvention event may also be seen as supplemental material.

  19. An ac bridge readout for bolometric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, F. M.; Lange, A. E.; Beeman, J. W.; Haller, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed a bolometer readout circuit which greatly improves the low-frequency stability of bolometric detectors. The circuit uses an ac bias voltage and two matched bolometers and allows stable dc bolometer operation for integration times greater than 10 s. In astronomical applications the readout allows for qualitatively different observation modes (e.g. staring or slow-drift scanning) which are particularly well suited for space observations and for the use of arrays. In many applications the readout can increase sensitivity. The authors present noise spectra for 4He temperature bolometers with no excess noise at frequencies greater than 0.1 Hz. The measured optical responsivity of a bolometer operated with the present readout is the same as that of a bolometer operated with a conventional readout.

  20. Advanced ac powertrain for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Slicker, J.M.; Kalns, L.

    1985-01-01

    The design of an ac propulsion system for an electric vehicle includes a three-phase induction motor, transistorized PWM inverter/battery charger, microprocessor-based controller, and two-speed automatic transaxle. This system was built and installed in a Mercury Lynx test bed vehicle as part of a Department of Energy propulsion system development program. An integral part of the inverter is a 4-kw battery charger which utilizes one of the bridge transistors. The overall inverter strategy for this configuration is discussed. The function of the microprocessor-based controller is described. Typical test results of the total vehicle and each of its major components are given, including system efficiencies and test track performance results.