Science.gov

Sample records for act outer continental

  1. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  2. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  3. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  4. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  5. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  6. 77 FR 7148 - Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... AGENCY Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Gulf of Mexico, Inc., and Shell Offshore, Inc. for the Discoverer Drillship AGENCY: United States Environmental...) permit applications, one from Shell Gulf of Mexico, Inc., for operation of the Discoverer drillship...

  7. 77 FR 27054 - Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Offshore, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... AGENCY Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Offshore, Inc. for the Kulluk Conical Drilling Unit AGENCY: United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Title V air quality operating permit to Shell Offshore, Inc. (``Shell'') for operation of the...

  8. Problem on the United States Continental Shelf - measuring the environmental {open_quotes}effectiveness{close_quotes} of the Outer Continental Shelf Act (OCSA)

    SciTech Connect

    Dubner, B.H.

    1994-12-31

    This article reviews the interplay of environmental standard with oil and gas leasing on the Outer Continental Shelf (OSC) in order to determine if the marine environment is really protected by the interplay of domestic legislation. The 1982 LOS treaty leaves environmental protection to State (domestic) regulation. There is no customary law regarding this type of domestic shelf regulation. The main problem is measuring the {open_quotes}effectiveness{close_quotes} of our domestic shelf legislation. For example, do we simply review effectiveness in terms of controlling operational damage or in terms of environmental injury caused by catastrophic accidents?

  9. Outer Continental Shelf Deep Water Royalty Relief Act. Introduced in the Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, April 11, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This is a report on the bill (S.318) which provides for the energy security of the Nation through encouraging the production of domestic oil and gas resources in deep water on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Gulf of Mexico, and on possible amendments it.

  10. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  11. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas, with... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Interior....

  12. 76 FR 70156 - Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Study (PEIS) for Proposed 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ...-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), BOEM announces the availability of the OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program 2012- 2017 Draft PEIS prepared by BOEM to support the Proposed Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas...

  13. 76 FR 63654 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM... (SOBDs); Correction. SUMMARY: BOEM (formerly the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation...

  14. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing/Production Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This annual report on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing and Production program summarizes receipts and expenditures, and includes information on OCS safety violations as reported by the US Coast Guard. 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. 76 FR 19122 - Record of Decision (ROD) for Authorizing the Use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand Resources...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... the Use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand Resources in National Aeronautics and Space... resources in National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Wallops Flight Facility (WFF... Department of the Interior by the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA) (43 U.S.C. 1337(k)(2))....

  16. Neogene sedimentation on the outer continental margin, southern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallier, T.L.; Underwood, M.B.; Gardner, J.V.; Barron, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Neogene sedimentary rocks and sediments from sites on the outer continental margin in the southern Bering Sea and on the Alaska Peninsula are dominated by volcanic components that probably were eroded from an emergent Aleutian Ridge. A mainland continental source is subordinate. Most sediment in the marine environment was transported to the depositional sites by longshore currents, debris flows, and turbidity currents during times when sea level was near the outermost continental shelf. Fluctuations of sea level are ascribed both to worldwide glacio-eustatic effects and to regional vertical tectonics. Large drainage systems, such as the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers, had little direct influence on sedimentation along the continental slope and Unmak Plateau in the southern Bering Sea. Sediments from those drainage systems probably were transported to the floor of the Aleutian Basin, to the numerous shelf basins that underlie the outer continental shelf, and to the Arctic Ocean after passing through the Bering Strait. Environments of deposition at the sites along the outer continental margin have not changed significantly since the middle Miocene. The site on the Alaska Peninsula, however, is now emergent following shallow-marine and transitional sedimentation during the Neogene. ?? 1980.

  17. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section 192.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  18. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section 195.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  19. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section 195.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  20. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section 195.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  1. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section 192.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  2. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section 192.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  3. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section 195.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  4. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section 195.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  5. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section 192.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  6. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section 192.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  7. Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program: comprehensive bibliography, January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The bibliography lists reports from investigators of the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program. Some non-program documents are also included. More than 3600 entries are sorted by author and citation number. Cross-references are available by Alaska region, discipline and research unit number.

  8. 76 FR 43230 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Virginia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Virginia AGENCY... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources located within...

  9. 76 FR 58273 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; EPA ICR... all outer continental shelf (OCS) sources except those located in the Gulf of Mexico west of 87.5... boundary extends three leagues (about nine miles) from the coastline. Title: Outer Continental Shelf...

  10. Outer Continental Shelf Permit Processing Coordination Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Begich, Mark [D-AK

    2011-04-14

    05/17/2011 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 112-51. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Outer Continental Shelf Reform Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Bingaman, Jeff [D-NM

    2011-05-09

    05/17/2011 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 112-51. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Outer continental shelf, Beaufort Sea, oil and gas lease sale 170 (proposed notice of sale)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The Minerals Management Service (MMS) is issuing this proposed Notice of Sale under the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Lands Act (43 U.S.C. 1331-1356, as amended) and the regulations issued thereunder (30 CFR Part 256). A `Sale Notice Package,` containing this Notice and several supporting and essential documents referenced in the Notice, is available from the MMS Alaska OCS Regional Office Public Information Unit.

  13. Comparison of marine productivity among Outer Continental Shelf planning areas

    SciTech Connect

    Darnell, R.M.

    1991-04-01

    Continental Shelf Associates was contracted to update and expand an earlier work on a comparison of primary productivity among Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) planning areas. The update consists of four general objectives. This report addresses the fourth objective, the potential to use measures of marine secondary productivity in determining relative rankings of the OCS planning area. Ideally, comparisons of secondary productivity among diverse geographic areas would take an ecosystem perspective. However, there is not enough ecosystem-level understanding to allow a comparison on that basis. The report focuses on individual species and group of species. Zooplankton and benthic communities represent major portions of the marine ecosystems and would be the preferred subjects for comparative studies. At this time comparisons of secondary productivity among planning areas would be difficult with existing databases. It is unlikely this situation will improve in the near future.

  14. 76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... renewable energy, mineral, and oil and gas lease sales in the geographic areas they represent. The revised... . Dated: November 15, 2010. Robert P. LaBelle, Acting Associate Director for Offshore Energy and...

  15. 75 FR 17155 - Preparation of an Environmental Assessment (EA) for Proposed Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... gas leasing, exploration, and development that might result from an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil... been on ``environmental analysis'' of biologically sensitive habitats, physical oceanography,...

  16. Estimated oil and gas reserves, Southern California outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballantyne, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Remaining recoverable reserves of oil* and gas in the Outer Continental Shelf off Southern California are estimated to be 968 million barrels of oil and 1,851 billion cubic feet of gas as of December 31, 1982. These reserves are attributed to 14 fields. Original recoverable reserves from these fields are estimated at 1,217 million barrels of oil and 1,983 billion cubic feet of gas. The estimates for both the remaining and the original recoverable reserves of oil and gas are higher than the corresponding estimates for December 31, 1981. Reserve estimates for 12 fields were based on volumetric reservoir studies. Decline-curve and volumetric analyses were used for the remaining two fields. Six fields were on production at year's end and a gas field is scheduled to commence production in 1983. *The term 'oil' as used in this report includes crude oil, condensate, and gas-plant liquids.

  17. Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

    2007-04-20

    This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

  18. 75 FR 9780 - Technical Amendment to the Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Technical Amendment to the Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency... Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations for Alaska. DATES: Effective on March 22, 2010. FOR FURTHER... Information This Notice is to provide a technical correction to the final regulation published at 75 FR...

  19. 75 FR 51968 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Massachusetts AGENCY... update to a portion of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying...

  20. 76 FR 5189 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activities: 1010-0081, Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ...: 1010-0081, Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur... Shelf for Minerals Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur. This notice also provides the public a second... 282, Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur....

  1. 77 FR 15382 - Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Notice of Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... and data being produced to meet BOEM's scientific information needs for decision-making and may... Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Notice of Renewal AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (Committee). The Committee provides advice...

  2. 77 FR 15118 - Information Collection Activities: Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... Continental Shelf for Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur; Submitted for Office of Management and Budget... Continental Shelf for Minerals Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur. This notice also provides the public a second... 282, Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur....

  3. Depositional history of Louisiana-Mississippi outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, J.L.; Miller, R.J.; Stelting, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    A geological study was undertaken in 1981 in the Louisiana-Mississippi outer continental shelf for the Bureau of Land Management. The study included a high-resolution seismic reflection survey, surficial sediment sampling and surface current drifter sampling. Approximately 7100 sq km of the Louisiana-Mississippi shelf and upper slope were surveyed. The sea floor of the entire area is relatively smooth except for occasional areas of uplift produced by diapiric intrusion along the upper slope. Characteristics of the topography and subsurface shelf sediments are the result of depositional sequences due to delta outbuilding over transgressive sediments with intervening periods of erosion during low sea level stands. Little evidence of structural deformation such as faults, diapirs, and shallow gas is present on the shelf and only a few minor faults and scarps are found on the slope. Minisparker seismic records in combination with air gun (40 and 5 cu in) and 3.5-kHz subbottom profile records reveal that seven major stages of shelf development have occurred since the middle Pleistocene. The shelf development has been controlled by the rise and fall of sea level. These stages are defined by four major unconformities, several depositions of transgressive sediments, sequences of river channeling and progradational delta deposits. Surficial sediment sample and seismic records indicate tat the last major depositional event was the progradation of the St. Bernard Delta lobe. This delta lobe covered the northwestern and central regions. Surficial sediments in most of the study area are the product of the reworking of the San Bernard Delta lobe and previous progradations.

  4. 75 FR 76632 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Increased Safety Measures for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf--Increased Safety Measures for Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf; Correction AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation... oil and gas exploration and development on the Outer Continental Shelf. This document contains...

  5. 77 FR 44231 - Delegation of Authority To Implement and Enforce Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... AGENCY Delegation of Authority To Implement and Enforce Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations to the... enforce sections of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Air Regulations. To inform regulated facilities and... the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations). On February...

  6. 77 FR 19321 - Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice...

  7. 78 FR 36571 - North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official Protraction Diagram (OPDs) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior... Ocean Energy Management. BILLING CODE 4310-MR-P...

  8. 75 FR 7515 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Mineral Exploration on the Alaska Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Minerals Management Service Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Mineral Exploration on the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of the... Minerals Management Service (MMS), in accordance with Federal regulations that implement the...

  9. 75 FR 61511 - Intent To Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement: Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ..., and transportation; and accidental crude oil spills. 3. Scoping: In accordance with 40 CFR 1502.9(c)(4... Environmental Impact Statement: Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193 in the Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Alaska....

  10. Organic geochemistry of outer continental margins and deep ocean sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the activities and progress made in the study of continental margins and deep ocean sediments. Topics discussed are the calibration of thermal maturation markers, hydrous pyrolysis studies and sample collection. (KS)

  11. Mineral resource management of the Outer Continental Shelf : leasing procedures, evaluation of resources, and supervision of production operations on leased lands of the Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Maurice V.; John, C.B.; Kelly, R.F.; LaPointe, A.E.; Meurer, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    An important function of the Geological Survey is the evaluation and management of the mineral resources of the Outer Continental Shelf, particularly with respect to oil and gas, salt, and sulfur. Production of oil and gas from the Outer Continental Shelf of the United States has increased substantially over the past 20 years and represents an increasing percentage of total United States production. As discovery of major onshore production of oil and gas has become more difficult, the search has moved into the surrounding waters where submerged sedimentary formations are conducive to the accumulation of oil and gas. Increased energy demands of recent years have accelerated the pace of offshore operations with a corresponding improvement in technology as exploration and development have proceeded farther from shore and into deeper water. While improved technology and enforcement of more stringent regulations have made offshore operations safer, it is unrealistic to believe that completely accident-free operations can ever be achieved. Only slightly more than six percent of the world's continental terrace is adjacent to the United States, but less than one percent has been explored for oil and gas. Since the lead time for the development of offshore oil and gas resources can be as much as a decade, they do not provide an immediate energy supply but should be viewed in the light of a near-term source with a potential of becoming a medium-range source of supply pending the development of alternative energy sources. Revenues from the Outer Continental Shelf are deposited to the general fund of the United States Treasury. A major portion of these funds is allocated to the Land and Water Conservation Fund, the largest Federal grant-in-aid program of assistance to States, counties, and cities for the acquisition and development of public parks, open space, and recreation lands and water.

  12. 76 FR 23331 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC); Announcement of Plenary Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... status of the BOEMRE and its activities. There will be a presentation on Alternative Energy Programs... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC); Announcement of Plenary Session AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation...

  13. 77 FR 10707 - Safety Zone; NOBLE DISCOVERER, Outer Continental Shelf Drillship, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting The Coast Guard does not plan to hold a public meeting. But... prospects located in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska, from 12:01 a.m. on July... exploratory wells in several prospects located in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas during the 2012...

  14. 78 FR 33859 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities in the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities in the Gulf of Mexico; Correction AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior.... SUMMARY: On May 10, 2013, BOEM published a document in the Federal Register (78 FR 27427) entitled...

  15. 76 FR 28449 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement... Director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement by the joint...

  16. 78 FR 64243 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: List of Restricted Joint Bidders. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the authority vested in the Director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management by the...

  17. 76 FR 67759 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ] ACTION: List of Restricted Joint Bidders. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the authority vested in the Director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management by the...

  18. 78 FR 27430 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: List of restricted joint bidders SUMMARY: Pursuant to the authority vested in the Director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management by the...

  19. 77 FR 64826 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Interior. ACTION: List of Restricted Joint Bidders. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the authority vested in the Director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management by the joint...

  20. 76 FR 7230 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and.... Correction In the Federal Register of January 24, 2011, in FR Doc. 2011-1319, on page 4129, correct...

  1. 77 FR 4056 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC); Announcement of Plenary Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC); Announcement of Plenary Session AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of..., Executive Secretary to the OCS SC, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 381 Elden Street, Mail Stop...

  2. 77 FR 24980 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... Group II. Shell Oil Company Shell Offshore Inc. SWEPI LP Shell Frontier Oil & Gas Inc. SOI Finance Inc... Alaska, Inc. Phillips Pt. Arguello Production Company Burlington Resources Oil & Gas Company...

  3. 76 FR 4129 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... any entity in any other of the following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease sales to... Company. Shell Offshore Inc. SWEPI LP. Shell Frontier Oil & Gas Inc. Shell Onshore Ventures Inc. SOI..., Inc. Phillips Pt. Arguello Production Company. Burlington Resources Oil & Gas Company LP....

  4. 76 FR 13205 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Interior... of Restricted Joint Bidders'' that contained an error. We are correcting the name of an oil...

  5. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 5. Program logic manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The final report for the project is presented in five volumes. This volume is the Programmer's Manual. It covers: a system overview, attractiveness component of gravity model, trip-distribution component of gravity model, economic-effects model, and the consumer-surplus model. The project sought to determine the impact of Outer Continental Shelf development on recreation and tourism.

  6. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 4. User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The final report for the project is presented in five volumes. The project sought to determine the impact of Outer Continental Shelf development on recreation and tourism in California. This volume is the User's Guide. It includes the following topics: Introduction and Summary Guide; Input Data Files; Gravity Model Programs; Economic Effects Model Programs; Consumer Surplus Model Programs; References; and Appendices.

  7. 78 FR 48180 - Consolidation of Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection For Outer Continental Shelf Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Consolidation of Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection For Outer Continental Shelf Activities; Eighth Coast Guard District AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is considering establishing a single Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection...

  8. 75 FR 10809 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee-Notice of Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... to the Secretary of the Interior through the Director of the Minerals Management Service. The Committee reviews the relevance of the research and data being produced to meet MMS scientific information... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee--Notice of Renewal AGENCY: Minerals...

  9. 77 FR 24734 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Leasing for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Leasing for... and information on the public session can be found online at: http://www.boem.gov/Renewable-Energy... Renewable Energy Programs, 381 Elden Street, HM 1328, Herndon, Virginia 20170-4817, (703) 787-1340...

  10. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. 78 FR 4167 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Delaware

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... Offshore Delaware. SUMMARY: BOEM has issued a commercial wind energy lease to Bluewater Wind Delaware LLC... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Delaware AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice...

  12. 78 FR 45965 - Research Lease on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Virginia, Request for Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Research Lease on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Virginia...) to acquire an OCS lease for wind energy research activities; (2) solicit indications of interest in a renewable energy lease in the area identified by DMME for substantially similar wind energy activities;...

  13. 75 FR 24966 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... Minerals Management Service Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Minerals... vested in the Director of the Minerals Management Service by the joint bidding provisions of 30 CFR 256...Hydro Gulf Properties Inc. Dated: April 12, 2010. S. Elizabeth Birnbaum, Director, Minerals...

  14. 75 FR 20859 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Policy Committee; Notice and Agenda for Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Policy Committee; Notice and Agenda for Meeting AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: The OCS Policy..., telephone (202) 208-3530. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Jeryne Bryant at Minerals Management...

  15. 76 FR 40725 - Approval of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Permit Issued to Cape Wind Associates, LLC (EPA Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... offshore renewable wind energy project in federal waters off the coast of Massachusetts. DATES: Effective... AGENCY Approval of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Permit Issued to Cape Wind Associates, LLC (EPA Permit... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) air permit decision regarding Cape Wind Associates, LLC (Cape Wind)....

  16. 76 FR 54787 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... for the description of renewable energy, mineral, and oil and gas lease sales in the geographic areas..., Acting Associate Director for Offshore Energy and Minerals Management. BILLING CODE 4310-MR-P...

  17. Outer Continental shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 51

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The following are repoted: research to determine the accumulation of organic constituents and heavy metals from petroleum-impacted sediments by marine detritivores of the Alaskan outer continental shelf; Suspended particulate matter distribution, transport, and physical characteristics in the north Aleutian Shelf and St. George Basin lease areas; The production and dispersion of dissolved methane in southeastern Bering Sea; Oil spill vulnerability, coastal morphology, and sedimentation of outer Kenai Peninsula and Montague Island; Circulation and water masses in the Gulf of Alaska; Coastal oceanography of the northeastern Gulf of Alaska.

  18. An oilspill risk analysis for the North Atlantic outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard Allmon; Slack, James Richard; Davis, Robert K.

    1976-01-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to lease 1,172,795 acres of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lands on Georges Bank off the New England Coast for oil and gas development. Estimated recoverable petroleum resources for the proposed 206 tract sale area range from 180 to 650 million barrels. Contingent upon actual discovery of this quantity of oil, production is expected to span a period of about 20 years. An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine relative environmental hazards of developing oil in the North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf lease area. The study analyzed probability of spill occurrence, likely path of pollutants from spills, and locations in space and time of recreational and biological resources likely to be vulnerable. These results are combined to yield estimates of the overall oilspill risk associated with development of the lease area. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. An oilspill risk analysis for the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard Allmon; Slack, James Richard; Davis, Robert K.

    1976-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine relative environmental impacts of developing oil in different regions of the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf lease area. The study analyzed probability of spills, likely path of pollutants from spills, and locations in space and time of recreational and biological resources likely to be vulnerable. These results are combined to yield estimates of the overall oilspill risk associated with development of the lease area. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and Outer Continental Shelf in 1985 and 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, R.V.

    1987-10-01

    Drilling activity for 1985 was not reported previously due to the low level of activity. No exploratory drilling took place on the Atlantic outer continental shelf in 1985 or 1986. One shallow well was drilled onshore in Georgia on the Atlantic coastal plan in 1985, and 2 wells were completed in Georgia in 1986. Texaco drilled 6 core holes on the Virginia coastal plain in 1986. 2 tables.

  1. Outer Continental Shelf Transboundary Hydrocarbon Agreements Authorization Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Duncan, Jeff [R-SC-3

    2013-04-18

    10/01/2013 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 113-104. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. The Bay of Bengal and the Statement of Understanding Concerning the Establishment of the Outer Edge of the Continental Margin: Regional Implications for Delimiting the Juridical Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mridha, M.; Varma, H.; Macnab, R.

    2005-12-01

    The Bay of Bengal is the site of massive depositions of sediment from the Ganga-Brahmaputra river systems, which discharge an estimated 2300 million tons of material into the Indian Ocean every year. The accumulated material comprises an enormous fan that extends some 4000 km from the Mouths of the Ganges, a delta system which encompasses the entire coast of Bangladesh and a segment of the coast of India. The major tectonic elements of the Bay of Bengal and surrounding areas are: the passive eastern continental margin of India; the 85E Ridge; the Ninetyeast Ridge; the intervening basin buried beneath deep sediment; and the Sunda Arc system with the associated back-arc Andaman Basin. Except for the Nikitin Seamounts which rise above the seabed just south of the Equator, the 85E Ridge is totally covered by thick sediment. The Ninetyeast Ridge, on the other hand, protrudes above the seabed as far north as 10N, where it plunges beneath the thickening sediment and separates the deposits into the Bengal Fan and the smaller Nicobar Fan. The 85E and Ninetyeast Ridges present the most significant relief in the crystalline basement underlying the Bay of Bengal, and should therefore figure substantially in any analysis of sediment thickness pursuant to the delimitation of the outer continental shelf. In this region, the sediment thickness provision of Article 76 has been modified by a Statement of Understanding in Annex II of the Final Act of the Third UN Conference on the Law of the Sea. To avoid a perceived inequity that might arise from the application of the standard one percent sediment thickness formula of Article 76, the Statement introduced a new formula: a qualified State in this region, even if it has a narrow physiographic continental shelf, may establish the outer edge of its continental margin by a line where the thickness of sedimentary rock is not less than one km. This presentation will describe the development of a joint formula line for the States that

  3. 75 FR 19880 - Safety Zone; BW PIONEER at Walker Ridge 249, Outer Continental Shelf FPSO, Gulf of Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... PIONEER at Walker Ridge 249, Outer Continental Shelf FPSO, Gulf of Mexico in the Federal Register (74 FR...-2103, madeleine.w.mcnamara@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing the docket, call Renee V....

  4. 75 FR 17156 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf, Western Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 215 (2010...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf, Western Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 215 (2010) Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Minerals Management Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability of an environmental assessment. SUMMARY: The Minerals Management Service (MMS)...

  5. 76 FR 53481 - Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193, Chukchi Sea, Alaska (OCS EIS/EA BOEMRE 2011-041)....

  6. Estimated oil and gas reserves, Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf and continental slope, December 31, 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hewitt, Jack E.; Brooke, Jeff P.; Knipmeyer, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Remaining recoverable reserves of oil* and gas in the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf and Continental Slope have been estimated to be about 2.98 billion barrels of oil and 39.8 trillion cubic feet of gas, as of December 31, 1982. These reserves are recoverable from 468 studied fields under the Federal submerged lands off the coasts of Louisiana and Texas. An additional 53 fields, discovered since December 31, 1980, have not been sufficiently developed to permit a reasonably accurate estimate of reserves. Original recoverable reserves are estimated to have been 8.56 billion barrels of oil and 98.1 trillion cubic feet of gas from 484 fields in the same geographic area. Included in this number are 16 fields that are depleted and were abandoned; not included are the 53 insufficiently developed fields. Estimates were made for individual reservoirs in 382 fields and on a field-wide basis for the other 102 fields. *The term 'oil' as used in this report includes crude oil and condensate.

  7. Surface current patterns suggested by suspended sediment distribution over the outer continental margin, Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karl, Herman A.; Carlson, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of total suspended matter (TSM) were collected at the surface over the northern outer continental margin of the Bering Sea during the summers of 1980 and 1981. Volume concentrations of surface TSM averaged 0.6 and 1.1 mg l-1 for 1980 and 1981, respectively. Organic matter, largely plankton, made up about 65% of the near-surface TSM for both years. Distributions of TSM suggested that shelf circulation patterns were characterized either by meso- and large- scale eddies or by cross-shelf components of flow superimposed on a general northwesterly net drift. These patterns may be caused by large submarine canyons which dominate the physiography of this part of the Bering Sea continental margin. ?? 1987.

  8. Late Cretaceous - Cenozoic development of outer continental margin, southwestern Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    The growth pattern for the outer continental margin of Nova Scotia during the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic was studied using seismic stratigraphy and well data. Sediment accumulation was broadly controlled by temporal changes in relative sea level, but significant spatial and temporal changes in accumulation patterns were caused by changes in sediment supply rate, morphology, erosion by abyssal currents, and salt tectonics. A Jurassic-Early Cretaceous carbonate platform remained exposed until the Late Cretaceous and controlled the location and steepness of the paleoslope until the late Miocene. Local erosion of the outer shelf and slope in the late Paleocene-early Eocene produced chalky fans on the upper rise. The relationship between erosion of the shelf in the late Eocene and early Oligocene, and abyssal current erosion of the upper rise in the Oligocene, is unclear. Seaward extensions of Tertiary shelf-edge canyons are poorly defined except for the Eocene fans. In the Miocene, abyssal currents eroded a bench on the upper continental rise. Subsequently, sediments lapped onto and buried the paleoslope. The lower rise above horizon A/sup u/ (Oligocene) is composed of fans and olistostromes shed from halokinetic uplift of the upper rise. Current eroded unconformities are common in the rise sequence, but the only current deposit is a Pliocene interval (< 300 m) restricted to the lowermost rise. Pleistocene turbidity currents eroded the present canyon morphology. 15 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope.

    PubMed

    Di Tullio, Juliana Couto; Gandra, Tiago B R; Zerbini, Alexandre N; Secchi, Eduardo R

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m) and slope (1500m) off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S). The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the subtropical Southwestern

  10. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope.

    PubMed

    Di Tullio, Juliana Couto; Gandra, Tiago B R; Zerbini, Alexandre N; Secchi, Eduardo R

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m) and slope (1500m) off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S). The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the subtropical Southwestern

  11. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope

    PubMed Central

    Di Tullio, Juliana Couto; Gandra, Tiago B. R.; Zerbini, Alexandre N.; Secchi, Eduardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m) and slope (1500m) off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S). The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the subtropical Southwestern

  12. Modeling the number of bids received for outer continental shelf leases by Poisson-type models

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, L.A.; Nachtsheim, C.J.

    1983-07-01

    Since 1954, the U.S. federal government has held hydrocarbon lease sales for areas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The U.S. DOE is charged with developing lease sale policies designed to increase competition on the offered tracts. Increased competition has been assumed synonymous with increased number of bids (NOB). To study the influence of alternative bidding systems on the number of bids received, a mixed Poisson-type model has previously been employed. The authors show why this model is not statistically supportable. A truncated model is proposed and is shown to be statistically justified for the number of solo bids over all sales and marginally supported for the number of joint bids on sales before the joint-bidding ban.

  13. Large sand waves on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf around Wilmington Canyon, off Eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.; Folger, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    New seismic-reflection data show that large sand waves near the head of Wilmington Canyon on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf have a spacing of 100-650 m and a relief of 2-9 m. The bedforms trend northwest and are asymmetrical, the steeper slopes being toward the south or west. Vibracore sediments indicate that the waves apparently have formed on a substrate of relict nearshore sediments. Although the age of the original bedforms is unknown, the asymmetry is consistent with the dominant westerly to southerly drift in this area which has been determined by other methods; the asymmetry, therefore, is probably modern. Observations in the sand-wave area from a submersible during August 1975, revealed weak bottom currents, sediment bioturbation, unrippled microtopography, and lack of scour. Thus, the asymmetry may be maintained by periodic water motion, possibly associated with storms or perhaps with flow in the canyon head. ?? 1976.

  14. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 3. Detailed methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The final report for the project is presented in five volumes. This volume, Detailed Methodology Review, presents a discussion of the methods considered and used to estimate the impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas development on coastal recreation in California. The purpose is to provide the Minerals Management Service with data and methods to improve their ability to analyze the socio-economic impacts of OCS development. Chapter II provides a review of previous attempts to evaluate the effects of OCS development and of oil spills on coastal recreation. The review also discusses the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches and presents the rationale for the methodology selection made. Chapter III presents a detailed discussion of the methods actually used in the study. The volume contains the bibliography for the entire study.

  15. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The study was intended to provide the Mineral Management Service (MMS) with an analytical tool to evaluate possible economic impacts from Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development. In particular, the study was designed to provide MMS staff who work on lease sale Energy Impact Statements with an objective technique for estimating the impacts to coastal communities from events that might occur as a result of lease sales: oil spills, onshore construction, and construction of platforms offshore. The project had several specific objectives: (1) provide profiles of 1982 socio-economic conditions in coastal communities, including an analysis of the relative importance of the tourist industry in each coastal county; (2) develop a methodology for determining the effects of OCS development on coastal recreation; and recommend mitigation measure that may reduce the negative effect of OCS development on coastal recreation using gravity and economic effects models.

  16. Environmental studies results: 1973-1992. Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Environmental Studies Program was initiated in 1973 under the Bureau of Land Management by the Secretary of the Interior. The Purpose of the program was to conduct studies needed to predict, assess and manage impacts on the human, marine and coastal environments of the OCS and nearshore areas that may be affected by oil and gas activities. The narrative summary updates the version printed in 1986, which covered studies managed by the MMS in the Atlantic OCS region between 1973 and 1985. Descriptions of the study results are divided into the following categories: baseline studies and environmental inventories, biology/ecology, drill site monitoring, endangered species, geology/chemistry, oil spill studies, physical oceanography/meteorology, and social and economic studies. Results of each major type of study are subdivided into North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic, South Atlantic, and multiregional studies in chronological sequence.

  17. Proceedings of second Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Region Information Transfer Meeting (ITM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    The second Information Transfer Meeting (ITM) for the Atlantic OCS, held January 28-29, 1987 in Arlington, Virginia, included 20 presentations over a two-day period. The first morning, an overview of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Environmental Studies Program introduced a day of detailed presentations on active and recently completed North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic, South Atlantic and Multi-Regional Studies. The second day was devoted to panel discussions on non-energy minerals on the Atlantic OCS and environmental concerns on the Georges Bank. Summaries of all presentations are included. This document was developed from the ITM conference tapes, questions and answers taken by the conference rapporteur, and written materials provided by the speakers. Although verbatim transcripts are not contained in these Proceedings, detailed information about individual study objectives, findings, and policy implications may be obtained from the appropriate Principal Investigator(s). Addresses for all speakers and general attendees are provided in the Appendices.

  18. Environmental geologic studies on the southeastern United States Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf, 1977-1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Popenoe, Peter; Popenoe, Peter

    1981-01-01

    This report is a summary of the second year of marine environmental research activities by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on the southeaster U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin, in accordance with with Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) AA551-MU8-13 between the USGS and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The report covers studies whose fieldwork was conducted during the period from 1 October 1977 to 30 September 1978. The results of the first year of study are reported in Popenoe (1978a and b) and as U.S. Department of Commerce NTIS report PB 300-820. The purpose of these investigations is to provide basic geologic and oceanographic data to the BLM Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Marine Environmental Studies Program in support of management decisions which relate to possible development of oil and gas resources of the continental shelf. The objectives of the USGS-BLM geologic research program for fiscal year 1978 (FY-78) were 1) to determine the sedimentation rates and processes on the upper slope and inner Blake Plateau; 2) to determine the distribution, areal extent, and vertical characteristics of geological features supportive of biological communities; 3) to monitor the transport of bottom sediment across the OCS, evaluate its possible effect on pollutant transfer along the seabed and the potential of sediment as a pollutant sink, determine the implications of erosion/deposition on pipeline emplacement, and aid the interpretation of chemical, biological, and physical data; 4) to determine the concentration levels of chosen trace metals and silica in three chemically defined fractions of the suspended particulate matter (seston); 5) to study the shelf edge and slope near areas of oil and gas interest, and the northern portion of the Blake Plateau for evidence of slope instability and other geologic hazards, and 6) to determine the depth and rate of sediment mixing caused by large storms and/or by benthic organisms and where possible to estimate the rate of

  19. Cenozoic Fault Evolution During Three Successive Tectonic Episodes in the Outer Continental Borderland off Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M. A.; Langenheim, V. E.; Sliter, R. W.; Wong, F. L.

    2006-12-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) sections as well as aeromagnetic and oil-well data reveal that a complex geographic distribution of normal, reverse and strike-slip faults developed during the Cenozoic in the outer part of the California Continental Borderland. A close spatial association between magnetic basement rocks and inverted Miocene graben points to the importance of structural inheritance in shaping the outer Borderland. For instance, we focus on a northwest-trending series of bathymetric knolls and ridges that closely follows the east flank of rocks that cause strong magnetic anomalies. These rocks are probably pre-Cenozoic basement. Sedimentary rocks forming these knolls and ridges originally were deposited within Miocene graben, but since the Miocene, these graben have been inverted tectonically and deformed by reverse and strike-slip faults. The sequence of graben formation and inversion shows that the study area first underwent regional extension and then contraction. This interpreted tectonic sequence accords with findings from other studies of the Borderland (e.g. Crouch and Suppe, 1993; Bohannan and Geist, 1998). The earliest of three tectonic episodes started from during the Mesozoic and persisted into the early Miocene and involved eastward subduction of the Farallon plate beneath the continental margin. Except for a forearc basin that is partly filled with a southwest-thinning wedge of Paleogene sedimentary rocks, few structures stemming from this tectonic episode can be recognized. The second tectonic episode began during the Miocene and involved crustal extension intense enough to expose the Mesozoic Catalina Schist in one or more metamorphic-core complexes. MCS data reveal two extensional episodes. The earlier caused low-angle detachments to form, and the later produced high-angle faults that crosscut the detachments. In the southeastern part of the study area, east-dipping reflections from within basement may reveal an extensional

  20. 76 FR 11079 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Safety and Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... 250, Subpart S--Safety and Environmental Management Systems, in the Federal Register (75 FR 63610... Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf--Safety and Environmental Management Systems; Public Workshop... and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) for oil and gas and sulphur operations in the...

  1. 76 FR 55090 - Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... Offshore Alternative Energy Programs at (703) 787-1300 for lease questions. ADDRESSES: You may submit... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  2. 75 FR 25291 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220... May 17, 2010 (see 75 FR 16830). Pursuant to the regulations implementing the procedural provisions...

  3. 78 FR 9731 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central Planning Area (CPA) Oil and Gas Lease Sale...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... Mississippi. In making its decision, BOEM considered alternatives to the proposed action and the potential... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central Planning Area...: Notice of Availability (NOA) of a Record of Decision (ROD) for CPA Lease Sale 227 in the Gulf of...

  4. 76 FR 70748 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central and Western Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central and Western Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales for Years 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement) published a notice in the Federal...

  5. 77 FR 68147 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA), Oil and Gas Lease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA), Oil and Gas Lease Sale 229 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION... Energy Management, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, 1201 Elmwood Park Boulevard (GM 623E), New...

  6. 77 FR 51568 - Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales, Western Planning Area Lease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales... Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Reopening of Scoping Comment Period. Authority... Ocean Energy Management, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, 1201 Elmwood Park ] Boulevard, New...

  7. 75 FR 20271 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Oil and Gas Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... Rulemaking (NPR) in the Federal Register (72 FR 9884). This NPR requested comments on proposed revisions to... Minerals Management Service 30 CFR Part 250 RIN 1010-AD12 Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf--Oil and Gas Production Requirements AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS),...

  8. 78 FR 67326 - Safety and Environmental Management System Requirements for Vessels on the U.S. Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... FR 3316). II. Regulatory History and Information The Coast Guard published an ANPRM entitled ``Safety... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Vessels on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf,'' published on September 10, 2013, until January 23, 2014....

  9. 78 FR 60892 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning... addition of the map entitled ``Chukchi Sea Planning Area for Information and Nominations Lease Sale 237... Lease Sale 237 in the Chukchi Sea Planning Area, scheduled to be held in 2016, as included in...

  10. 77 FR 5529 - Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on.... SUMMARY: The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) will use Form 0008 to issue commercial renewable..., ``Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf,'' BOEM...

  11. 76 FR 70156 - Proposed 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ...-2011), a paper expanding upon the energy alternatives likely to replace OCS oil and gas in the absence... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Proposed 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing... on the Proposed 5-Year OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 (``Proposed Program''). This...

  12. 75 FR 26091 - Safety Zone; Riser for DEEPWATER HORIZON at Mississippi Canyon 252 Outer Continental Shelf MODU...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... HORIZON, a Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), at Mississippi Canyon 252 in the Outer Continental Shelf... Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), which has sunk in the deepwater area of the Gulf of Mexico near....T08-849 DEEPWATER HORIZON Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit Safety Zone. (a) Location. All areas...

  13. 78 FR 8190 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore North Carolina...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS... Information and Nominations for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power Offshore North Carolina (Call), published on December 13, 2012 (77 FR 7204). DATES: BOEM must receive your nomination describing your interest...

  14. 77 FR 47877 - Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Maine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... notice, BOEM receives one or more indications of competitive interest for offshore wind energy... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Maine; Request for Interest AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management...

  15. 78 FR 9420 - Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (CPA) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Lease Sale 227

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (CPA) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS... Mexico Region Public Information Office, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 1201 Elmwood Park Boulevard... completed: Green Canyon (OPD NG15-03) Block 20 Please Note: Bids on Blocks near the U.S.-Mexico Maritime...

  16. 78 FR 45558 - Western Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (WPA) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Lease Sale...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Western Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (WPA) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS... Diagrams (SOBDs) for blocks containing the U.S. 200 Nautical Mile Limit line and the U.S.-Mexico Maritime... in effect in the Western Gap area of the GOM after the United States and Mexico exchanged...

  17. 75 FR 70023 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western and Central Planning Areas, Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Mexico's WPA off the States of Texas and Louisiana and in the CPA off the States of Texas, Louisiana... Environment (MS 5410), Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Gulf of Mexico OCS... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western...

  18. 75 FR 62418 - Notice of Intent To Conduct a Review of Categorical Exclusions for Outer Continental Shelf Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Notice of Intent To Conduct a Review of Categorical Exclusions for Outer Continental Shelf Decisions AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management...: The Department of the Interior (DOI), Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and...

  19. 77 FR 29683 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Consolidated Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area Sale; 216/222

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Consolidated Central Gulf of Mexico... site: Gulf of Mexico Region Public Information Office, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 1201 Elmwood... Gulf of Mexico (Agreement). Bidders are advised to refer to the Bids on Blocks Near...

  20. 78 FR 59715 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 237 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior... later than November 12, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael S. Rolland, Chief,...

  1. Sedimentology and geochemistry of surface sediments, outer continental shelf, southern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Dean, W.E.; Vallier, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Present-day sediment dynamics, combined with lowerings of sea level during the Pleistocene, have created a mixture of sediments on the outer continental shelf of the southern Bering Sea that was derived from the Alaskan Mainland, the Aleutian Islands, and the Pribilof ridge. Concentrations of finer-grained, higher-organic sediments in the region of the St. George basin have further modified regional distribution patterns of sediment composition. Q-mode factor analysis of 58 variables related to sediment size and composition - including content of major, minor, and trace elements, heavy and light minerals, and clay minerals - reveals three dominant associations of sediment: 1. (1) The most significant contribution, forming a coarse-grained sediment scattered over most of the shelf consists of felsic sediment derived from the generally quartz-rich rocks of the Alaskan mainland. This sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Si, Ba, Rb, quartz, garnet, epidote, metamorphic rock fragments, potassium feldspar, and illite. 2. (2) The next most important group, superimposed on the felsic group consists of andesitic sediment derived from the Aleutian Islands. This more mafic sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Na, Ca, Ti, Sr, V, Mn, Cu, Fe, Al, Co, Zn, Y, Yb, Ga, volcanic rock fragments, glass, clinopyroxene, smectite, and vermiculite. 3. (3) A local group of basaltic sediment, derived from rocks of the Pribilof Islands, is a subgroup of the Aleutian andesite group. Accumulation of fine-grained sediment in St. George basin has created a sediment group containing relatively high concentrations of C, S, U, Li, B, Zr, Ga, Hg, silt, and clay. Sediment of the Aleutian andesite group exhibits a strong gradient, or "plume", with concentrations decreasing away from Unimak Pass and toward St. George basin. The absence of present-day currents sufficient to move even clay-size material as well as the presence of Bering submarine canyon between the Aleutian

  2. Processes controlling the characteristics of the surficial sand sheet, U.S. Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    A review of recent data on the velocity of bottom currents, the frequency of bottom-sediment movement, the kinds and amounts of suspended sediments in near-bottom waters, and the acoustic and sedimentary features of subbottom strata indicates that the characteristics of the ubiquitous sand sheet on the Atlantic outer continental shelf of the United States have been controlled by a variety of past and present processes. Although these processes collectively have had a widespread effect on the characteristics of the sand sheet, the relative importance of each process changes geographically. On Georges Bank, late Pleistocene glaciations along with modern tidal currents and the regional circulation pattern have played a dominant role. On the Middle Atlantic shelf, ancestral rivers, former near-shore processes, and modern wind- and wave-generated currents are important factors. On the South Atlantic shelf, the sediments reflect subaerial weathering, erosion or nondeposition over or near hardgrounds, and the production of biogenic carbonate. Other processes such as the movement of water masses, bioturbation, and bottom fishing probably have affected the sediments in all areas. A knowledge of the various factors affecting the sand sheet is fundamental to an understanding of its general geologic history and to the paleoenvironmental interpretation of ancient sand strata. ?? 1981.

  3. Distribution of modern benthic foraminifers on the New Jersey Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Knebel, H. J.; Todd, R.

    1980-01-01

    We used samples from 21 stations within a 600 km2 area of the New Jersey Outer Continental Shelf to assess the effects of a hydrodynamic environment on the distribution and redistribution of benthic foraminifers. These samples show that, although the predominant genera (Elphidium, Cibicides, and Saccammina) are the same as those reported by other investigators for this region, the environmental factors that control the generic distribution are more complex than were previously postulated. Generic distribution patterns derived from this study are correlated with the bottom topography and sediment distribution as well as the temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom waters. The six predominant species observed in the samples (and their phenotypic variants) are cryophilic forms known to occur in the Virginian and Nova Scotian biogeographic provinces and in Arctic waters. Species distribution patterns also correlate well with bottom topography and hydrographic factors, but may be modified by seasonal fluctuations in test production and by redistribution of dead tests. At most stations, specimens of Elphidium subarcticum were attached to quartz grains. This phenomenon, which has not been reported before, probably is an adaptation to a high-energy environment. The distribution pattern of Elphidium subarcticum along with those of the sessile species Webbinella concava and Vasiglobulina n.sp. corroborate sedimentological evidence that the accumulation of modern sediments in the area is negligible. ?? 1980.

  4. Factors controlling heavy-mineral variations on the South Texas outer continental shelf, Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Shideler, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    Heavy-mineral distribution on the outer continental shelf off the southern coast of Texas shows regional variability induced by provenance and local variability reflecting genetic differences in sea-floor sediments. Q-mode factor analysis showed that three suites of heavy minerals are present. The southern ancestral Rio Grande delta sediments contain a distinct opaque-pyroxene-garnet suite, whereas the northern ancestral Brazes-Colorado delta sediments contain a tourmaline-green hornblende suite. An interdelta region contains a heavy mineral suite that is mixed owing to contributions from both ancestral deltas. Analysis of variance, correlation, and regression methods indicate that heavy-mineral variations in each sedimentary province have been significantly influenced by hydraulic fractionation by size, shape, and density, and by a selective chemical decomposition of unstable minerals. These factors have operated at varying degrees on the relict, palimpsest, and modern sediment populations of the sedimentary provinces since the end of Pleistocene time. The differential effects of these processes on the sediments have resulted in local variations that contribute to the total mineralogical variability. A comparison of the heavy mineral suites of the modern and relict Rio Grande delta sediments, which are derived from a common provenance, also shows mineral variations resulting from factors other than provenance.

  5. The Toms Canyon structure, New Jersey outer continental shelf: A possible late Eocene impact crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C.W.; Poppe, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Toms Canyon structure [~20-22 km wide] is located on the New Jersey outer continental shelf beneath 80-100 m of water, and is buried by ~1 km of upper Eocene to Holocene sedimentary strata. The structure displays several characteristics typical of terrestrial impact craters (flat floor; upraised faulted rim: brecciated sedimentary fill), but several other characteristics are atypical (an unusually thin ejecta blanket; lack of an inner basin, peak ring, or central peak; bearing nearly completely filled with breccia). Seismostratigraphic and biostratigraphic analyses show that the structure formed during planktonic foraminiferal biochron P15 of the early to middle late Eocene. The fill unit is stratigraphically correlating with impact ejecta cored nearby at Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 612 and at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 903 and 904 (22-35 km southeast of the Toms Canyon structure). The Toms Canyon fill unit also correlates with the Exmore breccia, which fills the much larger Chesapeake Bay impact crater (90-km diameter; 335 km to the southwest). On the basis of our analyses, we postulate that the Toms Canyon structure is an impact crater, formed when a cluster of relatively small meteorites approached the target site bearing ~N 50 E, and struck the sea floor obliquely.

  6. Oil-spill risk analysis: Gulf of Mexico (Proposed Lease Sales 131/135/137) Outer Continental Shelf. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, L.J.; LaBelle, R.P.; Lear, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. In evaluating the significance of accidental oil spills, it is important to remember that the occurrence of such spills is fundamentally probabilistic. The effects of oil spills that could occur during oil and gas production must be considered. The report summarizes results of an oil spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 131/135/137. The objective of this analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sales.

  7. Arctic summary report: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Arctic and their onshore impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, C.; Slitor, D. L.; Rudolph, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Issues and developments occuring in the Arctic Outer Continental Shelf subregion are discussed. The geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Diapir Field petroleum provinces are detailed. Recent lease sales, exploration activities, and the first development proposals for offshore areas of the North slope are considered. Issues relating to transporting resources from production islands to shore and various proposals for moving Arctic hydrocarbons to market are presented. Production projects onshore and possible support bases for offshore activity are also examined.

  8. Hurricane Andrew's impact on natural gas and oil facilities on the outer continental shelf (interim report as of November 1993)

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The interim report reviews Hurricane Andrew's impact on Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) natural gas and oil drilling and production facilities. The report provides background on Hurricane Andrew's progression, discusses how OCS operators responded to the storm, summarizes the types of damage to offshore facilies caused by Hurricane Andrew, and discusses Minerals Management Service's continuing damage assessment and repair efforts. The summaries of damage estimates are presented in tables in Appendix 1. A glossary of report terminology is provided in Appendix 2.

  9. Geological and technological assessment of artificial reef sites, Louisiana outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, D.L.; Moslow, T.F.; Wagner, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the general procedures used to select sites for obsolete oil and gas platforms as artificial reefs on the Louisiana outer continental shelf (OCS). The methods employed incorporate six basic steps designed to resolve multiple-use conflicts that might otherwise arise with daily industry and commercial fishery operations, and to identify and assess both geological and technological constraints that could affect placement of the structures. These steps include: (1) exclusion mapping; (2) establishment of artificial reef planning areas; (3) database compilation; (4) assessment and interpretation of database; (5) mapping of geological and man-made features within each proposed reef site; and (6) site selection. Nautical charts, bathymetric maps, and offshore oil and gas maps were used for exclusion mapping, and to select nine regional planning areas. Pipeline maps were acquired from federal agencies and private industry to determine their general locations within each planning area, and to establish exclusion fairways along each pipeline route. Approximately 1600 line kilometers of high-resolution geophysical data collected by federal agencies and private industry was acquired for the nine planning areas. These data were interpreted to determine the nature and extent of near-surface geologic features that could affect placement of the structures. Seismic reflection patterns were also characterized to evaluate near-bottom sedimentation processes in the vicinity of each reef site. Geotechnical borings were used to determine the lithological and physical properties of the sediment, and for correlation with the geophysical data. Since 1987, five sites containing 10 obsolete production platforms have been selected on the Louisiana OCS using these procedures. Industry participants have realized a total savings of approximately US $1 500 000 in salvaging costs by converting these structures into artificial reefs. ?? 1993.

  10. A statistical overview of mass movement characteristics on the North American atlantic outer continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, James S.; O'Leary, Dennis W.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of 179 mass movements on the North American Atlantic continental slope and upper rise shows that slope failures have occurred throughout the geographic extent of the outer margin. Although the slope failures show no striking affinity for a particular depth as an origination level, there is a broad, primary mode centered at about 900 m. The resulting slides terminate at almost all depths and have a primary mode at 1100 m, but the slope/rise boundary (at 2200 m) also is an important mode. Slope failures have occurred at declivities ranging from 1° to 30° (typically, 4°); the resultant mass movement deposits vary in width from 0.2 to 50 km (typically, 1-2 km) and in length from 0.3 to 380 km (typically, 2–4 km), and they have been reported to be as thick as 650 m. On a numeric basis, mass movements are slightly more prevalent on open slopes than in other physiographic settings, and both translational and rotational failure surfaces are common. The typical mass movement is disintegrative in nature. Open slope slides tend to occur at lower slope angles and are larger than canyon slides. Further, large‐scale slides rather than small‐scale slides tend to originate on gentle slopes (≍ 3-4°). Rotational slope failures appear to have a slightly greater chance of occurring in canyons, but there is no analogous bias associated with translational failures. Similarly, disintegrative slides seem more likely to be associated with rotational slope failures than translational ones and are longer than their nondisintegrative counterparts. The occurrence of such a variety of mass movements at low declivities implies that a regional failure mechanism has prevailed. We suggest that earthquakes or, perhaps in some areas, gas hydrates are the most likely cause of the slope failures.

  11. Oil spills, 1971-75, Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danenberger, Elmer P.

    1976-01-01

    Oil spillage connected with federally supervised drilling and production activities has been a matter of wide public concern. In its supervision of mineral-resource development on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), the U.S. Geological Survey is responsible for the day-to-day inspection and monitoring of OCS oil and gas operations. During these activities, the U.S. Geological Survey records and investigates hydrocarbon discharges resulting from such operations. Beginning in 1971, all spills have been recorded, and a computer file has been maintained on all spills of 1 barrel or more. The total Gulf of Mexico OCS oil spillage recorded during January 1, 1971-December 31, 1975, amounted to 51,421 barrels. Production during that period amounted to 35,219 barrels per barrel spilled. In all, 5,857 spills were recorded, but 85.5 percent of the total spill volume was contributed by just 5 incidents. The environmental effect of these incidents apparently was minimal and of short duration. No spills of more than 50 barrels resulted from drilling operations during the period. The only spillage resulting from blowouts was caused by nondrilling incidents, including completion, production, and workover. The amount of oil discharged from spills of less than 50 barrels decreased by more than half between 1971 and 1975. The improvement reflects changes in the operating philosophy of the offshore industry, tightening of U.S. Geological Survey operating orders, and substantial increases in the inspection force. Most production-platform spills involve failures in the sump system, the separator system, or other hydrocarbon-handling equipment; improved sump-system designs and better high-low-level controls have reduced both the number and the volume of spills. Pipeline and pump spills also declined significantly, although the decline appears less attributable to revisions in OCS operating requirements. No operator consistently contributed a disproportionate amount of spillage. Most of

  12. An oilspill risk analysis for the South Atlantic (proposed sale 78) outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuels, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted for the South Atlantic (proposed sale 78) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lease area. The analysis considered the probability of spill occurrences based on historical trends; likely movement of oil slicks based on a climatological model ; and locations of environmental resources which could be vulnerable to spilled oil. The times between spill occurrence and contact with resources were estimated to aid analysts in estimating slick characteristics. Critical assumptions made for this particular analysis were: (1) that oil exists in the lease area, (2) that either 0.228 billion (mean case) or 1.14 billion (high case) barrels of oil will be found and produced from tracts sold in sale 78, and (3) that all the oil will be found either in the northern or the southern portion of the lease area. On the basis of these resource estimates, it was estimated that 1 to 5 oilspills of 1,000 barrels or greater will occur over the 25 to 30-year production life of the proposed sale 78 tracts. The results also depend upon the routes and methods chosen to transport oil from OCS platforms to shore. Given the above assumptions, the estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than 30 days is less than 15 percent for all cases considered; for spills 10,000 barrels or larger, the probability is less than 10 percent. These probabilities also reflect the following assumptions: oilspills remain intact for up to 30 days, do not weather, and are not cleaned up. It is noteworthy that over 80 percent of the risk of oilspill occurrence from proposed sale 78 is due to transportation rather than production of oil. In addition, the risks of oilspill occurrence from proposed sale 78 (mean resource estimate) are less than one-tenth of the risks of existing tanker transportation of crude oil imports and refined products in the South Atlantic area.

  13. Geological studies of the COST GE-1 well, United States South Atlantic outer continental shelf area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholle, Peter A.

    1979-01-01

    The COST No. GE-1 well is the first deep stratigraphic test to be drilled in the southern part of the U.S. Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (AOCS) area. The well was drilled within the Southeast Georgia Embayment to a total depth of 13,254 ft (4,040 m). It penetrated a section composed largely of chalky limestones to a depth of about 3,300 ft (1,000 m) below the drill platform. Limestones and calcareous shales with some dolomite predominate between 3,300 and 7,200 ft (1,000 and 2,200 m), whereas interbedded sandstones and shales are dominant from 7,200 to 11,000 ft (2,200 to 3,350 m). From 11,000 ft (3,350 m) to the bottom, the section consists of highly indurated to weakly metamorphosed pelitic sedimentary rocks and meta-igneous flows or intrusives. Biostratigraphic examination has shown that the section down to approximately 3,500 ft (1,060 m) is Tertiary, the interval from 3,500 to 5,900 ft (1,060 to 1,800 m) is Upper Cretaceous, and the section from 5,900 to 11,000 ft (1,800 to 3,350 m) is apparently Lower Cretaceous. The indurated to weakly metamorphosed section below 11,000 ft (3,350 m) is barren of fauna or flora but is presumed to be Paleozoic based on radiometric age determinations. Rocks deposited at upper-slope water depths were encountered in the Upper Cretaceous, Oligocene, and Miocene parts of the section. All other units were deposited in outer-shelf to terrestrial environments. Examination of cores, well cuttings, and electric logs shows that potential hydrocarbon-reservoir units are present within the chalks in the uppermost part of the section as well as in sandstone beds to a depth of at least 10,000 ft (3,000 m). Sandstones below that depth, and the metamorphic section between 11,000 and 13.250 ft (3,350 and 4,040 m) have extremely low permeabilities and are unlikely to contain potential reservoir rock. Studies of organic geochemistry, vitrinite reflectance, and color alteration of visible organic matter indicate that the chalk section down to

  14. Oil-spill risk analysis: Central and western Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf, Lease Sales 139 and 141. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Lear, E.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. The effects of oil spills that could occur during oil and gas production must be considered. The report summarizes results of an oil spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 139 and 141.

  15. Geology of the head of Lydonia Canyon, U.S. Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    The geology of the part of Lydonia Canyon shoreward of the continental shelf edge on the southern side of Georges Bank was mapped using high-resolution seismic-reflection and side-scan sonar techniques and surface sediment grab samples. The head of the canyon incises Pleistocene deltaic deposits and Miocene shallow marine strata. Medium sand containing some coarse sand and gravel covers the shelf except for a belt of very fine sand containing no gravel on either side of the canyon in water depths of 125-140 m. Gravel and boulders, presumably ice-rafted debris, cover the rim of the canyon. The canyon floor and canyon wall gullies are covered by coarse silt of Holocene age which is as much as 25 m thick, and Miocene and Pleistocene strata are exposed on the spurs between gullies. The Holocene sediment is restricted to the canyon shoreward of the shelf edge and has been winnowed from the shelf. Furrows cut in the shelf sands and ripples on the shelf and in the canyon suggest that sediment continues to be moved in this area. Sediment distribution, however, is inconsistent with that expected from the inferred westward sediment transport on the shelf. Either the fine-grained deposits on the shelf to either side of the canyon head are relict or there is a significant component of offshore transport around the canyon head. In the head of Oceanographer Canyon, only 40 km west of Lydonia Canyon, present conditions are strikingly different. The floor of Oceanographer Canyon is covered by sand waves, and their presence indicates active reworking of the bottom sediments by strong currents. The close proximity of the two canyons suggests that the relative importance of processes acting in canyons can be variable over short distances. ?? 1983.

  16. Oil-spill risk analysis: Outer continental shelf lease sale 158, Gulf of Alaska/Yakutat. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.M.; Johnson, W.R.; Marshall, C.F.; Lear, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Gulf of Alaska/Yakutat for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. The report summarizes results of an oil-spill risk analysis conducted for OCS Lease Sale 158, Gulf of Alaska/Yakutat. The objective of this analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sale.

  17. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The area designated for possible oil and gas lease sale in Bureau of Land Management memorandum 3310 #43 (722) and referred to therein as part of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) contains about 98,000 square kilometres of the continental margin seaward of the 3 mile offshore limit and within the 600 metre isobath. The designated area, offshore of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, encompasses parts of three physiographic provinces: the Continental Shelf, the Florida-Hatteras Slope, and the Blake Plateau. The structural framework of the U.3. South Atlantic region is dominated by the Southeast Georgia Embayment --an east-plunging depression recessed into the Atlantic Coastal Plain and shelf between Cape Fear, North Carolina and Jacksonville, Florida. The embayment is bounded to the north by the Cape Fear Arch and to southeast by the Peninsular Arch. Refraction data indicate a minor basement(?) ridge beneath the outer shelf between 30? and 32?N at 80?W. Drill hole data also suggest a gentle fold or accretionary structure (reef?) off the east coast of Florida. Several other structural features have been identified by refraction and reflection techniques and drilling. These are the Yamacraw Uplift, Burton High, Stone Arch, and the Suwannee Channel. Gravity and magnetic anomalies within the area probably result from emplacement of magma bodies along linear features representing fundamental crustal boundaries. Of these anomalies, the most prominent, is a segment of the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly which crosses the coast at Brunswick, Georgia. This anomaly has been interpreted as representing an ancient continental boundary where two formerly separate continental plates collided and were welded together. There may be as much as 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks in the Southeast Georgia Embayment out to the 600 m isobath. Basement rocks beneath the Southeast Georgia Embayment are expected to be similar to those exposed in the

  18. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter of the mid and outer continental shelf, head of De Soto Canyon, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Hughes-Clarke, John E.; Meyer, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    The mid to outer continental shelf off Mississippi-Alabama and off northwest Florida were the focus of US Geological Survey (USGS) multibeam echosounder (MBES) mapping cruises in 2000 and 2001, respectively. These areas were mapped to investigate the extent of "deep-water reefs" first suggested by Ludwick and Walton (1957). The reefs off Mississippi and Alabama were initially described in water depths of 60 to 120 m (Ludwick and Walton, 1957) but the 2000 mapping found reef and hardgrounds to be much more extensive than previously thought (Gardner et al., 2001). The persistent trend of reef-like features along the outer shelf of Mississippi-Alabama suggested the trend might continue along the northwest Florida mid and outer shelf so a MBES-mapping effort was mounted in 2001 to test this suggestion. It is critical to determine the accurate location, geomorphology, and types of the ridges and reefs that occur in this region to understand the Quaternary history of the area and to assess their importance as benthic habitats for fisheries. The 2001 survey found a series of shelf-depth platforms with ridges (possibly reefs) constructed on their surfaces (Gardner et al., 2002). The area known as the "head of De Soto Canyon" is the large unmapped region between the 2000 and 2001 mapped areas. The head of De Soto Canyon is an outer shelf zone with a relatively steep western wall and a much gentler eastern wall. It was unknown prior to this cruise whether the reefs of the Mississippi-Alabama shelf continue eastward into the head of De Soto Canyon and connect with the ridges and reefs mapped on the northwest Florida outer shelf. The existence of carbonate-cemented latest Quaternary to Holocene sandstones along the western wall of the head of De Soto Canyon (Shipp and Hopkins, 1978; Benson et al., 1997; W.W. Schroeder, personnel comm., 2002) is of interest because of the potential benthic habitats they may represent. Precisely georeferenced high-resolution mapping of

  19. Multichannel seismic depth sections and interval velocities over outer continental shelf and upper continental slope between Cape Hatteras and Cape Cod: rifted margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grow, John A.; Mattick, Robert E.; Schlee, John S.

    1979-01-01

    Six computer-generated seismic depth sections over the outer continental shelf and upper slope reveal that subhorizontal Lower Cretaceous reflectors continue 20 to 30 km seaward of the present shelf edge. Extensive erosion on the continental slope has occurred primarily during the Tertiary, causing major unconformities and retreat of the shelf edge to its present position. The precise age and number of erosional events is not established, but at least one major erosional event is thought to be Oligocene and related to a marine regression in response to a worldwide eustatic lowering of sea level. Velocities derived from the multichannel data reveal distinctive ranges and lateral trends as functions of sediment age, depth of burial, and distance from the coastline. Seismic units beneath the shelf and slope of inferred Tertiary age range from 1.7 to 2.7 km/sec, increasing with age and depth of burial. Units interpreted as Upper Cretaceous rocks beneath the shelf range from 2.3 to 3.6 km/sec and show a distinct lateral increase across the shelf followed by a decrease beneath the present continental slope. Inferred Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic rocks beneath the shelf increase from 3.7 to 4.8 km/sec from nearshore to offshore and indicate a change in facies from clastic units below the inner shelf to carbonate units beneath the outer shelf and upper continental slope. Both reflection and refraction data suggest that thin, high-velocity limestone units (5.0 km/sec) are present within the Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic units beneath the outermost shelf edge, but that these change lithology or pinch out before reaching the middle shelf. Although lateral changes in velocity across the shelf and local velocity inversions appear, the interval velocities along the length of the margin show excellent continuity between Cape Hatteras and Cape Cod. The high-velocity horizons within the Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic shelf-edge complex indicate the presence of a

  20. 75 FR 18404 - Safety Zone; FRONTIER DISCOVERER, Outer Continental Shelf Drillship, Chukchi and Beaufort Sea...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... Continental Shelf Drillship, Chukchi and Beaufort Sea, Alaska'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 803). The NPRM... discussion of the background and purpose for this rule can be found in the preamble to the NPRM (75 FR 803..., while anchored or deploying and recovering moorings on location in order to drill exploratory wells...

  1. Outer continental shelf environmental-assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 68

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The contents of this study include the following: biological reconnaissance of Boulder Island Shoal in western Camden Bay, Beaufort Sea, Alaska; the Chukchi Sea continental shelf: benthos-environmental interactions; ecological assessment of sublittoral plant communities in the northern Gulf of Alaska; and ecology of unconsolidated beaches in Lower Cook Inlet.

  2. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 33

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    This ccompilation of five final reports deals with the distribution and dynamics of heavy metals in Alaskan Shelf environments; characterization of organic matter in sediments; distribution of trace elements in bottom sediment of the Northern Bering Sea; aspects of size distributions, clay mineralogy, and geochemistry of sediments of the Beaufort Sea and adjacent deltas; and the natural distribution and dynamics of hydrocarbons on the Alaskan continental shelf.

  3. An oilspill risk analysis for the eastern Gulf of Mexico (proposed sale 65) Outer Continental Shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyant, Timothy; Slack, James R.

    1978-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine the relative environmental hazards of developing oil in different regions of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf lease area. The study analyzed the probability of spill occurrence, likely paths of the spills, and locations in space and time of such objects as recreational and biological resources likely to be vulnerable. These results combined to yield estimates of the overall oilspill risk associated with development of the proposed lease area. This risk is compared to the existing oilspill risk from existing leases in the area. The analysis implicitly includes estimates of weathering rates and slick dispersion and an indication of the possible mitigating effects of cleanups.

  4. Bathymetric map of Lydonia Canyon, U.S. Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Moody, John A.

    1984-01-01

    Lydonia Canyon is one of several large submarine canyons that indent the eastern U.S. Continental Shelf along the southern flank of Georges Bank (Index map).  This bathymetric map of the upper part of Lydonia Canyon (water depths shallower than about 2,00 m) was prepared as part of a study of the physical oceanography and geology of Lydonia Canyon (Butman and others, 1983; Twichell, 1983).  An accurate map of the canyon at a scale of at least 1:50,000 was needed for placement of current-meter morrings, for location of hydrographic and sediment sampling stations, and for interpretation of current-meter and geologic data. The map covers the area from 40°10'N. to 40°40'N. and from 67°28'W. to 67°50'W. 

  5. 78 FR 64237 - Information Collection: General and Oil and Gas Production Requirements in the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Information Collection: General and Oil and Gas Production Requirements.... MMAA104000 SUMMARY: To comply with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), the Bureau of Ocean Energy... Clearance Officer, Arlene Bajusz, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 381 Elden Street, HM-3127,...

  6. 76 FR 71595 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Eastern Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales for Years 2012-2017

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Eastern Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas...) in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) to be included in the OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017. Two... information on the Call, please contact Mr. Carrol Williams, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Gulf of...

  7. Latest Pleistocene Sediment Wedge on the New Jersey Outer Continental Shelf - Forced Regressive Paleo-Hudson Delta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, M.; Goff, J. A.; Steel, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The offlapping sediment wedge on the outer shelf off New Jersey that overlies the regional reflector R-horizon shows many of the characteristic features of a progradational succession deposited during falling sea level (forced regression). This interpretation is consistent with the estimated latest Pleistocene age of the wedge - a well-established period of large-scale eustatic sea level fall. The sediment wedge occupies the outer shelf of New Jersey south of the Hudson Shelf Valley, extending down to the shelf edge. The sediment wedge appears to be strongly strike-oriented. The absence of any record of time-equivalent fluvial/distributary channels on the proximal part of the sediment wedge led some previous workers to the interpretation that the wedge was a product of redistribution of sediment on the shelf rather than a deltaic feature supplied by a fluvial source. The absence of fluvial and coastal plain deposits capping the proximal end of the wedge is actually a characteristic feature of forced regressive deposits and does not preclude a fluvial source for the sediments constituting the wedge. Reinterpretation of high-resolution (1-12 kHz), deep-towed and hull-mounted CHIRP seismic data collected on the New Jersey outer shelf in 2001, 2002 and 2006 shows possible terminal distributary channel deposits and mass transport deposits preserved in the distal part of the wedge that have not been described previously. These channel-like features are restricted in their distribution and their preservation in the sedimentary record is possibly due to punctuated sea-level rise within the overall falling trajectory of sea level that preceded the last glacial maximum (LGM). The presence of these channels and the mass transport complexes point to a direct fluvial feeder, which supplied the sediments to build the sediment wedge on New Jersey outer continental shelf. Detailed mapping of the sediment wedge using the CHIRP data shows that the sediment wedge is composed of

  8. Evidence of post-Pleistocene faults on New Jersey Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheridan, R.E.; Knebel, H. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recently obtained high-resolution seismic profiles (400-4,000-Hz band) show evidence of faults in shallow sedimentary strata near the edge of the Atlantic continental shelf off New Jersey. Apparent normal faults having a throw of about 1.5 m displace sediments to within 7 m of the sea floor. The faults appear to be overlain by undeformed horizontal beds of relatively recent age. Several faults 1 to 2 km apart strike approximately N70°E and dip northwest. The data suggest that the faults are upthrown on the southeast. Projection of the faults on the high-resolution profiles to a nearby multichannel seismic-reflection profile indicates that these shallow faults might be the near-surface expression of a more fundamental deep-seated fault. Several prominent reflectors in the multichannel records are offset by a high-angle normal fault reaching depths of 4.0 to 5.0 sec (6.0 to 6.5 km). The deep fault on the multichannel line also is upthrown on the southeast. Throws of as much as 90 m are apparent at depth, but offsets of as much as 10 m could be present in the shallower parts of the section that may not be resolved in the multichannel data. The position and strike of these faults coincide with and parallel the East Coast magnetic anomaly interpreted as the fundamental seaward basement boundary of the Baltimore Canyon trough. Recurring movements along such boundary faults are expected theoretically if the marginal basins are subsiding in response to the plate rotation of North America and seafloor spreading in the Atlantic.

  9. Organic matter diagenesis and hydrocarbon generation on outer Continental Margin of northwestern Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, P.A.; Snowdon, L.R.; Heggie, D.; Bent, A.

    1989-03-01

    Organic geochemical analyses of sediments and rocks obtained from drill sites on the Exmouth and Wombat Plateaus and the Argo Abyssal Plain on the northwestern margin of Australia were done onboard the JOIDES Resolution during Ocean Drilling Program Legs 122 and 123. These analyses provide information about the sources of organic matter to these offshore locations from Triassic to Holocene times and also indicate the degree of postdepositional diagenesis and maturation the organic matter has experienced. Because this margin has interest to petroleum explorationists, these data have practical as well as fundamental significance. Triassic claystones (equivalent to the onshore Mungeroo Formation) from the Wombat Plateau contain up to several percent of land-derived organic carbon. Neocomian siltstones and claystones (equivalent to the Barrow Group and Muderong Shale) from the Exmouth Plateau hold similar organic matter but at lower concentrations. Younger sediments are generally very lean in organic matter. Gas chromatographic analysis of extractable hydrocarbons shows a large and often dominant contribution of continental components, notably n-alkanes with a strong odd/even ratio and tricyclic diterpanes. Both Rock-Eval and hydrocarbon results agree in indicating low to moderate levels of thermal maturity. Locations on the Exmouth Plateau typically contain large amounts of thermogenic gaseous hydrocarbons dominated by methane. Concentrations peak in Senonian chalk sequences. In Neocomian siltstones and claystones, methane-ethane ratios diminish as concentrations decrease. The source of these hydrocarbons is likely to be the Triassic coals and coaly material below the Dingo claystone, which was not drilled during these legs but has been characterized from industry wells on this passive margin.

  10. An oilspill risk analysis of the Mid-Atlantic (Proposed Sale 49) outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, James Richard; Wyant, Timothy

    1978-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine the relative environmental hazards of developing oil in different regions of the mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf lease area. The study analyzed the probability of spill occurrence, likely paths of the spilled oil, and locations in space and time of recreational and biological resources that are likely to be vulnerable. These results are combined to yield estimates of the overall oilspill risk associated with development of the proposed lease area. The analysis implicitly includes estimates of weathering rates and slick dispersion and an indication of the possible mitigating effects of cleanups. Assuming that economically recoverable amounts of petroleum are found in the area, the leasing of the tracts proposed for sale 49 will increase the expected number of spills by about 20-25 percent over the number expected from the existing (sale 40) leases. The probability that an object such as land will be contacted by a spill is increased by at most five percentage points. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Oil-spill risk analysis: Cook inlet outer continental shelf lease sale 149. Volume 1. The analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Marshall, C.F.; Anderson, C.M.; Lear, E.M.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes results of an oil-spill risk analysis (OSRA) conducted for the proposed lower Cook Inlet Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Lease Sale 149. The objective of this analysis was to estimate relative oil-spill risks associated with oil and gas production from the leasing alternatives proposed for the lease sale. The Minerals Management Service (MMS) will consider the analysis in the environmental impact statement (EIS) prepared for the lease sale. The analysis for proposed OCS Lease Sale 149 was conducted in three parts corresponding to different aspects of the overall problem. The first part dealt with the probability of oil-spill occurrence. The second dealt with trajectories of oil spills from potential spill sites to various environmental resources or land segments. The third part combined the results of the first two parts to give estimates of the overall oil-spill risk if there is oil production as a result of the lease sale. To aid the analysis, conditional risk contour maps of seasonal conditional probabilities of spill contact were generated for each environmental resource or land segment in the study area (see vol. 2).

  12. Oil-spill risk analysis: Central and western Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 142 and 143. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.M.; Lear, E.M.

    1992-03-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. In evaluating the significance of accidental oil spills, it is important to remember that the occurrence of such spills is fundamentally probabilistic. The effects of oil spills that could occur during oil and gas production must be considered. The report summarizes results of an oil spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 142 and 143. The objective of the analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sales.

  13. Oil-spill risk analysis: Central and Western Gulf of Mexico (Proposed Lease Sales 123 and 125) Outer Continental Shelf. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, L.J.; Lear, E.M.

    1990-06-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Central and Western Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing. Oil spills are a major concern associated with offshore oil production. In evaluating the significance of accidental oil spills, it is important to remember that the occurrence of such spills is fundamentally probabilistic. The effects of oil spills that could occur during oil and gas production must be considered. The report summarizes results of and oil spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 123 125. The objective of the analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sales.

  14. Examples of deep-water-bottom multiple dereverberation techniques applied to seismic-reflection data from the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Steven D.; Balch, A.H.; Patterson, W.C.; Taylor, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    Seismic-reflection data recorded in deep water over the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf are often dominated by multiply-reflected seismic energy. This energy reverberates between the surface of the water and the seafloor (or other strong reflectors), and makes portions of the seismic data completely useless. Several different data-processing techniques can be applied to partially suppress these multiples and enhance the interpretability of the data. These techniques include (1) the three-point operator, (2) predictive deconvolution, (3) near-trace muting, (4) spatially variant bandpass filters, (5) Nth root stack, and (6) trace distance weighting. Application of these methods to several seismic lines indicates that trace distance weighting is the most useful method studied for suppressing deep-water-bottom multiples for data from the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf.

  15. Depositional history of the post-glacial transgression on the outer continental shelf of the Gulf of Lions (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassetti, M. A.; Jouet, G.; Berne, S.; Taviani, M.; Leroux, E.; Perez-Belmonte, L.

    2004-12-01

    Late Pleistocene sedimentation on the Gulf of Lions continental shelf was investigated using a combination of seismic, sedimentological and geochronological methods. According to the calibrated age data generated in the cores material, a correlation between the transgressive seismic units (and associate coastal features) and the post-glacial climatic/sea level changes was attempted. The formation of trangressive deposits was favoured during short-term cool episodes, such as Younger Dryas Event, as well as ancient sea-level positions can be assigned on the basis of the easily recognizable coastal features. The internal structure of the transgressive deposits and sedimentation processes are largely controlled by the nature of sea-level rise (deceleration or short-lived sea-level stillstands), sediment supply changes, and paleogeographic/paleoceanographic conditions related to post-glacial transgression. Sedimentological data (sedimentary facies and fossil content) and depositional ages determined on the 14C radiocarbon dating of well-preserved fossil shells allow us to establish a chronostratigraphic sequence that concerns the transgressive deposits of the Gulf of Lions. In particular, the combined use of available data permit: (1) to trace the ravinement surfaces, possibly related to mpwIA and mpwIB events, throughout the outer shelf; (2) to detect the nature of preserved sedimentary bodies that are mainly related to the deceleration of sea-level rise during the major post-glacial cold event (submerged dunes formed during Younger Dryas); (3) to describe the characteristics of the ravinement deposits and the degree of preservation of relict sediments on the shelf depositional environments. In fact, the post-Last Glacial Maximum transgressive phase occurs as complete record in the low-gradient outer shelf of the Gulf of Lions, but the deposits show a thickness that is considerably thinner with respect to the inner shelf area. They are seen as the distal part of the

  16. Oil-Spill Analysis: Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Lease Sales, Eastern Planning Area, 2003-2007 and Gulfwide OCS Program, 2003-2042

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    The Federal Government plans to offer U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lands in the Eastern Planning Area of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) for oil and gas leasing. This report summarizes results of that analysis, the objective of which was to estimate the risk of oil-spill contact to sensitive offshore and onshore environmental resources and socioeconomic features from oil spills accidentally occurring from the OCS activities.

  17. Geological studies on the COST No. B-2 well, U. S. Mid-Atlantic outer continental shelf area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholle, Peter A.

    1977-01-01

    The COST No. B-2 well is the first deep stratigraphic test to be drilled on the United States Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (AOCS) area. The well was drilled on the eastern flank of the Baltimore Canyon trough to a total depth of 16,043 feet; it penetrated a section composed almost entirely of sand and shale with subordinate amounts of limestone, coal, and lignite. Biostratigraphic studies have shown that the uppermost 5,000 feet is of Tertiary and Quaternary age and was deposited in nonmarine to deep marine environments. The Upper Cretaceous section is about 3,000 feet thick and is of dominantly shallow marine origin. The basal 8,000 feet of sediment has been tentatively determined to be entirely of Early Cretaceous age, the basal sediments being dated as Berriasian. This Lower Cretaceous section is primarily nonmarine to very shallow marine in origin. Examination of cores, well cuttings, and electric logs shows that thick potential reservoir sands are found through much of the section. However, porosity and permeability decrease strikingly in the deeper parts of the Lower Cretaceous section as a result of compaction and cementation. Most of the sands are quite feldspathic, and progressive decomposition of feldspar stimulates authigenic clay and silica formation. Studies of color alteration of visible organic matter, organic geochemistry, and vitrinite reflectance show that although many units have high organic-carbon contents, moderately low geothermal gradients may have retarded thermal maturation. This, in conjunction with the scarcity of marine-derived organic matter in the lower part of the section, suggests a relatively low potential for the generation of liquid hydrocarbons. However, the overall combination of source beds, reservoirs, seals, structures, and thermal gradients may be favorable for the generation and entrapment of natural gas. Furthermore, the presence of reservoir rocks, seals, and trapping structures may indicate a significant potential

  18. Physiography and late Quaternary-Holocene processes of Northeastern Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf off Mississippi and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Dartnell, P.; Sulak, K.J.; Calder, B.; Hellequin, L.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution multibeam mapping of the mid- and outer continental shelf and upper slope off Mississippi and Alabama reveals a complex bathymetry that reflects conditions during the last eustatic rise and the present high stand of sea level. The most prominent bathymetric features are pinnacles and hardgrounds that are scattered throughout the area. These features generally stand <10 m above the surrounding seafloor, cover large areas, and display a variety of morphologies. Almost all the reef pinnacles and hardgrounds have zones of high acoustic backscatter on their summits and on the seafloor immediately adjacent to their southwest walls. In addition, they also have erosional moats on the seafloor to the southwest. Large fields of bedforms are scattered throughout the mapped area. The asymmetries and orientations of the bedforms suggest that they were formed by excursions of the northeast-flowing Loop Current. In contrast, the pervasive ponding of sediment on the northeast sides of bathymetric highs indicates that one of the predominant directions of sediment transport has been to the south and southwest. The shelf break is a zone of numerous landslides of various sizes and complexities. The morphology of several landslide scars indicates that some of the failures occurred recently. One large reef-capped salt dome was mapped in the area, surrounded by a large field of pock-marks. Fields of pockmarks are also scattered on the shelf. The growth and demise of the reefs are related to the fluctuating transgression of eustatic sea level during the last deglaciation. Two episodes of reef drowning are correlated with the increased rates of sea-level rise during documented melt-water pulses; the first occurred from 14.8 to 14.2 ka and the second from 11.8 to 11.2 ka. Rates of sea-level rise exceeded the maximum growth rate of hermatypic corals only during these two intervals since the last glacial maximum and thus drowned the coral communities.

  19. An oilspill risk analysis for the Mid-Atlantic (proposed sale 76) outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuels, W.B.; Hopkins, Dorothy

    1982-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted for the mid-Atlantic (proposed sale 76) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lease area. The analysis considered: the probability of spill occurrences based on historical trends; likely movement of oil slicks based on a climatological model; and locations of environmental resources which could be vulnerable to spilled oil. The times between spill occurrence and contact with resources were estimated to aid analysts in estimating slick characteristics. Critical assumptions made for this particular analysis were (1) that oil exists in the lease area, and (2) that 0.879 billion barrels of oil will be found and produced from tracts sold in sale 76. On the basis of this resource estimate, it was calculated that 3 to 4 oilspills of 1,000 barrels or greater will occur over the 30-year production life of the proposed sale 76 lease tracts. The results also depend upon the routes and methods chosen to transport oil from 0CS platforms to shore. Given the above assumptions, the estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than 30 days is 0.36; for spills 10,000 barrels or larger, the probability is 0.22. These probabilities also reflect the following assumptions: oilspills remain intact for up to 30 days, do not weather, and are not cleaned up. It is noteworthy that over 90 percent of the risk from proposed sale 76 is due to transportation rather than production of oil. In addition, the risks from proposed sale 76 are about 1/10 to 1/15 those of existing tanker transportation of crude oil imports and refined products in the mid-Atlantic area.

  20. H.R. 1282: A Bill to provide enhanced energy security through incentives to explore and develop frontier areas of the Outer Continental Shelf and to enhance production of the domestic oil and gas resources in deep water areas of the Outer Continental Shelf. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, March 10, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The report H.R. 1282 is a bill to provide enhanced energy security through incentives to explore and develop frontier areas of the Outer Continental Shelf and to enhance production of the domestic oil and gas resources in deep water areas. The proposed legislative text is included.

  1. An oilspill risk analysis for the Beaufort Sea, Alaska (proposed sale 71)outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuels, W.B.; Hopkins, Dorothy; Lanfear, K.J.

    1981-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine the relative environmental hazards of developing oil in different regions of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska, (Proposed Sale 71) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lease area. The probability of spill occurrences, likely movement of oil slicks, and locations of resources vulnerable to spilled oil were analyzed. The model predicted movement of the center of spill mass and estimated the times between spill occurrence and contact with various resources, to allow a qualitative assessment of oil characteristics at the time of contact; no direct computation was made of weathering and cleanup. The model also assumed that any oil spilled under ice would remain in place, unchanged, until spring breakup. Ice movements, or travel of oil under ice, if occurring, would affect the results in a manner not directly predictable at this time. The combined results of spill occurrence and spill movement predictions yielded estimates of the overall risks associated with development of the proposed lease area. Assuming that oil exists in the lease area (a 99.3-percent chance) it is estimated that the leasing of the tracts proposed for OCS Sale 71 will result in an expected 9.2 oilspills (of 1,000 barrels or larger) over the lease lifetime of 25 years. This estimate is based on historic oilspill accident data for platforms and pipelines on the U.S. OCS (Gulf of Mexico and California). The estimated probability that land will be contacted by one or more oilspills (of 1,000 barrels or larger) that have been at sea less than 30 days (not counting any time trapped under ice) is greater than 99.5 percent. If oilspill accident data for Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, is used in the analysis, it is estimated that 5.6 oilspills (1,000 barrels or larger) will occur over the lease lifetime. The estimated probability that one or more oilspills (1,000 barrels or larger)will occur and contact land is99 percent. The results of a recent experimental cleanup operation for

  2. An oilspill risk analysis for the Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf lease area; regional environmental impact statement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaBelle, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted for the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)lease area region. Results of the analysis can be used to determine relative risks associated with oil production in different regions to be offered in OCS Lease Sales 72, 74, and 79. The analysis considered the probability of spill occurrences based on historical trends; likely movement of oil slicks based on a climatological model; and locations of major environmental resources which could be vulnerable to spilled oil. The times between spill occurrence and contact with resources were estimated to aid in estimating slick characteristics. Critical assumptions made for this particular analysis were (1) that oil exists in the lease area, and (2) that oil will be, found and produced from tracts sold in sales 72, 74, and 79. On the basis of a most likely resource estimate of 241 million barrels of oil to be produced over an 18-year production life from sales to be held in 1983 (sales 72, 74, 79), it was calculated that approximately one oilspill of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur. The estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than 30 days is 41-percent. For a high resource estimate case of sales to be held in 1983, 717 million barrels are estimated to be produced over an 18-year production life with an 83-percent chance of one or more spills of 1,000 barrels or larger occurring and contacting land within 30 days. These results depend upon the routes and methods chosen to transport oil from OCS platforms to shore. Given a total development scenario in which 5.6 billion barrels of oil are estimated to be present and produced, it was calculated that 18 oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur over the 40-year production life of the proposed lease area. The estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than

  3. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The area designated for possible oil and gas lease sale as modified from BLM memorandum 3310 #42 (722) and referred to therein as the North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) contains about 58,300 sq km of shelf beneath water depths of less than 200 m and lies chiefly within the Georges Bank basin. The oldest sediments drilled or dredged on the bordering Continental Slope are sandstone, clay, and silt of Upper Cretaceous age. In Upper Cretaceous exposures, on Marthas Vineyard and nearby New England islands, the predominant lithology appears to be clay. About 125 km northeast of the eastern tip of Georges Bank, the Shell B-93 well penetrated clays and silts of Upper and Lower Cretaceous age above dense Jurassic carbonate rocks which overlie a basement of lower Paleozoic slate, schist, quartzite, and granite. Structurally, the Georges Bank basin is a westerly trending trough which opens to the west-southwest. Post-Paleozoic sediments are more than 8 km thick in parts of the basin. Major structural features appear to be directly related to basement structures. Local anticlines, probably caused by differential compaction over basement flexures and horst blocks or by later uplift along basement faults are reflected principally in Lower Cretaceous and older sediments, though some of these features continue upward to within 0.7 of a second (about 650 m) of the seafloor. Tertiary deposits in the Georges Bank basin are probably up to a kilometre thick and are made up of poorly consolidated sand, silt, and clay. The Cretaceous section is inferred to be up to 3.5 km thick and to be mainly clastics -- shale, siltstone, calcareous shale, changing to limestone in the lowest part of the system. Jurassic rocks in the deepest part of the basin appear to be about 3.6 to 4.0 km thick and probably consist mainly of dense carbonates. Potential source rocks in the Georges Bank basin may include organic-rich Cretaceous shale and carbonaceous Jurassic limestone. By analogy with the

  4. 78 FR 65705 - Request for Comments on the Annual Progress Report on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM... (Report) on the OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program 2012-2017 (Five Year Program). The Annual Progress Report... the Five Year Program is available online at...

  5. 77 FR 4360 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale for Outer... Mexico AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability of the... Energy Management, 1201 Elmwood Park Boulevard, New Orleans, Louisiana 70123-2394. Telephone: (504)...

  6. 77 FR 43355 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale for Outer... AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability of the Proposed.... Beaudreau, Director, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. BILLING CODE 4310-MR-P...

  7. 75 FR 32273 - Safety Zone; DEEPWATER HORIZON at Mississippi Canyon 252 Outer Continental Shelf MODU in the Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... DEEPWATER HORIZON, a Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), at Mississippi Canyon 252 in the Outer.... 147.T08-849 to read as follows: Sec. 147.T08-849 DEEPWATER HORIZON Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit... Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), that sank in the deepwater area of the Gulf of Mexico...

  8. 78 FR 760 - Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... competitive interest for a commercial lease for wind energy development on the OCS offshore New York for the... indications of competitive interest for offshore wind energy development from qualified entities that wish to... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer...

  9. 75 FR 17159 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale (NOS) for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Minerals Management Service Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale (NOS) for Outer... (GOM) AGENCY: Minerals Management Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability of the proposed NOS... potential bidders may be obtained from the Public Information Unit, Gulf of Mexico Region,...

  10. Paleomagnetism of sedimentary cores from the Ross Sea outer shelf and continental slope (PNRA-ROSSLOPE II Project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrì, Patrizia; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Caricchi, Chiara; Colizza, Ester

    2016-04-01

    We carried out a paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of 4 gravity cores sampled in the Ross Sea continental slope of the area to the east of Pennell-Iselin banks. The cores (RS14-C1, C2, C3 and ANTA99-C20) consist of hemipelagic fine-grained (silty-clays) sediments with an IRD component. Rock magnetic and paleomagnetic measurements were carried out at 1-cm spacing on u-channel samples. The data indicate that the cored sediments carry a well-defined characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) and have a valuable potential to reconstruct dynamics and amplitude of the geomagnetic field variation at high southern latitudes (ca. 75°S) during the Holocene and the late Pleistocene. The paleomagnetic and rock magnetic data are integrated in a multidisciplinary context which includes previous geological, geophysical, oceanographic and morpho-bathimetric data obtained in the same area in the frame of the PNRA/ROSSLOPE (Past and present sedimentary dynamic in the ROSS Sea: a multidisciplinary approach to study the continental slope) Project. The main aim of the project is to investigate the relation between present and past water mass circulation and to provide a basis for paleoceanographic reconstructions and for the development of a depositional model of the modern processes active along the continental slope.

  11. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter of the mid and outer continental shelf, head of De Soto Canyon, northeastern Gulf of Mexico: data, images, and GIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Hughes-Clarke, John E.; Mayer, Larry A.; Dartnell, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The mid to outer continental shelf off Mississippi-Alabama and off northwest Florida were the focus of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) multibeam echosounder (MBES) mapping cruises in 2000 and 2001, respectively. These areas were mapped to investigate the extent of "deep-water reefs" first suggested by Ludwig and Walton (1957). The reefs off Mississippi and Alabama were initially described in water depths of 60 to 120 m (Ludwig and Walton, 1957) but the 2000 mapping found reef and hardgrounds to be much more extensive than previously thought (Gardner et al., 2001). The persistent trend of reef-like features along the outer shelf of Mississippi-Alabama suggested the trend might continue along the northwest Florida mid and outer shelf so a MBES-mapping effort was mounted in 2001 to test this suggestion. It is critical to determine the accurate location, geomorphology, and types of the ridges and reefs that occur in this region to understand the Quaternary history of the area and to assess their importance as benthic habitats for fisheries. The area known as the "Head of De Soto Canyon" is the large unmapped region between the 2000 and 2001 mapped areas. It was unknown whether the reefs of the Mississippi-Alabama shelf continue eastward into the head of De Soto Canyon and connect with the ridges and reefs mapped on the northwest Florida outer shelf. The existence of carbonate-cemented Quaternary to Holocene sandstones along the western wall of the head of De Soto Canyon (Shipp and Hopkins, 1978; Benson et al., 1997; W.W. Schroeder, personal commun., 2002) is of interest because of the potential benthic habitats they may represent. In the summer of 2002, the USGS, in cooperation with Minerals Management Service (MMS), the University of New Hampshire, and the University of New Brunswick, conducted a MBES survey of the Head of De Soto Canyon Region connecting the 2000 and 2001 mapped regions.

  12. Mineralogy of the silt fraction in surficial sediments from the outer continental shelf off southeastern New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Commeau, J.A.; Valentine, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The silt-sized heavy mineral assemblage, which is predominantly detrital, has been concentrated in this fraction by hydraulic factors and ranges between 11.8 wt. % of the silt fraction in the sandy sediments near Georges Bank to 3.4% in the clayey silt deposit south of Martha's Vineyard. By contrast, the sand fraction averages only 1.5% heavy minerals. Lateral variability within the silt-sized heavy mineral assemblage is considerable. Zircon and ilmenite abundances progressively decrease from east to west on the continental shelf off southeastern New England. Conversely, abundances within the amphibole and the epidote groups increase from east to west. -from Authors

  13. Oil-spill risk analysis: Cook inlet outer continental shelf lease sale 149. Volume 2: Conditional risk contour maps of seasonal conditional probabilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Marshall, C.F.; Anderson, C.M.; Lear, E.M.

    1994-08-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lands in Cook Inlet for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. In evaluating the significance of accidental oil spills, it is important to remember that the occurrence of such spills is fundamentally probabilistic. The effects of oil spills that could occur during oil and gas production must be considered. This report summarizes results of an oil-spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Cook Inlet OCS Lease Sale 149. The objective of this analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sale. To aid the analysis, conditional risk contour maps of seasonal conditional probabilities of spill contact were generated for each environmental resource or land segment in the study area. This aspect is discussed in this volume of the two volume report.

  14. Applicability of NASA contract quality management and failure mode effect analysis procedures to the USGS Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease management program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, M. K.; Little, D. G.; Hoard, E. G.; Taylor, A. C.; Campbell, R.

    1972-01-01

    An approach that might be used for determining the applicability of NASA management techniques to benefit almost any type of down-to-earth enterprise is presented. A study was made to determine the following: (1) the practicality of adopting NASA contractual quality management techniques to the U.S. Geological Survey Outer Continental Shelf lease management function; (2) the applicability of failure mode effects analysis to the drilling, production, and delivery systems in use offshore; (3) the impact on industrial offshore operations and onshore management operations required to apply recommended NASA techniques; and (4) the probable changes required in laws or regulations in order to implement recommendations. Several management activities that have been applied to space programs are identified, and their institution for improved management of offshore and onshore oil and gas operations is recommended.

  15. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas moratoria. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, September 17, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Representatives of oil and gas producing states, the petroleum and mineral industry, environmental agencies and groups, and others testified on the impact which a lease moratorium affecting the Outer Continental Shelf will have, specifically on California. Among the issues raised were the current oil glut and the need to take a long view in energy production, the environmental risks of offshore drilling, and the economic impact on drilling companies and those who manufacture drilling equipment. The moratorium would affect only the proposal to expand leasing and drilling operations, not platforms already in operation in the tidelands and off the coast of California. Two appendices with additional responses and material submitted for the record follows the testimony of the 24 witnesses.

  16. Regional pipeline environmental assessment record: an aggregate analysis of major areas of pipeline concern and impact on the Outer Continental Shelf (Gulf of Mexico)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Oil and gas pipeline activities on the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) affect a wide range of living and nonliving environmental variables (i.e., water, biologically sensitive areas, and food-web relations). These industrial activities have been increasing steadily over the past 20 years. Much of the information included herein pertains to a description of the existing environment for offshore Louisiana and Texas and an analysis of potential pipeline proposals and alternatives. The document is not as complete as an environmental impact statement (EIS) but it is sufficient in scope to consider the analysis of impacts of the majority of pipeline activities occurring in the northern and western Gulf of Mexico OCS. This report will be useful in evaluating pipeline impacts on the regional environment in the future. Rather than treating each pipeline application extensively, the information included herein will be referenced, thereby reducing the paperwork involved in environmental analysis.

  17. Movement and effects of spilled oil over the outer continental shelf; inadequacy of existent data for the Baltimore Canyon Trough area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, Harley J.

    1974-01-01

    A deductive approach to the problem of determining the movement and effects of spilled oil over the Outer Continental Shelf requires that the potential paths of oil be determined first, in order that critical subareas may be defined for later studies. The paths of spilled oil, in turn, depend primarily on the temporal and spatial variability of four factors: the thermohaline structure of the waters, the circulation of the water, the winds, and the distribution of suspended matter. A review of the existent data concerning these factors for the Baltimore Canyon Trough area (a relatively well studied segment of the Continental Shelf) reveals that the movement and dispersal of potential oil spills cannot be reliably predicted. Variations in the thermohaline structure of waters and in the distribution of suspended matter are adequately known; the uncertainty is due to insufficient wind and storm statistics and to the lack of quantitative understanding of the relationship between the nontidal drift and its basic driving mechanisms. Similar inadequacies should be anticipated for other potentially leasable areas of the shelf because an understanding of the movement of spilled oil has not been the underlying aim of most previous studies.

  18. Summary of environmental geologic studies in the Mid-Atlantic outer continental shelf area; results of 1978-1979 field seasons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robb, James M.

    1983-01-01

    Because of the need for knowledge of an offshore area that is undergoing exploration for oil and gas resources, since 1975 the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has funded studies of the environmental characteristics of the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. This volume briefly summarizes a final report to the BLM on the results of U.S. Geological Survey investigations stemming from data acquired during 1978 and 1979. The parent final report contains complete accounts of those investigations. The subjects of the studies range from the geologic effects of water currents and their capabilities of erosion and transportation, to delineation of potentially hazardous geologic characteristics of the area. Nine specific studies address the complexities of water currents, the nature of materials suspended in the sea waters, rates of mixing-in of material deposited on the bottom, and the sites of probable deposition of such materials, as well as sites and mechanisms of possible submarine landsliding or unstable bottom (engineering characteristics) of the Continental Slope and shelf.

  19. Seabed fluid expulsion along the upper slope and outer shelf of the U.S. Atlantic continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, D.S.; Ruppel, C.; Kluesner, J.W.; ten Brink, U.S.; Chaytor, J.D.; Hill, J.C.; Andrews, B.D.; Flores, C.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the spatial distribution of seabed fluid expulsion features is crucial for understanding the substrate plumbing system of any continental margin. A 1100 km stretch of the U.S. Atlantic margin contains more than 5000 pockmarks at water depths of 120 m (shelf edge) to 700 m (upper slope), mostly updip of the contemporary gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). Advanced attribute analyses of high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection data reveal gas-charged sediment and probable fluid chimneys beneath pockmark fields. A series of enhanced reflectors, inferred to represent hydrate-bearing sediments, occur within the GHSZ. Differential sediment loading at the shelf edge and warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation along the upper slope are the proposed mechanisms that led to transient changes in substrate pore fluid overpressure, vertical fluid/gas migration, and pockmark formation.

  20. CHIRP seismic reflection study of falling-stage (forced regressive) sediment wedges on the New Jersey outer continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, M.; Goff, J.; Ron, S.; Austin, J.

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution (1-12 kHz), deep-towed and hull-mounted CHIRP seismic data were collected on the New Jersey outer shelf in 2001, 2002 and 2006 as part of Office of Naval Research-funded projects. These data have imaged two well-developed, offlapping sedimentary wedges (named outer-shelf wedge and deep-shelf wedge) that are now postulated to have developed on the falling-stage limb of the last glacial cycle, during some time prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (20-22 kyrs BP). These wedges formed atop the high-amplitude, regional R horizon, a complex erosional unconformity that formed about 40,000 years ago. The outer shelf wedge is also characterized in part by an enigmatic, erose boundary separating layered horizons below from a mostly transparent section above. New Jersey shelf wedges appear analogous to forced-regressive units imaged on the Rhone shelf edge, as well as Eocene sections documented from seismic-scale outcrops on Spitsbergen Island. These examples can reach thicknesses up to 100 m on the shelf edge and uppermost slope, but usually thin rapidly downslope. Such wedges represent one of two documented mechanisms involving sand transport across a shelf margin into deeper water settings, the other being a canyonized shelf-edge. Our study will includes analysis of the CHIRP data and, if available, additional ground truth provided by short cores collected in summer 2007 at numerous intra-wedge stratigraphic horizons. Our goals are to understand the external and internal geometry of the wedges and sediment pathways across the paleo-shelf. These data should allow us to characterize margin segments that build during sea-level fall by slope-apron accretion rather than by the formation of channel-levee complexes. The literature is heavily weighted by the latter and their associated canyon systems, but information on shelf-edge attached slope aprons and how they contribute to deep-water sedimentation, and in particular the delivery of clean sands to slope settings

  1. Lithology, stratigraphy, and paleoenvironments of the Mobil 312-1 well, Georges Bank Basin, US North Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Poag, C.W.; Stanton, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Mobil 312-1 hydrocarbon exploratory well, southeastern Georges Bank Basin penetrated a section entirely composed of sedimentary rocks that range from Middle to Pliocene age. Carbonates are the dominant lithologies in the intervals at 6096-3444 m, 2560-2096 m and 1067-887 m; siliciclastics make up most of the remaining section. Although inferred paleoenvironments range primarily from supratidal to outer neritic, thin lignitic coal beds at 2204-2195 m and 1929-1920 m record brief periods of nonmarine sedimentation. Middle and Upper Jurassic calcarenites, the drilling targets of the well, have little or no visible porosity and underwent at least three episodes of cementation. -from Authors

  2. 78 FR 44150 - Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 1 (ATLW1) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ..., hurricanes, floods), wars, riots, acts of terrorism, fire, strikes, civil disorder or other events of a... description of the WEA and lease area) (77 FR 5545). The lease area is identical to that announced in the... comment period (77 FR 71621). In this FSN, you will find information pertaining to the area available...

  3. 77 FR 71621 - Atlantic Wind One (ATLW1) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ..., hurricanes, floods), wars, riots, acts of terrorism, fire, strikes, civil disorder or other events of a... Information and Nominations (77 FR 5545) as a single lease using an ascending clock auction. In this PSN, you..., 2012. Additional information about the proposed lease area is provided in the Call (77 FR 5545)....

  4. 77 FR 5039 - Accommodation Service Provided on Vessels Engaged in U.S. Outer Continental Shelf Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). II. Background A. General The offshore mineral and energy exploration and production industry... offshore. Because of this, we believe that the use of vessels providing accommodation service on the...

  5. Oil and gas development on the outer continental shelf. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, September 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The hearing addressed oil and gas development on the outer continental shelf. Testimony is given by Department of Energy officials on the United States oil and gas leasing program. Congressional questions and agency responses are provided. Statements and documents prepared for the record are included.

  6. An outer arm dynein light chain acts in a conformational switch for flagellar motility

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.

    2009-01-01

    A system distinct from the central pair–radial spoke complex was proposed to control outer arm dynein function in response to alterations in the mechanical state of the flagellum. In this study, we examine the role of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii outer arm dynein light chain that associates with the motor domain of the γ heavy chain (HC). We demonstrate that expression of mutant forms of LC1 yield dominant-negative effects on swimming velocity, as the flagella continually beat out of phase and stall near or at the power/recovery stroke switchpoint. Furthermore, we observed that LC1 interacts directly with tubulin in a nucleotide-independent manner and tethers this motor unit to the A-tubule of the outer doublet microtubules within the axoneme. Therefore, this dynein HC is attached to the same microtubule by two sites: via both the N-terminal region and the motor domain. We propose that this γ HC–LC1–microtubule ternary complex functions as a conformational switch to control outer arm activity. PMID:19620633

  7. 76 FR 52344 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale (NOS) for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ...BOEMRE announces the availability of the proposed NOS for proposed Sale 218 in the WPA. This Notice is published pursuant to 30 CFR 256.29(c) as a matter of information to the public. With regard to oil and gas leasing on the OCS, the Secretary of the Interior, pursuant to section 19 of the OCS Lands Act, provides the affected states the opportunity to review the proposed Notice. The proposed......

  8. An evaluation of the science needs to inform decisions on Outer Continental Shelf energy development in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland-Bartels, Leslie; Pierce, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    On March 31, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced a national strategy for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas development. In that announcement, the Administration outlined a three-pronged approach (U.S. Department of the Interior, 2010a): Development: "...expand development and production throughout the Gulf of Mexico, including resource-rich areas of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico..." Exploration: "...expand oil and gas exploration in frontier areas, such as the Arctic Ocean and areas in the Atlantic Ocean, to gather the information necessary to develop resources in the right places and the right ways." Conservation: "...calls for the protection of special areas like Bristol Bay in Alaska...national treasure[s] that we must protect for future generations." In a companion announcement (U.S. Department of the Interior, 2010b), within the Administration's "Exploration" component, the Secretary asked the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct an initial, independent evaluation of the science needs that would inform the Administration's consideration of the right places and the right ways in which to develop oil and gas resources in the Arctic OCS, particularly focused on the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas (fig. 1).

  9. A spatial correlation of the flow distribution on the outer continental shelf of Louisiana during the major hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico during the 2005 season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coor, J. L.; Li, C. Y.; Rouse, L. J.

    2007-12-01

    The 2005 hurricane season was unusually active, producing 31 named storms in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico. Of these 31 storms, 11 entered the Gulf of Mexico, the most notable of which were Hurricanes Cindy, Dennis, Katrina, and Rita. Data were collected during these storms by acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) based on 58 oil and gas platforms scattered across the outer continental shelf (OCS) region of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nine to 31 ADCPs were active and recording data during each major storm passage through the Gulf of Mexico. Data were recorded from depths of 60 to 70m down to 1100 to 1200m, with a few extending to depths around 2000m. From these data, the flow distribution of the OCS region was studied with the use of time series and spectrum analysis. Preliminary analysis has shown temporal variations in the vertical structure, increased diurnal oscillation current velocities (by a factor of approximately two), near-inertial oscillations, and variations in the overall direction of the flow before, during, and after the passage of the hurricanes. Methods of harmonic analysis and rotary spectra were implemented in this study. These data and results provide an estimate of the spatial extent to which a hurricane influences subsurface currents.

  10. Offshore safety. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Panama Canal/Outer Continental Shelf, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on the safety of life at sea and safety on oil and gas rigs on the Outer Continental Shelf, June 16, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Representatives of diving contractors, shippers, drilling consultants, safety inspectors, and government agencies testified at a hearing on offshore safety in connection with oil and gas rigs on the Outer Continental Shelf. The committee reviewed existing safety programs and practices, focusing on drilling operations in new areas where the environment is increasingly inhospitable. Among the issues aired at the hearing were the problem of insurance coverage and the level of compensation to workers in stressful and hazardous settings. Oil companies described their procedures for preparing equipment and employees for hurricanes and other natural and manmade problems that they will experience. Various consultants offered suggestions for improving the level of safety preparedness and engineering. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony of 21 witnesses.

  11. Turtles, birds, and mammals in the northern Gulf of Mexico and nearby Atlantic waters: an overview based on aerial surveys of OCS (Outer Continental Shelf) areas, with emphasis on oil and gas effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, T.H.; Irvine, A.B.; Jennings, R.D.; Collum, L.A.; Hoffman, W.

    1983-07-01

    Aerial line transect surveys of marine turtles, birds, and mammals were conducted in four areas of the Gulf of Mexico and nearby Atlantic waters. Areas surveyed were 111 km by 222 km and located off Brownsville, Texas; Marsh Island, Louisiana; Naples, Florida; and Merritt Island, Florida. Data on distribution, abundance, seasonal occurrence, and habitat use are reported in accounts for each of the 88 species observed. Information on reproduction, behavior, and potential impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development are also discussed.

  12. An evaluation of the science needs to inform decisions on Outer Continental Shelf energy development in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland-Bartels, Leslie; Pierce, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) was asked to conduct an initial, independent evaluation of the science needs that would inform the Administration's consideration of the right places and the right ways in which to develop oil and gas resources in the Arctic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), particularly focused on the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas. Oil and gas potential is significant in Arctic Alaska. Beyond petroleum potential, this region supports unique fish and wildlife resources and ecosystems, and indigenous people who rely on these resources for subsistence. This report summarizes key existing scientific information and provides initial guidance of what new and (or) continued research could inform decision making. This report is presented in a series of topical chapters and various appendixes each written by a subset of the USGS OCS Team based on their areas of expertise. Three chapters (Chapters 2, 3, and 4) provide foundational information on geology; ecology and subsistence; and climate settings important to understanding the conditions pertinent to development in the Arctic OCS. These chapters are followed by three chapters that examine the scientific understanding, science gaps, and science sufficiency questions regarding oil-spill risk, response, and impact (Chapter 5), marine mammals and anthropogenic noise (Chapter 6), and cumulative impacts (Chapter 7). Lessons learned from the 1989 Exxon Valdez Oil Spill are included to identify valuable "pre-positioned" science and scientific approaches to improved response and reduced uncertainty in damage assessment and restoration efforts (appendix D). An appendix on Structured Decision Making (appendix C) is included to illustrate the value of such tools that go beyond, but incorporate, science in looking at what can/should be done about policy and implementation of Arctic development. The report provides a series of findings and recommendations for consideration developed during the independent examination of

  13. 78 FR 1759 - Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Minor Source/Title V Minor Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Minor Permit Modification Issued to Shell Offshore, Inc. for the Kulluk Conical Drilling Unit AGENCY... announces that EPA Region 10 has issued a final decision granting Shell Offshore Inc.'s (``Shell'') request... of the Kulluk Conical Drilling Unit (``Kulluk'') in the Beaufort Sea to conduct exploratory oil...

  14. Oil-spill risk analysis: Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) central and western lease sales, 1998-2002, and gulfwide OCS program, 1998-2036. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.M.; Marshall, C.F.; Lear, E.M.

    1997-11-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Central and Western Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing during 1998-2002. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. This report summarizes results of an oil-spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Central and Western Gulf of Mexico lease sales and te Gulfwide OCS Program, 1998-2036. The objective of this analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sales.

  15. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Pacific (Southern California) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macpherson, George S.; Bernstein, Janis

    1980-01-01

    Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas exploration and development have been under way in the Pacific (Southern California) Region since 1966. During that time, there have been four Federal lease sales: in 1966, 1968, 1975 (Sale 35), and 1979 (Sale 48). Oil and gas production from three leases has been going on since 1968. It peaked in 1971 and now averages around 31,400 barrels of oil and 15.4 million cubic feet of gas per day. Discoveries on areas leased in the 1968 and 1975 sales have led to plans for eight new platforms to begin production in the early 1980's. Five platforms are in the eastern end of Santa Barbara Channel, one is in the western Channel, and two are in San Pedro Bay, south of Long Beach. Three rigs are doing exploratory drilling in the Region. The most recent estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey of remaining reserves for all identified fields in the Southern California Region are 695 million barrels of oil and 1,575 billion cubic feet of gas (January 1979). The USGS has also made risked estimates of economically recoverable oil and gas resources for all the leased tracts in the Region (March 1980). These risked estimates of economically recoverable resources are 394 billion barrels of oil and 1,295 billion cubic feet of gas. The USGS estimates of undiscovered recoverable resources for the entire Southern California OCS Region (January 1980) are 3,200 million barrels of oil and 3,400 billion cubic feet of gas. Because of the long history of oil and gas production in Southern California from wells onshore and in State waters, there are many existing facilities for the transportation, processing, and refining of oil and gas. Some of the expected new OCS production can be accommodated in these facilities. Four new onshore projects will be required. Two of these are under construction: (1) a 9.6-km (6-mi) onshore oil pipeline (capacity: 60,000 bpd) between Carpinteria (Santa Barbara County) and the existing Mobil-Rincon separation and treatment

  16. Wildlife Densities and Habitat Use Across Temporal and Spatial Scales on the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Final Report to the Department of Energy EERE Wind & Water Power Technologies Office

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kathryn A.; Stenhouse, Iain J.; Johnson, Sarah M.; Connelly, Emily E.

    2015-10-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies Project helped address environmental barriers to offshore wind energy development in the mid-Atlantic region by providing regulators, developers, and other stakeholders with comprehensive baseline ecological data and analyses. Project funders and collaborators from a range of academic institutions, non-governmental organizations, federal agencies, foundations, and private companies came together to study bird, sea turtle, and marine mammal distributions, densities, and movements on the mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf between 2012 and 2014. Specific project activities and goals included the following: (1) Conduct standardized surveys to quantify bird, sea turtle, and marine mammal densities seasonally and annually throughout the study region and identify important habitat use or aggregation areas. (2) Develop statistical models to help understand the drivers of wildlife distribution and abundance patterns. (3) Use individual tracking data for several focal bird species to provide information on population connectivity and individual movements that is complementary to survey data. (4) Identify species that are likely to be exposed to offshore wind energy development activities in the mid-Atlantic study area. (5) Develop U.S.-based technological resources and assessment methods for future monitoring efforts, including a comparison of high resolution digital video aerial surveys to boat-based surveys. (6) Help meet data needs associated with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Marine Mammal Protection Act, and Endangered Species Act requirements, by contributing several years of data and analysis towards future Environmental Impact Statements. This report consists of six parts: Project overview (executive summary and Chapters 1-2); Examining wildlife distributions and relative abundance from a digital video aerial survey platform (Chapters 3-6); Examining wildlife distributions and abundance using boat-based surveys

  17. Summary of the 1995 assessment of conventionally recoverable hydrocarbon resources of the Gulf of Mexico and atlantic outer continental shelf as of January 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Lore, G.L.; Brooke, J.P.; Cooke, D.W.; Klazynski, R.J.; Olson, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    The principal purpose of this report is to present estimates of the total endowment of conventionally recoverable oil and gas that may be present beneath the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic continental margin. Secondary objectives are to briefly describe the geologic and mathematical methodologies employed in the assessment, present an economic analysis of the undiscovered conventionally recoverable resources of the area, and provide a historical perspective in which to review the results.

  18. S. 782: A bill to amend the Clean Air Act. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, April 13, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    A bill was introduced in the Senate to amend the Clean Air Act by providing the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency with the authority to regulate air pollution on and over the Outer Continental Shelf.

  19. Distribution of marine birds on the mid- and North-Atlantic US outer continental shelf. Technical progress report, January 1978-July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, K.D.; Pittman, G.L.; Fitch, S.J.

    1980-09-01

    The species composition, distribution, and abundance of marine birds on continental shelf waters from Cape Hatteras to the Bay of Fundy were examined using ships-of-opportunity. Northern Fulmar, Cory's Shearwater, Greater Shearwater, Sooty Shearwater, Wilson's Storm-Petrel, Gannet, Red Phalarope, Great Black-backed Gull, Herring Gull, and Black-legged Kittiwake were the most abundant and common species. These species were ecologically dominant within the bird community in numbers and biomass. Georges Bank and Gulf of Marine regions generally had greatest estimates of standing stock and biomass; whereas, in the Middle Atlantic region these estimates were consistently lowest. Species diversity throughout the study area was greatest in spring and least in fall. Oceanic fronts at the continental shelf break and at Nantucket Shoals influenced the distribution of Wilson's Storm-Petrels and Red Phalaropes. Fishing activities were particularly important to Larus gull distribution. Fishes, squids, and crustaceans were the most important groups of prey items in diets of nine bird species. An oiled bird or pollution index was developed. According to the index, frequency of oiled birds was greatest in winter and spring, and gulls made up the majority of species with oiled plumages.

  20. Downslope Eulerian mean flow associated with high-frequency current fluctuations observed on the outer continental shelf and upper slope along the northeastern United States continental margin: implications for sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, B.

    1988-01-01

    Eulerian current measurements made 5-7 m above bottom at six stations along the United States east coast continental margin show a net downslope flow of 1-5 cm s-1. Although the scalar current speed decreases with water depth and toward the bottom, fluctuations in the cross-isobath flow were stronger and increasingly asymmetric near the bottom. Maximum downslope flow exceeded maximum upslope flow by a factor of two to three. The strength of the low-passed downslope flow was proportional to the upslope Reynolds flux of density as well as to the amplitude of the current fluctuations that have periods shorter than 30 h. These flow characteristics may be caused by differential vertical mixing in the bottom boundary layer where a stratified fluid flows upslope (unstable) and downslope (stable). The asymmetry in current strength clearly favors net downslope transport of sediments that move as bedload. ?? 1988.

  1. A geodynamic model of the evolution of the Arctic basin and adjacent territories in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic and the outer limit of the Russian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverov, N. P.; Lobkovsky, L. I.; Kononov, M. V.; Dobretsov, N. L.; Vernikovsky, V. A.; Sokolov, S. D.; Shipilov, E. V.

    2013-01-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Arctic Region in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic is considered with allowance for the Paleozoic stage of evolution of the ancient Arctida continent. A new geodynamic model of the evolution of the Arctic is based on the idea of the development of upper mantle convection beneath the continent caused by subduction of the Pacific lithosphere under the Eurasian and North American lithospheric plates. The structure of the Amerasia and Eurasia basins of the Arctic is shown to have formed progressively due to destruction of the ancient Arctida continent, a retained fragment of which comprises the structural units of the central segment of the Arctic Ocean, including the Lomonosov Ridge, the Alpha-Mendeleev Rise, and the Podvodnikov and Makarov basins. The proposed model is considered to be a scientific substantiation of the updated Russian territorial claim to the UN Commission on the determination of the Limits of the Continental Shelf in the Arctic Region.

  2. Beaufort Sea monitoring program: analysis of trace metals and hydrocarbons from Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) activities. Final report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, P.D.; Crecelius, E.; Steinhauer, W.; Steinhauer, M.; Tuckfield, C.

    1986-08-13

    An environmental-monitoring program, designed to detect and quantify long-term changes in sediment and tissue concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons potentially due to oil and gas exploration and development on the U.S. Beaufort Sea continental shelf, was initiated in 1984. In Year-1 of the three-year study, a series of benthic stations was established in the nearshore area between Barter Island and Cape Halkett. In Year-2 of the study, areal coverage of the Study Area was increased to 39 marine stations and 10 shoreline and river stations. Analysis of six replicate sediment samples for trace metals, and saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons revealed a wide range of concentrations. Both trace metal and hydrocarbon analyses of bivalve and crustacean tissues indicated concentrations differences between species but no apparent relationship between animal body burdens and sediment concentrations.

  3. H.R. 73: A Bill to protect the ecologically fragile coastal resources of south Florida by prohibiting offshore oil and gas activities and by cancelling Federal leases in the area of the Outer Continental Shelf adjacent to the south Florida coast. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains H.R. 73, A Bill to protect the ecologically fragile coastal resources of south Florida by prohibiting offshore oil and gas activities and by cancelling Federal leases in the area of the Outer Continental Shelf adjacent to south Florida. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 4, 1995.

  4. Taxonomy and bathymetric distribution of the outer neritic/upper bathyal ostracodes (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from the southernmost Brazilian continental margin.

    PubMed

    Bergue, Cristianini Trescastro; Coimbra, João Carlos; Ramos, Maria Inês Feijó

    2016-02-10

    Sixty-five ostracode species belonging to 41 genera and 17 families were recorded in the outer shelf and upper slope off Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina states, southernmost Brazil, between 100 and 586 m water depth interval. The ostracode occurrences are hypothesized to be influenced by both, the coastal waters and the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW). The taxonomy of some species of Bradleya Hornibrook, 1952, Legitimocythere Coles & Whatley, 1989 and Henryhowella Puri, 1957 previously described in the same study area is revised. Bradleya gaucha sp. nov., Legitimocythere megapotamica sp. nov., Apatihowella acelos sp. nov., Apatihowella capitulum sp. nov., Apatihowella besnardi sp. nov., Apatihowella convexa sp. nov., and Aversovalva tomcronini sp. nov. are herein proposed. Trachyleberis aorata Bergue & Coimbra, 2008 is reassigned to the genus Legitimocythere and Bradleya pseudonormani Ramos et al., 2009 has its diagnosis emended. Bythocypris praerenis Brandão, 2008 is considered a junior synonym of Bythocypris kyamos Whatley et al., 1998a. Apatihowella Jellinek & Swanson, 2003 and Legitimocythere species have well-defined bathymetric distributions and are potential paleoceanographic markers for the Quaternary in the Southern Brazilian Margin.

  5. Taxonomy and bathymetric distribution of the outer neritic/upper bathyal ostracodes (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from the southernmost Brazilian continental margin.

    PubMed

    Bergue, Cristianini Trescastro; Coimbra, João Carlos; Ramos, Maria Inês Feijó

    2016-01-01

    Sixty-five ostracode species belonging to 41 genera and 17 families were recorded in the outer shelf and upper slope off Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina states, southernmost Brazil, between 100 and 586 m water depth interval. The ostracode occurrences are hypothesized to be influenced by both, the coastal waters and the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW). The taxonomy of some species of Bradleya Hornibrook, 1952, Legitimocythere Coles & Whatley, 1989 and Henryhowella Puri, 1957 previously described in the same study area is revised. Bradleya gaucha sp. nov., Legitimocythere megapotamica sp. nov., Apatihowella acelos sp. nov., Apatihowella capitulum sp. nov., Apatihowella besnardi sp. nov., Apatihowella convexa sp. nov., and Aversovalva tomcronini sp. nov. are herein proposed. Trachyleberis aorata Bergue & Coimbra, 2008 is reassigned to the genus Legitimocythere and Bradleya pseudonormani Ramos et al., 2009 has its diagnosis emended. Bythocypris praerenis Brandão, 2008 is considered a junior synonym of Bythocypris kyamos Whatley et al., 1998a. Apatihowella Jellinek & Swanson, 2003 and Legitimocythere species have well-defined bathymetric distributions and are potential paleoceanographic markers for the Quaternary in the Southern Brazilian Margin. PMID:27395992

  6. The saltwater-freshwater interface in the Tertiary limestone aquifer, southeast Atlantic outer-continental shelf of the U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    Hydrologic testing in an offshore oil well abandoned by Tenneco, Inc., determined the position of the saltwater-freshwater interface in Tertiary limestones underlying the Florida-Georgia continental shelf of the U.S.A. Previous drilling (JOIDES and U.S.G.S. AMCOR projects) established the existence of freshwater far offshore in this area. At the Tenneco well 55 mi. (???88 km) east of Fernandina Beach, Florida, drill-stem tests made in the interval 1050-1070 ft. (320-326 m) below sea level in the Ocala Limestone recovered a sample with a chloride concentration of 7000 mg l-1. Formation water probably is slightly fresher. Pressure-head measurements indicated equivalent freshwater heads of 24-29 ft. (7.3-8.8 m) above sea level. At the coast (Fernandina Beach), a relatively thin transition zone separating freshwater and saltwater occurs at a depth of 2100 ft. (640 m) below sea level. Fifty-five miles (???88 km) offshore, at the Tenneco well, the base of freshwater is ???1100 ft. (???335 m) below sea level. The difference in approximate depth to the freshwater-saltwater transition at these two locations suggests an interface with a very slight landward slope. Assuming the Hubbert interface equation applies here (because the interface and therefore freshwater flow lines are nearly horizontal) the equilibrium depth to the interface should be 40 times the freshwater head above sea level. Using present-day freshwater heads along the coast in the Hubbert equation results in depths to the interface of less than the observed 2100 ft. (640 m). Substituting predevelopment heads in the equation yields depths greater than 2100 ft. (640 m). Thus the interface appears to be in a transient position between the position that would be compatible with present-day heads and the position that would be compatible with predevelopment heads. This implies that some movement of the interface from the predevelopment position has occurred during the past hundred years. The implied movement is

  7. Age & reproduction in three reef - dwelling serranid fishes of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf: Pronotogrammus martinicensis, Hemanthias vivanus & Serranus phoebe (with preliminary observations on the Pomacentrid fish, Chromis enchrysurus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, Paul E.; McBride, Richard S.; Sulak, Kenneth J.; Dennis, George D.

    2004-01-01

    Specimens of the four study species were collected during cruises to outer-continental shelf reefs of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Age was estimated for all serranid species using whole otoliths and C. enchrysurus ages were determined from transverse sections of sagittal otoliths. Ring structure observed on otoliths was validated as having an annual periodicity for P. martinicensis using marginal increment analysis. Ring structure on remaining species was assumed to correspond to age (years). Pronotogrammus martinicensis, H. vivanus, S. phoebe, and C. enchrysurus exhibited maximum ages of 9, 8, 5, and 11, respectively. Spatial variations in size-at-age were observed in P. martinicensis populations. Individuals inhabiting reefs in the Madison-Swanson Reserve area on the West Florida Shelf edge exhibited the fastest growth rates, while the slowest growing P. martinicensis were collected from the Alabama Alps Reef, the farthest west study reef. Pronotogrammus martinicensis and H. vivanus are both protogynous hermaphrodites. Evidence of active spawning was observed in the months from February through July for P. martinicensis, and March and May for H. vivanus. Serranus phoebe was observed to be a simultaneous hermaphroditic capable of spawning year-round. Batch fecundity estimates for P. martinicensis ranged from 149-394 oocytes per fish. Size selectivity was evident in our primary sampling method, hook and line using small tandem bait hooks. Smaller size-classes of all species examined were under-represented in our samples, hindering accurate growth modeling. Due to the protogynous nature of P. martinicensis and H. vivanus, hook and line sampling also tended to select for males. Future descriptions of the reproductive biology of both protogynous species would be more complete if less selective sampling methods could be successfully employed. The data presented here contribute to a better assessment of the fish community of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Little

  8. Cardiolipin externalization to the outer mitochondrial membrane acts as an elimination signal for mitophagy in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Charleen T.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Shrivastava, Indira H.; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Wang, Kent Zhi Qiang; Zhu, Jianhui; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Borisenko, Grigory; Huang, Zhentai; Gusdon, Aaron M.; Cheikhi, Amin; Steer, Erin K.; Wang, Ruth; Baty, Catherine; Watkins, Simon; Bahar, Ivet; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of injured mitochondria for degradation by macroautophagy is essential for cellular health, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Cardiolipin is an inner mitochondrial membrane phospholipid. We found that rotenone, staurosporine, 6-hydroxydopamine and other pro-mitophagy stimuli caused externalization of cardiolipin to the mitochondrial surface in primary cortical neurons and SH-SY5Y cells. RNAi knockdown of cardiolipin synthase or of phospholipid scramblase-3, which transports cardiolipin to the outer mitochondrial membrane, decreased mitochondrial delivery to autophagosomes. Furthermore, we found that the autophagy protein microtubule-associated-protein-1-light chain-3 (LC3), which mediates both autophagosome formation and cargo recognition, contains cardiolipin-binding sites important for the engulfment of mitochondria by the autophagic system. Mutation of LC3 residues predicted as cardiolipin-interaction sites by computational modeling inhibited its participation in mitophagy. These data indicate that redistribution of cardiolipin serves as an “eat-me” signal for the elimination of damaged mitochondria from neuronal cells. PMID:24036476

  9. 77 FR 40080 - Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Proposed Final Five-Year Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Proposed Final Five-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 AGENCY... National Environmental Policy Act, BOEM announces the availability of the OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program 2012- 2017 Final PEIS prepared by BOEM to support the Proposed Final 5-Year OCS Oil and Gas...

  10. RV Ocean Surveyor cruise O1-02-GM: bathymetry and acoustic backscatter of selected areas of the outer continental shelf, northwestern Gulf of Mexico; June 8, through June 28, 2002; Iberia, LA to Iberia, LA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaudoin, Jonathan D.; Gardner, James V.; Clarke, John E. Hughes

    2002-01-01

    Following the publication of high-resolution multibeam echosounder (MBES) images and data of the Flower Gardens area of the northwest Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf (Gardner et al., 1998), the Flower Gardens Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) have been interested in additional MBES data in the area. A coalition of FGBNMS, MMS, and the US Geological Survey (USGS) was formed to map additional areas of interest in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico in 2002. The areas were chosen by personnel of the FGBNMS and the choice of MBES was made by the USGS. MMS and FGBNMS funded the mapping and the USGS organized the ship and multibeam systems through a Cooperative Agreement between the USGS and the University of New Brunswick. The University of New Brunswick (UNB) contracted the RV Ocean Surveyor and the EM1000 MBES system from C&C Technologies, Inc., Lafayette, LA. C&C personnel oversaw data collection whereas UNB personnel conducted the cruise and processed all the data. USGS personnel were responsible for the overall cruise including the final data processing and digital map products.

  11. Influences of offshore activity. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Panama Canal/Outer Continental Shelf, of the House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on offshore oil and gas activity and its socio-economic and environmental influences, October 12, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    A field hearing in Humble, Texas heard testimony on the socio-economic and environmental effects of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activity in the Gulf of Mexico. These activities influence the commercial and recreational climate of the area as well as municipal services. The 20 witnesses included representatives of the petroleum, shipping, fishing, and other industries, environmental groups, and both organizations and agencies concerned with coastal management. Additional material and communications supplied for the record follows the testimony.

  12. 30 CFR 552.6 - Freedom of Information Act requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) and 30 CFR part 551 (Geological and Geophysical Explorations of the Outer Continental Shelf). (b... Section 552.6 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE... contained in 43 CFR part 2 (Records and Testimony), the requirements of the Act, and the...

  13. 30 CFR 552.6 - Freedom of Information Act requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) and 30 CFR part 551 (Geological and Geophysical Explorations of the Outer Continental Shelf). (b... Section 552.6 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE... contained in 43 CFR part 2 (Records and Testimony), the requirements of the Act, and the...

  14. 30 CFR 552.6 - Freedom of Information Act requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) and 30 CFR part 551 (Geological and Geophysical Explorations of the Outer Continental Shelf). (b... Section 552.6 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE... contained in 43 CFR part 2 (Records and Testimony), the requirements of the Act, and the...

  15. 30 CFR 252.6 - Freedom of Information Act requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 252.6 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... contained in 43 CFR part 2 (Records and Testimony), the requirements of the Act, and the regulations contained in 30 CFR parts 250 and 550 (Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental...

  16. 30 CFR 252.6 - Freedom of Information Act requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Section 252.6 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... contained in 43 CFR part 2 (Records and Testimony), the requirements of the Act, and the regulations contained in 30 CFR parts 250 and 550 (Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental...

  17. 30 CFR 252.6 - Freedom of Information Act requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 252.6 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... contained in 43 CFR part 2 (Records and Testimony), the requirements of the Act, and the regulations contained in 30 CFR parts 250 and 550 (Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental...

  18. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): A USGS-Boem Partnership to Provide Free and Easy Access to Previously Proprietary Seismic Reflection Data on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triezenberg, P. J.; Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) was established by the USGS in 2004 in an effort to rescue marine seismic reflection profile data acquired largely by the oil exploration industry throughout the US outer continental shelf (OCS). It features a Web interface for easy on-line geographic search and download. The commercial value of these data had decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and newer acquisition technology, and large quantities were at risk of disposal. But, the data still had tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes, and an effort was undertaken to ensure that the data were preserved and publicly available. More recently, the USGS and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have developed a partnership to make similarly available a much larger quantity of 2D and 3D seismic data acquired by the U.S. government for assessment of resources in the OCS. Under Federal regulation, BOEM is required to publicly release all processed geophysical data, including seismic profiles, acquired under an exploration permit, purchased and retained by BOEM, no sooner than 25 years after issuance of the permit. Data acquired prior to 1989 are now eligible for release. Currently these data are distributed on CD or DVD, but data discovery can be tedious. Inclusion of these data within NAMSS vastly increases the amount of seismic data available for research purposes. A new NAMSS geographical interface provides easy and intuitive access to the data library. The interface utilizes OpenLayers, Mapnik, and the Django web framework. In addition, metadata capabilities have been greatly increased using a PostgresSQL/PostGIS database incorporating a community-developed ISO-compliant XML template. The NAMSS database currently contains 452 2D seismic surveys comprising 1,645,956 line km and nine 3D seismic surveys covering 9,385 square km. The 2D data holdings consist of stack, migrated and depth sections, most in SEG-Y format.

  19. H. R. 3708: A Bill to amend the Title III of the Clean Air Act. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, November 17, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    H.R.3708, a bill to amend the Clean Air Act, was introduced in the House of Representatives of the United States on November 17, 1989. The main purpose of the bill is to control air pollution from sources on the Outer Continental Shelf. Attention is focused on air pollution from Outer Continental Shelf activities, such as oil or gas exploration or development on tidal waters and power generation located on shore.

  20. 30 CFR 280.80 - Paperwork Reduction Act statement-information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 280, Prospecting for Minerals other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur on the Outer Continental Shelf... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Paperwork Reduction Act statement-information collection. 280.80 Section 280.80 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  1. S. 752: This Act may be cited as the Outer Space Protection Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, April 11, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    S. 752 is a bill to preserve the cooperative, peaceful uses of outer space for the benefit of all mankind by prohibiting the basing or testing of weapons in outer space and the testing of antisatellite weapons, and for other purposes.

  2. H. R. 2201: This Act may be cited as the Outer Space Protection Act of 1989. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, May 3, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    H.R. 2201 is a bill to preserve the cooperative, peaceful uses of outer space for the benefit of all mankind by prohibiting the basing or testing of weapons in outer space and the testing of antisatellite weapons, and for other purposes.

  3. 30 CFR 250.260 - What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Contents of Development and Production Plans (dpp) and Development Operations Coordination Documents (docd) § 250.260 What Coastal Zone Management... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What Coastal Zone Management Act...

  4. Coastal zone and Continental Shelf conflict resolution: improving ocean use and resource dispute management

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhart, J.D.; Harding, E.T.

    1985-11-01

    Contents include: An overview of coastal zone and continental shelf conflicts; Experience in coastal zone management conflict; Future coastal zone conflicts; Outer continental shelf conflicts; Georges Bank and Gulf of Maine; and Future considerations.

  5. cis- and trans-acting elements involved in regulation of aniA, the gene encoding the major anaerobically induced outer membrane protein in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Householder, T C; Belli, W A; Lissenden, S; Cole, J A; Clark, V L

    1999-01-01

    AniA (formerly Pan1) is the major anaerobically induced outer membrane protein in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. AniA has been shown to be a major antigen in patients with gonococcal disease, and we have been studying its regulation in order to understand the gonococcal response to anaerobiosis and its potential role in virulence. This study presents a genetic analysis of aniA regulation. Through deletion analysis of the upstream region, we have determined the minimal promoter region necessary for aniA expression. This 130-bp region contains a sigma 70-type promoter and an FNR (fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator protein) binding site, both of which are absolutely required for anaerobic expression. Also located in the minimal promoter region are three T-rich direct repeats and several potential NarP binding sites. This 80-bp region is required for induction by nitrite. By site-directed mutagenesis of promoter sequences, we have determined that the transcription of aniA is initiated only from the sigma 70-type promoter. The gearbox promoter, previously believed to be the major promoter, does not appear to be active during anaerobiosis. The gonococcal FNR and NarP homologs are involved in the regulation of aniA, and we demonstrate that placing aniA under the control of the tac promoter compensates for the inability of a gonococcal fnr mutant to grow anaerobically.

  6. The Brazilian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, L. R.; Coutinho, P. N.

    1981-04-01

    The Brazilian continental margin, with its interesting morphology, structure and sediments, has become better known only during the last two decades. Six physiographical provinces can be recognized at the continental margin and the adjacent coast: (1) Cabo Orange-Parnaiba delta; (2) Parnaiba delta-Cabo Sa˜o Roque; (3) Cabo Sa˜o Roque-Belmonte; (4) Belmonte-Cabo Frio; (5) Cabo Frio-Cabo Santa Marta; and (6) Cabo Santa Marta-Chui. The shelf is rather wide near the Amazon Mouth, becoming narrower eastwards, continuing very narrow along the northeastern and eastern coast, and becoming wider again in the south towards the Plate River. Prominent morphological features along the margin are the Amazon cone, the marginal plateaus off northeastern Brazil, the Sa˜o Francisco cone and canyon, the Abrolhos Bank, and the deep-sea plateaus of Pernambuco and Sa˜o Paulo. On the shelf proper a number of relief elements exist, such as sand waves east of the Amazon, submarine terraces at various places, and irregularities of structural origin. The shelf break is rather smooth in the far north and south, more abrupt in the remainder. Surface sediments of the Brazilian shelf show five distinct facies types: littoral quartz sands, mud, transition sand-mud, coralline algae, and biodetrital. The terrigenous elastic fractions dominate off the Amazon and in southern Brazil; between these areas they occupy a very narrow strip near the coast. The carbonate facies, predominantly composed of calcareous algae, is abundant between the Parnaiba delta and Cabo Frio; to the south this facies is more biodetrital and restricted to the outer shelf. Economically important on the Brazilian continental margin besides oil, are sands and gravels, carbonate deposits, evaporites and some subsurface coal. Other possible mineral resources could be phosphate, heavy minerals and clays for ceramics.

  7. Continental crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pakiser, L.C.

    1964-01-01

    The structure of the Earth’s crust (the outer shell of the earth above the M-discontinuity) has been intensively studied in many places by use of geophysical methods. The velocity of seismic compressional waves in the crust and in the upper mantle varies from place to place in the conterminous United States. The average crust is thick in the eastern two-thirds of the United States, in which the crustal and upper-mantle velocities tend to be high. The average crust is thinner in the western one-third of the United States, in which these velocities tend to be low. The concept of eastern and western superprovinces can be used to classify these differences. Crustal and upper-mantle densities probably vary directly with compressional-wave velocity, leading to the conclusion that isostasy is accomplished by the variation in densities of crustal and upper-mantle rocks as well as in crustal thickness, and that there is no single, generally valid isostatic model. The nature of the M-discontinuity is still speculative.

  8. Volatile components and continental material of planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

  9. 75 FR 71734 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Scientific Committee (SC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... of field and laboratory studies in biology, chemistry, and physical oceanography, as well as studies... vacancies in the following disciplines: Biological oceanography/marine biology; social science;...

  10. 75 FR 1076 - Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... adjusting the civil penalty assessment to $25,000 per violation per day on August 8, 1997 (62 FR 42667); to $30,000 on October 29, 2003 (68 FR 61622); and to $35,000 on February 28, 2007 (72 FR 8897). In...

  11. To amend the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to conduct offshore oil and gas lease sales through Internet-based live lease sales, and for other purposes.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Graves, Garret [R-LA-6

    2016-06-24

    09/07/2016 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. The Outer Limits: English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Barbara R.; Biesekerski, Joan

    The Quinmester course "The Outer Limits" involves an exploration of unknown worlds, mental and physical, through fiction and nonfiction. Its purpose is to focus attention on the ongoing conquest of the frontiers of the mind, the physical world, and outer space. The subject matter includes identification and investigation of unknown worlds in the…

  13. Outer planet satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon.

  14. 30 CFR 550.1402 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf... means failure to comply with the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA) or any other applicable...

  15. Cross-shelf and vertical structure of ichthyoplankton assemblages in continental shelf waters of the Southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Fuentes, M. L.; Flores-Coto, C.

    2004-02-01

    The horizontal and vertical variation of ichthyoplankton assemblages in continental shelf waters of the Southern Gulf of Mexico was studied during an annual cycle (1994-1995) at 22 stations distributed across four transects located off the main fluvio-lagoon systems of the area. Samples were collected from five levels of the water column, from the surface to a depth of 105 m. The Bray-Curtis Dissimilarity Index identified five assemblages: Coastal, Inner Neritic, Outer Neritic, Oceanic and a Transition Group. The main species of each assemblage reflected the habitat, season, and spawning area of adult organisms. The Coastal Assemblage occupied the uppermost water column levels of the most nearshore stations. The Oceanic Assemblage was restricted to the deepest samplings of the stations of the outer shelf and the Neritic Assemblages were located on the continental shelf between the Coastal and Oceanic Assemblages, embracing all the sampling levels in some periods. Variation in composition, location and abundance of larvae in each assemblage was determined by a series of physical processes that act at different temporal and spatial scales, especially the mixing process generated by the wind stress and continental water discharges acting at a mesoscale that influences the distribution of the assemblages along the whole continental shelf as well as a fine scale affecting the composition and vertical distribution of organisms in a more reduced area of just tens of meters in the water column. Canonical Correspondence Analysis revealed that the depth of the sample, the potential energy, and the temperature generated the greatest variability in the system. Vertical and horizontal salinity gradients play a determinant role in delimiting the Coastal and Neritic Assemblages.

  16. Continental Margins: Linking Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly-Gerreyn, Boris; Rabalais, Nancy; Middelburg, Jack; Roy, Sylvie; Liu, Kon-Kee; Thomas, Helmuth; Zhang, Jing

    2008-02-01

    Impacts of Global, Local and Human Forcings on Biogeochemical Cycles and Ecosystems, IMBER/LOICZ Continental Margins Open Science Conference; Shanghai, China, 17-21 September 2007; More than 100 scientists from 25 countries came together to address global, regional, local, and human pressures interactively affecting continental margin biogeochemical cycles, marine food webs, and society. Continental margins cover only 12% of the global ocean area yet account for more than 30% of global oceanic primary production. In addition, continental margins are the most intensely used regions of the world's ocean for natural commodities, including productive fisheries and mineral and petroleum resources. The land adjacent to continental margins hosts about 50% of the world's population, which will bear many direct impacts of global change on coastal margins. Understanding both natural and human-influenced alterations of biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems on continental margins and the processes (including feedbacks) that threaten sustainability of these systems is therefore of global interest.

  17. Outer planet satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon. 210 refs.

  18. Deep continental margin reflectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewing, J.; Heirtzler, J.; Purdy, M.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to the rarity of such observations a decade ago, seismic reflecting and refracting horizons are now being observed to Moho depths under continental shelves in a number of places. These observations provide knowledge of the entire crustal thickness from the shoreline to the oceanic crust on passive margins and supplement Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP)-type measurements on land.

  19. Freshly brewed continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  20. The Continental Margins of the Western North Atlantic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlee, John S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents an interpretation of geological and geophysical data, which provides a summary of the structural and sedimentary history of the United States Atlantic Margin. The importance of an understanding of the development of the outer continental shelf to future hydrocarbon exploration is detailed. (BT)

  1. Newborns' Face Recognition: Role of Inner and Outer Facial Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turati, Chiara; Macchi Cassia, Viola; Simion, Francesca; Leo, Irene

    2006-01-01

    Existing data indicate that newborns are able to recognize individual faces, but little is known about what perceptual cues drive this ability. The current study showed that either the inner or outer features of the face can act as sufficient cues for newborns' face recognition (Experiment 1), but the outer part of the face enjoys an advantage…

  2. Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Behannon, K. W.; Carbary, J. F.; Eviatar, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Similarities between the Saturnian and terrestrial outer magnetosphere are examined. Saturn, like Earth, has a fully developed magnetic tail, 80 to 100 RS in diameter. One major difference between the two outer magnetospheres is the hydrogen and nitrogen torus produced by Titan. This plasma is, in general, convected in the corotation direction at nearly the rigid corotation speed. Energies of magnetospheric particles extend to above 500 keV. In contrast, interplanetary protons and ions above 2 MeV have free access to the outer magnetosphere to distances well below the Stormer cutoff. This access presumably occurs through the magnetotail. In addition to the H+, H2+, and H3+ ions primarily of local origin, energetic He, C, N, and O ions are found with solar composition. Their flux can be substantially enhanced over that of interplanetary ions at energies of 0.2 to 0.4 MeV/nuc.

  3. The Outer Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Kerstin

    η Carinae is surrounded by a complex circumstellar nebula ejected during more than one eruption, the great eruption in the 1840s and the second or lesser eruption in the 1890s. Beyond the well-defined edges of its famous bipolar nebula are additional nebulous features and ejecta referred to as the outer ejecta. The outer ejecta includes a variety of structures of very different sizes and morphologies distributed in a region 0.67 pc in diameter with a mass of > 2-4 M⊙. Some individual features in the outer ejecta are moving extremely fast, up to 3,200 km/s, with most of the expansion velocities between 400-900 km/s. As a consequence of these high velocities, structures in the outer ejecta interact with the surrounding medium and with each other. The strong shocks that arise from these interactions give rise to soft X-ray emission. The global expansion pattern of the outer ejecta reveals an overall bipolar distribution, giving a symmetric structure to its morphologically more irregular appearance. The long, highly collimated filaments, called strings, are particularly unusual. The material in the strings follow a Hubble-flow and appear to originate at the central star. The properties of the nebulae associated with other LBVs also are described and compared with η Car. HR Car and AG Car show similar bipolar morphologies but are much older; HR Car's nebula may be η Car's older twin. The larger, extended nebulae detected around the giant eruption LBV P Cygni, and the extended nebulosity associated with AG Car and HR Car could be either from previous eruptions or facsimiles to η Car's outer ejecta.

  4. 75 FR 70021 - Environmental Documents Prepared in Support of Oil and Gas Activities on the Alaska Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Environmental Documents Prepared in Support of Oil and Gas Activities on the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... Location Project purpose FONSI Shell Exploration & Production, Beaufort Sea, Alaska...... Conduct...

  5. Continental Basaltic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, G. L.

    2003-12-01

    During the past few decades, geochemical studies of continental basaltic rocks and their petrologic kin have become mainstays of studies of the continental lithosphere. These igneous rocks have taken on such an important role largely because the chemical and isotopic composition of continental basaltic rocks and their mantle (see Chapter 2.05) and crustal xenoliths (see Chapter 3.01) provide the best proxy record available to earth scientists for the chemical and physical evolution of the deep continental lithosphere and underlying mantle, areas that are otherwise resistant to direct study. Keeping this in mind, the primary goal of this chapter is to illustrate how geochemical data can be used both to assess the origin of these rocks and to study the evolution of the continental lithosphere.A complete overview of continental basaltic rocks will not be attempted here, because continental "basalts" come in too wide a range of compositions, and because of the sheer volume of geochemical data available for such rocks worldwide. The scope of the chapter is limited to a discussion of a select group of ultramafic to mafic composition "intraplate" continental igneous rocks consisting primarily of kimberlites, potassic and sodic alkali basalts, and continental flood basalts. Igneous rocks forming at active continental margins, such as convergent or transform plate margins, are important examples of continental magmatism but are not directly discussed here (convergent margin magmas are discussed in Chapters 2.11, 3.11, and 3.18). The geochemistry of intraplate igneous rocks of the ocean basins are covered in Chapters 2.04 and 3.16. Although basaltic magmatism has occurred throughout the Earths history, the majority of the examples presented here are from Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic fields due to the more complete preservation of younger continental mafic igneous rocks. While considerable effort has been expended in studying the chemical differentiation of mafic magmas

  6. Law in Outer Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the current practice and fascinating future of legal issues involved in outer space exploration and colonization. Current space law, by necessity, addresses broad principles rather than specific incidents. Nonetheless, it covers a variety of issues including commercial development, rescue agreements, object registration,…

  7. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event.

  8. Continental Margins of the Arctic Ocean: Implications for Law of the Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, David

    2016-04-01

    A coastal State must define the outer edge of its continental margin in order to be entitled to extend the outer limits of its continental shelf beyond 200 M, according to article 76 of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea. The article prescribes the methods with which to make this definition and includes such metrics as water depth, seafloor gradient and thickness of sediment. Note the distinction between the "outer edge of the continental margin", which is the extent of the margin after application of the formula of article 76, and the "outer limit of the continental shelf", which is the limit after constraint criteria of article 76 are applied. For a relatively small ocean basin, the Arctic Ocean reveals a plethora of continental margin types reflecting both its complex tectonic origins and its diverse sedimentation history. These factors play important roles in determining the extended continental shelves of Arctic coastal States. This study highlights the critical factors that might determine the outer edge of continental margins in the Arctic Ocean as prescribed by article 76. Norway is the only Arctic coastal State that has had recommendations rendered by the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS). Russia and Denmark (Greenland) have made submissions to the CLCS to support their extended continental shelves in the Arctic and are awaiting recommendations. Canada has yet to make its submission and the US has not yet ratified the Convention. The various criteria that each coastal State has utilized or potentially can utilize to determine the outer edge of the continental margin are considered. Important criteria in the Arctic include, 1) morphological continuity of undersea features, such as the various ridges and spurs, with the landmass, 2) the tectonic origins and geologic affinities with the adjacent land masses of the margins and various ridges, 3) sedimentary processes, particularly along continental slopes, and 4) thickness and

  9. 30 CFR 580.80 - Paperwork Reduction Act statement-information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 580, Prospecting for Minerals other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur on the Outer Continental Shelf... INTERIOR OFFSHORE PROSPECTING FOR MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF... retain a benefit. We will protect information considered proprietary under applicable law and...

  10. 30 CFR 580.80 - Paperwork Reduction Act statement-information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 580, Prospecting for Minerals other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur on the Outer Continental Shelf... INTERIOR OFFSHORE PROSPECTING FOR MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF... retain a benefit. We will protect information considered proprietary under applicable law and...

  11. 30 CFR 580.80 - Paperwork Reduction Act statement-information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 580, Prospecting for Minerals other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur on the Outer Continental Shelf... INTERIOR OFFSHORE PROSPECTING FOR MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF... retain a benefit. We will protect information considered proprietary under applicable law and...

  12. 77 FR 65547 - Reissuance of the NPDES General Permits for Oil and Gas Exploration Facilities on the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... AGENCY Reissuance of the NPDES General Permits for Oil and Gas Exploration Facilities on the Outer...) General Permits for Oil and Gas Exploration Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf and Contiguous State... from facilities engaged in field exploration and exploratory drilling activities under the...

  13. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.

    1998-01-01

    The Principal Investigator's responsibilities on this grant fell into two categories according to his participation. In the nomenclature work of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Owen is chair of the Task Group for the Outer Solar System. He is also a member of the IAU's Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) which is composed of the chairs of the several Task Groups plus the presidents of two IAU Commissions and several outside consultants. The WGPSN is presided over by its President, Professor Kaare Aksnes from the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway.

  14. Jupiter's outer atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, N. M.

    1973-01-01

    The current state of the theory of Jupiter's outer atmosphere is briefly reviewed. The similarities and dissimilarities between the terrestrial and Jovian upper atmospheres are discussed, including the interaction of the solar wind with the planetary magnetic fields. Estimates of Jovian parameters are given, including magnetosphere and auroral zone sizes, ionospheric conductivity, energy inputs, and solar wind parameters at Jupiter. The influence of the large centrifugal force on the cold plasma distribution is considered. The Jovian Van Allen belt is attributed to solar wind particles diffused in toward the planet by dynamo electric fields from ionospheric neutral winds, and the consequences of this theory are indicated.

  15. Continental magnetic anomaly constraints on continental reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized anomalies are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental anomalies demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they suggest further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.

  16. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event. PMID:16057953

  17. The Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchfiel, B. Clark

    1983-01-01

    Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

  18. Continental Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Continental flood basalts have been receiving considerable scientific attention lately. Recent publications have focused on several particular flood-basalt provinces (Brito-Arctic, Karoo, Parana', Deccan, and Columbia Plateau), and much attention has been given to the proposed connection between flood-basalt volcanism, bolide impacts, and mass extinctions. The editor of Continental Flood Basalts, J. D. Macdougall, conceived the book to assemble in a single volume, from a vast and scattered literature, an overview of each major post-Cambrian flood-basalt province.Continental Flood Basalts has 10 chapters; nine treat individual flood-basalt provinces, and a summary chapter compares and contrasts continental flood-basalts and mid-oceanic ridge basalts. Specifically, the chapters address the Columbia River basalt, the northwest United States including the Columbia River basalt, the Ethiopian Province, the North Atlantic Tertiary Province, the Deccan Traps, the Parana' Basin, the Karoo Province, the Siberian Platform, and Cenozoic basaltic rocks in eastern China. Each chapter is written by one or more individuals with an extensive background in the province.

  19. Outer atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    The region above the earth from about 90 km to 150 km is a major part of the upper or outer atmosphere. It is relatively unexplored, being too high for balloons or aircraft and too low for persistent orbiting spacecraft. However, the concept of a tethered subsatellite, deployed downward from an orbiting, more massive craft such as the Space Shuttle, opens the possibility of a research capability that could provide global mapping of this region. The need for research in this thick spherical shell above the earth falls into two major categories: (1) scientific data for understanding and modeling the global atmosphere and thereby determining its role in the earth system, and (2) engineering data for the design of future aerospace vehicles that will operate there. This paper presents an overview and synthesis of the currently perceived research needs and the state-of-the-art of the proposed tethered research capability.

  20. The leptospiral outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Haake, David A; Zückert, Wolfram R

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) is the front line of leptospiral interactions with their environment and the mammalian host. Unlike most invasive spirochetes, pathogenic leptospires must be able to survive in both free-living and host-adapted states. As organisms move from one set of environmental conditions to another, the OM must cope with a series of conflicting challenges. For example, the OM must be porous enough to allow nutrient uptake, yet robust enough to defend the cell against noxious substances. In the host, the OM presents a surface decorated with adhesins and receptors for attaching to, and acquiring, desirable host molecules such as the complement regulator, Factor H.Factor H. On the other hand, the OM must enable leptospires to evade detection by the host's immune system on their way from sites of invasion through the bloodstream to the protected niche of the proximal tubule. The picture that is emerging of the leptospiral OM is that, while it shares many of the characteristics of the OMs of spirochetes and Gram-negative bacteria, it is also unique and different in ways that make it of general interest to microbiologists. For example, unlike most other pathogenic spirochetes, the leptospiral OM is rich in lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Leptospiral LPS is similar to that of Gram-negative bacteria but has a number of unique structural features that may explain why it is not recognized by the LPS-specific Toll-like receptor 4 of humans. As in other spirochetes, lipoproteins are major components of the leptospiral OM, though their roles are poorly understood. The functions of transmembrane outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in many cases are better understood, thanks to homologies with their Gram-negative counterparts and the emergence of improved genetic techniques. This chapter will review recent discoveries involving the leptospiral OM and its role in leptospiral physiology and pathogenesis.

  1. 30 CFR 252.6 - Freedom of Information Act requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Continental Shelf) and 30 CFR part 251 (Geological and Geophysical Explorations of the Outer Continental Shelf... Section 252.6 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT.... 552), the regulations contained in 43 CFR part 2 (Records and Testimony), the requirements of the...

  2. Strategy for outer planets exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    NASA's Planetary Programs Office formed a number of scientific working groups to study in depth the potential scientific return from the various candidate missions to the outer solar system. The results of these working group studies were brought together in a series of symposia to evaluate the potential outer planet missions and to discuss strategies for exploration of the outer solar system that were consistent with fiscal constraints and with anticipated spacecraft and launch vehicle capabilities. A logical, scientifically sound, and cost effective approach to exploration of the outer solar system is presented.

  3. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.; Grant, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This grant has supported work by T. Owen and B. A. Smith on planetary and satellite nomenclature, carried out under the general auspices of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The IAU maintains a Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) whose current chair is Prof.Kaare Aksnes of the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway. Both Owen and Smith are members of the WGPSN; Owen as chair of the Outer Solar System Task Group, and Smith as chair of the Mars Task Group. The major activity during the last grant period (2002) was the approval of several new names for features on Mars by Smith's group and features on Jovian satellites plus new names for satellites of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus by Owen's group. Much of this work was accomplished by e-mail exchanges, but the new nomenclature was formally discussed and approved at a meeting of the WGPSN held in conjunction with the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting in Birmingham, Alabama in October 2002.

  4. 75 FR 54369 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-NEW, Upcoming Projects Considering the Use of Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ...: 1010-NEW, Upcoming Projects Considering the Use of Outer Continental Shelf Sand, Gravel, and Shell... paperwork requirements that respondents will submit to BOEMRE to obtain OCS sand, gravel, and shell...-1275. Marine Minerals Program information and procedures for obtaining sand, gravel, and...

  5. 76 FR 4244 - Regulation and Enforcement; Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Regulation and Enforcement; Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf--Acquire a Lease... renewable energy regulatory provisions that pertain to noncompetitive acquisition of leases, published...

  6. The Leptospiral Outer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Haake, David A; Zückert, Wolfram R

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) is the front line of leptospiral interactions with their environment and the mammalian host. Unlike most invasive spirochetes, pathogenic leptospires must be able survive in both free-living and host-adapted states. As organisms move from one set of environmental conditions to another, the OM must cope with a series of conflicting challenges. For example, the OM must be porous enough to allow nutrient uptake, yet robust enough to defend the cell against noxious substances. In the host, the OM presents a surface decorated with adhesins and receptors for attaching to, and acquiring, desirable host molecules such as the complement regulator, Factor H. On the other hand, the OM must enable leptospires to evade detection by the host’s immune system on their way from sites of invasion through the bloodstream to the protected niche of the proximal tubule. The picture that is emerging of the leptospiral OM is that, while it shares many of the characteristics of the OMs of spirochetes and Gram-negative bacteria, it is also unique and different in ways that make it of general interest to microbiologists. For example, unlike most other pathogenic spirochetes, the leptospiral OM is rich in lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Leptospiral LPS is similar to that of Gram-negative bacteria but has a number of unique structural features that may explain why it is not recognized by the LPS-specific Toll-like receptor 4 of humans. As in other spirochetes, lipoproteins are major components of the leptospiral OM, though their roles are poorly understood. The functions of transmembrane OMPs in many cases are better understood thanks to homologies with their Gram-negative counterparts and the emergence of improved genetic techniques. This chapter will review recent discoveries involving the leptospiral OM and its role in leptospiral physiology and pathogenesis. Readers are referred to earlier, excellent summaries related to this subject (Adler and de la Peña Moctezuma

  7. 30 CFR 250.1404 - Which violations will BSEE review for potential civil penalties?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250... responsibility requirements at 30 CFR part 553....

  8. 30 CFR 250.1405 - When is a case file developed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1405 When is a case file developed?...

  9. 30 CFR 550.1405 - When is a case file developed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1405 When is a case file developed? BOEM...

  10. 30 CFR 250.1401 - Index table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1401 Index table. The following table...

  11. 30 CFR 250.1406 - When will BSEE notify me and provide penalty information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1406 When will...

  12. 30 CFR 250.1401 - Index table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1401 Index table. The following table is an index of...

  13. 30 CFR 250.1408 - When will I be notified of the Reviewing Officer's decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties §...

  14. 30 CFR 550.1408 - When will I be notified of the Reviewing Officer's decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1408 When will I...

  15. 30 CFR 250.1407 - How do I respond to the letter of notification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1407 How do...

  16. 30 CFR 250.1408 - When will I be notified of the Reviewing Officer's decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties §...

  17. 30 CFR 550.1408 - When will I be notified of the Reviewing Officer's decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1408 When will I...

  18. 30 CFR 250.1401 - Index table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1401 Index table. The following table is an index of...

  19. 30 CFR 550.1407 - How do I respond to the letter of notification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1407 How do I respond to...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1404 - Which violations will BSEE review for potential civil penalties?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250... responsibility requirements at 30 CFR part 553....

  1. 30 CFR 550.1407 - How do I respond to the letter of notification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1407 How do I respond to...

  2. 30 CFR 550.1403 - What is the maximum civil penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1403 What is the maximum civil...

  3. 30 CFR 250.1400 - How does MMS begin the civil penalty process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties §...

  4. 30 CFR 250.1400 - How does BSEE begin the civil penalty process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1400 How does...

  5. 30 CFR 550.1406 - When will BOEM notify me and provide penalty information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1406 When will BOEM notify...

  6. 30 CFR 250.1405 - When is a case file developed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1405 When is a...

  7. 30 CFR 250.1403 - What is the maximum civil penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1403 What is...

  8. 30 CFR 550.1406 - When will BOEM notify me and provide penalty information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1406 When will BOEM notify...

  9. 30 CFR 550.1400 - How does BOEM begin the civil penalty process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1400 How does BOEM begin...

  10. 30 CFR 250.1407 - How do I respond to the letter of notification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1407 How do...

  11. 30 CFR 250.1403 - What is the maximum civil penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1403 What is the maximum...

  12. 30 CFR 550.1400 - How does BOEM begin the civil penalty process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1400 How does BOEM begin...

  13. 30 CFR 550.1405 - When is a case file developed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1405 When is a case file developed? BOEM...

  14. 30 CFR 550.1403 - What is the maximum civil penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1403 What is the maximum civil...

  15. 30 CFR 250.1403 - What is the maximum civil penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1403 What is the maximum...

  16. 30 CFR 250.1405 - When is a case file developed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1405 When is a case file developed?...

  17. 30 CFR 250.1406 - When will MMS notify me and provide penalty information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties §...

  18. 30 CFR 250.1406 - When will BSEE notify me and provide penalty information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1406 When will...

  19. 30 CFR 250.1407 - How do I respond to the letter of notification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties §...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1400 - How does BSEE begin the civil penalty process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1400 How does...

  1. 30 CFR 256.4 - Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Oil, Gas... for oil and gas, and sulphur, in submerged lands of the outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The Act... major oil and gas producers....

  2. 30 CFR 250.1407 - How do I respond to the letter of notification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1407 How do...

  3. 30 CFR 250.1400 - How does BSEE begin the civil penalty process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1400 How does...

  4. 30 CFR 250.1406 - When will BSEE notify me and provide penalty information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1406 When will...

  5. 30 CFR 550.1407 - How do I respond to the letter of notification?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1407 How do I respond to...

  6. 30 CFR 550.1406 - When will BOEM notify me and provide penalty information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1406 When will BOEM notify...

  7. 30 CFR 550.1400 - How does BOEM begin the civil penalty process?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1400 How does BOEM begin...

  8. 30 CFR 550.1408 - When will I be notified of the Reviewing Officer's decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1408 When will I...

  9. 30 CFR 250.1403 - What is the maximum civil penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1403 What is the maximum...

  10. 30 CFR 550.1403 - What is the maximum civil penalty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1403 What is the maximum civil...

  11. 30 CFR 550.1405 - When is a case file developed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 550.1405 When is a case file developed? BOEM...

  12. 30 CFR 250.1408 - When will I be notified of the Reviewing Officer's decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties §...

  13. 30 CFR 250.1405 - When is a case file developed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1405 When is a case file developed?...

  14. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  15. Thermoelectric Outer Planets Spacecraft (TOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research and advanced development work is reported on a ballistic-mode, outer planet spacecraft using radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) power. The Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS) project was established to provide the advanced systems technology that would allow the realistic estimates of performance, cost, reliability, and scheduling that are required for an actual flight mission. A system design of the complete RTG-powered outer planet spacecraft was made; major technical innovations of certain hardware elements were designed, developed, and tested; and reliability and quality assurance concepts were developed for long-life requirements. At the conclusion of its active phase, the TOPS Project reached its principal objectives: a development and experience base was established for project definition, and for estimating cost, performance, and reliability; an understanding of system and subsystem capabilities for successful outer planets missions was achieved. The system design answered long-life requirements with massive redundancy, controlled by on-board analysis of spacecraft performance data.

  16. NSF Continental Lithosphere Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhew, Michael; MacGregor, Ian

    For several months the Continental Lithosphere Program (CL) of the National Science Foundation has been subject to a major review. The process was stimulated by a series of budget setbacks over the past few years. Although Presidential budget requests have been very favorable for the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR), and there has been strong support within the National Science Foundation and Congress, actual appropriations by Congress have been disappointing.In each year the final allocation to EAR has been affected by external factors beyond the control of the Foundation. In the four fiscal years from 1986 through 1989 the factors include reductions tied to the Gramm-Rudman deficit reduction measures, congressional reaction to the October 1987 stock market crash, and two years of protection for the Ocean Sciences part of the NSF budget that was paid for from the budgets of the Atmospheric and Earth Sciences divisions.

  17. Cascading Off Continental Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthnance, J.

    Cascading is the motion of dense water that is formed by cooling, evaporation or freezing in the surface layer, along a sloping sea bottom to a greater depth. It is in- fluential in water-mass formation and particularly in ventilation of intermediate and abyssal layers, hence affecting thermohaline circulation and global climate. Cascad- ing is intermittent in time and space, takes place in the bottom layers and cannot be traced via satellites. Hence it is rarely observed while in progress, and there is a dearth of knowledge of the statistical and main individual characteristics of cascading: most favourable locations, frequency of occurrence, density difference, speed of sinking, off-shore volume fluxes etc. The INTAS 99-1600 project "Dense water overflows off continental shelves (cascading)" aims to (i) improve understanding and modelling of dense water overflows, ie. cascading as a meso-scale process (ii) extrapolate from spe- cific observations (focused on the edge of the continental shelf) using generic models and (iii) estimate its influence on fluxes of dissolved and particulate matter between the shelf and open ocean in the bottom boundary layer. An overview of the project to date will be given: - collation of existing confirmed observations of cascading, and data of relevant laboratory experiments, to provide a common data base for modelling; - search of oceanographic data banks and collation of wider relevant data; - systematic analysis; inter-comparison, identifying factors and mechanisms in pre-conditioning, initiation, the evolving form and the end-stages of dense water overflow. - developing a linked set of new or modified models (1.5-layer to 3-D full-physics) capable of sim- ulating the main driving mechanisms and predicting the characteristics of cascading; - developing a model to study the generation and movement of mudslides that the cas- cading process can trigger if sediment material becomes unstable over a steep bottom slope.

  18. Transform continental margins - part 1: Concepts and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    This paper reviews the geodynamic concepts and models related to transform continental margins, and their implications on the structure of these margins. Simple kinematic models of transform faulting associated with continental rifting and oceanic accretion allow to define three successive stages of evolution, including intra-continental transform faulting, active transform margin, and passive transform margin. Each part of the transform margin experiences these three stages, but the evolution is diachronous along the margin. Both the duration of each stage and the cumulated strike-slip deformation increase from one extremity of the margin (inner corner) to the other (outer corner). Initiation of transform faulting is related to the obliquity between the trend of the lithospheric deformed zone and the relative displacement of the lithospheric plates involved in divergence. In this oblique setting, alternating transform and divergent plate boundaries correspond to spatial partitioning of the deformation. Both obliquity and the timing of partitioning influence the shape of transform margins. Oblique margin can be defined when oblique rifting is followed by oblique oceanic accretion. In this case, no transform margin should exist in the prolongation of the oceanic fracture zones. Vertical displacements along transform margins were mainly studied to explain the formation of marginal ridges. Numerous models were proposed, one of the most used is being based on thermal exchanges between the oceanic and the continental lithospheres across the transform fault. But this model is compatible neither with numerical computation including flexural behavior of the lithosphere nor with timing of vertical displacements and the lack of heating related to the passing of the oceanic accretion axis as recorded by the Côte d'Ivoire-Ghana marginal ridge. Enhanced models are still needed. They should better take into account the erosion on the continental slope, and the level of coupling

  19. 30 CFR 250.199 - Paperwork Reduction Act statements-information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., injuries, and oil spills during OCS activities. ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General... relevant information. (b) Respondents are OCS oil, gas, and sulphur lessees and operators. The...

  20. 30 CFR 250.199 - Paperwork Reduction Act statements-information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., injuries, and oil spills during OCS activities. ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General... relevant information. (b) Respondents are OCS oil, gas, and sulphur lessees and operators. The...

  1. 30 CFR 250.199 - Paperwork Reduction Act statements-information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., injuries, and oil spills during OCS activities. ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General... relevant information. (b) Respondents are OCS oil, gas, and sulphur lessees and operators. The...

  2. Geomorphic characterization of the U.S. Atlantic continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Daniel S.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Andrews, Brian D.; Chaytor, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing volume of multibeam bathymetry data collected along continental margins is providing new opportunities to study the feedbacks between sedimentary and oceanographic processes and seafloor morphology. Attempts to develop simple guidelines that describe the relationships between form and process often overlook the importance of inherited physiography in slope depositional systems. Here, we use multibeam bathymetry data and seismic reflection profiles spanning the U.S. Atlantic outer continental shelf, slope and rise from Cape Hatteras to New England to quantify the broad-scale, across-margin morphological variation. Morphometric analyses suggest the margin can be divided into four basic categories that roughly align with Quaternary sedimentary provinces. Within each category, Quaternary sedimentary processes exerted heavy modification of submarine canyons, landslide complexes and the broad-scale morphology of the continental rise, but they appear to have preserved much of the pre-Quaternary, across-margin shape of the continental slope. Without detailed constraints on the substrate structure, first-order morphological categorization the U.S. Atlantic margin does not provide a reliable framework for predicting relationships between form and process.

  3. Palaeomagnetism and the continental crust

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, J.D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to palaeomagnetism offering treatment of theory and practice. It analyzes the palaeomagnetic record over the whole of geological time, from the Archaean to the Cenozoic, and goes on to examine the impact of past geometries and movements of the continental crust at each geological stage. Topics covered include theory of rock and mineral magnetism, field and laboratory methods, growth and consolidation of the continental crust in Archaean and Proterozoic times, Palaeozoic palaeomagnetism and the formation of Pangaea, the geomagnetic fields, continental movements, configurations and mantle convection.

  4. Triple acting radial seal

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  5. Dynamics of Continental Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to swallow buoyant exotic crust. Accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins are the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North and South American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific. The geologic record is riddled with accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana and the Altaides that formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. Both the modern and ancient examples are characterised by episodic switches between extension and shortening associated with transitions from collision of exotic crust and subduction related rollback. We present three-dimensional dynamic models that show for the first time how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back arc region. The complexity of the morphology and evolution of the system are driven by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonal to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, but infer that this is a global phenomena throughout Earth's evolution.

  6. Dynamics of continental accretion.

    PubMed

    Moresi, L; Betts, P G; Miller, M S; Cayley, R A

    2014-04-10

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon.

  7. Coordination: Southeast continental shelf studies

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1989-01-26

    The objective of this investigation is to obtain model descriptions of the flow modifications in the Southeast Atlantic continental shelf due to Gulf Stream fluctuations and topographic effects. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Magnetosphere of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    Scaling laws for possible outer planet magnetospheres are derived. These suggest that convection and its associated auroral effects will play a relatively smaller role than at earth, and that there is a possibility that they could have significant radiation belts of energetic trapped particles.

  9. The View from "Outer Britain"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Gareth

    2007-01-01

    In the UK, there remains an economy of "outer Britain" which has a higher representation of low-pay, low-skill jobs, and correspondingly, lower levels of economic growth than other parts of the country. The author discusses how the distinctive ideological complexions of Scottish and Welsh politics open the possibility of different approaches to…

  10. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  11. Newborns' face recognition: role of inner and outer facial features.

    PubMed

    Turati, Chiara; Macchi Cassia, Viola; Simion, Francesca; Leo, Irene

    2006-01-01

    Existing data indicate that newborns are able to recognize individual faces, but little is known about what perceptual cues drive this ability. The current study showed that either the inner or outer features of the face can act as sufficient cues for newborns' face recognition (Experiment 1), but the outer part of the face enjoys an advantage over the inner part (Experiment 2). Inversion of the face stimuli disrupted recognition when only the inner portion of the face was shown, but not when the whole face was fully visible or only the outer features were presented (Experiment 3). The results enhance our picture of what information newborns actually process and encode when they discriminate, learn, and recognize faces.

  12. 76 FR 52006 - Information Collection Activity: Leasing of Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas and Sulphur in the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... 15, 2011, we published a Federal Register notice (76 FR 21393) announcing that we would submit this... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Information Collection Activity: Leasing of... Leasing of Minerals Other than Oil, Gas and Sulphur in the Outer Continental Shelf (OMB No. 1010-...

  13. 77 FR 74213 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... Supplementary Information section of this notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Ocean...

  14. 78 FR 72096 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... Supplementary Information Section of this notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Ocean...

  15. 77 FR 57581 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... Information Unit, Information Services Section at the number below. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Gulf...

  16. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X.; Morrison, Jay A.

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  17. 30 CFR 250.1402 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1402 Definitions. Terms used in this subpart have the... penalties. Violation means failure to comply with the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA) or any...

  18. Deep Continental Crustal Earthquakes and Lithospheric Structure: A Global Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, S.; Isacks, B. L.

    2007-12-01

    measurements indicate that lower crustal earthquakes exist within continental regions experiencing youthful (generally Neogene to present) tectonism typically with < 15 % strain. We propose a model that describes relative continental deformation and corresponding seismogenic thickness. In stable seismogenic regions, earthquakes are limited to depths where near-surface derived fluids can induce activity and therefore TS < 25 km. As continental lithosphere passes into an intermediate state of deformation, fluids from the near surface and melts formed in situ or derived from the mantle can act to seismically activate the entire continental crust. As deformation continues, percent strains can reach 100 % or more, mantle lithosphere is typically thinned or absent, and the lower crust via heating and/or sufficient weakening becomes aseismic.

  19. Physics of the outer heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gazis, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Major advances in the physics of the outer heliosphere are reviewed for the 1987-1990 time frame. Emphasis is placed on five broad topics: the detailed structure of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances, the global structure of the interplanetary field, latidudinal variations and meridional flows, radial and temporal variations, and the interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium. 122 refs.

  20. Origin of Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Boyce, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We feel that at the present moment the available theoretical models of the Kuiper belt are still in advance of the data, and thus our main task has been to conduct observational work guided by theoretical motivations. Our efforts over the past year can be divided into four categories: A) Wide-field Searches for Kuiper Belt Objects; B) Pencil-beam Searches for Kuiper Belt Objects; C) Wide-field Searches for Moons of the Outer Planets; D) Pencil-beam Searches for Faint Uranian and Neptunian Moons; E) Recovery Observations. As of April 2002, we have conducted several searches for Kuiper belt objects using large-format mosaic CCD camera on 4-meter class telescopes. In May 1999, we used the Kitt Peak 4-meter with the NOAO Mosaic camera we attempted a search for KBOs at a range of ecliptic latitudes. In addition to our wide-field searches, we have conducted three 'pencil-beam' searches in the past year. In a pencil-beam search we take repeated integrations of the same field throughout a night. After preprocessing the resulting images we shift and recombine them along a range of rates and directions consistent with the motion of KBOs. Stationary objects then smear out, while objects moving at near the shift rate appear as point sources. In addition to our searches for Kuiper belt objects, we are completing the inventory of the outer solar system by search for faint satellites of the outer planets. In August 2001 we conducted pencil beam searches for faint Uranian and Neptunian satellites at CFHT and CTIO. These searches resulted in the discover of two Neptunian and four Uranian satellite candidates. The discovery of Kuiper belt objects and outer planet satellites is of little use if the discoveries are not followed by systematic, repeated astrometric observations that permit reliable estimates of their orbits.

  1. Data Management Supporting the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, E.; Henderson, J. F.; Warnken, R.; McLean, S. J.; Varner, J. D.; Mcquinn, E.; LaRocque, J.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Extended Continental Shelf (ECS) Project is a multi-agency collaboration led by the U.S. Department of State whose mission is to establish the full extent of the continental shelf of the United States consistent with international law. Since 2003, the U.S. has been actively collecting bathymetric, seismic, and other geophysical data and geologic samples required to delineate its outer limits in accordance with Article 76 of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea. In 2007, the U.S. ECS Task Force designated the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) to serve as both the Data Management lead and the Data Archive and Integration Center for the U.S. ECS Project. NGDC, one of three National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Offices active in the ECS Project, has the primary responsibility to provide a common infrastructure and a means to integrate the data supporting, and products resulting from ECS analysis. One of the key challenges in the ECS project is the requirement to track the provenance of data and derived products. Final ECS analyses may result in hundreds of points that define a new maritime boundary that is our extended continental shelf. These points will be developed in a rigorous process of analysis encompassing potentially thousands of raw datasets and derived products. NGDC has spent the past two years planning, designing, and partially implementing the Information Management System (IMS), a highly functional, interactive software system that serves as the master database for the ECS Project. The purpose of this geospatial database is to archive, access, and manage the primary data, derivative data and products, associated metadata, information and decisions that will form the U.S. submission. The IMS enables team members to manage ECS data in a consistent way while maintaining institutional memory and the rationale behind decisions. The IMS contains two major components: First, a catalog that acts as the interface to the IMS by

  2. Observations of intermediate nepheloid layers on the northern California continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee-Shaw, E. E.; Sternberg, R. W.; Mullenbach, B.; Ogston, A. S.

    2004-04-01

    Conductivity-temperature-depth and transmissometer surveys were undertaken to investigate the characteristics and seasonal nature of intermediate nepheloid layers (INLs) over the outer shelf and upper slope of the northern California margin, near Eureka, CA. Observed INLs could generally be grouped into one of two categories: INLs that formed and spread seaward from the continental shelf, and INLs generated at continental slope depths greater than 150 m. Shelf INLs, forming between 70 and 150-m depth on the outer shelf and extending seaward 15-20 km past the shelf break, were prevalent during winter and early spring. Continental slope INLs were found during all seasons of the year. Their suspended particulate matter concentration was lower than that of the shelf INLs, and their horizontal extent was 3-7 km seaward from the slope. Mooring data from 450-m depth show strong bottom-trapped semidiurnal internal tidal energy and asymmetry between upslope and downslope semidiurnal motions, indicative of bore-like behavior. These analyses suggest that critical reflection of internal tides is a common feature of the outer continental slope in this region. The location of slope-depth INLs was often observed to coincide with regions where the topographic slope angle was critical for internal tide reflection. In addition, seasonal variability in the span of critical topography over the slope matches seasonal variability in the density of observed INLs over the continental slope. Slope-depth INLs appear to be associated with energetic tidal motions and interaction between internal tides and bathymetry, whereas shelf-depth INLs are likely formed by resuspension events on the outer shelf and subsequent transport offshore by mesoscale circulation processes.

  3. The northern Egyptian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Mohamed, Gad; Omar, Khaled; Farid, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Africa displays a variety of continental margin structures, tectonics and sedimentary records. The northern Egyptian continental margin represents the NE portion of the North African passive continental margin. Economically, this region is of great importance as a very rich and productive hydrocarbon zone in Egypt. Moreover, it is characterized by remarkable tectonic setting accompanied by active tectonic processes from the old Tethys to recent Mediterranean. In this article, seismicity of the northern Egyptian continental margin has been re-evaluated for more than 100-years and the source parameters of three recent earthquakes (October 2012, January 2013 and July 2013) have been estimated. Moment tensor inversions of 19th October 2012 and 17th January 2013 earthquakes reveal normal faulting mechanism with strike-slip component having seismic moment of 3.5E16 N m and 4.3E15 N m respectively. The operation of the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) since the end of 1997 has significantly enhanced the old picture of earthquake activity across northern Egyptian continental margin whereas; the record-ability (annual rate) has changed from 2-events/year to 54-event/year before and after ENSN respectively. The spatial distribution of earthquakes foci indicated that the activity tends to cluster at three zones: Mediterranean Ridge (MR), Nile Cone (NC) and Eratosthenes Seamount (ERS). However, two seismic gaps are reported along Levant Basin (LEV) and Herodotus Basin (HER).

  4. Geometrical interpretation for the outer SU(3) outer multiplicity label

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draayer, Jerry P.; Troltenier, D.

    1995-01-01

    A geometrical interpretation for the outer multiplicity rho that occurs in a reduction of the product of two SU(3) representations, (lambda(sub pi), mu(sub pi)) x (lambda(sub nu), mu(sub nu)) approaches sigma(sub rho)(lambda, mu)(sub rho), is introduced. This coupling of proton (pi) and neutron (nu) representations arises, for example, in both boson and fermion descriptions of heavy deformed nuclei. Attributing a geometry to the coupling raises the possibility of introducing a simple interaction that provides a physically meaningful way for distinguishing multiple occurrences of (lambda, mu) values that can arise in such products.

  5. Weighing the deep continental biosphere.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Sean; Parnell, John

    2014-01-01

    There is abundant evidence for widespread microbial activity in deep continental fractures and aquifers, with important implications for biogeochemical cycling on Earth and the habitability of other planetary bodies. Whitman et al. (P Natl Acad Sci USA, 95, 1998, 6578) estimated a continental subsurface biomass on the order of 10(16) -10(17) g C. We reassess this value in the light of more recent data including over 100 microbial population density measurements from groundwater around the world. Making conservative assumptions about cell carbon content and the ratio of attached and free-living microorganisms, we find that the evidence continues to support a deep continental biomass estimate of 10(16) -10(17) g C, or 2-19% of Earth's total biomass.

  6. Continental crust: a geophysical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book develops an integrated and balanced picture of present knowledge of the continental crust. Crust and lithosphere are first defined, and the formation of crusts as a general planetary phenomenon is described. The background and methods of geophysical studies of the earth's crust and the collection of related geophysical parameters are examined. Creep and friction experiments and the various methods of radiometric age dating are addressed, and geophysical and geological investigations of the crustal structure in various age provinces of the continents are studied. Specific tectonic structures such as rifts, continental margins, and geothermal areas are discussed. Finally, an attempt is made to give a comprehensive view of the evolution of the continental crust and to collect and develop arguments for crustal accretion and recycling. 647 references.

  7. Antarctic glacial history from numerical models and continental margin sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, P.F.; Barrett, P.J.; Cooper, A. K.; Huybrechts, P.

    1999-01-01

    The climate record of glacially transported sediments in prograded wedges around the Antarctic outer continental shelf, and their derivatives in continental rise drifts, may be combined to produce an Antarctic ice sheet history, using numerical models of ice sheet response to temperature and sea-level change. Examination of published models suggests several preliminary conclusions about ice sheet history. The ice sheet's present high sensitivity to sea-level change at short (orbital) periods was developed gradually as its size increased, replacing a declining sensitivity to temperature. Models suggest that the ice sheet grew abruptly to 40% (or possibly more) of its present size at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, mainly as a result of its own temperature sensitivity. A large but more gradual middle Miocene change was externally driven, probably by development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and Polar Front, provided that a few million years' delay can be explained. The Oligocene ice sheet varied considerably in size and areal extent, but the late Miocene ice sheet was more stable, though significantly warmer than today's. This difference probably relates to the confining effect of the Antarctic continental margin. Present-day numerical models of ice sheet development are sufficient to guide current sampling plans, but sea-ice formation, polar wander, basal topography and ice streaming can be identified as factors meriting additional modelling effort in the future.

  8. Magnetospheres of the outer planets

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, A.F.

    1986-12-01

    The magnetospheres of the outer planets have been shown by Voyager explorations to strongly interact with the surfaces and atmospheres of their planetary satellites and rings. In the cases of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus, the processes of charged particle sputtering, neutral gas cloud formation, and rapid plasma injection from the ionization of the neutral clouds, have important implications both for the magnetospheres as a whole and for the surfaces and atmospheres of their satellites. The general methodology employed in these researches has involved comparisons of the planetary magnetospheres in order to identify common physical processes. 16 references.

  9. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, K.L.; Entekhabi, D.; Eagleson, P.S. )

    1993-06-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: (1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and (2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the Continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases. 48 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

  11. 75 FR 3423 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... action'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR... Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999); Is not an economically significant regulatory action based on health or safety risks subject to Executive Order 13045 (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997); Is not...

  12. 78 FR 27427 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities in the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... electromagnetic surveys, deep stratigraphic and shallow test drilling, and various remote sensing methods; (3..., electromagnetic surveys, magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, remote sensing surveys, marine vibrator surveys,...

  13. 76 FR 7226 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Characterization Activities; Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Office of Offshore Alternative Energy Programs, 381 Elden Street, MS 4090, Herndon, Virginia 20170-4817... Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Energy Development and Production and Alternate Use... ``Comments on Mid Atlantic WEA Regional EA'' to Program Manager, Office of Offshore Alternative...

  14. 77 FR 74512 - Interim Policy Leasing for Renewable Energy Data Collection Facility on the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... leases, easements and rights-of-way on the OCS for alternative energy activities. The Secretary delegated... renewable energy activities and initiatives (73 FR 21152). BOEM also took into consideration the importance... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Interim Policy Leasing for Renewable Energy Data Collection Facility...

  15. 76 FR 14681 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Massachusetts...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... address: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Office of Offshore Alternative... Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Office of Offshore Alternative Energy Programs, 381 Elden... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on...

  16. 76 FR 20367 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Off Delaware...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Offshore Alternative Energy Programs, 381 Elden Street, Mail Stop 4090, Herndon, Virginia 20170-4817... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the... Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE), Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  17. 76 FR 30184 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Interim Policy Leasing for Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Alternative Energy Programs, 381 Elden Street, MS 4090, Herndon, Virginia 20170-4817, (703) 787-1340 or... the OCS for alternative energy activities. This authority has been delegated to BOEMRE. In a Request... authorizing alternative energy resource assessment, data collection, and technology testing activities on...

  18. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 69

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This article includes the following: trace contaminants in surface sediment of the northern Bering Sea: a statistical review; trace contaminants in the greater St. George Basin: a statistical review; mercury in Alaska marine surface sediments: a review of the regional data; and natural distribution and environmental background of trace heavy metals in Alaskan shelf and estuarine areas.

  19. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 38

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    This final report of a study of the environmental characterization of the North Aleutian Shelf nearshore region includes: characterization, processes, and vulnerability to development; and annotated bibliography and keyword index.

  20. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 73

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The volume contains information on the following: Subsea permafrost: probing, thermal regime, and data analyses, 1975-81 and a geographic based information management system for permafrost prediction in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. Part I contains: Submarine permafrost on the Alaskan shelf and a geographic based information management system for permafrost prediction in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. Part II contains: Submarine permafrost on the Arctic shelf of Eurasia and the development of the Arctic in the Pleistocene. Each paper is in reference to offshore drilling of oil and gas.

  1. 77 FR 72744 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... 30, 2012 (77 FR 52630), EPA proposed to incorporate various Santa Barbara County APCD air pollution... action'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR... Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999); Is not an economically significant regulatory...

  2. 75 FR 3387 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... reader may refer to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, December 5, 1991 (56 FR 63774), and the preamble to the final rule promulgated September 4, 1992 (57 FR 40792) for further background and information on the OCS regulations. On March 3, 2009, (74 FR 1980), EPA proposed to approve requirements into...

  3. 78 FR 42902 - Safety Zone; Olympus Tension Leg Platform, Mississippi Canyon Block 807, Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ...: If you have questions on this rule, call or email Mr. Rusty Wright, U.S. Coast Guard, District Eight Waterways Management Branch; telephone 504-671-2138, rusty.h.wright@uscg.mil . If you have questions on... USCG United States Coast Guard FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking OCS...

  4. 75 FR 803 - Safety Zone; FRONTIER DISCOVERER, Outer Continental Shelf Drillship, Chukchi and Beaufort Sea...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... submitting comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have questions on this proposed rule, call or e..., e-mail Kenneth.G.Phillips@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing or submitting material to the... body of your document so that we can contact you if we have questions regarding your submission....

  5. 77 FR 5561 - Information Collection Activities: Oil, Gas, and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    .... Such rules and regulations will apply to all operations conducted under a lease, right-of-way, or a right-of-use and easement. Operations on the OCS must preserve, protect, and develop oil and natural gas... Appropriations Bill (Pub. L. 104-133, 110 Stat. 1321, April 26, 1996), and OMB Circular A-25, authorize...

  6. 76 FR 15898 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... Combustion Engines (Adopted 06/19/08) Rule 342 Control of Oxides of Nitrogen (NO X ) from Boilers, Steam... onshore requirements. \\1\\ See Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, December 5, 1991 (56 FR 63774), and the preamble to the final rule promulgated September 4, 1992 (57 FR 40792) for further background...

  7. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 53

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    Contents include: Baffin Island experimental oil spill and dispersant studies. Hydrocarbon bioaccumulation and histopathological and biochemical responses in marine bivalve molluscs; Feeding ecology of juvenile king and Tanner crab in the southeastern Bering Sea; Distribution of larval and juvenile red king crabs (Paralithodes camtschatica) in Bristol Bay; Distribution and abundance of decapod crustacean larvae in the southeastern Bering Sea with emphasis on commercial species.

  8. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 56

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Contents include: seal, sea lion, walrus and beluga whale surveys of the Bering Sea, 1979 and 1982-1983; investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska. i. distribution, abundance, and movements; investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska. ii. biology and ecology; investigations of belukha whales in coastal water of western and northern Alaska. iii. food habits; behavioral responses of gray whales to industrial noise: feeding observations and predictive modeling.

  9. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assesment program. Final reports of principal investigators. volume 37

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    A compilation of seven final reports dealing with seal/sea lion and walrus surveys of the Navarin Basin; potential impacts of man-made noise on ringed seals; modern populations, migrations, demography, trophics, and historical status of the Pacific Walrus; distribution of marine mammals in the coastal zone of the eastern Chukchi Sea during summer and autumn; and early spring distribution, density and abundance of the Pacific Walrus in 1976.

  10. 76 FR 65521 - Information Collection; Geological and Geophysical Explorations of the Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Information Collection; Geological and Geophysical Explorations of the... of Ocean Energy Management, Attention: Arlene Bajusz; 381 Elden Street, Herndon, Virginia 20170- 4817... Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), per Secretarial Order 3299. Regulations to carry out...

  11. 76 FR 43185 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Virginia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    .... Standard for dioxins/furans. 9VAC5-40-6050. Standard for hydrogen chloride. 9VAC5-40-6060. Standard for... for hydrogen chloride. 9VAC5-40-6310. Standard for sulfur dioxide. 9VAC5-40-6320. Standard for.... 9VAC5-40-6600. Standard for hydrogen chloride. 9VAC5-40-6610. Standard for sulfur dioxide....

  12. 75 FR 3617 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Update To Include New Jersey State Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... degrees longitude. \\1\\ The reader may refer to the Proposed Rulemaking, December 5, 1991 (56 FR 63774), and the preamble to the final rule promulgated September 4, 1992 (57 FR 40792) for further background and information on the OCS regulations. On October 2, 2009 (74 FR 50939), EPA proposed to...

  13. 75 FR 51950 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    .../ 2010) Section 7.22: Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Reductions for the Purpose of Reducing Acid Rain... FR 63774), and the preamble to the final rule promulgated September 4, 1992 (57 FR 40792) for further... will be approved by EPA for inclusion in the SIP. On September 17, 2008 (73 FR 53718), EPA finalized...

  14. 75 FR 55277 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... To Emit Limitations (Adopted 03/16/01) XXXI Acid Rain Permit Program (Adopted 02/10/95... FR 67845), EPA proposed to incorporate various South Coast AQMD air pollution control requirements... action'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58...

  15. Outer Continental Shelf environmental-assessment program: final reports of principal investigators. Volume 25

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    This compilation of includes final reports on the following subjects: ice edge ecosystems, primary productivity, nutrient cycling and organic matter transfer; analysis of Harrison Bay zooplankton samples; Beaufort Sea plankton studies, winter-spring studies in Stefansson Sound and off Narwhal Island; foodweb and nutrient dynamics in nearshore Beaufort Sea waters.

  16. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 40

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    Contents include: Interaction of oil with sea ice; Physical oceanographic investigations in the Bering Sea marginal ice zone; The movement and decay of ice edge bands in the winter Bering Sea; On some possible interactions between internal waves and sea ice in the marginal ice zone; The Bering Sea ice cover during March 1979: Comparison of surface and satellite data with the Nimbus-7, SMMR; Persistence of spilled oil along the Beaufort Sea coast; Potential oiled ice trajectories in the Beaufort Sea; Interaction of oil with artic sea ice; Activity-directed fractionation of petroleum samples.

  17. 75 FR 80717 - Increased Safety Measures for Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf; Availability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... . In the entry titled ``Enter Keyword or ID,'' enter BOEM-2010-0034 then click search. Follow the... Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . In the entry titled ``Enter Keyword or ID,'' enter BOEM-2010-0034 then click search. You may also request a copy through Amy C. White, Bureau...

  18. Environmental studies for oilspill trajectory modeling in the southeastern U. S. Outer Continental Shelf leasing area

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfear, K.J.; Amstutz, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    Oilspill trajectory modeling and physical oceanographic studies of areas off the southeastern coast of the United States have been in progress since 1976, and have been used in making decisions for two separate offshore lease sales. The initial oilspill trajectory model was modified to accommodate the findings of ongoing studies. Research has enlarged the data base and increased the understanding of oceanographic and meteorological processes observed in this region. Hypothesized ocean surface circulation patterns, originally based upon drift bottle returns, are now based upon a series of satellite observations. By correlating winds observed at data buoys with observed winds on land, correction factors have been developed to more accurately apply data from land-based meteorological stations for predicting winds on the ocean surface. 18 refs.

  19. 76 FR 29156 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... (Adopted 06/11/79). Rule 333 Control of Emissions from Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (Adopted... Comment III. EPA Action IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews I. Background On January 10, 2011 (76 FR... action'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58...

  20. 78 FR 59263 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... 333 Control of Emissions from Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (Adopted 06/19/08) Rule 342... 22, 2011 (76 FR 15898), EPA proposed to incorporate various Santa Barbara County APCD air pollution... action'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58...

  1. Rare, threatened, and endangered vertebrates of southwest Florida and potential OCS (outer continental shelf) activity impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfender, G.E.

    1983-02-01

    The eight southwestern Florida counties include populations of 68 vertebrates considered in this report as rare, threatened, or endangered. The terrestrial and near-shore habitats of the study area and the habitat preferences of each of the 68 vertebrates are described. Each vertebrate is listed in the habitats it occupies, and information about reproduction, feeding, and where available, population estimates, is given under the habitat considered most important for each species. The distributions of the rare, threatened and endangered vertebrates by county and habitat demonstrate the relative importance of the southernmost counties (Monroe and Collier) and wetland and coastal habitats. Activities contributing to the decline of these 68 vertebrates are assessed and habitat loss is overwhelmingly more important for all.

  2. The North American Atlantic outer continental margin landslides data base: Summary and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, J.S.; O'Leary, D.W. )

    1990-06-01

    A compilation of published data from 179 Quaternary mass movement features was analyzed to determine the common attributes of the slides, to reveal general trends, and to classify and compare slide types. The data set was derived primarily from high-resolution, seismic-reflection data and sidescan-sonar images. In general, evidence of slope failure is found throughout the length of the margin and in all water depths. Slides have occurred on slope angles ranging from 1{degree} to 30{degree} (avg.{approximately}5{degree}); they vary in width from 0.2 to 50 km (avg. {approximately}4 km) and in length from 0.3 to 380 km (avg. {approximately}10 km) and have been reported to be as thick as 650 m. They are slightly more prevalent on open slopes than in other physiographic settings (e.g., canyons, ridges, spurs) and more commonly translational than rotational (i.e., slumps). The slides show no striking affinity for a particular depth range, either in the data set as a whole or when analyzed in terms of physiographic setting, size, slope angle, or other basis for classification. Comparison of slides found on the open slope with those found within canyons shows that the average open slope slide tends to occur at lower slope angles and is much larger (by an order of magnitude) than the average canyon slide. Regardless of the physiographic setting or other characteristic, large-scale slides (area >100 km{sup 2}) rather than small-scale slides (area <10 km{sup 2}) tend to be associated with gentle slopes ({approximately}3-4{degree}) Similarly, slides generated on steep slopes ({>=}10{degree}), regardless of other attributes, tend to be small (avg. area <5 km{sup 2}). With few exceptions, comparisons between slide categories show only minor differences.

  3. 78 FR 5836 - Adjustment of Service Fees for Outer Continental Shelf Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... updated in 2008, with Federal Register Notice 73 FR 49943. BOEM is now adjusting various cost recovery... Rights (Transfer) $186 Sec. 556.63 $198. Right-of-Use and Easement (RUE) for $2,569 Sec. 550.165...

  4. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 34

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The report is a compilation of three final reports dealing with geologic processes and hazards of the Beaufort and Chukchi Sea Shelf and coastal regions: Beaufort and Chukchi, seacoast permafrost studies; and the environmental geology and geomorphology of the Barrier Island-lagoon system along the Beaufort Sea coastal plain from Prudhoe Bay to the Colville River. Fifteen oversized maps are included.

  5. 76 FR 37274 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... refer to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, December 5, 1991 (56 FR 63774), and the preamble to the final rule promulgated September 4, 1992 (57 FR 40792) for further background and information on the OCS... February 10, 2011, (76 FR 7518), EPA proposed to approve requirements into the OCS Air...

  6. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 43

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    Contents include: Assessment of gray whale feeding grounds and sea floor interaction in the northeastern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of the gray whale in the northern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of the gray whale in the Chirikof Basin, summer 1982; Project rationale, design, summary; Distribution, production, and ecology of gray whale prey species; Distribution and abundance of gray whales in the Chirikof Basin, summer 1982; Assessment of gray whale feeding grounds and sea floor interaction in the northeastern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of gray whales in the Chirikof Basin; Investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska, 1982-1983: marking and tracking of whales in Bristol Bay; Belukha whale responses to industrial noise in Nushagak Bay, Alaska.

  7. 76 FR 79705 - Information Collection Activities: Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... production of minerals other than oil, gas, and sulphur in the OCS are conducted in a manner that will result... environments; (b) to ensure that adequate measures will be taken during operations to prevent waste, conserve.... production. 12(f)(1), (h); Request approval of operations or departure from 0. operating requirements...

  8. 77 FR 5545 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power Development on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Ocean Council (75 FR 43023). The Order establishes a comprehensive, integrated national policy for the... nomination to BOEM for a four-block area under the BOEM Interim Policy (72 FR 62673 (Nov. 6, 2007)) for.... These four blocks were contained within a surrounding ocean space of 50 lease blocks that were...

  9. 77 FR 57572 - Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ..., facilities, and Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs) operating on the OCS. This information is currently... or email LCDR Michael Lendvay, Commercial Vessel Compliance, Foreign and Offshore Vessel Compliance... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Basis and Purpose On January 13 2011, the Coast Guard, published the...

  10. 76 FR 2254 - Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... issuing regulations which will require notice of arrival for floating facilities, mobile offshore drilling.... MODU Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit. NAICS North American Industry Classification System. NOA Notice of... rule outlines the procedures that owners or operators of floating facilities, mobile offshore...

  11. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities. Pacific update: August 1987 - November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Slitor, Douglas L.; Wiese, Jeffrey D.; Karpas, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    This Pacific Update focuses on the geology and petroleum potential of the Central California and Washington-Oregon OCS Planning Areas. This report discusses the following topics: offshore oil and gas resources of the Pacific region; project-specific developments and status; and magnitude and timing of offshore developments. (CBS)

  12. 76 FR 1389 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... FR 63774), and the preamble to the final rule promulgated September 4, 1992 (57 FR 40792) for further... date 102 Definitions 09/20/10 202 Exemptions to Rule 201. 09/20/10 321 Solvent Cleaning 09/20/10 Machines and Solvent Cleaning. IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews A. Executive Order...

  13. 77 FR 52630 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... Rulemaking, December 5, 1991 (56 FR 63774), and the preamble to the final rule promulgated September 4, 1992 (57 FR 40792) for further background and information on the OCS regulations. Pursuant to section 55.12.../21/12 321 Solvent Cleaning 6/21/12 Machines and Solvent Cleaning. 330 Surface Coating of...

  14. 78 FR 14917 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... October 9, 2012 (77 FR 61308), EPA proposed to incorporate various Ventura County APCD air pollution... action'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR... Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999); Is not an economically significant regulatory...

  15. 77 FR 61308 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... 5, 1991 (56 FR 63774), and the preamble to the final rule promulgated September 4, 1992 (57 FR 40792... Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735 (October 4, 1993)), the Agency must determine whether the regulatory... on March 1, 2006 (71 FR 10499- 10500). The approval expires January 31, 2009. As EPA...

  16. 76 FR 7518 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... 5, 1991 (56 FR 63774), and the preamble to the final rule promulgated September 4, 1992 (57 FR 40792... A. Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review Under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735... 13132: Federalism Executive Orders 13132, entitled ``Federalism'' (64 FR 43255 (August 10,...

  17. Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 67

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The contents of this study include the following: distribution, abundance, and biology of blue king and Korean hair crabs around the Pribilof Islands; distribution, abundance, and diversity of the epifaunal benthic organisms in Alitak and Ugak bays, Kodiak Island, Alaska; distribution and abundance of some epibenthic invertebrates of the northeastern Gulf of Alaska with notes on the feeding biology of selected species; reproductive success in Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) during long-term exposures to oil-contaminated sediments; and distribution and abundance of decapod larvae of the Kodiak shelf.

  18. Benthic habitat and geologic mapping of the outer continental shelf of north-central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anima, Roberto J.; Chin, John L.; Conrad, James E.; Golden, Nadine E.

    2006-01-01

    The Fanny Shoal area is located between North Farallon Island and Cordell Bank approximately 40 miles west of San Francisco, California. The area lies within the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary (GFNMS) which is located just a few miles from San Francisco. The waters within the GFNMS are part of a nationally significant marine ecosystem encompassing a diversity of highly productive marine habitats. Protection of the living and cultural resources at the sites are administered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) and NOAA, including the GFNMS, and Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS), collected side-scanning sonar, and underwater video data over three cruises in July of 2003, and April of 2004. The data are consolidated into a geographic information system (GIS) to produce benthic habitat and geologic maps that provide researchers and those involved in decision making with crucial, georeferenced geologic information that will aid in preserving the area's environment.

  19. 77 FR 75656 - Research Lease for Renewable Energy on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Virginia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ...) Describe the proposal submitted to BOEM by the Commonwealth of Virginia, Department of Mines Minerals and... in the area identified by DMME for activities that would support future, potential commercial wind... support the future production of renewable energy within and around the Wind Energy Area (WEA)...

  20. 78 FR 8190 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ...-1340 or Michelle.Morin@boem.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background: On December 13, 2012, BOEM published the Notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 74218) inviting Federal, state, local government... Assessment Activities on the OCS Offshore North Carolina. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle...

  1. 75 FR 3392 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ....regulations.gov Web site is an ``anonymous access'' system, which means EPA will not know your identity or... Information On September 4, 1992, EPA promulgated 40 CFR part 55,\\1\\ which established requirements to control... FR 63774), and the preamble to the final rule promulgated September 4, 1992 (57 FR 40792) for...

  2. 77 FR 30551 - Commercial Renewable Energy Transmission on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... megawatt (MW) offshore wind energy project located in Rhode Island State waters off Block Island to the... 30 MW offshore wind energy project located in Rhode Island State waters approximately 2.5 nautical... received an application from Deepwater Wind for a ROW grant on the OCS offshore Rhode Island....

  3. 77 FR 5830 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... of involving Federal agencies, states, tribes, local governments, offshore wind energy developers... initiative offshore Massachusetts. The purpose of the ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative is to... potential future wind energy leasing offshore Massachusetts (Call Area). This Call Area is identified in...

  4. 76 FR 79206 - Commercial Renewable Energy Transmission on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Mid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... project does not include any proposals for offshore wind energy generation facilities. The proposal... (RFCI) in the Area of the Atlantic Wind Connection Proposal AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... offshore wind turbine capacity to be delivered to the regional high- voltage grid controlled by...

  5. 77 FR 74218 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... agencies, states, tribes, local governments, offshore wind energy developers, and the public in the Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative offshore North Carolina... for potential future wind energy leasing offshore North Carolina (Call Areas). These Call Areas...

  6. 77 FR 5560 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... project proposals on those leases) in identified Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) on the OCS offshore New Jersey... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the... site assessment plans (SAPs) on those leases. BOEM may issue one or more commercial wind energy...

  7. 75 FR 82055 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Massachusetts...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ..._Options_Offshore_Wind_12-01-09.pdf . In January 2010, the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental... potential development of offshore wind energy in an ``area of mutual interest'' (AMI) on the OCS offshore... area on the OCS for wind energy projects offshore of Massachusetts will be the evaluation...

  8. 78 FR 33908 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... identified Wind Energy Area (WEA) on the OCS offshore Rhode Island (RI) and Massachusetts (MA). The revised... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the.... BOEM may issue one or more commercial wind energy leases in the WEA. The competitive lease process...

  9. 77 FR 39508 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... specific project proposals on those leases) in an identified Wind Energy Area (WEA) on the OCS offshore... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the... Activities on the Atlantic OCS Offshore RI and MA'' to: Program Manager, Office of Renewable Energy...

  10. 75 FR 52546 - Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf (OCS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Committee will meet in discipline breakout sessions (i.e., biology/ecology, physical sciences, and social sciences) to review the specific studies plans of the BOEM regional offices for Fiscal Years 2011-2013. On.... Geological Survey science with respect to the Deepwater Horizon incident. Following these presentations...

  11. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 46

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    Contents include: Source, composition, and flux of organic detritus in lower Cook Inlet; Lower Cook Inlet meroplankton; Seasonal population density distribution of copepods, euphausiids, amphipods, and other holoplankton on the Kodiak Shelf.

  12. 78 FR 25100 - Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Announcement of Plenary Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ..., Herndon, Virginia 20170-4817, or by calling (703) 787-1087 or via email at Rodney.Cluck@boem.gov... previous day. Continuation of the individual discipline breakout sessions will resume at 1:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. Public comment will be held from 3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. and Committee business will...

  13. 77 FR 27480 - Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Announcement of Plenary Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    .... to 5:00 p.m.; and on Thursday, May 24, 2012, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: 633 East Cabrillo..., Virginia 20170-4817, or by calling (703) 787-1087 or via email at Rodney.Cluck@boem.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY... Management and Budget's Circular A-63, Revised. Dated: May 3, 2012. Alan Thornhill, Chief...

  14. Drift of continental rafts with asymmetric heating.

    PubMed

    Knopoff, L; Poehls, K A; Smith, R C

    1972-06-01

    A laboratory model of a lithospheric raft is propelled through a viscous asthenospheric layer with constant velocity of scaled magnitude appropriate to continental drift. The propulsion is due to differential heat concentration in the model oceanic and continental crusts.

  15. Numerical Modeling of West Antarctic Ice Sheet grounding-line stability under the influence of changing continental shelf physiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, R.; Fastook, J.; Bart, P.

    2007-12-01

    Bart and Iwai (in prep.) utilize morphologic and biologic evidence to hypothesize that the Antarctic Peninsula's outer continental shelf overdeepened during a transitory period of increased glacial erosion in the early Pliocene. They attribute the enhanced erosion of the continental shelf to a period of regional warming on the peninsula's pacific margin that produced an associated increased flux of snow and ice. On the over-deepened outer continental shelf, the deeper-water sills presumably permitted a larger influx of relatively warm circumpolar deep water. If correct and if early Pliocene overdeepening of the continental shelf was a continent-wide phenomenon, then this relatively recent modification of the Antarctic continental shelf may have greatly altered the way in which the marine terminus of the Antarctic Ice Sheet interacts with global thermohaline circulation. Our ongoing numerical modeling experiments of the Eastern Basin Ross Sea continental shelf are designed to evaluate the influence of changing shelf morphology (primarily water depth) and water-mass properties (primarily, water temperature) on West Antarctic Ice Sheet grounding-line stability.

  16. Flux of energy and essential elements through the continental shelf ecosystem. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1981-11-30

    There are three distinct but not mutually exclusive areas of research in this contract, studies of intrusions of the west wall of the Gulf Stream onto the outer continental shelf, studies of the flux of materials across nearshore density fronts, and advances in understanding of the planktonic food web of the continental shelf. Studies of frontal events on the outer and inner continental shelf involve distinctive physical and chemical regimes and have proven to require distinctive biological approaches. The studies of the food web run through our work on both of the frontal regimes, but certain aspects have become subjects in their own right. We have developed a simulation model of the flux of energy through the continental shelf food web which we believe to be more realistic than previous ones of its type. We have examined several of the many roles of dissolved organic compounds in sea water which originate either from release by phytoplankton, digestive processes or metabolites of zooplankton, or extracellular digestion of microorganisms. Methods have been developed under this contract to measure both the chelating capacity of naturally occurring organic materials and the copper concentration in the water. It has been possible to characterize the effects, both toxic and stimulatory, of copper on photosynthesis of naturally occurring phytoplankton populations. It is possible to characterize in considerable detail the course of biological events associated with meanders of the Gulf Stream. We are now in a position to explain the limits to biological productivity of the outer continental shelf of the southeastern US and the reasons why that biological production moves through the food web in the characteristic way that it does.

  17. Aft outer rim seal arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J; Campbell, Christian X

    2015-04-28

    An outer rim seal arrangement (10), including: an annular rim (70) centered about a longitudinal axis (30) of a rotor disc (31), extending fore and having a fore-end (72), an outward-facing surface (74), and an inward-facing surface (76); a lower angel wing (62) extending aft from a base of a turbine blade (22) and having an aft end (64) disposed radially inward of the rim inward-facing surface to define a lower angel wing seal gap (80); an upper angel wing (66) extending aft from the turbine blade base and having an aft end (68) disposed radially outward of the rim outward-facing surface to define a upper angel wing seal gap (80, 82); and guide vanes (100) disposed on the rim inward-facing surface in the lower angel wing seal gap. Pumping fins (102) may be disposed on the upper angel wing seal aft end in the upper angel wing seal gap.

  18. Outer Appearances Can Be Deceiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the chemical composition of the rock at Gusev Crater dubbed 'Mazatzal' after it was brushed and ground by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's rock abrasion tool. The data, taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer over the last few sols, show that the amount of chlorine and sulfur tri-oxide in Mazatzal first increased after brushing, then diminished after grinding. The interior of the rock appears to have the same chemical make-up as other volcanic or basalt rocks studied in the Gusev Crater area ('Adirondack' and 'Humphrey'). Its outer coating or rind, on the other hand, appears to be of a different constitution. Scientists are still puzzling out the implications of these data.

    The larger symbols on the graph represent inferred rock compositions, while the smaller symbols are actual data points. Observations were made at the target dubbed 'New York' on Mazatzal.

  19. Chemistry of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Various aspects were studied of past or present chemistry in the atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites using lab simulations. Three areas were studied: (1) organic chemistry induced by kinetically hot hydrogen atoms in the region of Jupiter's atmosphere containing the ammonia cirrus clouds; (2) the conversion of NH3 into N2 by plasmas associated with entry of meteors and other objects into the atmosphere of early Titan; and (3) the synthesis of simple hydrocarbons and HCN by lightning in mixtures containing N2, CH4, and NH3 representing the atmospheres of Titan and the outer planets. The results showed that: (1) hot H2 atoms formed from the photodissociation of NH3 in Jupiter's atmosphere could account for some of the atmospheric chemistry in the ammonia cirrus cloud region; (2) the thermalization of hot H2 atoms in atmospheres predominated by molecular H is not as rapid as predicted by elastic collision theory; (3) the net quantum loss of NH3 in the presence of a 200 fold excess of H2 is 0.02, much higher than was expected from the amount of H2 present; (4) the conversion of NH3 into N2 in plasmas associated with infalling meteors is very efficient and rapid, and could account for most of the N2 present on Titan; (5) the yields of C2H2 and HCN from lightning induced chemistry in mixtures of CH4 and N2 is consistent with quenched thermodynamic models of the discharge core; and (6) photolysis induced by the UV light emitted by the gases in the hot plasmas may account for some, if not most, of the excess production of C2H6 and the more complex hydrocarbons.

  20. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  1. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  2. Religion and fertility in the Outer Hebrides.

    PubMed

    Clegg, E J; Cross, J F

    1995-01-01

    Estimates of fertility in Protestant Barra and Catholic Harris, islands in the Outer Hebrides, over the period 1856-1985, show that in both islands fertility declined, although marital fertility was generally greater than in Scotland as a whole, and illegitimate fertility was less. However, in Barra during 1966-75 there were pronounced rises in all the indices; illegitimate fertility showed the smallest rise. The publication of the papal encyclical Humanae Vitae may have played a part in this change in fertility, although other, probably local, factors must have been acting, as the first rise in numbers of births occurred before the publication of the encyclical. Other than this transient rise, the religious difference between Harris and Barra had little effect on changes in fertility over the whole period. Indices of proportions married showed declines until after World War 2, followed by steep increases. The marked decline in fertility in both islands may be due in part to this low nuptiality. In addition, a trend of occupation away from traditional crofting and fishing towards more skilled mercantile and professional employment may have played a role.

  3. Active diapirism and slope steepening, northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, R.G.; Bouma, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Large diapiric and nondiapiric masses of Jurassic salt and Tertiary shale underlie the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope and adjacent outer continental shelf. Local steepening of the sea floor in response to the vertical growth of these structures is a serious concern to those involved in the site selection and the construction of future oil and gas production and transportation facilities in this frontier petroleum province. The evidence given in this paper supports the conclusion that the present continental slope region of the northern Gulf of Mexico is undergoing active diapirism and consequent slope steepening. Because most of the sediment on the flanks of diapiric structures consists of underconsolidated muds, slumping will take place regularly in response to further diapiric movement.-from Authors

  4. Influence of submarine morphology on bottom water flow across the western Ross Sea continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davey, F.J.; Jacobs, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Multibeam sonar bathymetry documents a lack of significant channels crossing outer continental shelf and slope of the western Ross Sea. This indicates that movement of bottom water across the shelf break into the deep ocean in this area is mainly by laminar or sheet flow. Subtle, ~20 m deep and up to 1000 m wide channels extend down the continental slope, into tributary drainage patterns on the upper rise, and then major erosional submarine canyons. These down-slope channels may have been formed by episodic pulses of rapid down slope water flow, some recorded on bottom current meters, or by sub-ice melt water erosion from an icesheet grounded at the margin. Narrow, mostly linear furrows on the continental shelf thought to be caused by iceberg scouring are randomly oriented, have widths generally less than 400 m and depths less than 30m, and extend to water depths in excess of 600 m.

  5. Petroleum source potential of rocks dredged from the continental slope in the eastern Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plafker, George; Claypool, George Edwin

    1979-01-01

    A bedrock dredging program by the R/V Sea Sounder in 1977 and 1978 along the continental slope in the eastern Gulf of Alaska revealed a previously unknown Eocene sedimentary sequence that includes argillaceous rocks with favorable petroleum source rock characteristics. Seven of 36 dredge hauls that sampled outcrop contain argillaceous rocks with more than l percent and as much as 1.64 percent organic carbon. Some of the rocks in samples of probable early Eocene age have undergone a thermal history that has resulted in generation of hydrocarbons. The organic matter appears to be hydrogen deficient, however, which could indicate that the rocks are more likely to be a source of gas rather than liquid hydrocarbon, unless the hydrogen loss is due to weathering. The Eocene rocks are associated with sandstone and conglomerate on the continental slope. They dip northward beneath younger Tertiary strata in the outer continental shelf where they could be an important petroleum source and exploratory target.

  6. Continental collisions and seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

    1991-04-01

    Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

  7. Surface heat flow measurements from the East Siberian continental slope and southern Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Matt; Preto, Pedro; Stranne, Christian; Jakobsson, Martin; Koshurnikov, Andrey

    2016-05-01

    Surface heat flow data in the Arctic Ocean are needed to assess hydrocarbon and methane hydrate distributions, and provide constraints into the tectonic origins and nature of underlying crust. However, across broad areas of the Arctic, few published measurements exist. This is true for the outer continental shelf and slope of the East Siberian Sea, and the adjoining deep water ridges and basins. Here we present 21 new surface heat flow measurements from this region of the Arctic Ocean. On the Southern Lomonosov Ridge, the average measured heat flow, uncorrected for effects of sedimentation and topography, is 57 ± 4 mW/m2 (n = 4). On the outer continental shelf and slope of the East Siberian Sea (ESS), the average is 57 ± 10 mW/m2 (n = 16). An anomalously high heat flow of 203 ± 28 mW/m2 was measured at a single station in the Herald Canyon. With the exception of this high heat flow, the new data from the ESS are consistent with predictions for thermally equilibrated lithosphere of continental origin that was last affected by thermotectonic processes in the Cretaceous to early Cenozoic. Variability within the data likely arises from differences in radiogenic heat production within the continental crust and overlying sediments. This can be further explored by comparing the data with geophysical constraints on sediment and crustal thicknesses.

  8. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland.

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Trond H; Amundsen, Hans E F; Trønnes, Reidar G; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D; Griffin, William L; Werner, Stephanie C; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-04-14

    The magmatic activity (0-16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland--and especially the Öræfajökull volcano--is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (207)Pb/(204)Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr-Nd-Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2-6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  9. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland.

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Trond H; Amundsen, Hans E F; Trønnes, Reidar G; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D; Griffin, William L; Werner, Stephanie C; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-04-14

    The magmatic activity (0-16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland--and especially the Öræfajökull volcano--is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (207)Pb/(204)Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr-Nd-Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2-6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume.

  10. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  11. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Griffin, William L.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    The magmatic activity (0–16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland—and especially the Öræfajökull volcano—is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr–Nd–Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2–6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  12. 30 CFR 250.1402 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Civil Penalties § 250.1402 Definitions. Terms used in this... assess civil penalties. Violation means failure to comply with the Outer Continental Shelf Lands...

  13. Shallow structure and stratigraphy of the carbonate West Florida continental slope and their implications to sedimentation and geohazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Larry J.

    1983-01-01

    An 1800-joule sparker survey of the West Florida continental slope between about 26?N and 29?15?N showed a top bed of Pleistocene age forming an irregular drape over a surface that is probably Pliocene. The contact between the top two layers is unconformable in the south and, in some places, shows karst collapse and solution features. Karst topography grades into a more hummocky erosional surface to the north, which in turn smoothes out; the contact become conformable still further north. A period of folding, which is widespread over the outer portion of the study area and which may be related to large scale mass wasting, occurred at about the same time represented by the unconformity. Significant subsidence has occurred as late as Pleistocene. The surface layer thins to a minimum (0 in the south) at about 525-meters water depth and then thickens again dramatically to the west, downslope. This thinning is interpreted to be due to the Loop Current, which flows from north to south in the area and which acts to block deposition and scour the bottom. Despite the fact that the margin is dominated by carbonates, usually associated with low sedimentation rates, there is widespread evidence of mass wasting affecting ancient and surficial deposits on the outer part of the upper slope. Three potential groups of geohazards identified are: 1. Potential bottom failure in areas where a thin top layer overlies the karst surface. 2. Potential for sliding and slumping. 3. Scour due to currents which could also affect drilling and engineering activities.

  14. Design Of Robots For Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roston, Gerald P.

    1990-01-01

    Report discusses design of robots for use in zero gravity and vacuum, with attention to differences between requirements imposed on designs by outer space and by terrestrial applications. Terrestrial robots designed for multiple purposes and for minimal cost. Outer-space robots designed specialized to one task where cost has relatively low priority. Design optimal in one environment unlikely optimal in another.

  15. Astroparticles: Messengers from Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiati, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Since Galileo pointed a spyglass toward the sky, 400 years ago, observations empowered by man-made instrumentation have provided us with an enormous leap in the knowledge of how the Universe functions. More and more powerful optical telescopes made it possible for us to reach the farthest corners of space. At the same time, the advances in microphysics and the discovery of the electromagnetic spectrum, made it possible to directly look at the Universe in a way that our eyes cannot see. The discoveries of the intimate structure of matter, of subatomic particles and of how they interact with each other, have led astronomers to use the smallest objects in Nature to observe the farthest reaches of the otherwise invisible Universe. Not unlike Galileo, today we observe Outer Space with visible light and beyond, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from long wavelength radio waves to short wavelength gamma rays. But also with instruments detecting cosmic rays (the atomic nuclei we know on Earth) neutrinos (neutral subatomic particles that interact very weakly with matter) and gravitational waves (perturbations of spacetime predicted by General Relativity). Each cosmic messenger provides us with a unique piece of information about their source and the history of their journey to us. Modern astrophysics has the challenging goal to collect as much information as possible from all those messengers, to reconstruct the story of the Universe and how it became what it is today. This journey started with the unsettling discovery that we are only one minuscule dot in the immensity of the Universe and yet we are able to observe objects that are far in space and time. This journey is yet to complete its course, and the more we advance our knowledge, the more we need to understand. This interdisciplinary talk provides an overview of this journey and the future perspectives.

  16. Thermal models pertaining to continental growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Ashwal, Lew

    1988-01-01

    Thermal models are important to understanding continental growth as the genesis, stabilization, and possible recycling of continental crust are closely related to the tectonic processes of the earth which are driven primarily by heat. The thermal energy budget of the earth was slowly decreasing since core formation, and thus the energy driving the terrestrial tectonic engine was decreasing. This fundamental observation was used to develop a logic tree defining the options for continental growth throughout earth history.

  17. Hydrological Modeling of Continental-Scale Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Eric F.; Lettenmaier, Dennis; Liang, Xu; Nijssen, Bart; Wetzel, Suzanne W.

    Hydrological models at continental scales are traditionally used for water resources planning. However, continental-scale hydrological models may be useful in assessing the impacts from future climate change on catchment hydrology and water resources or from human activity on hydrology and biogeochemical cycles at large scales. Development of regional-scale terrestrial hydrological models will further our understanding of the Earth's water cycle. Continental scales allow for better understanding of the geographic distribution of land-atmospheric moisture fluxes, improved water management at continental scales, better quantification of the impact of human activity and climate change on the water cycle, and improved simulation of weather and climate.

  18. Continental aggregation, subduction initiation, and plume generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, P. J.; Lowman, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Several processes unfold during the supercontinent cycle, more than one of which might result in an elevation in subcontinental mantle temperatures through the generation of mantle plumes. Paleogeographic plate reconstructions have indicated that sub-continental mantle upwellings appear below large continents that are extensively ringed by subduction zones. Moreover, several numerical simulations of supercontinent formation and dispersal attribute the genesis of sub-continental plumes to the generation of subduction zones on the edges of the supercontinent, rather than resulting from continental insulation. However, the role of the location of downwellings in producing a return-flow upwelling, and on increasing sub-continental mantle temperatures, is not fully understood. In this mantle convection study, we examine the evolution of mantle dynamics after supercontinent accretion over a subduction zone (analogous to the formation of Pangea) for a range of continental coverage. We present 2D and 3D Cartesian geometry mantle convection simulations, featuring geotherm- and pressure-dependent viscosity with thermally and mechanically distinct oceanic and continental plates. Through changing the size of the continent we are able to analyze the factors involved in the generation of mantle plumes in purely thermal convection. Furthermore, we change the upper and lower mantle viscosity to determine their relation to plume formation in vigorous mantle convection simulations. Elevated sub-continental temperatures are analyzed in relation to continental coverage to further understand the influence of continental tectonics on the thermal evolution of the mantle.

  19. Continental rifting: a planetary perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlberger, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The only inner planet that has abundant evidence of regional extension, and the consequent generation of rifts in the earth. The absence of plate motion on the other inner planets limits their rifts to localized bulges or subsidence areas. The rifting of oceanic lithosphere is seldom preserved in the geological record. Thus, such rifting must be inferred via plate tectonic interpretation: if there is rifting, then there must be subduction whose results are commonly well preserved. Modern continental rifts are found in many tectonic settings: continental breakup, extension transverse to collisional stresses, or wide regions of nearly uniform extension. Recognition of these settings in older rocks becomes more difficult the farther back in geologic time you travel. Rift basin fillings typically show rapid lateral and vertical facies and thickness changes, bimodal volcanism, and distinctive rift-drift sequences. Proterozoic rifts and aulacogens are well-documented in North America; ex. Keweenawan, western margin of Labrador fold belt, Belt-Uinta and the Wopmay-Athapuscow regions. Documented Archean rifts are rare. In Quebec, the truncated margin of the Minto craton bounded on the south by a 2.8 Ga greenstone belt implies an earlier rift event. The oldest proposed rift dated at 3.0 Ga contains the Pongola Supergroup in southeastern Africa. The presence of Archean dikes demonstrates a rigid crust and andesites as old as 3.5 Ga imply plate tectonics and thus, at least, oceanic rifting.

  20. Palaeoclimate, Sedimentation and Continental Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A. M.; Barrett, S. F.; Scotese, C. R.

    1981-05-01

    Climate has a pervasive effect on sedimentation today, and the same climatic patterns are reflected in the distribution of lithofacies through the Palaeozoic, as the continents migrate beneath the climatic zones. The low-latitude hot wet zone is represented by thick clastics, coals and carbonates and is best developed along east coasts where prevailing winds bring moisture and heated surface waters toward the continent. The desert zones occur on the west sides of continents centred at 20 degrees north and south, and these dry belts are represented in the geological record by evaporites. Tillites, thick clastics and coals occur in the temperate rainy belts, especially on the windward, west sides of continents above 40 degrees latitude. Continental accretion occurs where subduction zones coincide with rainy zones, such that the products of erosion are transported to the trench, and thus thrust back, extending the margin of the continent. The opposite process of `tectonic erosion', wherein the descending oceanic slab continually `rasps' away the margin of the continental crust, may occur in areas where rainfall and surface run-off is insufficient to provide trench sediments. This process has been operating adjacent to the Atacama Desert in South America during the past 200 Ma. To judge by the eastward migration of the calc-alkaline intrusive foci, about 250 km of the margin of South America have been transported down the subduction zone during this period.

  1. Structural Basis for Alginate Secretion Across the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    J Whitney; I Hay; C Li; P Eckford; H Robinson; M Amaya; L Wood; D Ohman; C Bear; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  2. Structural basis for alginate secretion across the bacterial outer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, J.C.; Robinson, H.; Hay, I. D.; Li, C.; Eckford, P. D. W.; Amaya, M. F.; Wood, L. F.; Ohman, D. E.; Bear, C. E.; Rehm, B. H.; Howell, P. L.

    2011-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  3. Temperate bacteriophages collected by outer membrane vesicles in Komagataeibacter intermedius.

    PubMed

    Kharina, Alla; Podolich, Olga; Faidiuk, Iuliia; Zaika, Sergiy; Haidak, Andriy; Kukharenko, Olga; Zaets, Iryna; Tovkach, Fedor; Reva, Oleg; Kremenskoy, Maxim; Kozyrovska, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    The acetic acid bacteria have mainly relevance for bacterial cellulose production and fermented bio-products manufacture. The purpose of this study was to identify temperate bacteriophages in a cellulose-producing bacterial strain Komagataeibacter intermedius IMBG180. Prophages from K. intermedius IMBG180 were induced with mitomycin C and nalidixic acid. Transmission electron microscopy analysis exhibited tailed bacteriophages belonging to Myoviridae. A PCR assay targeting the capsid gene of the myoviruses proved phylogenetic position of induced phages. Nalidixic acid was poor inducer of prophages, however, it induced the OMV-like particles release. Size of OMVs depended on an antibiotic applied for phage induction and varied in the range of 30-80 and 120-200 nm. Inside some of them, tails of phages have been visible. Under conditions, inducing prophages, OMVs acted as the collectors of formed phage particles, using outer membrane receptors for phage detection (in this case, outer membrane siderophore receptor), and fulfilled therefore "a cleaning," as well as defensive functions, preventing bacteriophage spread outside population. This is the first description of myoviruses affiliated to K. intermedius, as well as outer membrane vesicles interaction with phages within this host.

  4. Incorporation of squalene into rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.K.; Fliesler, S.J. )

    1990-08-15

    We have reported previously that squalene is the major radiolabeled nonsaponifiable lipid product derived from ({sup 3}H)acetate in short term incubations of frog retinas. In the present study, we demonstrate that newly synthesized squalene is incorporated into rod outer segments under similar in vitro conditions. We show further that squalene is an endogenous constituent of frog rod outer segment membranes; its concentration is approximately 9.5 nmol/mumol of phospholipid or about 9% of the level of cholesterol. Pulse-chase experiments with radiolabeled precursors revealed no metabolism of outer segment squalene to sterols in up to 20 h of chase. Taken together with our previous absolute rate studies, these results suggest that most, if not all, of the squalene synthesized by the frog retina is transported to rod outer segments. Synthesis of protein is not required for squalene transport since puromycin had no effect on squalene incorporation into outer segments. Conversely, inhibition of isoprenoid synthesis with mevinolin had no effect on the incorporation of opsin into the outer segment. These latter results support the conclusion that the de novo synthesis and subsequent intracellular trafficking of opsin and isoprenoid lipids destined for the outer segment occur via independent mechanisms.

  5. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Malhotra, Renu

    1997-01-01

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  6. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  7. Crustal influence in the generation of continental flood basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Lugmair, G. W.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The suggestion that primordial undifferentiated material may exist in the earth's mantle has recently been revived on the strength of Nd isotope data for two types of young continental rocks - flood basalts and kimberlites. The limited published data show a clustering of Nd isotopic compositions close to those for meteorites with chondritic relative rare-earth (REE) abundance. In contrast, data are presented for samples from the Columbia flood basalt province of the northwestern United States which show large isotopic variability suggestive of mixing processes acting after the separation of the primary magmas from their mantle source.

  8. Earth's continental crustal gold endowment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, H. E.

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of the temporal distribution of gold deposits, combined with gold production data as well as reserve and resource estimates for different genetic types of gold deposit, revealed that the bulk of the gold known to be concentrated in ore bodies was added to the continental crust during a giant Mesoarchaean gold event at a time (3 Ga) when the mantle temperature reached a maximum and the dominant style of tectonic movement changed from vertical, plume-related to subhorizontal plate tectonic. A magmatic derivation of the first generation of crustal gold from a relatively hot mantle that was characterized by a high degree of partial melting is inferred from the gold chemistry, specifically high Os contents. While a large proportion of that gold is still present in only marginally modified palaeoplacer deposits of the Mesoarchaean Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa, accounting for about 40% of all known gold, the remainder has been recycled repeatedly on a lithospheric scale, predominantly by plate-tectonically induced magmatic and hydrothermal fluid circulation, to produce the current variety of gold deposit types. Post-Archaean juvenile gold addition to the continental crust has been limited, but a mantle contribution to some of the largest orogenic or intrusion-related gold deposits is indicated, notably for the Late Palaeozoic Tien Shan gold province. Magmatic fluids in active plate margins seem to be the most effective transport medium for gold mobilization, giving rise to a large proportion of volcanic-arc related gold deposits. Due to their generally shallow crustal level of formation, they have a low preservation potential. In contrast, those gold deposits that form at greater depth are more widespread also in older rocks. This explains the high proportion of orogenic (including intrusion-related) gold (32%) amongst all known gold deposits. The overall proportion of gold concentrated in known ore bodies is only 7 × 10- 7 of the estimated total

  9. ACT: Acting Out Central Theme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kise, Joan Duff

    1982-01-01

    The author describes ACT (Acting Out Central Theme), a method for dealing with psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains in slow readers. The ACT approach involves three sessions which focus on discussion of a theme such as friendship, presentaton of the theme as a skit, and assignment of topics to individual students. (SW)

  10. The role of structural inheritance in continental rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne; Tetreault, Joya

    2015-04-01

    In nature we observe that passive margins tend to originate on continental collision zones. This is not surprising as continents are long-lived and therefore have undergone multiple deformation phases, producing many regions with inherited structures. Collision zones can act as intrinsic rift-localizers for several reasons: rifting at a suture may be initiated by extensional collapse of the orogen, the thicker crustal root of orogens and their associated increase in heat producing elements makes orogens thermally weak, and inherited thrust faults form large-scale heterogeneities. When investigating continental extension geodynamically, numerical experiments often simplify such inheritance and start from laterally homogeneous crustal layers with a prescribed inhomogeneity that initiates deformation. These inhomogeneities represent thermal or structural remnants from previous deformation phases and are imposed as a thermal anomaly, a variation in Moho geometry, or an inherited weak region. However, imposed initial heterogeneities do not fully capture the structural and thermal complexities of continental sutures. Here we present 2-D numerical experiments that investigate the role of inherited crustal structures in continental rifting and passive margin formation. We first examine a series of experiments in which we explicitly prescribe collisional structures in the initial setup, such as increased Moho depth and inherited thrust faults. Different prescribed collisional structures result in different rift to break-up durations, crustal shear zone patterns, and margin symmetry. Our second series of experiments actually creates an inherited collision zone through subduction and closure of an ocean. We use this set-up to investigate how extension localizes on a former continental collision zone. Passive margin architecture strongly depends on the duration of post-collision thermal equilibration time, with a long pause between collision and initiation of extension

  11. Deformation in the continental lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Physical Properties of Earth Materials Committee, a technical committee of AGU's Tectonophysics Section, is organizing a dinner/colloquium as part of the Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. This event will be held Monday, December 3rd, in the Gold Rush Room of the Holiday Inn Golden Gateway Hotel at 1500 Van Ness St. There will be a no-host bar from 6:30 to 7:30 P.M., followed by dinner from 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. Paul Tapponnier will deliver the after-dinner talk, “Large-Scale Deformation Mechanisms in the Continental Lithosphere: Where Do We Stand?” It will start at 8:30 P.M. and a business meeting will follow at 9:30 P.M.

  12. Composition of the continental plates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilluly, J.

    1954-01-01

    The structures of continental plates and of oceanic basins suggested by several seismologists are utilized to estimate the relative volumes of sial and sima in the earth's crust. It seems that sial of the composition of the average igneous rock constitutes fully 26% and perhaps as much as 43% of the total crust. This ratio is far higher than seems likely if the sial had been entirely derived through fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma. The relative paucity of intermediate rocks as compared with granite and gabbro in the crust points in the same direction. The tentative conclusion is reached that the sial owes a large part of its volume to some process other than fractional crystallization of basalt-possibly to the emanation of low-melting constituents such as water, silica, potassa, soda, and alumina directly from the mantle to the crust. ?? 1954 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Formaldehyde in the Far Outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, S. K.; Magnani, L.; Brand, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.

    2006-06-01

    We present results from an initial survey of the 212-111 transition of formaldehyde (H2CO) in the Far Outer Galaxy (galactocentric distances, Rg > 16 kpc). Formaldehyde is a key prebiotic molecule; determining the outermost extent of its distribution can be used to set a limit to the Galaxy's "Habitable Zone", the region where conditions for the formation of life are most favorable. We surveyed 67 clouds in the outer Galaxy ranging 12 - 23 kpc in distance from the Galactic Center. Formaldehyde emission at 140.8 GHz was detected from 44 of 67 lines of sight, including 7 clouds at Rg > 20 kpc. Formaldehyde is readily detectable even in the Far Outer Galaxy beyond the edge of the stellar disk. The widespread distribution of H2CO in the Far Outer Galaxy is a positive first step in determining how favorable are conditions in this large region towards the formation of life.

  14. Outer planet probe engineering model structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Gustin, W. H.; Griffin, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of proof of concept structural tests was performed on an engineering model of the Outer Planets Atmospheric Entry Probe. The tests consisted of pyrotechnic shock, dynamic and static loadings. The tests partially verified the structural concept.

  15. Outer Membrane Permeability and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Delcour, Anne H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary To date most antibiotics are targeted at intracellular processes, and must be able to penetrate the bacterial cell envelope. In particular, the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria provides a formidable barrier that must be overcome. There are essentially two pathways that antibiotics can take through the outer membrane: a lipid-mediated pathway for hydrophobic antibiotics, and general diffusion porins for hydrophilic antibiotics. The lipid and protein compositions of the outer membrane have a strong impact on the sensitivity of bacteria to many types of antibiotics, and drug resistance involving modifications of these macromolecules is common. This review will describe the molecular mechanisms for permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane, and the strategies that bacteria have deployed to resist antibiotics by modifications of these pathways. PMID:19100346

  16. How Continental Bank outsourced its "crown jewels.".

    PubMed

    Huber, R L

    1993-01-01

    No industry relies more on information than banking does, yet Continental, one of America's largest banks, outsources its information technology. Why? Because that's the best way to service the customers that form the core of the bank's business, says vice chairman Dick Huber. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Continental participated heavily with Penn Square Bank in energy investments. When falling energy prices burst Penn Square's bubble in 1982, Continental was stuck with more than $1 billion in bad loans. Eight years later when Dick Huber came on board, Continental was working hard to restore its once solid reputation. Executives had made many tough decisions already, altering the bank's focus from retail to business banking and laying off thousands of employees. Yet management still needed to cut costs and improve services to stay afloat. Regulators, investors, and analysts were watching every step. Continental executives, eager to focus on the bank's core mission of serving business customers, decided to outsource one after another in-house service--from cafeteria services to information technology. While conventional wisdom holds that banks must retain complete internal control of IT, Continental bucked this argument when it entered into a ten-year, multimillion-dollar contract with Integrated Systems Solutions Corporation. Continental is already reaping benefits from outsourcing IT. Most important, Continental staffers today focus on their true core competencies: intimate knowledge of customers' needs and relationships with customers.

  17. How Continental Bank outsourced its "crown jewels.".

    PubMed

    Huber, R L

    1993-01-01

    No industry relies more on information than banking does, yet Continental, one of America's largest banks, outsources its information technology. Why? Because that's the best way to service the customers that form the core of the bank's business, says vice chairman Dick Huber. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Continental participated heavily with Penn Square Bank in energy investments. When falling energy prices burst Penn Square's bubble in 1982, Continental was stuck with more than $1 billion in bad loans. Eight years later when Dick Huber came on board, Continental was working hard to restore its once solid reputation. Executives had made many tough decisions already, altering the bank's focus from retail to business banking and laying off thousands of employees. Yet management still needed to cut costs and improve services to stay afloat. Regulators, investors, and analysts were watching every step. Continental executives, eager to focus on the bank's core mission of serving business customers, decided to outsource one after another in-house service--from cafeteria services to information technology. While conventional wisdom holds that banks must retain complete internal control of IT, Continental bucked this argument when it entered into a ten-year, multimillion-dollar contract with Integrated Systems Solutions Corporation. Continental is already reaping benefits from outsourcing IT. Most important, Continental staffers today focus on their true core competencies: intimate knowledge of customers' needs and relationships with customers. PMID:10124146

  18. A Facies Model for Temperate Continental Glaciers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Gail Mowry

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the presence and dynamics of continental glaciers in the domination of the physical processes of erosion and deposition in the mid-latitudes during the Pleistocene period. Describes the use of a sedimentary facies model as a guide to recognizing ancient temperate continental glacial deposits. (TW)

  19. Evolution of Oxidative Continental Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konhauser, Kurt; Lalonde, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is currently viewed as a protracted process during which atmospheric oxygen levels increased above 10-5 times the present atmospheric level. This value is based on the loss of sulphur isotope mass independent fractionation (S-MIF) from the rock record, beginning at 2.45 Ga and disappearing by 2.32 Ga. However, a number of recent papers have pushed back the timing for oxidative continental weathering, and by extension, the onset of atmospheric oxygenation several hundreds of million years earlier despite the presence of S-MIF (e.g., Crowe et al., 2013). This apparent discrepancy can, in part, be resolved by the suggestion that recycling of older sedimentary sulphur bearing S-MIF might have led to this signal's persistence in the rock record for some time after atmospheric oxygenation (Reinhard et al., 2013). Here we suggest another possibility, that the earliest oxidative weathering reactions occurred in environments at profound redox disequilibrium with the atmosphere, such as biological soil crusts, riverbed and estuarine sediments, and lacustrine microbial mats. We calculate that the rate of O2 production via oxygenic photosynthesis in these terrestrial microbial ecosystems provides largely sufficient oxidizing potential to mobilise sulphate and a number of redox-sensitive trace metals from land to the oceans while the atmosphere itself remained anoxic with its attendant S-MIF signature. These findings reconcile geochemical signatures in the rock record for the earliest oxidative continental weathering with the history of atmospheric sulphur chemistry, and demonstrate the plausible antiquity of a terrestrial biosphere populated by cyanobacteria. Crowe, S.A., Dossing, L.N., Beukes, N.J., Bau, M., Kruger, S.J., Frei, R. & Canfield, D.E. Atmospheric oxygenation three billion years ago. Nature 501, 535-539 (2013). Reinhard, C.T., Planavsky, N.J. & Lyons, T.W. Long-term sedimentary recycling of rare sulphur isotope anomalies. Nature 497

  20. The outer solar system - Perspectives for exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt is made to summarize the current knowledge about the composition and structures of outer planet atmospheres with special emphasis on Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan. The nature of the substances which are responsible for the yellow coloration observed on both Jupiter and Saturn is discussed. The analysis of planetary conditions conducted shows that the outer solar system offers a variety of environments in which natural experiments in prebiotic organic synthesis must be taking place at the present time.

  1. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM.

  2. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM. PMID:26627837

  3. Insular avian adaptations on two Neotropical continental islands

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Natalie A.; Steadman, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Aim Most studies of avian insular adaptations have focused on oceanic islands, which may not allow characters that are insular adaptations to be teased apart from those that benefit dispersal and colonization. Using birds on continental islands, we investigated characters that evolved in situ in response to insular environments created by late Pleistocene sea level rise. Location Trinidad and Tobago, nearby Caribbean islands and continental South America. Methods We weighed fresh flight muscles and measured museum skeletal specimens of seven species of birds common to the continental islands of Trinidad and Tobago. Results When corrected for body size, study species exhibited significantly smaller flight muscles, sterna and sternal keels on Tobago than on larger Trinidad and continental South America. Tobago populations were more ‘insular’ in their morphologies than conspecifics on Trinidad or the continent in other ways as well, including having longer bills, longer wings, longer tails and longer legs. Main conclusions We hypothesize that the longer bills enhance foraging diversity, the longer wings and tails compensate for the smaller pectoral assemblage (allowing for retention of volancy, but with a probable reduction in flight power and speed), and the longer legs expand perching ability. Each of these differences is likely to be related to the lower diversity and fewer potential predators and competitors on Tobago compared with Trinidad. These patterns of smaller flight muscles and larger bills, legs, wings and tails in island birds are not the results of selection for island dispersal and colonization, but probably arose from selection pressures acting on populations already inhabiting these islands. PMID:23066173

  4. Outer membrane protein profiles of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, V J; Munson, R S; Ross, R F

    1986-01-01

    Outer membrane protein profiles of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Cells were disrupted by sonication, and outer membrane-enriched fractions were prepared by differential centrifugation and selective solubilization of the inner membrane with sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate. Colony type, growth medium, time of harvest, and in vitro or in vivo passage had no appreciable effect on the protein profiles of the strains examined. Seven patterns were distinguished among the reference strains of the nine capsular serotypes. These patterns were based on the mobility of the major outer membrane proteins migrating in the 39,000- to 44,000-molecular-weight region of the gel, a 16K to 16.5K protein, and a heat-modifiable 29K protein. Strains of serotypes 1 and 9 had identical outer membrane protein profiles, as did strains of serotypes 2 and 6. The reference strains of the remaining five serotypes each had a distinct pattern. The outer membrane protein profiles of 95 field isolates belonging to serotypes 1, 5, 7, and 9 from swine in the midwestern United States were determined and compared with the reference patterns. The results indicate that the population of H. pleuropneumoniae is clonal, with three predominant clones distinguished by both serotype and outer membrane protein profile responsible for the majority of H. pleuropneumoniae disease occurring in swine in the United States. Images PMID:3699889

  5. Chronobiology of deep-water decapod crustaceans on continental margins.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Company, Joan B

    2010-01-01

    Species have evolved biological rhythms in behaviour and physiology with a 24-h periodicity in order to increase their fitness, anticipating the onset of unfavourable habitat conditions. In marine organisms inhabiting deep-water continental margins (i.e. the submerged outer edges of continents), day-night activity rhythms are often referred to in three ways: vertical water column migrations (i.e. pelagic), horizontal displacements within benthic boundary layer of the continental margin, along bathymetric gradients (i.e. nektobenthic), and endobenthic movements (i.e. rhythmic emergence from the substrate). Many studies have been conducted on crustacean decapods that migrate vertically in the water column, but much less information is available for other endobenthic and nektobenthic species. Also, the types of displacement and major life habits of most marine species are still largely unknown, especially in deep-water continental margins, where steep clines in habitat factors (i.e. light intensity and its spectral quality, sediment characteristics, and hydrography) take place. This is the result of technical difficulties in performing temporally scheduled sampling and laboratory testing on living specimens. According to this scenario, there are several major issues that still need extensive research in deep-water crustacean decapods. First, the regulation of their behaviour and physiology by a biological clock is almost unknown compared to data for coastal species that are easily accessible to direct observation and sampling. Second, biological rhythms may change at different life stages (i.e. size-related variations) or at different moments of the reproductive cycle (e.g. at egg-bearing) based on different intra- and interspecific interactions. Third, there is still a major lack of knowledge on the links that exist among the observed bathymetric distributions of species and selected autoecological traits that are controlled by their biological clock, such as the

  6. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (Antarctic Peninsula): Sedimentology of glacially influenced continental margin topsets and foresets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eyles, N.; Daniels, J.; Osterman, L.E.; Januszczak, N.

    2001-01-01

    Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (February-April 1998) drilled two sites (Sites 1097 and 1103) on the outer Antarctic Peninsula Pacific continental shelf. Recovered strata are no older than late Miocene or early Pliocene (<4.6 Ma). Recovery at shallow depths in loosely consolidated and iceberg-turbated bouldery sediment was poor but improved with increasing depth and consolidation to allow description of lithofacies and biofacies and interpretation of depositional environment. Site 1097 lies on the outer shelf within Marguerite Trough which is a major outlet for ice expanding seaward from the Antarctic Peninsula and reached a maximum depth drilled of 436.6 m below the sea floor (mbsf). Seismic stratigraphic data show flat-lying upper strata resting on strata that dip gently seaward. Uppermost strata, to a depth of 150 mbsf, were poorly recovered, but data suggest they consist of diamictites containing reworked and abraded marine microfauna. This interval is interpreted as having been deposited largely as till produced by subglacial cannibalization of marine sediments (deformation till) recording ice sheet expansion across the shelf. Underlying gently dipping strata show massive, stratified and graded diamictite facies with common bioturbation and slump stuctures that are interbedded with laminated and massive mudstones with dropstones. The succession contains a well-preserved in situ marine microfauna typical of open marine and proglacial marine environments. The lower gently dipping succession at Site 1097 is interpreted as a complex of sediment gravity flows formed of poorly sorted glacial debris. Site 1103 was drilled in that part of the continental margin that shows uppermost flat-lying continental shelf topsets overlying steeper dipping slope foresets seaward of a structural mid-shelf high. Drilling reached a depth of 363 mbsf with good recovery in steeply dipping continental slope foreset strata. Foreset strata are dominated by massive and chaotically

  7. Juggling Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudalevige, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Two education bills from George W. Bush's first term are long overdue for reauthorization. One, of course, is the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), passed in late 2001. The other is the Education Sciences Reform Act (ESRA), which in November 2002 replaced the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) with a new Institute of Education…

  8. Outer Hair Cell Electromotility and Otoacoustic Emissions*

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Outer hair cell electromotility is a rapid, force generating, length change in response to electrical stimulation. DC electrical pulses either elongate or shorten the cell and sinusoidal electrical stimulation results in mechanical oscillations at acoustic frequencies. The mechanism underlying outer hair cell electromotility is thought to be the origin of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. The ability of the cell to change its length requires that it be mechanically flexible. At the same time the structural integrity of the organ of Corti requires that the cell possess considerable compressive rigidity along its major axis. Evolution appears to have arrived at novel solutions to the mechanical requirements imposed on the outer hair cell. Segregation of cytoskeletal elements in specific intracellular domains facilitates the rapid movements. Compressive strength is provided by a unique hydraulic skeleton in which a positive hydrostatic pressure in the cytoplasm stabilizes a flexible elastic cortex with circumferential tensile strength. Cell turgor is required in order that the pressure gradients associated with the electromotile response can be communicated to the ends of the cell. A loss in turgor leads to loss of outer hair cell electromotility. Concentrations of salicylate equivalent to those that abolish spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in patients weaken the outer hair cell’s hydraulic skeleton. There is a significant diminution in the electromotile response associated with the loss in cell turgor. Aspirin’s effect on outer hair cell electromotility attests to the role of the outer hair cell in generating otoacoustic emissions and demonstrates how their physiology can influence the propagation of otoacoustic emissions. PMID:2187727

  9. Dynamics of continental deformation in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergnolle, M.; Calais, E.; Dong, L.

    2007-11-01

    The relevance of plate tectonics concepts to the description of deformation of large continental areas like Asia is subject to much debate. For some, the deformation of continents is better described by rigid motion of lithospheric blocks with strain concentrated along narrow fault zones. For others, it is better described by viscous flow of a continuously deforming solid in which faults play a minor role. Discriminating these end-member hypotheses requires spatially dense measurements of surface strain rates covering the whole deforming area. Here we revisit the issue of the forces and rheological structure that control present-day deformation in Asia. We use the "thin sheet" theory, with deformation driven by the balance of boundary and buoyancy stresses acting on a faulted lithosphere with laterally varying strength. Models are validated against a recent, homogeneous, GPS velocity field that covers most of Asia. In the models, deformation in compressional areas (Himalayas, Tien Shan, Altay) is well reproduced with strong coupling at the India/Eurasia plate contact, which allows for boundary forces to transfer into Asia. Southeastward motions observed in north and south China, however, require tensional, oceanward directed stresses, possibly generated by gravitational potential energy gradients across the Indonesian and Pacific subductions. Model and observed strain rates show that a large part of Asia undergoes no resolvable strain, with a kinematics apparently consistent with block- or plate-like motions. Internal strain, possibly continuous, is limited to high-elevation, mechanically weaker areas. Lateral variations of lithospheric strength appear to control the style of deformation in Asia, with a dynamics consistent with the thin sheet physical framework.

  10. Episodic Instabilities of Thick Continental Lithosphere (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C. P.; Fourel, L.; Farnetani, C. G.

    2009-12-01

    Although continental interiors are commonly described as stable, many have been subjected to major perturbations. The North American continent, for example, saw the formation or reactivation of four intracratonic basins (Williston, Hudson Bay, Illinois and Michigan) in the Paleozoic about 500 million years ago. These events occurred far from ocean basins and are not related to other tectonic events, and hence have usually been explained as late consequences of earlier orogenies or of mantle plumes impinging the base of the lithosphere. Why and how subsidence affected four neighbouring basins simultaneously in the Paleozoic has not been explained, however. Other important observations are that intracratonic basins and subsidence events tend to recur at the same locations, and that subsidence is rarely preceded by domal uplift. These observations can be explained by the behaviour of thick compositionally buoyant lithosphere that becomes unstable because it is being cooled from above. Laboratory analog experiments, stability theory and numerical simulations in 2-D and 3-D have been conducted to specify the necessary conditions for instability and to illustrate how flow develops and deforms the lithosphere. Numerical solutions accounting for temperature-dependent viscosity show that the compositional viscosity contrast between the lithospheric mantle and the underlying asthenosphere has only a weak effect on flow and deformation. Lithosphere behaviour depends on the Rayleigh number and the buoyancy ratio, which is equal to the ratio of compositional density contrast over the thermal density contrast through the unstable part of the lithosphere. Episodic instabilities are generated at small buoyancy numbers appropriate for geological conditions. Scaling laws for temperature-dependent viscosity fluids will be presented. Little uplift is generated by the instability because the hot upwelling asthenospheric mantle displaces compositionally buoyant colder lithospheric

  11. Spontaneous Regeneration of Human Photoreceptor Outer Segments.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jonathan C; Parker, Alicia B; Botelho, James V; Duncan, Jacque L

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors are damaged in many common eye diseases, such as macular degeneration, retinal detachment, and retinitis pigmentosa. The development of methods to promote the repair or replacement of affected photoreceptors is a major goal of vision research. In this context, it would be useful to know whether photoreceptors are capable of undergoing some degree of spontaneous regeneration after injury. We report a subject who lost retinal function in a wide zone around the optic disc, giving rise to massive enlargement of the physiological blind spot. Imaging with an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) showed depletion of cone outer segments in the affected retina. A year later visual function had improved, with shrinkage of the enlarged blind spot. AOSLO imaging showed repopulation of cone outer segments, although their density remained below normal. There was a one-to-one match between sites of formerly missing outer segments and new outer segments that had appeared over the course of the year's recovery. This correspondence provided direct morphological evidence that damaged cones are capable, under some circumstances, of generating new outer segments. PMID:26213154

  12. Spontaneous Regeneration of Human Photoreceptor Outer Segments

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jonathan C.; Parker, Alicia B.; Botelho, James V.; Duncan, Jacque L.

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors are damaged in many common eye diseases, such as macular degeneration, retinal detachment, and retinitis pigmentosa. The development of methods to promote the repair or replacement of affected photoreceptors is a major goal of vision research. In this context, it would be useful to know whether photoreceptors are capable of undergoing some degree of spontaneous regeneration after injury. We report a subject who lost retinal function in a wide zone around the optic disc, giving rise to massive enlargement of the physiological blind spot. Imaging with an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) showed depletion of cone outer segments in the affected retina. A year later visual function had improved, with shrinkage of the enlarged blind spot. AOSLO imaging showed repopulation of cone outer segments, although their density remained below normal. There was a one-to-one match between sites of formerly missing outer segments and new outer segments that had appeared over the course of the year’s recovery. This correspondence provided direct morphological evidence that damaged cones are capable, under some circumstances, of generating new outer segments. PMID:26213154

  13. Continental volume and freeboard through geological time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Reymer, A. P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences of approximately constant freeboard for continental growth are explored using a model that relates the volumes of isostatically compensated continents and oceans to the secular decline in terrestrial heat flow. It is found that a post-Archean increase in freeboard by 200 m requires continental growth of only 10 percent, while a decrease in freeboard by 200 m during this same period necessitates a crustal growth of 40 percent. Shrinkage of the continental crust since the end of the Archean can be ruled out. Changes of more than 10 percent in post-Archean crustal thickness are highly unlikely.

  14. Regional magnetic anomaly constraints on continental breakup

    SciTech Connect

    von Frese, R.R.B.; Hinze, W.J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Continental lithosphere magnetic anomalies mapped by the Magsat satellite are related to tectonic features associated with regional compositional variations of the crust and upper mantle and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. These continental-scale anomaly patterns when corrected for varying observation elevation and the global change in the direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field show remarkable correlation of regional lithospheric magnetic sources across rifted continental margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, these anomalies provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans.

  15. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milly, P. C. D.; Dunne, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. `Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman-Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  16. Continental rifting - Progress and outlook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, B. H.; Morgan, P.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that in spite of the flood of new data on continental rifts in the last 15 years, there is little consensus about the basic mechanisms and causes of rifting. The remarkable similarities in rift cross sections (shown in a figure), are considered to suggest that the anomalous lithospheric structure of rifts is more dependent on lithosphere properties than the mode of rifting. It is thought that there is a spectrum of rifting processes for which two fundamental mechanisms can be postulated: an active mechanism, whereby thermal energy is transmitted into the lithosphere from the underlying asthenosphere, and a passive mechanism by which mechanical energy is transmitted laterally through the lithosphere as a consequence of plate interactions at a distance. In order to permit the concept of the two fundamentally different mechanisms to be tested, a tentative classification is proposed that divides rifts into two basic categories: active rifting and passive rifting. Here, the magnitude of active rifting will depend on the rate at which lithosphere moves over the thermal source, with rifts being restricted to stationary or slow-moving plates.

  17. Northwest margin of California continental borderland: marine geology and tectonic evolution.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crouch, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The NW margin of the California continental border land consists of 2 NW-trending pre-Neogene lithologic belts blanketed by Miocene and younger strata. These represent facies corresponding to the subduction complex and forearc-basin deposits of a late Mesozoic and Paleogene continental-margin arc-trench system. The outer belt, which forms the acoustic basement is characterized by: 1) moderately high compressional velocities; 2) discordant and discontinuous seismic reflectors; and 3) nonfossiliferous and diverse rock types. Landward, the inner Great Valley sequence belt is characterized by: 1) intermediate compressional velocities; 2) concordant and relatively continuous reflectors, and 3) a thick turbidite sequence. Well-developed wrench-fault structures in overlying Miocene strata record a transition from Paleogene subduction to Neogene transform faulting. The timing of volcanism and uplift, and of the younger wrenching event, closely matches the plate-tectonic model of Atwater and Molnar.-from Author

  18. Middle and upper jurassic depositional environments at outer shelf and slope of Baltimore Canyon Trough

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, L.A.; Stoffa, P.L.; Truchan, M.

    1985-04-01

    New CDP data acquired in the Baltimore Canyon Trough during project LASE made it possible to map a continuous Jurassic sedimentary sequence from the continental margin to the abyssal plain without interruption by basement structures. Intense carbonate sedimentation is inferred at the outer shelf during the Middle and Late Jurassic. Carbonate sedimentation probably started during the Middle Jurassic with a platform that prograded seaward with the development of ramps. By the Late Jurassic, a major reef complex had developed at the outer continental shelf. The onset of reef growth can be tentatively dated as 138 Ma by using the J1 reflector dated by the Deep Sea Drilling Project. A well-developed reef-talus deposit can be identified overlying the interface that generates the J1 reflector. A detailed analysis of semblancederived interval velocities in the reef-talus sequence indicates a compressional velocity of 4.3-4.5 km/sec (14,100-14,800 ft/sec) for that interval, which was part of a major barrier reef along the United States eastern margin. After the reef formed, the deep oceanic basin was mostly starved from shelf-derived sediments until the reef died and was buried by clastic sediments. By correlation of our seismic data and COST well information, that in the Baltimore Canyon Trough this reef had terminated by about the end of the Jurassic Period.

  19. Continental shelf benthos off Otago Peninsula, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probert, P. Keith; Wilson, John B.

    1984-09-01

    Benthic macrofauna of the continental shelf off Otago Peninsula, south-eastern New Zealand (45°51'S, 170°52'E) was surveyed by dredge sampling during 1973-1975. Numerical classification (Canberra metric coefficient and flexible sorting) was used to produce site groups and species groups, and three major benthic communities were recognised: a shallow-water (14-25 m) fauna inhabiting well-sorted fine sand, a mid-shelf fauna (concentrated in the depth range 50-76 m) associated with sediments containing the greatest proportions of gravel and siltclay, and a predominantly sand-bottom fauna occurring mainly on the outer shelf (87-150 m). All station groups were dominated numerically by polychaetes (mean of 36·6-56% of individuals) with Mollusca (13·8-25%) or Crustacea (12·1-19·4%) the next most abundant group. The inshore sand fauna was the most distinct, characteristic elements being the trochid gastropod Antisolarium egenum, an amphipod of the genus Hippomedon and dense patches of the spionid polychaete Spiophanes bombyx. Diagnostic species of the mid-shelf mixed sediments were Lepidonotus jacksoni, Psammolyce antipoda, Lumbrineris brevicirra and Phyllamphicteis foliata (Polychaeta), Terenochiton otagoensis, Micrelenchus caelatus caelatus, Maoricolpus roseus roseus and Zegalerus tenuis (Mollusca), Ampelisca chiltoni (Amphipoda) and Amphipholis squamata (Ophiuroidea). Outer shelf sand stations were faunally less distinct, but among the more characteristic species were Euthalenessa fimbriata, Sigalion sp. and Euchone sp. (Polychaeta) and Gari stangeri (Bivalvia). Several abundant species were widely distributed among station groups, notably Nephtys macroura, Lumbrineris magalhaensis, Phyllochaetopterus socialis and Owenia fusiformis (Polychaeta) and Nucula nitidula and Tawera spissa (Bivalvia). Free-living lunulitiform Bryozoa of the genus Otionella were a characteristic component of inner and outer shelf sand faunas, and their inshore penetration probably marks

  20. Flux of energy and essential elements through the continental shelf ecosystem. Progress report, May 31, 1980-May 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L R

    1981-02-01

    There are three distinct areas of research reported, studies of intrusions of the west wall of the Gulf Stream onto the outer continental shelf, studies of the flux of materials across near-shore density fronts, and advances in the understanding of the planktonic food web of the continental shelf. Studies of frontal events on the outer and inner continental shelf involve distinctive physical and chemical regimes and have proven to required distinctive biological approaches. A simulation model of the flux of energy through the continental shelf food web was developed. It represents realistically both details of the energy transfers within the plankton community and the termanal production of fishes. It was discovered that the fecal ribbons of pelagic tunicates break up into flocculent material visually and chemically identical with the flocculent organic aggregates present in sea water. Subsequent experimental work with tunicate fecal matter indicates that some of the naturally occurring aggregates are indeed fecal. This makes it possible to understand and quantify for the first time the production and fate of that population of seston. An examination was made of several of the many roles of dissolved organic compounds in sea water which originate either from release by phytoplankton, digestive processes or metabolites of zooplankton, or extracellular digestion of microorganisms.

  1. Baseline Microstructural Characterization of Outer 3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, Phillip E.; Dunn, Kerry A

    2005-07-31

    Three DOE Standard 3013 outer storage containers were examined to characterize the microstructure of the type 316L stainless steel material of construction. Two of the containers were closure-welded yielding production-quality outer 3013 containers; the third examined container was not closed. Optical metallography and Knoop microhardness measurements were performed to establish a baseline characterization that will support future destructive examinations of 3013 outer containers in the storage inventory. Metallography revealed the microstructural features typical of this austenitic stainless steel as it is formed and welded. The grains were equiaxed with evident annealing twins. Flow lines were prominent in the forming directions of the cylindrical body and flat lids and bottom caps. No adverse indications were seen. Microhardness values, although widely varying, were consistent with annealed austenitic stainless steel. The data gathered as part of this characterization will be used as a baseline for the destructive examination of 3013 containers removed from the storage inventory.

  2. MHD processes in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic field measurements from Voyager and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes in the outer heliosphere are reviewed. A bibliography of the experimental and theoretical work concerning magnetic fields and plasmas observed in the outer heliosphere is given. Emphasis in this review is on basic concepts and dynamical processes involving the magnetic field. The theory that serves to explain and unify the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma observations is magnetohydrodynamics. Basic physical processes and observations that relate directly to solutions of the MHD equations are emphasized, but obtaining solutions of this complex system of equations involves various assumptions and approximations. The spatial and temporal complexity of the outer heliosphere and some approaches for dealing with this complexity are discussed.

  3. Geometry of Comet Halley's outer plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez de Tejada, H.

    A study of Comet Halley's outer plasma environment is presented. It is argued that the intermediate transition detected nearly halfway between the comet's bow shock and the cometopause represents the outer boundary of a thick friction layer that develops along the flanks of the cometopause. In the subsolar region the cometopause and the intermediate transition are expected to reach nearly the same (about 350,000 km) distance from the nucleus. The plasma changes seen in the outer ionosheath (between the bow shock and the intermediate transition) are further interpreted as due to an intrinsic axial asymmetry of the cometopause which may have a highly oblate cross-sectional shape with respect to the solar wind direction.

  4. Carbonate sediment production in the equatorial continental shelf of South America: Quantifying Halimeda incrassata (Chlorophyta) contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Pedro Bastos de Macêdo; Morais, Jader Onofre de

    2016-12-01

    The middle and outer continental shelves of eastern equatorial South America (ESA) are characterized by intense production of carbonate sediments. Qualitative analyses of sediment deposits suggest that the calcareous green alga Halimeda incrassata is among the top CaCO3 producers. Nevertheless, no study so far has quantified its real contributions. To better understand the sediment dynamic in this area, we measured biomass, growth rates and calcium carbonate production by this alga. The species exhibited high growth rates (3.38 segments.individual-1.day-1), coverage (174 individuals.m-2) and biomass (214.02 g.m-2). Substitution of segments may allow a sedimentation rate of 1.53 mm.yr-1 and a complete turnover of the population every 60.2 days. The rapid growth indicates that this alga can produce as much CaCO3 (1.19 kg CaCO3.m-2.year-1) as other tropical organisms, such as corals and rhodoliths. In a conservative estimate, 773.500 tonnes of CaCO3 are produced per year in a 5000 km2 area off the northern coast of Brazil. Sedimentation rate seems to be higher than that promoted by continental inputs in middle and outer continental shelf. On the other hand, population turnover is twice as slow as in other H. incrassata assemblages, suggesting that South American populations are sensible to physical disturbances. New studies are necessary to accurately estimate H. incrassata coverage along the Brazilian coast and to integrate data on other CaCO3 producers, such as foraminifera and coralline algae. This would allow a better understanding of the role of South American continental shelf on the global carbon budget. Furthermore, analysis on the health of these organisms is urgent, since a decline in their populations could negatively affect ecosystems functioning and services.

  5. Maps showing late Pleistocene and Holocene evolution of the South Texas continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyle, Carroll A.; Berryhill, Henry L.; Trippet, Anita R.

    1979-01-01

    Interpretation of acoustical profiles has provided insight into the late Quaternary geologic history of the Continental Shelf off South Texas. (See the geographic index map on sheet 1 for location of the area studied.) The profiles reveal the interplay of tectonism, sedimentation, and cyclic fluctuations of sea level in the building and geologic evolution of the continental terrace. The sequence of sediments studied extends to about 200 meters (m) beneath the sea-floor surface. Four seismic-stratigraphic units underlain by four prominent sound reflectors were identified and mapped. This geologic synthesis, for which the research was funded by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), is but one aspect of a coordinated, multidisciplinary environmental study of the South Texas Outer Continental Shelf sponsored by BLM (Berryhill, 1976, 1977). The environmental studies are keyed to the leasing of Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lands for petroleum exploration and production. Their purpose is to provide the data development of petroleum resources on the OCS, as well as to provide the basis for predicting the impact of oil and gas exploration and production on the marine environment. Of primary concern is the recognition of geologic conditions that might be hazardous to structures placed on the sea floor. Geologic hazards relate directly to the potential for significant movement of the sea floor in the future. Judging sea-floor stability and recognizing geologic features that are potentially hazardous require an understanding of the recent geologic history of the area, which, in turn, entails determining the relative rates and interactions of sedimentation and tectonism through time. In addition to the primary objective, the synthesis provides knowledge about the magnitude and extent of sea-level fluctuations in the western Gulf of Mexico, and it provides a depositional facies model of possible use in appraising the resource potential of the more deeply buried

  6. ACT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: ACT; Activated Coagulation Time Formal name: Activated Clotting Time Related tests: ... in the blood called platelets and proteins called coagulation factors are activated in a sequence of steps ...

  7. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  8. Modeling the dynamics of continental shelf carbon.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Eileen E; Cahill, Bronwyn; Fennel, Katja; Friedrichs, Marjorie A M; Hyde, Kimberly; Lee, Cindy; Mannino, Antonio; Najjar, Raymond G; O'Reilly, John E; Wilkin, John; Xue, Jianhong

    2011-01-01

    Continental margin systems are important contributors to global nutrient and carbon budgets. Effort is needed to quantify this contribution and how it will be modified under changing patterns of climate and land use. Coupled models will be used to provide projections of future states of continental margin systems. Thus, it is appropriate to consider the limitations that impede the development of realistic models. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of modeling carbon cycling on continental margins as well as the processes and issues that provide the next challenges to such models. Our overview is done within the context of a coupled circulation-biogeochemical model developed for the northeastern North American continental shelf region. Particular choices of forcing and initial fields and process parameterizations are used to illustrate the consequences for simulated distributions, as revealed by comparisons to observations using quantitative statistical metrics.

  9. The Continental Plates are Getting Thicker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews seismological studies that provide evidence of the existence of continental roots beneath the continents. Suggests, that through the collisions of plate tectonics, continents stabilized part of the mobile mantle rock beneath them to form deep roots. (ML)

  10. Ptolemy's treatment of the outer planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether for the outer planets Ptolemy followed his otherwise consistent custom of describing a scenario that did not happen as he says, or whether, at least for the outer planets, he left us a more accurate rendition of events. The detailed reconstructions of Ptolemy's calculations that follow show that, at least in the Almagest, Ptolemy is a writer with consistent habits when it comes to observations. We begin by reviewing, with minimal editorial comment, Ptolemy's calculations for each planet.

  11. Outer planet probe cost estimates: First impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niehoff, J.

    1974-01-01

    An examination was made of early estimates of outer planetary atmospheric probe cost by comparing the estimates with past planetary projects. Of particular interest is identification of project elements which are likely cost drivers for future probe missions. Data are divided into two parts: first, the description of a cost model developed by SAI for the Planetary Programs Office of NASA, and second, use of this model and its data base to evaluate estimates of probe costs. Several observations are offered in conclusion regarding the credibility of current estimates and specific areas of the outer planet probe concept most vulnerable to cost escalation.

  12. Cochlear amplification, outer hair cells and prestin

    PubMed Central

    Dallos, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical amplification of acoustic signals is apparently a common feature of vertebrate auditory organs. In non-mammalian vertebrates amplification is produced by stereociliary processes, related to the mechanotransducer channel complex and probably to the phenomenon of fast adaptation. The extended frequency range of the mammalian cochlea has likely co-evolved with a novel hair cell type, the outer hair cell and its constituent membrane protein, prestin. Cylindrical outer hair cells are motile and their somatic length changes are voltage driven and powered by prestin. One of the central outstanding problems in mammalian cochlear neurobiology is the relation between the two amplification processes. PMID:18809494

  13. Involvement of a 43-kilodalton outer membrane protein in beta-lactam resistance of Shigella dysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Kar, A K; Ghosh, A S; Chauhan, K; Ahamed, J; Basu, J; Chakrabarti, P; Kundu, M

    1997-01-01

    A beta-lactam-sensitive strain (C152) of Shigella dysenteriae showed two major outer membrane proteins (OMPs) with M(r)s of 43,000 and 38,000, while the clinical isolate M2 lacked the 43,000-Mr OMP, which acted as a channel for beta-lactam antibiotics. Permeability of beta-lactams across the outer membrane (OM) of M2 was lower than that across the OM of C152. Mutants deficient in the 43-kDa OMP could be selected in vitro from strain C152 in the presence of cefoxitin. All beta-lactam-resistant strains were sensitive to imipenem. PMID:9333070

  14. Outer Sphere Adsorption of Pb(II)EDTA on Goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John R

    1999-07-16

    FTIR and EXAFS spectroscopic measurements were performed on Pb(II)EDTA adsorbed on goethite as functions of pH (4-6), Pb(II)EDTA concentration (0.11 {micro}M - 72 {micro}M), and ionic strength (16 {micro}M - 0.5M). FTIR measurements show no evidence for carboxylate-Fe(III) bonding or protonation of EDTA at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Both FTIR and EXAFS measurements suggest that EDTA acts as a hexadentate ligand, with all four of its carboxylate and both amine groups bonded to Pb(II). No evidence was observed for inner-sphere Pb(II)-goethite bonding at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Hence, the adsorbed complexes should have composition Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}}. Since substantial uptake of PbEDTA(II){sup 2{minus}} occurred in the samples, we infer that Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}} adsorbed as outer-sphere complexes and/or as complexes that lose part of their solvation shells and hydrogen bond directly to goethite surface sites. We propose the term ''hydration-sphere'' for the latter type of complexes because they should occupy space in the primary hydration spheres of goethite surface functional groups, and to distinguish this mode of sorption from common structural definitions of inner- and outer-sphere complexes. The similarity of Pb(II) uptake isotherms to those of other divalent metal ions complexed by EDTA suggests that they too adsorb by these mechanisms. The lack of evidence for inner-sphere EDTA-Fe(III) bonding suggests that previously proposed metal-ligand - promoted dissolution mechanisms should be modified, specifically to account for the presence of outer-sphere precursor species.

  15. Generation of Continental Rifts, Basins and Swells by Lithosphere Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milelli, L.; Fourel, L.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    blocks of finite size that became unstable due to cooling from above and describe the peculiar horizontal planform that developed. Dynamical behaviour depends on three dimensionless numbers, a Rayleigh number for the unstable block, a buoyancy number that scales the intrinsic density contrast to the thermal one and the aspect ratio of the block. Within the block, instability develops in two different ways in an outer annulus and in an inner region. In the outer annulus, upwellings and downwellings take the form of radial rolls spaced regularly. In the interior region, the planform adopts the more familiar form of polygonal cells. Translated to geological conditions, such instabilities should manifest themselves as linear rifts striking at a right angle to the continent-ocean boundary and an array of domal uplifts, volcanic swells and basins in the continental interior. The laboratory data lead to simple scaling laws for the dimensions and spacings of the convective structures. For the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, these dimensions and distances take values in the 500-1000 km range, close to geological examples. The large intrinsic buoyancy of Archean lithospheric roots prevents this type of instability, which explains why the widespread volcanic activity that currently affects Western Africa is confined to post-Archean domains.

  16. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    The objectives are to identify important physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the transfer of materials on the southeast continental shelf, determine important parameters which govern observed temporal and spatial varibility on the continental shelf, determine the extent and modes of coupling between events at the shelf break and nearshore, and determine physical, chemical and biological exchange rates on the inner shelf. Progress in meeting these research objectives is presented. (ACR)

  17. Freshwater peat on the continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emery, K.O.; Wigley, R.L.; Bartlett, A.S.; Rubin, M.; Barghoorn, E.S.

    1967-01-01

    Freshwater peats from the continental shelf off northeastern United States contain the same general pollen sequence as peats from ponds that are above sea level and that are of comparable radiocarbon ages. These peats indicate that during glacial times of low sea level terrestrial vegetation covered the region that is now the continental shelf in an unbroken extension from the adjacent land areas to the north and west.

  18. The Continental Margins Program in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cocker, M.D.; Shapiro, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These addtional investigations are quite varied in scope, and many were made possible because of GIS expertise gained as a result of the Continental Margins Program. Future investigations will also reap the benefits of the Continental Margins Program.From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These additional

  19. Freshwater peat on the continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Emery, K O; Wigley, R L; Bartlett, A S; Rubin, M; Barghoorn, E S

    1967-12-01

    Freshwater peats from the continental shelf off northeastern United States contain the same general pollen sequence as peats from ponds that are above sea level and that are of comparable radiocarbon ages. These peats indicate that during glacial times of low sea level terrestrial vegetation covered the region that is now the continental shelf in an unbroken extension from the adjacent land areas to the north and west. PMID:17801856

  20. Continental subduction induced tremor activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, H. J.; Chen, K. H.; Ide, S.; Mouyen, M.; Byrne, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Central Range of Taiwan, a place where deep-seated tectonic tremors (a proxy of slow slip) and earthquake swarms are closely located in space and highly correlated in time, provides rare opportunity towards the understanding of physical mechanisms governing different style of slip. To identify tremor events, we used the identification scheme similar to Ide et al. (2015) but applied slightly different techniques: (1) Higher waveform cross-correlation coefficient (>0.6) (2) careful visual inspection for excluding local earthquakes and short-lasted event (duration < 60 s) (3) Signal to noise ratio higher than 1.2 and lower than 30 (4) No spatio-temporal clustering technique used. During the study period of 2007-2012, we identified 2320 tremor events with duration ranging from 60 s to 1550 s. They are located underneath southern Central Range, forming a NS-striking and SE-dipping pipe-like structure at a depth of 20-40 km. The up-dip extension of this tremor structure reaches an aseismic zone under the western flank of Central Range at shallow depths, where is an area characterized by high heat flow, low Vp and Vs anomaly. Such seismic gap was explained by the buoyancy induced crust detachment during continental subduction of Eurasian Plate. This detachment may open a new channel for hot and ductile material ascending to shallow depth, producing high temperatures along the way. This provides a common mechanism for down-dip tremor and up-dip shallow seismic gap along the same eastern dipping channel. In addition, the tremor events are found to be mostly occurred in high tides and exhibit higher correlation with tide data from west coast of Taiwan. This may again imply the association between tremor activity and subduction of Eurasian Plate.