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Sample records for act intravital multiphoton

  1. Caught in the Act: Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy of Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Heather D.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2009-01-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy provides a unique opportunity to discover and characterize biological phenomena in the natural context of living organisms. Here we provide an overview of multiphoton microscopy with particular attention to its application for studying host-pathogen interactions. PMID:19154984

  2. Intravital multiphoton microscopy for imaging hepatobiliary function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng-Chieh; Sun, Tzu-Lin; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Yang, Shu-Mei; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    Liver is the chemical factory in body responsible for important functions such as metabolism and detoxification. When liver can not be regenerated in time to amend damages that has occurred, failure of hepatic functions can result. Traditionally, the study of liver pathology has depended on histological techniques, but such methods are limited to ex-vivo observation. In order to study hepatic metabolism in vivo, we have designed a hepatic imaging chamber made of biocompatible titanium alloy (6V4Al-Ti, ELI grade). In combination with multiphoton and second harmonic generation microscopy, our approach allows the intravital observation of hepatic intravital activities to be achieved. Processes such as hepatic metabolism and disease progression can be studied using this methodology.

  3. Visualization of hepatobiliary excretory function by intravital multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Hsiao-Ching; Yang, Shu-Mei; Sun, Tzu-Lin; Lo, Wen; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Huang, Guan Tarn; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Lee, Hsuan-Shu

    2007-01-01

    Intravital imaging of hepatobiliary excretion is vital for elucidating liver metabolism. In this work, we describe a novel method to observe the intravital dynamics of the uptake, processing, and excretion of an organic anion, 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (6-CFDA) in the hepatobiliary system. This is achieved by the use of multiphoton microscopy and an intravital hepatic imaging chamber. The high-quality images show sequential uptake and processing of 6-CFDA from the hepatocytes and the subsequent excretion into bile canaliculi within approximately 50 min. This is a promising technique to study intravital hepatic physiology and metabolism.

  4. Intravital Multiphoton Imaging of the Kidney: Tubular Structure and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Small, David M; Sanchez, Washington Y; Gobe, Glenda C

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) allows the visualization of dynamic pathophysiological events in real time in live animals. Intravital imaging can be applied to investigate novel mechanisms and treatments of different forms of kidney disease as well as improve our understanding of normal kidney physiology. Using rodent models, in conjunction with endogenous fluorescence and infused exogenous fluorescent dyes, measurement can be made of renal processes such as glomerular permeability, juxtaglomerular apparatus function, interactions of the tubulointerstitium, tubulovascular interactions, vascular flow rate, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Subcellular processes including mitochondrial dynamics, reactive oxygen species production, cytosolic ion concentrations, and death processes of apoptosis and necrosis can also be seen and measured by MPM. The current methods chapter presents an overview of MPM with a focus on techniques for intravital kidney imaging and gives examples of instances where intravital MPM has been utilized to study renal pathophysiology. Suggestions are provided for MPM methods within the confines of intravital microscopy and selected kidney structure. MPM is undoubtedly a powerful new technique for application in experimental nephrology, and we believe it will continue to create new paradigms for understanding and treating kidney disease.

  5. Intravital multiphoton imaging of mouse tibialis anterior muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jasmine; Goh, Chi Ching; Devi, Sapna; Keeble, Jo; See, Peter; Ginhoux, Florent; Ng, Lai Guan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intravital imaging by multiphoton microscopy is a powerful tool to gain invaluable insight into tissue biology and function. Here, we provide a step-by-step tissue preparation protocol for imaging the mouse tibialis anterior skeletal muscle. Additionally, we include steps for jugular vein catheterization that allow for well-controlled intravenous reagent delivery. Preparation of the tibialis anterior muscle is minimally invasive, reducing the chances of inducing damage and inflammation prior to imaging. The tibialis anterior muscle is useful for imaging leukocyte interaction with vascular endothelium, and to understand muscle contraction biology. Importantly, this model can be easily adapted to study neuromuscular diseases and myopathies. PMID:28243520

  6. Multiphoton intravital microscopy setup to visualize the mouse mammary gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Herrera Torres, Ana M.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Baratti, Mariana O.; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, light microscopy-based techniques have been extended to live mammalian models leading to the development of a new imaging approach called intravital microscopy (IVM). Although IVM has been introduced at the beginning of the last century, its major advancements have occurred in the last twenty years with the development of non-linear microscopy that has enabled performing deep tissue imaging. IVM has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool that provide information on tissues such as morphology, cellular architecture, and metabolic status. IVM has become an indispensable tool in numerous areas. This study presents and describes the practical aspects of IVM necessary to visualize epithelial cells of live mouse mammary gland with multiphoton techniques.

  7. Using quantitative intravital multiphoton microscopy to dissect hepatic transport in rats.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kenneth W; Ryan, Jennifer C

    2017-09-01

    Hepatic solute transport is a complex process whose disruption is associated with liver disease and drug-induced liver injury. Intravital multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy provides the spatial and temporal resolution necessary to characterize hepatic transport at the level of individual hepatocytes in vivo and thus to identify the mechanisms and cellular consequences of cholestasis. Here we present an overview of the use of fluorescence microscopy for studies of hepatic transport in living animals, and describe how we have combined methods of intravital microscopy and digital image analysis to dissect the effects of drugs and pathological conditions on the function of hepatic transporters in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intravital assessment of myelin molecular order with polarimetric multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Rutledge, Danette J.; Bélanger, Erik; Dill, Dorothy; Macklin, Wendy B.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Myelin plays an essential role in the nervous system and its disruption in diseases such as multiple sclerosis may lead to neuronal death, thus causing irreversible functional impairments. Understanding myelin biology is therefore of fundamental and clinical importance, but no tools currently exist to describe the fine spatial organization of myelin sheaths in vivo. Here we demonstrate intravital quantification of the myelin molecular structure using a microscopy method based on polarization-resolved coherent Raman scattering. Developmental myelination was imaged noninvasively in live zebrafish. Longitudinal imaging of individual axons revealed changes in myelin organization beyond the diffraction limit. Applied to promyelination drug screening, the method uniquely enabled the identification of focal myelin regions with differential architectures. These observations indicate that the study of myelin biology and the identification of therapeutic compounds will largely benefit from a method to quantify the myelin molecular organization in vivo. PMID:27538357

  9. Intravital assessment of myelin molecular order with polarimetric multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Rutledge, Danette J.; Bélanger, Erik; Dill, Dorothy; Macklin, Wendy B.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-08-01

    Myelin plays an essential role in the nervous system and its disruption in diseases such as multiple sclerosis may lead to neuronal death, thus causing irreversible functional impairments. Understanding myelin biology is therefore of fundamental and clinical importance, but no tools currently exist to describe the fine spatial organization of myelin sheaths in vivo. Here we demonstrate intravital quantification of the myelin molecular structure using a microscopy method based on polarization-resolved coherent Raman scattering. Developmental myelination was imaged noninvasively in live zebrafish. Longitudinal imaging of individual axons revealed changes in myelin organization beyond the diffraction limit. Applied to promyelination drug screening, the method uniquely enabled the identification of focal myelin regions with differential architectures. These observations indicate that the study of myelin biology and the identification of therapeutic compounds will largely benefit from a method to quantify the myelin molecular organization in vivo.

  10. Usefulness of Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy in Visualizing Study of Mouse Cochlea and Volume Changes in the Scala Media.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyun Mi; Lee, Sun Hee; Kong, Tae Hoon; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Choi, Jin Sil; Seo, Young Joon

    2017-01-01

    Conventional microscopy has limitations in viewing the cochlear microstructures due to three-dimensional spiral structure and the overlying bone. But these issues can be overcome by imaging the cochlea in vitro with intravital multiphoton microscopy (MPM). By using near-infrared lasers for multiphoton excitation, intravital MPM can detect endogenous fluorescence and second harmonic generation of tissues. In this study, we used intravital MPM to visualize various cochlear microstructures without any staining and non-invasively analyze the volume changes of the scala media (SM) without removing the overlying cochlear bone. The intravital MPM images revealed various tissue types, ranging from thin membranes to dense bone, as well as the spiral ganglion beneath the cochlear bone. The two-dimensional, cross-sectional, and serial z-stack intravital MPM images also revealed the spatial dilation of the SM in the temporal bone of pendrin-deficient mice. These findings suggest that intravital MPM might serve as a new method for obtaining microanatomical information regarding the cochlea, similar to standard histopathological analyses in the animal study for the cochlea. Given the capability of intravital MPM for detecting an increase in the volume of the SM in pendrin-deficient mice, it might be a promising new tool for assessing the pathophysiology of hearing loss in the future.

  11. Usefulness of Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy in Visualizing Study of Mouse Cochlea and Volume Changes in the Scala Media

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hyun Mi; Lee, Sun Hee; Kong, Tae Hoon; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Choi, Jin Sil; Seo, Young Joon

    2017-01-01

    Conventional microscopy has limitations in viewing the cochlear microstructures due to three-dimensional spiral structure and the overlying bone. But these issues can be overcome by imaging the cochlea in vitro with intravital multiphoton microscopy (MPM). By using near-infrared lasers for multiphoton excitation, intravital MPM can detect endogenous fluorescence and second harmonic generation of tissues. In this study, we used intravital MPM to visualize various cochlear microstructures without any staining and non-invasively analyze the volume changes of the scala media (SM) without removing the overlying cochlear bone. The intravital MPM images revealed various tissue types, ranging from thin membranes to dense bone, as well as the spiral ganglion beneath the cochlear bone. The two-dimensional, cross-sectional, and serial z-stack intravital MPM images also revealed the spatial dilation of the SM in the temporal bone of pendrin-deficient mice. These findings suggest that intravital MPM might serve as a new method for obtaining microanatomical information regarding the cochlea, similar to standard histopathological analyses in the animal study for the cochlea. Given the capability of intravital MPM for detecting an increase in the volume of the SM in pendrin-deficient mice, it might be a promising new tool for assessing the pathophysiology of hearing loss in the future. PMID:28824523

  12. Setup and use of a two-laser multiphoton microscope for multichannel intravital fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Roussos, Evanthia T; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing biological mechanisms dependent upon the interaction of many cell types in vivo requires both multiphoton microscope systems capable of expanding the number and types of fluorophores that can be imaged simultaneously while removing the wavelength and tunability restrictions of existing systems, and enhanced software for extracting critical cellular parameters from voluminous 4D data sets. We present a procedure for constructing a two-laser multiphoton microscope that extends the wavelength range of excitation light, expands the number of simultaneously usable fluorophores and markedly increases signal to noise via ‘over-clocking’ of detection. We also utilize a custom-written software plug-in that simplifies the quantitative tracking and analysis of 4D intravital image data. We begin by describing the optics, hardware, electronics and software required, and finally the use of the plug-in for analysis. We demonstrate the use of the setup and plug-in by presenting data collected via intravital imaging of a mouse model of breast cancer. The procedure may be completed in ~24 h. PMID:21959234

  13. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates-only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment.

  14. From morphology to biochemical state - intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy.

  15. Visualizing dynamics of sub-hepatic distribution of nanoparticles using intravital multiphoton fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Li, Feng-Chieh; Souris, Jeffrey S; Yang, Chung-Shi; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Chen, Chin-Tu; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2012-05-22

    Nanoparticles that do not undergo renal excretion or in vivo degradation into biocompatible debris often accumulate in the reticuloendothelial system, also know as the mononuclear phagocyte system, with undesired consequences that limit their clinical utility. In this work, we report the first application of intravital multiphoton fluorescence microscopy to dynamically track the hepatic metabolism of nanoparticles with subcellular resolution in real time. Using fluorescently labeled mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) in mice as a prototypical model, we observed significant hepatocyte uptake of positively charged, but not negatively charged, moieties. Conversely, in vivo imaging of negatively charged, but not positively charged, MSNs reveals an overwhelming propensity for the former's rapid uptake by Kupffer cells in liver sinusoids. Since the only prerequisite for these studies was that nanoparticles are fluorescently labeled and not of a specific composition or structure, the techniques we present can readily be extended to a wide variety of nanoparticle structures and surface modifications (e.g., shape, charge, hydrophobicity, PEGylation) in the preclinical assessment and tailoring of their hepatotoxicities and clearances.

  16. Long Term Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy Imaging of Immune Cells in Healthy and Diseased Liver Using CXCR6.Gfp Reporter Mice

    PubMed Central

    Peusquens, Julia; Ergen, Can; Kohlhepp, Marlene; Mossanen, Jana C.; Schneider, Carlo; Vogt, Michael; Tolba, Rene H.; Trautwein, Christian; Martin, Christian; Tacke, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Liver inflammation as a response to injury is a highly dynamic process involving the infiltration of distinct subtypes of leukocytes including monocytes, neutrophils, T cell subsets, B cells, natural killer (NK) and NKT cells. Intravital microscopy of the liver for monitoring immune cell migration is particularly challenging due to the high requirements regarding sample preparation and fixation, optical resolution and long-term animal survival. Yet, the dynamics of inflammatory processes as well as cellular interaction studies could provide critical information to better understand the initiation, progression and regression of inflammatory liver disease. Therefore, a highly sensitive and reliable method was established to study migration and cell-cell-interactions of different immune cells in mouse liver over long periods (about 6 hr) by intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) in combination with intensive care monitoring. The method provided includes a gentle preparation and stable fixation of the liver with minimal perturbation of the organ; long term intravital imaging using multicolor multiphoton microscopy with virtually no photobleaching or phototoxic effects over a time period of up to 6 hr, allowing tracking of specific leukocyte subsets; and stable imaging conditions due to extensive monitoring of mouse vital parameters and stabilization of circulation, temperature and gas exchange. To investigate lymphocyte migration upon liver inflammation CXCR6.gfp knock-in mice were subjected to intravital liver imaging under baseline conditions and after acute and chronic liver damage induced by intraperitoneal injection(s) of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). CXCR6 is a chemokine receptor expressed on lymphocytes, mainly on Natural Killer T (NKT)-, Natural Killer (NK)- and subsets of T lymphocytes such as CD4 T cells but also mucosal associated invariant (MAIT) T cells1. Following the migratory pattern and positioning of CXCR6.gfp+ immune cells allowed a

  17. A novel model for ectopic, chronic, intravital multiphoton imaging of bone marrow vasculature and architecture in split femurs

    PubMed Central

    Bălan, Mirela; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Creating a model for intravital visualization of femoral bone marrow, a major site of hematopoiesis in adult mammalian organisms, poses a serious challenge, in that it needs to overcome bone opacity and the inaccessibility of marrow. Furthermore, meaningful analysis of bone marrow developmental and differentiation processes requires the repetitive observation of the same site over long periods of time, which we refer to as chronic imaging. To surmount these issues, we developed a chronic intravital imaging model that allows the observation of split femurs, ectopically transplanted into a dorsal skinfold chamber of a host mouse. Repeated, long term observations are facilitated by multiphoton microscopy, an imaging technique that combines superior imaging capacity at greater tissue depth with low phototoxicity. The transplanted, ectopic femur was stabilized by its sterile environment and rapidly connected to the host vasculature, allowing further development and observation of extended processes. After optimizing transplant age and grafting procedure, we observed the development of new woven bone and maturation of secondary ossification centers in the transplanted femurs, preceded by the sprouting of a sinusoidal-like vascular network, which was almost entirely composed of femoral endothelial cells. After two weeks, the transplant was still populated with stromal and haematopoietic cells belonging both to donor and host. Over this time frame, the transplant partially retained myeloid progenitor cells with single and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. In summary, our model allowed repeated intravital imaging of bone marrow angiogenesis and hematopoiesis. It represents a promising starting point for the development of improved chronic optical imaging models for femoral bone marrow. PMID:28243515

  18. Improving signal levels in intravital multiphoton microscopy using an objective correction collar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriello, Pamela A.; Dunn, Kenneth W.

    2008-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has enabled biologists to collect high-resolution images hundreds of microns into biological tissues, including tissues of living animals. While the depth of imaging exceeds that possible from any other form of light microscopy, multiphoton microscopy is nonetheless generally limited to depths of less than a millimeter. Many of the advantages of multiphoton microscopy for deep tissue imaging accrue from the unique nature of multiphoton fluorescence excitation. However, the quadratic relationship between illumination level and fluorescence excitation makes multiphoton microscopy especially susceptible to factors that degrade the illumination focus. Here we examine the effect of spherical aberration on multiphoton microscopy in fixed kidney tissues and in the kidneys of living animals. We find that spherical aberration, as evaluated from axial asymmetry in the point-spread function, can be corrected by adjustment of the correction collar of a water immersion objective lens. Introducing a compensatory positive spherical aberration into the imaging system decreases the depth-dependence of signal levels in images collected from living animals, increasing signal by up to 50%.

  19. From morphology to biochemical state – intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    PubMed Central

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27004454

  20. Quantification of Cy-5 siRNA signal in the intra-vital multi-photon microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Antong; Dogdas, Belma; Mehta, Saurin; Haskell, Kathleen; Ng, Bruce; Keough, Ed; Howell, Bonnie; Meacham, D Adam; Aslamkhan, Amy G; Davide, Joseph; Stanton, Matthew; Bagchi, Ansuman; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Tao, Weikang

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic mice with Tie2- green fluorescent protein (GFP) are used as a model to study the kinetic distribution of the Cy5-siRNA delivered by lipid nanoparticles (LNP) into the liver. After the mouse is injected with the LNP, it undergoes a procedure of intra-vital multi-photon microscopy imaging over a period of two hours, during which the process for the nanoparticle to diffuse into the hepatocytes from the vasculature system is monitored. Since the images are obtained in-vivo, the quantification of Cy5 kinetics suffers from the moving field of view (FOV). A method is proposed to register the sequence of images through template matching. Based on the semi-automatic segmentations of the vessels in the common FOV, the registered images are segmented into three regions of interest (ROI) in which the Cy5 signals are quantified. Computation of the percentage signal strength in the ROIs over time allows for the analysis of the diffusion of Cy5-siRNA into the hepatocytes, and helps demonstrate the effectiveness of the Cy5-siRNA delivery vehicle.

  1. Intravital multiphoton imaging reveals multicellular streaming as a crucial component of in vivo cell migration in human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Patsialou, Antonia; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Wang, Yarong; Entenberg, David; Liu, Huiping; Clarke, Michael; Condeelis, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in breast cancer patients. Cell migration is an essential component of almost every step of the metastatic cascade, especially the early step of invasion inside the primary tumor. In this report, we have used intravital multiphoton microscopy to visualize the different migration patterns of human breast tumor cells in live primary tumors. We used xenograft tumors of MDA-MB-231 cells as well as a low passage xenograft tumor from orthotopically injected patient-derived breast tumor cells. Direct visualization of human tumor cells in vivo shows two patterns of high-speed migration inside primary tumors: a. single cells and b. multicellular streams (i.e., cells following each other in a single file but without cohesive cell junctions). Critically, we found that only streaming and not random migration of single cells was significantly correlated with proximity to vessels, with intravasation and with numbers of elevated circulating tumor cells in the bloodstream. Finally, although the two human tumors were derived from diverse genetic backgrounds, we found that their migratory tumor cells exhibited coordinated gene expression changes that led to the same end-phenotype of enhanced migration involving activating actin polymerization and myosin contraction. Our data are the first direct visualization and assessment of in vivo migration within a live patient-derived breast xenograft tumor. PMID:25013744

  2. Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    PubMed Central

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Shibue, Tsukasa; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. To investigate tumor cell behavior in vivo with ultrastructural accuracy, a reliable approach is needed to retrieve single tumor cells imaged deep within the tissue. For this purpose, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into a mouse ear and imaged using two-photon-excitation microscopy. Using near-infrared branding, the position of the imaged area within the sample was labeled at the skin level, allowing for its precise recollection. Following sample preparation for electron microscopy, concerted usage of the artificial branding and anatomical landmarks enables targeting and approaching the cells of interest while serial sectioning through the specimen. We describe here three procedures showing how three-dimensional (3D) mapping of structural features in the tissue can be exploited to accurately correlate between the two imaging modalities, without having to rely on the use of artificially introduced markers of the region of interest. The methods employed here facilitate the link between intravital and nanoscale imaging of invasive tumor cells, enabling correlating function to structure in the study of tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:25479106

  3. Visualization of bone marrow monocyte mobilization using Cx3cr1gfp/+Flt3L−/− reporter mouse by multiphoton intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Maximilien; Chong, Shu Zhen; Devi, Sapna; Chew, Weng Keong; Lee, Bernett; Poidinger, Michael; Ginhoux, Florent; Tan, Suet Mien; Ng, Lai Guan

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes are innate immune cells that play critical roles in inflammation and immune defense. A better comprehension of how monocytes are mobilized and recruited is fundamental to understand their biologic role in disease and steady state. The BM represents a major “checkpoint” for monocyte homeostasis, as it is the primary site for their production and release. Our study determined that the Cx3cr1gfp/+ mouse strain is currently the most ideal model for the visualization of monocyte behavior in the BM by multiphoton intravital microscopy. However, we observed that DCs are also labeled with high levels of GFP and thus, interfere with the accuracy of monocyte tracking in vivo. Hence, we generated a Cx3cr1gfp/+Flt3L−/− reporter mouse and showed that whereas monocyte numbers were not affected, DC numbers were reduced significantly, as DCs but not monocytes depend on Flt3 signaling for their development. We thus verified that mobilization of monocytes from the BM in Cx3cr1gfp/+Flt3L−/− mice is intact in response to LPS. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the Cx3cr1gfp/+Flt3L−/− reporter mouse model represents a powerful tool to visualize monocyte activities in BM and illustrates the potential of a Cx3cr1gfp/+-based, multifunctionality fluorescence reporter approach to dissect monocyte function in vivo. PMID:25516753

  4. Intravital multiphoton tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory disease of human skin. Its pathogenesis is still unknown; however, dysfunctions of the epidermal barrier and the immune response are regarded as key factors for the development of AD. In our study we applied intravital multiphoton tomography (5D-IVT), equipped with a spectral-FLIM module for in-vivo and ex-vivo analysis of human skin affected with AD. In addition to the morphologic skin analysis, FLIM technology gain access to the metabolic status of the epidermal cells referring to the NADH specific fluorescence lifetime. We evaluated a characteristic 5D-IVT skin pattern of AD in comparison to histological sections and detected a correlation with the disease activity measured by SCORAD. FLIM analysis revealed a shift of the mean fluorescence lifetime (taum) of NADH, indicating an altered metabolic activity. Within an ex-vivo approach we have investigated cryo-sections of human skin with or without barrier defects. Spectral-FLIM allows the detection of autofluorescent signals that reflect the pathophysiological conditions of the defect skin barrier. In our study the taum value was shown to be different between healthy and affected skin. Application of the 5D-IVT allows non-invasive in-vivo imaging of human skin with a penetration depth of 150 μm. We could show that affected skin could be distinguished from healthy skin by morphological criteria, by FLIM and by spectral-FLIM. Further studies will evaluate the application of the 5D-IVT technology as a diagnostic tool and to monitor the therapeutic efficacy.

  5. Intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Mikael J; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-11-23

    Until recently, the idea of observing life deep within the tissues of a living mouse, at a resolution sufficient to pick out cellular behaviors and molecular signals underlying them, remained a much-coveted dream. Now, a new era of intravital fluorescence microscopy has dawned. In this Primer, we review the technologies that made this revolution possible and demonstrate how intravital imaging is beginning to provide quantitative and dynamic insights into cell biology, immunology, tumor biology, and neurobiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Recent advances in intravital imaging of dynamic biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has opened a new era in the field of biological imaging. Focal excitation of fluorophores by simultaneous attack of multiple (normally "two") photons generates images with high spatial resolution, and use of near-infrared lasers for multiphoton excitation allows penetration of thicker specimens, enabling biologists to visualize living cellular dynamics deep inside tissues and organs without thin sectioning. Moreover, the minimized photo-bleaching and toxicity associated with multiphoton techniques is beneficial for imaging of live specimens for extended observation periods. Here we focus on recent findings using intravital multiphoton imaging of dynamic biological systems such as the immune system and bone homeostasis. The immune system comprises highly dynamic networks, in which many cell types actively travel throughout the body and interact with each other in specific areas. Therefore, real-time intravital imaging represents a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms underlying this dynamic system.

  7. Intravital multiphoton tomography as an appropriate tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Mess, Christian; Dimitrova, Valentina; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2011-03-01

    Increasing incidence of inflammatory skin diseases such as Atopic Dermatitis (AD) has been noted in the past years. According to recent estimations around 15% of newborn subjects are affected with a disease severity that requires medical treatment. Although its pathogenesis is multifactorial, recent reports indicate that an impaired physical skin barrier predispose for the development of AD. The major part of this barrier is formed by the stratum corneum (SC) wherein corneocytes are embedded in a complex matrix of proteins and lipids. Its components were synthesized in the stratum granulosum (SG) and secreted via lamellar bodies at the SC/SG interface. Within a clinical in vivo study we focused on the skin metabolism at the SC/SG interface in AD affected patients in comparison to healthy subjects. Measurement of fluorescence life-time of NADH provides access to the metabolic state of skin. Due to the application of a 5D intravital tomographic skin analysis we facilitate the non-invasive investigation of human epidermis in the longitudinal course of AD therapy. We could ascertain by blinded analysis of 40 skin areas of 20 patients in a three month follow-up that the metabolic status at the SC/SG interface was altered in AD compromised skin even in non-lesional, apparent healthy skin regions. This illustrates an impaired skin barrier formation even at non-affected skin of AD subjects appearing promotive for the development of acute skin inflammation. Therefore, our findings allow a deeper understanding of the individual disease development and the improved management of the therapeutic intervention in clinical application.

  8. Intravital imaging in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kidokoro, Kengo; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The review aims to provide a brief summary and evaluation of the current state of research that uses multiphoton fluorescence microscopy for intravital kidney imaging. Recent findings Direct visualization of the glomerular filter, proximal and distal tubule segments, and the renal vasculature in the living, intact kidney in zebrafish, mouse, and rat models with high temporal and spatial resolution provided new insights into the function of the normal and diseased kidney. New technical developments in fluorescence excitation and detection, in combination with transgenic animal models for cell function and fate mapping, and serial imaging of the same glomerulus in the same animal over several days further advanced the field of nephrology research, and the understanding of disease mechanisms. Summary Intravital multiphoton imaging has solved many critical technical barriers in kidney research and allowed the dynamic portrayal of the structure and function of various renal cell types in vivo. It has become a widely used research technique, with significant past achievements, and tremendous potential for future development and applications for the study and better understanding of kidney diseases. PMID:27008595

  9. Two-photon microscopy of deep intravital tissues and its merits in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Wang, B-G; König, K; Halbhuber, K-J

    2010-04-01

    Multiphoton excitation laser scanning microscopy, relying on the simultaneous absorption of two or more photons by a molecule, is one of the most exciting recent developments in biomedical imaging. Thanks to its superior imaging capability of deeper tissue penetration and efficient light detection, this system becomes more and more an inspiring tool for intravital bulk tissue imaging. Two-photon excitation microscopy including 2-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generated signal microscopy is the most common multiphoton microscopic application. In the present review we take diverse ocular tissues as intravital samples to demonstrate the advantages of this approach. Experiments with registration of intracellular 2-photon fluorescence and extracellular collagen second harmonic generated signal microscopy in native ocular tissues are focused. Data show that the in-tandem combination of 2-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generated signal microscopy as two-modality microscopy allows for in situ co-localization imaging of various microstructural components in the whole-mount deep intravital tissues. New applications and recent developments of this high technology in clinical studies such as 2-photon-controlled drug release, in vivo drug screening and administration in skin and kidney, as well as its uses in tumourous tissues such as melanoma and glioma, in diseased lung, brain and heart are additionally reviewed. Intrinsic emission two-modal 2-photon microscopy/tomography, acting as an efficient and sensitive non-injurious imaging approach featured by high contrast and subcellular spatial resolution, has been proved to be a promising tool for intravital deep tissue imaging and clinical studies. Given the level of its performance, we believe that the non-linear optical imaging technique has tremendous potentials to find more applications in biomedical fundamental and clinical research in the near future.

  10. Early development of cutaneous cancer revealed by intravital nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Chou; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Shean-Jen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-09-01

    We performed intravital multiphoton microscopy to image and analyze normal and carcinogen treated skin tissues of nude mice in vivo. Using intravital images and the quantitative pixel to pixel ratiometric processing of multiphoton autofluorescence to second harmonic generation index (MAFSI), we can visualize the interaction between epithelial cells and extracellular matrix. We found that as the imaging depth increases, MAFSI has different distribution in normal and treated cutaneous specimens. Since the treated skin eventually became squamous cell carcinoma, our results show that the physiological changes to mouse skin en route to become cancer can be effectively tracked by multiphoton microscopy.

  11. High speed multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxiao; Brustle, Anne; Gautam, Vini; Cockburn, Ian; Gillespie, Cathy; Gaus, Katharina; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a powerful technique to visualize cellular processes in-vivo. Real time processes revealed through live imaging provided many opportunities to capture cellular activities in living animals. The typical parameters that determine the performance of multiphoton microscopy are speed, field of view, 3D imaging and imaging depth; many of these are important to achieving data from in-vivo. Here, we provide a full exposition of the flexible polygon mirror based high speed laser scanning multiphoton imaging system, PCI-6110 card (National Instruments) and high speed analog frame grabber card (Matrox Solios eA/XA), which allows for rapid adjustments between frame rates i.e. 5 Hz to 50 Hz with 512 × 512 pixels. Furthermore, a motion correction algorithm is also used to mitigate motion artifacts. A customized control software called Pscan 1.0 is developed for the system. This is then followed by calibration of the imaging performance of the system and a series of quantitative in-vitro and in-vivo imaging in neuronal tissues and mice.

  12. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C.; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L.; Padera, Timothy P.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates—only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  13. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Boscá, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-François; Bolze, Frédéric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature. PMID:26793221

  14. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging.

    PubMed

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Boscá, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-François; Bolze, Frédéric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature.

  15. IMART software for correction of motion artifacts in images collected in intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kenneth W; Lorenz, Kevin S; Salama, Paul; Delp, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is a uniquely powerful tool, providing the ability to characterize cell and organ physiology in the natural context of the intact, living animal. With the recent development of high-resolution microscopy techniques such as confocal and multiphoton microscopy, intravital microscopy can now characterize structures at subcellular resolution and capture events at sub-second temporal resolution. However, realizing the potential for high resolution requires remarkable stability in the tissue. Whereas the rigid structure of the skull facilitates high-resolution imaging of the brain, organs of the viscera are free to move with respiration and heartbeat, requiring additional apparatus for immobilization. In our experience, these methods are variably effective, so that many studies are compromised by residual motion artifacts. Here we demonstrate the use of IMART, a software tool for removing motion artifacts from intravital microscopy images collected in time series or in three dimensions. PMID:26090271

  16. Highly Resolved Intravital Striped-illumination Microscopy of Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Volker; Sporbert, Anje

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring cellular communication by intravital deep-tissue multi-photon microscopy is the key for understanding the fate of immune cells within thick tissue samples and organs in health and disease. By controlling the scanning pattern in multi-photon microscopy and applying appropriate numerical algorithms, we developed a striped-illumination approach, which enabled us to achieve 3-fold better axial resolution and improved signal-to-noise ratio, i.e. contrast, in more than 100 µm tissue depth within highly scattering tissue of lymphoid organs as compared to standard multi-photon microscopy. The acquisition speed as well as photobleaching and photodamage effects were similar to standard photo-multiplier-based technique, whereas the imaging depth was slightly lower due to the use of field detectors. By using the striped-illumination approach, we are able to observe the dynamics of immune complex deposits on secondary follicular dendritic cells – on the level of a few protein molecules in germinal centers. PMID:24748007

  17. Time-lapsed, large-volume, high-resolution intravital imaging for tissue-wide analysis of single cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Entenberg, David; Pastoriza, Jessica M; Oktay, Maja H; Voiculescu, Sonia; Wang, Yarong; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Condeelis, John

    2017-09-01

    Pathologists rely on microscopy to diagnose disease states in tissues and organs. They utilize both high-resolution, high-magnification images to interpret the staining and morphology of individual cells, as well as low-magnification overviews to give context and location to these cells. Intravital imaging is a powerful technique for studying cells and tissues in their native, live environment and can yield sub-cellular resolution images similar to those used by pathologists. However, technical limitations prevent the straightforward acquisition of low-magnification images during intravital imaging, and they are hence not typically captured. The serial acquisition, mosaicking, and stitching together of many high-resolution, high-magnification fields of view is a technique that overcomes these limitations in fixed and ex vivo tissues. The technique however, has not to date been widely applied to intravital imaging as movements caused by the living animal induce image distortions that are difficult to compensate for computationally. To address this, we have developed techniques for the stabilization of numerous tissues, including extremely compliant tissues, that have traditionally been extremely difficult to image. We present a novel combination of these stabilization techniques with mosaicked and stitched intravital imaging, resulting in a process we call Large-Volume High-Resolution Intravital Imaging (LVHR-IVI). The techniques we present are validated and make large volume intravital imaging accessible to any lab with a multiphoton microscope. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intravital imaging of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Hato, Takashi; Winfree, Seth; Dagher, Pierre C

    2017-04-11

    Two-photon intravital microscopy is a powerful tool that allows the examination of dynamic cellular processes in the live animal with unprecedented resolution. Indeed, it offers the ability to address unique biological questions that may not be solved by other means. While two-photon intravital microscopy has been successfully applied to study many organs, the kidney presents its own unique challenges that need to be overcome in order to optimize and validate imaging data. For kidney imaging, the complexity of renal architecture and salient autofluorescence merit special considerations as these elements directly impact image acquisition and data interpretation. Here, using illustrative cases, we provide practical guides and discuss issues that may arise during two-photon live imaging of the rodent kidney.

  19. Improved intravital microscopy via synchronization of respiration and holder stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungon; Vinegoni, Claudio; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-09-01

    A major challenge in high-resolution intravital confocal and multiphoton microscopy is physiologic tissue movement during image acquisition. Of the various physiological sources of movement, respiration has arguably the largest and most wide-ranging effect. We describe a technique for achieving stabilized microscopy imaging using a dual strategy. First, we designed a mechanical stabilizer for constraining physical motion; this served to simultaneously increase the in-focus range over which data can be acquired as well as increase the reproducibility of imaging a certain position within each confocal imaging plane. Second, by implementing a retrospective breathing-gated imaging modality, we performed selective image extraction gated to a particular phase of the respiratory cycle. Thanks to the high reproducibility in position, all gated images presented a high degree of correlation over time. The images obtained using this technique not only showed significant improvements over images acquired without the stabilizer, but also demonstrated accurate in vivo imaging during longitudinal studies. The described methodology is easy to implement with any commercial imaging system, as are used by most biological imaging laboratories, and can be used for both confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy.

  20. Intravital Microscopic Methods to Evaluate Anti-inflammatory Effects and Signaling Mechanisms Evoked by Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, Mozow Y.; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule with potent anti-inflammatory properties. Exogenous application of H2S donors, administered either acutely during an inflammatory response or as an antecedent preconditioning intervention that invokes the activation of anti-inflammatory cell survival programs, effectively limits leukocyte rolling, adhesion and emigration, generation of reactive oxygen species, chemokine and cell adhesion molecule expression, endothelial barrier disruption,capillary perfusion deficits, and parenchymal cell dysfunction and injury. This chapter focuses on intravital microscopic methods that can be used to assess the anti-inflammatory effects exerted by H2S, as well as to explore the cellular signaling mechanisms by which this gaseous molecule limits the aforementioned inflammatory responses. Recent advances include use of intravital multiphoton microscopy and optical biosensor technology to explore signaling mechanisms in vivo. PMID:25747477

  1. Automated motion artifact removal for intravital microscopy, without a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungon; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matthew; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy, through extended penetration depth and imaging resolution, provides the ability to image at cellular and subcellular resolution in live animals, presenting an opportunity for new insights into in vivo biology. Unfortunately, physiological induced motion components due to respiration and cardiac activity are major sources of image artifacts and impose severe limitations on the effective imaging resolution that can be ultimately achieved in vivo. Here we present a novel imaging methodology capable of automatically removing motion artifacts during intravital microscopy imaging of organs and orthotopic tumors. The method is universally applicable to different laser scanning modalities including confocal and multiphoton microscopy, and offers artifact free reconstructions independent of the physiological motion source and imaged organ. The methodology, which is based on raw data acquisition followed by image processing, is here demonstrated for both cardiac and respiratory motion compensation in mice heart, kidney, liver, pancreas and dorsal window chamber.

  2. [Frontiers in Live Bone Imaging Researches. Intravital imaging of osteoclast dynamics].

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2015-06-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing giant polykaryons that differentiate from mononuclear macrophage/monocyte-lineage hematopoietic precursors. Upon the stimulation of essential factors such as M-CSF and RANKL, osteoclast precursor monocytes attach to the bone surface ( "migration" ), fuse with each other to form giant cells ( "differentiation" ) and mediate bone resorption ( "function" ). To reveal the regulatory mechanism of these three dynamic steps of osteoclastic activity, we have originally established an advanced imaging system for visualizing living bone tissues with intravital multiphoton microscopy. By means of the system, we have recently succeeded in visualization of osteoclast migration, differentiation, and function in living bone tissues in vivo. In this review we summarize the latest data of intravital imaging of osteoclast dynamics, and discuss novel lines of osteoclast-targeted therapies that will impact future treatment of bone destructive diseases.

  3. Live-Animal Imaging of Renal Function by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kenneth W.; Sutton, Timothy A.; Sandoval, Ruben M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy, microscopy of living animals, is a powerful research technique that combines the resolution and sensitivity found in microscopic studies of cultured cells with the relevance and systemic influences of cells in the context of the intact animal. The power of intravital microscopy has recently been extended with the development of multiphoton fluorescence microscopy systems capable of collecting optical sections from deep within the kidney at subcellular resolution, supporting high-resolution characterizations of the structure and function of glomeruli, tubules, and vasculature in the living kidney. Fluorescent probes are administered to an anesthetized, surgically prepared animal, followed by image acquisition for up to 3 hr. Images are transferred via a high-speed network to specialized computer systems for digital image analysis. This general approach can be used with different combinations of fluorescent probes to evaluate processes such as glomerular permeability, proximal tubule endocytosis, microvascular flow, vascular permeability, mitochondrial function, and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. PMID:23042524

  4. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  5. Intravital microscopy in historic and contemporary immunology.

    PubMed

    Secklehner, Judith; Lo Celso, Cristina; Carlin, Leo M

    2017-07-01

    In this review, we discuss intravital microscopy of immune cells, starting from its historic origins to current applications in diverse organs. It is clear from a quantitative review of the literature that intravital microscopy is a key tool in both historic and contemporary immunological research, providing unique advances in our understanding of immune responses. We have chosen to focus this review on how intravital microscopy methodologies are used to image specific organs or systems and we present recent descriptions of fundamental immunological processes that could not have been achieved by other methods. The following target organs/systems are discussed in more detail: cremaster muscle, skin (ear and dorsal skin fold chamber), lymph node, liver, lung, mesenteric vessels, carotid artery, bone marrow, brain, spleen, foetus and lastly vessels of the knee joint.

  6. Intravital imaging of metastasis in adult Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, David C; Hynes, Richard O

    2017-09-25

    Metastasis is a major clinical problem whose biology is not yet fully understood. This lack of understanding is especially true for the events at the metastatic site, which include arrest, extravasation, and growth into macrometastases. Intravital imaging is a powerful technique that has shown great promise in increasing our understanding of these events. To date, most intravital imaging studies have been performed in mice, which has limited its adoption. Zebrafish are also a common system for the intravital imaging of metastasis. However, as imaging in embryos is technically simpler, relatively few studies have used adult zebrafish to study metastasis and none have followed individual cells at the metastatic site over time. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that adult casper zebrafish offer a convenient model system for performing intravital imaging of the metastatic site over time with single-cell resolution. ZMEL1 zebrafish melanoma cells were injected into 6 to 10-week-old casper fish using an intravenous injection protocol. Because casper fish are transparent even as adults, they could be imaged without surgical intervention. Individual cells were followed over the course of 2 weeks as they arrested, extravasated, and formed macroscopic metastases. Our injection method reliably delivered cells into circulation and led to the formation of tumors in multiple organs. Cells in the skin and sub-dermal muscle could be imaged at high resolution over 2 weeks using confocal microscopy. Arrest was visualized and determined to be primarily due to size restriction. Following arrest, extravasation was seen to occur between 1 and 6 days post-injection. Once outside of the vasculature, cells were observed migrating as well as forming protrusions. Casper fish are a useful model for studying the events at the metastatic site using intravital imaging. The protocols described in this study are relatively simple. Combined with the reasonably low cost of zebrafish, they

  7. Principles of multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kenneth W; Young, Pamela A

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy is a powerful, important tool in biomedical research that offers low photon toxicity and higher spatial and temporal resolution than other in vivo imaging modalities. The capability to collect images hundreds of micrometers into biological tissues provides an invaluable tool for studying cellular and subcellular processes in the context of tissues and organs in living animals. Multiphoton microscopy is based upon two-photon excitation of fluorescence that occurs only in a sub-femtoliter volume at the focus; by scanning the focus through a sample, 2- and 3-dimensional images can be collected. The complex 3-dimensional organization of the kidney makes it especially appropriate for multiphoton microscopic analysis, which has been used to characterize numerous aspects of renal physiology and pathophysiology in living rats and mice. However, the ability to collect fluorescence images deep into biological tissues raises unique problems not encountered in other forms of optical microscopy, including issues of probe access, and tissue optics. Future improvements in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy will involve optimizing objectives for the unique characteristics of multiphoton fluorescence imaging, improving the speed at which images may be collected and extending the depth to which imaging may be conducted. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe−/−Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages “dancing on the spot” and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells. PMID:25710308

  9. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  10. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  11. Correlative intravital imaging of cGMP signals and vasodilation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thunemann, Martin; Schmidt, Kjestine; de Wit, Cor; Han, Xiaoxing; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling molecule and drug target in the cardiovascular system. It is well known that stimulation of the vascular nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway results in vasodilation. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP signals themselves and the cGMP concentrations within specific cardiovascular cell types in health, disease, and during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs are largely unknown. To facilitate the analysis of cGMP signaling in vivo, we have generated transgenic mice that express fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP sensor proteins. Here, we describe two models of intravital FRET/cGMP imaging in the vasculature of cGMP sensor mice: (1) epifluorescence-based ratio imaging in resistance-type vessels of the cremaster muscle and (2) ratio imaging by multiphoton microscopy within the walls of subcutaneous blood vessels accessed through a dorsal skinfold chamber. Both methods allow simultaneous monitoring of NO-induced cGMP transients and vasodilation in living mice. Detailed protocols of all steps necessary to perform and evaluate intravital imaging experiments of the vasculature of anesthetized mice including surgery, imaging, and data evaluation are provided. An image segmentation approach is described to estimate FRET/cGMP changes within moving structures such as the vessel wall during vasodilation. The methods presented herein should be useful to visualize cGMP or other biochemical signals that are detectable with FRET-based biosensors, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate or Ca2+, and to correlate them with respective vascular responses. With further refinement and combination of transgenic mouse models and intravital imaging technologies, we envision an exciting future, in which we are able to “watch” biochemistry, (patho-)physiology, and pharmacotherapy in the context of a living mammalian organism. PMID:25352809

  12. Understanding liver immunology using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro Elias; Oliveira, André Gustavo; Chang, Lynne; Paula-Neto, Heitor Affonso; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-09-01

    The liver has come a long way since it was considered only a metabolic organ attached to the gastrointestinal tract. The simultaneous ascension of immunology and intravital microscopy evidenced the liver as a central axis in the immune system, controlling immune responses to local and systemic agents as well as disease tolerance. The multiple hepatic cell populations are organized in a vascular environment that promotes intimate cellular interactions, including initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses, rapid leukocyte recruitment, pathogen clearance and production of a variety of immune mediators. In this review, we focus on the advances in liver immunology supported by intravital microscopy in diseases such as isquemia/reperfusion, acute liver injury and infections.

  13. Fluorescein Derivatives in Intravital Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Thomas A.; Bunel, Florestan; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy enables the direct imaging of fluorophores in vivo and advanced techniques such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) enable the simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores. Consequently, it is now possible to record distribution and metabolism of a chemical in vivo and to optimise the delivery of fluorophores in vivo. Recent clinical applications with fluorescein and other intravital fluorescent stains have occurred in neurosurgery, dermatology [including photodynamic therapy (PDT)] and endomicroscopy. Potential uses have been identified in periodontal disease, skin graft and cancer surgery. Animal studies have demonstrated that diseased tissue can be specifically stained with fluorophore conjugates. This review focuses on the fluorescein derived fluorophores in common clinical use and provides examples of novel applications from studies in tissue samples. PMID:24709799

  14. Visualizing the podocyte with multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Charbel C.; Khayat, Mark F.; Yeo, Tet-Kin; Pyagay, Petr E.; Wang, Amy; Asuncion, Allan M.; Sharma, Kumar; Yu, Weiming; Chen, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    The podocyte is a highly specialized kidney glomerular epithelial cell that plays an essential role in glomerular filtration and is believed to be the target of numerous glomerular diseases leading to proteinuria. Despite the leaps in our understanding of podocyte biology, new methodologies are needed to facilitate research into the cell. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to image the nephrin knockout/green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in heterozygote (Nphs1tm1Rkl/J) mouse. The nephrin promoter restricts GFP expression to the podocytes that fluoresce green under excitation. From the exterior of an intact kidney, MPM can peer into the renal parenchyma and visualize the podocytes that outline the globular shape of the glomeruli. Details as fine as the podocyte’s secondary processes can be resolved. In contrast, podocytes exhibit no fluorescence in the wildtype mouse and are invisible to MPM. Phenotypically, there are no significant differences between wildtype and Nphs1tm1Rkl/J mice in body weight, urinary albumin excretion, creatinine clearance, or glomerular depth. Interestingly, the glomeruli are closer to the kidney capsule in female mice, making the gender the preferred choice for MPM. For the first time, green fluorescent podocytes in a mouse model free of confounding phenotypes can be visualized unequivocally and in the “positive” by MPM, facilitating intravital studies of the podocyte. PMID:23022193

  15. Unified approach to multiphoton coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanta, P.; Chaturvedi, S.; Srinivasan, V.; Agarwal, G. S.; Mehta, C. L.

    1994-03-01

    We obtain a large class of multiphoton annihilation operator (F) eigenstates by constructing an operator G° such that [F,G°]=1. We show that almost all known coherent states, including the squeezed states and other nonclassical states such as the cat and the kitten states follow from our approach. Further, we show that all of them can be expressed as an exponential operator acting on the vacuum of the operator F. The technique can be easily generalized to deformed bosons.

  16. In vivo multiphoton imaging of bile duct ligation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Feng-Chieh; Chen, Hsiao-Chin; Chang, Po-shou; Yang, Shu-Mei; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Bile is the exocrine secretion of liver and synthesized by hepatocytes. It is drained into duodenum for the function of digestion or drained into gallbladder for of storage. Bile duct obstruction is a blockage in the tubes that carry bile to the gallbladder and small intestine. However, Bile duct ligation results in the changes of bile acids in serum, liver, urine, and feces1, 2. In this work, we demonstrate a novel technique to image this pathological condition by using a newly developed in vivo imaging system, which includes multiphoton microscopy and intravital hepatic imaging chamber. The images we acquired demonstrate the uptake, processing of 6-CFDA in hepatocytes and excretion of CF in the bile canaliculi. In addition to imaging, we can also measure kinetics of the green fluorescence intensity.

  17. Substrate-Free Self-Assembled SiOx-Core Nanodots from Alkylalkoxysilane as a Multicolor Photoluminescence Source for Intravital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Kung, Mei-Lang; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2013-01-01

    Intravital fluorescence imaging has great potential in biological and biomedical research, as it provides the ability to directly observe biological structures and processes in their natural state. Contrast agents for intravital imaging applications should exhibit good biocompatibility, multiphoton fluorescence, and long emission. Carbon nanodots and semiconductor nanocrystals meet these requirements in most cases, with the added benefit that their properties can be ‘tuned' for specific applications by controlling the size and surface chemistry of the nanoparticles. Here, we report on a simple heat-assisted strategy to fabricate SiOx-core self-assembled nanodots using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) materials. Our results demonstrate that substrate-free self-assembled nanodots from alkylalkoxysilane exhibit controllable structural and chemical characteristics that are well suited for applications in biological, biomedical, and clinical research, and may find further use in optoelectronic and sensor devices. PMID:23609156

  18. Intravital imaging of dendritic spine plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sau Wan Lai, Cora

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic part of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Recent works have suggested that the structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines have been associated with information coding and memories. Advances in imaging and labeling techniques enable the study of dendritic spine dynamics in vivo. This perspective focuses on intravital imaging studies of dendritic spine plasticity in the neocortex. I will introduce imaging tools for studying spine dynamics and will further review current findings on spine structure and function under various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:28243511

  19. Clinical multiphoton FLIM tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    This paper gives an overview on current clinical high resolution multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging in volunteers and patients. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in Life Sciences was introduced in Jena/Germany in 1988/89 based on a ZEISS confocal picosecond dye laser scanning microscope equipped with a single photon counting unit. The porphyrin distribution in living cells and living tumor-bearing mice was studied with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. Ten years later, time-gated cameras were employed to detect dental caries in volunteers based on one-photon excitation of autofluorescent bacteria with long fluorescence lifetimes. Nowadays, one-photon FLIM based on picosecond VIS laser diodes are used to study ocular diseases in humans. Already one decade ago, first clinical twophoton FLIM images in humans were taken with the certified clinical multiphoton femtosecond laser tomograph DermaInspectTM. Multiphoton tomographs with FLIM modules are now operating in hospitals at Brisbane, Tokyo, Berlin, Paris, London, Modena and other European cities. Multiple FLIM detectors allow spectral FLIM with a temporal resolution down to 20 ps (MCP) / 250 ps (PMT) and a spectral resolution of 10 nm. Major FLIM applications include the detection of intradermal sunscreen and tattoo nanoparticles, the detection of different melanin types, the early diagnosis of dermatitis and malignant melanoma, as well as the measurement of therapeutic effects in pateints suffering from dermatitis. So far, more than 1,000 patients and volunteers have been investigated with the clinical multiphoton FLIM tomographs DermaInspectTM and MPTflexTM.

  20. Multiphoton Assisted Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, E. S.; Jones, R. R.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    We have observed multiphoton assisted recombination in the presence of a 38.8 GHz microwave field. Stimulated emission of up to ten microwave photons results in energy transfer from continuum electrons, enabling recombination. The maximum electron energy loss is far greater than the 2Up predicted by the standard “simpleman’s” model. The data are well reproduced by both an approximate analytic expression and numerical simulations in which the combined Coulomb and radiation fields are taken into account.

  1. Methodological advances in imaging intravital axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, James N; Vagnoni, Alessio; Twelvetrees, Alison E; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2017-01-01

    Axonal transport is the active process whereby neurons transport cargoes such as organelles and proteins anterogradely from the cell body to the axon terminal and retrogradely in the opposite direction. Bi-directional transport in axons is absolutely essential for the functioning and survival of neurons and appears to be negatively impacted by both aging and diseases of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The movement of individual cargoes along axons has been studied in vitro in live neurons and tissue explants for a number of years; however, it is currently unclear as to whether these systems faithfully and consistently replicate the in vivo situation. A number of intravital techniques originally developed for studying diverse biological events have recently been adapted to monitor axonal transport in real-time in a range of live organisms and are providing novel insight into this dynamic process. Here, we highlight these methodological advances in intravital imaging of axonal transport, outlining key strengths and limitations while discussing findings, possible improvements, and outstanding questions.

  2. Methodological advances in imaging intravital axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Sleigh, James N.; Vagnoni, Alessio; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2017-01-01

    Axonal transport is the active process whereby neurons transport cargoes such as organelles and proteins anterogradely from the cell body to the axon terminal and retrogradely in the opposite direction. Bi-directional transport in axons is absolutely essential for the functioning and survival of neurons and appears to be negatively impacted by both aging and diseases of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The movement of individual cargoes along axons has been studied in vitro in live neurons and tissue explants for a number of years; however, it is currently unclear as to whether these systems faithfully and consistently replicate the in vivo situation. A number of intravital techniques originally developed for studying diverse biological events have recently been adapted to monitor axonal transport in real-time in a range of live organisms and are providing novel insight into this dynamic process. Here, we highlight these methodological advances in intravital imaging of axonal transport, outlining key strengths and limitations while discussing findings, possible improvements, and outstanding questions. PMID:28344778

  3. Time-Saving Benefits of Intravital Staining.

    PubMed

    Macgillivray, Catherine; Sylvan, Jeremy; Lee, Richard T; Huang, Hayden

    2008-09-01

    One of the challenges in labeling tissues for fluorescence microscopy is minimizing sample processing while maintaining or improving the information generated by the fluorescent label. Generally, tissues are extracted, fixed, and embedded in mounting media (such as paraffin), sectioned, and then postprocessed by removing the paraffin, blocking, labeling, and washing. Despite all of these steps, the consistency of labeling quality can vary as a result of several factors, including heterogeneity in labeling efficiency from slide to slide, the necessity of postprocessing to obtain information on sequential sections of tissue, interference from the mounting media, and loss of native three-dimensional structural information, especially in thicker sections. A method for embedding and processing tissues that have been labeled by intravital staining is described in this study. Intravital staining is the process in which live-cell dyes and other labels are injected into the bloodstream before fixation of the tissues. Tissues processed this way can be imaged upon sectioning without further staining and retain their native, three-dimensional information, thereby improving the information retained by the labels and speeding up sample processing.

  4. Intravital Microscopic Interrogation of Peripheral Taste Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Myunghwan; Lee, Woei Ming; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience but has not been adapted to the taste sensory organ due to anatomical constraint. Here we developed an imaging window to facilitate microscopic access to the murine tongue in vivo. Real-time two-photon microscopy allowed the visualization of three-dimensional microanatomy of the intact tongue mucosa and functional activity of taste cells in response to topically administered tastants in live mice. Video microscopy also showed the calcium activity of taste cells elicited by small-sized tastants in the blood circulation. Molecular kinetic analysis suggested that intravascular taste sensation takes place at the microvilli on the apical side of taste cells after diffusion of the molecules through the pericellular capillaries and tight junctions in the taste bud. Our results demonstrate the capabilities and utilities of the new tool for taste research in vivo. PMID:25726964

  5. Intravital Microscopic Interrogation of Peripheral Taste Sensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Lee, Woei Ming; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-03-01

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience but has not been adapted to the taste sensory organ due to anatomical constraint. Here we developed an imaging window to facilitate microscopic access to the murine tongue in vivo. Real-time two-photon microscopy allowed the visualization of three-dimensional microanatomy of the intact tongue mucosa and functional activity of taste cells in response to topically administered tastants in live mice. Video microscopy also showed the calcium activity of taste cells elicited by small-sized tastants in the blood circulation. Molecular kinetic analysis suggested that intravascular taste sensation takes place at the microvilli on the apical side of taste cells after diffusion of the molecules through the pericellular capillaries and tight junctions in the taste bud. Our results demonstrate the capabilities and utilities of the new tool for taste research in vivo.

  6. Intravital microscopic interrogation of peripheral taste sensation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myunghwan; Lee, Woei Ming; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-03-02

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience but has not been adapted to the taste sensory organ due to anatomical constraint. Here we developed an imaging window to facilitate microscopic access to the murine tongue in vivo. Real-time two-photon microscopy allowed the visualization of three-dimensional microanatomy of the intact tongue mucosa and functional activity of taste cells in response to topically administered tastants in live mice. Video microscopy also showed the calcium activity of taste cells elicited by small-sized tastants in the blood circulation. Molecular kinetic analysis suggested that intravascular taste sensation takes place at the microvilli on the apical side of taste cells after diffusion of the molecules through the pericellular capillaries and tight junctions in the taste bud. Our results demonstrate the capabilities and utilities of the new tool for taste research in vivo.

  7. Intravital microscopy: new insights into cellular interactions.

    PubMed

    Gavins, Felicity N E

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation is the body's way of combating invading pathogens or noxious stimuli. Under normal conditions, the complex host response of rubor, dolor, calor, tumor, and functio laesa is essential for survival and the return to homeostasis. However, unregulated inflammation is all too often observed in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, stroke, and cancer. The host inflammatory response is governed by a number of tightly regulated processes that enable cellular trafficking to occur at the sites of damage to ultimately ensure the resolution of inflammation. Intravital microscopy (IVM) provides quantitative, qualitative, and dynamic insights into cell biology and these cellular interactions. This review highlights the pros and cons of this specialized technique and how it has evolved to help understand the physiology and pathophysiology of inflammatory events in a number of different disease states, leading to a number of potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 5D-intravital tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in-vivo analysis of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans G.; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Stracke, Frank; Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Some years ago, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have been launched. These tomographs provide optical biopsies with submicron resolution based on two-photon excited autofluorescence (NAD(P)H, flavoproteins, keratin, elastin, melanin, porphyrins) and second harmonic generation by collagen. The 3D tomograph was now transferred into a 5D imaging system by the additional detection of the emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime based on spatially and spectrally resolved time-resolved single photon counting. The novel 5D intravital tomograph (5D-IVT) was employed for the early detection of atopic dermatitis and the analysis of treatment effects.

  9. Transverse correlations in multiphoton entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jianming; Rubin, Morton H.; Shih, Yanhua

    2007-10-01

    We have analyzed the transverse correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N -photon state. The Klyshko’s two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N -photon case.

  10. Transverse correlations in multiphoton entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Jianming; Rubin, Morton H.; Shih Yanhua

    2007-10-15

    We have analyzed the transverse correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N-photon state. The Klyshko's two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N-photon case.

  11. Multiphoton ionization of Uracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Eladio; Martinez, Denhi; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization and dissociation of Uracil using a Reflectron time of flight spectrometer was performed along with radiation from the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. Uracil is one of the four nitrogen bases that belong to RNA. The last years special interest has been concentrated on the study of the effects under UV radiation in nucleic acids1 and also in the role that this molecule could have played in the origin and development of life on our planet.2 The MPI mass spectra show that the presence and intensity of the resulting ions strongly depend on the density power. The identification of the ions in the mass spectra is presented. The results are compared with those obtained in other laboratories under different experimental conditions and some of them show partial agreement.3 The present work was supported by CONACYT-Mexico Grant 165410 and DGAPA UNAM Grant IN101215 and IN102613.

  12. Intravital Microscopy for THz-Bio Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilhan

    Intravital microscopy is a high-resolution imaging technique to observe biological phenomena in living organisms. It often also stated as in vivo microscopy. Literal meaning of in vivo is "within the living" and there is another term, ex vivo of which literal meaning is "out of the living". Both terms are commonly used to describe the status of sample at the moment of biological manipulations or investigations are done. In vivo study is a form of research using whole living organism in experiment to investigate a certain biological phenomenon in its natural environment, whereas ex vivo study uses non-living subjects such as tissues or organs dissected from dead animal. In addition, in vitro of which literal meaning is "within the glass" is another commonly used term. In vitro study is a form of research using small living subject such as cell in a controlled environment such as petri dish or test tube. Cell culture, the process of growing cells in a petri dish, is the most common form of in vitro study. Figure 1 summarizes the status of samples for biological study categorized by in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo.

  13. Just Look! Intravital Microscopy as the Best Means to Study Kidney Cell Death Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Hammer, Anna; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2016-05-01

    Kidney cell death plays a key role in the progression of life-threatening renal diseases, such as acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. Injured and dying epithelial and endothelial cells take part in complex communication with the innate immune system, which drives the progression of cell death and the decrease in renal function. To improve our understanding of kidney cell death dynamics and its impact on renal disease, a study approach is needed that facilitates the visualization of renal function and morphology in real time. Intravital multiphoton microscopy of the kidney has been used for more than a decade and made substantial contributions to our understanding of kidney physiology and pathophysiology. It is a unique tool that relates renal structure and function in a time- and spatial-dependent manner. Basic renal function, such as microvascular blood flow regulation and glomerular filtration, can be determined in real time and homeostatic alterations, which are linked inevitably to cell death and can be depicted down to the subcellular level. This review provides an overview of the available techniques to study kidney dysfunction and inflammation in terms of cell death in vivo, and addresses how this novel approach can be used to improve our understanding of cell death dynamics in renal disease.

  14. Real-time intravital microscopy of individual nanoparticle dynamics in liver and tumors of live mice

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Anne L; Kim, Pilhan; Ferrari, Mauro; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is emerging as an important experimental tool for the research and development of multi-functional therapeutic nanoconstructs. The direct visualization of nanoparticle dynamics within live animals provides invaluable insights into the mechanisms that regulate nanotherapeutics transport and cell-particle interactions. Here we present a protocol to image the dynamics of nanoparticles within the liver and tumors of live mice immediately following systemic injection using a high-speed (30-400 fps) confocal or multi-photon laser-scanning fluorescence microscope. Techniques for quantifying the real-time accumulation and cellular association of individual particles with a size ranging from several tens of nanometers to micrometers are described, as well as an experimental strategy for labeling Kupffer cells in the liver in vivo. Experimental design considerations and controls are provided, as well as minimum equipment requirements. The entire protocol takes approximately 4-8 hours and yields quantitative information. These techniques can serve to study a wide range of kinetic parameters that drive nanotherapeutics delivery, uptake, and treatment response. PMID:25383179

  15. A cerebellar window for intravital imaging of normal and disease states in mice.

    PubMed

    Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Badeaux, Mark; Roberge, Sylvie; Batista, Ana; Kirkpatrick, Ned; Snuderl, Matija; Amoozgar, Zohreh; Seano, Giorgio; Ferraro, Gino B; Chatterjee, Sampurna; Xu, Lei; Fukumura, Dai; Duda, Dan G; Jain, Rakesh K

    2017-11-01

    The cerebellum is a prominent part of the vertebrate hindbrain that is critically involved in the regulation of important body functions such as movement coordination, maintenance of balance and posture, and motor control. Here, we describe a cerebellar window that provides access to the mouse cerebellum for intravital imaging, thereby allowing for a detailed characterization of the dynamic processes in this region of the brain. First, the skull overlying the cerebellum is removed, and then the window is applied to the region of interest. Windows may be exchanged depending on the desired imaging modality. This technique has a variety of applications. In the setting of medulloblastoma, spontaneous or orthotopically implanted lesions can be imaged, and tumor morphology and size can be monitored using ultrasonography. Multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPLSM) or optical-frequency-domain imaging (OFDI) can be applied for in vivo visualization and analysis of cellular and vascular structures in a variety of disease states, including malignancies and ataxia telangiectasia. This protocol describes a novel and rapid method for cerebellar window construction that can be set up in under an hour.

  16. Multiphoton tomography of astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Pietruszka, Anna; Bückle, Rainer; Gerlach, Nicole; Heinrich, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    Weightlessness may impair the astronaut's health conditions. Skin impairments belong to the most frequent health problems during space missions. Within the Skin B project, skin physiological changes during long duration space flights are currently investigated on three European astronauts that work for nearly half a year at the ISS. Measurements on the hydration, the transepidermal water loss, the surface structure, elasticity and the tissue density by ultrasound are conducted. Furthermore, high-resolution in vivo histology is performed by multiphoton tomography with 300 nm spatial and 200 ps temporal resolution. The mobile certified medical tomograph with a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm is employed to measure two-photon autofluorescence and SHG in the volar forearm of the astronauts. Modification of the tissue architecture and of the fluorescent biomolecules NAD(P)H, keratin, melanin and elastin are detected as well as of SHG-active collagen. Thinning of the vital epidermis, a decrease of the autofluoresence intensity, an increase in the long fluorescence lifetime, and a reduced skin ageing index SAAID based on an increased collagen level in the upper dermis have been found. Current studies focus on recovery effects.

  17. Multiphoton Effects in Rutile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royce, Gerald A.

    Multiphoton effects are investigated in crystalline rutile TiO(,2) using Nd:YAG laser photons. The 1.06 micron laser is operated in Q-switched mode with intensities up to 1.4 x 10('6) watts/cm('2) on the rutile crystal. Photoconductivity measurements provide data indicating a mixture of modes for electrons to be photoionized. Assuming aluminum impurity as the contributing sites, the first order photionization cross section is found to be 1.5 x 10('-26) cm('2) and second order cross section is found to be 7.7 x 10('-51) cm('4)-s. No appreciable change in cross section is observed for circular versus linear polarization of the laser. Observations of the photo-emission of the laser illuminated crystal provide radiative relaxation times on the order of 100 nanoseconds with emission peaks at 4500 and 5000 angstroms plus a near infrared continuum out to 1 micron. The thermoluminescence of rutile shows a number of trapping levels between 0.4 and 0.8 eV below the conduction band. These are attributed to an aluminum impurity.

  18. Quantitative multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada

    2014-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs for label-free multidimensional high-resolution in vivo imaging have been introduced to the market several years ago. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechanooptical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as a CARS module. Non-fluorescent lipids and water, mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged in vivo with submicron resolution in human skin. Sensitive and rapid detectors allow single photon counting and the construction of 3D maps where the number of detected photons per voxel is depicted. Intratissue concentration profiles from endogenous as well exogenous substances can be generated when the number of detected photons can be correlated with the number of molecules with respect to binding and scattering behavior. Furthermore, the skin ageing index SAAID based on the ratio elastin/collagen as well as the epidermis depth based on the onset of SHG generation can be determined.

  19. Multimodal multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Légaré, François; Pfeffer, Christian P.; Ganikhanov, Feruz

    2009-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful technique for high spatial resolution thick tissue imaging. In its simple version, it uses a high repetition rate femtosecond oscillator laser source focussed and scanned across biological sample that contains fluorophores. However, not every biological structure is inherently fluorescent or can be stained without causing biochemical changes. To circumvent these limitations, other non-invasive nonlinear optical imaging approaches are currently being developed and investigated with regard to different applications. These techniques are: (1) second harmonic generation (SHG), (2) third harmonic generation (THG), and (3) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The main advantage of the above mentioned techniques is that they derive their imaging contrast from optical nonlinearities that do not involve fluorescence process. As a particular application example we investigated collagen arrays. We show that combining SHG-THG-CARS onto a single imaging platform provides complementary information about the sub-micron architecture of the tissue. SHG microscopy reveals the fibrillar architecture of collagen arrays and confirm a rather high degree of heterogeneity of χ(2) within the focal volume, THG highlights the boundaries between the collagen sheets, and CH2 spectroscopic contrast with CARS.

  20. Using multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging to characterize liver damage and fluorescein disposition in liver in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Studier, Hauke; Crawford, Darrell; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Liver disease is the fifth most common cause of death and unlike many other major causes of mortality, liver disease rates are increasing rather than decreasing. There is no ideal measurement of liver disease and although biopsies are the gold standard, this only allows for a spot examination and cannot follow dynamic processes of the liver. Intravital imaging has the potential to extract detailed information over a larger sampling area continuously. The aim of this project was to investigate whether multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy could detect early liver damage and to assess whether it could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein in normal and diseased livers. Four experimental groups were used in this study: 1) control; 2) ischemia reperfusion injury; 3) steatosis and 4) steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. Results showed that multiphoton microscopy could visualize morphological changes such as decreased fluorescence of endogenous fluorophores and the presence of lipid droplets, characteristic of steatosis. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy showed increase in NADPH in steatosis with and without ischemia reperfusion injury and could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein to fluorescein monoglurcuronide, which was impaired in steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. These results concluded that the combination of multiphoton microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging is a promising method of assessing early stage liver damage and that it can be used to study changes in drug metabolism in the liver as an indication of liver disease and has the potential to replace the traditional static liver biopsy currently used.

  1. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  2. Viral nanoparticles as tools for intravital vascular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John D; Destito, Giuseppe; Zijlstra, Andries; Gonzalez, Maria J; Quigley, James P; Manchester, Marianne; Stuhlmann, Heidi

    2008-01-01

    A significant impediment to the widespread use of noninvasive in vivo vascular imaging techniques is the current lack of suitable intravital imaging probes. We describe here a new strategy to use viral nanoparticles as a platform for the multivalent display of fluorescent dyes to image tissues deep inside living organisms. The bioavailable cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) can be fluorescently labeled to high densities with no measurable quenching, resulting in exceptionally bright particles with in vivo dispersion properties that allow high-resolution intravital imaging of vascular endothelium for periods of at least 72 h. We show that CPMV nanoparticles can be used to visualize the vasculature and blood flow in living mouse and chick embryos to a depth of up to 500 μm. Furthermore, we show that the intravital visualization of human fibrosarcoma-mediated tumor angiogenesis using fluorescent CPMV provides a means to identify arterial and venous vessels and to monitor the neovascularization of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:16501571

  3. Advances in multiphoton microscopy technology

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Erich E.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has enabled unprecedented dynamic exploration in living organisms. A significant challenge in biological research is the dynamic imaging of features deep within living organisms, which permits the real-time analysis of cellular structure and function. To make progress in our understanding of biological machinery, optical microscopes must be capable of rapid, targeted access deep within samples at high resolution. In this Review, we discuss the basic architecture of a multiphoton microscope capable of such analysis and summarize the state-of-the-art technologies for the quantitative imaging of biological phenomena. PMID:24307915

  4. Multiphoton tomography for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2008-02-01

    Femtosecond laser multiphoton tomography has been employed in the field of tissue engineering to perform 3D high-resolution imaging of the extracellular matrix proteins elastin and collagen as well as of living cells without any fixation, slicing, and staining. Near infrared 80 MHz picojoule femtosecond laser pulses are able to excite the endogenous fluorophores NAD(P)H, flavoproteins, melanin, and elastin via a non-resonant two-photon excitation process. In addition, collagen can be imaged by second harmonic generation. Using a two-PMT detection system, the ratio of elastin to collagen was determined during optical sectioning. A high submicron spatial resolution and 50 picosecond temporal resolution was achieved using galvoscan mirrors and piezodriven focusing optics as well as a time-correlated single photon counting module with a fast microchannel plate detector and fast photomultipliers. Multiphoton tomography has been used to optimize the tissue engineering of heart valves and vessels in bioincubators as well as to characterize artificial skin. Stem cell characterization and manipulation are of major interest for the field of tissue engineering. Using the novel sub-20 femtosecond multiphoton nanoprocessing laser microscope FemtOgene, the differentiation of human stem cells within spheroids has been in vivo monitored with submicron resolution. In addition, the efficient targeted transfection has been demonstrated. Clinical studies on the interaction of tissue-engineered products with the natural tissue environment can be performed with in vivo multiphoton tomograph DermaInspect.

  5. Multiphoton microscopy in life sciences.

    PubMed

    König, K

    2000-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) multiphoton microscopy is becoming a novel optical tool of choice for fluorescence imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution, diagnostics, photochemistry and nanoprocessing within living cells and tissues. Three-dimensional fluorescence imaging based on non-resonant two-photon or three-photon fluorophor excitation requires light intensities in the range of MW cm(-2) to GW cm(-2), which can be derived by diffraction limited focusing of continuous wave and pulsed NIR laser radiation. NIR lasers can be employed as the excitation source for multifluorophor multiphoton excitation and hence multicolour imaging. In combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), this novel approach can be used for multi-gene detection (multiphoton multicolour FISH). Owing to the high NIR penetration depth, non-invasive optical biopsies can be obtained from patients and ex vivo tissue by morphological and functional fluorescence imaging of endogenous fluorophores such as NAD(P)H, flavin, lipofuscin, porphyrins, collagen and elastin. Recent botanical applications of multiphoton microscopy include depth-resolved imaging of pigments (chlorophyll) and green fluorescent proteins as well as non-invasive fluorophore loading into single living plant cells. Non-destructive fluorescence imaging with multiphoton microscopes is limited to an optical window. Above certain intensities, multiphoton laser microscopy leads to impaired cellular reproduction, formation of giant cells, oxidative stress and apoptosis-like cell death. Major intracellular targets of photodamage in animal cells are mitochondria as well as the Golgi apparatus. The damage is most likely based on a two-photon excitation process rather than a one-photon or three-photon event. Picosecond and femtosecond laser microscopes therefore provide approximately the same safe relative optical window for two-photon vital cell studies. In labelled cells, additional phototoxic effects may occur via

  6. Multiphoton imaging of cardiovascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke-Layland, Katja; Opitz, Florian; Riemann, Iris; Stock, Ulrich A.; Konig, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    Near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser imaging systems represent a novel and very promising diagnostic technology for non-invasive cross-sectional analysis of living biological tissues. In this study 3D multiphoton imaging with submicron resolution has been performed for non-invasive analysis of living native and tissue-engineered (TE) heart valves and blood vessels. High-resolution autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) images of collagenous structures and elastic fibers were demonstrated using multiphoton excitation at two different wavelengths. Non-invasive optical sections have been obtained without the need of staining or embedding. The quality of the resulting three-dimensional images allowed exact differentiation between collagenous structures and elastic fibers. These experimental results are very encouraging for NIR femtosecond laser scanning microscopy as a useful tool for future non-destructive monitoring and characterization of vital and intact TE cardiovascular structures.

  7. Compact clinical high-NA multiphoton endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2012-02-01

    Multiphoton imaging methods are excellent for non-invasive imaging of living tissue without any need of additional contrast agents. The increasing demand for endoscopic techniques has forced the development of multiphoton endoscopes for imaging of areas with reduced accessibility like chronic wounds. Gradient index (GRIN) lenses can miniaturize the bulky distal focusing optics of conventional tomographs to a diameter of less than 1.4 mm and a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.8. We combined a high NA clinical multiphoton endoscope with existing multiphoton tomographs like the DermaInspect® and the MPTflex® to enable the examination of wound healing processes.

  8. Multiphoton microscopy of atheroslcerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Haugen, Olav A.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a techniques that fascilitates three dimensional imaging of intact, unstained tissue. Especially connective tissue has a relatively strong nonlinear optical response and can easily be imaged. Atherosclerosis is a disease where lipids accumulate in the vessel wall and there is a thickening of the intima by growth of a cap of connective tissue. The mechanical strength of this fibrous cap is of clinically importance. If the cap ruptures a thrombosis forms which can block a coronary vessel and therby causing myocardial infarction. Multiphoton microscopy can be used to image the fibrous cap and thereby determine the thickness of the cap and the structure of the connective fibres. This could possibly be developed into a diagnostic and clincal tool to monitor the vulnerability of a plaque and also to better understand the development of a plaque and effects of treatment. We have collected multiphoton microscopy images from atherosclerotic plaque in human aorta, both two photon excited fluorescens and second harmonic generated signal. The feasability of using this technique to determine the state of the plaque is explored.

  9. Two-Photon Intravital Multicolor Imaging Combined with Inducible Gene Expression to Distinguish Metastatic Behavior of Breast Cancer Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Le Dévédec, Sylvia E.; Lalai, Reshma; Pont, Chantal; de Bont, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to use multicolor intravital imaging together with an inducible cell model to compare metastatic behavior of control and genetically modified breast cancer cell populations within the intact primary tumor of a mouse. Procedure GFP-MTLn3-ErbB1 cells were generated with doxycycline-regulated conditional transgene expression using lentiviral TREAutoR3-cyan fluorescent protein (CFP). CFP expression together with tumor cell motility is monitored in vitro and in vivo. Results Effective and tight control of doxycycline-induced CFP expression was observed both in vitro and in vivo. Intravital multiphoton microscopy on intact orthotopic tumors allowed a clear discrimination between GFP-only and (GFP + CFP) cell populations, which enables direct comparison of the motility behavior of two different cell populations in the same microenvironment in vivo. Conclusions This system is robust and versatile for conditional gene expression and can be used to study the role of individual candidate metastasis genes in vitro and in vivo. This technology will allow investigations of cellular events in cancer metastasis and in particular intravasation within a primary tumor. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11307-010-0307-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20396956

  10. [Bone and Stem Cells. Intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroki; Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Various kinds of cell types, such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts, hematopoietic cells, and mesenchymal cells, have been reported to exist in the bone marrow and communicate with each other. Although there have been many previous studies about bone marrow microenvironment, most of them were analyzed by conventional methods such as histological analysis and flow cytometry. These methods could not observe the dynamic cell movement in living bone marrow. Recently rapid development of fluorescent imaging techniques enables us to understand the cellular dynamics in vivo . That's why we have originally established an advanced imaging system for visualizing living bone tissues with intravital two-photon microscopy. Here we show the latest data and the detailed methodology of intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment, and also discuss its further application.

  11. Intravital Fluorescence Videomicroscopy to Study Tumor Angiogenesis and Microcirculation1

    PubMed Central

    Vajkoczy, Peter; Ullrich, Axel; Meager, Michael D

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Angiogenesis and microcirculation play a central role in growth and metastasis of human neoplasms, and, thus, represent a major target for novel treatment strategies. Mechanistic analysis of processes involved in tumor vascularization, however, requires sophisticated in vivo experimental models and techniques. Intravital microscopy allows direct assessment of tumor angiogenesis, microcirculation and overall perfusion. Its application to the study of tumor-induced neovascularization further provides information on molecular transport and delivery, intra- and extravascular cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interaction, as well as tumor oxygenation and metabolism. With the recent advances in the field of bioluminescence and fluorescent reporter genes, appropriate for in vivo imaging, the intravital fluorescent microscopic approach has to be considered a powerful tool to study microvascular, cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumor growth. PMID:10933068

  12. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Daniel T.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C.; Bogner, Paul N.; Evans, Sharon S.; Skitzki, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  13. Intravital FRET: Probing Cellular and Tissue Function in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Radbruch, Helena; Bremer, Daniel; Mothes, Ronja; Günther, Robert; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Pohlan, Julian; Ulbricht, Carolin; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2015-01-01

    The development of intravital Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is required to probe cellular and tissue function in the natural context: the living organism. Only in this way can biomedicine truly comprehend pathogenesis and develop effective therapeutic strategies. Here we demonstrate and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of two strategies to quantify FRET in vivo—ratiometrically and time-resolved by fluorescence lifetime imaging—and show their concrete application in the context of neuroinflammation in adult mice. PMID:26006244

  14. In vivo Evaluation of Venular Glycocalyx during Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats using Intravital Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Brief Communication In vivo evaluation of venular glycocalyx during hemorrhagic shock in rats using intravital microscopy☆,☆☆ Ivo Torres Filho...pathophysiology and tested the hypothesis that hemorrhage causes glycocalyx degrada- tion in cremaster muscle microvessels. We utilized intravital microscopy...bound (Reitsma et al., 2007; Weinbaum et al., 2007). Intravital microscopy has been an invaluable resource for in vivo measurements of critically

  15. Correlated multiphoton holes: absence of multiphoton coincidence events.

    PubMed

    Afek, I; Ambar, O; Silberberg, Y

    2010-08-27

    We generate bipartite states of light which exhibit an absence of multiphoton coincidence events between two modes amid a constant background flux. These "correlated photon holes" are produced by mixing a coherent state and relatively weak spontaneous parametric down-conversion by using a balanced beam splitter. Correlated holes with arbitrarily high photon numbers may be obtained by adjusting the relative phase and amplitude of the inputs. We measure states of up to five photons and verify their nonclassicality. The scheme provides a route for observation of high-photon-number nonclassical correlations without requiring intense quantum resources.

  16. Multiphoton excited fluorescence spectroscopy of biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2001-09-01

    Recent work on the emerging application of multiphoton excitation to fluorescence studies of biomolecular dynamics and structure is reviewed. The fundamental principles and experimental techniques of multiphoton excitation are outlined, fluorescence lifetimes, anisotropy and spectra in membranes, proteins, hydrocarbons, skin, tissue and metabolites are featured, and future opportunities are highlighted.

  17. COMPACT NON-CONTACT TOTAL EMISSION DETECTION FOR IN-VIVO MULTI-PHOTON EXCITATION MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, Brian; Karamzadeh, Nader S.; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Redford, Glen; Kilborn, Karl; Knutson, Jay R.; Balaban, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe a compact, non-contact design for a Total Emission Detection (c-TED) system for intra-vital multi-photon imaging. To conform to a standard upright two-photon microscope design, this system uses a parabolic mirror surrounding a standard microscope objective in concert with an optical path that does not interfere with normal microscope operation. The non-contact design of this device allows for maximal light collection without disrupting the physiology of the specimen being examined. Tests were conducted on exposed tissues in live animals to examine the emission collection enhancement of the c-TED device compared to heavily optimized objective-based emission collection. The best light collection enhancement was seen from murine fat (5×-2× gains as a function of depth), while murine skeletal muscle and rat kidney showed gains of over two and just under two-fold near the surface, respectively. Gains decreased with imaging depth (particularly in the kidney). Zebrafish imaging on a reflective substrate showed close to a two-fold gain throughout the entire volume of an intact embryo (approximately 150 μm deep). Direct measurement of bleaching rates confirmed that the lower laser powers (enabled by greater light collection efficiency) yielded reduced photobleaching in vivo. The potential benefits of increased light collection in terms of speed of imaging and reduced photo-damage, as well as the applicability of this device to other multi-photon imaging methods is discussed. PMID:24251437

  18. Signal improvement in multiphoton microscopy by reflection with simple mirrors near the sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehberg, Markus; Krombach, Fritz; Pohl, Ulrich; Dietzel, Steffen

    2010-03-01

    In conventional fluorescence or confocal microscopy, emitted light is generated not only in the focal plane but also above and below. The situation is different in multiphoton-induced fluorescence and multiphoton-induced higher harmonic generation. Here, restriction of signal generation to a single focal point permits that all emitted photons can contribute to image formation if collected, regardless of their path through the specimen. Often, the intensity of the emitted light is rather low in biological specimens. We present a method to significantly increase the fraction of photons collected by an epi (backward) detector by placing a simple mirror, an aluminum-coated coverslip, directly under the sample. Samples investigated include fluorescent test slides, collagen gels, and thin-layered, intact mouse skeletal muscles. Quantitative analysis revealed an intensity increase of second- and third-harmonic generated signal in skeletal muscle of nine- and sevenfold respectively, and of fluorescent signal in test slides of up to twofold. Our approach thus allows significant signal improvement also for situations were a forward detection is impossible, e.g., due to the anatomy of animals in intravital microscopy.

  19. Phase-imprinted multiphoton subradiant states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, H. H.

    2017-08-01

    We propose to generate the multiphoton subradiant states and investigate their fluorescences in an array of two-level atoms. These multiphoton states are created initially from the timed Dicke states. Then we can use either a Zeeman or Stark field gradient pulse to imprint linearly increasing phases on the atoms, and this phase-imprinting process unitarily evolves the system to the multiphoton subradiant states. The fluorescence engages a long-range dipole-dipole interaction which originates from a system-reservoir coupling in the dissipation. We locate some of the subradiant multiphoton states from the eigenmodes and show that an optically thick atomic array is best for the preparation of the state with the most reduced decay rate. This phase-imprinting process enables quantum-state engineering of the multiphoton subradiant states and realizes a potential quantum storage of the photonic qubits in the two-level atoms.

  20. Tracking the stochastic fate of cells of the renin lineage after podocyte depletion using multicolor reporters and intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Diana G.; Rusiniak, Michael E.; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S.; Gomez, R. Ariel; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2017-01-01

    Podocyte depletion plays a major role in focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS). Because cells of the renin lineage (CoRL) serve as adult podocyte and parietal epithelial cell (PEC) progenitor candidates, we generated Ren1cCre/R26R-ConfettiTG/WT and Ren1dCre/R26R-ConfettiTG/WT mice to determine CoRL clonality during podocyte replacement. Four CoRL reporters (GFP, YFP, RFP, CFP) were restricted to cells in the juxtaglomerular compartment (JGC) at baseline. Following abrupt podocyte depletion in experimental FSGS, all four CoRL reporters were detected in a subset of glomeruli at day 28, where they co-expressed de novo four podocyte proteins (podocin, nephrin, WT-1 and p57) and two glomerular parietal epithelial cell (PEC) proteins (claudin-1, PAX8). To monitor the precise migration of a subset of CoRL over a 2w period following podocyte depletion, intravital multiphoton microscopy was used. Our findings demonstrate direct visual support for the migration of single CoRL from the JGC to the parietal Bowman’s capsule, early proximal tubule, mesangium and glomerular tuft. In summary, these results suggest that following podocyte depletion, multi-clonal CoRL migrate to the glomerulus and replace podocyte and PECs in experimental FSGS. PMID:28329012

  1. Tracking the stochastic fate of cells of the renin lineage after podocyte depletion using multicolor reporters and intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaverina, Natalya V; Kadoya, Hiroyuki; Eng, Diana G; Rusiniak, Michael E; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R Ariel; Pippin, Jeffrey W; Gross, Kenneth W; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Shankland, Stuart J

    2017-01-01

    Podocyte depletion plays a major role in focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS). Because cells of the renin lineage (CoRL) serve as adult podocyte and parietal epithelial cell (PEC) progenitor candidates, we generated Ren1cCre/R26R-ConfettiTG/WT and Ren1dCre/R26R-ConfettiTG/WT mice to determine CoRL clonality during podocyte replacement. Four CoRL reporters (GFP, YFP, RFP, CFP) were restricted to cells in the juxtaglomerular compartment (JGC) at baseline. Following abrupt podocyte depletion in experimental FSGS, all four CoRL reporters were detected in a subset of glomeruli at day 28, where they co-expressed de novo four podocyte proteins (podocin, nephrin, WT-1 and p57) and two glomerular parietal epithelial cell (PEC) proteins (claudin-1, PAX8). To monitor the precise migration of a subset of CoRL over a 2w period following podocyte depletion, intravital multiphoton microscopy was used. Our findings demonstrate direct visual support for the migration of single CoRL from the JGC to the parietal Bowman's capsule, early proximal tubule, mesangium and glomerular tuft. In summary, these results suggest that following podocyte depletion, multi-clonal CoRL migrate to the glomerulus and replace podocyte and PECs in experimental FSGS.

  2. High-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2014-03-15

    An ultracompact high-resolution multiphoton cryomicroscope with a femtosecond near infrared fiber laser has been utilized to study the cellular autofluorescence during freezing and thawing of cells. Cooling resulted in an increase of the intracellular fluorescence intensity followed by morphological modifications at temperatures below -10 °C, depending on the application of the cryoprotectant DMSO and the cooling rate. Furthermore, fluorescence lifetime imaging revealed an increase of the mean lifetime with a decrease in temperature. Non-destructive, label-free optical biopsies of biomaterial in ice can be obtained with sub-20 mW mean powers.

  3. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile; Lolkema, Martijn; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior of primary tumor cells of a genetically engineered pancreatic cancer mouse model and found that pancreatic tumor cells migrate with a mesenchymal morphology as single individual cells or collectively as a stream of non-cohesive single motile cells. These findings may improve our ability to conceive treatments that block metastatic behavior. PMID:28243522

  4. Motion compensation using a suctioning stabilizer for intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Gorbatov, Rostic; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Motion artifacts continue to present a major challenge to single cell imaging in cardiothoracic organs such as the beating heart, blood vessels, or lung. In this study, we present a new water-immersion suctioning stabilizer that enables minimally invasive intravital fluorescence microscopy using water-based stick objectives. The stabilizer works by reducing major motion excursions and can be used in conjunction with both prospective or retrospective gating approaches. We show that the new approach offers cellular resolution in the beating murine heart without perturbing normal physiology. In addition, because this technique allows multiple areas to be easily probed, it offers the opportunity for wide area coverage at high resolution. PMID:24086796

  5. Two-color multiphoton emission from nanotips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng-Wei Huang, Wayne; Becker, Maria; Beck, Joshua; Batelaan, Herman

    2017-02-01

    Two-color multiphoton emission from polycrystalline tungsten nanotips has been demonstrated using two-color laser fields. The two-color photoemission is assisted by a three-photon multicolor quantum channel, which leads to a twofold increase in quantum efficiency. Weak-field control of two-color multiphoton emission was achieved by changing the efficiency of the quantum channel with pulse delay. The result of this study complements two-color tunneling photoemission in strong fields, and has potential applications for nanowire-based photonic devices. Moreover, the demonstrated two-color multiphoton emission may be important for realizing ultrafast spin-polarized electron sources via optically injected spin current.

  6. Multiphoton cryo microscope with sample temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2013-02-01

    We present a multiphoton microscope system which combines the advantages of multiphoton imaging with precise control of the sample temperature. The microscope provides online insight in temperature-induced changes and effects in plant tissue and animal cells with subcellular resolution during cooling and thawing processes. Image contrast is based on multiphoton fluorescence intensity or fluorescence lifetime in the range from liquid nitrogen temperature up to +600°C. In addition, micro spectra from the imaged regions can be recorded. We present measurement results from plant leaf samples as well as Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  7. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of human hair.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Alexander; Riemann, Iris; Stark, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    In vivo and in vitro multiphoton imaging was used to perform high resolution optical sectioning of human hair by nonlinear excitation of endogenous as well as exogenous fluorophores. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) based on time-resolved single photon counting and near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse excitation was employed to analyze the various fluorescent hair components. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of intratissue pigments has the potential (i) to identify endogenous keratin and melanin, (ii) to obtain information on intrahair dye accumulation, (iii) to study bleaching effects, and (iv) to monitor the intratissue diffusion of pharmaceutical and cosmetical components along hair shafts.

  8. Long-term intravital imaging of the multicolor-coded tumor microenvironment during combination immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Shuhong; Li, Hui; Lu, Lisen; Qi, Zhongyang; Liu, Lei; Chen, Lu; Shen, Guanxin; Fu, Ling; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    The combined-immunotherapy of adoptive cell therapy (ACT) and cyclophosphamide (CTX) is one of the most efficient treatments for melanoma patients. However, no synergistic effects of CTX and ACT on the spatio-temporal dynamics of immunocytes in vivo have been described. Here, we visualized key cell events in immunotherapy-elicited immunoreactions in a multicolor-coded tumor microenvironment, and then established an optimal strategy of metronomic combined-immunotherapy to enhance anti-tumor efficacy. Intravital imaging data indicated that regulatory T cells formed an 'immunosuppressive ring' around a solid tumor. The CTX-ACT combined-treatment elicited synergistic immunoreactions in tumor areas, which included relieving the immune suppression, triggering the transient activation of endogenous tumor-infiltrating immunocytes, increasing the accumulation of adoptive cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and accelerating the infiltration of dendritic cells. These insights into the spatio-temporal dynamics of immunocytes are beneficial for optimizing immunotherapy and provide new approaches for elucidating the mechanisms underlying the involvement of immunocytes in cancer immunotherapy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14756.001 PMID:27855783

  9. Intravital imaging of embryonic and tumor neovasculature using viral nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Hon Sing; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Ablack, Amber; Destito, Giuseppe; Zijlstra, Andries; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Manchester, Marianne; Lewis, John D

    2011-01-01

    Viral nanoparticles are a novel class of biomolecular agents that take advantage of the natural circulatory and targeting properties of viruses to allow the development of therapeutics, vaccines and imaging tools. We have developed a multivalent nanoparticle platform based on the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) that facilitates particle labeling at high density with fluorescent dyes and other functional groups. Compared with other technologies, CPMV-based viral nanoparticles are particularly suited for long-term intravital vascular imaging because of their biocompatibility and retention in the endothelium with minimal side effects. The stable, long-term labeling of the endothelium allows the identification of vasculature undergoing active remodeling in real time. In this study, we describe the synthesis, purification and fluorescent labeling of cpMV nanoparticles, along with their use for imaging of vascular structure and for intravital vascular mapping in developmental and tumor angiogenesis models. Dye-labeled viral nanoparticles can be synthesized and purified in a single day, and imaging studies can be conducted over hours, days or weeks, depending on the application. PMID:20671724

  10. Imaging windows for long-term intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alieva, Maria; Ritsma, Laila; Giedt, Randy J; Weissleder, Ralph; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is increasingly used to visualize and quantitate dynamic biological processes at the (sub)cellular level in live animals. By visualizing tissues through imaging windows, individual cells (e.g., cancer, host, or stem cells) can be tracked and studied over a time-span of days to months. Several imaging windows have been developed to access tissues including the brain, superficial fascia, mammary glands, liver, kidney, pancreas, and small intestine among others. Here, we review the development of imaging windows and compare the most commonly used long-term imaging windows for cancer biology: the cranial imaging window, the dorsal skin fold chamber, the mammary imaging window, and the abdominal imaging window. Moreover, we provide technical details, considerations, and trouble-shooting tips on the surgical procedures and microscopy setups for each imaging window and explain different strategies to assure imaging of the same area over multiple imaging sessions. This review aims to be a useful resource for establishing the long-term intravital imaging procedure. PMID:28243510

  11. Multiphoton microscopy: an introduction to gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye Jin; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Eun Sun; Cho, Bong Rae

    2011-10-28

    Multiphoton microscopy, relying on the simultaneous absorption of two or more photons by a fluorophore, has come to occupy a prominent place in modern biomedical research with its ability to allow real-time observation of a single cell and molecules in intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy exhibits nonlinear optical contrast properties, which can make it possible to provide an exceptionally large depth penetration with less phototoxicity. This system becomes more and more an inspiring tool for a non-invasive imaging system to realize "optical biopsy" and to examine the functions of living cells. In this review, we briefly present the physical principles and properties of multiphoton microscopy as well as the current applications in biological fields. In addition, we address what we see as the future potential of multiphoton microscopy for gastroenterologic research.

  12. Microbeam-integrated multiphoton imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Bigelow, Alan W.; Geard, Charles R.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Brenner, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has been added to the array of imaging techniques at the endstation for the Microbeam II cell irradiator at Columbia University’s Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF). This three-dimensional (3D), laser-scanning microscope functions through multiphoton excitation, providing an enhanced imaging routine during radiation experiments with tissuelike samples, such as small living animals and organisms. Studies at RARAF focus on radiation effects; hence, this multiphoton microscope was designed to observe postirradiation cellular dynamics. This multiphoton microscope was custom designed into an existing Nikon Eclipse E600-FN research fluorescence microscope on the irradiation platform. Design details and biology applications using this enhanced 3D-imaging technique at RARAF are reviewed. PMID:19123569

  13. Differential Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Young, Michael D.; Ding, Shi-you; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) in the biological and medical sciences has become an important tool for obtaining high resolution images at video rates. While current implementations of MMM achieve very high frame rates, they are limited in their applicability to essentially those biological samples that exhibit little or no scattering. In this paper, we report on a method for MMM in which imaging detection is not necessary (single element point detection is implemented), and is therefore fully compatible for use in imaging through scattering media. Further, we demonstrate that this method leads to a new type of MMM wherein it is possible to simultaneously obtain multiple images and view differences in excitation parameters in a single shot. PMID:27390511

  14. Differential Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Young, Michael D.; Ding, Shi-you; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2012-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (mfMPLSM) in the biological and medical sciences has the potential to become a ubiquitous tool for obtaining high-resolution images at video rates. While current implementations of mfMPLSM achieve very high frame rates, they are limited in their applicability to essentially those biological samples that exhibit little or no scattering. In this paper, we report on a method for mfMPLSM in which whole-field detection with a single detector, rather than detection with a matrix of detectors, such as a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, is implemented. This advance makes mfMPLSM fully compatible for use in imaging through scattering media. Further, we demonstrate that this method makes it possible to simultaneously obtain multiple images and view differences in excitation parameters in a single scan of the specimen.

  15. MULTI-PHOTON PHOSPHOR FEASIBILITY RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    R. Graham; W. Chow

    2003-05-01

    Development of multi-photon phosphor materials for discharge lamps represents a goal that would achieve up to a doubling of discharge (fluorescent) lamp efficacy. This report reviews the existing literature on multi-photon phosphors, identifies obstacles in developing such phosphors, and recommends directions for future research to address these obstacles. To critically examine issues involved in developing a multi-photon phosphor, the project brought together a team of experts from universities, national laboratories, and an industrial lamp manufacturer. Results and findings are organized into three categories: (1) Multi-Photon Systems and Processes, (2) Chemistry and Materials Issues, and (3) Concepts and Models. Multi-Photon Systems and Processes: This category focuses on how to use our current understanding of multi-photon phosphor systems to design new phosphor systems for application in fluorescent lamps. The quickest way to develop multi-photon lamp phosphors lies in finding sensitizer ions for Gd{sup 3+} and identifying activator ions to red shift the blue emission from Pr{sup 3+} due to the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 1}I{sub 6} transition associated with the first cascading step. Success in either of these developments would lead to more efficient fluorescent lamps. Chemistry and Materials Issues: The most promising multi-photon phosphors are found in fluoride hosts. However, stability of fluorides in environments typically found in fluorescent lamps needs to be greatly improved. Experimental investigation of fluorides in actual lamp environments needs to be undertaken while working on oxide and oxyfluoride alternative systems for backup. Concepts and Models: Successful design of a multi-photon phosphor system based on cascading transitions of Gd{sup 3+} and Pr{sup 3+} depends critically on how the former can be sensitized and the latter can sensitize an activator ion. Methods to predict energy level diagrams and Judd-Ofelt parameters of multi-photon

  16. Mechanisms of Multiphoton Dissociation of Molecular Ions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-30

    dissociation energy and are thus re- Thus, some small fraction of all ions produced in our moved from the beam by unimolecular decomposition. source probably...AD-A099 121 SRI INTERNATIONAL MENLO PARK CA F/6 7/5 MECHANISMS OF MULTIPHOTON DISSOCIATION OF MOLECULAR IONS, U) APR 81 M J COGGIOLA. J R PETERSON, P...Final Report MECHANISMS OF MULTIPHOTON DISSOCIATION OF MOLECULAR IONS By: Michael J. Coggiola, Project Leader James R. Peterson, Project Supervisor

  17. Multiphoton imaging reveals that nanosecond pulsed electric fields collapse tumor and normal vascular perfusion in human glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Bardet, Sylvia M.; Carr, Lynn; Soueid, Malak; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the biomedical advances of the last century, many cancers including glioblastoma are still resistant to existing therapies leaving patients with poor prognoses. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) are a promising technology for the treatment of cancer that have thus far been evaluated in vitro and in superficial malignancies. In this paper, we develop a tumor organoid model of glioblastoma and apply intravital multiphoton microscopy to assess their response to nsPEFs. We demonstrate for the first time that a single 10 ns, high voltage electric pulse (35–45 kV/cm), collapses the perfusion of neovasculature, and also alters the diameter of capillaries and larger vessels in normal tissue. These results contribute to the fundamental understanding of nsPEF effects in complex tissue environments, and confirm the potential of nsPEFs to disrupt the microenvironment of solid tumors such as glioblastoma. PMID:27698479

  18. Intravital imaging of the mouse popliteal lymph node.

    PubMed

    Liou, H L Rachel; Myers, Jay T; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Huang, Alex Y

    2012-02-08

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are secondary lymphoid organs, which are strategically located throughout the body to allow for trapping and presentation of foreign antigens from peripheral tissues to prime the adaptive immune response. Juxtaposed between innate and adaptive immune responses, the LN is an ideal site to study immune cell interactions. Lymphocytes (T cells, B cells and NK cells), dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages comprise the bulk of bone marrow-derived cellular elements of the LN. These cells are strategically positioned in the LN to allow efficient surveillance of self antigens and potential foreign antigens. The process by which lymphocytes successfully encounter cognate antigens is a subject of intense investigation in recent years, and involves an integration of molecular contacts including antigen receptors, adhesion molecules, chemokines, and stromal structures such as the fibro-reticular network. Prior to the development of high-resolution real-time fluorescent in vivo imaging, investigators relied on static imaging, which only offers answers regarding morphology, position, and architecture. While these questions are fundamental in our understanding of immune cell behavior, the limitations intrinsic with this technique does not permit analysis to decipher lymphocyte trafficking and environmental clues that affect dynamic cell behavior. Recently, the development of intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM) has allowed investigators to view the dynamic movements and interactions of individual cells within live LNs in situ. In particular, we and others have applied this technique to image cellular behavior and interactions within the popliteal LN, where its compact, dense nature offers the advantage of multiplex data acquisition over a large tissue area with diverse tissue sub-structures. It is important to note that this technique offers added benefits over explanted tissue imaging techniques, which require disruption of blood, lymph flow

  19. Intravital imaging reveals new ancillary mechanisms co-opted by cancer cells to drive tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Morghan C.; Timpson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging is providing new insights into the dynamics of tumor progression in native tissues and has started to reveal the layers of complexity found in cancer. Recent advances in intravital imaging have allowed us to look deeper into cancer behavior and to dissect the interactions between tumor cells and the ancillary host niche that promote cancer development. In this review, we provide an insight into the latest advances in cancer biology achieved by intravital imaging, focusing on recently discovered mechanisms by which tumor cells manipulate normal tissue to facilitate disease progression. PMID:27239290

  20. Imaging Nanotherapeutics in Inflamed Vasculature by Intravital Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenjia

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy (IVM) is the application of light microscopy to real time study biology of live animal tissues in intact and physiological conditions with the high spatial and temporal resolution. Advances in imaging systems, genetic animal models and imaging probes, IVM has offered quantitative and dynamic insight into cell biology, immunology, neurobiology and cancer. In this review, we will focus on the targeting of nanotherapeutics to inflamed vasculature. We will introduce the basic concept and principle of IVM and demonstrate that IVM is a powerful tool used to quantitatively determine the molecular mechanisms of interactions between nanotherapeutics and neutrophils or endothelium in living mice. In the future, it is needed to develop new imaging systems and novel imaging contrast agents to better understand molecular mechanisms of tissue processing of nanotherapeutics in vivo. PMID:27877245

  1. Intravital microscopy of biosensor activities and intrinsic metabolic states.

    PubMed

    Winfree, Seth; Hato, Takashi; Day, Richard N

    2017-09-01

    Intravital microscopy (IVM) is an imaging tool that is capable of detecting subcellular signaling or metabolic events as they occur in tissues in the living animal. Imaging in highly scattering biological tissues, however, is challenging because of the attenuation of signal in images acquired at increasing depths. Depth-dependent signal attenuation is the major impediment to IVM, limiting the depth from which significant data can be obtained. Therefore, making quantitative measurements by IVM requires methods that use internal calibration, or alternatively, a completely different way of evaluating the signals. Here, we describe how ratiometric imaging of genetically encoded biosensor probes can be used to make quantitative measurements of changes in the activity of cell signaling pathways. Then, we describe how fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used for label-free measurements of the metabolic states of cells within the living animal. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Advanced Motion Compensation Methods for Intravital Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has emerged in the recent decade as an indispensible imaging modality for the study of the micro-dynamics of biological processes in live animals. Technical advancements in imaging techniques and hardware components, combined with the development of novel targeted probes and new mice models, have enabled us to address long-standing questions in several biology areas such as oncology, cell biology, immunology and neuroscience. As the instrument resolution has increased, physiological motion activities have become a major obstacle that prevents imaging live animals at resolutions analogue to the ones obtained in vitro. Motion compensation techniques aim at reducing this gap and can effectively increase the in vivo resolution. This paper provides a technical review of some of the latest developments in motion compensation methods, providing organ specific solutions. PMID:24273405

  3. Multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. P.; Harkins, D. A.; Compton, R. N.; Ding, D.

    1994-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (TOFMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) studies of UF6 are reported using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental (λ=1064 nm) and its harmonics (λ=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF+x fragment ions, even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. In general, the doubly charged uranium ion (U2+) intensity is much greater than that of the singly charged uranium ion (U+). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the Un+ (n=1-4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The MPI-PES studies reveal only very slow electrons (≤0.5 eV) for all wavelengths investigated. The dominance of the U2+ ion, the absence or very small intensities of UF+x (x=1-3) fragments, the unstructured wavelength dependence, and the preponderance of slow electrons all indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms following the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule. The data also argue against stepwise photodissociation of UF+x (x=5,6) ions. Neither of the traditional MPI mechanisms (``neutral ladder'' or the ``ionic ladder'') are believed to adequately describe the ionization phenomena observed. We propose that the multiphoton excitation of UF6 under these experimental conditions results in a highly excited molecule, superexcited UF6**. The excitation of highly excited UF6** is proposed to be facilitated by the well known ``giant resonance,'' whose energy level lies in the range of 12-14 eV above that of ground state UF6. The highly excited molecule then primarily dissociates, via multiple channels, into Un+, UF+x, fluorine atoms, and ``slow'' electrons, although dissociation

  4. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  5. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-06-06

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments.

  6. Multi-Photon Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2007-06-01

    Based on the investigation of multi-photon entanglement, as produced by stimulated parametric down-conversion, a technique is presented to create heralded ``noon'' states. The relevance for interferometry will be discussed. Furthermore we explored the use of photon-number resolving detectors in Mach-Zehnder type of interferometers. Our current detectors can distinguish 0, 1, 2, to7, photon impacts. Although the overall collection and detection efficiency of photons is well below unity (about 0.3) the photon number resolving property is still very useful if combined with coherent input states since those state are eigenstates of the photon annihilation operator. First we analyze the coherent state interferometer with a single photon-number resolving detector, revealing the strong non-linear response of an interferometer in the case of Fock-state projection. Second, we use two such detectors together with a Baysian phase estimation strategy to demonstrate that it is possible to achieve the standard quantum limit independently from the true value of the phase shift. This protocol is unbiased and saturates the Cramer-Rao phase uncertainty bound and, therefore, is an optimal phase estimation strategy. As a final topic it will be shown how quantum interferometry combined with micromechanical structures can be used to investigate quantum superpositions and quantum decoherence of macroscopic objects.

  7. Clinical multiphoton and CARS microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Weinigel, M.; Darvin, M. E.; Lademann, J.; König, K.

    2012-03-01

    We report on clinical CARS imaging of human skin in vivo with the certified hybrid multiphoton tomograph CARSDermaInspect. The CARS-DermaInspect provides simultaneous imaging of non-fluorescent intradermal lipid and water as well as imaging of two-photon excited fluorescence from intrinsic molecules. Two different excitation schemes for CARS imaging have been realized: In the first setup, a combination of fs oscillator and optical parametric oscillator provided fs-CARS pump and Stokes pulses, respectively. In the second setup a fs oscillator was combined with a photonic crystal fiber which provided a broadband spectrum. A spectral range out of the broadband-spectrum was selected and used for CARS excitation in combination with the residual fs-oscillator output. In both setups, in addition to CARS, single-beam excitation was used for imaging of two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation signals. Both CARS-excitation systems were successfully used for imaging of lipids inside the skin in vivo.

  8. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikal, Ahmed A.; Webb, Watt W.

    2002-11-01

    The inherent advantages of nonlinear excitation make multiphoton fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) awell-suited imaging technique for extracting valuable information from turbid and thick biological samples. These advantages include high three-dimensional spatial resolution, large penetration depth, minimum out-of-focus cellular photodamage, and high signal-to-noise contrast. We have investigated the nonlinear spectroscopy of biologically important molecules such as NADH, flavins, and intrinsically fluorescent proteins. Fundamental understanding of the molecular spectroscopy and dynamics of these biomolecules is essential for advancing their applications in biological research. MPFM has been utilized for monitoring a large spectrum of biological processes including metabolic activity and exocytosis. We will discuss two-photon (2P) redox fluorescence microscopy of NADH, which gives a quantitative measure of the respiratory chain activity, thus allowing functional imaging of energy metabolism in neurons and native brain tissue. Finally, a rational design strategy, based on donor-acceptor-donor configuration, will be elucidated for fluorescent probes with large 2P-excitation cross-section. These dyes are water-soluble, yet possess a high affinity to organic phases with site-specific labeling and Ca+2 sensitivity (Kd ~ 350 nM). A brief account on the biological application of nanocrystals and second harmonic imaging will be reviewed.

  9. Phase sensitive demodulation in multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Walt G; Piston, David W; Wachter, Eric A

    2002-06-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy offers advantages in depth of penetration into intact samples over other optical sectioning techniques. To achieve these advantages it is necessary to detect the emitted light without spatial filtering. In this nondescanned (nonconfocal) approach, ambient room light can easily contaminate the signal, forcing experiments to be performed in absolute darkness. For multiphoton microscope systems employing mode-locked lasers, signal processing can be used to reduce such problems by taking advantage of the pulsed characteristics of such lasers. Specifically, by recovering fluorescence generated at the mode-locked frequency, interference from stray light and other ambient noise sources can be significantly reduced. This technology can be adapted to existing microscopes by inserting demodulation circuitry between the detector and data collection system. The improvement in signal-to-noise ratio afforded by this approach yields a more robust microscope system and opens the possibility of moving multiphoton microscopy from the research lab to more demanding settings, such as the clinic.

  10. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael D.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope. PMID:27182429

  11. Multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Crawford, Darrell; Burczynski, Frank J.; Liu, Xin; Liau, Ian; Roberts, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is the preferred method when in vivo deep-tissue imaging is required. This review presents the application of multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function. In particular, multiphoton microscopy is useful in imaging intracellular events, such as mitochondrial depolarization and cellular metabolism in terms of NAD(P)H changes with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The morphology of hepatocytes can be visualized without exogenously administered fluorescent dyes by utilizing their autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signal of collagen, which is useful in diagnosing liver disease. More specific imaging, such as studying drug transport in normal and diseased livers are achievable, but require exogenously administered fluorescent dyes. If these techniques can be translated into clinical use to assess liver function, it would greatly improve early diagnosis of organ viability, fibrosis, and cancer.

  12. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photo-electron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  13. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photoelectron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  14. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design.

    PubMed

    Young, Michael D; Field, Jeffrey J; Sheetz, Kraig E; Bartels, Randy A; Squier, Jeff

    2015-06-30

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope.

  15. Multiphoton absorption in amyloid protein fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanczyc, Piotr; Samoc, Marek; Norden, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Fibrillization of peptides leads to the formation of amyloid fibres, which, when in large aggregates, are responsible for diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Here, we show that amyloids have strong nonlinear optical absorption, which is not present in native non-fibrillized protein. Z-scan and pump-probe experiments indicate that insulin and lysozyme β-amyloids, as well as α-synuclein fibres, exhibit either two-photon, three-photon or higher multiphoton absorption processes, depending on the wavelength of light. We propose that the enhanced multiphoton absorption is due to a cooperative mechanism involving through-space dipolar coupling between excited states of aromatic amino acids densely packed in the fibrous structures. This finding will provide the opportunity to develop nonlinear optical techniques to detect and study amyloid structures and also suggests that new protein-based materials with sizable multiphoton absorption could be designed for specific applications in nanotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics.

  16. Design and development of compact multiphoton microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehravar, SeyedSoroush

    A compact multi-photon microscope (MPM) was designed and developed with the use of low-cost mode-locked fiber lasers operating at 1040nm and 1560nm. The MPM was assembled in-house and the system aberration was investigated using the optical design software: Zemax. A novel characterization methodology based on 'nonlinear knife-edge' technique was also introduced to measure the axial, lateral resolution, and the field curvature of the multi-photon microscope's image plane. The field curvature was then post-corrected using data processing in MATLAB. A customized laser scanning software based on LabVIEW was developed for data acquisition, image display and controlling peripheral electronics. Finally, different modalities of multi-photon excitation such as second- and third harmonic generation, two- and three-photon fluorescence were utilized to study a wide variety of samples from cancerous cells to 2D-layered materials.

  17. New developments in multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    80 years ago, the PhD student Maria Goeppert predicted in her thesis in Goettingen, Germany, two-photon effects. It took 30 years to prove her theory, and another three decades to realize the first two-photon microscope. With the beginning of this millennium, first clinical multiphoton tomographs started operation in research institutions, hospitals, and in the cosmetic industry. The multiphoton tomograph MPTflexTM with its miniaturized flexible scan head became the Prism-Award 2010 winner in the category Life Sciences. Multiphoton tomographs with its superior submicron spatial resolution can be upgraded to 5D imaging tools by adding spectral time-correlated single photon counting units. Furthermore, multimodal hybrid tomographs provide chemical fingerprinting and fast wide-field imaging. The world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph in spring 2010. In particular, nonfluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen have been imaged in patients with dermatological disorders. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution imaging tools such as ultrasound, optoacoustic, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer (malignant melanoma), optimization of treatment strategies (wound healing, dermatitis), and cosmetic research including long-term biosafety tests of ZnO sunscreen nanoparticles and the measurement of the stimulated biosynthesis of collagen by anti-ageing products.

  18. Human bladder cancer diagnosis using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sushmita; Wysock, James S.; Ng, Casey K.; Akhtar, Mohammed; Perner, Sven; Lee, Ming-Ming; Rubin, Mark A.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Webb, Watt W.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2009-02-01

    At the time of diagnosis, approximately 75% of bladder cancers are non-muscle invasive. Appropriate diagnosis and surgical resection at this stage improves prognosis dramatically. However, these lesions, being small and/or flat, are often missed by conventional white-light cystoscopes. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the surgical margin for negativity using conventional cystoscopes. Resultantly, the recurrence rates in patients with early bladder cancer are very high. This is currently addressed by repeat cystoscopies and biopsies, which can last throughout the life of a patient, increasing cost and patient morbidity. Multiphoton endoscopes offer a potential solution, allowing real time, noninvasive biopsies of the human bladder, as well as an up-close assessment of the resection margin. While miniaturization of the Multiphoton microscope into an endoscopic format is currently in progress, we present results here indicating that Multiphoton imaging (using a bench-top Multiphoton microscope) can indeed identify cancers in fresh, unfixed human bladder biopsies. Multiphoton images are acquired in two channels: (1) broadband autofluorescence from cells, and (2) second harmonic generation (SHG), mostly by tissue collagen. These images are then compared with gold standard hematoxylin/eosin (H&E) stained histopathology slides from the same specimen. Based on a "training set" and a very small "blinded set" of samples, we have found excellent correlation between the Multiphoton and histopathological diagnoses. A larger blinded analysis by two independent uropathologists is currently in progress. We expect that the conclusion of this phase will provide us with diagnostic accuracy estimates, as well as the degree of inter-observer heterogeneity.

  19. Multiphoton flow cytometry strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    Tkaczyk, Eric R; Tkaczyk, Alan H

    2011-10-01

    A handful of research teams around the world have recently begun to utilize multiphoton techniques in cytometry, especially for in vivo applications. These approaches offer similar enhancements to flow cytometry as the multiphoton phenomenon brought to the field of microscopy at the turn of the 20th century, with at least six advantages over single-photon excitation. Here, we review the published literature on multiphoton cytometry in vivo or in vitro from the initial experiments in 1999 to present. Multiphoton cytometry instrumentation set-ups vary from adapted multiphoton microscopy to a dedicated system, with laser pulse power and repetition rate serving as important variables. Two-beam geometry enables quantitation of cell size. Labeling strategies include conjugated fluorophore targeting, with folate and/or dendrimer platforms. With two-color measurement, ratiometric labeling is also possible, where one dye serves as a trigger to indicate the amount of excitation a cell receives, and another informs of cellular function. With two-color labeling, geometric fluorophore distribution proves important in theory and experiment for detection sensitivity curves and detected event intensity correlation. The main biological achievements to date using this young technology are reviewed, with emphasis on real-time monitoring of minute-by-minute and long-term cell dynamics as well as the clinically significant surveillance of circulating tumor cells. For this goal, minimally invasive two-photon flow cytometry with a fiber probe may overcome the primary issue of sample volume. The technique of multicolor, multiphoton flow cytometry greatly enhances the capabilities of flow cytometry to investigate the dynamics of circulating cells in cancer and other important diseases, and may in the future benefit from advances in microscopy such as super-resolution imaging, coherent control, and bioluminescence. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  20. From morphology to clinical pathophysiology: multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging at patients' bedside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mess, Christian; Zens, Katharina; Gorzelanny, Christian; Metze, Dieter; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of skin diseases. By means of multiphoton excitation, endogenous biomolecules like NADH, collagen or elastin show autofluorescence or second harmonic generation. Thus, these molecules provide information about the subcellular morphology, epidermal architecture and physiological condition of the skin. To gain a deeper understanding of the linkage between cellular structure and physiological processes, non-invasive multiphotonbased intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) were combined within the scopes of inflammatory skin, chronic wounds and drug delivery in clinical application. The optical biopsies generated via MPT were morphologically analyzed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed a perinuclear accumulation in lesional skin in contrast to an even distribution in healthy skin. Confirmatively, MPT-FLIM showed an obvious metabolic shift in lesions. Moreover, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. The feasibility of primary in vivo tracking of applied therapeutic agents further broadened our scope: We examined the permeation and subsequent distribution of agents directly visualized in patientś skin in short-term repetitive measurements. Furthermore, we performed MPT-FLIM follow-up investigations in the long-term course of therapy. Therefore, clinical MPT-FLIM application offers new insights into the pathophysiology and the individual therapeutic course of skin diseases, facilitating a better understanding of the processes of inflammation and wound healing.

  1. Imaging IGF-I uptake in growth plate cartilage using in vivo multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Serrat, Maria A; Ion, Gabriela

    2017-08-10

    Bones elongate through endochondral ossification in cartilaginous growth plates located at ends of primary long bones. Linear growth ensues from a cascade of biochemical signals initiated by actions of systemic and local regulators on growth plate chondrocytes. Although cellular processes are well defined, there is a fundamental gap in understanding how growth regulators are physically transported from surrounding blood vessels into and through dense, avascular cartilage matrix. Intravital imaging using in vivo multiphoton microscopy is one promising strategy to overcome this barrier by quantitatively tracking molecular delivery to cartilage from the vasculature in real time. We previously used in vivo multiphoton imaging to show that hindlimb heating increases vascular access of large molecules to growth plates using 10-, 40-, and 70 kDa dextran tracers. In order to comparatively evaluate transport of similarly sized physiological regulators, we developed and validated methods for measuring uptake of biologically active IGF-I into proximal tibial growth plates of live 5-week old mice. We demonstrate that fluorescently labeled IGF-I (8.2 kDa) is readily taken up in the growth plate and localizes to chondrocytes. Bioactivity tests performed on cultured metatarsal bones confirmed that the labeled protein is functional, assessed by phosphorylation of its signaling kinase Akt. This methodology, which can be broadly applied to many different proteins and tissues, is relevant for understanding factors that affect delivery of biologically relevant molecules to the skeleton in real time. Results may lead to the development of drug-targeting strategies to treat a wide range of bone and cartilage pathologies. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  2. Quantum cryptography with perfect multiphoton entanglement.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuhui; Chan, Kam Tai

    2005-05-01

    Multiphoton entanglement in the same polarization has been shown theoretically to be obtainable by type-I spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC), which can generate bright pulses more easily than type-II SPDC. A new quantum cryptographic protocol utilizing polarization pairs with the detected type-I entangled multiphotons is proposed as quantum key distribution. We calculate the information capacity versus photon number corresponding to polarization after considering the transmission loss inside the optical fiber, the detector efficiency, and intercept-resend attacks at the level of channel error. The result compares favorably with all other schemes employing entanglement.

  3. Multiphoton polymerization using optical trap assisted nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Flad, Florian; Schäffer, Eike; Quentin, Ulf; Alexeev, Ilya; Fardel, Romain; Arnold, Craig B.; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-06-01

    In this letter, we show the combination of multiphoton polymerization and optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) for the additive manufacturing of structures with nanometer resolution. User-defined patterns of polymer nanostructures are deposited on a glass substrate by a 3.5 μm polystyrene sphere focusing IR femtosecond laser pulses, showing minimum feature sizes of λ/10. Feature size depends on the applied laser fluence and the bead surface spacing. A finite element model describes the intensity enhancement in the microbead focus. The results presented suggest that OTAN in combination with multiphoton processing is a viable technique for additive nanomanufacturing with sub-diffraction-limited resolution.

  4. Studies on wide-field-of-view multiphoton imaging using the flexible clinical multiphoton tomograph MPTflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton imaging systems are capable of high-resolution 3-D image acquisition of deep tissue. A first commercially available CE-certified biomedical system for subcelluar resolution of human skin has been launched by JenLab company with the DermaInspectR in 2002. The demand for more flexibility caused the development of the MPTflexR, which provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetic examinations. However the high resolution of clinical multiphoton tomographs are adherent with a small field-of-view (FOV) of about 360×360μm2. Especially time-consuming is the relocation of areas of interest (AOI) like lesions, sweat glands or hair shafts during a multiphoton examination. This limitation can be be overcome by macroscopic large-area (wide-field-ofview) multiphoton tomography, which is tested first within this work.

  5. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Anno, Fabio; de Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [

    F. Dell’Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)
    ], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states.

  6. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [F. Dell'Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states.

  7. Experimental observation of multiphoton Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wenchao; Golovin, Grigory; Fruhling, Colton; Haden, Daniel; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen; Liu, Cheng; Chen, Shouyuan; Banerjee, Sudeep; Umstadter, Donald

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of high-power lasers, several multiphoton processes have been reported involving electrons in strong fields. For electrons that were initially bound to atoms, both multiphoton ionization and scattering have been reported. However, for free electrons, only low-order harmonic generation has been observed until now. This limitation stems from past difficulty in achieving the required ultra-high-field strengths in scattering experiments. Highly relativistic laser intensities are required to reach the multiphoton regime of Thomson scattering, and generate high harmonics from free electrons. The scaling parameter is the normalized vector potential (a0). Previous experiments have observed phenomena in the weakly relativistic case (a0 >> 1). In ultra-intense fields (a0 >>1), the anomalous electron trajectory is predicted to produce a spectrum characterized by the merging of multiple high-order harmonic generation into a continuum. This may be viewed as the multiphoton Thomson scattering regime analogous to the wiggler of a synchrotron. Thus, the light produced reflects the electrons behavior in an ultra-intense lase field. We discuss the first experiments in the highly relativistic case (a0 15). This material is based upon work supported by NSF No. PHY-153700; US DOE, Office of Science, BES, # DE-FG02-05ER15663; AFOSR # FA9550-11-1-0157; and DHS DNDO # HSHQDC-13-C-B0036.

  8. Multiphoton microscopy imaging of developing tooth germs.

    PubMed

    Pan, Pei-Yu; Chen, Rung-Shu; Ting, Chih-Liang; Chen, Wei-Liang; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Chen, Min-Huey

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, tooth germ is observed by histological investigation with hematoxylin and eosin stain and information may loss during the process. The purpose of this study is to use multiphoton laser fluorescence microscopy to observe the developing tooth germs of mice for building up the database of the images of tooth germs and compare with those from conventional histological analysis. Tooth germs were isolated from embryonic and newborn mice with age of Embryonic Day 14.5 and Postnatal Days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Comparison of the images of tooth germ sections in multiphoton microscopy with the images of histology was performed for investigating the molar tooth germs. It was found that various signals arose from different structures of tooth germs. Pre-dentin and dentin have strong second-harmonic generation signals, while ameloblasts and enamel tissues were shown with strong autofluorescence signals. In this study, a novel multiphoton microscopy database of images from developing tooth germs in mice was set up. We confirmed that multiphoton laser microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the development of tooth germ and is worthy for further application in the study of tooth regeneration. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. The Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Three Nitrolkanes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-24

    eam experiment, using infrared multiphoton dissociation where the concept of temperature has no place, can be quantitatively related to pyrolysis ...respectively. This large release of translational energy is suggested to be due to the nature of the transition state mechanical barrier which is largely...to pyrolysis experiments which are conducted under collisional, thermal conditions and measure phenomenological quantities such as activation energies

  10. Multiphoton ionization studies of xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Echt, O.; Cook, M.C.; Castleman, A.W.

    1987-04-03

    Non-resonant multiphoton ionization of xenon clusters has revealed the same magic numbers as found in the case of electron-impact ionization. Large dissociation rates are found for the trimer through pentamer ion, measured on a time scale of approx 10/sup -7/ s after ionization.

  11. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bixler, Joel N; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU.

  12. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bixler, Joel N.; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU. PMID:26901051

  13. Procedures and applications of long-term intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Prunier, Chloé; Chen, Na; Ritsma, Laila; Vrisekoop, Nienke

    2017-09-01

    Intravital microscopy (IVM) is increasingly used in biomedical research to study dynamic processes at cellular and subcellular resolution in their natural environment. Long-term IVM especially can be applied to visualize migration and proliferation over days to months within the same animal without recurrent surgeries. Skin can be repetitively imaged without surgery. To intermittently visualize cells in other organs, such as liver, mammary gland and brain, different imaging windows including the abdominal imaging window (AIW), dermal imaging window (DIW) and cranial imaging window (CIW) have been developed. In this review, we describe the procedure of window implantation and pros and cons of each technique as well as methods to retrace a position of interest over time. In addition, different fluorescent biosensors to facilitate the tracking of cells for different purposes, such as monitoring cell migration and proliferation, are discussed. Finally, we consider new techniques and possibilities of how long-term IVM can be even further improved in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermostatic tissue platform for intravital microscopy: 'the hanging drop' model.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Dragan; Frieling, Helge; Lauer, Kai-Stephan; Bac, Vo Hoai; Richter, Joern; Wendt, Michael; Lehmann, Christian; Usichenko, Taras; Meissner, Konrad; Gruendling, Matthias

    2006-11-01

    Intravital microscopy imposes the particular problem of the combined control of the body temperature of the animal and the local temperature of the observed organ or tissues. We constructed and tested, in the rat ileum microcirculation preparation, a new organ-support platform. The platform consisted of an organ bath filled with physiological solution, and contained a suction tube, a superfusion tube, an intestine-support hand that was attached to a micromanipulator and a thermometer probe. To cover the intestine we used a cover glass plate with a plastic ring glued on its upper surface. After a routine procedure (anaesthesia, monitoring and surgery), the intestine segment (2-3 cm long) was gently exteriorized and placed on the 'hand' of the organ support. A small part of the intestine formed a small 'island' in the bath that was filled with physiological salt solution. The cover glass was secured in place. The physiological salt solution from the superfusion tube, which was pointed to the lower surface of the cover glass, formed a 'hanging drop'. The objective of the microscope was then immersed into distilled water that was formed by the cover glass plastic ring. The 'hanging drop' technique prevented any tissue quenching, ensured undisturbed microcirculation, provided for stable temperature and humidity, and permitted a clear visual field.

  15. In vivo optical imaging of cancer metastasis using multiphoton microscopy: a short review

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koji; Toiyama, Yuji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Okigami, Masato; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Araki, Toshimitsu; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Mizoguchi, Akira; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Intravital (in vivo) microscopy using fluorescently-tagged proteins is a valuable tool for imaging the expression of a specific protein, its subcellular location and the dynamics of specific cell populations in living animals. Recently, multiphoton microscopy including two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) has been used in the field of tumor biology due to its ability to image target organs at higher magnification and at deeper depths from the tissue surface for longer time periods. We developed a method of in vivo real-time imaging for tumor metastasis using TPLSM with an organ stabilizing system, which allow us to observe not only a single tumor cell and its microenvironment for a long time, but also to observe the same organ of the same mouse at multiple time points in preclinical models. Here, we presented in vivo real-time images of 1) tumor cell arrest, 2) tumor cell-platelet interaction, 3) tumor cell-leukocyte interaction, and 4) metastatic colonization at the secondary organs as representative steps of metastatic process of experimental liver metastasis models using TPLSM. PMID:24936213

  16. The skin immune atlas: three-dimensional analysis of cutaneous leukocyte subsets by multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Philip L; Roediger, Ben; Kolesnikoff, Natasha; Biro, Maté; Tay, Szun S; Jain, Rohit; Shaw, Lisa E; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific differences in skin response to pathogens and in the course of cutaneous inflammatory diseases are well appreciated. The composition and localization of cutaneous leukocytes has been studied extensively using histology and flow cytometry. However, the precise three-dimensional (3D) distribution of distinct immune cell subsets within skin at different body sites requires visualization of intact living skin. We used intravital multiphoton microscopy in transgenic reporter mice in combination with quantitative flow cytometry to generate a 3D immune cell atlas of mouse skin. The 3D location of innate and adaptive immune cells and site-specific differences in the densities of macrophages, T cells, and mast cells at four defined sites (ear, back, footpad, and tail) is presented. The combinatorial approach further demonstrates an as yet unreported age-dependent expansion of dermal gamma-delta T cells. Localization of dermal immune cells relative to anatomical structures was also determined. Although dendritic cells were dispersed homogeneously within the dermis, mast cells preferentially localized to the perivascular space. Finally, we show the functional relevance of site-specific mast cell disparities using the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model. These approaches are applicable to assessing immune cell variations and potential functional consequences in the setting of infection, as well as the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin conditions.

  17. Thrombotic distal middle cerebral artery occlusion produced by topical FeCl3 application: a novel model suitable for intravital microscopy and thrombolysis studies

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Hulya; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Gursoy-Ozdemir, Yasemin; Gurer, Gunfer; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Dunn, Andrew K; Dalkara, Turgay

    2011-01-01

    Intravital or multiphoton microscopy and laser-speckle imaging have become popular because they allow live monitoring of several processes during cerebral ischemia. Available rodent models have limitations for these experiments; e.g., filament occlusion of the proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) is difficult to perform under a microscope, whereas distal occlusion methods may damage the MCA and the peri-arterial cortex. We found that placement of a 10% FeCl3-soaked filter paper strip (0.3 × 1 mm2) on the duramater over the trunk of the distal MCA through a cranial window for 3 minutes induced intraarterial thrombus without damaging the peri-arterial cortex in the mouse. This caused a rapid regional cerebral blood flow decrease within 10 minutes and total occlusion of the MCA segment under the filter paper in 17±2 minutes, which resulted in a typical cortical infarct of 27±4 mm3 at 24 hours and moderate sensorimotor deficits. There was no significant hemispheric swelling or hemorrhage or mortality at 24 hours. Reperfusion was obtained in half of the mice with tissue plasminogen activator, which allowed live monitoring of clot lysis along with restoration of tissue perfusion and MCA flow. In conclusion, this relatively simple and noninvasive stroke model is easy to perform under a microscope, making it suitable for live imaging and thrombolysis studies. PMID:21326267

  18. Utilization of 3D printing for an intravital microscopy platform to study the intestinal microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Burkovskiy, I; Lehmann, C; Jiang, C; Zhou, J

    2016-11-01

    Intravital microscopy of the intestine is a sophisticated technique that allows qualitative and quantitative in vivo observation of dynamic cellular interactions and blood flow at a high resolution. Physiological conditions of the animal and in particular of the observed organ, such as temperature and moisture are crucial for intravital imaging. Often, the microscopy stage with the animal or the organ of interest imposes limitations on how well the animal can be maintained. In addition, the access for additional oxygen supply or drug administration during the procedure is rather restricted. To address these limitations, we developed a novel intravital microscopy platform, allowing us to have improved access to the animal during the intravital microscopy procedure, as well as improved microenvironmental maintenance. The production process of this prototype platform is based on 3D printing of device parts in a single-step process. The simplicity of production and the advantages of this versatile and customizable design are shown and discussed in this paper. Our design potentially represents a major step forward in facilitating intestinal intravital imaging using fluorescent microscopy.

  19. Context-dependent intravital imaging of therapeutic response using intramolecular FRET biosensors.

    PubMed

    Conway, James R W; Warren, Sean C; Timpson, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Intravital microscopy represents a more physiologically relevant method for assessing therapeutic response. However, the movement into an in vivo setting brings with it several additional considerations, the primary being the context in which drug activity is assessed. Microenvironmental factors, such as hypoxia, pH, fibrosis, immune infiltration and stromal interactions have all been shown to have pronounced effects on drug activity in a more complex setting, which is often lost in simpler two- or three-dimensional assays. Here we present a practical guide for the application of intravital microscopy, looking at the available fluorescent reporters and their respective expression systems and analysis considerations. Moving in vivo, we also discuss the microscopy set up and methods available for overlaying microenvironmental context to the experimental readouts. This enables a smooth transition into applying higher fidelity intravital imaging to improve the drug discovery process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Immunohistochemical expression of fibronectin in the lungs of fire victims proves intravital reaction in fatal burns.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Michael; Anderson, Jürina; Rothschild, Markus A; Böhm, Joachim

    2010-11-01

    Immunohistochemical studies about the presence of fibronectin in the lungs were performed in a group of 73 fire victims (63 cases of intravital and 10 cases of postmortem burn) as well as in an unselected control group of 55 individuals not exposed to fire before death. The cases of intravital burn showed a significantly stronger fibronectin expression than the control cases and the cases of postmortem burn. Fibronectin was mainly present in macrophages of the peribronchial lung parenchyma and, not associated with cells, in the matrix of peribronchial tissue. Our findings suggest that higher levels of fibronectin expression in the lung tissue of burn victims compared to fire-unrelated deaths may serve as an indicator of an early intravital inflammatory response to fire damage.

  1. Intravital microscopy as a tool to study drug delivery in preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The technical developments in the field of non-linear microscopy have made intravital microscopy one of the most successful techniques for studying physiological and pathological processes in live animals. Intravital microscopy has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool for preclinical studies, with an enormous potential for clinical applications. The ability to dynamically image cellular and subcellular structures combined with the possibility to perform longitudinal studies have empowered investigators to use this discipline to study the mechanisms of action of therapeutic agents and assess the efficacy on their targets in vivo. The goal of this review is to provide a general overview of the recent advances in intravital microscopy and to discuss some of its applications in preclinical studies. PMID:20933026

  2. Intravital imaging of podocyte calcium in glomerular injury and disease

    PubMed Central

    Burford, James L.; Villanueva, Karie; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Hackl, Matthias J.; Pippin, Jeffrey; Shankland, Stuart J.; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling mediates physiological and pathological processes in multiple organs, including the renal podocyte; however, in vivo podocyte [Ca2+]i dynamics are not fully understood. Here we developed an imaging approach that uses multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to directly visualize podocyte [Ca2+]i dynamics within the intact kidneys of live mice expressing a fluorescent calcium indicator only in these cells. [Ca2+]i was at a low steady-state level in control podocytes, while Ang II infusion caused a minor elevation. Experimental focal podocyte injury triggered a robust and sustained elevation of podocyte [Ca2+]i around the injury site and promoted cell-to-cell propagating podocyte [Ca2+]i waves along capillary loops. [Ca2+]i wave propagation was ameliorated by inhibitors of purinergic [Ca2+]i signaling as well as in animals lacking the P2Y2 purinergic receptor. Increased podocyte [Ca2+]i resulted in contraction of the glomerular tuft and increased capillary albumin permeability. In preclinical models of renal fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, high podocyte [Ca2+]i correlated with increased cell motility. Our findings provide a visual demonstration of the in vivo importance of podocyte [Ca2+]i in glomerular pathology and suggest that purinergic [Ca2+]i signaling is a robust and key pathogenic mechanism in podocyte injury. This in vivo imaging approach will allow future detailed investigation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of glomerular disease in the intact living kidney. PMID:24713653

  3. Multiphoton imaging of renal regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Toma, Ildikó; Sipos, Arnold; Vargas, Sarah L

    2009-04-01

    Most physiological functions of the kidneys, including the clearance of metabolic waste products, maintenance of body fluid, electrolyte homeostasis, and blood pressure, are achieved by complex interactions between multiple renal cell types and previously inaccessible structures in many organ parts that have been difficult to study. Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy offers a state-of-the-art imaging technique for deep optical sectioning of living tissues and organs with minimal deleterious effects. Dynamic regulatory processes and multiple functions in the intact kidney can be quantitatively visualized in real time, noninvasively, and with submicron resolution. This article reviews innovative multiphoton imaging technologies and their applications that provided the most complex, immediate, and dynamic portrayal of renal function-clearly depicting as well as analyzing the components and mechanisms involved in renal (patho)physiology.

  4. Collective multiphoton blockade in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C. J.; Yang, Y. P.; Agarwal, G. S.

    2017-06-01

    We present a study of collective multiphoton blockade in coherently driven atoms in a single-mode cavity. Considering two atoms strongly coupled to an optical cavity, we show that the two-photon blockade with two-photon antibunching, and the three-photon blockade with three-photon antibunching can be observed simultaneously. The three-photon blockade probes both dressed states in the two-photon and three-photon spaces. The two-photon and three-photon blockades strongly depend on the location of the two atoms in the strong-coupling regime. The asymmetry in the atom-cavity coupling constants opens pathways for multiphoton blockade which is also shown to be sensitive to the atomic decay and pumping strengths. The work presented here predicts many quantum statistical features due to the collective behavior of atoms and can be useful to generate nonclassical photon pairs.

  5. In vivo multiphoton tomography of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Buckle, Rainer; Dimitrow, Enrico; Kaatz, Martin; Fluhr, Joachim; Elsner, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The multiphoton tomograph DermaInspect was used to perform first clinical studies on the early non-invasive detection of skin cancer based on non-invasive optical sectioning of skin by two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation. In particular, deep-tissue pigmented lesions -nevi- have been imaged with intracellular resolution using near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser radiation. So far, more than 250 patients have been investigated. Cancerous tissues showed significant morphological differences compared to normal skin layers. In the case of malignant melanoma, the occurrence of luminescent melanocytes has been detected. Multiphoton tomography will become a novel non-invasive method to obtain high-resolution 3D optical biopsies for early cancer detection, treatment control, and in situ drug screening.

  6. Multiphoton tomography to detect chemo- and biohazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    In vivo high-resolution multiphoton/CARS tomography provides optical biopsies with 300 nm lateral resolution with chemical fingerprints. Thousands of volunteers and patients have been investigated for early cancer diagnosis, evaluation of anti-ageing cosmetic products, and changes of cellular metabolism by UV exposure and decreased oxygen supply. The skin as the outermost and largest organ is also the major target of CB agents. Current UV-based sensors are useful for bio-aerosol sensing but not for evaluating exposed in vivo skin. Here we evaluate the use of 4D multiphoton/CARS tomographs based on near infrared femtosecond laser radiation, time-correlated single photon counting (FLIM) and white light generation by photonic crystal fibers to detect bio- and chemohazards in human in vivo skin using twophoton fluorescence, SHG, and Raman signals.

  7. Multiphoton adiabatic passage for atom optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demeter, Gabor; Djotyan, Gagik P.

    2009-04-15

    We study the force exerted on two-level atoms by short, counterpropagating laser pulses. When the counterpropagating pulses overlap each other partially, multiphoton adiabatic processes are possible in several configurations, which amplify the force exerted on the atoms. We investigate the practical usefulness of such multiphoton adiabatic transitions for the manipulation of the atoms' mechanical state. In particular, we compare the efficiency of a pair of constant frequency, oppositely detuned laser pulses and that of a pair of frequency-chirped pulses. We also consider the case of prolonged exposure to a sequence of laser pulses for a duration that is comparable to or much larger than the spontaneous lifetime of the atoms. We use numerical methods to calculate the reduction of the force and the heating of the atomic ensemble when spontaneous emission cannot be neglected during the interaction. In addition, we derive simple approximate formulas for the force and the heating, and compare them to the numerical results.

  8. Multiphoton tomography of intratissue tattoo nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2012-02-01

    Most of today's intratissue tattoo pigments are unknown nanoparticles. So far, there was no real control of their use due to the absence of regulations. Some of the tattoo pigments contain carcinogenic amines e.g. azo pigment Red 22. Nowadays, the European Union starts to control the administration of tattoo pigments. There is an interest to obtain information on the intratissue distribution, their interaction with living cells and the extracellular matrix, and the mechanisms behind laser tattoo removal. Multiphoton tomographs are novel biosafety and imaging tools that can provide such information non-invasively and without further labeling. When using the spectral FLIM module, spatially-resolved emission spectra, excitation spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes can pr provided. Multiphoton tomographs are used by all major cosmetic comapanies to test the biosafety of sunscreen nanoparticles.

  9. Photophysics of infrared multiphoton excitation in thiophosgene

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, D.M.; Spencer, M.N.; Steinfeld, J.I.

    1983-01-01

    IR multiphoton absorption (IRMPA) in thiophosgene has been studied by IR-visible double resonance. In particular, the probability of absorption has been measured in both collision-free (molecular beam) and collision-perturbed environments by monitoring the depopulation of the ground state level (000000). Although no evidence for true multiphoton absorption is found, a number of important observations have been made. (1) No correlation exists between the IRMPA spectrum under collision-free conditions and the low energy IR absorption spectrum. (2) Homogeneous depletion of rotational populations occurs at all CO/sub 2/-laser frequencies. (3) Bottlenecks to absorption do not occur in the pumped-mode ladder. (4) The probability of absorption depends inversely on pressure and is affected dramatically by long-range collisions. These results are interpreted in the framework of an optical Bloch equation model.

  10. Gene inactivation by multiphoton-targeted photochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Berns, Michael W.; Wang, Zifu; Dunn, Andrew; Wallace, Vincent; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2000-01-01

    Multiphoton-targeted photochemistry was used to selectively inactivate the expression of genes in vertebrate cells. A membrane permeable DNA-associating vital dye, ethidium bromide monoacetate (visible wavelength single photon absorption peak at 530 nm) was used to photosensitize chromosomes in dividing cells. A 100-ps infrared laser beam operating at 1.06 microns was focused onto a selected region of a mitotic chromosome corresponding to the sites of the nucleolar (ribosomal) genes. Individual cells followed through mitosis demonstrated a reduction in the number of nucleoli formed in daughter cells that corresponded to the number of nucleolar genes sites irradiated. These results demonstrate the ability to selectively manipulate genes by using the focal point specificity characteristic of multiphoton microscopy. This technique should have wide biotechnology applications both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:10944219

  11. Clinical multiphoton endoscopy with FLIM capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    Multiphoton endoscopy can be applied for intra-corporeal imaging as well as to examine otherwise hard-to-access tissue areas like chronic wounds. Using high-NA (NA = 0.8) gradient-index (GRIN) lens-based endoscopes with a diameter of 1.4 mm and effective lengths of 7 mm and 20 mm, respectively, two-photon excitation of endogenous fluorophores and second-harmonic generation (SHG) is used for multimodal in vivo imaging of human skin. A further imaging modality is fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) which allows functional imaging to investigate the healing mechanism of chronic wounds and the corresponding cell metabolism. We performed first in vivo measurements using FLIM endoscopy with the medically-certified multiphoton tomograph MPTflex® in combination with a computer-controlled motorized scan head and a GRIN-lens endoscope.

  12. Assessing and benchmarking multiphoton microscopes for biologists

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Kaitlin; Pinkard, Henry; Peck, Sebastian; Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2017-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become staple tool for tracking cells within tissues and organs due to superior depth of penetration, low excitation volumes, and reduced phototoxicity. Many factors, ranging from laser pulse width to relay optics to detectors and electronics, contribute to the overall ability of these microscopes to excite and detect fluorescence deep within tissues. However, we have found that there are few standard ways already described in the literature to distinguish between microscopes or to benchmark existing microscopes to measure the overall quality and efficiency of these instruments. Here, we discuss some simple parameters and methods that can either be used within a multiphoton facility or by a prospective purchaser to benchmark performance. This can both assist in identifying decay in microscope performance and in choosing features of a scope that are suited to experimental needs. PMID:24974026

  13. Assessing and benchmarking multiphoton microscopes for biologists.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Kaitlin; Pinkard, Henry; Peck, Sebastian; Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F

    2014-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become staple tool for tracking cells within tissues and organs due to superior depth of penetration, low excitation volumes, and reduced phototoxicity. Many factors, ranging from laser pulse width to relay optics to detectors and electronics, contribute to the overall ability of these microscopes to excite and detect fluorescence deep within tissues. However, we have found that there are few standard ways already described in the literature to distinguish between microscopes or to benchmark existing microscopes to measure the overall quality and efficiency of these instruments. Here, we discuss some simple parameters and methods that can either be used within a multiphoton facility or by a prospective purchaser to benchmark performance. This can both assist in identifying decay in microscope performance and in choosing features of a scope that are suited to experimental needs. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Studies of atmospheric molecules by multiphoton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1991-10-01

    Carbon dioxide presents a great challenge to spectroscopy because of its propensity toward dissociation in all of its excited states. Multiphoton ionization spectroscopy is usually not applicable to the study of dissociating molecules because the dissociation competes effectively with ionization, resulting in no signal. We reasoned, however, that with high enough laser fluence, ionization could compete with dissociation in the longer lived states, exposing them for study from the continuous spectral background resulting from rapidly dissociating states. We describe the various spectroscopic and photophysical effects found through the multiphoton ionization and multiphoton photoelectron spectra. A recently developed variant of threshold ionization spectroscopy, usually called ZEKE, has shown a great deal of usefulness in providing the same information as traditional photoelectron spectroscopy but with higher resolution and much better signal-to-noise when using standard laboratory lasers. Threshold ionization techniques locate the states of an ion by scanning a light source across the ionization continuum of a neutral and somehow detecting when electrons are produced with no kinetic energy. We chose to develop our capabilities in threshold ionization spectroscopy using aromatic molecules because of their importance and because their electronic structure allows a pump-probe type of excitation scheme which avoids the use of vacuum ultraviolet laser beams. Among aromatics, the azines are noted for their small S{sub 1}-T{sub 1} energy gap which give them unique and interesting photophysical properties. We have continued our work on the multiphoton spectrum of metastable nitrogen produced by an electric discharge in supersonic beam. We have been able to assign more of the lines and simulated their rotational structure but many peaks remain unassigned.

  15. Multiphoton spectroscopy of human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Hans G.; Weinigel, Martin; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    In vivo multiphoton-intensity images and emission spectra of human skin are reported. Optical sections from different depths of the epidermis and dermis have been measured with near-infrared laser-pulse excitation. While the intensity images reveal information on the morphology, the spectra show emission characteristics of main endogenous skin fluorophores like keratin, NAD(P)H, melanin, elastin and collagen as well as of second harmonic generation induced by the excitation-light interaction with the dermal collagen network.

  16. First multiphoton tomography of brain in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Kantelhardt, Sven R.; Kalasauskas, Darius; Kim, Ella; Giese, Alf

    2016-03-01

    We report on the first two-photon in vivo brain tissue imaging study in man. High resolution in vivo histology by multiphoton tomography (MPT) including two-photon FLIM was performed in the operation theatre during neurosurgery to evaluate the feasibility to detect label-free tumor borders with subcellular resolution. This feasibility study demonstrates, that MPT has the potential to identify tumor borders on a cellular level in nearly real-time.

  17. Superresolving multiphoton interferences with independent light sources.

    PubMed

    Oppel, S; Büttner, T; Kok, P; von Zanthier, J

    2012-12-07

    We propose to use multiphoton interferences from statistically independent light sources in combination with linear optical detection techniques to enhance the resolution in imaging. Experimental results with up to five independent thermal light sources confirm this approach to improve the spatial resolution. Since no involved quantum state preparation or detection is required, the experiment can be considered an extension of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiment for spatial intensity correlations of order N>2.

  18. Multiphoton imaging of renal tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2005-06-01

    The highly inhomogeneous and light-scattering structure of living renal tissue makes the application of conventional imaging techniques more difficult compared with other parenchymal organs. On the other hand, key physiological processes of the kidney, such as regulation of glomerular filtration, hemodynamics, concentration, and dilution, involve complex interactions between multiple cell types and otherwise inaccessible structures that necessitate visual approaches. An ideal solution is multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy, a state-of-the-art imaging technique superior for deep optical sectioning of living tissue samples. Here, we review the basics and advantages of multiphoton microscopy and provide examples for its application in renal physiology using dissected cortical and medullary tissues in vitro. In combination with microperfusion techniques, the major functions of the juxtaglomerular apparatus, tubuloglomerular feedback and renin release, can be studied with high spatial and temporal resolution. Salt-dependent changes in macula densa cell volume, vasoconstriction of the afferent arteriole, and activity of an intraglomerular precapillary sphincter composed of renin granular cells are visualized in real time. Release and tissue activity of renin can be studied on the individual granule level. Imaging of the living inner medulla shows how interstitial cells interconnect cells of the vasa recta, loop of Henle, and collecting duct. In summary, multiphoton microscopy is an exciting new optical sectioning technique that has great potential for numerous future developments and is ideal for applications that require deep optical sectioning of living tissue samples.

  19. Live cell imaging by multifocal multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Straub, M; Lodemann, P; Holroyd, P; Jahn, R; Hell, S W

    2000-10-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) permits parallel multiphoton excitation by scanning an array of high numerical aperture foci across a plane in the sample. MMM is particularly suitable for live cell investigations since it combines advantages of standard multiphoton microscopy such as optical sectioning and suppression of out-of-focus phototoxicity with high recording speeds. Here we describe several applications of MMM to live cell imaging using the neuroendocrine cell line PC12 and bovine chromaffin cells. Stainings were performed with the acidophilic dye acridine orange and the lipophilic dyes FM1-43 and Fast DiA as well as by transfection of the cells with GFP. In both bovine chromaffin and PC12 cells structural elements of nuclear chromatin and the 3-D distribution of acidic organelles inside the cells were visualized. In PC12 cells differentiated by nerve growth factor examples of neurites were monitored. Stainings of membranes were used to reconstruct the morphology of cells and neurites in three dimensions by volume-rendering and by isosurface plots. 3-D reconstructions were composed from stacks of about 50 images each with a diameter of 30-100 microm that were acquired within a few seconds. We conclude that MMM proves to be a technically simple and very effective method for fast 3-D live cell imaging at high resolution.

  20. In vivo multiphoton nanosurgery on cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Sacconi, Leonardo; O'Connor, Rodney P; Jasaitis, Audrius; Masi, Alessio; Buffelli, Mario; Pavone, Francesco S

    2007-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy has been used to perform high spatial resolution imaging of spine plasticity in the intact neocortex of living mice. Multiphoton absorption has also been used as a tool for the selective disruption of cellular structures in living cells and simple organisms. In this work, we exploit the spatial localization of multiphoton excitation to perform selective lesions on the neuronal processes of cortical neurons in living mice expressing fluorescent proteins. Neurons are irradiated with a focused, controlled dose of femtosecond laser energy delivered through cranial optical windows. The morphological consequences are then characterized with time lapse 3-D two-photon imaging over a period of minutes to days after the procedure. This methodology is applied to dissect single dendrites with submicrometric precision without causing any visible collateral damage to the surrounding neuronal structures. The spatial precision of this method is demonstrated by ablating individual dendritic spines, while sparing the adjacent spines and the structural integrity of the dendrite. The combination of multiphoton nanosurgery and in vivo imaging in mammals represents a promising tool for neurobiology and neuropharmacology research.

  1. Surgical preparation of rats and mice for intravital microscopic imaging of abdominal organs.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, George J

    2017-09-01

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful research tool that can provide insight into cellular and subcellular events that take place in organs in the body. However, meaningful results can only be obtained from animals whose physiology is preserved during the process of microscopy. Here I discuss the importance of preserving the overall state of health of the animal, methods of anesthesia, surgical techniques for intravital microscopy of various abdominal organs, methods to maintain and monitor the physiology of the animal during microscopy and associated peri- and post-operative recovery considerations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intravital imaging of podocyte calcium in glomerular injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Burford, James L; Villanueva, Karie; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Hackl, Matthias J; Pippin, Jeffrey; Shankland, Stuart J; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2014-05-01

    Intracellular calcium ([Ca²⁺]i) signaling mediates physiological and pathological processes in multiple organs, including the renal podocyte; however, in vivo podocyte [Ca²⁺]i dynamics are not fully understood. Here we developed an imaging approach that uses multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to directly visualize podocyte [Ca²⁺]i dynamics within the intact kidneys of live mice expressing a fluorescent calcium indicator only in these cells. [Ca²⁺]i was at a low steady-state level in control podocytes, while Ang II infusion caused a minor elevation. Experimental focal podocyte injury triggered a robust and sustained elevation of podocyte [Ca²⁺]i around the injury site and promoted cell-to-cell propagating podocyte [Ca²⁺]i waves along capillary loops. [Ca²⁺]i wave propagation was ameliorated by inhibitors of purinergic [Ca²⁺]i signaling as well as in animals lacking the P2Y2 purinergic receptor. Increased podocyte [Ca²⁺]i resulted in contraction of the glomerular tuft and increased capillary albumin permeability. In preclinical models of renal fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, high podocyte [Ca²⁺]i correlated with increased cell motility. Our findings provide a visual demonstration of the in vivo importance of podocyte [Ca²⁺]i in glomerular pathology and suggest that purinergic [Ca²⁺]i signaling is a robust and key pathogenic mechanism in podocyte injury. This in vivo imaging approach will allow future detailed investigation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of glomerular disease in the intact living kidney.

  3. Multiphoton spectroscopy of Rydberg states of small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Stephen T.; McCormack, E. F.; Dehmer, Joseph L.; Dehmer, Patricia M.

    1990-09-01

    Multiphoton ionization techniques provide a versatile means for studying highly excited states of atoms and molecules and provide a valuable complement to traditional techniques based on single-photon absorption and ionization studies. In this paper we present the results of new multiphoton ionization studies of molecular nitrogen and molecular oxygen that serve to illustrate the power of these techniques. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Tumor Microvasculature and Microenvironment: Novel Insights Through Intravital Imaging in Pre-Clinical Models

    PubMed Central

    Fukumura, Dai; Duda, Dan G.; Munn, Lance L.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Intravital imaging techniques have provided unprecedented insight into tumor microcirculation and microenvironment. For example, these techniques allowed quantitative evaluations of tumor blood vasculature to uncover its abnormal organization, structure and function (e.g., hyper-permeability, heterogeneous and compromised blood flow). Similarly, imaging of functional lymphatics has documented their absence inside tumors. These abnormalities result in elevated interstitial fluid pressure and hinder the delivery of therapeutic agents to tumors. In addition, they induce a hostile microenvironment characterized by hypoxia and acidosis, as documented by intravital imaging. The abnormal microenvironment further lowers the effectiveness of anti-tumor treatments such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. In addition to these mechanistic insights, intravital imaging may also offer new opportunities to improve therapy. For example, tumor angiogenesis results in immature, dysfunctional vessels—primarily caused by an imbalance in production of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors by the tumors. Restoring the balance of pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling in tumors can “normalize” tumor vasculature and thus, improve its function, as demonstrated by intravital imaging studies in preclinical models and in cancer patients. Administration of cytotoxic therapy during periods of vascular normalization has the potential to enhance treatment efficacy. PMID:20374484

  5. Some simple mechanisms of multiphoton excitation in many - level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donley, E. A.; Marquardt, R.; Quack, M.; Stohner, J.; Thanopulos, I.; Wallenborn, E.-U.

    Results are reported on coherent monochromatic multiphoton excitation in many-level systems, which are representative for some of the basic mechanisms for atomic and molecular multiphoton processes. Numerical solutions are discussed that use the Floquet and quasiresonant approximations in the framework of the URIMIR program package. The excitation schemes include direct three-photon excitation, two-photon excitation with diagonal coupling, Göppert-Mayer-type two-photon processes, multiphoton excitation with off-resonant intermediates, and practically irreversible coherent excitation into dense spectral structures. Several interesting phenomena are observed, such as nonlinear line shifts and broadenings of multiphoton resonances of relevance for multiphoton spectroscopy and almost constant intermediate population inversions, potentially useful for laser design. The accurate numerical results are compared with approximate solutions from perturbation theory, and with simple analytical solutions from Rabi-type formulae.

  6. Pulse front adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The accurate focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important in multiphoton microscopy. Using adaptive optics to manipulate the incident ultrafast beam in either the spectral or spatial domain can introduce significant benefits when imaging. Here we introduce pulse front adaptive optics: manipulating an ultrashort pulse in both the spatial and temporal domains. A deformable mirror and a spatial light modulator are operated in concert to modify contours of constant intensity in space and time within an ultrashort pulse. Through adaptive control of the pulse front, we demonstrate an enhancement in the measured fluorescence from a two photon microscope.

  7. Electron Vortices in Femtosecond Multiphoton Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengel, D.; Kerbstadt, S.; Johannmeyer, D.; Englert, L.; Bayer, T.; Wollenhaupt, M.

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton ionization of potassium atoms with a sequence of two counter-rotating circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses produces vortex-shaped photoelectron momentum distributions in the polarization plane describing Archimedean spirals. The pulse sequences are produced by polarization shaping and the three-dimensional photoelectron distributions are tomographically reconstructed from velocity map imaging measurements. We show that perturbative ionization leads to electron vortices with c6 rotational symmetry. A change from c6 to c4 rotational symmetry of the vortices is demonstrated for nonperturbative interaction.

  8. Efficient Multiphoton Generation in Waveguide Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    González-Tudela, A; Paulisch, V; Kimble, H J; Cirac, J I

    2017-05-26

    Engineering quantum states of light is at the basis of many quantum technologies such as quantum cryptography, teleportation, or metrology among others. Though, single photons can be generated in many scenarios, the efficient and reliable generation of complex single-mode multiphoton states is still a long-standing goal in the field, as current methods either suffer from low fidelities or small probabilities. Here we discuss several protocols which harness the strong and long-range atomic interactions induced by waveguide QED to efficiently load excitations in a collection of atoms, which can then be triggered to produce the desired multiphoton state. In order to boost the success probability and fidelity of each excitation process, atoms are used to both generate the excitations in the rest, as well as to herald the successful generation. Furthermore, to overcome the exponential scaling of the probability of success with the number of excitations, we design a protocol to merge excitations that are present in different internal atomic levels with a polynomial scaling.

  9. Ultrafast Multiphoton Thermionic Photoemission from Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shijing; Argondizzo, Adam; Wang, Cong; Cui, Xuefeng; Petek, Hrvoje

    2017-01-01

    Electronic heating of cold crystal lattices in nonlinear multiphoton excitation can transiently alter their physical and chemical properties. In metals where free electron densities are high and the relative fraction of photoexcited hot electrons is low, the effects are small, but in semimetals, where the free electron densities are low and the photoexcited densities can overwhelm them, the intense femtosecond laser excitation can induce profound changes. In semimetal graphite and its derivatives, strong optical absorption, weak screening of the Coulomb potential, and high cohesive energy enable extreme hot electron generation and thermalization to be realized under femtosecond laser excitation. We investigate the nonlinear interactions within a hot electron gas in graphite through multiphoton-induced thermionic emission. Unlike the conventional photoelectric effect, within about 25 fs, the memory of the excitation process, where resonant dipole transitions absorb up to eight quanta of light, is erased to produce statistical Boltzmann electron distributions with temperatures exceeding 5000 K; this ultrafast electronic heating causes thermionic emission to occur from the interlayer band of graphite. The nearly instantaneous thermalization of the photoexcited carriers through Coulomb scattering to extreme electronic temperatures characterized by separate electron and hole chemical potentials can enhance hot electron surface femtochemistry, photovoltaic energy conversion, and incandescence, and drive graphite-to-diamond electronic phase transition.

  10. Multiphoton tomography of the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Batista, Ana; Hager, Tobias; Seitz, Berthold

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton tomography (MPT) is a novel label-free clinical imaging method for non-invasive tissue imaging with high spatial (300 nm) and temporal (100 ps) resolutions. In vivo optical histology can be realized due to the nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and second-harmonic generation (SHG) of collagen. Furthermore, optical metabolic imaging (OMI) is performed by two-photon autofluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). So far, applications of the multiphoton tomographs DermaInspect and MPTflex were limited to dermatology. Novel applications include intraoperative brain tumor imaging as well as cornea imaging. In this work we describe two-photon imaging of ex vivo human corneas unsuitable for transplantation. Furthermore, the cross-linking (CXL) process of corneal collagen based on UVA exposure and 0.1 % riboflavin was studied. The pharmacokinetics of the photosensitizer could be detected with high spatial resolution. Interestingly, an increase in the stromal autofluorescence intensity and modifications of the autofluorescence lifetimes were observed in the human corneal samples within a few days following CXL.

  11. Development of an applicator for multiphoton PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graschew, Georgi; Bastian, Matthias; Rakowsky, Stefan; Roelofs, Theo A.; Balanos, Evangelos; Schlag, Peter M.; Steinmeyer, Gunter; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    Multiphoton excitation of photosensitizers for laser induced fluorescence diagnosis (LIFD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumors has the advantage of greater tissue penetration due to the longer wavelength of irradiation. However, multiphoton LIFD and PDT are presently not clinically applicable as there are no applicators available for the delivery of the pulsed laser radiation to the operating room. As an approach, in this contribution the beam delivery through photonic crystal fibers has been investigated. Pulses of a Ti:sapphire laser of 100 fs pulse duration and an average power of 150 mW have been transported through such a fiber of 25 m length and the resulting pulses show the absence of nonlinear contributions but still a broadening of the pulse to 2 ps due to the dispersion of the fiber. It is planned to compensate this broadening by a grating in front of the fiber. Alternatively, the transport of laser radiation of 150 fs and 100 mW through a mirror-joint-arm used for conventional CO2 lasers has been tested showing no broadening of the laser pulses. Two-photon photodynamic activity of mTHPC-CMPEG4 shall serve as a test of the laser light transport system.

  12. Efficient Multiphoton Generation in Waveguide Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Tudela, A.; Paulisch, V.; Kimble, H. J.; Cirac, J. I.

    2017-05-01

    Engineering quantum states of light is at the basis of many quantum technologies such as quantum cryptography, teleportation, or metrology among others. Though, single photons can be generated in many scenarios, the efficient and reliable generation of complex single-mode multiphoton states is still a long-standing goal in the field, as current methods either suffer from low fidelities or small probabilities. Here we discuss several protocols which harness the strong and long-range atomic interactions induced by waveguide QED to efficiently load excitations in a collection of atoms, which can then be triggered to produce the desired multiphoton state. In order to boost the success probability and fidelity of each excitation process, atoms are used to both generate the excitations in the rest, as well as to herald the successful generation. Furthermore, to overcome the exponential scaling of the probability of success with the number of excitations, we design a protocol to merge excitations that are present in different internal atomic levels with a polynomial scaling.

  13. Multiphoton imaging with a nanosecond supercontinuum source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Claire; O'Connor, Rodney P.; Blanquet, Véronique; Baraige, Fabienne; Tombelaine, Vincent; Lévêque, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a well-established technique for biological imaging of several kinds of targets. It is classically based on multiphoton processes allowing two means of contrast simultaneously: two-photon fluorescence (TPF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Today, the quasi exclusive laser technology used in that aim is femtosecond titanium sapphire (Ti: Sa) laser. We experimentally demonstrate that a nanosecond supercontinuum laser source (STM-250-VIS-IR-custom, Leukos, France; 1 ns, 600-2400 nm, 250 kHz, 1 W) allows to obtain the same kind of image quality in the case of both TPF and SHG, since it is properly filtered. The first set of images concerns the muscle of a mouse. It highlights the simultaneous detection of TPF and SHG. TPF is obtained thanks to the labelling of alpha-actinin with Alexa Fluor® 546 by immunochemistry. SHG is created from the non-centrosymmetric organization of myosin. As expected, discs of actin and myosin are superimposed alternatively. The resulting images are compared with those obtained from a standard femtosecond Ti: Sa source. The physical parameters of the supercontinuum are discussed. Finally, all the interest of using an ultra-broadband source is presented with images obtained in vivo on the brain of a mouse where tumor cells labeled with eGFP are grafted. Texas Red® conjugating Dextran is injected into the blood vessels network. Thus, two fluorophores having absorption wavelengths separated by 80 nm are imaged simultaneously with a single laser source.

  14. Sub-cycle dynamics of multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Dmitry A.; Nasiri Avanaki, K.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    Sub-cycle oscillatory structures are revealed in calculated time-dependent multiphoton ionization rates. Both atomic and molecular targets manifest multiple ionization bursts per one optical cycle of the laser field. Using the accurate and efficient time-dependent generalized pseudospectral method to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we have performed calculations on H, He+, H2+,and HHe2+, for the laser fields with several intensities and wavelengths in the near-infrared range (750 nm to 1064 nm). The sub-cycle structures appear a universal feature of multiphoton ionization and become well pronounced for sufficiently strong laser fields depending on the target atom or molecule. Analysis of the electron density distributions on the sub-femtosecond time scale shows several time moments per optical cycle (not necessarily corresponding to the peak values of the laser field) when significant portions of the electron density move away from the nucleus giving rise to the bursts in the ionization rate. The nature of the phenomenon can be related to ionization through different pathways, including direct ionization as well as population of the excited states by the laser field with subsequent ionization at later times. This work is partially supported by DOE.

  15. Multifocal multiphoton microscopy with adaptive optical correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Simao; Poland, Simon; Krstajic, Nikola; Li, David; Monypenny, James; Walker, Richard; Tyndall, David; Ng, Tony; Henderson, Robert; Ameer-Beg, Simon

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a well established approach for measuring dynamic signalling events inside living cells, including detection of protein-protein interactions. The improvement in optical penetration of infrared light compared with linear excitation due to Rayleigh scattering and low absorption have provided imaging depths of up to 1mm in brain tissue but significant image degradation occurs as samples distort (aberrate) the infrared excitation beam. Multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) FLIM is a method for obtaining functional, high resolution images of biological structures. In order to achieve good statistical accuracy TCSPC typically requires long acquisition times. We report the development of a multifocal multiphoton microscope (MMM), titled MegaFLI. Beam parallelization performed via a 3D Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), increases TCSPC count rate proportional to the number of beamlets produced. A weighted 3D GS algorithm is employed to improve homogeneity. An added benefit is the implementation of flexible and adaptive optical correction. Adaptive optics performed by means of Zernike polynomials are used to correct for system induced aberrations. Here we present results with significant improvement in throughput obtained using a novel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) 1024 pixel single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array, opening the way to truly high-throughput FLIM.

  16. Nonperturbative multiphoton processes and electron-positron pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Mueller, C.; Keitel, C. H.

    2006-04-07

    Various regimes of pair production in laser fields are analyzed. Particularly, the question of the observability of pair production in a nonperturbative multiphoton regime is discussed. A simple heuristic method is employed which gives order-of-magnitude estimates for probabilities of multiphoton processes and allows to describe its main features. The method is initially probed upon the known process of pair production in a Coulomb and a strong laser field. Then it is applied to the nonperturbative multiphoton regime of the pair production process in a standing laser wave.

  17. Nonperturbative multiphoton processes and electron-positron pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Müller, C.; Keitel, C. H.

    2006-04-01

    Various regimes of pair production in laser fields are analyzed. Particularly, the question of the observability of pair production in a nonperturbative multiphoton regime is discussed. A simple heuristic method is employed which gives order-of-magnitude estimates for probabilities of multiphoton processes and allows to describe its main features. The method is initially probed upon the known process of pair production in a Coulomb and a strong laser field. Then it is applied to the nonperturbative multiphoton regime of the pair production process in a standing laser wave.

  18. Multiphoton entanglement through a Bell-multiport beam splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Lim Yuanliang; Beige, Almut

    2005-06-15

    Multiphoton entanglement is an important resource for linear optics quantum computing. Here we show that a wide range of highly entangled multiphoton states, including W-states, can be prepared by interfering single photons inside a Bell multiport beam splitter and using postselection. A successful state preparation is indicated by the collection of one photon per output port. An advantage of the Bell multiport beam splitter is that it redirects the photons without changing their inner degrees of freedom. The described setup can therefore be used to generate polarization, time-bin, and frequency multiphoton entanglement, even when using only a single photon source.

  19. Coherent scattering of a multiphoton quantum superposition by a mirror BEC.

    PubMed

    De Martini, Francesco; Sciarrino, Fabio; Vitelli, Chiara; Cataliotti, Francesco S

    2010-02-05

    We present the proposition of an experiment in which the multiphoton quantum superposition consisting of N approximately 10{5} particles generated by a quantum-injected optical parametric amplifier, seeded by a single-photon belonging to an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled pair, is made to interact with a mirror-Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) shaped as a Bragg interference structure. The overall process will realize a macroscopic quantum superposition involving a microscopic single-photon state of polarization entangled with the coherent macroscopic transfer of momentum to the BEC structure, acting in spacelike separated distant places.

  20. High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Multiphoton Processes in Atoms and Molecules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-15

    Poliakoff , P. M. Dehmer, and J. L. Dehmer, "Photoelectron Studies of Resonant Multiphoton Ionization of CO via the A ’R State," J. Chen. Phys. 78, 65 (1983...7. E. D. Poliakoff , J. L. Deher, P. M. Debmer, and A. C. Parr, "Vibrationally-Resolved Photoelectron Angular Distributions for H2 ," Chem. Phys...submitted for publication. 6 ABSTR.ACTS OF C.ONFEENC PRESENTATIONS 1. J. L. Dehmer, E. D. Poliakoff , and P. M. Dehmer, "Photoelectron Angular

  1. Intravital Microscopy in the Cremaster Muscle Microcirculation for Endothelial Dysfunction Studies.

    PubMed

    Rius, Cristina; Sanz, María J

    2015-01-01

    The intravital microscopy in the mouse cremaster muscle microcirculation is a method widely used to visualize in vivo blood cells interacting with the endothelium and within the vessels. Therefore, it is a suitable technique to study leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions along every stage of the canonical leukocyte recruitment cascade: rolling, adhesion, intravascular crawling, and migration both in postcapillary venules and arterioles of the mouse cremasteric microcirculation. This technique also enables to assess vessel functionality, since hemodynamic parameters such as shear stress, flow rate, and vasodilatation/vasoconstriction, among other vascular events, can be additionally determined. Furthermore, response to multiple drugs and mechanisms underlying blood cells interactions within the vascular system can be studied in a real scenario. This chapter describes a protocol for intravital microscopy in the mouse cremaster muscle microcirculation.

  2. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  3. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Carlotta; Bonora, Massimo; Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-30

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca²⁺). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca²⁺ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway.

  4. Validation of a device for the active manipulation of the tumor microenvironment during intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James K.; Entenberg, David; Wang, Yarong; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Padgen, Michael; Clark, Ashley; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.; Castracane, James; Condeelis, John S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tumor microenvironment is recognized as playing a significant role in the behavior of tumor cells and their progression to metastasis. However, tools to manipulate the tumor microenvironment directly, and image the consequences of this manipulation with single cell resolution in real time in vivo, are lacking. We describe here a method for the direct, local manipulation of microenvironmental parameters through the use of an implantable Induction Nano Intravital Device (iNANIVID) and simultaneous in vivo visualization of the results at single-cell resolution. As a proof of concept, we deliver both a sustained dose of EGF to tumor cells while intravital imaging their chemotactic response as well as locally induce hypoxia in defined microenvironments in solid tumors. PMID:27790386

  5. Elucidation of monocyte/macrophage dynamics and function by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rua, Rejane; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are a diverse population of innate immune cells that play a critical role in homeostasis and inflammation. These cells are surveillant by nature and closely monitor the vasculature and surrounding tissue during states of health and disease. Given their abundance and strategic positioning throughout the body, myeloid cells are among the first responders to any inflammatory challenge and are active participants in most immune-mediated diseases. Recent studies have shed new light on myeloid cell dynamics and function by use of an imaging technique referred to as intravital microscopy (IVM). This powerful approach allows researchers to gain real-time insights into monocytes and macrophages performing homeostatic and inflammatory tasks in living tissues. In this review, we will present a contemporary synopsis of how intravital microscopy has revolutionized our understanding of myeloid cell contributions to vascular maintenance, microbial defense, autoimmunity, tumorigenesis, and acute/chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26162402

  6. Imaging the beating heart in the mouse using intravital microscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Aguirre, Aaron D; Lee, Sungon; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Real-time microscopic imaging of moving organs at single-cell resolution represents a major challenge in studying complex biology in living systems. Motion of the tissue from the cardiac and respiratory cycles severely limits intravital microscopy by compromising ultimate spatial and temporal imaging resolution. However, significant recent advances have enabled single-cell resolution imaging to be achieved in vivo. In this protocol, we describe experimental procedures for intravital microscopy based on a combination of thoracic surgery, tissue stabilizers and acquisition gating methods, which enable imaging at the single-cell level in the beating heart in the mouse. Setup of the model is typically completed in 1 h, which allows 2 h or more of continuous cardiac imaging. This protocol can be readily adapted for the imaging of other moving organs, and it will therefore broadly facilitate in vivo high-resolution microscopy studies. PMID:26492138

  7. Investigation of depilatory mechanism by use of multiphoton fluorescent microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chiao-Ying; Lee, Gie-ne; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Lin, Sung-Jan

    2007-07-01

    Transdermal drug delivery provides a non-invasive route of drug administration, and can be a alternative method to oral delivery and injection. The stratum corneum (SC) of skin acts as the main barrier to transdermal drug delivery. Studies suggest that depilatory enhances permeability of drug through the epidermis. However, transdermal delivery pathway and mechanism are not completely understood. Previous studies have found that depilatory changes the keratinocytes of epidermis, and cause the protein in combination with lipid extraction of SC to become disordered. Nevertheless, those studies did not provide images of those processes. The aim of this study is to characterize the penetration enhancing effect of depilatory agent and the associated structural alterations of stratum corneum. Fresh human foreskin is treated by a depilatory agent for 10 minutes and then subjected to the treatment of fluorescent model drugs of hydrophilic rhodamine and hydrophobic rhodamine-RE. The penetration of model drugs is imaged and quantified by multiphoton microscopy. Our results showed that the penetration of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic agents can be enhanced and multifocal detachment of surface corneocytes is revealed. Nile red staining revealed, instead of a regular motar distribution of lipid around the brick of corneocytes, a disorganized and homogenized pattern of lipid distribution. We concluded that depilatory agents enhance drug penetration by disrupting both the cellular integrity of corneocytes and the regular packing of intercellular lipid of stratum corneum.

  8. Intravital two-photon microscopy of immune cell dynamics in corneal lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Steven, Philipp; Bock, Felix; Hüttmann, Gereon; Cursiefen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    The role of lymphatic vessels in tissue and organ transplantation as well as in tumor growth and metastasis has drawn great attention in recent years. We now developed a novel method using non-invasive two-photon microscopy to simultaneously visualize and track specifically stained lymphatic vessels and autofluorescent adjacent tissues such as collagen fibrils, blood vessels and immune cells in the mouse model of corneal neovascularization in vivo. The mouse cornea serves as an ideal tissue for this technique due to its easy accessibility and its inducible and modifiable state of pathological hem- and lymphvascularization. Neovascularization was induced by suture placement in corneas of Balb/C mice. Two weeks after treatment, lymphatic vessels were stained intravital by intrastromal injection of a fluorescently labeled LYVE-1 antibody and the corneas were evaluated in vivo by two-photon microscopy (TPM). Intravital TPM was performed at 710 nm and 826 nm excitation wavelengths to detect immunofluorescence and tissue autofluorescence using a custom made animal holder. Corneas were then harvested, fixed and analyzed by histology. Time lapse imaging demonstrated the first in vivo evidence of immune cell migration into lymphatic vessels and luminal transport of individual cells. Cells immigrated within 1-5.5 min into the vessel lumen. Mean velocities of intrastromal corneal immune cells were around 9 µm/min and therefore comparable to those of T-cells and macrophages in other mucosal surfaces. To our knowledge we here demonstrate for the first time the intravital real-time transmigration of immune cells into lymphatic vessels. Overall this study demonstrates the valuable use of intravital autofluorescence two-photon microscopy in the model of suture-induced corneal vascularizations to study interactions of immune and subsequently tumor cells with lymphatic vessels under close as possible physiological conditions.

  9. [Frontiers in Live Bone Imaging Researches. Novel drug discovery by means of intravital bone imaging technology].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masaru

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in intravital bone imaging technology has enabled us to grasp the real cellular behaviors and functions in vivo , revolutionizing the field of drug discovery for novel therapeutics against intractable bone diseases. In this chapter, I introduce various updated information on pharmacological actions of several antibone resorptive agents, which could only be derived from advanced imaging techniques, and also discuss the future perspectives of this new trend in drug discovery.

  10. Non-invasive intravital imaging of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas in live mice.

    PubMed

    Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Thompson, Jamie; Melis, Nicolas; Weigert, Roberto

    2017-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common cancers with a 50% 5-year survival rate. Understanding the mechanisms that control development, progression, and spreading of the tumor to distal sites is of paramount importance to develop effective therapies. Here, we describe a minimally invasive procedure, which enables performing intravital microscopy of the mouse tongue in models for oral cancer and provides structural and dynamic information of the tumors at cellular and subcellular level. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Multiphoton imaging of biological samples during freezing and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2014-02-01

    We applied multiphoton microscopic imaging to observe freezing and heating effects in plant- and animal cell samples. The experimental setups consisted of a multiphoton imaging system and a heating and cooling stage which allows for precise temperature control from liquid nitrogen temperature (-196°C 77 K) up to +600°C (873 K) with heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K/min and 150 K/min. Two multiphoton imaging systems were used: a system based on a modified optical microscope and a flexible mobile system. To illustrate the imaging capabilities, plant leafs as well as animal cells were microscopically imaged in vivo during freezing based on autofluorescence lifetime and intensity of intrinsic molecules. The measurements illustrate the usefulness of multiphoton imaging to investigate freezing effects on animal and plant cells.

  12. Intravital Microscopy Imaging Approaches for Image-Guided Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kirui, Dickson K.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Rapid technical advances in the field of non-linear microscopy have made intravital microscopy a vital pre-clinical tool for research and development of imaging-guided drug delivery systems. The ability to dynamically monitor the fate of macromolecules in live animals provides invaluable information regarding properties of drug carriers (size, charge, and surface coating), physiological, and pathological processes that exist between point-of-injection and the projected of site of delivery, all of which influence delivery and effectiveness of drug delivery systems. In this Review, we highlight how integrating intravital microscopy imaging with experimental designs (in vitro analyses and mathematical modeling) can provide unique information critical in the design of novel disease-relevant drug delivery platforms with improved diagnostic and therapeutic indexes. The Review will provide the reader an overview of the various applications for which intravital microscopy has been used to monitor the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents and discuss some of their potential clinical applications. PMID:25901526

  13. Rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Daniel H.; Beerepoot, Maarten T. P.; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    Rotational averaging of tensors is a crucial step in the calculation of molecular properties in isotropic media. We present a scheme for the rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections. We extend existing literature on rotational averaging to even-rank tensors of arbitrary order and derive equations that require only the number of photons as input. In particular, we derive the first explicit expressions for the rotational average of five-, six-, and seven-photon absorption cross sections. This work is one of the required steps in making the calculation of these higher-order absorption properties possible. The results can be applied to any even-rank tensor provided linearly polarized light is used.

  14. Rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections.

    PubMed

    Friese, Daniel H; Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-11-28

    Rotational averaging of tensors is a crucial step in the calculation of molecular properties in isotropic media. We present a scheme for the rotational averaging of multiphoton absorption cross sections. We extend existing literature on rotational averaging to even-rank tensors of arbitrary order and derive equations that require only the number of photons as input. In particular, we derive the first explicit expressions for the rotational average of five-, six-, and seven-photon absorption cross sections. This work is one of the required steps in making the calculation of these higher-order absorption properties possible. The results can be applied to any even-rank tensor provided linearly polarized light is used.

  15. Multi-photon entanglement in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Mehul; Erhard, Manuel; Huber, Marcus; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Forming the backbone of quantum technologies today, entanglement has been demonstrated in physical systems as diverse as photons, ions and superconducting circuits. Although steadily pushing the boundary of the number of particles entangled, these experiments have remained in a two-dimensional space for each particle. Here we show the experimental generation of the first multi-photon entangled state where both the number of particles and dimensions are greater than two. Two photons in our state reside in a three-dimensional space, whereas the third lives in two dimensions. This asymmetric entanglement structure only appears in multiparticle entangled states with d > 2. Our method relies on combining two pairs of photons, high-dimensionally entangled in their orbital angular momentum. In addition, we show how this state enables a new type of ‘layered’ quantum communication protocol. Entangled states such as these serve as a manifestation of the complex dance of correlations that can exist within quantum mechanics.

  16. Multiphoton double ionization of the He atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) calculations are made for the multiphoton double ionization of the He atom under the influence of a fast pulse XUV laser. One set of TDCC calculations employs l1m1l2m2 coupling on a 2D (r1 ,r2) numerical lattice, a second set of TDCC calculations employs m1m2 coupling on a 4D (r1 ,θ1 ,r2 ,θ2) numerical lattice, and a third set of TDCC calculations employs m1m2 coupling on a 4D (ρ1 ,z1 ,ρ2 ,z2) numerical lattice. Studies are made to see which TDCC method is the most efficient at explaining measurements as the number of photons absorbed is increased. Work supported in part by Grants from NASA, NSF, and DOE.

  17. REVIEW ARTICLE Multiphoton polymerization of hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2010-12-01

    Multiphoton polymerization has been developed as a direct laser writing technique for the preparation of complex 3D structures with resolution beyond the diffraction limit of light. The combination of two or more hybrid materials with different functionalities in the same system has allowed the preparation of structures with advanced properties and functions. Furthermore, the surface functionalization of the 3D structures opens new avenues for their applications in a variety of nanobiotechnological fields. This paper describes the principles of 2PP and the experimental set-up used for 3D structure fabrication. It also gives an overview of the materials that have been employed in 2PP so far and depicts the perspectives of this technique in the development of new active components.

  18. Evaluation of Barrett esophagus by multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianxin; Wong, Serena; Nathanson, Michael H; Jain, Dhanpat

    2014-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on 2-photon excitation fluorescence and second-harmonic generation allows simultaneous visualization of cellular details and extracellular matrix components of fresh, unfixed, and unstained tissue. Portable multiphoton microscopes, which could be placed in endoscopy suites, and multiphoton endomicroscopes are in development, but their clinical utility is unknown. To examine fresh, unfixed endoscopic biopsies obtained from the distal esophagus and gastroesophageal junction to (1) define the MPM characteristics of normal esophageal squamous mucosa and gastric columnar mucosa, and (2) evaluate whether diagnosis of intestinal metaplasia/Barrett esophagus (BE) could be made reliably with MPM. The study examined 35 untreated, fresh biopsy specimens from 25 patients who underwent routine upper endoscopy. A Zeiss LSM 710 Duo microscope (Carl Zeiss, Thornwood, New York) coupled to a Spectra-Physics (Mountain View, California) Tsunami Ti:sapphire laser was used to obtain a MPM image within 4 hours of fresh specimen collection. After obtaining MPM images, the biopsy specimens were placed in 10% buffered formalin and submitted for routine histopathologic examination. Then, the MPM images were compared with the findings in the hematoxylin-eosin-stained, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. The MPM characteristics of the squamous, gastric-type columnar and intestinal-type columnar epithelium were analyzed. In biopsies with discrepancy between MPM imaging and hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections, the entire tissue block was serially sectioned and reevaluated. A diagnosis of BE was made when endoscopic and histologic criteria were satisfied. Based on effective 2-photon excitation fluorescence of cellular reduced pyridine nucleotides and flavin adenine dinucleotide and lack of 2-photon excitation fluorescence of mucin and cellular nuclei, MPM could readily identify and distinguish among squamous epithelial cells, goblet cells, gastric

  19. Dynamics of cluster dissociation following multiphoton ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    A major advance in the study of unimolecular dissociation and the spectroscopy of clusters has become available through the use of multiphoton ionization coupled with a reflectron introduced into the drift region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Using single and two-color tunable pulsed lasers, the excess energy introduced into a cluster can be well controlled. The power of this method is demonstrated by the results of recent investigations of hydrogen-bonded clusters which, following ionization, lead to an internal ion-molecule reaction, and cluster fragmentation. The role of dissociation and the influence of the thermochemical stability of cluster ions in effecting the appearance of magic numbers in certain cluster distributions is discussed. The application of this method in determining ionization potentials of probe molecules following successive clustering with a solvent species is also presented.

  20. Point spread function engineering with multiphoton SPIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsing, Keith A.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende-Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-03-01

    MultiPhoton SPatIal Frequency modulated Imaging (MP-SPIFI) has recently demonstrated the ability to simultaneously obtain super-resolved images in both coherent and incoherent scattering processes -- namely, second harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence, respectively.1 In our previous analysis, we considered image formation produced by the zero and first diffracted orders from the SPIFI modulator. However, the modulator is a binary amplitude mask, and therefore produces multiple diffracted orders. In this work, we extend our analysis to image formation in the presence of higher diffracted orders. We find that tuning the mask duty cycle offers a measure of control over the shape of super-resolved point spread functions in an MP-SPIFI microscope.

  1. Multiphoton microscopy of cleared mouse organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Sonia G.; Chia, Thomas H.; Zinter, Joseph P.; Levene, Michael J.

    2010-05-01

    Typical imaging depths with multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are limited to less than 300 μm in many tissues due to light scattering. Optical clearing significantly reduces light scattering by replacing water in the organ tissue with a fluid having a similar index of refraction to that of proteins. We demonstrate MPM of intact, fixed, cleared mouse organs with penetration depths and fields of view in excess of 2 mm. MPM enables the creation of large 3-D data sets with flexibility in pixel format and ready access to intrinsic fluorescence and second-harmonic generation. We present high-resolution images and 3-D image stacks of the brain, small intestine, large intestine, kidney, lung, and testicle with image sizes as large as 4096×4096 pixels.

  2. Intensity dependence of multiphoton dissociation in formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, G.

    1980-01-01

    The paper reports a new intensity-dependent measurement of multiple-photon dissociation (MPD) in H2CO, HDCO, and D2CO gases using an intense pulsed CO2 TEA laser. In this measurement the energy and duration of the laser pulses are constant, and the intensity is varied by irradiating the sample with concave mirrors of different focal lengths. A model calculation is used to analyze and fit the MPD data of HDCO and D2CO which assumes that dissociation is obtained by a repeated mechanism in which coherent multiphoton excitation (CME) of the molecule to high vibration-rotation states is followed by intramolecular transfer of the excitation energy (ITEE) to the other molecule modes. It is concluded that the results are consistent with the absorption of 14 plus or minus 4 and 17 plus or minus 5 photons per molecule of HDCO and D2CO, respectively.

  3. Multiphoton nanosurgery in cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Anhut, Tiemo; Stracke, Frank; Le Harzic, Ronan; Koenig, Karsten

    2005-04-01

    Multiphoton Microscopy with a femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser in the near infrared (NIR) enables the user not only to image cells and tissues with a subcellular resolution but also to perform highly precise nanosurgery. Intratissue compartments, single cells and even cell organelles like mitochondria, membranes or chromosomes can be manipulated and optically knocked out. Working at transient TW/cm2 laser intensities, single cells of tumor-sphaeroids were eliminated efficiently inside the sphaeroid without damaging the neighbour cells. Also single organelles of cells inside tissues could be optically knocked out with the nanoscalpel without collateral damage. Tissue structures inside a human tooth have been ablated with sizes below 1 μm. This method may become a useful instrument for nano-manipulating and surgery in several fields of science, including targeted transfection.

  4. Rapid mesoscale multiphoton microscopy of human skin

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Mihaela; Mikami, Hideharu; Hou, Jue; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a multiphoton microscope designed for mesoscale imaging of human skin. The system is based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation, and images areas of ~0.8x0.8 mm2 at speeds of 0.8 fps (800x800 pixels; 12 frame averages) for high signal-to-noise ratio, with lateral and axial resolutions of 0.5µm and 3.3µm, respectively. The main novelty of this instrument is the design of the scan head, which includes a fast galvanometric scanner, optimized relay optics, a beam expander and high NA objective lens. Computed aberrations in focus are below the Marechal criterion of 0.07λ rms for diffraction-limited performance. We demonstrate the practical utility of this microscope by ex-vivo imaging of wide areas in normal human skin. PMID:27895980

  5. Studies of atmospheric molecules by multiphoton spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. M.

    1990-12-01

    Resonance ionization processes can play an important role in understanding molecules important in combustion processes. They are a reflection of the dynamic as well as the static properties of atomic and molecular species. Due to the sequential or quasisequential nature of photon absorption in resonant multiphoton events, the lifetimes of the intermediate states play an essential role in the overall cross-sections if they are short enough to be competitive with subsequent photon interactions. In molecules, this is particularly important because there are many dissociative and other radiationless pathways which can contribute to a competitive channel. Under those conditions it should be possible to obtain information about the nature of the dynamics of the intermediate state from the multiphoton ionization process. This will involve looking at not only the ionization cross-section but also other observables such as the kinetic energy of the ejected electrons and possibly the distribution of fragment ions produced in the ionization event. Whether the ionization amplitude is affected or not, the time scales of the dynamic events which alter the ionization path can vary over a large range from the femtoseconds of dissociation to the microseconds of some radiationless transitions in large molecules. When the competing channel has a time scale shorter than the laser pulse length, the kinetics of the ionization are intimately tied into the precise nature of the laser pulse. For time scales longer than the laser pulse, pump-probe ionization schemes in which one laser prepares a state while another does the ionization provide a particularly simple method for investigating the dynamics of the intermediate state. Here the author discusses examples from each of these regimes. CO2 and pyrazine are examined.

  6. Multiphoton Photochemical and Collisional Effects during Oxygen Atom Flame Detection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    multiphoton ionization (MPI), 3𔃾’ 5 the latter allo referred to as optogalvanic detection. In the case of the oxv en atoms, however, direct...multiphoton induced photolysis of the fuel and oxidizer parent molecules followed by a 0 atom two-photon resonant formation of a microplasma . In the...of nonlinearity. A microplasma is not surprising since the absorption of the third photon ionizes the 0 atoms4 and the temperature in the focal

  7. High-efficiency multiphoton boson sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; He, Yu; Li, Yu-Huai; Su, Zu-En; Li, Bo; Huang, He-Liang; Ding, Xing; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Liu, Chang; Qin, Jian; Li, Jin-Peng; He, Yu-Ming; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Höfling, Sven; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-06-01

    Boson sampling is considered as a strong candidate to demonstrate 'quantum computational supremacy' over classical computers. However, previous proof-of-principle experiments suffered from small photon number and low sampling rates owing to the inefficiencies of the single-photon sources and multiport optical interferometers. Here, we develop two central components for high-performance boson sampling: robust multiphoton interferometers with 99% transmission rate and actively demultiplexed single-photon sources based on a quantum dot-micropillar with simultaneously high efficiency, purity and indistinguishability. We implement and validate three-, four- and five-photon boson sampling, and achieve sampling rates of 4.96 kHz, 151 Hz and 4 Hz, respectively, which are over 24,000 times faster than previous experiments. Our architecture can be scaled up for a larger number of photons and with higher sampling rates to compete with classical computers, and might provide experimental evidence against the extended Church-Turing thesis.

  8. A large area liquid scintillation multiphoton detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, V. K.; Cain, M. P.; Caldwell, D. O.; Denby, B. H.; Eisner, A. M.; Joshi, U. P.; Kennett, R. G.; Lu, A.; Morrison, R. J.; Pfost, D. R.; Stuber, H. R.; Summers, D. J.; Yellin, S. J.; Appel, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A 60 layer lead-liquid scintillator shower detector, which we call the SLIC, has been used for multiphoton detection in the Fermilab tagged photon spectrometer. The detector has an unimpeded active area which is 2.44 m by 4.88 m and is segmented, by means of teflon coated channels, into 3.17 cm wide strips. The 60 layers in depth are broken into three directions of alternating readouts so that three position coordinates are determined for each shower. At present the readouts are made by 334 photomultiplier tubes coupled to BBQ doped wavelength shifter bars which integrate the entire depth of the detector. It is relatively straightforward to increase the number of readouts to include longitudinal segmentation and to increase the segmentation of the outer region which are at present read out two strips to a readout. The energy and position resolutions of isolated showers are about {12%}/{√E} and 3 mm., respectively. The SLIC has been used to study the K-π+π0 decay of the D 0 [1], as well as for electron and muon identification in ψ → e +e - and ψ → μ+μ- plus π0 identification in γp → ψχ [8].

  9. Soliton dynamics in the multiphoton plasma regime

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad A.; Combrié, Sylvain; Colman, Pierre; Zheng, Jiangjun; De Rossi, Alfredo; Wong, Chee Wei

    2013-01-01

    Solitary waves have consistently captured the imagination of scientists, ranging from fundamental breakthroughs in spectroscopy and metrology enabled by supercontinuum light, to gap solitons for dispersionless slow-light, and discrete spatial solitons in lattices, amongst others. Recent progress in strong-field atomic physics include impressive demonstrations of attosecond pulses and high-harmonic generation via photoionization of free-electrons in gases at extreme intensities of 1014 W/cm2. Here we report the first phase-resolved observations of femtosecond optical solitons in a semiconductor microchip, with multiphoton ionization at picojoule energies and 1010 W/cm2 intensities. The dramatic nonlinearity leads to picojoule observations of free-electron-induced blue-shift at 1016 cm−3 carrier densities and self-chirped femtosecond soliton acceleration. Furthermore, we evidence the time-gated dynamics of soliton splitting on-chip, and the suppression of soliton recurrence due to fast free-electron dynamics. These observations in the highly dispersive slow-light media reveal a rich set of physics governing ultralow-power nonlinear photon-plasma dynamics.

  10. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs.

    PubMed

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5 x 10(-50) cm(4)s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  11. The multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.P. . UEO Enrichment Technical Operations Div.)

    1992-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy studies of UF{sub 6} have been conducted using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental ({lambda}=1064 nm) and its harmonics ({lambda}=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF{sub x}{sup +} fragment ions even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. The laser power dependence of U{sup n+} ions signals indicates that saturation can occur for many of the steps required for their ionization. In general, the doubly-charged uranium ion (U{sup 2+}) intensity is much greater than that of the singly-charged uranium ion (U{sup +}). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the U{sup n+} (n = 1- 4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The dominance of the U{sup 2+} ion and the absence or very small intensities of UF{sub x}{sup +} fragments, along with the unsaturated wavelength dependence, indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms after the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule.

  12. Continuous-variable entanglement via multiphoton catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liyun; Liao, Zeyang; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the performance of multiphoton catalysis applied on the two-mode squeezed state by examining the entropy of entanglement, logarithmic negativity, Eistein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR), and Hillery-Zubairy (HZ) correlations, and the fidelity of teleportation. It is found that the entanglement increases with the number of catalysis operations if the squeezing parameter is low initially. Our comparisons show that the HZ correlation presents a better performance than the EPR correlation for detecting the entanglement, and the improvement of HZ correlation definitely results in the improvement of entropy of entanglement rather than negativity; the region of enhanced EPR correlation is a subregion of all other entanglement properties. In addition, we consider the performances of the fidelity by comparing such operations applied before or after the amplitude damping channel. It is shown that the catalysis operation of m =n =1 before the channel presents the best performance in the initial-low squeezing regime. This may provide a useful insight for a long-distance quantum communication.

  13. Infrared multiphoton dissociation for quantitative shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Lee, M Violet; McAlister, Graeme C; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J

    2012-05-15

    We modified a dual-cell linear ion trap mass spectrometer to perform infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in the low-pressure trap of a dual-cell quadrupole linear ion trap (dual-cell QLT) and perform large-scale IRMPD analyses of complex peptide mixtures. Upon optimization of activation parameters (precursor q-value, irradiation time, and photon flux), IRMPD subtly, but significantly, outperforms resonant-excitation collisional-activated dissociation (CAD) for peptides identified at a 1% false-discovery rate (FDR) from a yeast tryptic digest (95% confidence, p = 0.019). We further demonstrate that IRMPD is compatible with the analysis of isobaric-tagged peptides. Using fixed QLT rf amplitude allows for the consistent retention of reporter ions, but necessitates the use of variable IRMPD irradiation times, dependent upon precursor mass to charge (m/z). We show that IRMPD activation parameters can be tuned to allow for effective peptide identification and quantitation simultaneously. We thus conclude that IRMPD performed in a dual-cell ion trap is an effective option for the large-scale analysis of both unmodified and isobaric-tagged peptides.

  14. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation for Quantitative Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Ledvina, Aaron R.; Lee, M. Violet; McAlister, Graeme C.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    We modified a dual-cell linear ion trap mass spectrometer to perform infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in the low pressure trap of a dual-cell quadrupole linear ion trap (dual cell QLT) and perform large-scale IRMPD analyses of complex peptide mixtures. Upon optimization of activation parameters (precursor q-value, irradiation time, and photon flux), IRMPD subtly, but significantly outperforms resonant excitation CAD for peptides identified at a 1% false-discovery rate (FDR) from a yeast tryptic digest (95% confidence, p = 0.019). We further demonstrate that IRMPD is compatible with the analysis of isobaric-tagged peptides. Using fixed QLT RF amplitude allows for the consistent retention of reporter ions, but necessitates the use of variable IRMPD irradiation times, dependent upon precursor mass-to-charge (m/z). We show that IRMPD activation parameters can be tuned to allow for effective peptide identification and quantitation simultaneously. We thus conclude that IRMPD performed in a dual-cell ion trap is an effective option for the large-scale analysis of both unmodified and isobaric-tagged peptides. PMID:22480380

  15. High-resolution multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    This review focuses on multimodal multiphoton tomography based on near infrared femtosecond lasers. Clinical multiphoton tomographs for 3D high-resolution in vivo imaging have been placed into the market several years ago. The second generation of this Prism-Award winning High-Tech skin imaging tool (MPTflex) was introduced in 2010. The same year, the world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph. In particular, non-fluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen has been imaged with submicron resolution in patients suffering from psoriasis. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution wide-field systems such as ultrasound, optoacoustical, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer, optimization of treatment strategies, and cosmetic research including long-term testing of sunscreen nanoparticles as well as anti-aging products.

  16. Metrology of Multiphoton Microscopes Using Second Harmonic Generation Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Mahou, Pierre; Malkinson, Guy; Chaudan, Élodie; Gacoin, Thierry; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Supatto, Willy

    2017-09-19

    In multiphoton microscopy, the ongoing trend toward the use of excitation wavelengths spanning the entire near-infrared range calls for new standards in order to quantify and compare the performances of microscopes. This article describes a new method for characterizing the imaging properties of multiphoton microscopes over a broad range of excitation wavelengths in a straightforward and efficient manner. It demonstrates how second harmonic generation (SHG) nanoprobes can be used to map the spatial resolution, field curvature, and chromatic aberrations across the microscope field of view with a precision below the diffraction limit and with unique advantages over methods based on fluorescence. KTiOPO4 nanocrystals are used as SHG nanoprobes to measure and compare the performances over the 850-1100 nm wavelength range of several microscope objectives designed for multiphoton microscopy. Finally, this approach is extended to the post-acquisition correction of chromatic aberrations in multicolor multiphoton imaging. Overall, the use of SHG nanoprobes appears as a uniquely suited method to standardize the metrology of multiphoton microscopes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The mouse dorsal skinfold chamber as a model for the study of thrombolysis by intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Boulaftali, Yacine; Lamrani, Lamia; Rouzaud, Marie-Catherine; Loyau, Stéphane; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Bouton, Marie-Christine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    Although intravital microscopy models of thrombosis in mice have contributed to dissect the mechanisms of thrombus formation and stability, they have not been well adapted to study long-term evolution of occlusive thrombi. Here, we assessed the suitability of the dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) for the study of thrombolysis and testing of thrombolytic agents by intravital microscopy. We show that induction of FeCl3-induced occlusive thrombosis is achievable in microvessels of DSCs, and that thrombi formed in DSCs can be visualized by intravital microscopy using brightfield transmitted light, or fluorescent staining of thrombus components such as fibrinogen, platelets, leukocytes, and von Willebrand factor. Direct application of control saline or recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator (rtPA) to FeCl3-produced thrombi in DSCs did not affect thrombus size or induce recanalization. However, in the presence of hirudin, rtPA treatment caused a rapid dose-dependent lysis of occlusive thrombi, resulting in recanalization within 1 hour after treatment. Skin hemorrhage originating from vessels located inside and outside the FeCl3-injured area was also observed in DSCs of rtPA-treated mice. We further show that rtPA-induced thrombolysis was enhanced in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-deficient (PAI-1−/−) mice, and dropped considerably as the time between occlusion and treatment application increased. Together, our results show that by allowing visualization and measurement of thrombus lysis and potential bleeding complications of thrombolytic treatments, the DSC provides a model for studying endogenous fibrinolysis and for first-line screening of thrombolytic agents. Furthermore, using this system, we found that thrombin and clot aging impair the thrombolytic action of rtPA towards FeCl3-produced thrombi. PMID:22552380

  18. Intravital microscopy imaging of macrophage localization to immunogenic particles and co-localized tissue oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Choe, Se-woon; Acharya, Abhinav P; Keselowsky, Benjamin G; Sorg, Brian S

    2010-09-01

    Well-designed biomaterial polymer particle-based vaccines will optimally promote immune cell antigen-presenting behavior while minimizing adverse inflammatory responses to the particles and encapsulated drugs or adjuvants. It is important in the design of particle-based vaccines to consider possible harmful effects of immune response on tissue at the vaccination site. Intravital microscopy with rodent dorsal skin window chambers enables in vivo serial observations in the same animal, and such models which have been used to study angiogenesis and macrophage response to implanted biomaterials may also be useful for the development of particle-based vaccines. To our knowledge there have been no reports where intravital microscopy has documented real-time immune cell localization and potentially harmful co-localized tissue effects. In this proof-of-principle study we used fluorescence and spectral imaging intravital microscopy of mouse window chambers to measure macrophage localization and co-localized tissue microvessel hemoglobin saturation changes in response to an immunogenic stimulus from polymer particles loaded with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) serving as a model vaccine/adjuvant system. We observed greater and faster macrophage localization to stronger inflammatory stimuli from LPS-loaded particle doses, a trend of decreased microvessel oxygenation with increased macrophage accumulation and, in an extreme case, complete microvessel collapse accompanied by tissue necrosis. Our technique may be useful for optimizing design of particle-based vaccines and may give insight into the use of hemoglobin saturation as a biomarker of tissue inflammation for clinical investigations of particle-based vaccines. 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Intravital microscopy of the spleen: quantitative analysis of parasite mobility and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Mireia; Martin-Jaular, Lorena; Calvo, Maria; del Portillo, Hernando A

    2012-01-14

    The advent of intravital microscopy in experimental rodent malaria models has allowed major advances to the knowledge of parasite-host interactions. Thus, in vivo imaging of malaria parasites during pre-erythrocytic stages have revealed the active entrance of parasites into skin lymph nodes, the complete development of the parasite in the skin, and the formation of a hepatocyte-derived merosome to assure migration and release of merozoites into the blood stream. Moreover, the development of individual parasites in erythrocytes has been recently documented using 4D imaging and challenged our current view on protein export in malaria. Thus, intravital imaging has radically changed our view on key events in Plasmodium development. Unfortunately, studies of the dynamic passage of malaria parasites through the spleen, a major lymphoid organ exquisitely adapted to clear infected red blood cells are lacking due to technical constraints. Using the murine model of malaria Plasmodium yoelii in Balb/c mice, we have implemented intravital imaging of the spleen and reported a differential remodeling of it and adherence of parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs) to barrier cells of fibroblastic origin in the red pulp during infection with the non-lethal parasite line P.yoelii 17X as opposed to infections with the P.yoelii 17XL lethal parasite line. To reach these conclusions, a specific methodology using ImageJ free software was developed to enable characterization of the fast three-dimensional movement of single-pRBCs. Results obtained with this protocol allow determining velocity, directionality and residence time of parasites in the spleen, all parameters addressing adherence in vivo. In addition, we report the methodology for blood flow quantification using intravital microscopy and the use of different colouring agents to gain insight into the complex microcirculatory structure of the spleen. ETHICS STATEMENT: All the animal studies were performed at the animal facilities of

  20. From good to bad: Intravital imaging of the hijack of physiological processes by cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suijkerbuijk, Saskia J E; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2017-08-15

    Homeostasis of tissues is tightly regulated at the cellular, tissue and organismal level. Interestingly, tumor cells have found ways to hijack many of these physiological processes at all the different levels. Here we review how intravital microscopy techniques have provided new insights into our understanding of tissue homeostasis and cancer progression. In addition, we highlight the different strategies that tumor cells have adopted to use these physiological processes for their own benefit. We describe how visualization of these dynamic processes in living mice has broadened to our view on cancer initiation and progression. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High-intensity laser heating in liquids: Multiphoton absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    At high laser intensities, otherwise transparent liquids can absorb strongly by the mechanism of multiphoton absorption, resulting in absorption and heating several orders of magnitude greater than classical, low-intensity mechanisms. The use of multiphoton absorption provides a new mechanism for strong, controlled energy deposition in liquids without bulk plasma formation, shock waves, liquid ejection, etc., which is of interest for many laser-liquid applications, including laser desorption of liquid films, laser particle removal, and laser water removal from microdevices. This work develops a microscopically based model of the heating during multiphoton absorption in liquids. The dependence on pulse duration, intensity, wavelength, repetition rate, and liquid properties is discussed. Pure water exposed to 266 nm laser radiation is investigated, and a novel heating mechanism for water is proposed that uses multiple-wavelength laser pulses.

  2. Vibrational resonance enhanced broadband multiphoton absorption in a triphenylamine derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Changgui; Cui Yiping; Huang Wei; Yun Binfeng; Wang Zhuyuan; Hu Guohua; Cui Jing; Lu Zhifeng; Qian Ying

    2007-09-17

    Multiphoton absorption of 2,5-bis[4-(2-N,N-diphenylaminostyryl)phenyl]-1,3,4-oxadiazole was experimentally studied by using femtosecond laser pulses. This material demonstrates a very broad multiphoton absorption band of around 300 nm width with two peaks of 1250 and 1475 nm. The first peak results from the three-photon absorption process while the second is attributed to the vibrational resonance enhanced four-photon absorption process. Combination of these two processes provides a much broader multiphoton absorption band. In this letter, the analytical solution to nonlinear transmission of a three-photon absorption process is also given when the incident beam has a Gaussian transverse spatial profile.

  3. A review of biomedical multiphoton microscopy and its laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Claire

    2017-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has been the subject of major development efforts for about 25 years for imaging biological specimens at micron scale and presented as an elegant alternative to classical fluorescence methods such as confocal microscopy. In this topical review, the main interests and technical requirements of MPM are addressed with a focus on the crucial role of excitation source for optimization of multiphoton processes. Then, an overview of the different sources successfully demonstrated in literature for MPM is presented, and their physical parameters are inventoried. A classification of these sources in function with their ability to optimize multiphoton processes is proposed, following a protocol found in literature. Starting from these considerations, a suggestion of a possible identikit of the ideal laser source for MPM concludes this topical review. Dedicated to Martin.

  4. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems. PMID:27599635

  5. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems.

  6. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-09-07

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems.

  7. Intravital imaging of the effects of 5-fluorouracil on the murine liver microenvironment using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    OKIGAMI, MASATO; TANAKA, KOJI; INOUE, YASUHIRO; SAIGUSA, SUSUMU; OKUGAWA, YOSHINAGA; TOIYAMA, YUJI; MOHRI, YASUHIKO; KUSUNOKI, MASATO

    2016-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5FU) is often used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. 5FU improves the median overall and disease-free survival rates and reduces recurrence rates in patients who have undergone curative surgical resection. However, in the adjuvant setting, whether 5FU eradicates clinically undetectable micrometastases in target organs such as the liver, or whether 5-FU inhibits the adhesion of circulating tumor cells has not yet been established. In the present study, 5FU was administered following the inoculation of red fluorescent protein-expressing HT29 cells into green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic nude mice to examine its inhibitory effect. 2-photon laser scanning microscopy was performed at selected time points for time-series imaging of liver metastasis of GFP-transgenic mice. The cell number in vessels was quantified to evaluate the response of the tumor microenvironment to chemotherapy. HT29 cells were visualized in hepatic sinusoids at the single-cell level. A total of 2 hours after the injection (early stage), time-series imaging revealed that the number of caught tumor cells gradually reduced over time. In the 5FU treatment group, no significant difference was observed in the cell number in the early stage. One week after the injection (late stage), a difference in morphology was observed. The results of the present study indicated that 5FU eradicated clinically undetectable micrometastases in liver tissues by acting as a cytotoxic agent opposed to preventing adhesion. The present study indicated that time-series intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopic imaging of metastatic tumor xenografts may facilitate the screening and evaluation of novel chemotherapeutic agents with less interindividual variability. PMID:27073493

  8. Comparison of intravital thinned skull and cranial window approaches to study CNS immunobiology in the mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dorand, R Dixon; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Evans, Teresa A; Petrosiute, Agne; Huang, Alex Y

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging coupled with high-resolution femtosecond pulsed infrared lasers allows for interrogation of cellular interactions deeper in living tissues than ever imagined. Intravital imaging of the central nervous system (CNS) has provided insights into neuronal development, synaptic transmission, and even immune interactions. In this review we will discuss the two most common intravital approaches for studying the cerebral cortex in the live mouse brain for pre-clinical studies, the thinned skull and cranial window techniques, and focus on the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. In addition, we will discuss the use of neuronal physiologic parameters as determinants of successful surgical and imaging preparation. PMID:25568834

  9. Spectroscopic analysis of keratin endogenous signal for skin multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, A.-M.; Strupler, M.; Boulesteix, T.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2005-08-01

    We recorded one-photon excited fluorescence (1PEF) and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) spectra of purified keratin from human epidermis, and determined the action cross section of this endogenous chromophore. We used this spectroscopic analysis to analyse multiphoton images of skin biopsies and assign the intrinsic fluorescence signals in the epidermis. We observed a good agreement between in situ and in vitro 2PEF spectra of keratin. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the 2PEF signal of the keratins from the epidermis, and will be of practical interest for multiphoton imaging of the skin.

  10. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of human normal and cancerous oesophagus tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, W S; Wang, Y; Liu, N R; Zhang, J X; Chen, R

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, microstructures of human oesophageal submucosa are evaluated using multiphoton microscopy, based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation. The content and distribution of collagen, elastic fibers and cancer cells in normal and cancerous submucosa layer have been distinctly obtained and briefly discussed. The variation of these components is very relevant to the pathology in oesophagus, especially in early oesophageal cancer. Our results further indicate that the multiphoton microscopy technique has the potential application in vivo in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of early oesophageal cancer. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Unambiguous atomic Bell measurement assisted by multiphoton states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan Mauricio; Bernád, József Zsolt; Alber, Gernot

    2016-05-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate an unambiguous Bell measurement of atomic qubits assisted by multiphoton states. The atoms interact resonantly with the electromagnetic field inside two spatially separated optical cavities in a Ramsey-type interaction sequence. The qubit states are postselected by measuring the photonic states inside the resonators. We show that if one is able to project the photonic field onto two coherent states on opposite sites of phase space, an unambiguous Bell measurement can be implemented. Thus, our proposal may provide a core element for future components of quantum information technology such as a quantum repeater based on coherent multiphoton states, atomic qubits and matter-field interaction.

  12. In vivo multiphoton microscopy beyond 1 mm in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David R.; Medina, Flor A.; Hassan, Ahmed; Perillo, Evan P.; Hagan, Kristen; Kazmi, S. M. Shams; Zemelman, Boris V.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2017-02-01

    We perform high-resolution, non-invasive, in vivo deep-tissue imaging of the mouse neocortex using multiphoton microscopy with a high repetition rate optical parametric amplifier laser source tunable between λ=1,100 and 1,400 nm. We demonstrate an imaging depth of 1,200 μm in vasculature and 1,160 μm in neurons. We also demonstrate deep-tissue imaging using Indocyanine Green (ICG), which is FDA approved and a promising route to translate multiphoton microscopy to human applications.

  13. Multiphoton autofluorescence spectral analysis for fungus imaging and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Kuo, Chien-Jui; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Wang, Shiou-Han; Chen, Wei-Liang; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2009-07-01

    We performed multiphoton imaging on fungi of medical significance. Fungal hyphae and spores of Aspergillus flavus, Micosporum gypseum, Micosoprum canis, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans were found to be strongly autofluorescent but generate less prominent second harmonic signal. The cell wall and septum of fungal hyphae can be easily identified by autofluorescence imaging. We found that fungi of various species have distinct autofluorescence characteristics. Our result shows that the combination of multiphoton imaging and spectral analysis can be used to visualize and identify fungal species. This approach may be developed into an effective diagnostic tool for fungal identification.

  14. Multiphoton absorption is probably not the primary threshold damage mechanism for femtosecond laser pulse exposures in the retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2004-07-01

    Laser induced breakdown has the lowest energy threshold in the femtosecond domain, and is responsible for production of threshold ocular lesions. It has been proposed that multiphoton absorption may also contribute to ultrashort-pulse tissue damage, based on the observation that 33 fs, 810 nm pulse laser exposures caused more DNA breakage in cultured, primary RPE cells, compared to CW laser exposures delivering the same average power. Subsequent studies, demonstrating two-photon excitation of fluorescence in isolated RPE melanosomes, appeared to support the role of multiphoton absorption, but mainly at suprathreshold irradiance. Additional experiments have not found a consistent difference in the DNA strand breakage produced by ultrashort and CW threshold exposures. DNA damage appears to be dependent on the amount of melanin pigmentation in the cells, rather than the pulsewidth of the laser; current studies have found that, at threshold, CW and ultrashort pulse laser exposures produce almost identical amounts of DNA breakage. A theoretical analysis suggest that the number of photons delivered to the RPE melanosome during a single 33-fsec pulse at the ED50 irradiance is insufficient to produce multiphoton excitation. This result appears to exclude the melanosome as a locus for two- or three-photon excitation; however, a structure with a larger effective absorption cross-section than the melanosome may interact with the laser pulses. One possibility is that the nuclear chromatin acts as a unit absorber of photons resulting in DNA damage, but this does not explain the near equivalence of ultrashort and CW exposures in the comet assay model. This equivalence indicated that multiphoton absorption is not a major contributor to the ultrashort pulse laser damage threshold in the near infrared.

  15. Intravital microscopy: a novel tool to study cell biology in living animals.

    PubMed

    Weigert, Roberto; Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2010-05-01

    Intravital microscopy encompasses various optical microscopy techniques aimed at visualizing biological processes in live animals. In the last decade, the development of non-linear optical microscopy resulted in an enormous increase of in vivo studies, which have addressed key biological questions in fields such as neurobiology, immunology and tumor biology. Recently, few studies have shown that subcellular processes can be imaged dynamically in the live animal at a resolution comparable to that achieved in cell cultures, providing new opportunities to study cell biology under physiological conditions. The overall aim of this review is to give the reader a general idea of the potential applications of intravital microscopy with a particular emphasis on subcellular imaging. An overview of some of the most exciting studies in this field will be presented using resolution as a main organizing criterion. Indeed, first we will focus on those studies in which organs were imaged at the tissue level, then on those focusing on single cells imaging, and finally on those imaging subcellular organelles and structures.

  16. Fungal Infection in the Brain: What We Learned from Intravital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Meiqing; Mody, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 1.2 billion people suffer from fungal diseases worldwide. Arguably, the most serious manifestation occurs when pathogenic fungi infect the brain, often causing fatal meningoencephalitis. For most fungi, infection occurs via the vascular route. The organism must first be arrested in the brain microvasculature and transmigrate into the brain parenchyma across the blood–brain barrier. As a result, host immune cells are recruited into the brain to contain the fungi. However, it remains poorly understood how fungi traffic to, and migrate into the brain and how immune cells interact with invading fungi in the brain. A new era of intravital fluorescence microscopy has begun to provide insights. We are able to employ this powerful approach to study dynamic interactions of disseminating fungi with brain endothelial cells as well as resident and recruited immune cells during the brain infection. In this review, with a focus on Cryptococcus neoformans, we will provide an overview of the application of intravital imaging in fungal infections in the brain, discuss recent findings and speculate on possible future research directions. PMID:27532000

  17. Intravital microscopy: a novel tool to study cell biology in living animals

    PubMed Central

    Weigert, Roberto; Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2011-01-01

    Intravital microscopy encompasses various optical microscopy techniques aimed at visualizing biological processes in live animals. In the last decade, the development of non-linear optical microscopy resulted in an enormous increase of in vivo studies, which have addressed key biological questions in fields such as neurobiology, immunology and tumor biology. Recently, few studies have shown that subcellular processes can be imaged dynamically in the live animal at a resolution comparable to that achieved in cell cultures, providing new opportunities to study cell biology under physiological conditions. The overall aim of this review is to give the reader a general idea of the potential applications of intravital microscopy with a particular emphasis on subcellular imaging. An overview of some of the most exciting studies in this field will be presented using resolution as a main organizing criteria. Indeed, first we will focus on those studies in which organs where imaged at the tissue level, then on those focusing on single cells imaging, and finally on those imaging subcellular organelles and structures. PMID:20372919

  18. Intravital lectin perfusion analysis of vascular permeability in human micro- and macro- blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Debbage, P L; Sölder, E; Seidl, S; Hutzler, P; Hugl, B; Ofner, D; Kreczy, A

    2001-10-01

    We previously applied intravital lectin perfusion in mouse models to elucidate mechanisms underlying vascular permeability. The present work transfers this technique to human models, analysing vascular permeability in macro- and microvessels. Human vascular endothelial surface carbohydrate biochemistry differs significantly from its murine counterpart, lacking alpha-galactosyl epitopes and expressing the L-fucose moiety in the glycocalyx; the poly-N-lactosamine glycan backbone is common to all mammals. We examined extensively lectin binding specificities in sections and in vivo, and then applied the poly-N-lactosamine-specific lectin LEA and the L-fucose-specific lectin UEA-I in human intravital perfusions. Transendothelial transport differed in macrovessels and microvessels. In microvessels of adult human fat tissue, rectal wall and rectal carcinomas, slow transendothelial transport by vesicles was followed by significant retention at the subendothelial basement membrane; paracellular passage was not observed. Passage time exceeded 1 h. Thus we found barrier mechanisms resembling those we described previously in murine tissues. In both adult and fetal macrovessels, the vena saphena magna and the umbilical vein, respectively, rapid passage across the endothelial lining was observed, the tracer localising completely in the subendothelial tissues within 15 min; vesicular transport was more rapid than in microvessels, and retention at the subendothelial basement membrane briefer.

  19. Imaging windows for long-term intravital imaging: General overview and technical insights.

    PubMed

    Alieva, Maria; Ritsma, Laila; Giedt, Randy J; Weissleder, Ralph; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is increasingly used to visualize and quantitate dynamic biological processes at the (sub)cellular level in live animals. By visualizing tissues through imaging windows, individual cells (e.g., cancer, host, or stem cells) can be tracked and studied over a time-span of days to months. Several imaging windows have been developed to access tissues including the brain, superficial fascia, mammary glands, liver, kidney, pancreas, and small intestine among others. Here, we review the development of imaging windows and compare the most commonly used long-term imaging windows for cancer biology: the cranial imaging window, the dorsal skin fold chamber, the mammary imaging window, and the abdominal imaging window. Moreover, we provide technical details, considerations, and trouble-shooting tips on the surgical procedures and microscopy setups for each imaging window and explain different strategies to assure imaging of the same area over multiple imaging sessions. This review aims to be a useful resource for establishing the long-term intravital imaging procedure.

  20. Imaging Circulating Tumor Cells in Freely Moving Awake Small Animals Using a Miniaturized Intravital Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Sasportas, Laura Sarah; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM) strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals. PMID:24497977

  1. Expanding two-photon intravital microscopy to the infrared by means of optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Herz, Josephine; Siffrin, Volker; Hauser, Anja E; Brandt, Alexander U; Leuenberger, Tina; Radbruch, Helena; Zipp, Frauke; Niesner, Raluca A

    2010-02-17

    Chronic inflammation in various organs, such as the brain, implies that different subpopulations of immune cells interact with the cells of the target organ. To monitor this cellular communication both morphologically and functionally, the ability to visualize more than two colors in deep tissue is indispensable. Here, we demonstrate the pronounced power of optical parametric oscillator (OPO)-based two-photon laser scanning microscopy for dynamic intravital imaging in hardly accessible organs of the central nervous and of the immune system, with particular relevance for long-term investigations of pathological mechanisms (e.g., chronic neuroinflammation) necessitating the use of fluorescent proteins. Expanding the wavelength excitation farther to the infrared overcomes the current limitations of standard Titanium:Sapphire laser excitation, leading to 1), simultaneous imaging of fluorophores with largely different excitation and emission spectra (e.g., GFP-derivatives and RFP-derivatives); and 2), higher penetration depths in tissue (up to 80%) at higher resolution and with reduced photobleaching and phototoxicity. This tool opens up new opportunities for deep-tissue imaging and will have a tremendous impact on the choice of protein fluorophores for intravital applications in bioscience and biomedicine, as we demonstrate in this work.

  2. MULTIPHOTON IMAGING CAN BE USED FOR MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION OF INTACT HUMAN GASTROINTESTINAL MUCOSA EX VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Rogart, Jason N.; Nagata, Jun; Loeser, Caroline S.; Roorda, Robert D.; Aslanian, Harry; Robert, Marie E.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Background & Aims The ability to observe cellular and subcellular detail during routine endoscopy is a major goal in the development of new endoscopic imaging techniques. Multiphoton microscopy, which relies on nonlinear infared optical processes, has the potential to identify cellular details by excitation of endogenous fluorescent molecules. We examined the feasibility of using multiphoton microscopy to characterize mucosal histology in the human gastrointestinal tract. Methods A multiphoton microscope was used to determine the optimal excitation wavelength for examination of gastrointestinal mucosa. Fresh, unfixed, and unstained biopsy specimens obtained during routine endoscopy in human subjects were then examined by confocal microscopy and multiphoton microscopy. Multiphoton images also were compared to standard H&E images obtained from paired biopsy specimens. A prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe was used to examine intact rat colon. Results Peak multiphoton autofluorescence intensity was detected in mucosa excited at 735 nm. Multiphoton microscopic examination of unstained biopsy specimens revealed improved cellular detail relative to either unstained or stained specimens examined by confocal imaging. Resolution of structures such as epithelial nuclei, goblet cells, and interstitial fibers and cells was comparable to what was obtained using standard H&E histology. Similar findings were observed when using a prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe. Conclusions Multiphoton microscopy can be used to examine gastrointestinal mucosa at the cellular level, without the need for fluorescent dyes. The construction of a multiphoton endomicroscope could therefore provide a practical means of performing “virtual biopsies” during the course of routine endoscopy, with advantages over currently available endomicroscopy technologies. PMID:18065276

  3. Advances in renal (patho)physiology using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sipos, A; Toma, I; Kang, J J; Rosivall, L; Peti-Peterdi, J

    2007-11-01

    Multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy is a state-of-the-art confocal imaging technique ideal for deep optical sectioning of living tissues. It is capable of performing ultrasensitive, quantitative imaging of organ functions in health and disease with high spatial and temporal resolution which other imaging modalities cannot achieve. For more than a decade, multiphoton microscopy has been successfully used with various in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches to study many functions of different organs, including the kidney. This study focuses on recent advances in our knowledge of renal (patho)physiological processes made possible by the use of this imaging technology. Visualization of cellular variables like cytosolic calcium, pH, cell-to-cell communication and signal propagation, interstitial fluid flow in the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA), real-time imaging of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF), and renin release mechanisms are reviewed. A brief summary is provided of kidney functions that can be measured by in vivo quantitative multiphoton imaging including glomerular filtration and permeability, concentration, dilution, and activity of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system using this minimally invasive approach. New visual data challenge a number of existing paradigms in renal (patho)physiology. Also, quantitative imaging of kidney function with multiphoton microscopy has tremendous potential to eventually provide novel non-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic tools for future applications in clinical nephrology.

  4. Advances in time-dependent methods for multiphoton processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.C.; Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.

    1990-09-01

    This paper discusses recent theoretical results on above threshold ionization harmonic generation and high-frequency, high intensity suppression of ionization. These studies of multiphoton processes in atoms and molecules for short, intense pulsed optical lasers have been carried out using techniques which involve the explicit solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. 43 refs., 5 figs.

  5. A multiphoton microscope platform for imaging the mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Lei, Tim C.; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the ability of multiphoton microscopy to obtain full three-dimensional high-resolution images of the intact mouse eye anterior chamber without need for enucleation. Methods A custom multiphoton microscope was constructed and optimized for deep tissue imaging. Simultaneous two-photon autofluorescence (2PAF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging were performed. A mouse holder and stereotaxic platform were designed to access different parts of the eye for imaging. A reservoir for keeping the eye moist was used during imaging sessions. Results Non-invasive multiphoton images deep inside the anterior chamber of the mouse eye were obtained without the need for enucleation. The iris, corneal epithelium and endothelium, trabecular meshwork region and conjunctiva were visualized by the 2PAF and SHG signals. Identification of the anatomy was achieved by the intrinsic properties of the native tissue without any exogenous labeling. Images as deep as 600 microns into the eye were clearly demonstrated. Full three-dimensional image reconstructions of the entire anterior chamber were performed and analyzed using custom software. Conclusions Multiphoton imaging is a highly promising tool for ophthalmic research. We have demonstrated the ability to image the entire anterior chamber of the mouse eye in its native state. These results provide a foundation for future in vivo studies of the eye. PMID:22815637

  6. Two-Photon Intravital Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of the Kidney Reveals Cell-Type Specific Metabolic Signatures.

    PubMed

    Hato, Takashi; Winfree, Seth; Day, Richard; Sandoval, Ruben M; Molitoris, Bruce A; Yoder, Mervin C; Wiggins, Roger C; Zheng, Yi; Dunn, Kenneth W; Dagher, Pierre C

    2017-03-01

    In the live animal, tissue autofluorescence arises from a number of biologically important metabolites, such as the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Because autofluorescence changes with metabolic state, it can be harnessed as a label-free imaging tool with which to study metabolism in vivo Here, we used the combination of intravital two-photon microscopy and frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to map cell-specific metabolic signatures in the kidneys of live animals. The FLIM images are analyzed using the phasor approach, which requires no prior knowledge of metabolite species and can provide unbiased metabolic fingerprints for each pixel of the lifetime image. Intravital FLIM revealed the metabolic signatures of S1 and S2 proximal tubules to be distinct and resolvable at the subcellular level. Notably, S1 and distal tubules exhibited similar metabolic profiles despite apparent differences in morphology and autofluorescence emission with traditional two-photon microscopy. Time-lapse imaging revealed dynamic changes in the metabolic profiles of the interstitium, urinary lumen, and glomerulus-areas that are not resolved by traditional intensity-based two-photon microscopy. Finally, using a model of endotoxemia, we present examples of the way in which intravital FLIM can be applied to study kidney diseases and metabolism. In conclusion, intravital FLIM of intrinsic metabolites is a bias-free approach with which to characterize and monitor metabolism in vivo, and offers the unique opportunity to uncover dynamic metabolic changes in living animals with subcellular resolution.

  7. Improvement of axial excitation confinement in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy via spatially modulated illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2017-02-01

    Conventional temporal focusing-based multiphoton excitation microscopy (TFMPEM) can offer widefield optical sectioning with an axial excitation confinement (AEC) of a few microns. Herein, a developed TFMPEM with a digital micromirror device (DMD), acting as the blazed grating for light spatial dispersion and simultaneous patterned illumination, has been extended to implement spatially modulated illumination at structured frequency and orientation. By implementing the spatially modulated illumination, the beam coverage at the back-focal aperture of the objective lens can be increased. As a result, the AEC can be condensed from 3.0 μm to 1.5 μm in full width at half maximum for a 2-fold enhancement. Furthermore, by using HiLo microscopy with two structured illuminations at the same spatial frequency but different orientation, biotissue images according to the structured illumination with condensed AEC is obviously superior in contrast and scattering suppression.

  8. Acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy: Applications and implications for optical neurobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Vijay

    Multiphoton excitation of molecular probes has become an important tool in experimental neurobiology owing to the intrinsic optical sectioning and low light scattering it affords. Using molecular functional indicators, multiphoton excitation allows physiological signals within single neurons to be observed from within living brain tissue. Ideally, it would be possible to record from multiple sites located throughout the elaborately branching dendritic arbors, in order to study the correlations of structure and function both within and across experiments. However, existing multiphoton microscope systems based on scanning mirrors do not allow optical recordings to be obtained from more than a handful of sites simultaneously at the high rates required to capture the fast physiological signals of interest (>100Hz for Ca2+ signals, >1kHz for membrane potential transients). In order to overcome this limitation, two-dimensional acousto-optic deflection was employed, to allow an ultrafast laser beam suited for multiphoton excitation to be rapidly repositioned with low latency (˜15mus). This supports a random-access scanning mode in which the beam can repeatedly visit a succession of user-selected sites of interest within the microscope's field-of-view at high rates, with minimal sacrifice of pixel dwell time. This technique of acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscope (AO-MPLSM) was demonstrated to allow the spatial profile of signals arising in response to physiological stimulation to be rapidly mapped. Means to compensate or avoid problems of dispersion which have hampered AO-MPLSM in the past are presented, with the latter being implemented. Separately, the combination of photon counting detection with multiphoton excitation, termed generally multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy (MP-PCS), was also considered, with particular emphasis on the technique of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). MP-PCS was shown to allow information about molecular

  9. Intact corneal stroma visualization of GFP mouse revealed by multiphoton imaging.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wen; Teng, Shu-Wen; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Kim, Ki Hean; Chen, Hsiao-Ching; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Chen, Yang-Fan; So, Peter T C; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate that multiphoton microscopy is a preferred technique to investigate intact cornea structure without slicing and staining. At the micron resolution, multiphoton imaging can provide both large morphological features and detailed structure of epithelium, corneal collagen fibril bundles and keratocytes. A large area multiphoton cross-section across an intact eye excised from a GFP mouse was obtained by a homebuilt multiphoton microscope. The broadband multiphoton fluorescence (435-700 nm) and second harmonic generation (SHG, 360-400 nm) signals were generated by the 760 nm output of a femtosecond titanium-sapphire laser. A water immersion objective (Fluor, 40X, NA 0.8; Nikon) was used to facilitate imaging the curve ocular surface. The multiphoton image over entire cornea provides morphological information of epithelial cells, keratocytes, and global collagen orientation. Specifically, our planar, large area multiphoton image reveals a concentric pattern of the stroma collagen, indicative of the laminar collagen organization throughout the stroma. In addition, the green fluorescence protein (GFP) labeling contributed to fluorescence contrast of cellular area and facilitated visualizing of inactive keratocytes. Our results show that multiphoton imaging of GFP labeled mouse cornea manifests both morphological significance and structural details. The second harmonic generation imaging reveals the collagen orientation, while the multiphoton fluorescence imaging indicates morphology and distribution of cells in cornea. Our results support that multiphoton microscopy is an appropriate technology for further in vivo investigation and diagnosis of cornea. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Automated Identification and Localization of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in 3D Intravital Microscopy Data

    PubMed Central

    Khorshed, Reema A.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Duarte, Delfim; Scott, Mark K.; Akinduro, Olufolake A.; Rashidi, Narges M.; Spitaler, Martin; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Measuring three-dimensional (3D) localization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) within the bone marrow microenvironment using intravital microscopy is a rapidly expanding research theme. This approach holds the key to understanding the detail of HSC-niche interactions, which are critical for appropriate stem cell function. Due to the complex tissue architecture of the bone marrow and to the progressive introduction of scattering and signal loss at increasing imaging depths, there is no ready-made software to handle efficient segmentation and unbiased analysis of the data. To address this, we developed an automated image analysis tool that simplifies and standardizes the biological interpretation of 3D HSC microenvironment images. The algorithm identifies HSCs and measures their localization relative to surrounding osteoblast cells and bone collagen. We demonstrate here the effectiveness, consistency, and accuracy of the proposed approach compared to current manual analysis and its wider applicability to analyze other 3D bone marrow components. PMID:26120058

  11. Intravital imaging of multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment through skin-fold window chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Tumor immune microenvironment became very important for the tumor immunotherapy. There were several kinds of immune cells in tumor stromal, and they played very different roles in tumor growth. In order to observe the behaviors of multiple immune cells in tumor microenvironment and the interaction between immune cells and tumor cells at the same time, we generated a multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment model. The tumor cells and immune cells were labeled by different fluorescent proteins. By using of skin-fold window chamber implanted into mice and intravital imaging technology, we could dynamically observe the different immune cells in tumor microenvironment. After data analysis from the video, we could know the behavior of TILs, DCs and Tregs in tumor immune microenvironment; furthermore, we could know these immune cells play different roles in the tumor microenvironment.

  12. Combined application of dynamic light scattering imaging and fluorescence intravital microscopy in vascular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V.; Ziv, K.; Addadi, Y.; Madar-Balakirski, N.; Meglinski, I.; Neeman, M.; Harmelin, A.

    2010-08-01

    The dynamic light scattering imaging (DLSI) system combined with the conventional fluorescence intravital microscope (FIM) has been applied for the examination of blood and lymph vessels in the mouse ear in vivo. While the CCD camera can be shared by both techniques the combined application of DLSI and FIM allows rapid switching between the modalities. In current study temporal speckles fluctuations are used for rendering blood vessels structure and monitoring blood perfusion with the higher spatial resolution, whereas FIM provides the images of lymphatic vessels. The results clearly demonstrate that combined application of DLSI and FIM approaches provides synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels with higher contrast and specificity. The use of this new dual-modal diagnostic system is particularly important and has a great potential to significantly expand the capabilities of vascular diagnostics providing synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels.

  13. Integrated intravital microscopy and mathematical modeling to optimize nanotherapeutics delivery to tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Wu, Min; Lowengrub, John; McDougall, Steven R.; Chaplain, Mark A. J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2012-03-01

    Inefficient vascularization hinders the optimal transport of cell nutrients, oxygen, and drugs to cancer cells in solid tumors. Gradients of these substances maintain a heterogeneous cell-scale microenvironment through which drugs and their carriers must travel, significantly limiting optimal drug exposure. In this study, we integrate intravital microscopy with a mathematical model of cancer to evaluate the behavior of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems designed to circumvent biophysical barriers. We simulate the effect of doxorubicin delivered via porous 1000 x 400 nm plateloid silicon particles to a solid tumor characterized by a realistic vasculature, and vary the parameters to determine how much drug per particle and how many particles need to be released within the vasculature in order to achieve remission of the tumor. We envision that this work will contribute to the development of quantitative measures of nanoparticle design and drug loading in order to optimize cancer treatment via nanotherapeutics.

  14. Neutrophil Extravasation Cascade: What Can We Learn from Two-photon Intravital Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang A

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells (leukocytes or white blood cells) move actively and sensitively based on body conditions. Despite their important role as protectors inside the body, it is difficult to directly observe the spatiotemporal momentum of leukocytes. With advances in imaging technology, the introduction of two-photon microscopy has enabled researchers to look deeper inside tissues in a three-dimensional manner. In observations of immune cell movement along the blood vessel, vascular permeability and innate immune cell movements remain unclear. Here, we describe the neutrophil extravasation cascade, which were observed using a two-photon intravital imaging technique. We also provide evidence for novel mechanisms such as neutrophil body extension and microparticle formation as well as their biological roles during migration. PMID:28035206

  15. Intravital Imaging of Axonal Interactions with Microglia and Macrophages in a Mouse Dorsal Column Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Teresa A.; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Myers, Jay T.; Huang, Alex Y.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury causes an inflammatory reaction involving blood-derived macrophages and central nervous system (CNS)-resident microglia. Intra-vital two-photon microscopy enables the study of macrophages and microglia in the spinal cord lesion in the living animal. This can be performed in adult animals with a traumatic injury to the dorsal column. Here, we describe methods for distinguishing macrophages from microglia in the CNS using an irradiation bone marrow chimera to obtain animals in which only macrophages or microglia are labeled with a genetically encoded green fluorescent protein. We also describe a injury model that crushes the dorsal column of the spinal cord, thereby producing a simple, easily accessible, rectangular lesion that is easily visualized in an animal through a laminectomy. Furthermore, we will outline procedures to sequentially image the animals at the anatomical site of injury for the study of cellular interactions during the first few days to weeks after injury. PMID:25489963

  16. An intravital microscopy model to study early pancreatic inflammation in type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christian; Fisher, Nicholas B.; Tugwell, Barna; Zhou, Juan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intravital microscopy (IVM) of the pancreas has been proven to be an invaluable tool in pancreatitis, transplantation and ischemia/reperfusion research. Also in type 1 diabetes (T1D) pancreatic IVM offers unique advantages for the elucidation of the disease process. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice develop T1D spontaneously by 40 weeks of age. Our goal was to establish an IVM-based method to study early pancreatic inflammation in NOD mice, which can be used to screen novel medications to prevent or delay T1D in future studies. This included evaluation of leukocyte-endothelial interactions as well as disturbances of capillary perfusion in the pancreatic microcirculation. PMID:28243521

  17. Viral nanoparticles decorated with novel EGFL7 ligands enable intravital imaging of tumor neovasculature.

    PubMed

    Cho, Choi-Fong; Yu, Lihai; Nsiama, Tienabe K; Kadam, Alisha N; Raturi, Arun; Shukla, Sourabh; Amadei, Giulio A; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Luyt, Leonard G; Lewis, John D

    2017-08-24

    Angiogenesis is a dynamic process fundamental to the development of solid tumors. Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7) is a protein whose expression is restricted to endothelial cells undergoing active remodeling that has emerged as a key mediator of this process. EGFL7 expression is associated with poor outcome in several cancers, making it a promising target for imaging or therapeutic strategies. Here, EGFL7 is explored as a molecular target for active neovascularization. Using a combinatorial peptide screening approach, we describe the discovery and characterization of a novel high affinity EGFL7-binding peptide, E7p72, that specifically targets human endothelial cells. Viral nanoparticles decorated with E7p72 peptides specifically target tumor-associated neovasculature with high specificity as assessed by intravital imaging. This work highlights the value of EGFL7 as a target for angiogenic vessels and opens the door for novel targeted therapeutic approaches.

  18. A Novel Model of Intravital Platelet Imaging Using CD41-ZsGreen1 Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Makoto; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Ohno, Kousaku; Jakubowski, Joseph A.; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play pivotal roles in both hemostasis and thrombosis. Although models of intravital platelet imaging are available for thrombosis studies in mice, few are available for rat studies. The present effort aimed to generate fluorescent platelets in rats and assess their dynamics in a rat model of arterial injury. We generated CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats, in which green fluorescence protein ZsGreen1 was expressed specifically in megakaryocytes and thus platelets. The transgenic rats exhibited normal hematological and biochemical values with the exception of body weight and erythroid parameters, which were slightly lower than those of wild-type rats. Platelet aggregation, induced by 20 μM ADP and 10 μg/ml collagen, and blood clotting times were not significantly different between transgenic and wild-type rats. Saphenous arteries of transgenic rats were injured with 10% FeCl3, and the formation of fluorescent thrombi was evaluated using confocal microscopy. FeCl3 caused time-dependent increases in the mean fluorescence intensity of injured arteries of vehicle-treated rats. Prasugrel (3 mg/kg, p.o.), administered 2 h before FeCl3, significantly inhibited fluorescence compared with vehicle-treated rats (4.5 ± 0.4 vs. 14.9 ± 2.4 arbitrary fluorescence units at 30 min, respectively, n = 8, P = 0.0037). These data indicate that CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats represent a useful model for intravital imaging of platelet-mediated thrombus formation and the evaluation of antithrombotic agents. PMID:27128503

  19. Impact of rapamycin on phenotype and tolerogenic function of dendritic cells via intravital optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meijie; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-03-01

    Rapamycin (RAPA) as a unique tolerance-promoting therapeutic drug is crucial to successful clinical organ transplantation. DC (Dendritic cells) play a critical role in antigen presentation to T cells to initiate immune responses involved in tissue rejection. Although the influence of RAPA on DC differentiation and maturation had been reported by some research groups, it is still controversial and unclear right now. In addition, it is also lack of study on investigating the role of DC in DTH reaction via intravital optical imaging. Herein, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on phenotype and function of bone marrow monocyte-derived DC both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments by flow cytometry (FACS) showed that DC displayed decreased cell size and lower expression levels of surface molecule CD80 induced by RAPA; Furthermore, the phagocytic ability to OVA of DC was inhibited by RAPA started from 1 h to 2 h post co-incubation, but recovered after 4 h; In addition, the capacity of DC to activate naïve OT-II T cell proliferation was also inhibited at 3 day post co-incubation, but had no effect at 5 day, the data indicated this effect was reversible when removing the drug. More importantly, the DC-T interaction was monitored both in vitro and in intravital lymph node explant, and showed that RAPA-DC had a significant lower proportion of long-lived (>15min) contacts. Thus, RAPA displayed immunosuppressive to phenotypic and functional maturation of DC, and this phenomenon induced by RAPA may favorable in the clinical organ transplantation in future.

  20. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-15

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  1. Tracking neutrophil intraluminal crawling, transendothelial migration and chemotaxis in tissue by intravital video microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Najia; Lei, Xi; Liu, Lixin

    2011-09-24

    The recruitment of circulating leukocytes from blood stream to the inflamed tissue is a crucial and complex process of inflammation(1,2). In the postcapillary venules of inflamed tissue, leukocytes initially tether and roll on the luminal surface of venular wall. Rolling leukocytes arrest on endothelium and undergo firm adhesion in response to chemokine or other chemoattractants on the venular surface. Many adherent leukocytes relocate from the initial site of adhesion to the junctional extravasation site in endothelium, a process termed intraluminal crawling(3). Following crawling, leukocytes move across endothelium (transmigration) and migrate in extravascular tissue toward the source of chemoattractant (chemotaxis)(4). Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in vivo and revealing cellular and molecular mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment(2,5). In this report, we provide a comprehensive description of using brightfield intravital microscopy to visualize and determine the detailed processes of neutrophil recruitment in mouse cremaster muscle in response to the gradient of a neutrophil chemoattractant. To induce neutrophil recruitment, a small piece of agarose gel (~1-mm(3) size) containing neutrophil chemoattractant MIP-2 (CXCL2, a CXC chemokine) or WKYMVm (Trp-Lys-Tyr-Val-D-Met, a synthetic analog of bacterial peptide) is placed on the muscle tissue adjacent to the observed postcapillary venule. With time-lapsed video photography and computer software ImageJ, neutrophil intraluminal crawling on endothelium, neutrophil transendothelial migration and the migration and chemotaxis in tissue are visualized and tracked. This protocol allows reliable and quantitative analysis of many neutrophil recruitment parameters such as intraluminal crawling velocity, transmigration time, detachment time, migration velocity, chemotaxis velocity and chemotaxis index in tissue. We demonstrate that using this protocol, these

  2. Multiple Administrations of Viral Nanoparticles Alter in Vivo Behavior-Insights from Intravital Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sourabh; Dorand, R Dixon; Myers, Jay T; Woods, Sarah E; Gulati, Neetu M; Stewart, Phoebe L; Commandeur, Ulrich; Huang, Alex Y; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-05-09

    Multiple administrations of nanoparticle-based formulations are often a clinical requirement for drug delivery and diagnostic imaging applications. Steady pharmacokinetics of nanoparticles is desirable to achieve efficient therapeutic or diagnostic outcomes over such repeat administrations. While clearance through mononuclear phagocytic system is a key determinant of nanoparticle persistence in vivo, multiple administrations could potentially result in altered pharmacokinetics by evoking innate or adaptive immune responses. Plant viral nanoparticles (VNPs) represent an emerging class of programmable nanoparticle platform technologies that offer a highly organized proteinaceous architecture and multivalency for delivery of large payloads of drugs and molecular contrast agents. These very structural features also render them susceptible to immune recognition and subsequent accelerated systemic clearance that could potentially affect overall efficiency. While the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of VNPs have been reported, the biological response following repeat administrations remains an understudied area of investigation. Here, we demonstrate that weekly administration of filamentous plant viruses results in the generation of increasing levels of circulating, carrier-specific IgM and IgG antibodies. Furthermore, PVX specific immunoglobulins from the serum of immunized animals quickly form aggregates when incubated with PVX in vitro. Such aggregates of VNP-immune complexes are also observed in the mouse vasculature in vivo following repeat injections when imaged in real time using intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM). The size of aggregates diminishes at later time points, coinciding with antibody class switching from IgM to IgG. Together, our results highlight the need for careful in vivo assessment of (viral) nanoparticle-based platform technologies, especially in studying their performance after repeat administration. We also demonstrate

  3. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography.

    PubMed

    Umetani, K; Fukushima, K

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  4. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  5. Intravital imaging of a spheroid-based orthotopic model of melanoma in the mouse ear skin

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Keefe T.; Jones, Stephen W.; Brighton, Hailey E.; Bo, Tao; Cochran, Shelly D.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Bear, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful tool that enables the visualization of fluorescently tagged tumor cells and their stromal interactions within tissues in vivo. We have developed an orthotopic model of implanting multicellular melanoma tumor spheroids into the dermis of the mouse ear skin without the requirement for invasive surgery. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this approach to observe the primary tumor, single cell actin dynamics, and tumor-associated vasculature. These methods can be broadly applied to investigate an array of biological questions regarding tumor cell behavior in vivo. PMID:28748125

  6. A simple model of multiphoton micromachining in silk hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, Matthew B.; Alonzo, Carlo; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2016-06-13

    High resolution three-dimensional voids can be directly written into transparent silk fibroin hydrogels using ultrashort pulses of near-infrared (NIR) light. Here, we propose a simple finite-element model that can be used to predict the size and shape of individual features under various exposure conditions. We compare predicted and measured feature volumes for a wide range of parameters and use the model to determine optimum conditions for maximum material removal. The simplicity of the model implies that the mechanism of multiphoton induced void creation in silk is due to direct absorption of light energy rather than diffusion of heat or other photoproducts, and confirms that multiphoton absorption of NIR light in silk is purely a 3-photon process.

  7. Characteristics of subgingival calculus detection by multiphoton fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Oi-Hong; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin; Chen, How-Foo

    2011-06-01

    Subgingival calculus has been recognized as a major cause of periodontitis, which is one of the main chronic infectious diseases of oral cavities and a principal cause of tooth loss in humans. Bacteria deposited in subgingival calculus or plaque cause gingival inflammation, function deterioration, and then periodontitis. However, subgingival calculus within the periodontal pocket is a complicated and potentially delicate structure to be detected with current dental armamentaria, namely dental x-rays and dental probes. Consequently, complete removal of subgingival calculus remains a challenge to periodontal therapies. In this study, the detection of subgingival calculus employing a multiphoton autofluorescence imaging method was characterized in comparison with a one-photon confocal fluorescence imaging technique. Feasibility of such a system was studied based on fluorescence response of gingiva, healthy teeth, and calculus with and without gingiva covered. The multiphoton fluorescence technology perceived the tissue-covered subgingival calculus that cannot be observed by the one-photon confocal fluorescence method.

  8. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  9. Hybrid label-free multiphoton and optoacoustic microscopy (MPOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Dominik; Tserevelakis, George J.; Omar, Murad; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-07-01

    Many biological applications require a simultaneous observation of different anatomical features. However, unless potentially harmful staining of the specimens is employed, individual microscopy techniques do generally not provide multi-contrast capabilities. We present a hybrid microscope integrating optoacoustic microscopy and multiphoton microscopy, including second-harmonic generation, into a single device. This combined multiphoton and optoacoustic microscope (MPOM) offers visualization of a broad range of structures by employing different contrast mechanisms and at the same time enables pure label-free imaging of biological systems. We investigate the relative performance of the two microscopy modalities and demonstrate their multi-contrast abilities through the label-free imaging of a zebrafish larva ex vivo, simultaneously visualizing muscles and pigments. This hybrid microscopy application bears great potential for developmental biology studies, enabling more comprehensive information to be obtained from biological specimens without the necessity of staining.

  10. A simple model of multiphoton micromachining in silk hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, Matthew B.; Alonzo, Carlo; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2016-06-01

    High resolution three-dimensional voids can be directly written into transparent silk fibroin hydrogels using ultrashort pulses of near-infrared (NIR) light. Here, we propose a simple finite-element model that can be used to predict the size and shape of individual features under various exposure conditions. We compare predicted and measured feature volumes for a wide range of parameters and use the model to determine optimum conditions for maximum material removal. The simplicity of the model implies that the mechanism of multiphoton induced void creation in silk is due to direct absorption of light energy rather than diffusion of heat or other photoproducts, and confirms that multiphoton absorption of NIR light in silk is purely a 3-photon process.

  11. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence. PMID:27283889

  12. 48-channel coincidence counting system for multiphoton experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Li, Wei; Hu, Yi; Yang, Tao; Jin, Ge; Jiang, Xiao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a coincidence counting system with 48 input channels which is aimed to count all coincidence events, up to 531 441 kinds, in a multiphoton experiment. Using the dynamic delay adjusting inside the Field Programmable Gate Array, the alignment of photon signals of 48 channels is achieved. After the alignment, clock phase shifting is used to sample signal pulses. Logic constraints are used to stabilize the pulse width. The coincidence counting data stored in a 1G bit external random access memory will be sent to the computer to analyze the amount of 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-fold coincidence events. This system is designed for multiphoton entanglement experiments with multiple degrees of freedom of photons.

  13. Multiphoton imaging of freezing and heating effects in plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Hans Georg; Tümer, Fatma; König, Karsten

    2013-08-01

    Thermally-induced changes in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves were investigated with a novel cryo microscope by multiphoton, fluorescence lifetime and spectral imaging as well as micro spectroscopy. Samples were excited with fs pulses in the near-infrared range and cooled/heated in a cryogenic chamber. The results show morphological changes in the chloroplast distribution as well as a shift from chlorophyll to cell-wall fluorescence with decreasing temperature. At temperatures below -40 °C, also second harmonic generation was observed. The measurements illustrate the suitability of multiphoton imaging to investigate thermally-induced changes at temperatures used for cryopreservation as well as for basic investigations of thermal effects on plant tissue in general.

  14. Characteristics of subgingival calculus detection by multiphoton fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tung, Oi-Hong; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin; Chen, How-Foo

    2011-06-01

    Subgingival calculus has been recognized as a major cause of periodontitis, which is one of the main chronic infectious diseases of oral cavities and a principal cause of tooth loss in humans. Bacteria deposited in subgingival calculus or plaque cause gingival inflammation, function deterioration, and then periodontitis. However, subgingival calculus within the periodontal pocket is a complicated and potentially delicate structure to be detected with current dental armamentaria, namely dental x-rays and dental probes. Consequently, complete removal of subgingival calculus remains a challenge to periodontal therapies. In this study, the detection of subgingival calculus employing a multiphoton autofluorescence imaging method was characterized in comparison with a one-photon confocal fluorescence imaging technique. Feasibility of such a system was studied based on fluorescence response of gingiva, healthy teeth, and calculus with and without gingiva covered. The multiphoton fluorescence technology perceived the tissue-covered subgingival calculus that cannot be observed by the one-photon confocal fluorescence method.

  15. Nanoscale hydroxyl radical generation from multiphoton ionization of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Bisby, Roger H; Crisostomo, Ana G; Botchway, Stanley W; Parker, Anthony W

    2009-01-01

    Exposure of solutions containing both tryptophan and hydrogen peroxide to a pulsed ( approximately 180 fs) laser beam at 750 nm induces luminescence characteristic of 5-hydroxytryptophan. The results indicate that 3-photon excitation of tryptophan results in photoionization within the focal volume of the laser beam. The resulting hydrated electron is scavenged by hydrogen peroxide to produce the hydroxyl radical. The latter subsequently reacts with tryptophan to form 5-hydroxytryptophan. The involvement of hydroxyl radicals is confirmed by the use of ethanol and nitrous oxide as scavengers and their effects on the fluorescence yield in this system. It is postulated that such multiphoton ionization of tryptophanyl residues in cellular proteins may contribute to the photodamage observed during imaging of cells and tissues using multiphoton microscopy.

  16. Towards in vivo breast skin characterization using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Ana; Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    Breast cancer, the most common type of cancer in women worldwide, as well as its treatment (e.g. radiation therapy) can affect the human skin. Multiphoton imaging could provide new insights into these skin alterations non-invasively and with high-resolution. As a preparation for a later investigation involving patients, areas of the breast and forearm skin of healthy volunteers were imaged using the clinically certified multiphoton imaging tomograph MPTflex based on endogenous skin autofluorescence and second-harmonic signals. Depth-resolved image stacks were acquired in consecutive weeks to explore the influence of hormonal variations on the skin properties. Both breasts were considered and up to three different areas were imaged per session. Acquisition parameters were optimized to minimize artifacts caused by breathing-motion. As a first result, skin properties, such as the epidermal thickness, appear to be influenced by hormonal variations.

  17. Phase matching alters spatial multiphoton processes in dense atomic ensembles.

    PubMed

    Leszczyński, Adam; Parniak, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2017-01-09

    Multiphoton processes in dense atomic vapors such as four-wave mixing or coherent blue light generation are typically viewed from single-atom perspective. Here we study the surprisingly important effect of phase matching near two-photon resonances that arises due to spatial extent of the atomic medium within which the multiphoton process occurs. The non-unit refractive index of the atomic vapor may inhibit generation of light in nonlinear processes, significantly shift the efficiency maxima in frequencies and redirect emitted beam. We present these effects on an example of four-wave mixing in dense rubidium vapors in a double-ladder configuration. By deriving a simple theory that takes into account essential spatial properties of the process, we give precise predictions and confirm their validity in the experiment. The model allows us to improve on the geometry of the experiment and engineer more efficient four-wave mixing.

  18. Differentiation of highly metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Zhenlin; Sun, Zhenzhen; Li, Jingwen; Ye, Qing; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Xie, Shusen

    2016-10-01

    The primary hypothesis tested in the study was that nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells at different stage of invasion and metastasis can be differentiated using multiphoton microscopy (MPM). CNE1 and CNE2Z cells were cultured and used in this study. The activity of cell migration and invasion was measured using Transwell assays. At the same time, the morphologic features were quantified from the multiphoton images. The measurements of Transwell migration and invasion showed that the invasion and migration of CNE2Z cells were significantly enhanced when compared with that of CNE1 cells. Also, statistically significant differences in the morphologic features were found between two kinds of cancer cells. In conclusion, it is feasible to use MPM to differentiate cancer cells with different stage of invasion and metastasis.

  19. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jhih; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2009-07-01

    We utilize multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of noncancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from humans. Our results show that the combination of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from noncancerous lung tissues. Specifically, noncancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure, while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55+/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15, respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13, respectively. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from noncancerous tissues.

  20. Multiphoton Imaging of Ultrasound Bioeffects in the Murine Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott; Skoch, Jesse; Bacskai, Brian; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of multiphoton imaging in the murine brain during exposure to ultrasound. Our experimental setup coupled ultrasound through the ventral surface of the mouse while allowing imaging through a cranial window from the dorsal surface. Field attenuation was estimated by scanning the field after insertion of a freshly sacrificed mouse; beam profile and peak position were preserved, suggesting adequate targeting for imaging experiments. C57 mice were imaged with a Biorad multiphoton microscope while being exposed to ultrasound (f = 1.029 MHz, peak pressure ˜ 200 kPa, average power ˜ 0.18 W) with IV injection of Optison. We observed strong vasoconstriction coincident with US and Optison, as well as permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier.

  1. Multiphoton tomography of skin tumors after ALA application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Dill-Müller, Dorothee; Martin, Sven; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    In skin, the most common form of cancer is the basal cell carcinoma, affecting about 800.000 people in US each year. One of the treatments is photodynamic therapy (PDT) with a topical application of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) derivates. These photosensitizers accumulate mainly in cancerous cells and can be activated by light resulting in a destruction of the cells. We performed multiphoton tomography based on near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser pulses on skin biopsies in order to study the biosynthesis of protoporphyrine IX and the effect of treatment with submicron resolution. The fluorescence of the photosensitizer was excited using two-photon processes and monitored through the epidermis towards the basal layer. In comparison with normal skin the cancerous cells showed different morphology and fluorescence behavior. Multiphoton tomography might become a useful tool for high resolution imaging of cancerous tissue and to evaluate the therapeutical effects.

  2. Multi-photon UV photolysis of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Extinction spectra and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, A. J.; Ruth, A. A.; Gash, E. W.; Mansfield, M. W. D.

    2013-08-01

    The extinction spectra of static naphthalene and static biphenylene vapor, each buffered with a noble gas at room temperature, were measured as a function of time in the region between 390 and 850 nm after UV multi-photon laser photolysis at 308 nm. Employing incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS), the spectra were found to be unstructured with a general lack of isolated features suggesting that the extinction was not solely based on absorption but was in fact dominated by scattering from particles formed in the photolysis of the respective polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Following UV multi-photon photolysis, the extinction dynamics of the static (unstirred) closed gas-phase system exhibits extraordinary quasi-periodic and complex oscillations with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes, persisting for up to several hours. Depending on buffer gas type and pressure, several types of dynamical responses could be generated (classified as types I, II, and III). They were studied as a function of temperature and chamber volume for different experimental conditions and possible explanations for the oscillations are discussed. A conclusive model for the observed phenomena has not been established. However, a number of key hypotheses have made based on the measurements in this publication: (a) Following the multi-photon UV photolysis of naphthalene (or biphenylene), particles are formed on a timescale not observable using IBBCEAS. (b) The observed temporal behavior cannot be described on basis of a chemical reaction scheme alone. (c) The pressure dependence of the system's responses is due to transport phenomena of particles in the chamber. (d) The size distribution and the refractive indices of particles are time dependent and evolve on a timescale of minutes to hours. The rate of particle coagulation, involving coalescent growth and particle agglomeration, affects the observed oscillations. (e) The walls of the chamber act as a sink

  3. Multi-photon UV photolysis of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Extinction spectra and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, A. J.; Gash, E. W.; Mansfield, M. W. D.; Ruth, A. A.

    2013-08-07

    The extinction spectra of static naphthalene and static biphenylene vapor, each buffered with a noble gas at room temperature, were measured as a function of time in the region between 390 and 850 nm after UV multi-photon laser photolysis at 308 nm. Employing incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS), the spectra were found to be unstructured with a general lack of isolated features suggesting that the extinction was not solely based on absorption but was in fact dominated by scattering from particles formed in the photolysis of the respective polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Following UV multi-photon photolysis, the extinction dynamics of the static (unstirred) closed gas-phase system exhibits extraordinary quasi-periodic and complex oscillations with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes, persisting for up to several hours. Depending on buffer gas type and pressure, several types of dynamical responses could be generated (classified as types I, II, and III). They were studied as a function of temperature and chamber volume for different experimental conditions and possible explanations for the oscillations are discussed. A conclusive model for the observed phenomena has not been established. However, a number of key hypotheses have made based on the measurements in this publication: (a) Following the multi-photon UV photolysis of naphthalene (or biphenylene), particles are formed on a timescale not observable using IBBCEAS. (b) The observed temporal behavior cannot be described on basis of a chemical reaction scheme alone. (c) The pressure dependence of the system's responses is due to transport phenomena of particles in the chamber. (d) The size distribution and the refractive indices of particles are time dependent and evolve on a timescale of minutes to hours. The rate of particle coagulation, involving coalescent growth and particle agglomeration, affects the observed oscillations. (e) The walls of the chamber act as a sink

  4. Multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy for imaging keratoconus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yen; Lo, Wen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lin, Wei-Chou; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the possible application of multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for imaging the structural features of keratoconus cornea and to evaluate its potential as being a clinical in vivo monitoring technique. Using the near-infrared excitation source from a titanium-sapphire laser pumped by a diode-pumped, solid state (DPSS) laser system, we can induce and simultaneously acquire multiphoton autofluorescence and SHG signals from the cornea specimens with keratoconus. A home-modified commercial microscope system with specified optical components is used for optimal signal detection. Keratoconus cornea button from patient with typical clinical presentation of keratoconus was obtained at the time of penetrating keratoplasty. The specimen was also sent for the histological examination as comparison. In all samples of keratoconus, destruction of lamellar structure with altered collagen fiber orientation was observed within whole layer of the diseased stromal area. In addition, the orientation of the altered collagen fibers within the cone area shows a trend directing toward the apex of the cone, which might implicate the biomechanical response of the keratoconus stroma to the intraocular pressure. Moreover, increased autofluorescent cells were also found in the cone area, with increased density as one approaches the apical area. In conclusion, multiphoton autofluorescence and SHG microscopy non-invasively demonstrated the morphological features of keratoconus cornea, especially the structural alternations of the stromal lamellae. We believe that in the future the multiphoton microscopy can be applied in vivo as an effective, non-invasive diagnostic and monitoring technique for keratoconus.

  5. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Melnikov, A. S.; Rakcheeva, L. P. Murashov, S. V.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  6. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters.

    PubMed

    Serdobintsev, P Yu; Rakcheeva, L P; Murashov, S V; Melnikov, A S; Lyubchik, S; Timofeev, N A; Pastor, A A; Khodorkovskii, M A

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  7. Adaptive optics improves multiphoton super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Wu, Yicong; Winter, Peter; Fischer, Robert; Nogare, Damian Dalle; Hong, Amy; McCormick, Chad; Christensen, Ryan; Dempsey, William P; Arnold, Don B; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Chitnis, Ajay; Sellers, James; Waterman, Clare; Shroff, Hari

    2017-09-01

    We improve multiphoton structured illumination microscopy using a nonlinear guide star to determine optical aberrations and a deformable mirror to correct them. We demonstrate our method on bead phantoms, cells in collagen gels, nematode larvae and embryos, Drosophila brain, and zebrafish embryos. Peak intensity is increased (up to 40-fold) and resolution recovered (up to 176 ± 10 nm laterally, 729 ± 39 nm axially) at depths ∼250 μm from the coverslip surface.

  8. Multiphoton laser lithography for the fabrication of plasmonic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passinger, Sven; Koch, Jürgen; Kiyan, Roman; Reinhardt, Carsten; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2006-08-01

    In this contribution, we demonstrate multi-photon femtosecond laser lithography for the fabrication and rapid prototyping of plasmonic components. Using this technology different dielectric and metallic SPP-structures can be fabricated in a low-cost and time-efficient way. Resolution limits of this technology will be discussed. Investigations of the optical properties of the fabricated SPP-structures by far-field leakage radiation microscopy will be reported.

  9. Multi-Photon Micro-Spectroscopy of Biological Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana and maize stem sections were used to demonstrate the feasibility of multi- photon fluorescence micro-spectroscopy at subcellular...Micro-spectroscopy, multi-photon fluorescence spectroscopy, second harmonic generation, plant tissues, stem, chloroplast, protoplast, maize , Arabidopsis...thaliana and stem slices of maize (Zea mays) were used as samples to address these issues in a set-up for micro-spectroscopy. 2. MATERIALS AND METHODS

  10. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Rakcheeva, L. P.; Murashov, S. V.; Melnikov, A. S.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  11. Laser-Based Multiphoton Excitation Processes in Combustion Diagnostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    5 B. O-Atons ..... C. N- and C-Atoms . ...... o.18 IV. CONCLUSION .................................................... 18 REFERENCES ...Flame atomic species have be detected, as such, with resonant. multiphoton optogal,,anic spectroscopy. - In general, the term optogalvanic loosely refers ... jet burner system was fabricated from a Swagelock 0.635-cm stainless steel terminator fitting through which a 0.5 mm hole was drilled. The burner tip

  12. Multiphoton in vivo imaging with a femtosecond semiconductor disk laser

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Fabian F.; Emaury, Florian; Bethge, Philipp; Waldburger, Dominik; Link, Sandro M.; Carta, Stefano; van der Bourg, Alexander; Helmchen, Fritjof; Keller, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    We use an ultrafast diode-pumped semiconductor disk laser (SDL) to demonstrate several applications in multiphoton microscopy. The ultrafast SDL is based on an optically pumped Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VECSEL) passively mode-locked with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) and generates 170-fs pulses at a center wavelength of 1027 nm with a repetition rate of 1.63 GHz. We demonstrate the suitability of this laser for structural and functional multiphoton in vivo imaging in both Drosophila larvae and mice for a variety of fluorophores (including mKate2, tdTomato, Texas Red, OGB-1, and R-CaMP1.07) and for endogenous second-harmonic generation in muscle cell sarcomeres. We can demonstrate equivalent signal levels compared to a standard 80-MHz Ti:Sapphire laser when we increase the average power by a factor of 4.5 as predicted by theory. In addition, we compare the bleaching properties of both laser systems in fixed Drosophila larvae and find similar bleaching kinetics despite the large difference in pulse repetition rates. Our results highlight the great potential of ultrafast diode-pumped SDLs for creating a cost-efficient and compact alternative light source compared to standard Ti:Sapphire lasers for multiphoton imaging. PMID:28717563

  13. Multicolor multiphoton microscopy based on a nanosecond supercontinuum laser source.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Claire; O'Connor, Rodney P; Blanquet, Véronique; Magnol, Laetitia; Kano, Hideaki; Tombelaine, Vincent; Lévêque, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Multicolor multiphoton microscopy is experimentally demonstrated for the first time on a spectral bandwidth of excitation of 300 nm (full width half maximum) thanks to the implementation a nanosecond supercontinuum (SC) source compact and simple with a low repetition rate. The interest of such a wide spectral bandwidth, never demonstrated until now, is highlighted in vivo: images of glioma tumor cells stably expressing eGFP grafted on the brain of a mouse and its blood vessels network labelled with Texas Red(®) are obtained. These two fluorophores have a spectral bandwidth covering the whole 300 nm available. In parallel, a similar image quality is obtained on a sample of mouse muscle in vitro when excited with this nanosecond SC source or with a classical high rate, femtosecond and quasi monochromatic laser. This opens the way for (i) a simple and very complete biological characterization never performed to date with multiphoton processes, (ii) multiple means of contrast in nonlinear imaging allowed by the use of numerous fluorophores and (iii) other multiphoton processes like three-photon ones.

  14. Application of multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry: protected dideoxyribonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, J.; Grotemeyer, J.

    1991-08-01

    This work demonstrates how IR-laser desorption of neutral molecules followed by resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization can be employed to determine the molecular weight, base sequence of synthetic protected dinucleotides. All sixteen possible combinations of isomeric deoxyribodinucleotides which contain the phosphotriester linkage used in oligonucleotide synthesis have been investigated. The positively charged molecular ion was detected for each dinucleotide at low laser powers at an ionizing wavelength of 242.5 nm. In addition, fragment ions reflecting the primary structure were observed in the soft ionization mode. In the hard ionization mode intensive low mass fragment ions are formed by multiphoton absorption of the molecular ion. In this way the nucleic base composition of the dideoxyribonucleotide can be determined. Fragments containing the 5' end are preferentially detected indicating the high UV absorptivity of the aromatic protective function located at the 5' end. Beside absorption cross-sections, the stability of the N-glycosidic bond between the ribose, the nucleic base affects the intensity of both parent and daughter ions. By assigning the fragment ions generated by multiphoton absorption it is possible to distinguish isomeric sequences of these deoxyribodinucleotides. The influence of the type of the nucleobase and the position of the nucleoside with respect to the phosphate linkage on the relative intensities of the fragment ions are discussed.

  15. Non-invasive multiphoton imaging of extracellular matrix structures

    PubMed Central

    Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become a powerful method for the artifact-free, nondestructive evaluation of deep-tissue cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in their native environment. By interacting with highly non-centrosymmetric molecular assemblies such as fibrillar collagen, the non-linear process called second harmonic generation (SHG) has also proven to be an important diagnostic tool for the visualization of ECM compartments in situ with submicron resolution without the need for tissue processing. This review reports on applications of multiphoton-induced autofluorescence and SHG microscopy to identify collagen and elastic fiber orientation in native, tissue-engineered and processed, as well as healthy and diseased, tissues and organs. SHG signal profiling was used to quantify ECM damage in various cardiovascular and exocrine tissues, as well as cartilage. These novel imaging modalities open the general possibility of high-resolution in situ and more important in vivo imaging of ECM structures, cells and intracellular organelles in living intact tissues. Heart valve leaflets have a unique extracellular matrix that is organized in distinct layers, which can be non-destructively visualized by multiphoton imaging. PMID:19343671

  16. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    In this work, we utilized multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of non-cancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from human. Our results show that the combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from non-cancerous lung tissues. Specifically, non-cancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI or SAAID) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55 +/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15 respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13 respectively. Intrinsic fluorescence ratio (FAD/NADH) of SCC and non-cancerous tissues are 0.40+/-0.05 and 0.53+/-0.05 respectively, the redox ratio of SCC diminishes significantly, indicating that increased cellular metabolic activity. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from non-cancerous tissues. With additional development, multiphoton microscopy may be used for the clinical diagnosis of lung cancers.

  17. Implications of Intravital Imaging of Murine Germinal Centers on the Control of B Cell Selection and Division.

    PubMed

    Binder, Sebastian C; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging of antibody optimization in germinal center (GC) reactions has set a new dimension in the understanding of the humoral immune response during the last decade. The inclusion of spatio-temporal cellular dynamics in the research on GCs required analysis using the agent-based mathematical models. In this study, we integrate the available intravital imaging data from various research groups and incorporate these into a quantitative mathematical model of GC reactions and antibody affinity maturation. Interestingly, the integration of data concerning the spatial organization of GCs and B cell motility allows to draw conclusions on the strength of the selection pressure and the control of B cell division by T follicular helper cells.

  18. Implications of Intravital Imaging of Murine Germinal Centers on the Control of B Cell Selection and Division

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Sebastian C.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging of antibody optimization in germinal center (GC) reactions has set a new dimension in the understanding of the humoral immune response during the last decade. The inclusion of spatio-temporal cellular dynamics in the research on GCs required analysis using the agent-based mathematical models. In this study, we integrate the available intravital imaging data from various research groups and incorporate these into a quantitative mathematical model of GC reactions and antibody affinity maturation. Interestingly, the integration of data concerning the spatial organization of GCs and B cell motility allows to draw conclusions on the strength of the selection pressure and the control of B cell division by T follicular helper cells. PMID:28066409

  19. Long-term High-Resolution Intravital Microscopy in the Lung with a Vacuum Stabilized Imaging Window

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Tirado, Carolina; Kitamura, Takanori; Kato, Yu; Pollard, Jeffery W.; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis to secondary sites such as the lung, liver and bone is a traumatic event with a mortality rate of approximately 90% 1. Of these sites, the lung is the most difficult to assess using intravital optical imaging due to its enclosed position within the body, delicate nature and vital role in sustaining proper physiology. While clinical modalities (positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)) are capable of providing noninvasive images of this tissue, they lack the resolution necessary to visualize the earliest seeding events, with a single pixel consisting of nearly a thousand cells. Current models of metastatic lung seeding postulate that events just after a tumor cell's arrival are deterministic for survival and subsequent growth. This means that real-time intravital imaging tools with single cell resolution 2 are required in order to define the phenotypes of the seeding cells and test these models. While high resolution optical imaging of the lung has been performed using various ex vivo preparations, these experiments are typically single time-point assays and are susceptible to artifacts and possible erroneous conclusions due to the dramatically altered environment (temperature, profusion, cytokines, etc.) resulting from removal from the chest cavity and circulatory system 3. Recent work has shown that time-lapse intravital optical imaging of the intact lung is possible using a vacuum stabilized imaging window 2,4,5 however, typical imaging times have been limited to approximately 6 hr. Here we describe a protocol for performing long-term intravital time-lapse imaging of the lung utilizing such a window over a period of 12 hr. The time-lapse image sequences obtained using this method enable visualization and quantitation of cell-cell interactions, membrane dynamics and vascular perfusion in the lung. We further describe an image processing technique that gives an unprecedentedly clear view of the

  20. Treadmill exercise induces neutrophil recruitment into muscle tissue in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner. An intravital microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Silva, Albená; Bernardes, Priscila T T; Rezende, Bárbara M; Lopes, Fernando; Gomes, Elisa C; Marques, Pedro E; Lima, Paulo M A; Coimbra, Cândido C; Menezes, Gustavo B; Teixeira, Mauro M; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase) mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process.

  1. Treadmill Exercise Induces Neutrophil Recruitment into Muscle Tissue in a Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Manner. An Intravital Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-Silva, Albená; Bernardes, Priscila T. T.; Rezende, Bárbara M.; Lopes, Fernando; Gomes, Elisa C.; Marques, Pedro E.; Lima, Paulo M. A.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase) mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process. PMID:24798414

  2. Parallelized TCSPC for Dynamic Intravital Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging: Quantifying Neuronal Dysfunction in Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Radbruch, Helena; Andresen, Volker; Mossakowski, Agata; Siffrin, Volker; Seelemann, Thomas; Spiecker, Heinrich; Moll, Ingrid; Herz, Josephine; Hauser, Anja E.; Zipp, Frauke; Behne, Martin J.; Niesner, Raluca

    2013-01-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy has revolutionized our view on vital processes by revealing motility and interaction patterns of various cell subsets in hardly accessible organs (e.g. brain) in living animals. However, current technology is still insufficient to elucidate the mechanisms of organ dysfunction as a prerequisite for developing new therapeutic strategies, since it renders only sparse information about the molecular basis of cellular response within tissues in health and disease. In the context of imaging, Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) is one of the most adequate tools to probe molecular mechanisms of cell function. As a calibration-free technique, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is superior for quantifying FRET in vivo. Currently, its main limitation is the acquisition speed in the context of deep-tissue 3D and 4D imaging. Here we present a parallelized time-correlated single-photon counting point detector (p-TCSPC) (i) for dynamic single-beam scanning FLIM of large 3D areas on the range of hundreds of milliseconds relevant in the context of immune-induced pathologies as well as (ii) for ultrafast 2D FLIM in the range of tens of milliseconds, a scale relevant for cell physiology. We demonstrate its power in dynamic deep-tissue intravital imaging, as compared to multi-beam scanning time-gated FLIM suitable for fast data acquisition and compared to highly sensitive single-channel TCSPC adequate to detect low fluorescence signals. Using p-TCSPC, 256×256 pixel FLIM maps (300×300 µm2) are acquired within 468 ms while 131×131 pixel FLIM maps (75×75 µm2) can be acquired every 82 ms in 115 µm depth in the spinal cord of CerTN L15 mice. The CerTN L15 mice express a FRET-based Ca-biosensor in certain neuronal subsets. Our new technology allows us to perform time-lapse 3D intravital FLIM (4D FLIM) in the brain stem of CerTN L15 mice affected by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and, thereby, to truly quantify neuronal

  3. Intravital Placenta Imaging Reveals Microcirculatory Dynamics Impact on Sequestration and Phagocytosis of Plasmodium-Infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Luciana Vieira; Tadokoro, Carlos Eduardo; Gómez-Conde, Iván; Olivieri, David N.; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Malaria in pregnancy is exquisitely aggressive, causing a range of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes prominently linked to Plasmodium-infected erythrocyte cytoadherence to fetal trophoblast. To elucidate the physiopathology of infected erythrocytes (IE) sequestration in the placenta we devised an experimental system for intravital placental examination of P. berghei-infected mice. BALB/c females were mated to C57Bl/6 CFP+ male mice and infected with GFP+ P. berghei IE, and at gestational day 18, placentas were exposed for time-lapse imaging acquisition under two-photon microscopy. Real-time images and quantitative measurements revealed that trophoblast conformational changes transiently restrain blood flow in the mouse placental labyrinth. The complex dynamics of placental microcirculation promotes IE accumulation in maternal blood spaces with low blood flow and allows the establishment of stable IE-trophoblast contacts. Further, we show that the fate of sequestered IE includes engulfment by both macrophagic and trophoblastic fetal-derived cells. These findings reinforce the current paradigm that IE interact with the trophoblast and provide definitive evidence on two novel pathogenesis mechanisms: (1) trophoblast layer controls placental microcirculation promoting IE sequestration; and (2) fetal-derived placental cells engulf sequestered IE. PMID:23382682

  4. Intra-vital microscopy of lung tissue: A simulation based analysis of the image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Schirrmann, Kerstin; Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Kirsten, Lars; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    In the course of pulmonary research, understanding alveolar tissue dynamics plays a critical role in the treatment of patients suffering from acute lung diseases. As a gold standard technique for monitoring micro scale changes of lung tissue, real-time intra-vital microscopy (IVM) has been established to evaluate the behavior of the alveolar tissue. To allow profound qualitative and quantitative conclusions, characteristic features of the obtained images have to be thoroughly understood. These factors are strongly influenced by the imaging setup and physiological condition of the lung. To circumvent misinterpretations, a ray-tracing approach has been applied in this study using an idealized geometry of the mouse lung parenchyma deduced from optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a complementary imaging technique. Basic features of IVM images are double ring structures and disappearing of alveoli related to liquid infiltration. Ray propagation analysis reveals the formation of these features by two major reflection processes: partial reflection and total internal reflection. The results give rise to quantification errors of the alveolar area related to reflexes misinterpreted as alveolar borders and should further be used to yield a correction factor for future IVM lung tissue studies.

  5. Automated Identification and Localization of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in 3D Intravital Microscopy Data.

    PubMed

    Khorshed, Reema A; Hawkins, Edwin D; Duarte, Delfim; Scott, Mark K; Akinduro, Olufolake A; Rashidi, Narges M; Spitaler, Martin; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2015-07-14

    Measuring three-dimensional (3D) localization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) within the bone marrow microenvironment using intravital microscopy is a rapidly expanding research theme. This approach holds the key to understanding the detail of HSC-niche interactions, which are critical for appropriate stem cell function. Due to the complex tissue architecture of the bone marrow and to the progressive introduction of scattering and signal loss at increasing imaging depths, there is no ready-made software to handle efficient segmentation and unbiased analysis of the data. To address this, we developed an automated image analysis tool that simplifies and standardizes the biological interpretation of 3D HSC microenvironment images. The algorithm identifies HSCs and measures their localization relative to surrounding osteoblast cells and bone collagen. We demonstrate here the effectiveness, consistency, and accuracy of the proposed approach compared to current manual analysis and its wider applicability to analyze other 3D bone marrow components. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intravital Imaging Reveals Ghost Fibers as Architectural Units Guiding Myogenic Progenitors during Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Webster, Micah T; Manor, Uri; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Fan, Chen-Ming

    2016-02-04

    How resident stem cells and their immediate progenitors rebuild tissues of pre-injury organization and size for proportional regeneration is not well understood. Using 3D, time-lapse intravital imaging for direct visualization of the muscle regeneration process in live mice, we report that extracellular matrix remnants from injured skeletal muscle fibers, "ghost fibers," govern muscle stem/progenitor cell behaviors during proportional regeneration. Stem cells were immobile and quiescent without injury whereas their activated progenitors migrated and divided after injury. Unexpectedly, divisions and migration were primarily bi-directionally oriented along the ghost fiber longitudinal axis, allowing for spreading of progenitors throughout ghost fibers. Re-orienting ghost fibers impacted myogenic progenitors' migratory paths and division planes, causing disorganization of regenerated muscle fibers. We conclude that ghost fibers are autonomous, architectural units necessary for proportional regeneration after tissue injury. This finding reinforces the need to fabricate bioengineered matrices that mimic living tissue matrices for tissue regeneration therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intravital fiber-optic fluorescence imaging for monitoring ovarian carcinoma progression and treatment response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Evans, Conor L.; Zhong, Wei; Rizvi, Imran; Mai, Zhiming; Mertz, Jerome; Yun, Seok H.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    Our laboratory has constructed a custom fluorescence microendoscope for detecting and monitoring tumor nodules in a mouse model of metastatic ovarian carcinoma (OVCA). The microendoscope is being applied for tumor recognition and for quantifying tumor burden reduction following photodynamic therapy (PDT). Benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA), a photosensitizing agent for PDT, is administered to the mice and imaged with the microendoscope prior to PDT. BPD-MA fluorescence is a convenient means for locating tumor sites and quantifying tumor burden (despite the fact that BPD-MA is a non-targeted contrast agent). The miniature, flexible microendoscope probe is delivered via a 14-gauge catheter for imaging metastases along the outer surfaces of the internal organs and the inner walls of the peritoneal cavity. The minimal invasiveness of this approach facilitates frequent imaging of the mice in order to monitor cancer progression and treatment response. We present promising data for intravital imaging of treatment response following PDT and new developments in the microendoscope instrumentation for improved image quality.

  8. Intravital microscopy evaluation of angiogenesis and its effects on glucose sensor performance

    PubMed Central

    Koschwanez, H.E.; Reichert, W.M.; Klitzman, B.

    2009-01-01

    An optical window model for the rodent dorsum was used to perform chronic and quantitative intravital microscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry of microvascular networks adjacent to functional and non-functional glucose sensors. The one-sided configuration afforded direct, real-time observation of the tissue response to bare (unmodified, smooth surface) sensors and sensors coated with porous poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA). Microvessel length density and red blood cell flux (blood perfusion) within 1mm of the sensors were measured bi-weekly over two weeks. When non-functional sensors were fully implanted beneath the windows the porous coated sensors had twofold more vasculature and significantly higher blood perfusion than bare sensors on Day 14. When functional sensors were implanted percutaneously, as in clinical use, no differences in baseline current, neovascularization or tissue perfusion were observed between bare and porous coated sensors. However, percutaneously implanted bare sensors had two-fold more vascularity than fully implanted bare sensors by Day 14, indicating other factors, such as micromotion, might be stimulating angiogenesis. Despite increased angiogenesis adjacent to percutaneous sensors, modest sensor current attenuation occurred over 14 days, suggesting that factors other than angiogenesis may play a dominant role in determining sensor function. PMID:19911378

  9. Liver microcirculation analysis by red blood cell motion modeling in intravital microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Walid S; Schmugge, Stephen J; Kraftchick, Jerrod P; Clemens, Mark G; Shin, Min C

    2008-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has been used to visualize the microcirculation by imaging fluorescent labeled red blood cells (RBCs). Traditionally, microcirculation has been modeled by computing the mean velocity of a few, randomly selected, manually tracked RBCs. However, this protocol is tedious, time consuming, and subjective with technician related bias. We present a new method for analyzing the microcirculation by modeling the RBC motion through automatic tracking. The tracking of RBCs is challenging as in each image, as many as 200 cells move through a complex network of vessels at a wide range of speeds while deforming in shape. To reliably detect RBCs traveling at a wide range of speeds, a window of temporal template matching is applied. Then, cells appearing in successive frames are corresponded based on the motion behavior constraints in terms of the direction, magnitude, and path. The performance evaluation against a ground truth indicates the detection accuracy up to 84% TP at 6% FP and a correspondence accuracy of 89%. We include an in-depth discussion on comparison of the microcirculation based on motion modeling from the proposed automated method against a mean velocity from manual analysis protocol in terms of precision, objectivity, and sensitivity.

  10. Intravital fluorescence microscopic study of the behavior of long-circulating liposomes during microvascular thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoisselle, Jean-Marie; Begu, Sylvie; Tourne-Peteilh, Corine; Buys, Bruno; Mordon, Serge R.

    2002-06-01

    Treatment of thrombosis depends on the selectivity of thrombolytic agents to the clot. It has been already demonstrated that liposomes can provide a better selectivity of such agents to the clot site. We have recently shown that intravital fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool to image in situ and in real time the labeling of leukocytes by long circulating liposomes. The aim of this study was to monitor the in vivo behavior of such liposomes in a clot site. Carboxyfluorescein-loaded long circulating liposomes were prepared and characterized in term of size and permeability. The liposomes suspension was injected intravenously to golden hamsters. The skin microcirculation was observed using a dorsal skin-fold chamber by fluorescence microscopy. Thrombosis were obtained as the consequence of the inflammatory response due to the surgery. Using this model, fluorescent dots were observed at the site of the clot. Liposomes accumulate at the clot site whatever the mechanism (passive deposition or uptake). There is a period of latency and 30 seconds after the blood flow stop, fluorescence increases very rapidly and a bright fluorescent spot is observed at the site of the clot. Further studies are needed to determine the exact localization of liposomes in the clot and the mechanism of interaction.

  11. Fluorescent imaging of endothelial glycocalyx layer with wheat germ agglutinin using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hanae; Ushiyama, Akira; Kawakami, Hayato; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Sachie; Iijima, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx (GCX) is located on the apical surface of vascular endothelial cells and is composed of a negatively-charged network of proteoglycans and glycoproteins. The GCX plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of vascular walls and preventing leakage of plasma. Therefore, degradation of the GCX is believed to lead to pathological leakage of plasma. Because the GCX is a very thin layer, its ultrastructural image has been demonstrated on electron microscope. To explore the function of the GCX, it should be visualized by a microscope in vivo. Thus, we developed in vivo visualization technique of the GCX under fluorescence microscopy using a mouse dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) model. To label and visualize the GCX, we used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectin, which has a high specificity for sugar moieties. We examined the affinity of the different lectins to epivascular regions under an intravital fluorescent microscope. Among seven different lectins we examined, FITC labeled Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ) agglutinin (WGA) delineated the GCX most clearly. Binding of WGA to the GCX was inhibited by chitin hydrolysate, which contained WGA-binding polysaccharide chains. Furthermore, the septic condition attenuated this structure, suggesting structural degradation of endothelial GCX layer. In conclusion, FITC-labeled WGA lectin enabled visualization of endothelial GCX under in vivo fluorescence microscopy.

  12. Use of intravital microscopy to study the microvascular behavior of microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Michel; Broillet, Anne; Tardy, Isabelle; Pochon, Sibylle; Bussat, Philippe; Bettinger, Thierry; Helbert, Alexandre; Costa, Maria; Tranquart, François

    2012-04-01

    The study describes the use of intravital microscopy (IVM) to assess the behavior of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), including targeted UCAs, in the microcirculation of rodents. IVM was performed on various exteriorized organs: hamster cheek pouch, rat mesentery, liver, spinotrapezius muscle, and mouse cremaster muscle. A dorsal skin-fold chamber with MatBIII tumor cells was also implanted in rats. Nontargeted UCAs (SonoVue(®) and BR14) and targeted UCAs (BR55 and P-selectin targeted microbubbles) were tested. IVM was used to measure microbubble size, determine their persistence, and observe their behavior in the blood circulation. Intravenous and intra-arterial injections of high doses of UCAs did not modify the local microvascular hemodynamics. No microbubble coalescence and no increased size were observed. Adhesion of some microbubbles to leukocytes was observed in various microcirculation models. Microbubbles are captured by Kupffer cells in the liver. Targeted microbubbles were shown to adhere specifically to endothelial receptors without compromising local blood flow. These results support the safety of both targeted and nontargeted UCAs as no microvascular flow alteration or plugging of microvessels were observed. They confirm that binding observed with targeted microbubbles are due to the binding of these microbubbles to specific endothelial receptors. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Improving spinning disk confocal microscopy by preventing pinhole cross-talk for intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shimozawa, Togo; Yamagata, Kazuo; Kondo, Takefumi; Hayashi, Shigeo; Shitamukai, Atsunori; Konno, Daijiro; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Takayama, Jun; Onami, Shuichi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Yasuhito; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fujita, Katsumasa; Mimori-Kiyosue, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    A recent key requirement in life sciences is the observation of biological processes in their natural in vivo context. However, imaging techniques that allow fast imaging with higher resolution in 3D thick specimens are still limited. Spinning disk confocal microscopy using a Yokogawa Confocal Scanner Unit, which offers high-speed multipoint confocal live imaging, has been found to have wide utility among cell biologists. A conventional Confocal Scanner Unit configuration, however, is not optimized for thick specimens, for which the background noise attributed to “pinhole cross-talk,” which is unintended pinhole transmission of out-of-focus light, limits overall performance in focal discrimination and reduces confocal capability. Here, we improve spinning disk confocal microscopy by eliminating pinhole cross-talk. First, the amount of pinhole cross-talk is reduced by increasing the interpinhole distance. Second, the generation of out-of-focus light is prevented by two-photon excitation that achieves selective-plane illumination. We evaluate the effect of these modifications and test the applicability to the live imaging of green fluorescent protein-expressing model animals. As demonstrated by visualizing the fine details of the 3D cell shape and submicron-size cytoskeletal structures inside animals, these strategies dramatically improve higher-resolution intravital imaging. PMID:23401517

  14. Intravital correlated microscopy reveals differential macrophage and microglial dynamics during resolution of neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    van Ham, Tjakko J.; Brady, Colleen A.; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Oosterhof, Nynke; Kuipers, Jeroen; Veenstra-Algra, Anneke; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Peterson, Randall T.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2014-01-01

    Many brain diseases involve activation of resident and peripheral immune cells to clear damaged and dying neurons. Which immune cells respond in what way to cues related to brain disease, however, remains poorly understood. To elucidate these in vivo immunological events in response to brain cell death we used genetically targeted cell ablation in zebrafish. Using intravital microscopy and large-scale electron microscopy, we defined the kinetics and nature of immune responses immediately following injury. Initially, clearance of dead cells occurs by mononuclear phagocytes, including resident microglia and macrophages of peripheral origin, whereas amoeboid microglia are exclusively involved at a later stage. Granulocytes, on the other hand, do not migrate towards the injury. Remarkably, following clearance, phagocyte numbers decrease, partly by phagocyte cell death and subsequent engulfment of phagocyte corpses by microglia. Here, we identify differential temporal involvement of microglia and peripheral macrophages in clearance of dead cells in the brain, revealing the chronological sequence of events in neuroinflammatory resolution. Remarkably, recruited phagocytes undergo cell death and are engulfed by microglia. Because adult zebrafish treated at the larval stage lack signs of pathology, it is likely that this mode of resolving immune responses in brain contributes to full tissue recovery. Therefore, these findings suggest that control of such immune cell behavior could benefit recovery from neuronal damage. PMID:24973753

  15. Visualizing leukocyte trafficking in the living brain with 2-photon intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Saparna; Danne, Karyn J.; Qin, Jim; Cavanagh, Lois L.; Smith, Adrian; Hickey, Michael J.; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Intravital imaging of the superficial brain tissue in mice represents a powerful tool for the dissection of the cellular and molecular cues underlying inflammatory and infectious central nervous system (CNS) diseases. We present here a step-by-step protocol that will enable a non-specialist to set up a two-photon brain-imaging model. The protocol offers a two-part approach that is specifically optimized for imaging leukocytes but can be easily adapted to answer varied CNS-related biological questions. The protocol enables simultaneous visualization of fluorescently labeled immune cells, the pial microvasculature and extracellular structures such as collagen fibers at high spatial and temporal resolution. Intracranial structures are exposed through a cranial window, and physiologic conditions are maintained during extended imaging sessions via continuous superfusion of the brain surface with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF). Experiments typically require 1–2 h of preparation, which is followed by variable periods of immune cell tracking. Our methodology converges the experience of two laboratories over the past 10 years in diseased animal models such as cerebral ischemia, lupus, cerebral malaria, and toxoplasmosis. We exemplify the utility of this protocol by tracking leukocytes in transgenic mice in the pial vessels under steady-state conditions. PMID:23316136

  16. Field evaluation of an intravital diagnostic test of Echinococcus multilocularis infection in red foxes.

    PubMed

    Reiterová, K; Miterpáková, M; Turceková, L'; Antolová, D; Dubinský, P

    2005-03-10

    Echinococcus multilocularis parasitizes the small intestine of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and other carnivores, and has a wide distribution throughout the northern hemisphere. This cestode is the causative agent of human alveolar echinococcosis, a life-threatening helminth zoonosis. In 2000-2002, 2130 red foxes were examined for its presence in Slovakia, with a total prevalence of 30.7%. The data on occurrence were obtained by the combination of necropsy of small intestines from red foxes and coproantigen detection in faecal samples. The correlation between the number of detected specimens and the value of optical density of copro-ELISA test was found. When worm burdens were low (1-25 specimens) the sensitivity of the method was 31.3+/-8.64%, when worm burdens were >50 specimens, 81.8+/-0.66%, and with high worm burdens (>1000 specimens) the sensitivity reached 100+/-0.34%. E. multilocularis presence was detected using the nested PCR method from the eggs in the faecal samples with a 100% specificity. In epidemiological surveys of this zoonosis, it is of crucial importance to detect animals with a high level of infection, which are responsible for the bulk of environmental contamination. The advantage of copro-ELISA test lies in allowing the intravital diagnostics to be employed within the epidemiological survey of E. multilocularis occurrence in the protected and urban areas.

  17. Expanding Applications of the Nano Intravital Device as a Platform for Exploring Tumor Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgen, Michael R.

    The tumor microenvironment has been demonstrated to be a key determinant in the progression of cancer. Unfortunately, the mechanisms behind the different microenvironments (cytokine gradients, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, etc) have not been fully elucidated. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to targeted, individualized therapy to prevent metastasis. The Nano Intravital Device (NANIVID) is a microfabricated, implantable device designed to initiate specific microenvironments in vivo so that the time course of the effects can be observed. With both spatial and temporal control over the induced environments, the affected regions of the tumor can be compared to the rest of the tumor. The NANIVID was first used to establish cytokine gradients to monitor the migration of invasive cancer cells. The three projects that comprise this work expand the applications of the NANIVID to establish the device as a robust platform for investigating tumor microenvironment interactions. The first project released chemical mimics from the device to induce the cellular hypoxic response in tumors to determine how hypoxia affects the fate of disseminated tumor cells. The second project used the NANIVID in combination with an atomic force microscope to investigate the altered mechanics of migrating invasive cancer cells. The final project was to develop a cell counter to monitor the isolation of the invasive subpopulation of cells that were drawn into the device using a chemoattractant. These three projects demonstrate the potential of the NANIVID as a platform for investigating the tumor microenvironment.

  18. Multi-Photon Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Bio-Probes and Bio-Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    the set-up of a multi-photon fluorescence microscope. The information can also be useful in the detection of multi-photon fluorescence in bio -chip...technology. In addition, we have investigated a few highly fluorescent bio -molecules commonly found in plant cells.

  19. Optimization of multi-photon event discrimination levels using Poisson statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukka, Juri M.; Virkki, Arho; Hänninen, Pekka E.; Soini, Juhani T.

    2004-01-01

    In applications where random multi-photon events must be distinguishable from the background, detection of the signals must be based on either analog current measurement or photon counting and multi-level discrimination of single and multi-photon events. In this paper a novel method for optimizing photomultiplier (PMT) pulse discrimination levels in single- and multi-photon counting is demonstrated. This calibration method is based on detection of photon events in coincidence to short laser pulses. The procedure takes advantage of Poisson statistics of single- and mult-iphoton signals and it is applicable to automatic calibration of photon counting devices on production line. Results obtained with a channel photomultiplier (CPM) are shown. By use of three parallel discriminators and setting the discriminator levels according to the described method resulted in a linear response over wide range of random single- and multi-photon signals.

  20. Control of multiphoton molecular excitation with shaped femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bingwei

    The work presented in this dissertation describes the use of shaped femtosecond laser pulses to control the outcome of nonlinear optical process and thus to achieve the selectivity for multiphoton molecular transitions. This research could lead to applications in various fields including nonlinear optical spectroscopy, chemical identification, biological imaging, communications, photodynamic therapy, etc. In order to realize accurate pulse shaping of the femtosecond laser pulses, it is essential to measure and correct the spectral phase distortion of such pulses. A method called multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan is used to do so throughout this dissertation. This method is highly accurate and reproducible, and has been proved in this work to be compatible with any femtosecond pulses regardless of bandwidth, intensity and repetition rate of the laser. The phase control of several quasi-octave laser sources is demonstrated in this dissertation, with the generation of 4.3 fs and 5.9 fs pulses that reach the theoretically predicted transform-limited pulse duration. The excellent phase control achieved also guarantees the reproducibility for selective multiphoton excitations by accurate phase and/or amplitude shaping. Selective two-photon excitation, stimulated Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering with a single broadband laser source are demonstrated in this dissertation. Pulse shaping is used to achieve a fast and robust approach to measure the two-photon excitation spectrum from fluorescent molecules, which provide important information for two-photon biological imaging. The selective excitation concept is also applied in the field of remote chemical identification. Detection of characteristic Raman lines for several chemicals using a single beam coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy from a 12 meter standoff distance is shown, providing a promising approach to standoff detection of chemicals, hazardous contaminations

  1. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblasts contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, A.-M.; Olive, C.; Michelet, J.-F.; Galey, J.-B.; Fagot, D.; Leroy, F.; Martin, J.-L.; Colonna, A.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2010-02-01

    One of the main functions of dermal fibroblasts is the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix. Investigating molecules that could modulate fibroblast contraction and act as potent anti aging ingredients requires the development of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies for dermal substitute analysis. Here we use multiphoton microscopy in order to investigate the fibroblast-induced collagen matrix reorganization in engineered dermal tissue and to evaluate the effect of Y27632, a RhoA kinase inhibitor on dermal substitutes contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblast with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA kinase inhibitor. Moreover, when the culture medium containing the inhibitor was replaced with a control medium, the dermal substitutes presented the same 3D reorganization as the control samples, which indicates that the inhibitory effects are reversible. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the matrix induced by fibroblast contraction.

  2. Multiphoton ionization of ions, neutrals, and clusters. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1991-06-28

    Scientific results are summarized from a three year research program on multiphoton ionization in aromatic molecules, clusters, and their ions. As originally proposed, the studies elucidated a new cluster ionization mechanism, characterized properties of long range intermolecular interactions, and investigated electronic transitions of aromatic cations cooled in a supersonic beam. The studies indicate that the new cluster ionization mechanism is highly efficient and dominates conventional 1 + 1 resonant ionization. In the case of the dimer of the large aromatic molecule fluorene, the results suggest that excimer formation competes with a direct ionization process. Highly selective excitonic spectra have been identified for several cluster species.

  3. Anomalous multiphoton photoelectric effect in ultrashort time scales.

    PubMed

    Kupersztych, J; Raynaud, M

    2005-09-30

    In a multiphoton photoelectric process, an electron needs to absorb a given number of photons to escape the surface of a metal. It is shown for the first time that this number is not a constant depending only on the characteristics of the metal and light, but varies with the interaction duration in ultrashort time scales. The phenomenon occurs when electromagnetic energy is transferred, via ultrafast excitation of electron collective modes, to conduction electrons in a duration less than the electron energy damping time. It manifests itself through a dramatic increase of electron production.

  4. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Zheng, L. Q.; Jiang, X. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  5. Compact diode laser source for multiphoton biological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niederriter, Robert D.; Ozbay, Baris N.; Futia, Gregory L.; Gibson, Emily A.; Gopinath, Juliet T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact, pulsed diode laser source suitable for multiphoton microscopy of biological samples. The center wavelength is 976 nm, near the peak of the two-photon cross section of common fluorescent markers such as genetically encoded green and yellow fluorescent proteins. The laser repetition rate is electrically tunable between 66.67 kHz and 10 MHz, with 2.3 ps pulse duration and peak powers >1 kW. The laser components are fiber-coupled and scalable to a compact package. We demonstrate >600 μm depth penetration in brain tissue, limited by laser power. PMID:28101420

  6. Multi-photon microscope driven by novel green laser pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Dominik; Djurhuus, Martin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.

    2016-03-01

    Multi-photon microscopy is extensively used in research due to its superior possibilities when compared to other microscopy modalities. The technique also has the possibility to advance diagnostics in clinical applications, due to its capabilities complementing existing technology in a multimodal system. However, translation is hindered due to the high cost, high training demand and large footprint of a standard setup. We show in this article that minification of the setup, while also reducing cost and complexity, is indeed possible without compromising on image quality, by using a novel diode laser replacing the commonly used conventional solid state laser as the pump for the femtosecond system driving the imaging.

  7. Multiphoton laser direct writing of two-dimensional silver structures.

    PubMed

    Baldacchini, Tommaso; Pons, Anne-Cécile; Pons, Josefina; Lafratta, Christopher; Fourkas, John; Sun, Yong; Naughton, Michael

    2005-02-21

    We report a novel and efficient method for the laser direct writing of two-dimensional silver structures. Multiphoton absorption of a small fraction of the output of a Ti:sapphire oscillator is sufficient to photoreduce silver nitrate in a thin film of polyvinylpyrrolidone that has been spin-coated on a substrate. The polymer can then be washed away, leaving a pattern consisting of highly interconnected silver nanoparticles. We report the characterization of the silver patterns using scanning electron and atomic force microscopies, and demonstrate the application of this technique in the creation of diffraction gratings.

  8. Volumetric display with holographic multi-photon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Yoshio; Kumagai, Kota

    2016-10-01

    We developed a volumetric display with holographic two- and multi-photon excitations using a computer-generated hologram displayed on a liquid crystal spatial light modulator. The holographic technique has advantages of increasing the number of voxels of the volumetric graphics per unit time, increasing the total input energy to the volumetric display because the maximum energy incident at a point in the display material is limited by the damage threshold, and controlling the size, shape and spatial position of voxels. We demonstrated a volumetric display with stacked multi-color fluorescence plates.

  9. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  10. Quantum Radiation Reaction Effects in Multiphoton Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  11. Inherent contradictions in the tunneling-multiphoton dichotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, H. R.

    2007-03-15

    Strong-field phenomena are currently described as being multiphoton or tunneling, based on whether the Keldysh parameter {gamma} is greater than or less than unity. There are disqualifying features in this categorization. It is specific to the length gauge, dependent on only one intensity parameter, and backward in the sense that ionization with {gamma}>>1 can occur only by tunneling, and ionization with {gamma}<<1 must be over the barrier, and hence is not achieved by tunneling. As {gamma} becomes smaller, ionization becomes increasingly distant from tunneling, and eventually reaches conditions where the dipole approximation fails and there is no meaningful scalar-potential diagram at all.

  12. Combining multiphoton and CARS microscopy for skin imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Weinigel, M.; Kellner-Höfer, M.; Bückle, R.; Darvin, M. E.; Lademann, J.; König, K.

    2013-02-01

    Microscopic imaging based on multiphoton fluorescence, second harmonic generation (SHG) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging has been realized in one common platform which is appropriate for use in hospitals. The different optical modalities non-invasively provide in vivo images from human skin with subcellular resolution, at different depths based on endogenous fluorescent, SHG-active molecules as well as non-fluorescent molecules with vibrational resonances at 2845 cm-1, in particular lipids. An overview of the system employing a Ti:sapphire laser and photonic crystal fiber to generate the excitation light as well as several imaging examples are presented.

  13. Circular Dichroism in Multiphoton Ionization of Resonantly Excited He^{+} Ions.

    PubMed

    Ilchen, M; Douguet, N; Mazza, T; Rafipoor, A J; Callegari, C; Finetti, P; Plekan, O; Prince, K C; Demidovich, A; Grazioli, C; Avaldi, L; Bolognesi, P; Coreno, M; Di Fraia, M; Devetta, M; Ovcharenko, Y; Düsterer, S; Ueda, K; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Bozhevolnov, A V; Kazansky, A K; Kabachnik, N M; Meyer, M

    2017-01-06

    Intense, circularly polarized extreme-ultraviolet and near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses are combined to double ionize atomic helium via the oriented intermediate He^{+}(3p) resonance state. Applying angle-resolved electron spectroscopy, we find a large photon helicity dependence of the spectrum and the angular distribution of the electrons ejected from the resonance by NIR multiphoton absorption. The measured circular dichroism is unexpectedly found to vary strongly as a function of the NIR intensity. The experimental data are well described by theoretical modeling and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Circular Dichroism in Multiphoton Ionization of Resonantly Excited He+ Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilchen, M.; Douguet, N.; Mazza, T.; Rafipoor, A. J.; Callegari, C.; Finetti, P.; Plekan, O.; Prince, K. C.; Demidovich, A.; Grazioli, C.; Avaldi, L.; Bolognesi, P.; Coreno, M.; Di Fraia, M.; Devetta, M.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Düsterer, S.; Ueda, K.; Bartschat, K.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Bozhevolnov, A. V.; Kazansky, A. K.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Meyer, M.

    2017-01-01

    Intense, circularly polarized extreme-ultraviolet and near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses are combined to double ionize atomic helium via the oriented intermediate He+(3 p ) resonance state. Applying angle-resolved electron spectroscopy, we find a large photon helicity dependence of the spectrum and the angular distribution of the electrons ejected from the resonance by NIR multiphoton absorption. The measured circular dichroism is unexpectedly found to vary strongly as a function of the NIR intensity. The experimental data are well described by theoretical modeling and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Multiphoton ionization of ions, neutrals, and clusters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1995-12-28

    A multiyear research program investigating molecular detection methods based on multiphoton spectroscopy has been completed under DOE sponsorship. A number of new laser-based spectroscopic methods were developed and applied to a variety of aromatic hydrocarbons, including monomer and cluster species. The objectives of sensitivities approaching single molecule detection combined with high selectivity were achieved. This report references the status of the field at the beginning of this work and summarizes the significant progress during the period from 1987 onward. Detailed scientific findings from the studies are presented in the published literature referenced throughout this report.

  16. Thin and open vessel windows for intra-vital fluorescence imaging of murine cochlear blood flow.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaorui; Zhang, Fei; Urdang, Zachary; Dai, Min; Neng, Lingling; Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2014-07-01

    Normal microvessel structure and function in the cochlea is essential for maintaining the ionic and metabolic homeostasis required for hearing function. Abnormal cochlear microcirculation has long been considered an etiologic factor in hearing disorders. A better understanding of cochlear blood flow (CoBF) will enable more effective amelioration of hearing disorders that result from aberrant blood flow. However, establishing the direct relationship between CoBF and other cellular events in the lateral wall and response to physio-pathological stress remains a challenge due to the lack of feasible interrogation methods and difficulty in accessing the inner ear. Here we report on new methods for studying the CoBF in a mouse model using a thin or open vessel-window in combination with fluorescence intra-vital microscopy (IVM). An open vessel-window enables investigation of vascular cell biology and blood flow permeability, including pericyte (PC) contractility, bone marrow cell migration, and endothelial barrier leakage, in wild type and fluorescent protein-labeled transgenic mouse models with high spatial and temporal resolution. Alternatively, the thin vessel-window method minimizes disruption of the homeostatic balance in the lateral wall and enables study CoBF under relatively intact physiological conditions. A thin vessel-window method can also be used for time-based studies of physiological and pathological processes. Although the small size of the mouse cochlea makes surgery difficult, the methods are sufficiently developed for studying the structural and functional changes in CoBF under normal and pathological conditions.

  17. Intravital imaging of mesenchymal stem cell trafficking and association with platelets and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Grace Sock Leng; Yang, Zijiang; Carman, Christopher V.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Lin, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    Early events of MSC adhesion to and transmigration through the vascular wall following systemic infusion are important for MSC trafficking to inflamed sites, yet are poorly characterized in vivo. Here, we used intravital confocal imaging to determine the acute extravasation kinetics and distribution of culture-expanded MSC (2-6 hours post-infusion) in a murine model of dermal inflammation. By 2 h post-infusion, among the MSC that arrested within the inflamed ear dermis, 47.8±8.2% of MSC had either initiated or completed transmigration into the extravascular space. Arrested and transmigrating MSC were equally distributed within both small capillaries and larger venules. This suggested existence of an active adhesion mechanism, since venule diameters were greater than those of the MSC. Heterotypic intravascular interactions between distinct blood cell types have been reported to facilitate the arrest and extravasation of leukocytes and circulating tumor cells. We found that 42.8±24.8% of intravascular MSC were in contact with neutrophil-platelet clusters. A role for platelets in MSC trafficking was confirmed by platelet depletion, which significantly reduced the preferential homing of MSC to the inflamed ear, though the total percentage of MSC in contact with neutrophils was maintained. Interestingly, although platelet depletion increased vascular permeability in the inflamed ear, there was decreased MSC accumulation. This suggests that increased vascular permeability is unnecessary for MSC trafficking to inflamed sites. These findings represent the first glimpse into MSC extravasation kinetics and microvascular distribution in vivo, and further clarify the roles of active adhesion, the intravascular cellular environment and vascular permeability in MSC trafficking. PMID:25263183

  18. Effects of antihypertensive drugs on capillary rarefaction in spontaneously hypertensive rats: intravital microscopy and histologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Bruno; Lessa, Marcos A; Nascimento, Alessandro R; Rodrigues, Carlos Ab; Henriques, Maria das Graças; Garzoni, Luciana R; Levy, Bernard I; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the effects of chronic oral antihypertensive treatment on functional and structural capillary rarefaction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) were used as a normotensive control group. In untreated rats, intravital videomicroscopy showed that functional capillary density was lower in SHR skeletal muscle (WKY 395 +/- 17 and SHR 258 +/- 13 capillaries/mm, P < 0.01) and ear skin (WKY 391 +/- 18 and SHR 210 +/- 15 capillaries/mm, P < 0.01). A linear relationship was seen between skeletal muscle and skin capillary densities (r = 0.654, P < 0.0001). Histologic analysis showed that SHR had a lower capillary-to-fiber ratio in the skeletal muscle (WKY 1.74 +/- 0.08 and SHR 1.40 +/- 0.06, P < 0.01). Capillary volume density-to-fiber volume density ratio in the left ventricle of SHR was also reduced (WKY 0.55 +/- 0.09 and SHR 0.42 +/- 0.09, P < 0.01). The animals were treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril, the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1) receptor antagonist losartan, the beta-blocker atenolol, or the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, resulting in similar reductions in systolic blood pressure (19.8%, 19.1%, 17.4%, and 18.2%, respectively, P > 0.05). Atenolol did not induce any change in functional capillary density of SHR. Losartan and nifedipine completely reversed functional capillary rarefaction in both muscle and cutaneous tissues, whereas enalapril significantly increased functional capillary density only in the skin. The skeletal muscle capillary-to-fiber ratio was normalized by enalapril, losartan, and nifedipine. Treatments with enalapril or losartan normalized the cardiac structural capillary rarefaction of SHRs, whereas atenolol and nifedipine had no effect. Our results suggest that different pharmacologic classes of antihypertensive drugs with similar effect on blood pressure differ in terms of their effect on the microcirculation.

  19. Intravital Imaging of the Kidney in a Rat Model of Salt-Sensitive Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Endres, Bradley T; Sandoval, Ruben M; Rhodes, George J; Campos-Bilderback, Silvia B; Kamocka, Malgorzata M; McDermott-Roe, Christopher; Staruschenko, Alexander; Molitoris, Bruce A; Geurts, Aron M; Palygin, Oleg

    2017-04-12

    Hypertension is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide, and a major risk factor for renal failure and cardiovascular disease. The role of albuminuria, a common feature of hypertension and robust predictor of cardiorenal disorders, remains incompletely understood. The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanisms leading to albuminuria in the kidney of a rat model of hypertension, the Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat. To determine the relative contributions of the glomerulus and proximal tubule (PT) to albuminuria, we applied intravital two-photon-based imaging to investigate the complex renal physiological changes that occur during salt-induced hypertension. Following a high salt diet, SS rats exhibited elevated blood pressure, increased glomerular sieving of albumin (GSCalb=0.0686), relative permeability to albumin (+∆16%) and impaired volume hemodynamics (-∆14%). Serum albumin, but not serum globulins or creatinine, concentration was decreased (-0.54g/dL), which was concomitant with increased filtration of albumin (3.7 vs 0.8 g per day normal diet). Pathologically, hypertensive animals had significant tubular damage as indicated by increased prevalence of granular casts, expansion and necrosis of PT epithelial cells (+∆2.20score/image), progressive augmentation of red blood cell velocity (+∆269µm/s) and micro vessel diameter (+∆4.3µm), and increased vascular injury (+∆0.61leakage/image). Therefore, development of salt-induced hypertension can be triggered by fast and progressive pathogenic remodeling of PT epithelia, which can be associated with changes in albumin handling. Collectively, these results indicate that both the glomerulus and the PT contribute to albuminuria and dual treatment of glomerular filtration and albumin reabsorption may represent an effective treatment of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  20. Intravital Imaging Reveals Angiotensin II-Induced Transcytosis of Albumin by Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Hammer, Anna; Kattler, Veronika; Gess, Bernhard; Theilig, Franziska; Witzgall, Ralph; Castrop, Hayo

    2016-03-01

    Albuminuria is a hallmark of kidney disease of various etiologies and usually caused by deterioration of glomerular filtration barrier integrity. We recently showed that angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely increases albumin filtration in the healthy kidney. Here, we used intravital microscopy to assess the effects of Ang II on podocyte function in rats. Acute infusion of 30, 60, or 80 ng/kg per minute Ang II enhanced the endocytosis of albumin by activation of the type 1 Ang II receptor and resulted in an average (±SEM) of 3.7±2.2, 72.3±18.6 (P<0.001), and 239.4±34.6 µm(3) (P<0.001) albumin-containing vesicles per glomerulus, respectively, compared with none at baseline or 10 ng/kg per minute Ang II. Immunostaining of Ang II-infused kidneys confirmed the presence of albumin-containing vesicles, which colocalized with megalin, in podocin-positive cells. Furthermore, podocyte endocytosis of albumin was markedly reduced in the presence of gentamicin, a competitive inhibitor of megalin-dependent endocytosis. Ang II infusion increased the concentration of albumin in the subpodocyte space, a potential source for endocytic protein uptake, and gentamicin further increased this concentration. Some endocytic vesicles were acidified and colocalized with LysoTracker. Most vesicles migrated from the capillary to the apical aspect of the podocyte and were eventually released into the urinary space. This transcytosis accounted for approximately 10% of total albumin filtration. In summary, the transcellular transport of proteins across the podocyte constitutes a new pathway of glomerular protein filtration. Ang II enhances the endocytosis and transcytosis of plasma albumin by podocytes, which may eventually impair podocyte function.

  1. Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on rat dural artery diameter in an intravital microscopy model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, KY; Gupta, S; de Vries, R; Danser, AHJ; Villalón, CM; Muñoz-Islas, E; Maassen Van Den Brink, A

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: During migraine, trigeminal nerves may release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inducing cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition or blockade of craniovascular CGRP receptors may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. Several preclinical studies have shown that glutamate receptor antagonists affect the pathophysiology of migraine. This study investigated whether antagonists of NMDA (ketamine and MK801), AMPA (GYKI52466) and kainate (LY466195) glutamate receptors affected dural vasodilatation induced by α-CGRP, capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation in rats, using intravital microscopy. Experimental approach: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized and the overlying bone was thinned to visualize the dural artery. Then, vasodilator responses to exogenous (i.v. α-CGRP) and endogenous (released by i.v. capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation) CGRP were elicited in the absence or presence of the above antagonists. Key results: α-CGRP, capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation increased dural artery diameter. Ketamine and MK801 inhibited the vasodilator responses to capsaicin and electrical stimulation, while only ketamine attenuated those to α-CGRP. In contrast, GYKI52466 only attenuated the vasodilatation to exogenous α-CGRP, while LY466195 did not affect the vasodilator responses to endogenous or exogenous CGRP. Conclusions and implications: Although GYKI52466 has not been tested clinically, our data suggest that it would not inhibit migraine via vascular mechanisms. Similarly, the antimigraine efficacy of LY466195 seems unrelated to vascular CGRP-mediated pathways and/or receptors. In contrast, the cranial vascular effects of ketamine and MK801 may represent a therapeutic mechanism, although the same mechanism might contribute, peripherally, to cardiovascular side effects. PMID:20590623

  2. Future Perspective of Single-Molecule FRET Biosensors and Intravital FRET Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Eishu; Kiyokawa, Etsuko

    2016-09-20

    Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a nonradiative energy transfer process between two fluorophores located in close proximity to each other. To date, a variety of biosensors based on the principle of FRET have been developed to monitor the activity of kinases, proteases, GTPases or lipid concentration in living cells. In addition, generation of biosensors that can monitor physical stresses such as mechanical power, heat, or electric/magnetic fields is also expected based on recent discoveries on the effects of these stressors on cell behavior. These biosensors can now be stably expressed in cells and mice by transposon technologies. In addition, two-photon excitation microscopy can be used to detect the activities or concentrations of bioactive molecules in vivo. In the future, more sophisticated techniques for image acquisition and quantitative analysis will be needed to obtain more precise FRET signals in spatiotemporal dimensions. Improvement of tissue/organ position fixation methods for mouse imaging is the first step toward effective image acquisition. Progress in the development of fluorescent proteins that can be excited with longer wavelength should be applied to FRET biosensors to obtain deeper structures. The development of computational programs that can separately quantify signals from single cells embedded in complicated three-dimensional environments is also expected. Along with the progress in these methodologies, two-photon excitation intravital FRET microscopy will be a powerful and valuable tool for the comprehensive understanding of biomedical phenomena. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intravital Imaging Reveals Angiotensin II–Induced Transcytosis of Albumin by Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Hammer, Anna; Kattler, Veronika; Gess, Bernhard; Theilig, Franziska; Witzgall, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Albuminuria is a hallmark of kidney disease of various etiologies and usually caused by deterioration of glomerular filtration barrier integrity. We recently showed that angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely increases albumin filtration in the healthy kidney. Here, we used intravital microscopy to assess the effects of Ang II on podocyte function in rats. Acute infusion of 30, 60, or 80 ng/kg per minute Ang II enhanced the endocytosis of albumin by activation of the type 1 Ang II receptor and resulted in an average (±SEM) of 3.7±2.2, 72.3±18.6 (P<0.001), and 239.4±34.6 µm3 (P<0.001) albumin-containing vesicles per glomerulus, respectively, compared with none at baseline or 10 ng/kg per minute Ang II. Immunostaining of Ang II–infused kidneys confirmed the presence of albumin-containing vesicles, which colocalized with megalin, in podocin-positive cells. Furthermore, podocyte endocytosis of albumin was markedly reduced in the presence of gentamicin, a competitive inhibitor of megalin-dependent endocytosis. Ang II infusion increased the concentration of albumin in the subpodocyte space, a potential source for endocytic protein uptake, and gentamicin further increased this concentration. Some endocytic vesicles were acidified and colocalized with LysoTracker. Most vesicles migrated from the capillary to the apical aspect of the podocyte and were eventually released into the urinary space. This transcytosis accounted for approximately 10% of total albumin filtration. In summary, the transcellular transport of proteins across the podocyte constitutes a new pathway of glomerular protein filtration. Ang II enhances the endocytosis and transcytosis of plasma albumin by podocytes, which may eventually impair podocyte function. PMID:26116357

  4. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading killer among all cancers for both men and women in the US, and is associated with one of the lowest 5-year survival rates. Current diagnostic techniques, such as histopathological assessment of tissue obtained by computed tomography guided biopsies, have limited accuracy, especially for small lesions. Early diagnosis of lung cancer can be improved by introducing a real-time, optical guidance method based on the in vivo application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM). In particular, we hypothesize that MPM imaging of living lung tissue based on twophoton excited intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation can provide sufficient morphologic and spectroscopic information to distinguish between normal and diseased lung tissue. Here, we used an experimental approach based on MPM with multichannel fluorescence detection for initial discovery that MPM spectral imaging could differentiate between normal and neoplastic lung in ex vivo samples from a murine model of lung cancer. Current results indicate that MPM imaging can directly distinguish normal and neoplastic lung tissues based on their distinct morphologies and fluorescence emission properties in non-processed lung tissue. Moreover, we found initial indication that MPM imaging differentiates between normal alveolar tissue, inflammatory foci, and lung neoplasms. Our long-term goal is to apply results from ex vivo lung specimens to aid in the development of multiphoton endoscopy for in vivo imaging of lung abnormalities in various animal models, and ultimately for the diagnosis of human lung cancer.

  5. Three-dimensional multiphoton autofluorescence spectral imaging of live tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palero, Jonathan A.; de Bruijn, Henriëtte S.; van der Ploeg van den Heuvel, Angélique; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2006-04-01

    We combined a homebuilt multiphoton microscope and a prism-CCD based spectrograph to develop a spectral imaging system capable of imaging deep into live tissues. The spectral images originate from the two-photon autofluorescence of the tissue and second harmonic signal from the collagen fibers. A highly penetrating near-infrared light is used to excite the endogenous fluorophores via multiphoton excitation enabling us to produce high quality images deep into the tissue. We were able to produce 100-channel (330 nm to 600 nm) autofluorescence spectral images of live skin tissues in less than 2 minutes for each xy-section. The spectral images rendered in RGB (real) colors showed green hair shafts, blue cells, and purple collagen. Analysis on the optical signal degradation with increasing depth of the collagen second-harmonic signal showed 1) exponential decay behavior of the intensity and 2) linear broadening of the spectrum. This spectral imaging system is a promising tool for both in biological applications and biomedical applications such as optical biopsy.

  6. Superpenetration optical microscopy by iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianyong; Germain, Ronald N.; Cui, Meng

    2012-01-01

    Biological tissues are rarely transparent, presenting major challenges for deep tissue optical microscopy. The achievable imaging depth is fundamentally limited by wavefront distortions caused by aberration and random scattering. Here, we report an iterative wavefront compensation technique that takes advantage of the nonlinearity of multiphoton signals to determine and compensate for these distortions and to focus light inside deep tissues. Different from conventional adaptive optics methods, this technique can rapidly measure highly complicated wavefront distortions encountered in deep tissue imaging and provide compensations for not only aberration but random scattering. The technique is tested with a variety of highly heterogeneous biological samples including mouse brain tissue, skull, and lymph nodes. We show that high quality three-dimensional imaging can be realized at depths beyond the reach of conventional multiphoton microscopy and adaptive optics methods, albeit over restricted distances for a given correction. Moreover, the required laser excitation power can be greatly reduced in deep tissues, deviating from the power requirement of ballistic light excitation and thus significantly reducing photo damage to the biological tissue. PMID:22586078

  7. Multiphoton imaging: a view to understanding sulfur mustard lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert J. S.; Madren-Whalley, Janna S.

    2003-07-01

    It is well known that topical exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) produces persistent, incapacitating blisters of the skin. However, the primary lesions effecting epidermal-dermal separation and disabling of mechanisms for cutaneous repair remain uncertain. Immunofluorescent staining plus multiphoton imaging of human epidermal tissues and keratinocytes exposed to SM (400 μM x 5 min)have revealed that SM disrupts adhesion-complex molecules which are also disrupted by epidermolysis bullosa-type blistering diseases of the skin. Images of keratin-14 showed early, progressive, postexposure collapse of the K5/K14 cytoskeleton that resulted in ventral displacement of the nuclei beneath its collapsing filaments. This effectively corrupted the dynamic filament assemblies that link basal-cell nuclei to the extracellular matrix via α6β4-integrin and laminin-5. At 1 h postexposure, there was disruption in the surface organization of α6β4 integrins, associated displacement of laminin-5 anchoring sites and a concomitant loss of functional asymmetry. Accordingly, our multiphoton images are providing compelling evidence that SM induces prevesicating lesions that disrupt the receptor-ligand organization and cytoskeletal systems required for maintaining dermal-epidermal attachment, signal transduction, and polarized mobility.

  8. Rigid and high NA multiphoton fluorescence GRIN-endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkl, Selma; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan; Stark, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Kaatz, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-07-01

    Multiphoton autofluorescence imaging offers minimal-invasive examination of cells without the need of staining and complicated confocal detection systems. Therefore, it is especially interesting for non-invasive clinical diagnostics. To extend this sophisticated technique from superficial regions to deep lying cell layers, internal body parts and specimens difficult of access, the bulky optics need to be reduced in diameter. This is done by tiny GRIN-optics, based on a radial gradient in the reflective index. Of especial interest for multi-photon applications is the newly developed GRIN-lens assembly with increased numerical aperture. High resolution images of plant tissue, hair and cells show the improved image quality,compared to classical GRIN-lenses. The rigid GRIN-endoscopes are already applied in wound healing studies. Here, the GRIN-lenses with diameters smaller than 3 mm enter small skin depressions. They reproduce the focus of a conventional laser scanning tomograph tens of mm apart in the specimen under study. We present first clinical measurements of elastin and SHG of collagen of in-vivo human skin of venous ulcers (ulcer curis).

  9. Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization studies of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixit, S. N.; Levin, D.; Mckoy, V.

    1987-01-01

    In resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), an atom absorbs several photons making a transition to a resonant intermediate state and subsequently ionizing out of it. With currently available tunable narrow-band lasers, the extreme sensitivity of REMPI to the specific arrangement of levels can be used to selectively probe minute amounts of a single species (atom) in a host of background material. Determination of the number density of atoms from the observed REMPI signal requires a knowledge of the multiphoton ionization cross sections. The REMPI of atomic oxygen was investigated through various excitation schemes that are feasible with available light sources. Using quantum defect theory (QDT) to estimate the various atomic parameters, the REMPI dynamics in atomic oxygen were studied incorporating the effects of saturation and a.c. Stark shifts. Results are presented for REMPI probabilities for excitation through various 2p(3) (4S sup o) np(3)P and 2p(3) (4S sup o) nf(3)F levels.

  10. Multibeam multifocal multiphoton photon counting imaging in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Erich E.

    Multiphoton microscopy is an invaluable technique for the neurological community, allowing for deep explorations within highly scattering tissues such as the brain. However, prior to this research multiphoton microscopy was limited in its ability to rapidly construct volumetric images deep within scattering specimens. This work establishes a technique that permits such exploration through the application of multiple beams separated in both space and time, where signal photons corresponding to those beams are demultiplexed through the use of a field programmable gate array. With this system a number of improvements are provided to research in scattering media, including the coveted ability to perform photon-counting imaging with multiple beams. The ability to perform these measurements with multiple beams permits unique quantitative measurements of fluorophores within living specimens, allowing new research into dynamic three-dimensional behavior occurring within the brain. Additionally, the ability to perform multimodal measurements without filtering allows for unique avenues of research where the harmonic generation is indistinguishable from the two-photon excited fluorescence. These improvements provide neuroscience researchers with a large assortment of technological tools that will permit them to perform numerous novel experiments within the brain and other highly-scattering specimens, which should one day lead to significant advances in our understanding of complex neuronal activity.

  11. Bleed-through and photobleaching correction in multiphoton FRET microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Masilamani; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2001-04-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy provides a tool to visualize the protein with high spatial and temporal resolution. In multi-photon FRET microscopy one experiences considerably less photobleaching compared to one-photon excitation since the illumination is the diffraction limited spot and the excitation is infrared-pulsed laser light. Because of the spectral overlap involved in the selection of the fluorophore pair for FRET imaging, the spectral bleed-through signal in the FRET channel is unavoidable. We describe in this paper the development of dedicated software to correct the bleed-through signal due to donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules. We used living cells expressed with BFP-RFP (DsRed)-C/EBP(alpha) proteins in the nucleus. We acquired images of different combinations like donor alone, acceptor alone, and both acceptor and donor under similar conditions. We statistically evaluated the percentage of bleed-through signal from one channel to the other based on the overlap areas of the spectra. We then reconstructed the images after applying the correction. Characterization of multi-photon FRET imaging system taking into account the intensity, dwell time, concentration of fluorophore pairs, objective lens and the excitation wavelength are described in this paper.

  12. Multi-photon photoelectron spectromicroscopy of supported polystyrene spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilienkamp, Gerhard; Lindla, Florian; Senft, Christoph; Daum, Winfried

    2008-08-01

    Multi-photon photoemission excited by 100 fs, 400 nm laser pulses leads to an unexpected high contrast in photoelectron images of polystyrene spheres on a platinum substrate. The total, energy-integrated photoelectron yield shows clear signatures of two-photon photoemission from the substrate while photoemission from polystyrene is dominated by one-photon processes for low laser power and multi-photon processes for higher laser power. For excitation with UV light from a conventional Hg arc lamp, we observe a marked energy shift of the photoelectron spectrum of polystyrene with respect to that of the substrate. This shift is related to the different surface potentials of the conductive substrate and the dielectric spheres in the strong electric field of the objective lens of the microscope. Laser illumination causes photoconductivity in polystyrene by efficient two-photon excitation of long-lived states and induces a shifting of the surface potential of the polystyrene spheres. Pump-probe experiments support our conclusion that photoemission from polystyrene takes place from these long-lived intermediate states via a one-photon process for sufficiently low laser power. We suggest that photoelectron spectromicroscopy might be useful as a non-scanning method for fast height profiling of supported dielectric structures.

  13. The effect of radial polarization in multiphoton lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Le; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Dong, Xian-Zi; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Considering the axially symmetric polarization and intensity distribution, radially polarized (RP) laser beam has comparatively higher axial component of electric field and smaller size of focal spot compared to linearly polarized (LP) laser. In this study, the effect of radial polarization on multiphoton fabrication has been studied, and polymer spots and lines are chosen as the study objects of 2D micro/nano structures of multiphoton lithography. These structures were fabricated with IP-L, a commercial negative photoresist, by RP fs-pulse laser beam which was tightly focused by an objective lens with high numerical aperture. Multiple experimental conditions, such as fabrication power, exposure time and scanning velocity, were verified in order to observe the structural variation of these polymer structures. On the basis of measurement from images of the scanning electron microscope, the transverse and longitudinal sizes of polymer spots and lines could be analyzed, and the relationship between the aspect ratio (AR) and the above experimental conditions could be acquired. The statistical results agree with our predictions that the RP laser beam can significantly reduce the AR, and the AR in RP laser fabrication has little correlation with conditions besides fabrication power, such as exposure time and scanning velocity.

  14. In vivo multiphoton endoscopy of endogenous skin fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Alexander; Schenkl, Selma; Riemann, Iris; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Kaatz, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton tomography offers a painless method to examine patients under natural physiological conditions in vivo. Multiphoton excitation induces a weak autofluorescence of naturally endogenous fluorescent bio-molecules, such as flavines, NAD(P)H, metal-free porphyrines, components of lipofuscin, elastin and keratin. Additionally, collagen can be detected by second harmonic generation (SHG). Due to the nonlinearity, the effects occur only in a very tight focus, where the photon density is high enough. This leads to high axial and lateral resolution of <1μm without any need of a confocal detection and avoids out-of-focus damage. The limited depth range, given by the working distance of the focusing optics, is overcome with a gradient index-lens (GRIN-lens) based endoscope. In this work we present the first results of clinical applications in vivo of gradient-index lens endoscopes. Images of e.g. elastin and collagen (SHG) in the dermal layer of human skin are presented.

  15. In vivo multiphoton imaging of the eyelid skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; König, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton tomography (MPT) has become an important imaging method for non-invasive and high-resolution imaging of the skin in vivo. Due to the nonlinear excitation, by using near-infrared (NIR) light, 3D information is intrinsically provided. In combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), it is possible to obtain both structural and metabolic data. Human in vivo measurements are usually limited to easily accessible regions. However, often imaging of specific body parts such as the eyelid are of interest for cosmetic reasons. By using the clinically certified multiphoton imaging tomograph MPTflex this demand can be fulfilled. An articulated mirror arm and scan-detector head enable imaging at otherwise difficult-to-access areas. We show the characterization of the epidermal and upper dermal layers of the eyelid skin of human volunteers in vivo based on endogenous autofluorescence intensity, lifetime, and second-harmonic generation signals. Skin properties such as the epidermal thickness were also assessed. Furthermore, the influence of an anti-aging cream on the eyelid and forearm skin was investigated. Changes of the skin epidermis autofluorescence lifetime were observed after two-weeks long application of an anti-aging cream. The SHG-to-AF aging index of dermis (SAAID) increased during that time.

  16. From optical bench to cageside: intravital microscopy on the long road to rational vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Heather D.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary No anti-viral vaccine is perfect. For some important pathogens, there are no effective vaccines. Many current vaccines are based on the working principles of Jenner and Pasteur, i.e. empiric administration of attenuated or inactivated forms of the pathogen. Tapping the full potential of vaccination requires a thorough understanding of the mechanism of immune activation by pathogens and their individual components. Though the rate of discovery continues to accelerate, the complexity of the immune system is daunting, particularly when integrated into the overall physiology of the host. Here, we review the application of multiphoton microscopy to examine host-pathogen interactions, focusing on our recent efforts to understand mouse CD8+ T-cell responses to viruses at the level of cellular interactions in lymph nodes draining the infection site. We also discuss our recent efforts to understand the influence of the sympathetic nervous system on antiviral immunity, with the ultimate goal of appreciating the traditional elements of immunity as just one facet of the total organismal response to infection and immunization. PMID:21198674

  17. From optical bench to cageside: intravital microscopy on the long road to rational vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Heather D; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2011-01-01

    No antiviral vaccine is perfect. For some important pathogens, there are no effective vaccines. Many current vaccines are based on the working principles of Jenner and Pasteur, that is, empiric administration of attenuated or inactivated forms of the pathogen. Tapping the full potential of vaccination requires a thorough understanding of the mechanism of immune activation by pathogens and their individual components. Though the rate of discovery continues to accelerate, the complexity of the immune system is daunting, particularly when integrated into the overall physiology of the host. Here, we review the application of multiphoton microscopy to examine host-pathogen interactions, focusing on our recent efforts to understand mouse CD8(+) T-cell responses to viruses at the level of cellular interactions in lymph nodes draining the infection site. We also discuss our recent efforts to understand the influence of the sympathetic nervous system on antiviral immunity, with the ultimate goal of appreciating the traditional elements of immunity as just one facet of the total organismal response to infection and immunization. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Water-Soluble Quantum Dots for Multiphoton Fluorescence Imaging in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Daniel R.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Clark, Stephen W.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Wise, Frank W.; Webb, Watt W.

    2003-05-01

    The use of semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) as fluorescent labels for multiphoton microscopy enables multicolor imaging in demanding biological environments such as living tissue. We characterized water-soluble cadmium selenide-zinc sulfide quantum dots for multiphoton imaging in live animals. These fluorescent probes have two-photon action cross sections as high as 47,000 Goeppert-Mayer units, by far the largest of any label used in multiphoton microscopy. We visualized quantum dots dynamically through the skin of living mice, in capillaries hundreds of micrometers deep. We found no evidence of blinking (fluorescence intermittency) in solution on nanosecond to millisecond time scales.

  19. Water-soluble quantum dots for multiphoton fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larson, Daniel R; Zipfel, Warren R; Williams, Rebecca M; Clark, Stephen W; Bruchez, Marcel P; Wise, Frank W; Webb, Watt W

    2003-05-30

    The use of semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) as fluorescent labels for multiphoton microscopy enables multicolor imaging in demanding biological environments such as living tissue. We characterized water-soluble cadmium selenide-zinc sulfide quantum dots for multiphoton imaging in live animals. These fluorescent probes have two-photon action cross sections as high as 47,000 Goeppert-Mayer units, by far the largest of any label used in multiphoton microscopy. We visualized quantum dots dynamically through the skin of living mice, in capillaries hundreds of micrometers deep. We found no evidence of blinking (fluorescence intermittency) in solution on nanosecond to millisecond time scales.

  20. Fringe-free, Background-free, Collinear Third Harmonic Generation FROG Measurements for Multiphoton Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, R; Spahr, E; Squier, J A; Durfee, C G; Walker, B C; Fittinghoff, D N

    2006-07-21

    Collinear pulse measurement tools useful at the full numerical aperture (NA) of multiphoton microscope objectives are a necessity for a quantitative characterization of the femtosecond pulses focused by these systems. In this letter, we demonstrate a simple new technique, for characterizing the pulse at the focus in a multiphoton microscope. This technique, a background-free, fringe-free, form of frequency-resolved optical gating, uses the third harmonic signal generated from a glass coverslip. Here it is used to characterize 100 fs pulses (typical values for a multiphoton microscope) at the focus of a 0.65 NA objective.

  1. Generating Nanostructures with Multiphoton Absorption Polymerization using Optical Trap Assisted Nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Fardel, Romain; Schmidt, Michael; Arnold, Craig B.

    The need to generate sub 100 nm features is of interest for a variety of applications including optics, optoelectronics, and plasmonics. To address this requirement, several advanced optical lithography techniques have been developed based on either multiphoton absorption polymerization or near-field effects. In this paper, we combine strengths from multiphoton absorption and near field using optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN). A Gaussian beam is used to position a microsphere in a polymer precursor fluid near a substrate. An ultrafast laser is focused by that microsphere to induce multiphoton polymerization in the near field, leading additive direct-write nanoscale processing.

  2. Multiphoton imaging with a novel compact diode-pumped Ti:sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    König, Karsten; Andersen, Peter; Le, Tuan; Breunig, Hans Georg

    2015-12-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy commonly relies on bulky and expensive femtosecond lasers. We integrated a novel minimal-footprint Ti:sapphire oscillator, pumped by a frequency-doubled distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode laser, into a clinical multiphoton tomograph and evaluated its imaging capability using different biological samples, i.e. cell monolayers, corneal tissue, and human skin. With the novel laser, the realization of very compact Ti:sapphire-based systems for high-quality multiphoton imaging at a significantly size and weight compared to current systems will become possible.

  3. Intravital Computer Morphometry on Protozoa: A Method for Monitoring of the Morphofunctional Disorders in Cells Exposed in the Cell Phone Communication Electromagnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Uskalova, D V; Igolkina, Yu V; Sarapultseva, E I

    2016-08-01

    Morphofunctional disorders in unicellular aquatic protozoa - Spirostomum ambiguum infusorians after 30-, 60-, and 360-min exposure in electromagnetic field at a radiation frequency of 1 GHz and energy flow density of 50 μW/cm(2) were analyzed by intravital computer morphometry. Significant disorders in morphometric values correlated with low mobility of the protozoa. The results suggested the use of intravital computer morphometry on the protozoa for early diagnosis of radiation-induced effects of the mobile communication electromagnetic field, for example, low mobility of spermatozoa.

  4. Resonance Enhanced Multi-photon Spectroscopy of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligare, Marshall Robert

    For over 50 years DNA has been studied to better understand its connection to life and evolution. These past experiments have led to our understanding of its structure and function in the biological environment but the interaction of DNA with UV radiation at the molecular level is still not very well understood. Unique mechanisms in nucleobase chromaphores protect us from adverse chemical reactions after UV absorption. Studying these processes can help develop theories for prebiotic chemistry and the possibility of alternative forms of DNA. Using resonance enhanced multi-photon spectroscopic techniques in the gas phase allow for the structure and dynamics of individual nucleobases to be studied in detail. Experiments studying different levels of structure/complexity with relation to their biological function are presented. Resonant IR multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular mechanics and DFT calculations are used to determine gas phase structures of anionic nucleotide clusters. A comparison of the identified structures with known biological function shows how the hydrogen bonding of the nucleotides and their clusters free of solvent create favorable structures for quick incorporation into enzymes such as DNA polymerase. Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy techniques such as resonant two photon ionization (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance are used to further elucidate the structure and excited state dynamics of the bare nucleobases thymine and uracil. Both exhibit long lived excited electronic states that have been implicated in DNA photolesions which can ultimately lead to melanoma and carcinoma. Our experimental data in comparison with many quantum chemical calculations suggest a new picture for the dynamics of thymine and uracil in the gas phase. A high probability of UV absorption from a vibrationally hot ground state to the excited electronic state shows that the stability of thymine and uracil comes from

  5. Aqueous multiphoton lithography with multifunctional silk-centred bio-resists

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yun-Lu; Li, Qi; Sun, Si-Ming; Huang, Jing-Chun; Zheng, Bo-Yuan; Chen, Qi-Dai; Shao, Zheng-Zhong; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Silk and silk fibroin, the biomaterial from nature, nowadays are being widely utilized in many cutting-edge micro/nanodevices/systems via advanced micro/nanofabrication techniques. Herein, for the first time to our knowledge, we report aqueous multiphoton lithography of diversiform-regenerated-silk-fibroin-centric inks using noncontact and maskless femtosecond laser direct writing (FsLDW). Initially, silk fibroin was FsLDW-crosslinked into arbitrary two/three-dimensional micro/nanostructures with good elastic properties merely using proper photosensitizers. More interestingly, silk/metal composite micro/nanodevices with multidimension-controllable metal content can be FsLDW-customized through laser-induced simultaneous fibroin oxidation/crosslinking and metal photoreduction using the simplest silk/Ag+ or silk/[AuCl4]− aqueous resists. Noticeably, during FsLDW, fibroin functions as biological reductant and matrix, while metal ions act as the oxidant. A FsLDW-fabricated prototyping silk/Ag microelectrode exhibited 104-Ω−1 m−1-scale adjustable electric conductivity. This work not only provides a powerful development to silk micro/nanoprocessing techniques but also creates a novel way to fabricate multifunctional metal/biomacromolecule complex micro/nanodevices for applications such as micro/nanoscale mechanical and electrical bioengineering and biosystems. PMID:26472600

  6. Aqueous multiphoton lithography with multifunctional silk-centred bio-resists.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yun-Lu; Li, Qi; Sun, Si-Ming; Huang, Jing-Chun; Zheng, Bo-Yuan; Chen, Qi-Dai; Shao, Zheng-Zhong; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-10-16

    Silk and silk fibroin, the biomaterial from nature, nowadays are being widely utilized in many cutting-edge micro/nanodevices/systems via advanced micro/nanofabrication techniques. Herein, for the first time to our knowledge, we report aqueous multiphoton lithography of diversiform-regenerated-silk-fibroin-centric inks using noncontact and maskless femtosecond laser direct writing (FsLDW). Initially, silk fibroin was FsLDW-crosslinked into arbitrary two/three-dimensional micro/nanostructures with good elastic properties merely using proper photosensitizers. More interestingly, silk/metal composite micro/nanodevices with multidimension-controllable metal content can be FsLDW-customized through laser-induced simultaneous fibroin oxidation/crosslinking and metal photoreduction using the simplest silk/Ag(+) or silk/[AuCl4](-) aqueous resists. Noticeably, during FsLDW, fibroin functions as biological reductant and matrix, while metal ions act as the oxidant. A FsLDW-fabricated prototyping silk/Ag microelectrode exhibited 10(4)-Ω(-1 ) m(-1)-scale adjustable electric conductivity. This work not only provides a powerful development to silk micro/nanoprocessing techniques but also creates a novel way to fabricate multifunctional metal/biomacromolecule complex micro/nanodevices for applications such as micro/nanoscale mechanical and electrical bioengineering and biosystems.

  7. Aqueous multiphoton lithography with multifunctional silk-centred bio-resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun-Lu; Li, Qi; Sun, Si-Ming; Huang, Jing-Chun; Zheng, Bo-Yuan; Chen, Qi-Dai; Shao, Zheng-Zhong; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-10-01

    Silk and silk fibroin, the biomaterial from nature, nowadays are being widely utilized in many cutting-edge micro/nanodevices/systems via advanced micro/nanofabrication techniques. Herein, for the first time to our knowledge, we report aqueous multiphoton lithography of diversiform-regenerated-silk-fibroin-centric inks using noncontact and maskless femtosecond laser direct writing (FsLDW). Initially, silk fibroin was FsLDW-crosslinked into arbitrary two/three-dimensional micro/nanostructures with good elastic properties merely using proper photosensitizers. More interestingly, silk/metal composite micro/nanodevices with multidimension-controllable metal content can be FsLDW-customized through laser-induced simultaneous fibroin oxidation/crosslinking and metal photoreduction using the simplest silk/Ag+ or silk/[AuCl4]- aqueous resists. Noticeably, during FsLDW, fibroin functions as biological reductant and matrix, while metal ions act as the oxidant. A FsLDW-fabricated prototyping silk/Ag microelectrode exhibited 104-Ω-1 m-1-scale adjustable electric conductivity. This work not only provides a powerful development to silk micro/nanoprocessing techniques but also creates a novel way to fabricate multifunctional metal/biomacromolecule complex micro/nanodevices for applications such as micro/nanoscale mechanical and electrical bioengineering and biosystems.

  8. Automatic detection of motion blur in intravital video microscopy image sequences via directional statistics of log-Gabor energy maps.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Ricardo J; Pinto, Carlos H Villa; da Silva, Bruno C Gregório; Bernardes, Danielle; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana

    2015-02-01

    Intravital microscopy is an important experimental tool for the study of cellular and molecular mechanisms of the leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the microcirculation of various tissues and in different inflammatory conditions of in vivo specimens. However, due to the limited control over the conditions of the image acquisition, motion blur and artifacts, resulting mainly from the heartbeat and respiratory movements of the in vivo specimen, will very often be present. This problem can significantly undermine the results of either visual or computerized analysis of the acquired video images. Since only a fraction of the total number of images are usually corrupted by severe motion blur, it is necessary to have a procedure to automatically identify such images in the video for either further restoration or removal. This paper proposes a new technique for the detection of motion blur in intravital video microscopy based on directional statistics of local energy maps computed using a bank of 2D log-Gabor filters. Quantitative assessment using both artificially corrupted images and real microscopy data were conducted to test the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.95 (AUC = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.93-0.97) when tested on 329 video images visually ranked by four observers.

  9. Intravital excitation increases detection sensitivity for pulmonary tuberculosis by whole-body imaging with β-lactamase reporter enzyme fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Cheng, Yunfeng; Durkee, Madeleine S; Xie, Hexin; Rao, Jianghong; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2017-06-01

    Tuberculosis is a pulmonary disease with an especially high mortality rate in immuno-compromised populations, specifically children and HIV positive individuals. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is a very slow growing and difficult organism to work with, making both diagnosis and development of effective treatments cumbersome. We utilize a fiber-optic fluorescence microendoscope integrated with a whole-body imaging system for in vivo Mtb detection. The system exploits an endogenous enzyme of Mtb (β-lactamase, or BlaC) using a BlaC-specific NIR fluorogenic substrate. In the presence of BlaC, this substrate is cleaved and becomes fluorescent. Using intravital illumination of the lung to excite this probe, sensitivity of the optical system increases over trans- and epi-illumination methods of whole-body fluorescence imaging. We demonstrate that integration of these imaging technologies with BlaC-specific fluorescent reporter probe improves the level of detection to ∼100 colony forming units, a 100× increase in sensitivity in comparison to epi-illumination and a 10× increase in sensitivity in comparison to previous work in intravital excitation of tdTomato-expressing Mtb. This lower detection threshold enables the study of early stage bacterial infections with clinical strains of Mtb and longitudinal studies of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic efficacy with multiple time points in a single animal. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Automated measurement of blood flow velocity and direction and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the rat lung using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Gabi; Fontanella, Andrew; Palmer, Gregory; Shan, Siqing; Radiloff, Daniel R; Zhao, Yulin; Irwin, David; Hamilton, Karyn; Boico, Alina; Piantadosi, Claude A; Blueschke, Gert; Dewhirst, Mark; McMahon, Timothy; Schroeder, Thies

    2013-01-15

    Intravital microscopy of the pulmonary microcirculation in research animals is of great scientific interest for its utility in identifying regional changes in pulmonary microcirculatory blood flow. Although feasibility studies have been reported, the pulmonary window can be further refined into a practical tool for pharmaceutical research and drug development. We have established a method to visualize and quantify dynamic changes in three key features of lung function: microvascular red blood cell velocity, flow direction, and hemoglobin saturation. These physiological parameters were measured in an acute closed-chest pulmonary window, which allows real-time images to be captured by fluorescence and multispectral absorption microscopy; images were subsequently quantified using computerized analysis. We validated the model by quantifying changes in microcirculatory blood flow and hemoglobin saturation in two ways: 1) after changes in inspired oxygen content and 2) after pharmacological reduction of pulmonary blood flow via treatment with the β1 adrenergic receptor blocker metoprolol. This robust and relatively simple system facilitates pulmonary intravital microscopy in laboratory rats for pharmacological and physiological research.

  11. Direct observation of liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo in skin blood vessels using intravital fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Begu, Sylvie; Desmettre, Thomas

    2000-04-01

    This study aimed to observe liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo. The study was performed on skin by using a dorsal skin-fold chamber implanted in golden hamsters using intravital microscopy. 5,6-CF-encapsulated PEGylated liposomes were injected intravenously. The skin microcirculation was observed with an intravital Eclipse E800 Nikon microscope fitted with a Xenon light source and an epi-fluorescence assembly. An ultra-high sensitivity video-camera mounted on the microscope projected the image onto a monitor, and the images were recorded for playback analysis with a digital video cassette recorder. An acute inflammatory response was obtained by removing one complete layer of skin and the underlying fascia and avascular tissue on the opposing side of the flap corresponding to an area equivalent to the window aperture. Using these model and set-up, leukocyte rolling and adhesion were easily observed and the entry of PEGylated liposomes into hamster blood leukocytes was studied for a period of 6 hours. PEGylated liposomes were clearly identified alone inside the blood flow and inside the leukocytes as soon as the inflammatory reaction appeared. This study shows for the first time that blood leukocytes in their natural milieu of whole blood are capable of interacting with, and taking up liposomes. This observation is in accordance with previous in vitro studies.

  12. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Cell Division Orientation in Epidermal Basal Layer Using Intravital Two-Photon Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal structures are different among body sites, and proliferative keratinocytes in the epidermis play an important role in the maintenance of the epidermal structures. In recent years, intravital skin imaging has been used in mammalian skin research for the investigation of cell behaviors, but most of these experiments were performed with rodent ears. Here, we established a non-invasive intravital imaging approach for dorsal, ear, hind paw, or tail skin using R26H2BEGFP hairless mice. Using four-dimensional (x, y, z, and time) imaging, we successfully visualized mitotic cell division in epidermal basal cells. A comparison of cell division orientation relative to the basement membrane in each body site revealed that most divisions in dorsal and ear epidermis occurred in parallel, whereas the cell divisions in hind paw and tail epidermis occurred both in parallel and oblique orientations. Based on the quantitative analysis of the four-dimensional images, we showed that the epidermal thickness correlated with the basal cell density and the rate of the oblique divisions. PMID:27657513

  13. High-throughput multiphoton-induced three-dimensional ablation and imaging for biotissues

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Li, Pei-Kao; Cheng, Li-Chung; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a temporal focusing-based high-throughput multiphoton-induced ablation system with axially-resolved widefield multiphoton excitation has been successfully applied to rapidly disrupt biotissues. Experimental results demonstrate that this technique features high efficiency for achieving large-area laser ablation without causing serious photothermal damage in non-ablated regions. Furthermore, the rate of tissue processing can reach around 1.6 × 106 μm3/s in chicken tendon. Moreover, the temporal focusing-based multiphoton system can be efficiently utilized in optical imaging through iterating high-throughput multiphoton-induced ablation machining followed by widefield optical sectioning; hence, it has the potential to obtain molecular images for a whole bio-specimen. PMID:25780739

  14. Multiphoton Processes: ICOMP VIII: 8th International Conference, AIP Conference Proceedings, No. 525 [APCPCS

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Freeman, R.R.; Kulander, K.C.

    2000-12-31

    Topics include: atoms in strong fields; stabilization; double ionization and multi-electron calculations; high-order harmonics; molecules in strong fields; multiphoton processes in clusters; coherent control; light sources; and relativistic effects.

  15. Invited review article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N; Sheetz, Kraig E; Field, Jeffrey J; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W; Squier, Jeffrey A

    2009-08-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences.

  16. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  17. High-throughput multiphoton-induced three-dimensional ablation and imaging for biotissues.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Li, Pei-Kao; Cheng, Li-Chung; Li, Yi-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a temporal focusing-based high-throughput multiphoton-induced ablation system with axially-resolved widefield multiphoton excitation has been successfully applied to rapidly disrupt biotissues. Experimental results demonstrate that this technique features high efficiency for achieving large-area laser ablation without causing serious photothermal damage in non-ablated regions. Furthermore, the rate of tissue processing can reach around 1.6 × 10(6) μm(3)/s in chicken tendon. Moreover, the temporal focusing-based multiphoton system can be efficiently utilized in optical imaging through iterating high-throughput multiphoton-induced ablation machining followed by widefield optical sectioning; hence, it has the potential to obtain molecular images for a whole bio-specimen.

  18. Multiphoton FLIM: a reliable FRET detection tool in cell biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Ramanujan V.; Biener, Eva; Centonze, Victoria E.; Gertler, Arieh; Herman, Brian A.

    2004-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using multiphoton excitation is emerging as a reliable quantitative tool for measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in living cells. By virtue of being free from spectroscopic artifacts encountered in conventional FRET detection methods, multiphoton FLIM methods offer the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution, faster data acquisition and data analysis. We compare the FRET results obtained by two different methods namely (i) multiphoton excitation lifetime-based FRET and (ii) single photon excitation intensity-based acceptor photobleaching FRET. Using the same biological samples, we apply these two different methods in understanding the growth hormone receptor dimerization kinetics at the cell surface of human embryonic kidney cells. We conclude that the multiphoton FLIM using the streak-camera approach provides the best ability to monitor FRET in dynamic situations where high temporal and spatial resolution are required with minimal photodamage/phototoxicity.

  19. Multiphoton autofluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada

    2017-06-01

    The multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging tomograph MPTflex with its flexible 360-deg scan head, articulated arm, and tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) cultures. Autofluorescence (AF) lifetime imaging was performed with 250-ps temporal resolution and submicron spatial resolution using time-correlated single-photon counting. The two-photon excited AF was based on the metabolic coenzymes NAD(P)H and flavin adenine dinucleotide/flavoproteins. iPS cells generated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cocultured with growth-arrested MEFs as feeder cells have been studied. Significant differences on AF lifetime signatures were identified between iPS and feeder cells as well as between their differentiating counterparts.

  20. Reassignment of scattered emission photons in multifocal multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae Won; Singh, Vijay Raj; Kim, Ki Hean; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Peng, Qiwen; Yu, Hanry; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T C

    2014-06-05

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) achieves fast imaging by simultaneously scanning multiple foci across different regions of specimen. The use of imaging detectors in MMM, such as CCD or CMOS, results in degradation of image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the scattering of emitted photons. SNR can be partly recovered using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT). In this design, however, emission photons scattered to neighbor anodes are encoded by the foci scan location resulting in ghost images. The crosstalk between different anodes is currently measured a priori, which is cumbersome as it depends specimen properties. Here, we present the photon reassignment method for MMM, established based on the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation, for quantification of crosstalk between the anodes of MAPMT without a priori measurement. The method provides the reassignment of the photons generated by the ghost images to the original spatial location thus increases the SNR of the final reconstructed image.

  1. Reassignment of Scattered Emission Photons in Multifocal Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jae Won; Singh, Vijay Raj; Kim, Ki Hean; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Peng, Qiwen; Yu, Hanry; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) achieves fast imaging by simultaneously scanning multiple foci across different regions of specimen. The use of imaging detectors in MMM, such as CCD or CMOS, results in degradation of image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the scattering of emitted photons. SNR can be partly recovered using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT). In this design, however, emission photons scattered to neighbor anodes are encoded by the foci scan location resulting in ghost images. The crosstalk between different anodes is currently measured a priori, which is cumbersome as it depends specimen properties. Here, we present the photon reassignment method for MMM, established based on the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation, for quantification of crosstalk between the anodes of MAPMT without a priori measurement. The method provides the reassignment of the photons generated by the ghost images to the original spatial location thus increases the SNR of the final reconstructed image. PMID:24898470

  2. Search for Multiphoton Signatures of a Higgs Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Atramentov, Oleksiy Vladimirovich

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis we describe a search for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in 3γ+X events. The study has been performed on 0.83 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector that resides at one of the interaction regions of the Tevatron collider, the world's highest energy accelerator. This study was motivated by a fairly recent phenomenological paper [33] where it was noticed that in certain class of models (2HDM Type I and THM) the multi-photon final states like this one become detectable at the luminosity that has been collected by the D0 experiment by 2006. The mechanism that permits such final state becomes available when the conventional higgs production mechanism (higgs strahlung) are suppressed. This leads to the fact that Higgs boson with mass (mhf < 90 GeV/c2) lower than the current limit has not been excluded.

  3. Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (rempi) Spectroscopy of Weakly Bound Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzangwa, Lloyd; Nyambo, Silver; Uhler, Brandon; Reid, Scott A.

    2012-06-01

    We have recently implemented Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy in our laboratory as a spectroscopic probe of transient species. We will report on initial gas-phase studies of the spectra of weakly bound van der Waals and halogen bonded complexes involving aromatic organic donors. The complexes are formed in the rarified environment of a supersonic molecular beam, which is skimmed prior to passing into the differentially pumped flight tube of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ionization is initiated both by 1+1 and 1+1' REMPI schemes; the latter is used to minimize fragmentation. Our initial studies have examined van der Waals and halogen bonded complexes involving the phenol and toluene chromophores. Progress in the coupling of a discharge source into this apparatus will also be discussed.

  4. Multi-Photon Absorption in Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Medishetty, Raghavender; Nemec, Lydia; Nalla, Venkatram; Henke, Sebastian; Samoc, Marek; Reuter, Karsten; Fischer, Roland A

    2017-09-12

    Multi-photon absorption (MPA) is among the most prominent nonlinear optical (NLO) effects and has applications, for example in telecommunications, defense, photonics and bio-medicines. Established MPA materials include dyes, quantum dots, organometallics and conjugated polymers, most often dispersed in solution. We demonstrate how metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a novel NLO solid-state materials class, can be designed for exceptionally strong MPA behavior. MOFs consisting of zirconium- and hafnium-oxo-clusters and featuring a chromophore linker based on the tetraphenylethene (TPE) molecule exhibit record high two-photon absorption (2PA) cross section values, up to 3600 GM. The unique modular building-block principle of MOFs allows enhancing and optimizing their MPA properties in a theory guided approach by combining tailored charge polarization, conformational strain, three-dimensional arrangement and alignment of the chromophore linkers in the crystal. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources. PMID:24186400

  6. Performance evaluation of a sensorless adaptive optics multiphoton microscope.

    PubMed

    Skorsetz, Martin; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M

    2016-03-01

    A wavefront sensorless adaptive optics technique was combined with a custom-made multiphoton microscope to correct for specimen-induced aberrations. A liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCoS) modulator was used to systematically generate Zernike modes during image recording. The performance of the instrument was evaluated in samples providing different nonlinear signals and the benefit of correcting higher order aberrations was always noticeable (in both contrast and resolution). The optimum aberration pattern was stable in time for the samples here involved. For a particular depth location within the sample, the wavefront to be precompensated was independent on the size of the imaged area (up to ∼ 360 × 360 μm(2)). The mode combination optimizing the recorded image depended on the Zernike correction control sequence; however, the final images hardly differed. At deeper locations, a noticeable dominance of spherical aberration was found. The influence of other aberration terms was also compared to the effect of the spherical aberration.

  7. Molecule-specific darkfield and multiphoton imaging using gold nanocages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powless, Amy J.; Jenkins, Samir V.; McKay, Mary Lee; Chen, Jingyi; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Due to their robust optical properties, biological inertness, and readily adjustable surface chemistry, gold nanostructures have been demonstrated as contrast agents in a variety of biomedical imaging applications. One application is dynamic imaging of live cells using bioconjugated gold nanoparticles to monitor molecule trafficking mechanisms within cells; for instance, the regulatory pathway of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) undergoing endocytosis. In this paper, we have demonstrated a method to track endocytosis of EGFR in MDA-MB-468 breast adenocarcinoma cells using bioconjugated gold nanocages (AuNCs) and multiphoton microscopy. Dynamic imaging was performed using a time series capture of 4 images every minute for one hour. Specific binding and internalization of the bioconjugated AuNCs was observed while the two control groups showed non-specific binding at fewer surface sites, leading to fewer bound AuNCs and no internalization.

  8. Multimodal optoacoustic and multiphoton microscopy of human carotid atheroma.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Markus; Karlas, Angelos; Soliman, Dominik; Pelisek, Jaroslav; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-09-01

    Carotid artery atherosclerosis is a main cause of stroke. Understanding atherosclerosis biology is critical in the development of targeted prevention and treatment strategies. Consequently, there is demand for advanced tools investigating atheroma pathology. We consider hybrid optoacoustic and multiphoton microscopy for the integrated and complementary interrogation of plaque tissue constituents and their mutual interactions. Herein, we visualize human carotid plaque using a hybrid multimodal imaging system that combines optical resolution optoacoustic (photoacoustic) microscopy, second and third harmonic generation microscopy, and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. Our data suggest more comprehensive insights in the pathophysiology of atheroma formation and destabilization, by enabling congruent visualization of structural and biological features critical for the atherosclerotic process and its acute complications, such as red blood cells and collagen.

  9. Plasma induced by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-12-15

    We present a detailed model for the evolution of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) produced plasma during and after the ionizing laser pulse in inert gas (argon, as an example) at arbitrary pressures. Our theory includes the complete process of the REMPI plasma generation and losses, together with the changing gas thermodynamic parameters. The model shows that the plasma expansion follows a classical ambipolar diffusion and that gas heating results in a weak shock or acoustic wave. The gas becomes involved in the motion not only from the pressure gradient due to the heating, but also from the momentum transfer from the charged particles to gas atoms. The time dependence of the total number of electrons computed in theory matches closely with the results of coherent microwave scattering experiments.

  10. Multiphoton quantum interference in a multiport integrated photonic device.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Benjamin J; Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Spring, Justin B; Kundys, Dmytro; Broome, Matthew A; Humphreys, Peter C; Jin, Xian-Min; Barbieri, Marco; Kolthammer, W Steven; Gates, James C; Smith, Brian J; Langford, Nathan K; Smith, Peter G R; Walmsley, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    Increasing the complexity of quantum photonic devices is essential for many optical information processing applications to reach a regime beyond what can be classically simulated, and integrated photonics has emerged as a leading platform for achieving this. Here we demonstrate three-photon quantum operation of an integrated device containing three coupled interferometers, eight spatial modes and many classical and nonclassical interferences. This represents a critical advance over previous complexities and the first on-chip nonclassical interference with more than two photonic inputs. We introduce a new scheme to verify quantum behaviour, using classically characterised device elements and hierarchies of photon correlation functions. We accurately predict the device's quantum behaviour and show operation inconsistent with both classical and bi-separable quantum models. Such methods for verifying multiphoton quantum behaviour are vital for achieving increased circuit complexity. Our experiment paves the way for the next generation of integrated photonic quantum simulation and computing devices.

  11. Clinical multiphoton tomography and clinical two-photon microendoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Bückle, Rainer; Weinigel, Martin; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We report on applications of high-resolution clinical multiphoton tomography based on the femtosecond laser system DermaInspectTM with its flexible mirror arm in Australia, Asia, and Europe. Applications include early detection of melanoma, in situ tracing of pharmacological and cosmetical compounds including ZnO nanoparticles in the epidermis and upper dermis, the determination of the skin aging index SAAID as well as the study of the effects of anti-aging products. In addition, first clinical studies with novel rigid high-NA two-photon 1.6 mm GRIN microendoscopes have been conducted to study the effect of wound healing in chronic wounds (ulcus ulcera) as well as to perform intrabody imaging with subcellular resolution in small animals.

  12. In vivo multiphoton tomography in skin aging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Bückle, Rainer; Weinigel, Martin; Köhler, Johannes; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-02-01

    High-resolution clinical multiphoton tomography based on the femtosecond laser system DermaInspect has been performed on hundreds of patients and volunteers in Australia, Asia, and Europe. The system enables the in vivo detection of the elastin and the collagen network as well as the imaging of melanin clusters in aging spots. The epidermis-dermis junction can be detected with submicron resolution. One major applications of this novel HighTech imaging tool is the determination of the skin aging index SAAID as well as the study of the effects of anti-aging products. In particular, the stimulated biosynthesis of collagen can be investigated over long periods of time. The system with its sub-500 nm lateral resolution is able to image age-related modifications of the extracellular matrix on the level of a single elastin fiber.

  13. Monitoring wound healing by multiphoton tomography/endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kaatz, Martin; Hipler, Christina; Zens, Katharina; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs are employed to perform rapid label-free high-resolution in vivo histology. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as rigid two-photon GRIN microendoscope. Mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged with submicron resolution in human skin. The system was employed to study the healing of chronic wounds (venous leg ulcer) and acute wounds (curettage of actinic or seborrheic keratosis) on a subcellular level. Furthermore, a flexible sterile foil as interface between wound and focusing optic was tested.

  14. Imaging carious dental tissues with multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Po-Yen; Lyu, Hong-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen; Chang, Chia-Seng; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, multiphoton excitation was utilized to image normal and carious dental tissues noninvasively. Unique structures in dental tissues were identified using the available multimodality (second harmonic, autofluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime analysis) without labeling. The collagen in dentin exhibits a strong second harmonic response. Both dentin and enamel emit strong autofluorescence that reveals in detail morphological features (such as dentinal tubules and enamel rods) and, despite their very similar spectral profiles, can be differentiated by lifetime analysis. Specifically, the carious dental tissue exhibits a greatly reduced autofluorescence lifetime, which result is consistent with the degree of demineralization, determined by micro-computed tomography. Our findings suggest that two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging may be a promising tool for diagnosing and monitoring dental caries. PMID:21326645

  15. Optimization-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Jacopo; van Werkhoven, Tim; Verhaegen, Michel; Truong, Hoa H; Keller, Christoph U; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2014-06-01

    Optical aberrations have detrimental effects in multiphoton microscopy. These effects can be curtailed by implementing model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics, which only requires the addition of a wavefront shaping device, such as a deformable mirror (DM) to an existing microscope. The aberration correction is achieved by maximizing a suitable image quality metric. We implement a model-based aberration correction algorithm in a second-harmonic microscope. The tip, tilt, and defocus aberrations are removed from the basis functions used for the control of the DM, as these aberrations induce distortions in the acquired images. We compute the parameters of a quadratic polynomial that is used to model the image quality metric directly from experimental input-output measurements. Finally, we apply the aberration correction by maximizing the image quality metric using the least-squares estimate of the unknown aberration.

  16. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Li-Chung; Su, Hung-Wei; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Cho, Keng-Chi; Yen, Wei-Chung; Xu, Chris; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Temporal profile distortions reduce excitation efficiency and image quality in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy. In order to compensate the distortions, a wavefront sensorless adaptive optics system (AOS) was integrated into the microscope. The feedback control signal of the AOS was acquired from local image intensity maximization via a hill-climbing algorithm. The control signal was then utilized to drive a deformable mirror in such a way as to eliminate the distortions. With the AOS correction, not only is the axial excitation symmetrically refocused, but the axial resolution with full two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) intensity is also maintained. Hence, the contrast of the TPEF image of a R6G-doped PMMA thin film is enhanced along with a 3.7-fold increase in intensity. Furthermore, the TPEF image quality of 1μm fluorescent beads sealed in agarose gel at different depths is improved. PMID:24940539

  17. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Li-Chung; Su, Hung-Wei; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Cho, Keng-Chi; Yen, Wei-Chung; Xu, Chris; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2014-06-01

    Temporal profile distortions reduce excitation efficiency and image quality in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy. In order to compensate the distortions, a wavefront sensorless adaptive optics system (AOS) was integrated into the microscope. The feedback control signal of the AOS was acquired from local image intensity maximization via a hill-climbing algorithm. The control signal was then utilized to drive a deformable mirror in such a way as to eliminate the distortions. With the AOS correction, not only is the axial excitation symmetrically refocused, but the axial resolution with full two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) intensity is also maintained. Hence, the contrast of the TPEF image of a R6G-doped PMMA thin film is enhanced along with a 3.7-fold increase in intensity. Furthermore, the TPEF image quality of 1μm fluorescent beads sealed in agarose gel at different depths is improved.

  18. Multiphoton Rabi oscillations between highly excited Stark states of potassium

    SciTech Connect

    He Yonglin

    2011-11-15

    We have applied a nonperturbative resonant theory to study the Rabi frequency of microwave multiphoton transitions between two Rydberg states of potassium in a static electric field. The Stark electric dipole moments used to calculate the Rabi frequency are determined by the Stark states' wave functions, which are obtained by the diagonalization method. The frequencies of the Rabi oscillations are in good agreement with either experimental ones or ones calculated by the time-dependent close-coupling method and the Floquet theory. Furthermore, we are able to show that the size of avoided crossings between the (n+2)s and (n,3) states can be predicted from the Stark electric dipole moment and the difference of the two Stark states' energy at a given resonance.

  19. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; de Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-11-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources.

  20. Suppression of multiphoton intrashell resonances in Li Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Waheed, A.; Fregenal, D.; Frette, O.; Foerre, M.; Hjertaker, B. T.; Preclikova, J.; Horsdal, E.; Pilskog, I.

    2011-06-15

    Multiphoton intrashell transitions in strongly driven Li (n=25) Rydberg atoms are studied experimentally. Orthogonal dc electric and magnetic fields lift the degeneracy of the n shell and define the eccentricity e of the initial coherent elliptic states, which are formed by laser excitation and subsequent adiabatic transformation. The intrashell transitions are driven by a time-harmonic electric field linearly polarized parallel to the major axis of the ellipse. N-photon resonances with N=1-9 are studied as a function of e. All resonances with N{>=}3 are suppressed at certain e values in between 0 and 1. A similar system was analyzed by Yabuzaki et al. [Phys. Rev. A 10, 1955 (1974)] who found a simple pattern of suppressions that applies also for the present experiments. The results of these experimentally confirm that each time N is increased by two, an additional suppression is observed.

  1. Features of multiphoton-stimulated bremsstrahlung in a quantized field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenkov, Ivan A.; Tikhonova, Olga V.

    2010-12-01

    The process of absorption and emission of external field quanta by a free electron during the scattering on a potential centre is investigated in the case of interaction with a quantized electromagnetic field. The analytical expression for differential cross-sections and probabilities of different multiphoton channels are obtained. We demonstrate that in the case of a non-classical 'squeezed vacuum' initial field state the probability for the electron to absorb a large number of photons appears to be larger by several orders of magnitude in comparison to the classical field and leads to the formation of the high-energy plateau in the electron energy spectrum. The generalization of the Marcuse effect to the case of the quantized field is worked out. The total probability of energy absorption by electron from the non-classical light is analysed.

  2. Design of a fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy handheld probe

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Sheng, Mingyu; Huang, Lin; Tang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system with handheld probe using femtosecond fiber laser. Here we present the detailed optical design and analysis of the handheld probe. The optical systems using Lightpath 352140 and 352150 as objective lens were analyzed. A custom objective module that includes Lightpath 355392 and two customized corrective lenses was designed. Their performances were compared by wavefront error, field curvature, astigmatism, F-θ error, and tolerance in Zemax simulation. Tolerance analysis predicted the focal spot size to be 1.13, 1.19 and 0.83 µm, respectively. Lightpath 352140 and 352150 were implemented in experiment and the measured lateral resolution was 1.22 and 1.3 µm, respectively, which matched with the prediction. MPM imaging by the handheld probe were conducted on leaf, fish scale and rat tail tendon. The MPM resolution can potentially be improved by the custom objective module. PMID:27699109

  3. Spatiotemporal Analyses of Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis via Intravital Imaging in Cranial Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunlan; Ness, Vincent P.; Yang, Xiaochuan; Chen, Hongli; Luo, Jiebo; Brown, Edward B; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis and angiogenesis are two integrated components in bone repair and regeneration. A deeper understanding of osteogenesis and angiogenesis has been hampered by technical difficulties of analyzing bone and neovasculature simultaneously in spatiotemporal scales and in three-dimensional formats. To overcome these barriers, a cranial defect window chamber model was established that enabled high-resolution, longitudinal, and real-time tracking of angiogenesis and bone defect healing via Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy (MPLSM). By simultaneously probing new bone matrix via second harmonic generation (SHG), neovascular networks via intravenous perfusion of fluorophore, and osteoblast differentiation via 2.3kb collagen type I promoter driven GFP (Col2.3GFP), we examined the morphogenetic sequence of cranial bone defect healing and further established the spatiotemporal analyses of osteogenesis and angiogenesis coupling in repair and regeneration. We demonstrated that bone defect closure was initiated in the residual bone around the edge of the defect. The expansion and migration of osteoprogenitors into the bone defect occurred during the first 3 weeks of healing, coupled with vigorous microvessel angiogenesis at the leading edge of the defect. Subsequent bone repair was marked by matrix deposition and active vascular network remodeling within new bone. Implantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) isolated from Col2.3GFP mice further showed that donor-dependent bone formation occurred rapidly within the first 3 weeks of implantation, in concert with early angiogenesis. The subsequent bone wound closure was largely host-dependent, associated with localized modest induction of angiogenesis. The establishment of a live imaging platform via cranial window provides a unique tool to understand osteogenesis and angiogenesis in repair and regeneration, enabling further elucidation of the spatiotemporal regulatory mechanisms of osteoprogenitor cell interactions

  4. Multiphoton imaging for assessing renal disposition in acute kidney injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Liang, Xiaowen; Wang, Haolu; Roberts, Darren M.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-11-01

    Estimation of renal function and drug renal disposition in acute kidney injury (AKI), is important for appropriate dosing of drugs and adjustment of therapeutic strategies, but is challenging due to fluctuations in kidney function. Multiphoton microscopy has been shown to be a useful tool in studying drug disposition in liver and can reflect dynamic changes of liver function. We extend this imaging technique to investigate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and tubular transporter functional change in various animal models of AKI, which mimic a broad range of causes of AKI such as hypoxia (renal ischemia- reperfusion), therapeutic drugs (e.g. cisplatin), rhabdomyolysis (e.g. glycerol-induced) and sepsis (e.g. LPSinduced). The MPM images revealed acute injury of tubular cells as indicated by reduced autofluorescence and cellular vacuolation in AKI groups compared to control group. In control animal, systemically injected FITC-labelled inulin was rapidly cleared from glomerulus, while the clearance of FITC-inulin was significantly delayed in most of animals in AKI group, which may reflect the reduced GFR in AKI. Following intravenous injection, rhodamine 123, a fluorescent substrate of p-glycoprotein (one of tubular transporter), was excreted into urine in proximal tubule via p-glycoprotein; in response to AKI, rhodamine 123 was retained in tubular cells as revealed by slower decay of fluorescence intensity, indicating P-gp transporter dysfunction in AKI. Thus, real-time changes in GFR and transporter function can be imaged in rodent kidney with AKI using multiphoton excitation of exogenously injected fluorescent markers.

  5. Complex effective Hamiltonian approach for ir multiphoton dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flosnik, Thomas M.; Wyatt, Robert E.

    1989-11-01

    A complex effective Hamiltonian (CEH) approach is formulated in the semiclassical (quantum-molecule-classical-field) representation for the study of ir multiphoton-dissociation processes. This formulation enables one to evaluate the dissociation dynamics in terms of the discrete states only. The effects of the bound-continuum-state interactions are manifested in the CEH matrix by the addition of level shifts and imaginary decay widths to the unperturbed bound-state energies and bound-bound dipole-coupling elements. The periodicity of the CEH matrix in time is preserved, allowing the use of Floquet theory to exactly evaluate the time development of the system. This CEH formulation requires that transitions between continuum states can be safely ignored, that the bound-continuum dipole couplings vary slowly with the continuum state energy ɛ, and that time t is sufficiently long. High field intensities also tend to make these requirements more stringent. It is found that the CEH matrix in the semiclassical representation can be asymmetric with respect to the level shifts and decay widths. For the ir multiphoton dissociation of a nonrotating model diatomic molecule in the ground electronic state, a rather truncated form of the CEH is tested against a discretized continuum plus optical potential method. Despite the high field intensity and relatively short laser pulse used in these tests, the results indicate that this CEH method works well provided the bound-continuum dipole-coupling elements vary slowly with ɛ. As can be expected, the validity of the CEH is limited when the bound-continuum dipole couplings vary strongly with ɛ, which is the case with our model diatomic molecule. The nature of the bound-continuum interactions can apparently have considerable effect on the dissociation dynamics.

  6. Evaluating thermal damage induced by pulsed light with multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wei; Xie, Shusen; Huang, Yimei

    2009-02-01

    Nonablative skin remodeling is a new light treatment approach for photodamaged skin. Compared to ablative CO2 or Er:YAG laser resurfacing, dermabrasion, and chemical peels, the clinical objective of nonablative skin remodeling is to maximize thermal damage to upper dermis while minimizing injury to the epidermis and surrounding tissue, consequently decreasing potential complications and shortening long recuperation periods. Histological analysis of preoperative and postoperative biopsies using H&E or special stains has indicated the dermal thermal injury, which resulting in collagen denaturation, is the most important mechanism of nonablative skin remodeling for improving skin situation. And the extent of improvement of skin situation corresponded to the formation of a new band of dense, compact collagen bundles in the papillary dermis. The diversity of individual skin condition influences the choice of pulsed light treatment parameters, and further influences the degree of dermal thermal damage, thus the efficacy of nonablative skin remodeling remains unstable. Recently, multiphoton microscopy has show a promising application for monitoring skin thermal damage, because collagen could produce strong second harmonic generation (SHG). And SHG intensity is presumably proportional to the percentage of collagen in dermis. In this paper, the auto-fluorescence (AF) intensity and SHG intensity of mice skin irradiated by pulsed Nd:YAG laser were measured and imaged with multiphoton microscope, and the results show the ratio of SHG to AF decreases with the increase of irradiation exposure dose, and could be a quantitative technique to assess dermal thermal damage, and could further benefit the choice of light treatment parameters.

  7. Multi-Photon Absorption Spectra: A Comparison Between Transmittance Change and Fluorescence Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0134 multi-photon absorption spectra Cleber Mendonca INSTITUTO DE FISICA DE SAO CARLOS Final Report 05/21/2015 DISTRIBUTION A...multi-photon absorption spectra: a comparison between transmittance change and fluorescence methods 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Award No: FA9550-12-1-0028...presents the progress we have made on the project Determination of multi-photon absorption spectra: a comparison between transmittance change and

  8. High (1 GHz) repetition rate compact femtosecond laser: A powerful multiphoton tool for nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, A.; Riemann, I.; Martin, S.; Le Harzic, R.; Bartels, A.; Janke, C.; König, K.

    2007-07-01

    Multiphoton tomography of human skin and nanosurgery of human chromosomes have been performed with a 1GHz repetition rate laser by the use of the commercially available femtosecond multiphoton laser tomograph DermaInspect as well as a compact galvoscanning microscope. We performed the autofluorescence tomography up to 100μm in the depth of human skin. Submicron cutting lines and hole drillings have been conducted on labeled human chromosomes.

  9. High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Multiphoton Processes in Atoms and Molecules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-13

    perform photoion-photoelectron coincidence studies using a resonance lamp , is presently operated Independently of the photoelectron spectrometer. The mass...photoionization of excited states of atomic carbon. Atomic carbon in both the 3 p ground state and the 1D excited state was prepared by UV multiphoton...34 Gordon Conference on UV /Visible Multiphoton Ionization and Dissociation Processes, 12-16 July 1982 (no abstract available). 5. P. M. Dehmer, "VUV

  10. Multi-Photon Fluorescence Microscopy: Behavior of Biological Specimens Under High Intensity Illumination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    used in these types of microscopy. We have used maize leaf protoplast as a model system to evaluate the photo-induced response of living sample under...to fluorescence emission, second harmonic generation was observed in the maize protoplasts. Keywords: Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy, photon...damage, cell damage, high intensity illumination, maize 1. INTRODUCTION Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has been cited for its advantage in the

  11. In vivo multiphoton microscopy of deep tissue with gradient index lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levene, Michael J.; Dombeck, Daniel A.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Skoch, Jesse; Hickey, Gregory A.; Kasischke, Karl A.; Molloy, Raymond P.; Ingelsson, Martin; Stern, Edward A.; Klucken, Jochen; Bacskai, Brian J.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Webb, Watt W.

    2004-06-01

    Gradient index lenses enable multiphoton microscopy of deep tissues in the intact animal. In order to assess their applicability to clinical research, we present in vivo multiphoton microscopy with gradient index lenses in brain regions associated with Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease in both transgenic and wild-type mice. We also demonstrate microscopy of ovary in wild type mouse using only intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation, signal sources which may prove useful for both the study and diagnosis of cancer.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopic imaging and multiphoton microscopy of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Winterhalder, Martin J; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H; Geiger, Kathrin D; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Zumbusch, Andreas; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2012-10-16

    Spinal cord injury triggers a series of complex biochemical alterations of nervous tissue. Up to now, such cellular events could not be studied without conventional tissue staining. The development of optical, label-free imaging techniques could provide powerful monitoring tools with the potential to be applied in vivo. In this work, we assess the ability of vibrational spectroscopy to generate contrast at molecular level between normal and altered regions in a rat model of spinal cord injury. Using tissue sections, we demonstrate that Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy are able to identify the lesion, the surrounding scar, and unharmed normal tissue, delivering insight into the biochemical events induced by the injury and allowing mapping of tissue degeneration. The FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic imaging provides the basis for fast multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, endogenous two-photon fluorescence, and second harmonic generation). The latter proves to be a fast tool for imaging of the lesion on unstained tissue samples, based on the alteration in lipid content, extracellular matrix composition, and microglia/macrophages distribution pattern. The results establish these technologies in the field of regeneration in central nervous system, with the long-term goal to extend them to intravital use, where fast and nonharmful imaging is required.

  13. In vivo multiphoton microscopy associated to 3D image processing for human skin characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldeweck, T.; Tancrède, E.; Dokladal, P.; Koudoro, S.; Morard, V.; Meyer, F.; Decencière, E.; Pena, A.-M.

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged in the past decade as a promising non-invasive skin imaging technique. The aim of this study was to assess whether multiphoton microscopy coupled to specific 3D image processing tools could provide new insights into the organization of different skin components and their age-related changes. For that purpose, we performed a clinical trial on 15 young and 15 aged human female volunteers on the ventral and dorsal side of the forearm using the DermaInspectR medical imaging device. We visualized the skin by taking advantage of intrinsic multiphoton signals from cells, elastic and collagen fibers. We also developed 3D image processing algorithms adapted to in vivo multiphoton images of human skin in order to extract quantitative parameters in each layer of the skin (epidermis and superficial dermis). The results show that in vivo multiphoton microscopy is able to evidence several skin alterations due to skin aging: morphological changes in the epidermis and modifications in the quantity and organization of the collagen and elastic fibers network. In conclusion, the association of multiphoton microscopy with specific image processing allows the three-dimensional organization of skin components to be visualized and quantified thus providing a powerful tool for cosmetic and dermatological investigations.

  14. Development of synchrotron radiation x-ray intravital microscopy for in vivo imaging of rat heart vascular function.

    PubMed

    Umetani, Keiji; Pearson, James T; Schwenke, Daryl O; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2011-01-01

    This study elucidates the vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation in closed-chest rats to evaluate endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatory ability and to investigate disease mechanisms. For this study, we developed an X-ray intravital microscopy system using a microangiography technique and a synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8. An X-ray direct-conversion type detector with 7-μm spatial resolution was used for real-time imaging. Microangiographic images were stored in a digital frame memory system at a maximum rate of 30 frame/s with a 1024 × 1024-pixel, 10-bit format. In imaging experiments, the small coronary arteries were visualized after iodine contrast agent injection into the coronary artery.

  15. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated. PMID:27605489

  16. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-09-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated.

  17. Intravital fluorescence imaging of mouse brain using implantable semiconductor devices and epi-illumination of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Haruta, Makito; Nagasaki, Mizuki; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2015-05-01

    The application of the fluorescence imaging method to living animals, together with the use of genetically engineered animals and synthesized photo-responsive compounds, is a powerful method for investigating brain functions. Here, we report a fluorescence imaging method for the brain surface and deep brain tissue that uses compact and mass-producible semiconductor imaging devices based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. An image sensor chip was designed to be inserted into brain tissue, and its size was 1500 × 450 μm. Sample illumination is also a key issue for intravital fluorescence imaging. Hence, for the uniform illumination of the imaging area, we propose a new method involving the epi-illumination of living biological tissues, and we performed investigations using optical simulations and experimental evaluation.

  18. Long-term time-lapse multimodal intravital imaging of regeneration and bone-marrow-derived cell dynamics in skin

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Benedikt W.; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Adie, Steven G.; De Lisio, Michael; Valero, M. Carmen; Boppart, Marni D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for translating cell-based therapies is understanding the dynamics of cells and cell populations in complex in vivo environments. Intravital microscopy has shown great promise for directly visualizing cell behavior in vivo. However, current methods are limited to relatively short imaging times (hours), by ways to track cell and cell population dynamics over extended time-lapse periods (days to weeks to months), and by relatively few imaging contrast mechanisms that persist over extended investigations. We present technology to visualize and quantify complex, multifaceted dynamic changes in natural deformable skin over long time periods using novel multimodal imaging and a non-rigid image registration method. These are demonstrated in green fluorescent protein (GFP) bone marrow (BM) transplanted mice to study dynamic skin regeneration. This technology provides a novel perspective for studying dynamic biological processes and will enable future studies of stem, immune, and tumor cell biology in vivo. PMID:25089085

  19. Intravital fluorescence imaging of mouse brain using implantable semiconductor devices and epi-illumination of biological tissue

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Haruta, Makito; Nagasaki, Mizuki; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The application of the fluorescence imaging method to living animals, together with the use of genetically engineered animals and synthesized photo-responsive compounds, is a powerful method for investigating brain functions. Here, we report a fluorescence imaging method for the brain surface and deep brain tissue that uses compact and mass-producible semiconductor imaging devices based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. An image sensor chip was designed to be inserted into brain tissue, and its size was 1500 × 450 μm. Sample illumination is also a key issue for intravital fluorescence imaging. Hence, for the uniform illumination of the imaging area, we propose a new method involving the epi-illumination of living biological tissues, and we performed investigations using optical simulations and experimental evaluation. PMID:26137364

  20. Multiphoton microscopy and image guided light activated therapy using nanomaterials (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Paras N.

    2017-02-01

    This talk will focus on design and applications of nanomaterials exhibiting strong multiphoton upconversion for multiphoton microscopy as well as for image-guided and light activated therapy .1-3 Such processes can occur by truly nonlinear optical interactions proceeding through virtual intermediate states or by stepwise coupled linear excitations through real intermediate states. Multiphoton processes in biocompatible multifunctional nanoparticles allow for 3D deep tissue imaging. In addition, they can produce in-situ photon conversion of deep tissue penetrating near IR light into a needed shorter wavelength light for photo-activated therapy at a targeted site, thus overcoming the limited penetration of UV or visible light into biological media. We are using near IR emitters such as silicon quantum dots which also exhibit strong multiphoton excitation for multiphoton microscopy. Another approach involves nonlinear nanocrystals such as ZnO which can produce four wave mixing, sum frequency generation as well as second harmonic generation to convert a deep tissue penetrating Near IR light at the targeted biological site to a desired shorter wavelength light suitable for bio imaging or activation of a therapy. We have utilized this approach to activate a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy. Yet another type of upconversion materials is rare-earth ion doped optical nanotransformers which transform a Near IR (NIR) light from an external source by sequential single photon absorption, in situ and on demand, to a needed wavelength. Applications of these nanotransformers in multiphoton photoacoustic imaging will also be presented. An exciting direction pursued by us using these multiphoton nanoparticles, is functional imaging of brain. Simultaneously, they can effect optogenetics for regioselective stimulation of neurons for providing an effective intervention/augmentation strategy to enhance the cognitive state and lead to a foundation for futuristic vision of super

  1. Quantitative intravital two-photon excitation microscopy reveals absence of pulmonary vaso-occlusion in unchallenged Sickle Cell Disease mice.

    PubMed

    Bennewitz, Margaret F; Watkins, Simon C; Sundd, Prithu

    2014-07-07

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that leads to red blood cell (RBC) sickling, hemolysis and the upregulation of adhesion molecules on sickle RBCs. Chronic hemolysis in SCD results in a hyper-inflammatory state characterized by activation of circulating leukocytes, platelets and endothelial cells even in the absence of a crisis. A crisis in SCD is often triggered by an inflammatory stimulus and can lead to the acute chest syndrome (ACS), which is a type of lung injury and a leading cause of mortality among SCD patients. Although it is believed that pulmonary vaso-occlusion could be the phenomenon contributing to the development of ACS, the role of vaso-occlusion in ACS remains elusive. Intravital imaging of the cremaster microcirculation in SCD mice has been instrumental in establishing the role of neutrophil-RBC-endothelium interactions in systemic vaso-occlusion; however, such studies, although warranted, have never been done in the pulmonary microcirculation of SCD mice. Here, we show that two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy can be used to perform quantitative analysis of neutrophil and RBC trafficking in the pulmonary microcirculation of SCD mice. We provide the experimental approach that enables microscopic observations under physiological conditions and use it to show that RBC and neutrophil trafficking is comparable in SCD and control mice in the absence of an inflammatory stimulus. The intravital imaging scheme proposed in this study can be useful in elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanism of pulmonary vaso-occlusion in SCD mice following an inflammatory stimulus.

  2. Quantitative intravital two-photon excitation microscopy reveals absence of pulmonary vaso-occlusion in unchallenged Sickle Cell Disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Bennewitz, Margaret F; Watkins, Simon C; Sundd, Prithu

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that leads to red blood cell (RBC) sickling, hemolysis and the upregulation of adhesion molecules on sickle RBCs. Chronic hemolysis in SCD results in a hyper-inflammatory state characterized by activation of circulating leukocytes, platelets and endothelial cells even in the absence of a crisis. A crisis in SCD is often triggered by an inflammatory stimulus and can lead to the acute chest syndrome (ACS), which is a type of lung injury and a leading cause of mortality among SCD patients. Although it is believed that pulmonary vaso-occlusion could be the phenomenon contributing to the development of ACS, the role of vaso-occlusion in ACS remains elusive. Intravital imaging of the cremaster microcirculation in SCD mice has been instrumental in establishing the role of neutrophil-RBC-endothelium interactions in systemic vaso-occlusion; however, such studies, although warranted, have never been done in the pulmonary microcirculation of SCD mice. Here, we show that two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy can be used to perform quantitative analysis of neutrophil and RBC trafficking in the pulmonary microcirculation of SCD mice. We provide the experimental approach that enables microscopic observations under physiological conditions and use it to show that RBC and neutrophil trafficking is comparable in SCD and control mice in the absence of an inflammatory stimulus. The intravital imaging scheme proposed in this study can be useful in elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanism of pulmonary vaso-occlusion in SCD mice following an inflammatory stimulus. PMID:25995970

  3. The mouse cortical meninges are the site of immune responses to many different pathogens, and are accessible to intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Coles, Jonathan A; Stewart-Hutchinson, Phillip J; Myburgh, Elmarie; Brewer, James M

    2017-08-15

    A wide range of viral and microbial infections are known to cause meningitis, and there is evidence that the meninges are the gateway to pathogenic invasion of the brain parenchyma. Hence observation of these regions has wide application to understanding host-pathogen interactions. Interactions between pathogens and cells of the immune response can be modified by changes in their environment, such as suppression of the flow of blood and lymph, and, particularly in the case of the meninges, with their unsupported membranes, invasive dissection can alter the tissue architecture. For these reasons, intravital imaging through the unperforated skull is the method of choice. We give a protocol for a simple method of two-photon microscopy through the thinned cortical skull of the anesthetized mouse to enable real-time imaging with sub-micron resolution through the meninges and into the superficial brain parenchyma. In reporter mice in which selected cell types express fluorescent proteins, imaging after infection with fluorescent pathogens (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, Trypanosoma brucei or Plasmodium berghei) has shown strong recruitment to the cortical meninges of immune cells, including neutrophils, T cells, and putative dendritic cells and macrophages. Without special labeling, the boundaries between the dura mater, the leptomeninx, and the parenchyma are not directly visualized in intravital two-photon microscopy, but other landmarks and characteristics, which we illustrate, allow the researcher to identify the compartment being imaged. While most infectious meningitides are localized mainly in the dura mater, others involve recruitment of immune cells to the leptomeninx. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen

  5. Multiphoton Imaging of the Glomerular Permeability of Angiotensinogen

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Daisuke; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Burford, James L.; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Seidel, Saskia; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Nishiyama, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Patients and animals with renal injury exhibit increased urinary excretion of angiotensinogen. Although increased tubular synthesis of angiotensinogen contributes to the increased excretion, we do not know to what degree glomerular filtration of systemic angiotensinogen, especially through an abnormal glomerular filtration barrier, contributes to the increase in urinary levels. Here, we used multiphoton microscopy to visualize and quantify the glomerular permeability of angiotensinogen in the intact mouse and rat kidney. In healthy mice and Munich-Wistar-Frömter rats at the early stage of glomerulosclerosis, the glomerular sieving coefficient of systemically infused Atto565-labeled human angiotensinogen (Atto565-hAGT), which rodent renin cannot cleave, was only 25% of the glomerular sieving coefficient of albumin, and its urinary excretion was undetectable. In a more advanced phase of kidney disease, the glomerular permeability of Atto565-hAGT was slightly higher but still very low. Furthermore, unlike urinary albumin, the significantly higher urinary excretion of endogenous rat angiotensinogen did not correlate with either the Atto565-hAGT or Atto565-albumin glomerular sieving coefficients. These results strongly suggest that the vast majority of urinary angiotensinogen originates from the tubules rather than glomerular filtration. PMID:22997258

  6. Multiphoton imaging of the glomerular permeability of angiotensinogen.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Daisuke; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Burford, James L; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Seidel, Saskia; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2012-11-01

    Patients and animals with renal injury exhibit increased urinary excretion of angiotensinogen. Although increased tubular synthesis of angiotensinogen contributes to the increased excretion, we do not know to what degree glomerular filtration of systemic angiotensinogen, especially through an abnormal glomerular filtration barrier, contributes to the increase in urinary levels. Here, we used multiphoton microscopy to visualize and quantify the glomerular permeability of angiotensinogen in the intact mouse and rat kidney. In healthy mice and Munich-Wistar-Frömter rats at the early stage of glomerulosclerosis, the glomerular sieving coefficient of systemically infused Atto565-labeled human angiotensinogen (Atto565-hAGT), which rodent renin cannot cleave, was only 25% of the glomerular sieving coefficient of albumin, and its urinary excretion was undetectable. In a more advanced phase of kidney disease, the glomerular permeability of Atto565-hAGT was slightly higher but still very low. Furthermore, unlike urinary albumin, the significantly higher urinary excretion of endogenous rat angiotensinogen did not correlate with either the Atto565-hAGT or Atto565-albumin glomerular sieving coefficients. These results strongly suggest that the vast majority of urinary angiotensinogen originates from the tubules rather than glomerular filtration.

  7. Security of quantum key distribution with multiphoton components

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Mao, Yingqiu; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Most qubit-based quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols extract the secure key merely from single-photon component of the attenuated lasers. However, with the Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 (SARG04) QKD protocol, the unconditionally secure key can be extracted from the two-photon component by modifying the classical post-processing procedure in the BB84 protocol. Employing the merits of SARG04 QKD protocol and six-state preparation, one can extract secure key from the components of single photon up to four photons. In this paper, we provide the exact relations between the secure key rate and the bit error rate in a six-state SARG04 protocol with single-photon, two-photon, three-photon, and four-photon sources. By restricting the mutual information between the phase error and bit error, we obtain a higher secure bit error rate threshold of the multiphoton components than previous works. Besides, we compare the performances of the six-state SARG04 with other prepare-and-measure QKD protocols using decoy states. PMID:27383014

  8. In vivo multiphoton imaging of immune cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takaharu; Takahashi, Sonoko; Ishida, Azusa; Ishigame, Harumichi

    2016-11-01

    Multiphoton imaging has been utilized to analyze in vivo immune cell dynamics over the last 15 years. Particularly, it has deepened the understanding of how immune responses are organized by immune cell migration and interactions. In this review, we first describe the following technical advances in recent imaging studies that contributed to the new findings on the regulation of immune responses and inflammation. Improved multicolor imaging of immune cell behavior has revealed that their interactions are spatiotemporally coordinated to achieve efficient and long-term immunity. The use of photoactivatable and photoconvertible fluorescent proteins has increased duration and volume of cell tracking, even enabling the analysis of inter-organ migration of immune cells. In addition, visualization of immune cell activation using biosensors for intracellular calcium concentration and signaling molecule activities has started to give further mechanistic insights. Then, we also introduce recent imaging analyses of interactions between immune cells and non-immune cells including endothelial, fibroblastic, epithelial, and nerve cells. It is argued that future imaging studies that apply updated technical advances to analyze interactions between immune cells and non-immune cells will be important for thorough physiological understanding of the immune system.

  9. Identification of intramural metastasis in esophageal cancer using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Lin, jiangbo; Chen, Jianxin

    2017-02-01

    Intramural metastasis (IM) of esophageal cancer is defined as metastasis from a primary lesion to the esophageal wall without intraepithelial cancer extension. Esophageal cancer with IM is more common and such cases indicate a poor prognosis. In esophageal surgery, if curative resection is possible, the complete removal of both primary tumor and associated IMs is required. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of IMs in esophageal cancer prior to surgery is of particular importance. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) with subcellular resolution is well-suited for deep tissue imaging since many endogenous fluorophores of fresh biological tissues are excited through two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Here, a study to identify IM in fresh tissue section using MPM is reported. In this study, the morphological and spectral differences between IM and surrounding tissue are described. These results show that MPM has the ability to accurately identify IM in esophageal tissues. With improvement of the penetration depth of MPM and the development of multiphton microendoscope, MPM may be a promising imaging technique for preoperative diagnosis of IMs in esophageal cancer in the future.

  10. Multiphoton imaging the disruptive nature of sulfur mustard lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert J.; Braue, Catherine R.; Dillman, James F.

    2005-03-01

    Sulfur mustard [bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide] is a vesicating agent first used as a weapon of war in WWI. It causes debilitating blisters at the epidermal-dermal junction and involves molecules that are also disrupted by junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) and other blistering skin diseases. Despite its recurring use in global conflicts, there is still no completely effective treatment. We have shown by imaging human keratinocytes in cell culture and in intact epidermal tissues that the basal cells of skin contain well-organized molecules (keratins K5/K14, α6β4 integrin, laminin 5 and α3β1 integrin) that are early targets of sulfur mustard. Disruption and collapse of these molecules is coincident with nuclear displacement, loss of functional asymmetry, and loss of polarized mobility. The progression of this pathology precedes basal cell detachment by 8-24 h, a time equivalent to the "clinical latent phase" that defines the extant period between agent exposure and vesication. Our images indicate that disruption of adhesion-complex molecules also impairs cytoskeletal proteins and the integration of structures required for signal transduction and tissue repair. We have recently developed an optical system to test this hypothesis, i.e., to determine whether and how the early disruption of target molecules alters signal transduction. This environmentally controlled on-line system provides a nexus for real-time correlation of imaged lesions with DNA microarray analysis, and for using multiphoton microscopy to facilitate development of more effective treatment strategies.

  11. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Wernsing, Keith A.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-01-01

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2η below the diffraction limit, where η is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media. PMID:27231219

  12. Compact fixed wavelength femtosecond oscillators for multi-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, T.; Klein, J.; Zadoyan, R.; Baldacchini, T.; Franke, T.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years two-photon microscopy with fixed-wavelength has raised increasing interest in life-sciences: Two-photon (2P) absorption spectra of common dyes are broader than single-photon ones. Therefore, excitation of several dyes simultaneously with a single IR laser wavelength is feasible and could be seen as an advantage in 2P microscopy. We used pulsed fixed-wavelength infrared lasers with center wavelength at 1040 nm, for two-photon microscopy in a variety of biologically relevant samples, among these a mouse brain sample, a mouse artery (within the animal, acute preparation), and a preparation of mouse bladder. The 1040 nm laser proved to be efficient not only in exciting fluorescence from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and red fluorescent dyes, but also for second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from muscle tissue and collagen. With this work we demonstrate that economical, small-footprint fixedwavelength lasers can present an interesting alternative to tunable lasers that are commonly used in multiphoton microscopy.

  13. In vivo multiphoton microscopy of deep brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Levene, Michael J; Dombeck, Daniel A; Kasischke, Karl A; Molloy, Raymond P; Webb, Watt W

    2004-04-01

    Although fluorescence microscopy has proven to be one of the most powerful tools in biology, its application to the intact animal has been limited to imaging several hundred micrometers below the surface. The rest of the animal has eluded investigation at the microscopic level without excising tissue or performing extensive surgery. However, the ability to image with subcellular resolution in the intact animal enables a contextual setting that may be critical for understanding proper function. Clinical applications such as disease diagnosis and optical biopsy may benefit from minimally invasive in vivo approaches. Gradient index (GRIN) lenses with needle-like dimensions can transfer high-quality images many centimeters from the object plane. Here, we show that multiphoton microscopy through GRIN lenses enables minimally invasive, subcellular resolution several millimeters in the anesthetized, intact animal, and we present in vivo images of cortical layer V and hippocampus in the anesthetized Thy1-YFP line H mouse. Microangiographies from deep capillaries and blood vessels containing fluorescein-dextran and quantum dot-labeled serum in wild-type mouse brain are also demonstrated.

  14. The multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.P.

    1992-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy studies of UF{sub 6} have been conducted using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental ({lambda}=1064 nm) and its harmonics ({lambda}=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF{sub x}{sup +} fragment ions even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. The laser power dependence of U{sup n+} ions signals indicates that saturation can occur for many of the steps required for their ionization. In general, the doubly-charged uranium ion (U{sup 2+}) intensity is much greater than that of the singly-charged uranium ion (U{sup +}). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the U{sup n+} (n = 1- 4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The dominance of the U{sup 2+} ion and the absence or very small intensities of UF{sub x}{sup +} fragments, along with the unsaturated wavelength dependence, indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms after the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule.

  15. Dissecting multi-photon resonances at the large hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Bhatia, D.; Iyer, Abhishek M.

    2017-09-01

    We examine the phenomenology of the production, at the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC), of a heavy resonance X, which decays via other new on-shell particles n into multi-(i.e. three or more) photon final states. In the limit that n has a much smaller mass than X, the multi-photon final state may dominantly appear as a two-photon final state because the γ s from the n decay are highly collinear and remain unresolved. We discuss how to discriminate this scenario from X → γ γ : rather than discarding non-isolated photons, it is better to relax the isolation criteria and instead form photon jets substructure variables. The spins of X and n leave their imprint upon the distribution of pseudo-rapidity gap Δ η between the apparent two-photon states. Depending on the total integrated luminosity, this can be used in many cases to claim discrimination between the possible spin choices of X and n, although the case where X and n are both scalar particles cannot be discriminated from the direct X → γ γ decay in this manner. Information on the mass of n can be gained by considering the mass of each photon jet.

  16. Characterization of multiphoton emission from aggregated gold nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Akira; Lu, Phat; Kim, Youngsik; Milster, Tom D.

    2016-09-01

    Although gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are promising probes for biological imaging because of their attracting optical properties and bio-friendly nature, properties of the multi-photon (MP) emission from GNP aggregates produced by a short-wave infrared (SWIR) laser have not been examined. In this paper, characterization of MP emission from aggregated 50 nm GNPs excited by a femtosecond (fs) laser at 1560 nm is discussed with respect to aggregate structures. The key technique in this work is single particle spectroscopy. A pattern matching technique is applied to correlate MP emission and SEM images, which includes an optimization processes to maximize cross correlation coefficients between a binary microscope image and a binary SEM image with respect to xy displacement, image rotation angle, and image magnification. Once optimization is completed, emission spots are matched to the SEM image, which clarifies GNP ordering and emission properties of each aggregate. Correlation results showed that GNP aggregates have stronger MP emission than single GNPs. By combining the pattern matching technique with spectroscopy, MP emission spectrum is characterized for each GNP aggregate. A broad spectrum in the visible region and near infrared (NIR) region is obtained from GNP dimers, unlike previously reported surface plasmon enhanced emission spectrum.

  17. Dissociation dynamics of methanol clusters following multiphoton ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, S.; Castleman, A.W. Jr. )

    1989-06-01

    Following multiphoton ionization (MPI), neutral methanol clusters are found to undergo a well-known ion-molecule reaction which leads to the production of protonated clusters. Evaporative dissociation rates of the cluster ions are measured for sizes ranging from the dimer to the 21-mer following MPI. There is a general trend of the rates decreasing with time after the initial ionization event in accordance with the evaporative ensemble model. Rates measured at long times after ionization display a consistent trend of increasing with cluster size. These findings are shown to be in accord with statistical considerations of evaporative unimolecular dissociation. Collision-induced-dissociation cross sections are found to generally increase with size; the finding of a local minimum in the value for H{sup +}(CH{sub 3}OH){sub 3} is in agreement with predictions of its structure. Finally, through a combination of unimolecular evaporative and collision-induced-dissociation processes, as many as five methanol monomers are found to be lost from a cluster as small as H{sup +} (CH{sub 3}OH){sub 7}.

  18. Guided Homing of Cells in Multi-Photon Microfabricated Bioscaffolds.

    PubMed

    Skylar-Scott, Mark A; Liu, Man-Chi; Wu, Yuelong; Dixit, Atray; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-05-01

    Tissues contain exquisite vascular microstructures, and patterns of chemical cues for directing cell migration, homing, and differentiation for organ development and function. 3D microfabrication by multi-photon photolithography is a flexible, high-resolution tool for generating 3D bioscaffolds. However, the combined fabrication of scaffold microstructure simultaneously with patterning of cues to create both geometrically and chemically defined microenvironments remains to be demonstrated. This study presents a high-speed method for micron-resolution fabrication of scaffold microstructure and patterning of protein cues simultaneously using native scaffold materials. By the simultaneous microfabrication of arbitrary microvasculature geometries, and patterning selected regions of the microvasculature with the homing ligand P-selectin, this study demonstrates adhesion, rolling, and selective homing of cells in defined 3D regions. This novel ability to generate high-resolution geometries replete with patterned cues at high speed enables the construction of biomimetic microenvironments for complex 3D assays of cellular behavior. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Characterization of powdered epidermal vaccine delivery with multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, William J.; Kendall, Mark A. F.; White, Nick; Bellhouse, Brian J.

    2004-11-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) has been adapted to non-invasively characterize hand-held powdered epidermal vaccine delivery technology. A near infrared femtosecond pulsed laser, wavelength at approximately 920 nm, was used to evoke autofluorescence of endogenous fluorophores within ex vivo porcine and human skin. Consequently, sub cellular resolution three-dimensional images of stratum corneum and viable epidermal cells were acquired and utilized to observe the morphological deformation of these cells as a result of micro-particle penetration. Furthermore, the distributional pattern of micro-particles within the specific skin target volume was quantified by measuring the penetration depth as revealed by serial optical sections in the axial plane obtained with MPLSM. Additionally, endogenous fluorescence contrast images acquired at the supra-basal layer reveal cellular structures that may pertain to dendritic Langerhans cells of the epidermis. These results show that MPLSM has advantages over conventional histological approaches, since three-dimensional functional images with sub-cellular spatial resolution to depths beyond the epidermis can be acquired non-invasively. Accordingly, we propose that MPLSM is ideal for investigations of powdered epidermal vaccine delivery.

  20. Spectroscopic analysis of skin intrinsic signals for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Strupler, Mathias; Boulesteix, Thierry; Senni, Karim; Godeau, Gaston; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2006-02-01

    We recorded multiphoton images of human skin biopsies using endogenous sources of nonlinear optical signals. We detected simultaneously two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) from intrinsic fluorophores and second harmonic generation (SHG) from collagen. We observed SHG from fibrillar collagens in the dermis, whereas no SHG was detectable from the non fibrillar type IV collagen in the basal laminae. We compared these distinct behaviours of collagens I and IV in SHG microscopy to polarization-resolved surface SHG experiments on thin films of collagens I and IV molecules. We observed similar signals for both types of molecular films, except for the chiroptical contributions which are present only for collagen I and enhance the signal typically by a factor of 2. We concluded that SHG microscopy is a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in biological tissues. In order to elucidate the origin of the endogenous fluorescence signals, we recorded 2PEF spectra at various positions in the skin biopsies, and compared these data to in vitro spectroscopic analysis. In particular, we studied the keratin fluorescence and determined its 2PEF action cross section. We observed a good agreement between 2PEF spectra recorded in the keratinized upper layers of the epidermis and in a solution of purified keratin. Finally, to illustrate the capabilities of this technique, we recorded 2PEF/SHG images of skin biopsies obtained from patients of various ages.

  1. The analysis of aging skin based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiaoman; Li, Zhifang; Xu, Shufei

    2010-11-01

    Aging is a very important issue not only in dermatology, but also in cosmetic science. Cutaneous aging involves both chronological and photoaging aging process. The chronological aging is induced with the passage of time. And the photoaging skin is the extrinsic aging caused by sun exposure. The aim of this study is to use multiphoton microscopy (MPM) in vivo to assess intrinsic-age-related and photo-age-related difference. The changes of dermal collagen are measured in quantitively. The algorithm that we used automatically produced the transversal dermal map from MPM. Others, the texture of dermis are analyzed by Fourier transform and Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix. And the object extraction in textured images is proposed based on the method in object edge extraction, and the aim of it is to detect the object hidden in the skin texture in difference aging skin. The result demonstrates that the approach is effective in detecting the object in epidermis and dermis textured image in different aging skin. It could help to further understand the aging mechanism.

  2. Direct trabecular meshwork imaging in porcine eyes through multiphoton gonioscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Gibson, Emily A.; Lei, Tim C.

    2013-03-01

    The development of technologies to characterize the ocular aqueous outflow system (AOS) is important for the understanding of the pathophysiology of glaucoma. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) offers the advantage of high-resolution, label-free imaging with intrinsic image contrast because the emitted signals result from the specific biomolecular content of the tissue. Previous attempts to use MPM to image the murine irido-corneal region directly through the sclera have suffered from degradation in image resolution due to scattering of the focused laser light. As a result, transscleral MPM has limited ability to observe fine structures in the AOS. In this work, the porcine irido-corneal angle was successfully imaged through the transparent cornea using a gonioscopic lens to circumvent the highly scattering scleral tissue. The resulting high-resolution images allowed the detailed structures in the trabecular meshwork (TM) to be observed. Multimodal imaging by two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation allowed visualization of different features in the TM without labels and without disruption of the TM or surrounding tissues. MPM gonioscopy is a promising noninvasive imaging tool for high-resolution studies of the AOS, and research continues to explore the potential for future clinical applications in humans.

  3. Superresolved multiphoton microscopy with spatial frequency-modulated imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Wernsing, Keith A.; Domingue, Scott R.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.; DeLuca, Keith F.; Levi, Dean H.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.; Young, Michael D.; Squier, Jeff A.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-05-26

    Superresolved far-field microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for investigating the structure of objects with resolution well below the diffraction limit of light. Nearly all superresolution imaging techniques reported to date rely on real energy states of fluorescent molecules to circumvent the diffraction limit, preventing superresolved imaging with contrast mechanisms that occur via virtual energy states, including harmonic generation (HG). We report a superresolution technique based on spatial frequency-modulated imaging (SPIFI) that permits superresolved nonlinear microscopy with any contrast mechanism and with single-pixel detection. We show multimodal superresolved images with two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from biological and inorganic media. Multiphoton SPIFI (MP-SPIFI) provides spatial resolution up to 2..eta.. below the diffraction limit, where ..eta.. is the highest power of the nonlinear intensity response. MP-SPIFI can be used to provide enhanced resolution in optically thin media and may provide a solution for superresolved imaging deep in scattering media.

  4. Label-free imaging of cortical structures with multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu; Chen, Xiuqiang; Wu, Weilin; Chen, Zhida; Lin, Ruolan; Lin, Peihua; Wang, Xingfu; Fu, Yu Vincent; Chen, Jianxin

    2017-02-01

    Cortical structures in the central nervous system exhibit an ordered laminar organization. Defined cell layers are significant to our understanding of brain structure and function. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), which was applied for qualitatively visualizing the structure of cerebral and cerebellar cortex from the fresh, unfixed, and unstained specimen. MPM is able to effectively identify neurons and neurites in cerebral cortex, as well as glial cells, Purkinje cells, and granule cells in cerebellar cortex at subcellular resolution. In addition, the use of automated image processing algorithms can quantify the circularity of neurons and the density distribution of neurites based on the intrinsic nonlinear optical contrast, further providing quantitative characteristics for automatically analyzing the laminar structure of cortical structures. These results suggest that with the development of the feasibility of two-photon fiberscopes and microendoscope probes, the combined MPM and image analysis holds potential to provide supplementary information to augment the diagnostic accuracy of neuropathology and in vivo identification of various neurological illnesses in clinic.

  5. Multiphoton, confocal, and lifetime microscopy for molecular imaging in cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Krakow, Deborah; Kirilova, Veneta T.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Bertolotto, Cristina; Acuna, Dora; Fang, Qiyin; Krivorov, Nikola; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2005-03-01

    It has recently been shown that mutations in Filamin A and B genes produce a large spectrum of skeletal disorders in developing fetuses. However, high-resolution optical microscopy in cartilage growth plate using fluorescent antibody assays, which should elucidate molecular aspects of these disorders, is extremely difficult due to the high level of autofluoresce in this tissue. We apply multiphoton, confocal, lifetime and spectral microscopy to (i) image and characterize autofluorophores in chondrocytes and subtract their contributions to obtain a corrected antibody-marker fluorescence signal, and (ii) measure the interaction between Filamin A and B proteins by detecting the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between markers of the two proteins. Taking advantage of the different fluorescence spectra of the endogenous and exogenous markers, we can significantly reduce the autofluorescence background. Preliminary results of the FRET experiments suggest no interaction between Filamin A and B proteins. However, developing of new antibodies targeting the carboxy-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain may be necessary to confirm this result.

  6. Multiphoton catalysis with coherent state input: nonclassicality and decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Yun; Wu, Jia-Ni; Liao, Zeyang; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-09-01

    We propose a scheme to generate a new kind of non-Gaussian state—the Laguerre polynomial excited coherent state (LPECS)—by using multiphoton catalysis with coherent state input. The nonclassical properties of the LPECS are studied in terms of nonclassical depth, Mandel’s parameter, second-order correlation, quadrature squeezing, and the negativity of the Wigner function (WF). It is found that the LPECS is highly nonclassical and its nonclassicality depends on the amplitude of the coherent state, the catalysis photon number, and the parameters of the unbalanced beam splitter (BS). In particular, the maximum degree of squeezing can be enhanced by increasing the catalysis photon number. In addition, we examine the effect of decoherence using the WF, which shows that the negative region, the characteristic time of decoherence, and the structure of the WF are affected by catalysis photon number and the parameters of the unbalanced BS. Our work provides general analysis on how to prepare polynomial quantum states, which may be useful in the fields of quantum information and quantum computation.

  7. Label-Free Detection of Breast Masses Using Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianping; Zhu, Weifeng; Qiu, Jingting; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Histopathology forms the gold standard for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has been proposed to be a potentially powerful adjunct to current histopathological techniques. A label-free imaging based on two- photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation is developed for differentiating normal breast tissues, benign, as well as breast cancer tissues. Human breast biopsies (including human normal breast tissues, benign as well as breast cancer tissues ) that are first imaged (fresh, unfixed, and unstained) with MPM and are then processed for routine H-E histopathology. Our results suggest that the MPM images, obtained from these unprocessed biopsies, can readily distinguish between benign lesions and breast cancers. In the tissues of breast cancers, MPM showed that the tumor cells displayed marked cellular and nuclear pleomorphism. The tumor cells, characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei, and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, infiltrated into disrupted connective tissue, leading to the loss of second-harmonic generation signals. For breast cancer, MPM diagnosis was 100% correct because the tissues of breast cancers did not have second-harmonic generation signals in MPM imaging. On the contrary, in benign breast masses, second-harmonic generation signals could be seen easily in MPM imaging. These observations indicate that MPM could be an important potential tool to provide label-free noninvasive diagnostic impressions that can guide surgeon in biopsy and patient management. PMID:23755295

  8. Multiphoton gonioscopy to image the trabecular meshwork of porcine eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Gibson, Emily A.; Lei, Tim C.

    2013-03-01

    The aqueous outflow system (AOS), including the trabecular meshwork (TM), the collector channels (CC) and the Schlemm's canal (SC), regulates intraocular pressure (IOP) through the drainage of the aqueous humor (AH). Abnormal IOP elevation leads to increased pressure stress to retinal ganglion cells, resulting in cell loss that can ultimately lead to complete loss of eyesight. Therefore, development of imaging tools to detect abnormal structural and functional changes of the AOS is important in early diagnosis and prevention of glaucoma. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), including twophoton autofluorescence (TPAF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), is a label-free microscopic technique that allows molecular specific imaging of biological tissues like the TM. Since the TM and other AOS structures are located behind the highly scattering scleral tissue, transscleral imaging of the TM does not provide enough optical resolution. In this work, a gonioscopic lens is used to allow direct optical access of the TM through the cornea for MPM imaging. Compared to transscleral imaging, the acquired MPM images show improved resolution as individual collagen fiber bundles of the TM can be observed. MPM gonioscopy may have the potential to be developed as a future clinical imaging tool for glaucoma diagnostics.

  9. Application of Multiphoton Microscopy in Dermatological Studies: a Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Elijah; Rowlands, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the historical and more recent developments of multiphoton microscopy, as applied to dermatology. Multiphoton microscopy offers several advantages over competing microscopy techniques: there is an inherent axial sectioning, penetration depths that compete well with confocal microscopy on account of the use of near-infrared light, and many two-photon contrast mechanisms, such as second-harmonic generation, have no analogue in one-photon microscopy. While the penetration depths of photons into tissue are typically limited on the order of hundreds of microns, this is of less concern in dermatology, as the skin is thin and readily accessible. As a result, multiphoton microscopy in dermatology has generated a great deal of interest, much of which is summarized here. The review covers the interaction of light and tissue, as well as the various considerations that must be made when designing an instrument. The state of multiphoton microscopy in imaging skin cancer and various other diseases is also discussed, along with the investigation of aging and regeneration phenomena, and finally, the use of multiphoton microscopy to analyze the transdermal transport of drugs, cosmetics and other agents is summarized. The review concludes with a look at potential future research directions, especially those that are necessary to push these techniques into widespread clinical acceptance. PMID:25075226

  10. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. I. Canonical formalism and homodyne squeezed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Anno, Fabio; de Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a formalism of nonlinear canonical transformations for general systems of multiphoton quantum optics. For single-mode systems the transformations depend on a tunable free parameter, the homodyne local-oscillator angle; for n -mode systems they depend on n heterodyne mixing angles. The canonical formalism realizes nontrivial mixing of pairs of conjugate quadratures of the electromagnetic field in terms of homodyne variables for single-mode systems, and in terms of heterodyne variables for multimode systems. In the first instance the transformations yield nonquadratic model Hamiltonians of degenerate multiphoton processes and define a class of non-Gaussian, nonclassical multiphoton states that exhibit properties of coherence and squeezing. We show that such homodyne multiphoton squeezed states are generated by unitary operators with a nonlinear time evolution that realizes the homodyne mixing of a pair of conjugate quadratures. Tuning of the local-oscillator angle allows us to vary at will the statistical properties of such states. We discuss the relevance of the formalism for the study of degenerate (up-)down-conversion processes. In a companion paper [

    F. Dell’Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, 69, 033813 (2004)
    ], we provide the extension of the nonlinear canonical formalism to multimode systems, we introduce the associated heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states, and we discuss their possible experimental realization.

  11. Multiphoton fluorescent images with a spatially varying background signal: a ML deconvolution method.

    PubMed

    Crivaro, M; Enjieu-Kadji, H; Hatanaka, R; Nakauchi, S; Bosch, J; Judin, J; Riera, J; Kawashima, R

    2011-06-01

    By means of multiphoton laser scanning microscopy, neuroscientists can look inside the brain deeper than has ever been possible before. Multiphoton fluorescent images, as all optical images, suffer from degradation caused by a variety of sources (e.g. light dispersion and absorption in the tissue, laser fluctuations, spurious photodetection and staining deficiency). From a modelling perspective, such degradations can be considered the sum of stochastic noise and a background signal. Among the methods proposed in the literature to perform image deconvolution in either confocal or multiphoton fluorescent microscopy, Vicidomini et al. (2009) were the first to incorporate models for noise (a Poisson process) and background signal (spatially constant) in the context of regularized inverse problems. Unfortunately, the so-called split-gradient deconvolution method (SGM) they used did not consider possible spatial variations in the background signal. In this paper, we extend the SGM by adding a maximum-likelihood estimation step for the determination of a spatially varying background signal. We demonstrate that the assumption of a constant background is not always valid in multiphoton laser microscopy and by using synthetic and actual multiphoton fluorescent images, we evaluate the face of validity of the proposed method, and compare its accuracy with the previously introduced SGM algorithm.

  12. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. I. Canonical formalism and homodyne squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a formalism of nonlinear canonical transformations for general systems of multiphoton quantum optics. For single-mode systems the transformations depend on a tunable free parameter, the homodyne local-oscillator angle; for n-mode systems they depend on n heterodyne mixing angles. The canonical formalism realizes nontrivial mixing of pairs of conjugate quadratures of the electromagnetic field in terms of homodyne variables for single-mode systems, and in terms of heterodyne variables for multimode systems. In the first instance the transformations yield nonquadratic model Hamiltonians of degenerate multiphoton processes and define a class of non-Gaussian, nonclassical multiphoton states that exhibit properties of coherence and squeezing. We show that such homodyne multiphoton squeezed states are generated by unitary operators with a nonlinear time evolution that realizes the homodyne mixing of a pair of conjugate quadratures. Tuning of the local-oscillator angle allows us to vary at will the statistical properties of such states. We discuss the relevance of the formalism for the study of degenerate (up-)down-conversion processes. In a companion paper [F. Dell'Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, 69, 033813 (2004)], we provide the extension of the nonlinear canonical formalism to multimode systems, we introduce the associated heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states, and we discuss their possible experimental realization.

  13. Possibility of efficient generation of multiphoton entangled states using a one-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Yunxia; Zhang Xiangdong

    2010-03-15

    A rigorous quantum theory for the generation of multiphoton entangled states based on two consecutive three-frequency interactions of waves in a one-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal is developed using the field expansion and differentiation methods. The three-photon correlation coefficient and the average photon numbers generated in the structure are calculated. All order expansion terms are included in the calculation. The generation conditions for multiphoton entangled states in such a structure are also analyzed. It is shown that the created photons in the present structures obey the super-Poisson statistics at the interacting frequencies and are in a multiparticle entangled state. This means the nonlinear photonic crystal can be applied as a highly efficient source of an entangled multiphoton for highly integrated all-optical circuits.

  14. Label-free multiphoton imaging and photoablation of preinvasive cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Wu, Guizhu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan; Xie, Shusen

    2012-01-01

    Detection and treatment of early lesions in epithelial tissue offer several possibilities for curing cancer, but it is challenging. Here, we present an optical technique, the combination of multiphoton imaging and absorption, to label-freely detect and ablate preinvasive cancer cells in epithelial tissue. We find that multiphoton imaging can label-freely visualize the principal features of nuclear atypia associated with epithelial precancerous lesions, and the spatial localization of multiphoton absorption can perform targeted ablation of preinvasive cancer cells with micrometer-sized volume precision. These results indicate that this optical technique has the capability to label-freely visualize and remove preinvasive cancer cells in epithelial tissue. This study highlights the potential of this technique as a "seek-and-treat" tool for early lesions in epithelial tissue.

  15. Distinguishing human normal or cancerous esophagus tissue ex vivo using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G. N.; Wu, S. S.; Chen, R.

    2014-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to clinical cancer research has greatly developed over the last few years. In this paper, we mainly focus on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for investigating esophageal cancer. We chiefly discuss the SHG/TPEF image and spectral characteristics of normal and cancerous esophagus submucosa with the combined multi-channel imaging mode and Lambda mode of a multiphoton microscope (LSM 510 META). Great differences can be detected, such as collagen content and morphology, glandular-shaped cancer cells, TPEF/SHG intensity ratio, and so on, which demonstrate that the multiphoton imaging technique has the potential ability for minimally-invasive early cancer diagnosis.

  16. Theory of Multiphoton Multielectron Ionization of Xenon under Strong 93-eV Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Makris, M. G.; Lambropoulos, P.; Mihelic, A.

    2009-01-23

    We present a theoretical interpretation of recent experimental results on multiphoton multiple ionization of xenon by soft-x-ray radiation of photon energy {approx}93 eV and intensity up to 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}[A. A Sorokin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 213002 (2007)]. The data are interpreted within multiphoton perturbation theory, taking into account the spatiotemporal distribution of the radiation. Multiphoton cross sections have been obtained through a technique of scaling, with occasional adjustment to the data, provided the two prove to be compatible. Whatever discrepancies between theory and experiment persist can be reasonably attributed to some uncertainty in the experimental conditions and possibly to the value of some cross sections, without, however, any evidence for nonperturbative behavior.

  17. Ultrafast pulse-pair control in multiphoton fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    De, Arijit Kumar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    In multiphoton fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy, ultrafast laser pulses [i.e., light pulses having pulse width multiphoton absorption cross-sections of common fluorophores. Because of the broad overlapping two-photon absorption spectra of fluorophores and the large spectral bandwidth of a short pulse, simultaneous excitation of many fluorophores is common, which justifies a persistent demand for selective excitation of individual fluorophores. We describe the use of pulse-pair excitation with possibilities of controlling molecular fluorescence in laser-scanning microscopy and compare it with coherent control using pulse sequence [De and Goswami, "Coherent control in multiphoton fluorescence imaging," Proc. SPIE 7183, 71832B (2009)].

  18. Three-dimensional tooth imaging using multiphoton and second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min-Huey; Chen, Wei-Liang; Sun, Yen; Fwu, Peter Tramyeon; Lin, Ming-Gu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-02-01

    Detailed morphological and cellular information relating to the human tooth have traditionally been obtained through histological studies that required decalcification, staining, and fixation. With the recent invention of multiphoton microscopy, it has become possible to acquire high resolution images without histological procedures. Using an epiilluminated multiphoton microscope, we obtained two-photon excited autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) images of ex vivo human tooth. By combining these two imaging modalities we obtained submicron resolution images of the enamel, dentin, and the periodontal ligaments. The enamel emits endogenous two-photon autofluorescence. The structure of the dentin is visible from both the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signals. The periodontal ligament composed mostly of collagen can be visualized by SHG imaging. We also constructed three dimensional images of the enamel, dentin, and periodontal ligament. The effectiveness of using multiphoton and second harmonic generation microscopy to obtain structural information of teeth suggest its potential use in dental diagnostics.

  19. Kerr nonlinearity and multi-photon absorption in germanium at mid-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, B.-U.; Monmeyran, C.; Kimerling, L. C.; Agarwal, A. M.; Tan, D. T. H.

    2017-08-01

    Multiphoton absorption coefficients and nonlinear refractive indices of germanium in the near and mid-infrared (2-5 μm) are reported. The nonlinear coefficients are measured by open and closed aperture Z-scan with 150 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 1 kHz. The nonlinear refractive index of Ge has a peak value of 9.1 ×10-5cm2/GW at a wavelength of 3 μm. The effect of free electrons generated by multiphoton absorption is discussed by investigating the variation of multiphoton absorption coefficients at different input powers. Kramers-Kronig relations are also discussed with regard to the relationship between nonlinear refractive index and two photon absorption coefficient.

  20. In vivo microscopy of the mouse brain using multiphoton laser scanning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Elizabeth J.

    2002-06-01

    The use of multiphoton microscopy for imaging mouse brain in vivo offers several advantages and poses several challenges. This tutorial begins by briefly comparing multiphoton microscopy with other imaging modalities used to visualize the brain and its activity. Next, an overview of the techniques for introducing fluorescence into whole animals to generate contrast for in vivo microscopy using two-photon excitation is presented. Two different schemes of surgically preparing mice for brain imaging with multiphoton microscopy are reviewed. Then, several issues and problems with in vivo microscopy - including motion artifact, respiratory and cardiac rhythms, maintenance of animal health, anesthesia, and the use of fiducial markers - are discussed. Finally, examples of how these techniques have been applied to visualize the cerebral vasculature and its response to hypercapnic stimulation are provided.

  1. Two-photon imaging of intact living plants during freezing with a flexible multiphoton tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; König, K.

    2015-02-01

    We describe the combination of a flexible multiphoton tomograph (MPTflex) with a heating and cooling stage. The stage allows temperature control in the range of (-196 °C) (77 K) to +600 °C (873 K) with selectable heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K min-1 and 150 K min-1. To illustrate the imaging capabilities of the combined system, fluorescence intensity and lifetime of intrinsic molecules from a plant leaf were imaged with submicron resolution during freezing in vivo without detaching the leaf from the plant. An increase of fluorescence intensity and decay times with decreasing temperature was observed. The measurements illustrate the usefulness of multiphoton imaging as a non-invasive online tool to investigate temperature-induced effects. The flexible multiphoton tomograph with its adjustable mechano-optical arm and scan head allows imaging at otherwise hardly accessible sample regions.

  2. Real-time optical diagnosis of gastric cancer with serosal invasion using multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Zheng, Yu; Zheng, Xiaoling; Liu, Zhangyuanzhu; Liu, Wenju; Chen, Dexin; Dong, Xiaoyu; Li, Kai; Liu, Xiumin; Chen, Gang; Lu, Jianping; Chen, Jianxin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Li, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    A real-time optical biopsy, which could determine tissue histopathology, would be of extraordinary benefit to staging laparoscopy for gastric cancer with serosal invasion (T4) that requires downstage treatment. We investigated the feasibility of using multiphoton imaging to perform a real-time optical diagnosis of gastric cancer with or without serosal invasion. First, a pilot study was performed to establish the optical diagnostic features of gastric cancer with or without serosal invasion using multiphoton imaging compared with hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson’s trichrome staining. Second, a blinded study was performed to compare the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of multiphoton imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for T4 gastric cancer. In the pilot study, multiphoton imaging revealed collagen loss and degradation and cellular and nuclear pleomorphism in gastric cancer with serosal invasion. The collagen content in gastric cancer with or without serosal invasion was 0.36 ± 0.18 and 0.79 ± 0.16 (p < 0.001), respectively. In the blinded study, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of EUS and multiphoton imaging for T4 gastric cancer were 70% and 90% (p = 0.029), 66.67% and 96.67% (p = 0.003), and 68.33% and 93.33% (p = 0.001), respectively. It is feasible to use multiphoton imaging to make a real-time optical diagnosis of gastric cancer with or without serosal invasion. PMID:27499365

  3. Multiphoton absorption in graphene and metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiqiang, Chen

    Materials possessing large multiphoton absorption are of direct relevance to both photonics applications and materials physics. In this dissertation, we present our investigations into two novel materials: namely, (1) graphene and (2) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The dissertation divides into two parts. The first part of the dissertation reports our systematical Z-scan measurements onto two-photon absorption (2PA) in graphene in the spectral range of 435-1100 nm with femtosecond laser pulses. We report that the measured 2PA coefficients of graphene in the near-infrared (NIR) range of 800-1100 nm can be explained by a theoretical model based on the optical transitions near the Dirac point (K point). We also determine the 2PA coefficients of graphene in the visible spectrum (435-700 nm) and observe an enhancement induced by the excitonic Fano resonance at the saddle point (M point). By applying the second-order, time-dependent perturbation theory on interband transitions among three states near the saddle point, we develop a semi-empirical model to take excitons in graphene into consideration. And the model is in agreement with the photon-energy dependence of the observed 2PA spectrum with a scaling factor of B = (1 5) x 102 cm/MW/eV5. Our results verify, for the first time, that the excitonic Fano resonance plays an important role for the 2PA of graphene in the visible spectrum. Besides, we also detail our measurements on the spectral dependence of one-photon absorption (1PA) saturation in graphene over the visible-NIR range. A quadratic photon energy dependence of the measured saturation intensity/fluence is observed over the investigated spectral range. The underlying photo-dynamics is discussed. In the second part of the dissertation, we investigate multiphoton excited photoluminescence (MEPL) from three solid-state crystals of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs): (1) [Zn2(trans,trans-4,4 stilbenedicarboxylic acid (SDC))2(trans, trans-9, 10-bis (4-pyridylethenyl

  4. Rapid diagnosis of liver fibrosis using multimodal multiphoton nonlinear optical microspectroscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Kim, Jong Chul; Tae, Giyoong; Oh, Myoung-Kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2013-07-01

    A multimodal multiphoton nonlinear optical (NLO) microspectroscopy imaging system was developed using a femtosecond laser and a photonic crystal fiber. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy was combined with two-photon excitation fluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy in one platform and the system was applied to diagnose liver fibrosis. Normal and liver fibrosis tissues were clearly distinguished with the great difference from CARS spectra as well as multimodal multiphoton NLO images. We expect the system to be a rapid diagnosis tool for liver fibrosis at tissue level with label-free imaging of significant biochemical components.

  5. Diagrammatic analysis of multiphoton processes in a ladder-type three-level atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Moon, Han Seb

    2011-11-15

    We present a diagrammatic method for complete characterization of multiphoton processes in three-level atomic systems. By considering the interaction routes of the coupling and probe photons for a ladder-type, three-level, noncycling (or cycling) atomic system, we are able to completely discriminate between the pure one-photon and the pure two-photon resonance effects, and the effect of their combination in electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using our diagrammatic method. We show that the proposed diagrammatic method is very useful for the analysis of multiphoton processes in ladder-type EIT.

  6. Multiphoton adaptation of a commercial low-cost confocal microscope for live tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, James J; Larson, Adam M; Wensel, Theodore G; Saggau, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Nikon C1 confocal laser scanning microscope is a relatively inexpensive and user-friendly instrument. We describe a straightforward method to convert the C1 for multiphoton microscopy utilizing direct coupling of a femtosecond near-infrared laser into the scan head and fiber optic transmission of emission light to the three-channel detector box. Our adapted system can be rapidly switched between confocal and multiphoton mode, requires no modification to the original system, and uses only a few custom-made parts. The entire system, including scan mirrors and detector box, remain under the control of the user-friendly Nikon EZ-C1 software without modification.

  7. Switching the vibrational excitation of a polyatomic ion in multi-photon strong field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuzhu; Gerber, Thomas; Radi, Peter; Sych, Yaroslav; Knopp, Gregor

    2014-08-01

    The multiphoton ionization (MPI) of CH3I has been investigated by angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy as a function of femtosecond laser excitation intensity. A sudden change in the electron kinetic energy is observed above a specific field strength. The multiphoton excitation at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm becomes vibronically resonant due to Stark shifting of intermediate Rydberg state levels. The present letter gives an experimental evidence for ultrafast optical control of the vibrational excitation in a polyatomic ion by adjusting the intensity of a femtosecond laser pulse.

  8. Suppression of Multiphoton Resonances in Driven Quantum Systems via Pulse Shape Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Dumont, Joey; Lefebvre, Catherine; MacLean, Steve

    2017-08-01

    This Letter demonstrates control over multiphoton absorption processes in driven two-level systems, which include, for example, superconducting qubits or laser-irradiated graphene, through spectral shaping of the driving pulse. Starting from calculations based on Floquet theory, we use differential evolution, a general purpose optimization algorithm, to find the Fourier coefficients of the driving function that suppress a given multiphoton resonance in the strong field regime. We show that the suppression of the transition probability is due to the coherent superposition of high-order Fourier harmonics which closes the dynamical gap between the Floquet states of the two-level system.

  9. Reversed interplay of quantum interference and which-way information in multiphoton entangled states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Young-Sik; Tichy, Malte C.; Lim, Hyang-Tag; Gneiting, Clemens; Mølmer, Klaus; Buchleitner, Andreas; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2017-08-01

    We report experimental studies of quantum interference of multiphoton states impinging on a two-port balanced beam splitter. When the distinguishability between the two input paths is increased, we observe a reduction followed by a resurgence of the interference visibility in multiphoton coincidence detection. We ascribe this unusual behavior to the competition among contributions from distinct number state components of the interfering fields. Our results suggest that wave-particle duality gives rise to a wide range of largely unexplored phenomena in multiparticle interference.

  10. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Ross A.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Ascenzi, Daniela; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Buma, Wybren Jan; Scheper, Connie R.; de Lange, Cornelis A.

    1996-08-01

    Rydberg excited states of the OCS molecule in the energy range 70500-86000 cm-1 have been investigated via the two and three photon resonance enhancements they provide in the mass resolved multiphoton ionization (MPI) spectrum of a jet-cooled sample of the parent molecule. Spectral interpretation has been assisted by companion measurements of the kinetic energies of the photoelectrons that accompany the various MPI resonances. The present study supports the earlier conclusions of Weinkauf and Boesl [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 4459 (1993)] regarding five Rydberg origins in the 70500-73000 cm-1 energy range, attributable to, respectively, states of 3Π, 1Π, 3Δ, 1Δ and 1Σ+ symmetry arising from the 4pλ←3π orbital promotion. We also identify a further 21 Rydberg origins at higher energies. These partition into clumps with quantum defects ca. 3.5 and 4.5, which we associate with the orbital promotions npλ←3π (n=5,6), and others with near integer quantum defect which are interpretable in terms of excitation to s,d and (possibly) f Rydberg orbitals. We also identify MPI resonances attributable to CO(X 1Σ+) fragments and to S atoms in both their ground (3P) and excited (1D) electronic states. Analysis of the former resonances confirms that the CO(X) fragments resulting from one photon dissociation of OCS at excitation wavelengths ca. 230 nm are formed with a highly inverted, bimodal rotational state population distribution, whilst the latter are consistent with previous reports of the wavelength dependence for forming ground and excited state S atoms in the near uv photolysis of OCS.

  11. Large field of view multiphoton microscopy of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Mihaela; Mikami, Hideharu; Hou, Jue; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-03-01

    Clinical examination crucially relies on the ability to quickly examine large tissue areas and rapidly zoom in to regions of interest. Skin lesions often show irregularity in color and appearance in general, especially when they start to progress towards malignancy. Large field of view (FOV) and automatic translation of the imaging area are critical in the assessment of the entire lesion. Imaging of limited FOVs of the lesion can easily result in false negative diagnosis. We present a multiphoton microscope based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation that images FOVs of about 0.8 mm2 (without stitching adjacent FOVs) at speeds of 10 frames/second (800 x 800 pixels) with lateral and axial resolutions of 0.5 μm and 2.5 μm, respectively. The main novelty of this instrument is the design of the scan head, which includes a fast galvanometric scanner, relay optics, a beam expander and a high NA objective lens. We optimized the system based on the Olympus 25x, 1.05NA water immersion lens, that features a long working distance of 1 mm. Proper tailoring of the beam expander, which consists of the scan and tube lens elements, enables scaling of the FOV. The design criteria include a flat wavefront of the beam, minimum field curvature, and suppressed spherical aberrations. All aberrations in focus are below the Marechal criterion of 0.07λ rms for diffraction-limited performance. We demonstrate the practical utility of this microscope by ex-vivo imaging of wide FOVs in normal human skin.

  12. Particle modeling of microplasma generated by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholeti, Siva Sashank

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is a technique applied to the spectroscopy of atoms. The REMPI technique typically involves a resonant single or multiple photon absorption to an electronically excited intermediate state followed by another photon which ionizes the atom. Rayleigh scattering of REMPI plasma has given rise to a non-intrusive, time accurate measurement of electron formation and loss, which lead to many applications viz. trace species detection and micro-plasma diagnostics. It is very important to quantify the expansion process and the evolution of energy of electrons and ions. The operation scale of this process is in microns and non continuum nature of the process lead to the use of PIC/MCC scheme to compu- tationally model REMPI technique. This work attempts to understand and analyze the processes taking place during the expansion of REMPI plasma computationally using the PIC/MCC scheme. One dimensional and two dimensional approximations are considered to analyze the REMPI plasma expansion in Argon gas generated by a laser with a focal shape of a prolate ellipsoid. The expansion of the plasma is found to be very sensitive to the initial velocity distribution of the electrons. REMPI plasma expansion is shown to be ambipolar in nature, with the radial expansion more predominant than axial expansion, hence requiring the 2D model. Electron energy distribution functions(EEDFs) are found at various radial locations along with the corresponding mean energies. The deviation of the EEDFs from that of equilibrium Maxwell-Boltzmann energy distribution is presented both qualitatively and quanti- tatively, indicating the predominant processes at various instances in time.

  13. In Vivo Multiphoton Microscopy of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Mihaela; Zachary, Christopher B.; Harris, Ronald M.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; König, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Kelly, Kristen M.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are diagnosed by clinical evaluation, which can include dermoscopic evaluation, biopsy, and histopathologic examination. Recent translation of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to clinical practice raises the possibility of noninvasive, label-free in vivo imaging of BCCs that could reduce the time from consultation to treatment. Objectives To demonstrate the capability of MPM to image in vivo BCC lesions in human skin, and to evaluate if histopathologic criteria can be identified in MPM images. Design, Setting, and Participants Imaging in patients with BCC was performed at the University of California–Irvine Health Beckman Laser Institute & Medical Clinic, Irvine, between September 2012 and April 2014, with a clinical MPM-based tomograph. Ten BCC lesions were imaged in vivo in 9 patients prior to biopsy. The MPM images were compared with histopathologic findings. Main Outcomes and Measures MPM imaging identified in vivo and noninvasively the main histopathologic feature of BCC lesions: nests of basaloid cells showing palisading in the peripheral cell layer at the dermoepidermal junction and/or in the dermis. Results The main MPM feature associated with the BCC lesions involved nests of basaloid cells present in the papillary and reticular dermis. This feature correlated well with histopathologic examination. Other MPM features included elongated tumor cells in the epidermis aligned in 1 direction and parallel collagen and elastin bundles surrounding the tumors. Conclusions and Relevance This study demonstrates, in a limited patient population, that noninvasive in vivo MPM imaging can provide label-free contrast that reveals several characteristic features of BCC lesions. Future studies are needed to validate the technique and correlate MPM performance with histopathologic examination. PMID:25909650

  14. Multi-photon resonance phenomena using Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamideh Kazemi, Seyedeh; Mahmoudi, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    We study the influence of laser profile on the linewidth of the optical spectrum of multi-photon resonance phenomena. First, we investigate the dependence of the absorption spectrum on the laser profile in a two-level system. Thanks to the Laguerre-Gaussian field, the linewidth of the one-photon optical pumping and two-photon absorption peaks are explicitly narrower than that obtained with a Gaussian field. In the next section, it is shown that, compared to the Gaussian fields, the Laguerre-Gaussian ones reduce the linewidth of the optical spectrum in the coherent population trapping. Interestingly, it turns out that the use of a Laguerre-Gaussian beam makes the linewidth of the spectrum narrower as compared with a Gaussian one in Doppler-broadened electromagnetically induced transparency. Moreover, we study the effect of the laser profile on the Autler-Townes doublet structure in the absorption spectrum for a laser-driven four-level atomic system. We also consider the different values of the Laguerre-Gaussian mode beam waist, and, perhaps more remarkably, we find that for the small waist values, the Autler-Townes doublet can be removed and a prominent narrow central peak appears in the absorption spectrum. Finally, we investigate the effect of the laser profile on the linewidth of the sub-natural three-photon absorption peak of double dark resonance. The differences in the linewidth are quite large, offering potential applications in metrology and isotope separation methods. Our results can be used for super ultra-high resolution laser spectroscopy and to improve the resolution of the technology of isotope/isomer separation and photo-biology even at essential overlap of the spectra of the different particles.

  15. a UV+VUV Multiphoton Ionization Scheme for OH Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beames, Joseph M.; Liu, Fang; Lester, Marsha I.

    2012-06-01

    OH radicals are of significant atmospheric interest as a dominant oxidizing agent in day-time tropospheric chemistry. In this study, a 1+1' multiphoton ionization (MPI) scheme is employed to record rotationally-resolved spectra of OH radicals via the A^2Σ^+ resonant intermediate state. UV excitation is used to prepare OH A^2Σ^+(v=1, {J}, F_i), which is subsequently ionized by a second photon of fixed frequency VUV (118.3 nm), generated by tripling the 355 nm output of a Nd:YAG laser. The mass-selected OH^+ ion signal from 1+1' MPI is detected using time-of flight mass spectrometry and compared with the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signal arising from OH A^2Σ^+-X^2π(1,0) excitation. The MPI signal is observed over a range of UV+VUV total energies, corresponding to various OH A^2Σ^+ (v=1, {J}, F_i) intermediate states, with relative intensities that differ considerably from LIF. The ion signal is enhanced relative to LIF at combined UV + VUV photon energies consistent with an autoionizing 3{d} Rydberg state that converges on the OH^+ A^3π ion core; direct ionization into OH^+ X^3Σ^- is forbidden in a one-photon electric-dipole transition from OH A^2Σ^+. The MPI intensities have been quantified relative to LIF over the OH A^2Σ^+-X^2π(1,0) region such that this scheme is now applicable for quantitative state-selective detection of OH X^2π. J. M. Beames, F. Liu, M. I. Lester and C. Murray, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 241102 (2011). J. D. Barr, A. De Fanis, J. M. Dyke, S. D. Gamblin, N. Hooper, A. Morris, S. Stranges, J. B. West, and T. G. Wright, J. Chem. Phys. 110, 345 (1999).

  16. Mitochondrial Permeability Transition in Pathogenesis of Hemorrhagic Injury: Targeted Therapy with Minocycline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    minocy- cline treatment (Figures 1-4). Minocycline also improved mitochondrial function as assessed by intravital multiphoton imaging of the...will make direct measurements by intravital multiphoton microscopy to determine whether onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition and...oxidative stress were assessed 6 h after resuscitation. Mitochondrial polarization were assessed by intravital microscopy. After H/R with vehicle or

  17. Intravital imaging of mouse colonic adenoma using MMP-based molecular probes with multi-channel fluorescence endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gyungseok; Yoo, Su Woong; Jung, Yebin; Ryu, Yeon-Mi; Park, Youngrong; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Kim, Ki Hean; Kim, Sungjee; Myung, Seung-Jae; Chung, Euiheon

    2014-05-01

    Intravital imaging has provided molecular, cellular and anatomical insight into the study of tumor. Early detection and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases can be enhanced with specific molecular markers and endoscopic imaging modalities. We present a wide-field multi-channel fluorescence endoscope to screen GI tract for colon cancer using multiple molecular probes targeting matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) conjugated with quantum dots (QD) in AOM/DSS mouse model. MMP9 and MMP14 antibody (Ab)-QD conjugates demonstrate specific binding to colonic adenoma. The average target-to-background (T/B) ratios are 2.10 ± 0.28 and 1.78 ± 0.18 for MMP14 Ab-QD and MMP9 Ab-QD, respectively. The overlap between the two molecular probes is 67.7 ± 8.4%. The presence of false negative indicates that even more number of targeting could increase the sensitivity of overall detection given heterogeneous molecular expression in tumors. Our approach indicates potential for the screening of small or flat lesions that are precancerous.

  18. Intravital two-photon microscopy of host-pathogen interactions in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus skin abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Liese, Jan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Novick, Richard P; Dustin, Michael L

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a frequent cause of severe skin infections. The ability to control the infection is largely dependent on the rapid recruitment of neutrophils (PMN). To gain more insight into the dynamics of PMN migration and host-pathogen interactions in vivo, we used intravital two-photon (2-P) microscopy to visualize S. aureus skin infections in the mouse. Reporter S. aureus strains expressing fluorescent proteins were developed, which allowed for detection of the bacteria in vivo. By employing LysM-EGFP mice to visualize PMN, we observed the rapid appearance of PMN in the extravascular space of the dermis and their directed movement towards the focus of infection, which led to the delineation of an abscess within 1 day. Moreover, tracking of transferred labelled bone-marrow neutrophils showed that PMN localization to the site of infection is dependent on the presence of G-protein-coupled receptors on the PMN, whereas Interleukin-1 receptor was required on host cells other than PMN. Furthermore, the S. aureus complement inhibitor Ecb could block PMN accumulation at thesite of infection. Our results establish that 2-P microscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the orchestration of the immune cells, S. aureus location and gene expression in vivo on a single cell level.

  19. Reduction of Tubular Flow Rate as a Mechanism of Oliguria in the Early Phase of Endotoxemia Revealed by Intravital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kent; Kitamura, Hiroaki; Kuwabara, Takashige; Mori, Kiyoshi; Mukoyama, Masashi; Nishiyama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Urine output is widely used as a criterion for the diagnosis of AKI. Although several potential mechanisms of septic AKI have been identified, regulation of urine flow after glomerular filtration has not been evaluated. This study evaluated changes in urine flow in mice with septic AKI. The intratubular urine flow rate was monitored in real time by intravital imaging using two-photon laser microscopy. The tubular flow rate, as measured by freely filtered dye (FITC-inulin or Lucifer yellow), time-dependently declined after LPS injection. At 2 hours, the tubular flow rate was slower in mice injected with LPS than in mice injected with saline, whereas BP and GFR were similar in the two groups. Importantly, fluorophore-conjugated LPS selectively accumulated in the proximal tubules that showed reduced tubular flow at 2 hours and luminal obstruction with cell swelling at 24 hours. Delipidation of LPS or deletion of Toll-like receptor 4 in mice abolished these effects, whereas neutralization of TNF-α had little effect on LPS-induced tubular flow retention. Rapid intravenous fluid resuscitation within 6 hours improved the tubular flow rate only when accompanied by the dilation of obstructed proximal tubules with accumulated LPS. These findings suggest that LPS reduces the intratubular urine flow rate during early phases of endotoxemia through a Toll-like receptor 4–dependent mechanism, and that the efficacy of fluid resuscitation may depend on the response of tubules with LPS accumulation. PMID:25855781

  20. The mechanism of anti-CD20–mediated B cell depletion revealed by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Montalvao, Fabricio; Garcia, Zacarias; Celli, Susanna; Breart, Béatrice; Deguine, Jacques; Van Rooijen, Nico; Bousso, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Anti-CD20 Ab therapy has proven successful for treating B cell malignancies and a number of autoimmune diseases. However, how anti-CD20 Abs operate in vivo to mediate B cell depletion is not fully understood. In particular, the anatomical location, the type of effector cells, and the mechanism underlying anti-CD20 therapy remain uncertain. Here, we found that the liver is a major site for B cell depletion and that recirculation accounts for the decrease in B cell numbers observed in secondary lymphoid organs. Using intravital imaging, we established that, upon anti-CD20 treatment, Kupffer cells (KCs) mediate the abrupt arrest and subsequent engulfment of B cells circulating in the liver sinusoids. KCs were also effective in depleting malignant B cells in a model of spontaneous lymphoma. Our results identify Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis by KCs as a primary mechanism of anti-CD20 therapy and provide an experimental framework for optimizing the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. PMID:24177426