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Sample records for act rcra groundwater

  1. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual progress report for 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Fruland, R.M.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the progress during 1988 of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 16 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility (the Solid Waste Landfill). Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 21 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Quarterly report of RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976) groundwater monitoring data for period July 1, 1990 through September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and 40CFR265, Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (EPA 1988b). This submittal provides data obtained from groundwater monitoring activities for July 1, 1990 through September 30, 1990. 26 refs., 21 figs., 30 tabs.

  3. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period July through September 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2007-02-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period July through September 2006. Eighteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) sites were sampled during the reporting quarter.

  4. Calendar Year 2002 RCRA & CERCLA Groundwater Monitoring Well summary report

    SciTech Connect

    MARTINEZ, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the calendar year 2002 field activities associated with installing four new groundwater monitoring wells in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. Two groundwater monitoring wells are located around waste management area (WMA) TX-TY to support the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) and two groundwater monitoring wells are located in the 200-UP-1 and 200-ZP-1 operable units (OU) to support the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980'' (CERCLA).

  5. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual Progress Report for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.; Gorst, W.R.

    1990-03-01

    This report describes the progress during 1989 of 16 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 25 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility. Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 40 refs., 75 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1988. There are 16 individual hazardous waste facilities covered by the 13 ground-water monitoring projects. The Grout Treatment Facility is included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. The 13 projects discussed in this report were designed according to applicable interim-status ground-water monitoring requirements specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). During this quarter, field activities primarily consisted of sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes sediment analyses in addition to ground-water monitoring results. Twelve new wells were installed during the previous quarter: two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, six at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells include drillers' logs and other drilling and site characterization data, and are provided in Volume 2 or on microfiche in the back of Volume 1. 26 refs., 28 figs., 74 tabs.

  7. CY2003 RCRA GROUNDWATER MONITORING WELL SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    MARTINEZ, C.R.

    2003-12-16

    This report describes the calendar year (CY) 2003 field activities associated with the installation of two new groundwater monitoring wells in the A-AX Waste Management Area (WMA) and four groundwater monitoring wells in WMA C in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. All six wells were installed by Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH) for CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) in support of Draft Hanford Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) M-24-00 milestones and ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) groundwater monitoring requirements. Drilling data for the six wells are summarized in Table 1.

  8. RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Narbutovskih, Susan M.

    2001-01-01

    This document describes the groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area C located in the 200 East Area of the DOE Hanford Site. This plan is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA).

  9. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period July 1, 1991 through September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and 40 CFR 265, Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (EPA 1989). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303 (Ecology 1991). This submittal provides data obtained from groundwater monitoring activities for July 1, 1991 through September 30, 1991. This report contains groundwater monitoring data from Hanford Site groundwater projects. A RCRA network is currently being established at the 100-D Pond. Groundwater chemistry analyses have not yet been performed.

  10. RCRA groundwater monitoring data. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between April and June 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the April through June quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  11. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA): Hazardous wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Citations cover the handling of hazardous waste, facility investigation, and updates and reviews of selected provisions of the act. Groundwater monitoring, landfill design, liner systems, and incineration standards are among the topics discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1 through December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and {open_quotes}Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities{close_quotes} (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 265), as amended. Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. The location of each facility is shown. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between October and December 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  13. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jungers, D.K.

    1994-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between November 20 and February 25, 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  14. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 pond RCRA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D.B.; Chou, C.J.

    1998-06-01

    The 216-B-3 pond system was a series of ponds for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation since 1945, the B Pond system has been a RCRA facility since 1986, with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994, discharges were diverted from the main pond, where the greatest potential for contamination was thought to reside, to the 3C expansion pond. In 1997, all discharges to the pond system were discontinued. In 1990, the B Pond system was elevated from detection groundwater monitoring to an assessment-level status because total organic halogens and total organic carbon were found to exceed critical means in two wells. Subsequent groundwater quality assessment failed to find any specific hazardous waste contaminant that could have accounted for the exceedances, which were largely isolated in occurrence. Thus, it was recommended that the facility be returned to detection-level monitoring.

  15. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This quarterly report contains data received between January and March 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported. Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment.

  16. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1301-N, 1324-N/NA, and 1325-N RCRA Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2002-06-08

    The 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, the 1324-N Surface Impoundment, and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100 N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The closure plans for these facilities stipulate that groundwater is monitored according to the 100-N Pilot Project: Proposed Consolidated Groundwater Monitoring Program (BHI-00725). This document supplements the consolidated plan by providing information on sampling and analysis protocols, quality assurance, data management, and a conceptual model for the RCRA sites. Monitoring well networks, constituents, and sampling frequency remain the same as in the consolidated plan or the previous groundwater monitoring plan (Hartman 1996).

  17. Interim-Status RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 PUREX Cribs

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, Jon W.; Elmore, Rebecca P.

    2005-07-21

    This document presents a groundwater monitoring program for three Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) waste management units at the Hanford Site combined under one groundwater quality assessment program. The units are the 216 A 10, 216 A 36B, and 216 A-37-1 cribs (the RCRA PUREX cribs). The three cribs have been grouped together based on their proximity to one another, similar construction and waste history, and similar hydrogeologic regime. The RCRA PUREX cribs are located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This document replaces the previous RCRA monitoring plan (Lindberg 1997-PNNL-11523, Rev.0) for these cribs.

  18. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-11-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

  19. Monitoring Plan for RCRA Groundwater Assessment at the 216-U-12 Crib

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2005-09-20

    This document contains a revised and updated monitoring plan for RCRA interim status groundwater assessment, site hydrogeology, and a conceptual model of the RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal unit. Monitoring under interim status is expected to continue until the 216-U-12 crib is incorporated as a chapter into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit or administratively closed as proposed to EPA and Ecology.

  20. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA): Hazardous wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Citations cover the handling of hazardous waste, facility investigation, and updates and reviews of selected provisions of the act. Groundwater monitoring, landfill design, liner systems, and incineration standards are among the topics discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA): Hazardous wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Citations cover the handling of hazardous waste, facility investigation, and updates and reviews of selected provisions of the act. Groundwater monitoring, landfill design, liner systems, and incineration standards are among the topics discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. 32 CFR 32.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as described at § 32.49....

  3. 32 CFR 32.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as described at § 32.49....

  4. 32 CFR 32.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as described at § 32.49....

  5. 32 CFR 32.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as described at § 32.49....

  6. 14 CFR 1260.116 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... Requirements § 1260.116 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580...

  7. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1, 1993 through March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. This quarterly report contains data received between March 8 and May 24, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  8. Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford Site facilities for 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 20 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring projects and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Most of the projects no longer receive dangerous waste; a few projects continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 20 RCRA projects comprise 30 waste management units. Ten of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration, distribution, and rate of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect contamination, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1992 and September 1993. Recent groundwater quality is also described for the 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas and for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides.

  9. Groundwater modeling in RCRA assessment, corrective action design and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Rybak, I.; Henley, W.

    1995-12-31

    Groundwater modeling was conducted to design, implement, modify, and terminate corrective action at several RCRA sites in EPA Region 4. Groundwater flow, contaminant transport and unsaturated zone air flow models were used depending on the complexity of the site and the corrective action objectives. Software used included Modflow, Modpath, Quickflow, Bioplume 2, and AIR3D. Site assessment data, such as aquifer properties, site description, and surface water characteristics for each facility were used in constructing the models and designing the remedial systems. Modeling, in turn, specified additional site assessment data requirements for the remedial system design. The specific purpose of computer modeling is discussed with several case studies. These consist, among others, of the following: evaluation of the mechanism of the aquifer system and selection of a cost effective remedial option, evaluation of the capture zone of a pumping system, prediction of the system performance for different and difficult hydrogeologic settings, evaluation of the system performance, and trouble-shooting for the remedial system operation. Modeling is presented as a useful tool for corrective action system design, performance, evaluation, and trouble-shooting. The case studies exemplified the integration of diverse data sources, understanding the mechanism of the aquifer system, and evaluation of the performance of alternative remediation systems in a cost-effective manner. Pollutants of concern include metals and PAHs.

  10. GUAM - FACILITIES REGULATED UNDER THE RESOURCE CONVERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT (RCRA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent facilities that are regulated by the EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facilities regulated under RCRA generate, dispose of, treate or transport hazardous waste. RCRA is a law enacted by Congress in 1976 and amended in 1984 to include ...

  11. NEVADA FACILITIES REGULATED UNDER THE RESOURCE CONVERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT (RCRA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent facilities that are regulated by the EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facilities regulated under RCRA generate, dispose of, treate or transport hazardous waste. RCRA is a law enacted by Congress in 1976 and amended in 1984 to include ...

  12. 40 CFR 30.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... materials identified in guidelines developed by EPA (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly, State and... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Public Law 94-580...

  13. 40 CFR 30.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... materials identified in guidelines developed by EPA (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly, State and... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Public Law 94-580...

  14. 40 CFR 30.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... materials identified in guidelines developed by EPA (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly, State and... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Public Law 94-580...

  15. 40 CFR 30.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... materials identified in guidelines developed by EPA (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly, State and... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Public Law 94-580...

  16. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Nineteen RCRA groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford site. They include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. Groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim- and final- status federal and state regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of the following programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment or detection. This quarterly report contains data received between July 1 and Sept. 30, 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the July-Sept. quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events not previously reported.

  17. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.; McDonald, John P.

    2005-11-01

    The 216-B-3 Pond system was a series of ponds used for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation from 1945 to 1997, the B Pond System has been a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility since 1986, with RCRA interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994 the expansion ponds of the facility were clean closed, leaving only the main pond and a portion of the 216-B-3-3 ditch as the currently regulated facility. In 2001, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued a letter providing guidance for a two-year, trial evaluation of an alternate, intrawell statistical approach to contaminant detection monitoring at the B Pond system. This temporary variance was allowed because the standard indicator-parameters evaluation (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and accompanying interim status statistical approach is ineffective for detecting potential B-Pond-derived contaminants in groundwater, primarily because this method fails to account for variability in the background data and because B Pond leachate is not expected to affect the indicator parameters. In July 2003, the final samples were collected for the two-year variance period. An evaluation of the results of the alternate statistical approach is currently in progress. While Ecology evaluates the efficacy of the alternate approach (and/or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit), the B Pond system will return to contamination-indicator detection monitoring. Total organic carbon and total organic halides were added to the constituent list beginning with the January 2004 samples. Under this plan, the following wells will be monitored for B Pond: 699-42-42B, 699-43-44, 699-43-45, and 699-44-39B. The wells will be sampled semi-annually for the contamination indicator parameters (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and annually for

  18. 40 CFR 30.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Public Law 94-580 codified... materials identified in guidelines developed by EPA (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly, State and... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery...

  19. 14 CFR 1260.116 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 1260.116 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580...

  20. 10 CFR 600.149 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). 600.149 Section 600.149 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements...

  1. 14 CFR 1260.116 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 1260.116 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580...

  2. 10 CFR 600.149 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). 600.149 Section 600.149 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements...

  3. 14 CFR § 1260.116 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 1260.116 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580...

  4. 10 CFR 600.149 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). 600.149 Section 600.149 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements...

  5. 10 CFR 600.149 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). 600.149 Section 600.149 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements...

  6. 14 CFR 1260.116 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 1260.116 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580...

  7. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1, 1993 through June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jungers, D.K.

    1993-10-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between May 24 and August 20, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from samples collected during the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  8. HANFORD TANK FARM RESOURCE CONVERVATION & RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CORRECTIVE ACTION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.

    2007-01-15

    As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: (1) characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; (2) determine how the contamination will move in the future; (3) estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; (4) develop and implement mitigative measures; and (5) develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper.

  9. 38 CFR 49.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962), any...

  10. 38 CFR 49.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962), any...

  11. 38 CFR 49.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962), any...

  12. 38 CFR 49.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962), any...

  13. 38 CFR 49.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962), any...

  14. EVALUATION OF CONTROL CHART METHODOLOGIES FOR RCRA (RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT) WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a discussion of decision rules relating to the monitoring of ground water at hazardous waste sites that are subject to regulation under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The final rule for RCRA regulations 40CFR part 264 was published Octobe...

  15. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  16. RCRA FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent facilities that are regulated by the EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facilities regulated under RCRA generate, dispose of, treate or transport hazardous waste. RCRA is a law enacted by Congress in 1976 and amended in 1984 to include ...

  17. Results of RCRA groundwater quality assessment program at the 216-U-12 crib

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, B.A.; Chou, C.J.

    1997-05-01

    The 216-U-12 crib has been in a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) interim-status groundwater quality assessment program since the first quarter of 1993. Specific conductance measured in downgradient wells 299-W22-41 and 299-W22-42 exceeds its critical mean. This report presents the results and findings of Phases I and II of the assessment monitoring program, as required by 40 CFR 265.93. The elevated levels of specific conductance in the downgradient {open_quotes}triggering{close_quotes} wells are attributed to nitrate, the mobile anion released when nitric acid is diluted in water, and calcium which is released from the sediments as acid is neutralized. Technetium-99 levels have been elevated in these same downgradient wells since 1991. The source of these constituents is the 216-U-12 crib. Downward migration of nitrate and technetium-99 from the vadose zone (and continued elevated specific conductance in the two downgradient wells) is still occurring because the driving force is still present.

  18. Combination RCRA groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 PUREX cribs

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, J.W.

    1997-06-01

    This document presents a groundwater quality assessment monitoring plan, under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulatory requirements for three RCRA sites in the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area: 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 cribs (PUREX cribs). The objectives of this monitoring plan are to combine the three facilities into one groundwater quality assessment program and to assess the nature, extent, and rate of contaminant migration from these facilities. A groundwater quality assessment plan is proposed because at least one downgradient well in the existing monitoring well networks has concentrations of groundwater constituents indicating that the facilities have contributed to groundwater contamination. The proposed combined groundwater monitoring well network includes 11 existing near-field wells to monitor contamination in the aquifer in the immediate vicinity of the PUREX cribs. Because groundwater contamination from these cribs is known to have migrated as far away as the 300 Area (more than 25 km from the PUREX cribs), the plan proposes to use results of groundwater analyses from 57 additional wells monitored to meet environmental monitoring requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 to supplement the near-field data. Assessments of data collected from these wells will help with a future decision of whether additional wells are needed.

  19. Calendar Year 2007 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Annual Monitoring Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - RCRA Post-Closure Permit Nos. TNHW-113, TNHW-116, and TNHW-128

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental

    2008-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 2007 at the following hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; this S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm, Bear Creek Burial Grounds/Walk-In Pits (BCBG/WIP), Eastern S-3 Site Plume, Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP), Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Baste (CRSDB), few Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and East Chestnut Ridge Waste Pile (ECRWP). Hit monitoring data were obtained in accordance with the applicable Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) hazardous waste post-closure permit (PCP). The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) - Division of Solid Waste Management issued the PCPs to define the requirements for RCRA post-closure inspection, maintenance, and groundwater monitoring at the specified TSD units located within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-116), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-113), and Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-128). Each PCP requires the Submittal of an annual RCRA groundwater monitoring report containing the groundwater sampling information and analytical results obtained at each applicable TSD unit during the preceding CY, along with an evaluation of groundwater low rates and directions and the analytical results for specified RCRA groundwater target compounds; this report is the RCRA annual groundwater monitoring report for CY 2007. The RCRA post-closure groundwater monitoring requirements specified in the above-referenced PCP for the Chestnut Ridge Regime replace those defined in the previous PCP (permit no. TNHW-088), which expired on September 18, 2005, but remained effective until the TDEC issued the new PCP in September 2006. The new PCP defines site-specific groundwater sampling and analysis requirements for the

  20. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D. Brent; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2000-11-28

    The 216-B-3 Pond was a series of ponds for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In 1990, groundwater monitoring at B Pond was elevated from "detection" to assessment status because total organic halides and total organic carbon were found to exceed critical means in two wells. Groundwater quality assessment, which ended in 1996, failed to find any specific hazardous waste contaminant that could have accounted for the isolated occurrences of elevated total organic halides and total organic carbon. Hence, the facility was subsequently returned to detection-level monitoring in 1998. Exhaustive groundwater analyses during the assessment period indicated that only two contaminants, tritium and nitrate, could be positively attributed to the B Pond System, with two others (arsenic and I-129) possibly originating from B Pond. Chemical and radiological analyses of soil at the main pond and 216-B-3-3 ditch has not revealed significant contamination. Based on the observed, minor contamination in groundwater and in the soil column, three parameters were selected for site-specific, semiannual monitoring; gross alpha, gross beta, and specific conductance. Total organic halides and total organic carbon are included as constituents because of regulatory requirements. Nitrate, tritium, arsenic, and iodine-129 will be monitored under the aegis of Hanford site-wide monitoring. Although the B Pond System is not scheduled to advance from RCRA interim status to final status until the year 2003, a contingency plan for an improved monitoring strategy, which will partially emulate final status requirements, will be contemplated before the official change to final status. This modification will allow a more sensible and effective screening of groundwater for the facility.

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analyses and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc.

  2. Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford Site facilities for 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Although most of the facilities no longer receive dangerous waste, a few facilities continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facilities comprise 29 waste management units. Nine of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of contamination indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration profiles, rate, and extent of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect leakage, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1994 and September 1995. Groundwater quality is described for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides.

  3. Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-03-17

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria

  4. 45 CFR 74.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,...

  5. 45 CFR 74.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,...

  6. 45 CFR 74.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,...

  7. 45 CFR 74.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,...

  8. Small-quantity generator's handbook for managing RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) wastes. Pesticide application

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    This RCRA Handbook was developed for pesticide applicators to provide assistance in complying with pertinent sections of the RCRA requirements. Section 2 summarizes operations of pesticide users and describes potential waste types that could be generated from these operations. Section 3 provides a guide for determining if a particular pesticide waste is subject to these regulations. Section 4 discusses the RCRA generator requirements, while Section 5 describes waste-management strategies for minimizing the amount of hazardous waste generated by the pesticide applicators. Appendix A lists hazardous wastes. Appendix B summarizes RCRA characteristic wastes. Appendix C contains a list of references and contacts for obtaining more information about hazardous wastes and their regulation.

  9. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.T.

    1997-07-01

    This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

  10. RCRA TSD BOUNDARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a shapefile of RCRA Treatment, Storage, and Disposal facility boundaries developed by PRC Environmental Management, Inc (PRC) per a Work Assignment from the U.S. EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Enforcement, Permitting, and Assistance (REPA) Con...

  11. 43 CFR 12.916 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). Under the Act, any...

  12. 43 CFR 12.916 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). Under the Act, any...

  13. 43 CFR 12.916 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). Under the Act, any...

  14. 43 CFR 12.916 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). Under the Act, any...

  15. 43 CFR 12.916 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). Under the Act, any...

  16. Application of intrawell testing of RCRA groundwater monitoring data when no upgradient well exists.

    PubMed

    Chou, C J; O'Brien, R F; Barnett, D B

    2001-09-01

    A statistical quality control approach to detect changes in groundwater quality from a regulated waste unit is described. The approach applies the combined Shewhart-CUSUM control chart methodology for intrawell comparison of analyte concentrations over time and does not require an upgradient well. A case study from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site is used for illustration purposes. This method is broadly applicable in groundwater monitoring programs where there is no clearly defined upgradient location, the groundwater flow rate is exceptionally slow, or where a high degree of spatial variability exists in parameter concentrations. This study also indicates that the use of the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process can assist in designing an efficient and cost-effective groundwater monitoring plan to achieve the optimum goal of both low false positive and low false negative rates (high power). PMID:11589498

  17. 28 CFR 70.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 70.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C....

  18. 28 CFR 70.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 70.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C....

  19. 28 CFR 70.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 70.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C....

  20. 28 CFR 70.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 70.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C....

  1. 28 CFR 70.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 70.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C....

  2. 45 CFR 74.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR...

  3. How landfill gas causes RCRA compliance problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kerfoot, H.B.

    1996-06-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires landfill operators to monitor groundwater at their facilities. This regulatory requirement is designed to prevent contamination that can result as rainfall drains through refuse, causing pollutants to leach into the groundwater. Several parameters commonly associated with leachate are monitored under RCRA as indicator parameters, or parameters that represent readily detected indicators of contamination. These parameters include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and alkalinity. Because of its potentially high concentration of VOCs and non-volatile contaminants, landfill leachate represents the greatest threat to groundwater from solid waste facilities. However, other sources can elevate indicator parameters as well. Increasingly lower detection limits can be achieved for VOCs in groundwater, enabling detection of VOCs and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from landfill gas. In addition, CO{sub 2} from landfill gas can increase groundwater alkalinity. Releases of VOCs in landfill gas can be eliminated by minimizing the gas pressure within the landfill, either by installing a gas-collection system or upgrading an existing gas-collection system by adding wells or altering gas flow in portions of the system.

  4. 15 CFR 14.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.16 Resource Conservation and...

  5. 15 CFR 14.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.16 Resource Conservation and...

  6. 15 CFR 14.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.16 Resource Conservation and...

  7. 15 CFR 14.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.16 Resource Conservation and...

  8. 15 CFR 14.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.16 Resource Conservation and...

  9. Loss of interim status (LOIS) under RCRA. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires owners and operators of facilities that treat store, or disposal of hazardous waste (TSDFs) to obtain an operating permit. Recognizing that it would take EPA many years to issue operating permits to all RCRA facilities, Congress created ``interim status`` under Section 3005(e) of the Act. Interim status allows facilities to operate under Subtitle C of RCRA until their permits are issued or denied. This information brief defines interim status and describes how failure to meet interim status requirements may lead to loss of interim status (LOIS).

  10. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure sumamry for the Uranium Treatment Unit

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This closure summary has been prepared for the Uranium Treatment Unit (UTU) located at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The actions required to achieve closure of the UTU area are outlined in the Closure Plan, submitted to and approved by the Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation staff, respectively. The UTU was used to store and treat waste materials that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This closure summary details all steps that were performed to close the UTU in accordance with the approved plan.

  11. RCRA Subtitle C TSD facilities and solvent recovery facilities: Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. Toxic chemical release inventory; Industry guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this guidance document is to assist facilities in SIC code 4953 that are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle C and facilities in SIC code 7389 that are primarily engaged in solvent recovery services on a contract or fee basis. This document explains the EPCRA Section 313 and PPA Section 6607 reporting requirements (collectively referred to as the EPCRA Section 313) reporting requirements, and discusses specific release and other waste management activities encountered at many facilities in these industries. The objectives of this manual are to: clarify EPCRA Section 313 requirements for industry; increase the accuracy and completeness of the data being reported by RCRA Subtitle C TSD and solvent recovery facilities; and reduce the level of effort expended by those facilities that prepare an EPCRA Section 313 report.

  12. RCRA post-closure permits. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Coalgate, J.

    1993-02-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires that hazardous waste management facilities operate in accordance with permits granted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or a State authorized to carry out the RCRA Subtitle C program. Several categories of permits, including treatment,storage, and disposal permits; research, development and demonstration permits; post-closure permits; emergency permits; permits-by-rule; and trial burn and land treatment demonstration permits are issued under the RCRA Subtitle C program. This Information Brief focuses on post-closure permitting requirements under 40 CFR 270.1(c).

  13. RCRA post-closure permits

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires that hazardous waste management facilities operate in accordance with permits granted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or a State authorized to carry out the RCRA Subtitle C program. Several categories of permits (including treatment, storage, and disposal permits; research, development, and demonstration permits; post-closure permits; emergency permits; permits-by-rule; and trial burn and land treatment demonstration permits) are issued under the RCRA Subtitle C program. This Information Brief focuses on post-closure permitting requirements under 40 CFR 270.1(c).

  14. SINGLE-LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE RCRA (RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT) METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF DIOXIN IN HAZARDOUS WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-laboratory testing of RCRA Method 8280 for the analysis of chlorinated dibenzop-dioxins and dibenzofurans has been initiated on sample matrices including pottery clay soil, a Missouri soil, a fly ash, a still bottom from a chlorophenol-based herbicide production process, a...

  15. REMEDIATION COMPLETED: BUT IS THE GROUNDWATER MEETING THE SAFEDRINKING WATER ACT REQUIREMENTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater treatment is a theme that runs through several of EPA'sprograms including Drinking Water, Superfund, Underground StorageTanks, RCRA, etc. requently the same terms are used in thedifferent programs with quite different meanings. or example, thephrase "pump and treat" m...

  16. Loss of interim status (LOIS) under RCRA

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires owners and operators of facilities that treat, store, or dispose of hazardous waste (TSDFs) to obtain an operating permit. Recognizing that it would take EPA many years to issue operating permits to all RCRA facilities, Congress created ``interim status`` under Section 3005(e) of the Act. Interim status allows facilities to operating permits to all RCRA facilities to operate under Subtitle C of RCRA until their permits are issued or denied. This information brief defines interim status and describes how failure to meet interim status requirements may lead to loss of interim status (LOIS).

  17. THE INTEGRATION OF THE 241-Z BUILDING DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING (D&D) UNDER COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE COMPENSATION & LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) WITH RESOURCE CONSERVATION & RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CLOSURE AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2007-02-20

    The 241-Z treatment and storage tanks, a hazardous waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (TSD) unit permitted pursuant to the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) and Washington State ''Hazardous Waste Management Act, RCW 70.105'', have been deactivated and are being actively decommissioned. The 241-Z TSD unit managed non-listed radioactive contaminated waste water, containing trace RCRA characteristic constituents. The 241-Z TSD unit consists of below grade tanks (D-4, D-5, D-7, D-8, and an overflow tank) located in a concrete containment vault, sample glovebox GB-2-241-ZA, and associated ancillary piping and equipment. The tank system is located beneath the 241-Z building. The 241-Z building is not a portion of the TSD unit. The sample glovebox is housed in the above-grade building. Waste managed at the TSD unit was received via underground mining from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sources. Tank D-6, located in the D-6 vault cell, is a past-practice tank that was taken out of service in 1972 and has never operated as a portion of the RCRA TSD unit. CERCLA actions address Tank D-6, its containment vault cell, and soil beneath the cell that was potentially contaminated during past-practice operations and any other potential past-practice contamination identified during 241-Z closure, while outside the scope of the ''Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plant, 241-Z Treatment and Storage Tanks''.

  18. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2007-03-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater monitoring for FY 2006 on DOE's Hanford Site. Results of groundwater remediation, vadose zone monitoring, and characterization are summarized. DOE monitors groundwater at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and Washington Administrative Code (WAC).

  19. RCRA corrective action permit requirements and modifications under Subpart F regulations. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Coalgate, J.

    1993-07-01

    The ground water protection requirements under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 40 CFR 264, Subpart F, apply to surface impoundments, waste plies, land treatment units, and landfills that received hazardous waste after July 26,1982 (i.e., regulated units). There are three phases to the Subpart F ground water protection requirements: detection monitoring, compliance monitoring, and corrective action. Subpart F corrective action applies to remediation of ground water contamination resulting from releases from regulated units at a treatment, storage, or disposal facility (TSDF). The TSDF owner or operator is responsible for complying with these requirements. This Information Brief provides information on the permit requirements under Subpart F. This Information Brief is one of a series on RCRA corrective action. The first step in the permitting process is for the facility to determine the need for ground-water monitoring. The regulations found in 40 CFR 264 Sections 264.90 to 264.100 (Subpart F) apply to all regulated units. A ``regulated unit`` is defined as a surface impoundment, waste pile, landfill, or land treatment unit that received hazardous waste after July 26, 1982. Such units require a permit under RCRA. Subpart F entails a three-phased program designed to detect, evaluate, and, if necessary, respond to ground water contamination. The ground-water protection standard, including identification of maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and alternate concentration limits (ACLs), is established with the permit application. Where MCLs and ACLs cannot be established, the standard may be established at background levels.

  20. NGLW RCRA Storage Study

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

    2000-06-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

  1. Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kristofzski, J.R.; Mann, F.M.; Anderson, F.J.; Lober, R.W.

    2007-07-01

    As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: - Characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; - Determine how the contamination will move in the future; - Estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; - Develop and implement mitigative measures; - Develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper. (authors)

  2. Interim Status Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Low-Level Waste Management Areas 1 to 4, RCRA Facilities, Hanford,Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Dresel, P Evan

    2004-10-25

    This document describes the monitoring plan to meet the requirements for interim status groundwater monitoring at Hanford Site low-level waste burial grounds as specified by 40 CFR 265, incorporated by reference in WAC 173-303-400. The monitoring will take place at four separate low-level waste management areas in the 200-West and 200-East Areas, in the central part of the site. This plan replaces the previous monitoring plan.

  3. HANDBOOK: STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR RCRA CORRECTIVE ACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    On November 1984, Congress enacted the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA requires a corrective action program that prevents hazardous constituents from exceeding concentration limits at the compliance point (i.e...

  4. Criteria for municipal-solid-waste landfills (40 CFR Part 258). Subtitle D of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Location restrictions (Subpart B). Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    In August 1988, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed Solid-Waste Disposal Facilities Criteria (40 CFR Part 258) for municipal-solid-waste landfills. This background document provides the technical support for Subpart 'B' - Location Restrictions of Part 258. The document contains a discussion of the legislative and regulatory background for understanding the current status of Subtitle D. A discussion of other Federal laws, besides the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), that impact the siting of municipal-waste landfills also is presented. The document also presents detailed information on the revised location restrictions. The location restrictions include the following: airport safety; floodplains; wetlands; fault areas; seismic-impact areas; and unstable areas.

  5. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-B-63 Trench on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Mark D. )

    2002-11-14

    This document presents a groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-B-63 trench in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The monitoring will be conducted in accordance with regulatory requirements specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. The objective of the monitoring is to determine whether any hazardous constituents are detectable in the groundwater beneath the trench. This monitoring plan will serve as the basis for demonstrating monitoring compliance at the B-63 trench under the RCRA.

  6. Fall Semiannual Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    D. F. Gianotto N. C. Hutten

    2007-01-12

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  7. Supporting documentation for the RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) incinerator regulations 40 CFR 264, Support O - incinerators and appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    The report contains a summary of information on the hazardous-waste-incineration industry, a discussion and application of the risk analysis process for incinerators, and an evaluation of alternatives for controlling stack emissions from incinerators. It was prepared as part of the regulatory impact analysis program in support of the incinerator regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information on the incineration industry includes: a profile of facilities based on surveys of incinerator manufacturers and owner/operators, procedures for estimating capital and operating costs, data on the composition of hazardous waste streams currently incinerated, a technical and cost evaluation of 38 case study incinerators, and eight full-scale performance evaluations. Risk analysis is discussed as a tool that can be used in the regulatory process to assist those responsible for developing standards and managing risk to human health and the environment. The rationale for EPA's proposal to allow variances to the incinerator standards based on a case-by-case consideration of risk is discussed and a structure for implementing the variance procedure is presented.

  8. EVALUATION OF THE RCRA (RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT) EXTRACTION PROCEDURE - LYSIMETER STUDIES WITH MUNICIPAL/INDUSTRIAL WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was initiated to determine the accuracy with which the Extraction Procedures (EP), employed in the regulations promulgated under Section 3001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (40 CFR 26.124), simulates the leaching an industrial waste would undergo when codis...

  9. RCRA hazardous waste contingency plans

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, T.P. )

    1991-10-01

    This paper reports that the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities (TSDFs) to prepare a contingency plan. The plan is a blueprint for emergency response, and must be designed to minimize health and environmental hazards resulting from fires, explosions or other unplanned hazardous releases. Hazardous waste contingency plans often are neglected and considered an unnecessary regulatory exercise by facility operators. However, an effective contingency plan is a valuable tool for reducing liability, protecting workers and the community, and avoiding costly shutdowns. The requirement under Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) that regulated facilities report to EPA annually on releases to the environment has caused regulators to renew emphasis on the importance of RCRA contingency plans. However, regulatory agencies historically have provided insufficient information on the elements of an adequate contingency plan. Nevertheless, facility operators seriously should consider going beyond minimum regulatory requirements and create a comprehensive contingency plan.

  10. RCRA closure of mixed waste impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, F.J.; Greengard, T.C.; Arndt, M.B.

    1989-11-01

    A case study of a RCRA closure action at the Rocky Flats Plant is presented. Closure of the solar evaporation ponds involves removal and immobilization of a mixed hazardous/radioactive sludge, treatment of impounded water, groundwater monitoring, plume delineation, and collection and treatment of contaminated groundwater. The site closure is described within the context of regulatory negotiations, project schedules, risk assessment, clean versus dirty closure, cleanup levels, and approval of closure plans and reports. Lessons learned at Rocky Flats are summarized.

  11. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) general contingency plan for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skaggs, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be continually reviewed and revised if any of the following occur: the facility permit is revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures herein can be improved, the operations of the facility change in a way that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent`s Office and the Emergency Management Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal units. The 90-day accumulation areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement.

  12. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) contingency plan for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be continually reviewed and revised if any of the following occur: the facility permit is revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures can be improved, the operations of the facility change in a way that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent`s Office and the Emergency Management Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal units. The 90-day accumulation areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement.

  13. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-26

    WMA TX-TY contains underground, single-shell tanks that were used to store liquid waste that contained chemicals and radionuclides. Most of the liquid has been removed, and the remaining waste is regulated under the RCRA as modi¬fied in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington State’s Hazardous Waste Management Act . WMA TX-TY was placed in assessment monitoring in 1993 because of elevated specific conductance. A groundwater quality assessment plan was written in 1993 describing the monitoring activities to be used in deciding whether WMA TX-TY had affected groundwater. That plan was updated in 2001 for continued RCRA groundwater quality assessment as required by 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(7). This document further updates the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY by including (1) information obtained from ten new wells installed at the WMA after 1999 and (2) information from routine quarterly groundwater monitoring during the last five years. Also, this plan describes activities for continuing the groundwater assessment at WMA TX TY.

  14. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2003-02-28

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2002 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. This report is written to meet the requirements in CERCLA, RCRA, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and Washington State Administrative Code.

  15. Impact of Preservation of Subsoil Water Act on Groundwater Depletion: The Case of Punjab, India.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Amarnath; Mishra, Ashok K; Verma, Geetanjali

    2016-07-01

    Indian states like Punjab and Haryana, epicenters of the Green Revolution, are facing severe groundwater shortages and falling water tables. Recognizing it as a serious concern, the Government of Punjab enacted the Punjab Preservation of Subsoil Water Act in 2009 (or the 2009 act) to slow groundwater depletion. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of this policy on groundwater depletion, using panel data from 1985 to 2011. Results from this study find a robust effect of the 2009 act on reducing groundwater depletion. Our models for pre-monsoon, post-monsoon, and overall periods of analysis find that since implementation of the 2009 act, groundwater tables have improved significantly. Second, our study reveals that higher shares of tube wells per total cropped area and increased population density have led to a significant decline in the groundwater tables. On the other hand, rainfall and the share of area irrigated by surface water have had an augmenting effect on groundwater resources. In the two models, pre-monsoon and post-monsoon, this study shows that seasonality plays a key role in determining the groundwater table in Punjab. Specifically, monsoon rainfall has a very prominent impact on groundwater. PMID:27015967

  16. Impact of Preservation of Subsoil Water Act on Groundwater Depletion: The Case of Punjab, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Amarnath; Mishra, Ashok K.; Verma, Geetanjali

    2016-07-01

    Indian states like Punjab and Haryana, epicenters of the Green Revolution, are facing severe groundwater shortages and falling water tables. Recognizing it as a serious concern, the Government of Punjab enacted the Punjab Preservation of Subsoil Water Act in 2009 (or the 2009 act) to slow groundwater depletion. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of this policy on groundwater depletion, using panel data from 1985 to 2011. Results from this study find a robust effect of the 2009 act on reducing groundwater depletion. Our models for pre-monsoon, post-monsoon, and overall periods of analysis find that since implementation of the 2009 act, groundwater tables have improved significantly. Second, our study reveals that higher shares of tube wells per total cropped area and increased population density have led to a significant decline in the groundwater tables. On the other hand, rainfall and the share of area irrigated by surface water have had an augmenting effect on groundwater resources. In the two models, pre-monsoon and post-monsoon, this study shows that seasonality plays a key role in determining the groundwater table in Punjab. Specifically, monsoon rainfall has a very prominent impact on groundwater.

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application for Production Associated Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This is the RCRA required permit application for Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for the following units: Building 9206 Container Storage Unit; Building 9212 Container Storage Unit; Building 9720-12 Container Storage Unit; Cyanide Treatment Unit. All four of these units are associated with the recovery of enriched uranium and other metals from wastes generated during the processing of nuclear materials.

  18. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR) (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) and Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSPs). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the CRSPs with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) record of decision (ROD), (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA monitoring programs during 1996, (3) replace several of the technical procedures included in the PCP with updated versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), and (4) correct inaccurate regulatory citations and references to permit conditions and permit attachments. With these modifications, the Y- 12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. Section 3.0 contains proposed changes to Section II of the PCP. Modifications to site-specific permit conditions are presented in Section 4.0 (CRSDB), Section 5.0 (CRSPs), and Section 6.0 (KHQ). Sections 7.0 and 8.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the permit attachments.

  19. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  20. Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho Cleanup Project

    2006-06-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post-closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report.

  1. Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, Carl W. Jr.; Carr, Jennifer S.; Hildebrand, R. Douglas; Schatz, Aaron L.; Conley, S. F.; Brown, W. L.

    2013-01-22

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwatermonitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons.

  2. Hanford Facility RCRA permit handbook

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this Hanford Facility (HF) RCRA Permit Handbook is to provide, in one document, information to be used for clarification of permit conditions and guidance for implementing the HF RCRA Permit.

  3. Borehole Data Package for Calendar Year 2000 - 2001 RCRA Wells at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Johnson, Vernon G.

    2001-08-15

    Six new resource conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the single-shell tank farm Waste Management Area S-SX in July 2000 through March 2001 in partial fulfillment of Tri-Party Agreement milestones M-24-00L and M-24-00M. This document describes the drilling, construction, sampling and analyses of samples from the wells.

  4. Issuance of final revised guidance on the use and issuance of administrative orders under Section 7003 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-26

    The directive discusses guidance on the use and issuance of Administrative Orders under Section 7003 of RCRA where there is an emiminent and substantial endangerment to public health and the environment. In order to issue a Section 7003 order, the Administrator must possess evidence that the handling, storage, treatment, transportation or disposal of any solid waste or hazardous waste may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to health or the environment (42 U.S.C. Section 6973). Additionally, Section 7003 requires that the Administrator provide notice to the affected State prior to issuance of the order. Each of these requirements is discussed in the directive.

  5. 1999 Annual Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Correction - Action Report (Volumes I, II, and III)

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    2000-06-14

    This Corrective Action Report (CAR) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is being prepared to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Number SC1 890 008 989, dated October 31, 1999. This CAR compiles and presents all groundwater sampling and monitoring activities that are conducted at the MWMF. As set forth in previous agreements with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), all groundwater associated with the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) (comprised of the MWMF, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, and Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground) will be addressed under this RCRA Permit. This CAR is the first to be written for the MWMF and presents monitoring activities and results as an outcome of Interim Status and limited Permitted Status activities. All 1999 groundwater monitoring activities were conducted while the MWMF was operated during Interim Status. Changes to the groundwater monitoring program were made upon receipt of the RCRA Permit, where feasible. During 1999, 152 single-screened and six multi-screened groundwater monitoring wells at the BGC monitored groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer as required by the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR), settlement agreements 87-52-SW and 91-51-SW, and RCRA Permit SC1 890 008 989. However, overall compliance with the recently issued RCRA Permit could not be implemented until the year 2000 due to the effective date of the RCRA Permit and scheduling of groundwater monitoring activities. Changes have been made to the groundwater monitoring network to meet Permit requirements for all 2000 sampling events.

  6. NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration: Policy vs. practice

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R.P. ); Wolff, T.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Overwhelmed with environmental protection documentation requirements, a number of Federal agencies are grappling with the complexities of attempting to integrate'' the documentation requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). While there is some overlap between the general environmental policy objectives of NEPA, and the much more specific waste cleanup objectives of CERCLA and RCRA, there are also major differences and outright conflicts. This paper identifies both problems and opportunities associated with implementing emerging and evolving Federal agency policy regarding integration of the procedural and documentation requirements of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA. The emphasis is on NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration policy and practice at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The paper provides a comparative analysis of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA processes and discusses special integration issues including scoping, development and analysis of alternatives, risk assessment, tiering, scheduling, and the controversy surrounding applicability of NEPA to CERCLA or RCRA cleanup activities. Several NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration strategy options are evaluated and an annotated outline of an integrated NEPA/CERCLA document is included.

  7. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the S-3 Ponds, the Oil Landfarm, and the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (units A, C-West, and Walk-in Pits). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Watershed, (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring program during 1996, and (3) update applicable technical procedures with revised versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). With these modifications, the Y-12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2.0 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. The proposed changes to permit language are provided in Section 3.0 (S-3 Ponds), Section 4.0 (Oil Landfarm), and Section 5.0 (Bear Creek Burial Grounds). Sections 6.0 and 7.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the PCP Attachments.

  8. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring).

  9. Exclusions and exemptions from RCRA hazardous waste regulation. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J.

    1993-05-01

    The provisions in 40 CFR 261 establish which solid waste and are regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Considered hazardous waste and are regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These provisions also exclude or exempt certain wastes from regulation. Wastes are excluded or exempted from coverage for a variety of reasons. The original RCRA legislation excluded a number of wastes that did not present a significant threat to human health or the environment or that were managed under other environmental programs. Other wastes were excluded by EPA to encourage their recycling or reuse as feedstocks in manufacturing processes. Some exclusions or exemptions serve to establish when a waste material becomes subject to regulation or when waste quantities are too minimal to be fully covered by the Federal hazardous waste regulatory program. As new regulations have caused the universe of RCRA generators and facilities to increase, the number of exclusions and exemptions have increased as well. This information Brief provides an overview of the types of waste and hazardous waste management units/facilities that may be excluded or exempted from regulation under the Federal hazardous waste (RCRA) Subtitle C) regulatory program. These wastes and units/facilities may or may not be excluded or exempted from coverage under authorized State RCRA programs.

  10. Groundwater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braids, Olin C.; Gillies, Nola P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of groundwater quality covering publications of 1977. This review includes: (1) sources of groundwater contamination; and (2) management of groundwater. A list of 59 references is also presented. (HM)

  11. RCRA corrective measures using a permeable reactive iron wall US Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Schmithors, W.L.; Vardy, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    A chromic acid release was discovered at a former electroplating shop at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Initial investigative activities indicated that chromic acid had migrated into the subsurface soils and groundwater. In addition, trichloroethylene (TCE) was also discovered in groundwater during subsequent investigations of the hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) plume. Corrective measures were required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The in-situ remediation method, proposed under RCRA Interim Measures to passively treat the groundwater contaminants, uses reactive zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate the chlorinated compounds and to mineralize the hexavalent chromium. A 47 meter by 0.6 meter subsurface permeable iron wall was installed downgradient of the source area to a depth of 7 meters using a direct trenching machine. The iron filings were placed in the ground as the soils were excavated from the subsurface. This is the first time that direct trenching was used to install reactive zero-valent iron filings. Over 250 metric tons of iron filings were used as the reactive material in the barrier wall. Installation of the iron filings took one full day. Extensive negotiations with regulatory agencies were required to use this technology under the current facility Hazardous Waste Management Permit. All waste soils generated during the excavation activities were contained and treated on site. Once contaminant concentrations were reduced the waste soils were used as fill material.

  12. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring: Setting, sources and methods

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Hartman

    2000-04-11

    Groundwater monitoring is conducted on the Hanford Site to meet the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) orders; and the Washington Administrative Code. Results of monitoring are published annually (e.g., PNNL-11989). To reduce the redundancy of these annual reports, background information that does not change significantly from year to year has been extracted from the annual report and published in this companion volume. This report includes a description of groundwater monitoring requirements, site hydrogeology, and waste sites that have affected groundwater quality or that require groundwater monitoring. Monitoring networks and methods for sampling, analysis, and interpretation are summarized. Vadose zone monitoring methods and statistical methods also are described. Whenever necessary, updates to information contained in this document will be published in future groundwater annual reports.

  13. Costs of RCRA corrective action: Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.; Russell, M.; Hwang Ho-Ling; Goeltz, R. ); Warren, J. )

    1991-09-01

    This report estimates the cost of the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for all non-federal facilities in the United States. RCRA is the federal law which regulates the treatment, storage, disposal, and recovery of hazardous waste. The 1984 amendment to RCRA, known as the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments, stipulates that facilities that treat, store or dispose of hazardous wastes (TSDs) must remediate situations where hazardous wastes have escaped into the environment from their solid waste management units (SWMUs). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA 1990a), among others, believes that the costs of RCRA corrective action could rival the costs of SUPERFUND. Evaluated herein are costs associated with actual remedial actions. The remedial action cost estimating program developed by CH2M Hill is known as the Cost of Remedial Action Model (CORA). It provides cost estimates, in 1987 dollars, by technology used to remediate hazardous waste sites. Rules were developed to categorize each SWMU in the RTI databases by the kinds of technologies that would be used to remediate them. Results were then run through CORA using various assumptions for variable values that could not be drawn from the RTI databases and that did not have CORA supplied default values. Cost estimates were developed under several scenarios. The base case assumes a TSD and SWMU universe equal to that captured in the RTI databases, a point of compliance at the SWMU boundary with no ability to shift wastes from SWMU to SWMU, and a best-as-practical clean-up to health-based standards. 11 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Borehole Data Package for RCRA Well 299-W22-47 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2006-04-17

    One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) S-SX in fiscal year (FY) 2005 to fulfill commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for the new well, well 299-W22-47, was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/ Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, spectral gamma ray logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, aquifer testing, and sample collection/analysis activities. Appendix A contains the Well Summary Sheets, the Well Construction Summary Report, the geologist's Borehole Log, well development and pump installation records, and well survey results. Appendix B contains analytical results from groundwater samples collected during drilling. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma ray logs and borehole deviation surveys.

  15. Quantity of RCRA Hazardous Waste Generated and Managed

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the tonnage of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste generated and managed in the United States every two years between 2001 and 2009. It also describes the tonnage of hazardous waste disposed to land by disposal practice. This ...

  16. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-A-29 Ditch

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.D.

    1999-10-07

    This document presents a groundwater monitoring plan, under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulatory requirements found in WAC 173-303-400, and by reference, requirements in 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(6) for the 216-A-29 Ditch (A-29 Ditch) in the Hanford Site's 200 East Area. The objectives of this monitoring plan are to determine whether any hazardous constituents are detectable in the groundwater beneath the ditch. The groundwater monitoring network described in this plan includes 10 RCRA-compliant wells to monitor the aquifer in the immediate vicinity of the A-29 Ditch. Groundwater assessment activities have been conducted at the A-29 Ditch, the result of elevated specific conductivity and total organic halogens (TOX). A groundwater assessment report (Votava 1995) found that no hazardous constituents had impacted groundwater and the site returned to interim-status indicator-parameter/detection monitoring. This plan describes the process and quality objectives for conducting the indicator-parameter program. The site will be sampled semiannually for indicator parameters including pH, specific conductance, TOX, and total organic carbon. Site-specific parameters include tritium and ICP metals. These constituents, as well as anions, alkalinity, and turbidity will be sampled annually. Groundwater elevations will be recorded semiannually.

  17. Groundwater monitoring plan for the 300 Area process trenches

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, J.W.; Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1995-05-23

    This document describes the groundwater monitoring program for the Hanford Site 300 Area Process Trenches (300 APT). The 300 APT are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulated unit. The 300 APT are included in the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit No. WA890008967, and are subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring. This document describes a compliance monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the 300 APT. This plan describes the 300 APT monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the 300 APT. This plan will be used to meet groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the 300 APT becomes part of the Permit and through the postclosure care period until certification of final closure.

  18. Effectiveness evaluation of three RCRA caps at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Shevenell, L.A.; Goldstrand, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Because installation of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)- engineered caps is costly, it is prudent to evaluate the effectiveness of this procedure for hydrologically isolating contaminants. The objective for installation of five-part engineered caps at the Y-12 Plant was to (1) satisfy the regulatory compliance issues, (2) minimize the risk of direct contact with the wastes, and (3) reduce rainfall infiltration. Although the original objectives of installing the caps were not to alter groundwater flow, a potential effect of reducing infiltration is to minimize leaching, thus retarding groundwater contaminant migration from the site. Hence, cap effectiveness with respect to reduced groundwater contaminant migration is evaluated using groundwater data in this report. Based on the available data at the Y-12 capped areas, evaluation of cap effectiveness includes studying water level and chemical variability in nearby monitoring wells. Three caps installed during 1989 are selected for evaluation in this report. These caps are located in three significantly different hydrogeologic settings: overlying a karst aquifer (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits [CRSP]), overlying shales located on a hill slope (Oil Landfarm Waste Management Area [OLWMA]), and overlying shales in a valley floor which is a site of convergent groundwater flow (New Hope Pond [NHP]). Presumably, the caps have been effective in minimizing risk of direct contact with the wastes and halting direct rainfall infiltration into the sites over the extent of the capped areas, but no evidence is presented in this report to directly demonstrate this. The caps installed over the three sites appear to have had a minimal effect on groundwater contaminant migration from the respective sites. Following cap construction, no changes in the configuration of the water table were observed. Migration of contaminant plumes occurred at all three sites, apparently without regard to the timing of cap installation.

  19. Assessing the impact of hazardous constituents on the mobilization, transport, and fate of radionuclides in RCRA waste disposal units.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Orlandini, K. A.; Cheng, J. -J.; Biwer, B. M.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses the impact that hazardous organic chemical constituents could have on the mobilization, transport, and fate of radionuclides in disposal units regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The effect on a radionuclide's distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) is used as an indicator. Many factors can affect K{sub d}, including the chemical form of the radionuclide, pH of the leachate, nature of the organic constituents, porosity of the soil, amount of water in the landfill, infiltration rate of the water, presence of a chelating agent or other chemical species, and age of the landfill. A total of 19 radionuclides were studied. Of these, nine (H-3, C-14, Se-79, Sr-90, Tc-99, I-129, U-238, Np-237, and Am-241) were found to have the potential to reach groundwater and cause contamination; the remaining 10 (Co-60, Ni-63, Sb-125,Cs-137, Sm-151, Eu-152, Eu-154, Th-230, Th-232, and Pu-239) were considered less likely to cause groundwater contamination. It was also found that when organic material is in solution, it tends to lower a radionuclide's K{sub d} (and enhance transport), whereas when it is in a solid phase, it tends to increase the K{sub d}. The study introduces a simple model to estimate effective K{sub d} values on the basis of total organic carbon concentrations in landfill leachate. However, given the fact that the effective K{sub d} values of radionuclides in RCRA disposal units can either increase or decrease as the result of many factors, including the form of the organic matter (solid or in solution), the study concludes that whenever they are available, actual (measured) K{sub d} values rather than modeled values should be used to conduct dose and risk assessments of radionuclides in RCRA disposal units.

  20. Calendar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The East Fork Regime encompasses several confirmed and suspected sources of groundwater contamination within industrialized areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Groundwater and surface water monitoring in the East Fork Regime are performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Included are the groundwater monitoring data obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the East Fork Regime issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on August 30, 1996. The post-closure permit addresses post-closure monitoring requirements for two closed RCRA-regulated surface impoundments: the S-3 Ponds and New Hope Pond.

  1. Liquid effluent retention facility final-status groundwater monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.D.; Chou, C.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.

    1997-09-01

    The following sections describe the groundwater-monitoring program for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF). The LERF is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The LERF is included in the {open_quotes}Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit WA890008967{close_quotes}, (referred to herein as the Permit) (Ecology 1994) and is subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring (WAC 173-303-645). This document describes a RCRA/WAC groundwater detection-monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the LERF. This plan describes the LERF monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the LERF. This plan will be used to meet the groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the LERF becomes part of the Permit and through the post-closure care period, until certification of final closure.

  2. Borehole Data Package for Two RCRA Wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area T, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2006-04-17

    One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring and assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) T in calendar year 2005 in partial fulfillment of commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for increased monitoring capability at this WMA was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. The initial borehole, 299-W11-25B, was located about 20 ft from existing downgradient well 299 W11-39. The specific objective for the borehole was to determine the vertical distribution of contaminants in the unconfined aquifer at the northeast corner of WMA T. The permanent casing in borehole 299-W11-25B was damaged beyond repair during well construction and replacement borehole, 299-W11-46, was drilled about 10 ft from borehole 299-W11-25B (Figure 1). Borehole 299-W11-46 was completed as a RCRA monitoring well. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, geophysical logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, groundwater sampling and analysis activities, and preliminary results of slug tests associated with wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46. Appendix A contains geologists logs, Well Construction Summary Reports, Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams), and Well Development and Testing Data sheets. Appendix B contains the results of chemical analysis of groundwater samples. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma-ray logs and borehole deviation surveys and Appendix D contains initial results of slug tests. The non-conformance report for borehole 299-W11-46 is provided in Appendix E.

  3. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5, Technical Memorandums 06-09A, 06-10A, and 06-12A: Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring).

  4. Final report on the waste area grouping perimeter groundwater quality monitoring well installation program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    A groundwater quality monitoring well installation program was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the requirements of environmental regulations, including the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). A total of 173 wells were installed and developed at 11 different waste area groupings (WAGs) between June 1986 and November 1990. A location map of the wells is included.

  5. AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

    2009-01-16

    Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the

  6. Results of Phase I groundwater quality assessment for single-shell tank waste management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.G.; Chou, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Phase I, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment for the Richland Field Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-RL), in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area (WMA) S-SX has impacted groundwater quality. The WMA is located in the southern portion of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and consists of the 241-S and 241-SX tank farms and ancillary waste systems. The unit is regulated under RCRA interim-status regulations (40 CFR 265, Subpart F) and was placed in assessment groundwater monitoring (40 CFR 265.93 [d]) in August 1996 because of elevated specific conductance and technetium-99, a non-RCRA co-contaminant, in downgradient monitoring wells. Major findings of the assessment are summarized below: (1) Distribution patterns for radionuclides and RCRA/dangerous waste constituents indicate WMA S-SX has contributed to groundwater contamination observed in downgradient monitoring wells. (2) Drinking water standards for nitrate and technetium-99 are currently exceeded in one RCRA-compliant well (299-W22-46) located at the southeastern comer of the SX tank farm. (3) Technetium-99, nitrate, and chromium concentrations in downgradient well 299-W22-46 (the well with the highest current concentrations) appear to be declining after reaching maximum concentrations in May 1997. (4) Cesium-137 and strontium-90, major constituents of concern in single-shell tank waste, were not detected in any of the RCRA-compliant wells in the WMA network, including the well with the highest current technetium-99 concentrations (299-W22-46). (5) Low but detectable strontium-90 and cesium-137 were found in one old well (2-W23-7), located inside and between the S and SX tank farms.

  7. Addendum to the RCRA Assessment Report for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-10-07

    The initial Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment report for Waste Management Area S-SX (PNNL-11810) was issued in January 1998. The report stated a plan for conducting continued assessment would be developed after addressing Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) comments on initial findings in PNNL-11810. Comments from Ecology were received by US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) on September 24, 1998. Shortly thereafter, Ecology and DOE began dispute resolution and related negotiations about tank farm vadose issues. This led to proposed new Tri-Party Agreement milestones covering a RCRA Facility Investigation-Corrective Measures Study (RFI/CMS) of the four single-shell tank farm waste management areas that were in assessment status (Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY, S-SX, T and TX-TY). The RCRA Facility Investigation includes both subsurface (vadose zone and groundwater) and surface (waste handling facilities and grounds) characterization. Many of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 are more appropriate for, and in many cases are superseded by, the RFI/CMS at Waste Management Area S-SX. The proposed Tri-Party Agreement milestone changes that specify the scope and schedule for the RFI/CMS work plans (Tri-Party Agreement change number M-45-98-0) were issued for public comment in February 1999. The Tri-Party Agreement narrative indicates the ongoing groundwater assessments will be integrated with the RFI/CMS work plans. This addendum documents the disposition of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 and identifies which comments were more appropriate for the RFI/CMS work plan.

  8. Groundwater Monitoring Report Generation Tools - 12005

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Natalie

    2012-07-01

    Compliance with National and State environmental regulations (e.g. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) aka SuperFund) requires Savannah River Site (SRS) to extensively collect and report groundwater monitoring data, with potential fines for missed reporting deadlines. Several utilities have been developed at SRS to facilitate production of the regulatory reports which include maps, data tables, charts and statistics. Components of each report are generated in accordance with complex sets of regulatory requirements specific to each site monitored. SRS developed a relational database to incorporate the detailed reporting rules with the groundwater data, and created a set of automation tools to interface with the information and generate the report components. These process improvements enhanced quality and consistency by centralizing the information, and have reduced manpower and production time through automated efficiencies. (author)

  9. GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT GENERATION TOOLS - 12005

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.

    2011-11-21

    Compliance with National and State environmental regulations (e.g. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) aka SuperFund) requires Savannah River Site (SRS) to extensively collect and report groundwater monitoring data, with potential fines for missed reporting deadlines. Several utilities have been developed at SRS to facilitate production of the regulatory reports which include maps, data tables, charts and statistics. Components of each report are generated in accordance with complex sets of regulatory requirements specific to each site monitored. SRS developed a relational database to incorporate the detailed reporting rules with the groundwater data, and created a set of automation tools to interface with the information and generate the report components. These process improvements enhanced quality and consistency by centralizing the information, and have reduced manpower and production time through automated efficiencies.

  10. Procedures for ground-water investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This manual was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to document the procedures used to carry out and control the technical aspects of ground-water investigations at the PNL. Ground-water investigations are carried out to fulfill the requirements for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to meet the requirements of DOE Orders. Investigations are also performed for various clients to meet the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). National standards including procedures published by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the US Geological Survey were utilized in developing the procedures contained in this manual.

  11. 75 FR 1408 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the Lincoln County Land Act Groundwater...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ...The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announces the availability of the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Lincoln County Land Act Groundwater Development and Utility Right-of-Way (ROW) Project (the project). The BLM Ely District Manager signed the ROD on January 8, 2010, which constitutes the final decision of the BLM and makes the decision effective...

  12. Petroleum USTs: RCRA Subtitle 1, Underground Storage Tanks. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, R.

    1994-01-01

    Underground tanks that contain petroleum or hazardous substances may be subject to the Federal Underground Storage Tank (UST) regulations. These regulations, issued by EPA under authority of Subtitle I of the Resource Conservation and Recovery (RCRA) [Section 9003 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 (HSWA)], establish standards for installation, operation, release detection, corrective action, repair, and closure. The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 9007 of RCRA to implement these regulations at DOE facilities with USTs. DOE prepared a guidance document, Regulated Underground Storage Tanks (DOE/EH-231/0041/0191, June 1992), that describes the UST procedural requirements which regulate tanks and piping for both petroleum and hazardous substance USTs as well as USTs containing radioactive material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 USC 2011). This information Brief supplements the UST guidance by responding to critical questions concerning how the regulations apply to petroleum USTs. It is part of a series of information Briefs which address issues pertinent to specific categories of USTs.

  13. Hazardous substance USTs: RCRA Subtitle 1, Underground Storage Tanks. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    DiCerbo, J.

    1993-05-01

    Underground tanks that contain petroleum or hazardous substances may be subject to the Federal Underground Storage Tank (UST) regulations. These regulations, issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under authority of Subtitle I of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) [Section 9003 of the Hazardous an Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA)], established standards for installation, operation, release detection corrective action, repair, and closure. The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 9007 of RCRA t Implement these regulations at DOE facilities with USTs. DOE prepared a guidance document, Regulated Underground Storage Tanks (DOE/EH-231/004/0191, June 1992) that describes the UST procedural requirements which regulate tanks and piping for both petroleum and hazardous substance USTs as well as USTs containing radioactive material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 195 (42 U.S.C. 2011). This Information Brief supplements the UST guidance by responding to critical questions concerning how the regulations apply to hazardous substance USTs. It is a part of a series of Information Briefs which address issues pertinent to specific categories of USTs.

  14. Excluded USTs: RCRA Subtitle 1, Underground Storage Tanks. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    DiCerbo, J.

    1993-05-01

    Underground tanks that contain either petroleum or hazardous substances are subject to the Federal Underground Storage (UST) regulations. These regulations, issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under authority of Subtitle I of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of (RCRA) [Section 9003 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA)], establish standards for installation, operation, release detection, corrective action, repair, and closure. The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 9007 of RCRA to implement these regulations at DOE facilities with USTs. Certain USTs have been excluded from the Federal UST regulations. These excluded USTs have been determined by either Congress or EPA to pose an insignificant risk to human health and the environment. By excluding these USTs from regulation, EPA is focusing resources on the USTs that pose substantially greater risk to human health and the environment. DOE prepared a guidance document, Regulated Underground Storage Tanks (DOE/EH-231/004/0191, June 1992), that describes the US procedural requirements which regulate tanks and piping for both petroleum and hazardous substances USTs as well as USTs containing radioactive material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2011). This information Brief supplements the UST guidance by responding to critical questions concerning how the regulations apply to excluded USTs. It is part of a series of information Briefs which address issues pertinent to specific categories of USTs.

  15. Environmental implementation plan: Chapter 7, Groundwater protection

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, D.

    1994-08-10

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) uses large quantities of groundwater for drinking, processing, and non-contact cooling. Continued industrial and residential growth along with additional agricultural irrigation in areas adjacent to SRS will increase the demand for groundwater. This increasing demand will require a comprehensive management system to ensure the needed quality and quantity of groundwater is available for all users. The Groundwater Protection Program and the Waste Management Program establish the overall framework for protecting this resource. Ground water under SRS is monitored extensively for radiological, hazardous, and water quality constituents. Groundwater quality is known to have been affected at 33 onsite locations, but none of the contaminant plumes have migrated offsite. Onsite and offsite drinking water supplies are monitored to ensure they are not impacted. The site has more than 1800 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are analyzed for radiological and non-radiological constituents. SRS is complying with all applicable regulations related to groundwater protection, waste treatment, and waste disposal. The existing waste storage facilities are permitted or are being permitted. Existing hazardous- and mixed-waste storage facilities are being included in the site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit. Part B permitting has been initiated for many of the planned hazardous- and mixed-waste treatment and disposal facilities.

  16. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

  17. Calendar year 1993 groundwater quality report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1993 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This annual groundwater report contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1993 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste-management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These sites are located south of the Y-12 Plant in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The annual groundwater report for the Chestnut Ridge Regime is completed in two-parts; Part 1 (this report) containing the groundwater quality data and Part 2 containing a detailed evaluation of the data. The primary purpose of this report is to serve as a reference for the groundwater quality data obtained each year under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. However, because it contains information needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring and reporting requirements, this report is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline.

  18. Groundwater quality sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of energy and managed by martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

  19. Groundwater Quality Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

  20. Fall 2010 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility and the CPP 601/627/640 Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Ann

    2010-11-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report, as agreed between the Idaho Cleanup Project and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. The Permit Condition III.H. portion of this report includes a description and the results of field methods associated with groundwater monitoring of the Waste Calcining Facility. Analytical results from groundwater sampling, results of inspections and maintenance of monitoring wells in the Waste Calcining Facility groundwater monitoring network, and results of inspections of the concrete cap are summarized. The Permit Condition I.U. portion of this report includes noncompliances not otherwise required to be reported under Permit Condition I.R. (advance notice of planned changes to facility activity which may result in a noncompliance) or Permit Condition I.T. (reporting of noncompliances which may endanger human health or the environment). This report also provides groundwater sampling results for wells that were installed and monitored as part of the Phase 1 post-closure period of the landfill closure components in accordance with HWMA/RCRA Landfill Closure Plan for the CPP-601 Deep

  1. Calendar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge west of Scarboro Road and east of an unnamed drainage feature southwest of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (unless otherwise noted, directions are in reference to the Y-12 Plant administrative grid). The Chestnut Ridge Regime contains several sites used for management of hazardous and nonhazardous wastes associated with plant operations. Groundwater and surface water quality monitoring associated with these waste management sites is performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Included in this annual monitoring report are the groundwater monitoring data obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit for the Chestnut Ridge Regime (post-closure permit) issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in June 1996. Besides the signed certification statement and the RCRA facility information summarized below, condition II.C.6 of the post-closure permit requires annual reporting of groundwater monitoring activities, inclusive of the analytical data and results of applicable data evaluations, performed at three RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) units: the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (Sediment Disposal Basin), the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (Security Pits), and Kerr Hollow Quarry.

  2. Calendar year 1993 groundwater quality report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1993 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1993 calendar year (CY) at several waste management facilities and petroleum fuel underground storage tank (UST) sites associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These sites are within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface-water quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The annual groundwater report for the East Fork Regime is completed in two-parts; Part 1 (this report) containing the groundwater quality data and Part 2 containing a detailed evaluation of the data. The primary purpose of this report is to serve as a reference for the groundwater data obtained each year under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. However, because it contains information needed to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring reporting requirements, this report is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline.

  3. Calendar year 1993 groundwater quality report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1993 Groundwater quality data interpretations and proposed program modifications

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains an evaluation of the groundwater quality data obtained during the 1993 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste management facilities associated with the US DOE Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The groundwater quality data are presented in Part 1 of the GWQR submitted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in February 1994. Groundwater quality data evaluated in this report were obtained at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste management sites located within the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of the Y-12 Plant and is one of three hydrogeologic regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The annual GWQR for the Chestnut Ridge Regime is completed in two parts. Part 1 consists primarily of data appendices and serves as a reference for the groundwater quality data obtained each CY under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. Because it contains information needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring and reporting requirements, the Part 1 GWQR is submitted to the TDEC by the RCRA reporting deadline (March 1 of the following CY). Part 2 (this report) contains an evaluation of the data with respect to regime-wide groundwater quality, presents the findings and status of ongoing hydrogeologic studies, describes changes in monitoring priorities, and presents planned modifications to the groundwater sampling and analysis activities.

  4. Calendar year 1994 groundwater quality report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1994 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This annual groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1994 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste-management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). These sites are located south of the Y-12 Plant in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y- 12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The GWQR for the Chestnut Ridge Regime is completed in two-parts: Part 1 (this report) containing the groundwater quality data and Part 2 containing a detailed evaluation of the data. The primary purpose of this report is to serve as a reference containing the groundwater quality data obtained each year under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. However, because it contains information needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring and reporting requirements, this report is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline (March 1 of the following CY). Part 2 of the annual groundwater report, to be issued mid-year, will contain a regime-wide evaluation of groundwater quality, present the findings and status of ongoing hydrogeologic studies, describe changes in monitoring priorities, and present planned modifications to the groundwater sampling and analysis activities.

  5. Management of groundwater corrective actions at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Amidon, M.B.; Ebra, M.A.; Horvath, J.G.; Lewis, C.M.; Bergren, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Savannah River Site, SRS, has experienced groundwater contamination as a result of past operating practices. Clean-up of these groundwaters has the potential to become a very large effort requiring a significant commitment of resources. However, the contaminated groundwaters identified do not present an imminent risk to the offsite population or to onsite workers. In order to ensure a risk-based, cost-effective approach to these actions, a program plan has been developed for the management of contaminated groundwaters at the SRS. This paper will describe the strategy for contaminated groundwater management resulting from the SRS groundwater program plan. Initial corrective actions at SRS have been driven by regulatory requirements under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, RCRA. A major groundwater corrective action has been conducted at one waste site at the SRS since 1985. Other potentially major corrective actions at the SRS have been identified. The contaminants of concern include organic solvents, radionuclides, and heavy metals, and their removal presents significant technical challenges. The strategy proposes to: evaluate the regulatory requirements, the long-term risks of the various contaminated groundwater units, the technical requirements associated with clean-up, and the availability of resources; and prioritize future corrective actions while meeting existing commitments to action.

  6. Management of groundwater corrective actions at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Amidon, M.B.; Ebra, M.A.; Horvath, J.G.; Lewis, C.M.; Bergren, C.L.

    1992-06-01

    The Savannah River Site, SRS, has experienced groundwater contamination as a result of past operating practices. Clean-up of these groundwaters has the potential to become a very large effort requiring a significant commitment of resources. However, the contaminated groundwaters identified do not present an imminent risk to the offsite population or to onsite workers. In order to ensure a risk-based, cost-effective approach to these actions, a program plan has been developed for the management of contaminated groundwaters at the SRS. This paper will describe the strategy for contaminated groundwater management resulting from the SRS groundwater program plan. Initial corrective actions at SRS have been driven by regulatory requirements under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, RCRA. A major groundwater corrective action has been conducted at one waste site at the SRS since 1985. Other potentially major corrective actions at the SRS have been identified. The contaminants of concern include organic solvents, radionuclides, and heavy metals, and their removal presents significant technical challenges. The strategy proposes to: evaluate the regulatory requirements, the long-term risks of the various contaminated groundwater units, the technical requirements associated with clean-up, and the availability of resources; and prioritize future corrective actions while meeting existing commitments to action.

  7. Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-02-01

    This report contains the groundwater monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation Wd Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the PCP defines the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring requirements for the portion of the groundwater contaminant plume that has migrated into the East Fork Regime ftom the S-3 Ponds, a closed RCW-regulated former surface impoundment located in Bear Creek Valley near the west end of the Y-12 Plant. In addition to the RCIL4 post-closure corrective action monitoring results, this report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 1997 to fulfill requirements of DOE Order 5400.1.

  8. RCRA toxicity characterization of discarded electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Musson, Stephen E; Vann, Kevin N; Jang, Yong-Chul; Mutha, Sarvesh; Jordan, Aaron; Pearson, Brian; Townsend, Timothy G

    2006-04-15

    The potential for discarded electronic devices to be classified as toxicity characteristic (TC) hazardous waste under provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was examined. The regulatory TCLP method and two modified TCLP methods (in which devices were disassembled and leached in or near entirety) were utilized. Lead was the only element found to leach at concentrations greater than its TC limit (5 mg/L). Thirteen different types of electronic devices were tested using either the standard TCLP or modified versions. Every device type leached lead above 5 mg/L in at least one test and most devices leached lead above the TC limit in a majority of cases. Smaller devices that contained larger amounts of plastic and smaller amounts of ferrous metal (e.g., cellular phones, remote controls) tended to leach lead above the TC limit at a greater frequency than devices with more ferrous metal (e.g., computer CPUs, printers). PMID:16683614

  9. SEMINAR PROCEEDINGS: RCRA CORRECTIVE ACTION STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The seminar publication provides an overview of many technologies that can be used in applying the stabilization concept to RCRA cleanup activities. Technologies discussed include covers, grouting, slurry walls, hydrofracture, horizontal well drilling, a vacuum extraction, and b...

  10. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site, Washington, Interim Change Notice 3

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ronald M.

    2006-01-20

    This ICN updates the assessment plan to reflect the current wells in the monitoring system and the current constituent list for WMA S-SX in compliance with RCRA assessment monitoring. This ICN supplements all previous ICNs. This document was prepared under the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014).

  11. Calendar year 1993 groundwater quality report for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1993 groundwater and surface water quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report contains groundwater and surface-water quality data obtained during the 1993 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste-management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These sites are located southwest of the Y-12 Plant complex within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface-water quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Organization manages the monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The annual groundwater and surface water report for the Bear Creek Regime is completed in two-parts; Part 1 (this report) containing the groundwater and surface-water quality data and Part 2 containing a detailed evaluation of the data. The primary purpose of this report is to serve as a reference for the groundwater and surface-water quality data obtained each year under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. However, because it contains information needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring reporting requirements, this report is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline.

  12. 3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, C.M. Sr.

    2001-04-17

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

  13. SEMINAR PUBLICATION: DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF RCRA/CERCLA FINAL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover systems are an essential part of all land disposal facilities. Covers control moisture infiltration from the surface into closed facilities and limit the formation of leachate and its migration to ground water. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subparts G, K...

  14. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report - Designing a Groundwater Monitoring Network for the 200-BP-5 and 200-PO-1 Operable Units

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Edward C.; Lindberg, Jon W.

    2002-09-30

    This document presents the results of a series of interviews held with technical, management, and regulatory staff to determine the groundwater data quality objectives (DQOs) for monitoring activities associated with the 200-BP-5 and 200-PO-1 operable units located in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This assessment is needed to address changing contaminant plume conditions (e.g., plume migration) and to ensure that monitoring activities meet the requirements for performance monitoring as prescribed by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) past practice, and Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA) regulatory requirements and orders.

  15. RCRA and operational monitoring 1994 fiscal year work plan, WBS 1.5.3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the direct funded Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.5.3. The ROM Program Office is a Branch of liquid Waste Disposal, a part of Restoration and Remediation of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) takes it direction from the Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP). The FYWP provides the near term, enhanced details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Changs Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by the FYWP.

  16. Metals reclaimer urges agency to put RCRA on track

    SciTech Connect

    Borner, A.J. ); Perry, B.

    1991-11-01

    Twenty-five years ago, the nation yawned, tentatively scratched, then hiccuped its first official awareness of an environmental tumor with the passage of the 1965 Solid Waste Disposal Act. This was the first federal law requiring environmentally sound disposal of household, municipal, commercial and industrial refuse. Earth Day '70 rallies goaded a still sleepy congress into amending the law with the 1970 Resource Recovery Act-a legislative misnomer that would be compounded in 1976 by passage of RCRA. In 1980, RCRA again was amended, and the ruse of a nation struggling toward conservation and recovery continued. EPA's and the Department of Justice's (DOJ) indecision over whether Marine Shale Processors Inc. (St. Rose, La.) is an exempt recycler or a TSDF requiring the permits and scrutiny that status implies is evidence of this ruse. This article explores the risks, frustrations and opportunities encountered by a company that boldly has opted to enter the hazardous waste recycling market despite regulatory uncertainties, competitive disadvantages and difficulties breaking potential clients' disposal habits that include deep-well injection and landfilling valuable resources.

  17. Excluded USTs. RCRA Subtitle 1, Underground Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    Underground tanks that contain either petroleum or hazardous substances are subject to the Federal Underground Storage Tank (UST) regulations. These regulations, issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under authority of Subtitle I of the Resource Conservations and Recovery Act (RCRA) [Section 9003 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA)], establish standards for installation, operation, release detection, corrective action, repair, and closure. The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 9007 of RCRA to implement these regulations at DOE facilities with USTs. Certain USTs have been excluded from the Federal UST regulations. These excluded USTs have been determined by either Congress or EPA to pose an insignificant risk to human health and the environment. By excluding these USTs from regulation, EPA is focusing resources on the USTs that pose substantially greater risk to human health and the environment. DOE prepared a guidance document, Regulated Underground Storage Tanks (DOE/EH-231/004/0191, June 1992), that describes the UST procedural requirements which regulate tanks and piping for both petroleum and hazardous substance USTs as well as USTs containing radioactive material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2011). This Information Brief supplements the UST guidance by responding to critical questions concerning how the regulations apply to excluded USTs. It is part of a series of information Briefs which address issues pertinent to specific categories of USTs.

  18. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (904-113G)

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment (RFI/RI/BRA) for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (FDTF) (904-113G).

  19. Groundwater quality assessment report for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6, located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facility, is a shallow land burial site for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and other waste types. Wastes were disposed of in unlined trenches and auger holes from 1969 until May 1986, when it was determined that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated wastes were being disposed of there. DOE closed SWSA 6 until changes in operating procedures prevented the disposal of RCRA wastes at SWSA 6. The site, which reopened for waste disposal activities in July 1986, is the only currently operated disposal area for low-level radioactive waste at ORNL. This report provides the results of the 1998 RCRA groundwater assessment monitoring. The monitoring was performed in accordance with the proposed routine monitoring plan recommended in the 1996 EMP. Section 2 provides pertinent background on SWSA 6. Section 3 presents the 1998 monitoring results and discusses the results in terms of any significant changes from previous monitoring efforts. Section 4 provides recommendations for changes in monitoring based on the 1998 results. References are provided in Section 5. Appendix A provides the 1998 RCRA Sampling Data and Appendix B provides a summary of 1998 Quality Assurance results.

  20. Reaching site closure for groundwater under multiple regulatory agencies

    SciTech Connect

    Glucksberg, N.; Couture, B.

    2007-07-01

    , however CTDEP has approved the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) as the clean up standards for individual constituents. After remediation of an identified contamination source, the RSRs require that at least one groundwater monitoring well, hydraulically down-gradient of the remediation area, be sampled to confirm that the remediation has not impacted groundwater quality. After four quarters of groundwater monitoring with results below the MCLs, additional groundwater sampling must continue for up to three years to reach site closure in accordance with the RSRs. The cleanup criteria for chemical constituents, including boron, are regulated by the USEPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the CTDEP Bureau of Water Protection and Land Reuse. The USEPA, however, has accepted the CTDEP RSRs as the cleanup criteria for RCRA. Therefore attainment of the CTDEP RSRs is the only set of criteria needed to reach closure, but both agencies retain oversight, interpretation, and closure authority. As stated above, under the RSRs, groundwater must be monitored following a source remediation for a minimum of four quarters. After demonstrating that the remediation was successful, then additional groundwater sampling is required for up to three additional years. However, the number of monitoring wells and frequency of sampling are not defined in the RSRs and must be negotiated with CTDEP. To successfully reach closure, the conceptual site model, groundwater transport mechanisms, and potential receptors must be defined. Once the hydrogeology is understood, a long term groundwater monitoring program can then be coordinated to meet each agencies requirement to both terminate the NRC license and reach site closure under RCRA. (authors)

  1. Annual report of 1990 groundwater, monitoring data for treatment, storage, or disposal facilities at the Y-12 plant

    SciTech Connect

    Early, T.O.; Switek, J. )

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a summary and interpretation of hydrostatic head measurements obtained from wells surrounding the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin sites at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Water level observations are presented using hydrographs and water table elevation maps based on data obtained during calendar year 1990. Generalized, preliminary interpretation of results are presented. The two sites covered by the this report have interim status under the provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A subset of the wells at each are used for groundwater monitoring purposes under the requirements of RCRA. A discussion of the upgradient and downgradient directions for each of the sites is included. 18 refs., 14 figs.

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-07-01

    The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR §264.90 through §264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

  3. Calendar year 1994 groundwater quality report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains an evaluation of the groundwater quality data obtained during the 1994 calendar year (CY) at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste management facilities associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). These sites lie within the boundaries of the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime), which is one of three hydrogeologic regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant (Figure 2). The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The purpose of the GWPP is to characterize the hydrogeology and to monitor groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant and surrounding area to protect local groundwater resources in accordance with federal, state, and local regulations, DOE Orders, and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) corporate policy. The annual GWQR for the Chestnut Ridge Regime is completed in two parts. Part 1 consists primarily of data appendices and serves as a reference for the groundwater quality data obtained each CY under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. Because it contains information needed to comply with reporting requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring, the Part 1 GWQR is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline (March 1 of the following CY); Energy Systems submitted the 1994 Part 1 GWQR for the Chestnut Ridge Regime to the TDEC in February 1995 (HSW Environmental Consultants, Inc. 1995a).

  4. Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-02-01

    This report contains the groundwater monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). In July 1997, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved modifications to several of the permit conditions that address RCRA pow-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (Security Pits), and RCIU4 post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (Sediment Disposal Basin) and Kerr Hollow Quarry. This report has been prepared in accordance with these modified permit requirements. Also included in this report are the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 1997 for the purposes ofi (1) detection monitoring at nonhazardous solid waste disposal facilities (SWDFS) in accordance with operating permits and applicable regulations, (2) monitoring in accordance with Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Recove~ Act Records of Decision (now pefiormed under the Integrated Water Quality Program for the Oak Ridge Reservation), and (3) monitoring needed to comply with U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.1.

  5. RCRA Part A permit characterization plan for the U-2bu subsidence crater. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This plan presents the characterization strategy for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 109, U-2bu Subsidence Crater (referred to as U-2bu) in Area 2 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The objective of the planned activities is to obtain sufficient characterization data for the crater soils and observed wastes under the conditions of the current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A permit. The scope of the characterization plan includes collecting surface and subsurface soil samples with hand augers and for the purpose of site characterization. The sampling strategy is to characterize the study area soils and look for RCRA constituents. Observable waste soils and surrounding crater soils will be analyzed and evaluated according to RCRA closure criteria. Because of the status of the crater a RCRA Part A permit site, acquired radionuclide analyses will only be evaluated in regards to the health and safety of site workers and the disposition of wastes generated during site characterization. The U-2bu Subsidence Crater was created in 1971 by a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground nuclear test, event name Miniata, and was used as a land-disposal unit for radioactive and hazardous waste from 1973 to 1988.

  6. SALTSTONE BATCH 0 TCLP RCRA METAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A

    2007-06-14

    A saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material. After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  7. Groundwater Quality Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area U

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ronald M.; Hodges, Floyd N.; Williams, Barbara A.

    2001-08-29

    Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area U (WMA U) is in the 200 West Area on the Hanford Site. The area includes the U Tank Farm that contains 16 underground, single-shell tanks and their ancillary equipment and waste systems. WMA U is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) as codified in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington's Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA, RCW 70.105) and its implementing requirements in the Washington State dangerous waste regulations (WAC 173-303-400). Releases of hazardous wastes from WMA U have contaminated groundwater beneath the area. Therefore, the WMA U is being assessed to determine the rate of movement and extent of the contamination released and to determine the concentrations in groundwater. The original finding of groundwater impact was determined from elevated specific conductance in downgradient well 299-W19-41. The elevated specific conductance was attributed to the nonhazardous constituents calcium, magnesium, sulfate, and chloride. Tank waste constituents nitrate and technetium-99 are also present as co-contaminants and have increased over the past several years; however, at concentrations well below the respective drinking water standards. Chromium concentrations in downgradient wells have generally exceeded background levels, but similar levels were also observed in upgradient well 299-W18-25 in early 2000 before it went dry. The objective of this report is to present the current conceptual model for how and where contaminant releases have reached the water table and how that contamination has dispersed in the groundwater system. These efforts will achieve the requirements of a groundwater quality assessment under RCRA [40 CFR 265.93 (d)(4)]. On that basis, a monitoring schedule with appropriate analytes and proposals for new wells and tests are presented in this document.

  8. Environmental Sciences Division Groundwater Program Office. Annual report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-30

    This first edition of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Annual Report summarizes the work carried out by the Energy Systems GWPO for fiscal year (FY) 1993. This introductory section describes the GWPO`s staffing, organization, and funding sources. The GWPO is responsible for coordination and oversight for all components of the groundwater program at the three Oak Ridge facilities [ORNL, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], and the PGDP and PORTS, respectively. Several years ago, Energy systems senior management recognized that the manner in which groundwater activities were conducted at the five facilities could result in unnecessary duplication of effort, inadequate technical input to decisions related to groundwater issues, and could create a perception within the regulatory agencies of a confusing and inconsistent approach to groundwater issues at the different facilities. Extensive interactions among management from Environmental Compliance, Environmental Restoration (ER), Environmental Sciences Division, Environmental Safety and Health, and the five facilities ultimately led to development of a net technical umbrella organization for groundwater. On April 25, 1991, the GWPO was authorized to be set up within ORNL thereby establishing a central coordinating office that would develop a consistent technical and administrative direction for the groundwater programs of all facilities and result in compliance with all relevant U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations such as RCRA and Comprehensive Environmental Restoration, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) as well as U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and orders. For example, DOE Order 5400.1, issued on November 9, 1988, called for each DOE facility to develop an environmental monitoring program for all media (e.g., air, surface water, and groundwater).

  9. Annual report of 1991 groundwater monitoring data for the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin at the Y-12 Plant: Ground water surface elevations

    SciTech Connect

    Shevenell, L.; Switek, J.

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a summary and interpretation of hydraulic head measurements obtained from wells surrounding the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin sites at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Periodic water level observations are presented using hydrographs and water table contour maps based on data obtained from quarterly sampling during calendar year 1991. Generalized, preliminary interpretation of results are presented. The two sites covered by this report have interim status under the provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A subset of the wells at each rate are used for groundwater monitoring purposes under the requirements of RCRA. A discussion of the up-gradient and down-gradient directions for each of the sites is included.

  10. Results of Groundwater Monitoring for the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-10-31

    The 183-H solar evaporation basins (183-H basins) were located in the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site and have been demolished and backfilled under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (Ecology 2004). Post-closure actions remain for the 183 H basins. Groundwater is monitored in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303 645(11), ''Corrective Action Program'', and Part VI, Chapter 2 of the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (Ecology 2004). The waste discharged to the basins originated in the 300 Area fuel fabrication facility and included solutions of chromic, hydrofluoric, nitric, and sulfuric acids that had been neutralized. The waste solutions contained various metallic and radioactive constituents (e.g., chromium, technetium-99, uranium ). Between 1985 and 1996, remaining waste was removed, the facility was demolished, and the underlying contaminated soil was removed and replaced with clean fill. This is one of a series of reports on corrective action monitoring at the 183-H basins. It fulfills a requirement of WAC 173-303-645(11)(g) to report twice each year on the effectiveness of the corrective action program. This report covers the period from January through June 2006.

  11. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  12. Selective removal/recovery of RCRA metals from waste and process solutions using polymer filtration{trademark} technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.

    1997-10-01

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals are found in a number of process and waste streams at many DOE, U.S. Department of Defense, and industrial facilities. RCRA metals consist principally of chromium, mercury, cadmium, lead, and silver. Arsenic and selenium, which form oxyanions, are also considered RCRA elements. Discharge limits for each of these metals are based on toxicity and dictated by state and federal regulations (e.g., drinking water, RCRA, etc.). RCRA metals are used in many current operations, are generated in decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations, and are also present in old process wastes that require treatment and stabilization. These metals can exist in solutions, as part of sludges, or as contaminants on soils or solid surfaces, as individual metals or as mixtures with other metals, mixtures with radioactive metals such as actinides (defined as mixed waste), or as mixtures with a variety of inert metals such as calcium and sodium. The authors have successfully completed a preliminary proof-of-principle evaluation of Polymer Filtration{trademark} (PF) technology for the dissolution of metallic mercury and have also shown that they can remove and concentrate RCRA metals from dilute solutions for a variety of aqueous solution types using PF technology. Another application successfully demonstrated is the dilute metal removal of americium and plutonium from process streams. This application was used to remove the total alpha contamination to below 30 pCi/L for the wastewater treatment plant at TA-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and from nitric acid distillate in the acid recovery process at TA-55, the Plutonium Facility at LANL (ESP-CP TTP AL16C322). This project will develop and optimize the PF technology for specific DOE process streams containing RCRA metals and coordinate it with the needs of the commercial sector to ensure that technology transfer occurs.

  13. Groundwater bills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U.S. lawmakers have become concerned about groundwater problems in the United States, and thus the contamination of groundwater is rapidly becoming one of the hottest issues of 1987 and probably for many years into the future. The 100th Congress has seen a proliferation of bills relating to various problems involving groundwater: need for more data, funding of research, and development of standards for groundwater quality. Because round 50% of the nation's drinking water is obtained from groundwater, the available support is dependent not only upon the available quantity but also on the quality of that supply.Because groundwater quality in general and groundwater contamination in particular provides such complex problems, final legislation probably will emphasize more research and more data collection. At present, a bill, the National Ground Water Contamination Research Act, has been introduced in the House of Representatives by Rep. Sam Gejdenson (D-Conn.), and a companion bill has been introduced in the Senate by Sen. David Durenberger (R-Minn.). These bills renew action on a groundwater research bill that passed the House but not the Senate near the end of the 99th Congress. The bills address not only research but also promote a national program for the assessment of groundwater quality and a national clearinghouse for groundwater information.

  14. Glossary of CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms and acronyms. Environmental Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This glossary contains CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms that are most often encountered in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Emergency Preparedness activities. Detailed definitions are included for key terms. The CERCLA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended and related federal rulemakings. The RCRA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and related federal rulemakings. The TSCA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA) and related federal rulemakings. Definitions related to TSCA are limited to those sections in the statute and regulations concerning PCBs and asbestos.Other sources for definitions include additional federal rulemakings, assorted guidance documents prepared by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), guidance and informational documents prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and DOE Orders. The source of each term is noted beside the term. Terms presented in this document reflect revised and new definitions published before July 1, 1993.

  15. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-06-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted.

  16. Evaluation Of Calendar Year 1997 Groundwater and surface Water Quality Data For the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1997. The monitoring data were obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Regime and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, and are reported ixx Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater A40nitoringReport for the Bear Creek Hydrogeolo@"c Regime at the US. Department ofEnergy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (AJA Technical Services, Inc. 1998a). This report provides an evaluation of the monitoring data with respect to historical results for each sampling location, the regime-wide extent of groundwater and surface water contamination, and long-term concentration trends for selected groundwater and surface water contaminants.

  17. Applications of capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection to groundwater migration studies.

    PubMed

    Brumley, W C; Ferguson, P L; Grange, A H; Donnelly, J L; Farley, J W

    1996-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has been applied to the determination of groundwater migration based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and traditional spectrofluorimetry. Detection limits of injected dye-fluorescent whitening agent (tinopal) in the low ppt ranges have been accomplished with both a spectrofluorometer and with CE/LIF based on the HeCd laser. The real-world problem was the determination of groundwater migration between adjacent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Superfund sites. Fluorescent dyes were injected into wells and were discovered in monitoring wells by extracting pads that adsorbed the dye. The methodology based on CE/LIF exhibits increased specificity over existing methodology due to the separation and unique migration time of the dye. Additional studies were aimed at achieving sub-ppt levels in the water directly using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and field-amplified injection techniques. PMID:9384723

  18. Groundwater Quality Assessment for Waste Management Area U: First Determination

    SciTech Connect

    FN Hodges; CJ Chou

    2000-08-04

    Waste Management Area U (TWA U) is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The area includes the U Tank Farm, which contains 16 single-shell tanks and their ancillary equipment and waste systems. WMA U is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) as stipulated in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F, which is incorporated into the Washington State dangerous waste regulations (WAC 173-303400) by reference. Groundwater monitoring at WMA U has been guided by an interim status indicator evaluation program. As a result of changes in the direction of groundwater flow, background values for the WMA have been recalculated several times during its monitoring history. The most recent recalculation revealed that one of the indicator parameters, specific conductance, exceeded its background value in downgradient well 299-W19-41. This triggered a change from detection monitoring to a groundwater quality assessment program. The major contributors to the higher specific conductance are nonhazardous constituents, such as bicarbonate, calcium, chloride, magnesium, sodium and sulfate. Chromium, nitrate, and technetium-99 are present and are increasing; however, they are significantly below their drinking water standards. The objective of this study is to determine whether the increased concentrations of chromium, nitrate, and technetium-99 in groundwater are from WMA U or from an upgradient source. Interpretation of groundwater monitoring data indicates that both the nonhazardous constituents causing elevated specific conductance in groundwater and the tank waste constituents present in groundwater at the WMA are a result of surface water infiltration in the southern portion of the WMA. There is evidence that both upgradient and WMA sources contribute to the nitrate concentrations that were detected. There is no indication of an upgradient source for the chromium and technetium-99 that was detected. Therefore, a source of contamination appears to

  19. RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) MULTI-YEAR PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA will continue to improve and demonstrate its capability to assess environmental conditions and determine the relative risks that contaminated land poses to health and the environment. The Agency will ensure that the environmental data it collects is of known, documented, and ...

  20. SACM and the RCRA stabilization initiative: Similarities of principles and applicability

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) provide standards for the remediation of environmental media contaminated with hazardous substances or hazardous waste, respectively. In both cases, prior to the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) development of the two subject reform initiatives, existing formal processes specified the level of site investigation required, the process for reaching a decision on the method of remediation, public participation in the decision process, and enforcement authorities that include orders and schedules of compliance. Traditionally, implementation of these processes has resulted in a great amount of time, effort, and money being expended before actual remediation began. Following criticism from the public and the regulated community, the EPA has proposed streamlining reforms for hazardous waste site cleanup under both CERCLA and RCRA that will begin remediation sooner with lower costs. The purpose of this Information Brief is to discuss the common goals, processes, and strategies of the Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model (SACM) and the RCRA Stabilization Initiative.

  1. Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-02-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCIU) post- closure permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), and as otherwise required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. In July 1997, the Temessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved several modifications to the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring requirements specified in the PCP. This report has been prepared in accordimce with these modified requirements.

  2. Savannah River Site RCRA Facility Investigation plan: Road A Chemical Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The nature of wastes disposed of at the Road A Chemical Basin (RACB) is such that some degree of soil contamination is probable. Lead has also been detected in site monitoring wells at concentrations above SRS background levels. A RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) is proposed for the RACB and will include a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of soil cores, installation of groundwater monitoring wells, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of groundwater samples, and collection of chemical and radiological analyses of surface water and sediment samples. Upon completion of the proposed RFI field work and chemical and radiological analyses, and RFI report should be prepared to present conclusions on the nature and extent of contamination at the site, and to make recommendations for site remediation. If contamination is detected at concentrations above SRS background levels, a receptor analysis should be done to evaluate potential impacts of site contamination on nearby populations.

  3. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

  4. 75 FR 42130 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Resource...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; Safe Drinking Water Act; Toxic Substances Control Act; and the Reporting Requirements of the...''); Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1311 to 1387 (``CWA''); Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (``RCRA''),...

  5. Guidance document publications list - Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document provides a listing of Guidance Documents from the RCRA/CERCLA Division for August 1995. Documents are listed under the following categories: RCRA Guidance Manuals; RCRA Information Briefs; CERCLA Guidance Manuals; CERCLA Regulatory Bulletins; RCRA/CERCLA Guidance Manuals; TSCA Guidance Manuals; TSCA Information Briefs; and, Cross Cut Manuals.

  6. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

  7. The Integration of the 241-Z Building Decontamination and Decommissioning Under Cercla with RCRA Closure at the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mattlin, E.; Charboneau, S.; Johnston, G.; Hopkins, A.; Bloom, R.; Skeels, B.; Klos, D.B.

    2007-07-01

    The 241-Z treatment and storage tanks, a hazardous waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (TSD) unit permitted pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act, RCW 70.105, , have been deactivated and are being actively decommissioned under the provisions of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO), RCRA and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq. The 241-Z TSD unit managed non-listed radioactive contaminated waste water, containing trace RCRA characteristic constituents. The 241-Z TSD unit consists of below grade tanks (D-4, D-5, D-7, D-8, and an overflow tank) located in a concrete containment vault, sample glovebox GB-2-241-ZA, and associated ancillary piping and equipment. The tank system is located beneath the 241-Z building. The 241-Z building is not a portion of the TSD unit. The sample glovebox is housed in the above-grade building. Waste managed at the TSD unit was received via underground piping from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sources. Tank D-6, located in the D-6 vault cell, is a past-practice tank that was taken out of service in 1972 and has never operated as a portion of the RCRA TSD unit. CERCLA actions will address Tank D-6, its containment vault cell, and soil beneath the cell that was potentially contaminated during past-practice operations and any other potential past-practice contamination identified during 241-Z closure, while outside the scope of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan, 241-Z Treatment and Storage Tanks. Under the RCRA closure plan, the 241-Z TSD unit is anticipated to undergo clean closure to the performance standards of the State of Washington with respect to dangerous waste contamination from RCRA operations. The TSD unit will be clean closed if physical closure activities identified in the plan achieve clean closure standards for all 241-Z

  8. 1999 data report: Groundwater monitoring program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect

    Yvonne Townsend

    2000-03-01

    This report is a compilation of the annual 1999 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology and the groundwater sampling procedure. Wells Ue5PW-1, Ue5PW-2, and Ue5PW-3 were sampled semiannually for pH, specific conductance, major cations/anions, metals, tritium, total organic carbon (TOC), and total organic halogen (TOX). Results indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated unit within the Area 5 RWMS. Groundwater elevation was monitored quarterly with no major changes noted. There continues to be an extremely small gradient to the northeast with a flow velocity less than one foot per year; however, this is subject to change because the wells have a similar groundwater elevation.

  9. Resource conservation and recovery act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    This document describes the progress of 13 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period January 1 to March 31, 1989. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 32 refs., 30 figs., 103 tabs.

  10. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the CPP-602 Laboratory Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho Cleanup Project

    2009-09-30

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure (HWMA/RCRA) Plan for the CPP-602 laboratory lines was developed to meet the tank system closure requirements of the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.008 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 264, Subpart G. CPP-602 is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The lines in CPP-602 were part of a liquid hazardous waste collection system included in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Liquid Waste Management System Permit. The laboratory lines discharged to the Deep Tanks System in CPP-601 that is currently being closed under a separate closure plan. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards. The closure approach for the CPP-602 laboratory lines is to remove the lines, components, and contaminants to the extent practicable. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Site CPP-117 includes the CPP-602 waste trench and the area beneath the basement floor where waste lines are direct-buried. Upon completion of rinsing or mopping to remove contamination to the extent practicable from the waste trench and rinsing the intact buried lines (i.e., stainless steel sections), these areas will be managed as part of CERCLA Site CPP-117 and will not be subject to further HWMA/RCRA closure activities. The CPP-602 building is being decontaminated and decommissioned under CERCLA as a non-time critical removal action in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement/Consent Order. As such, all waste generated by this CERCLA action, including closure-generated waste, will be managed in coordination with that CERCLA action in substantive compliance with HWMA/RCRA regulations. All waste will be subject to a hazardous waste determination for the purpose of supporting appropriate management and will be managed in accordance

  11. H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Third and fourth quarters 1996, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for various hazardous and radioactive constituents as required by Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery ACT (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995. Currently, the H-Area HWMF monitoring network consists of 130 wells of the HSB series and 8 wells of the HSL series screened in the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area HWMF. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program as identified in provision IIIDH.11.c

  12. General requirements for RCRA regulated hazardous waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended, requires that tanks used for the storage or treatment of hazardous waste (HazW) be permitted, and comply with the requirements contained within the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) TItle 40 in Subpart J of Part 264/265, unless those tanks have been exempted. Subpart J specifies requirements for the design, construction, installation, operation, inspection, maintenance, repair, release, response, and closure of HazW tanks. Also, the regulations make a distinction between new and existing tanks. Effective December 6, 1995, standards for controlling volatile organic air emissions will apply to non-exempt HazW tanks. HazW tanks will have to be equipped with a cover or floating roof, or be designed to operate as a closed system, to be in compliance with the air emission control requirements. This information brief describes those tanks that are subject to the Subpart J requirements, and will also discuss secondary containment, inspection, restrictions on waste storage, release response, and closure requirements associated with regulated HazW tanks.

  13. RCRA implementation plan (RIP): Fiscal years 1996--1997

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The report defines the national policy and strategic goals and priority activities for the RCRA solid and hazardous waste program. Includes both changes and clarifications to the fiscal year 1994 RCRA implementation plan and the fiscal year 1995 addendum. It provides additional guidance in waste minimization, corrective action, state grants, beginning of the year plans, Indian programs, environmental justice, information management, state authorization, permitting/closure, and subtitle D activities.

  14. 3Q/4Q 2001 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Annual 2001 - Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Blas, J.F.

    2002-04-22

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the third and fourth quarters of 2001. The report also provides a summary of the corrective-action program for the entire year. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1 890 008 989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

  15. The installation of the Westbay multiport ground-water sampling system in well 699-43-42K near the 216-B-3 pond

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, T.J.

    1989-09-01

    In 1988 and 1989, Pacific Northwest Laboratory installed a multiport ground-water sampling system in well 699-43-42K drilled near the 216-B-3 Pond on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state. The multiport system will be used to evaluate methods for determining the vertical distribution of contaminants and hydraulic heads in ground water. This installation was in conjunction with a similar multiport installation near the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Well 699-43-42K is adjacent to two Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) ground-water monitoring wells, which will allow for a comparison of sampling intervals and head measurements between the multiport system and the RCRA monitoring wells. Eight sampling ports were installed in the upper unconfined aquifer by backfilling at depths of 161.1 ft, 174.1 ft, 187.1 ft, 201.17 ft, 217.2 ft, 230.2 ft, 243.2 ft, and 255.2 ft below land surface. However, because of damage to the casing during installation, only the top four ports should be used for pressure measurements and sampling until repairs occur. The locations of the sampling ports were determined by the hydrogeology of the area and the screened intervals of adjacent ground-water monitoring wells. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  16. POSTCLOSURE GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION AND MONITORING AT THE SANITARY LANDFILL, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TRANSITIONING TO MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J; Walt Kubilius, W; Thomas Kmetz, T; D Noffsinger, D; Karen M Adams, K

    2006-11-17

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements for hazardous waste facilities include 30 years of post-closure monitoring. The use of an objective-based monitoring strategy allows for a significant reduction in the amount of groundwater monitoring required, as the groundwater remediation transitions from an active biosparging system to monitored natural attenuation. The lifecycle of groundwater activities at the landfill has progressed from detection monitoring and plume characterization, to active groundwater remediation, and now to monitored natural attenuation and postclosure monitoring. Thus, the objectives of the groundwater monitoring have changed accordingly. Characterization monitoring evaluated what biogeochemical natural attenuation processes were occurring and determined that elevated levels of radium were naturally occurring. Process monitoring of the biosparging system required comprehensive sampling network up- and down-gradient of the horizontal wells to verify its effectiveness. Currently, the scope of monitoring and reporting can be significantly reduced as the objective is to demonstrate that the alternate concentration limits (ACL) are being met at the point of compliance wells and the maximum contaminant level (MCL) is being met at the surface water point of exposure. The proposed reduction is estimated to save about $2M over the course of the remaining 25 years of postclosure monitoring.

  17. Nevada Test Site 2002 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect

    Y. E. Townsend

    2003-02-01

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2002 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Wells Ue5PW-1, Ue5PW-2, and Ue5PW-3 were sampled semiannually for the required analytes: pH, specific conductance, major cations/anions, metals, tritium, total organic carbon (TOC), and total organic halogen (TOX). Results from all samples collected in 2002 were within established criteria. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act(RCRA) regulated unit within the RWMS-5 and confirm that the detections of TOC and TOX in 2000 were false positives. Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (ILs) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. There were no major changes noted in the monitored groundwater elevation. There continues to be an extremely small gradient to the northeast with an average flow velocity of less than one foot per year. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure.

  18. 2003 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program, Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-02-01

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2003 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site. Wells Ue5PW-1, Ue5PW-2, and Ue5PW-3 were sampled semi-annually for the required analytes: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon (TOC), total organic halides (TOX), tritium, and major cations/anions. Results from all samples collected in 2003 were within established criteria. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated unit within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and confirm that any previous detections of TOC and TOX were false positives. Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. There were no major changes noted in the monitored groundwater elevations. There continues to be an extremely small gradient to the northeast with an average flow velocity of less than one foot per year. Other information in the report includes a Cumulative Chronology for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the current groundwater sampling procedure.

  19. An example of system integration for RCRA policy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.; Goeltz, R. ); Schmidt, K. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of various computer technologies and software systems used on a project to estimate the costs of remediating Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) that fall under the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The project used two databases collected by Research Triangle Institute (RTI) that contain information on SWMUs and a PC-based software system called CORA that develops cost estimates for remediating SWMUs. The project team developed rules to categorize every SWMU in the databases by the kinds of technologies required to clean them up. These results were input into CORA, which estimated costs associated with the technologies. Early on, several computing challenges presented themselves. First, the databases have several hundred thousand records each. Second, the categorization rules could not be written to cover all combinations of variables. Third, CORA is run interactively and the analysis plan called for running CORA tens of thousands of times. Fourth, large data transfers needed to take place between RTI and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Solutions to these problems required systems integration. SWMU categorization was streamlined by using INTERNET as was the data transfer. SAS was used to create files used by a program called SuperKey that was used to run CORA. Because the analysis plan required the generation of hundreds of thousands of cost estimates, memory management software was needed to allow the portable IBM P70 to do the job. During the course of the project, several other software packages were used, including: SAS System for Personal Computers (SAS/PC), DBase III, LOTUS 1-2-3, PIZAZZ PLUS, LOTUS Freelance Plus, and Word Perfect. Only the comprehensive use of all available hardware and software resources allowed this project to be completed within the time and budget constraints. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. RCRA implementation plan: Fiscal year 1995: Addendum containing changes, clarifications, or additions to FY 1994 rip

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    The report provides additional information to supplement the `RCRA implementation plan: fiscal year 1994`. It describes the objectives and priorities EPA has set for the RCRA program. It also discusses waste minimization, environmental justice, corrective action, and biennial reporting.

  1. Rocky Flats Solar Evaporation Ponds RCRA hybrid-closure case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ogg, R.T.; Everett, L.G.; Cullen, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Solar Evaporation Ponds (SEP)/Operable Unit 4 (OU 4), located at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) sixteen miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, is currently undergoing remediation/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure in accordance with the Rocky Flats Interagency Agreement (IAG) signed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Colorado Department of Health (CDH) on January 22, 1991. Based on the Phase 1 (source and soils) RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) data and interpretations, the DOE and EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG and G) have selected a permanent surface engineered/isolation barrier as the technological option for remediation of the SEP. The DOE and EG and G will utilize all natural materials to create an impermeable barrier/structure to isolate the waste being left in place from impacting human health and the environment for a minimum of 1,000 years. The rationale for utilizing natural materials is two fold; (1) optimize long term performance of the barrier and; (2) design a structure which will be near maintenance free (passive remediation) for 1,000 years. The DOE and EG and G have taken a proactive approach in providing post closure performance assessment for this RCRA closure action. An integrated monitoring system has been designed which will include monitoring the engineered barrier, vadose zone and ground water systems. Rocky Flats will integrate instrumentation, into the permanent engineered barrier which will provide early warning of potential liquid migration through the barrier and into the waste zone.

  2. Rocky Flats Solar Evaporation Ponds RCRA hybrid-closure case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ogg, R.T.; Everett, L.G.; Cullen, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Solar Evaporation Ponds (SEP)/Operable Unit 4 (OU 4), located at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) sixteen miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, is currently undergoing remediation/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure in accordance with the Rocky Flats Interagency Agreement (IAG) signed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Colorado Department of Health (CDH) on January 22, 1991. Based on the ``Phase 1`` (source and soils) RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation (RFM data and interpretations), the DOE and EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG and G) have selected a permanent surface engineered/isolation barrier as the technological option for remediation of the SEP. The DOE and EG and G will utilize all natural materials to create an ``impermeable`` barrier/structure to isolate the waste being left in place from impacting human health and the environment for a minimum of 1,000 years. Their rationale for utilizing natural materials is two fold; (1) optimize long term performance of the barrier and; (2) design a structure which will be near maintenance free (passive remediation) for 1,000 years. The DOE and EG and G have taken a proactive approach in providing post closure performance assessment for this RCRA closure action. An integrated monitoring system has been designed which will include monitoring the engineered barrier, vadose zone and ground water systems. Rocky Flats will integrate instrumentation into the permanent engineered barrier which will provide early warning of potential liquid migration through the barrier and into the waste zone.

  3. Self-assembled monolayers on mosoporous supports (SAMMS) for RCRA metal removal

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiangdong; Liu, Jun; Fryxell, G.

    1997-10-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area has declared mercury removal and stabilization as the first and fourth priorities among 30 prioritized deficiencies. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal and mercury removal has also been identified as a high priority at DOE sites such as Albuquerque, Idaho Falls, Oak Ridge, Hanford, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River. Under this task, a proprietary new technology, Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports (SAMMS), for RCRA metal ion removal from aqueous wastewater and mercury removal from organic wastes such as vacuum pump oils is being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The six key features of the SAMMS technology are (1) large surface area (>900 m{sup 2}/g) of the mesoporous oxides (SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}) ensures high capacity for metal loading (more than 1 g Hg/g SAMMS); (2) molecular recognition of the interfacial functional groups ensures the high affinity and selectivity for heavy metals without interference from other abundant cations (such as calcium and iron) in wastewater; (3) suitability for removal of mercury from both aqueous wastes and organic wastes; (4) the Hg-laden SAMMS not only pass TCLP tests, but also have good long-term durability as a waste form because the covalent binding between mercury and SAMMS has good resistance to ion exchange, oxidation, and hydrolysis; (5) the uniform and small pore size (2 to 40 nm) of the mesoporous silica prevents bacteria (>2000 nm) from solubilizing the bound mercury; and (6) SAMMS can also be used for RCRA metal removal from gaseous mercury waste, sludge, sediment, and soil.

  4. The marriage of RCRA and CERCLA at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, D.C.; Brooks, L.M.

    1998-11-01

    A key goal of the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) signed in July of 1996 was to provide a seamless marriage of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (and other media specific programs) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the implementing agencies of each. This paper examines the two years since the signing of RFCA and identifies the successes, failures, and stresses of the marriage. RFCA has provided an excellent vehicle for regulatory and substantive progress at the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats facility. The key for a fully successful marriage is to build on the accomplishments to date and to continually improve the internal and external systems and relationships. To date, the parties can be proud of both the substantial accomplishment of substantive environmental work and the regulatory systems that have enabled the work.

  5. STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION OF CERCLA AND RCRA WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Handbook provides U.S. EPA regional staff responsible for reviewing CERCLA remedial action plans and RCRA permit applications with a tool for interpreting information on stabilization/solidification treatment. As a practical day-to-day reference guide, it will also provide t...

  6. Decontamination Study for Mixed Waste Storage Tanks RCRA Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Leaphart, D.M.; Reed, S.R.; Rankin, W.N.

    1995-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to close six underground tanks storing mixed waste under RCRA regulations. In support of this closure effort, a study was performed to determine the optimal method of decontaminating these tanks to meet the closure requirements. Items consaidered in the evaluation of the decontamination methods included effectiveness, compatibility with existing waste residues, possible cleaning solution disposal methods, and cost.

  7. RCRA closure of land-based units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Eight land-based hazardous waste management units at the Oak ridge Y-12 Plant are being closed. Closure plans for the units have been submitted and approved by regulatory authorities. Closure methods include liquid removal and treatment, sludge stabilization, contaminated sludge and/or soil removal, and capping. Closure is funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Budget Category (ERBC). A major project has been identified for ERBC funding to close and remediate the land units in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Hazardous wastes of various types are generated at Y-12 as part of plant production processes. These wastes have been stored, treated, and disposed of on the Y-12 site and include container and tank storage areas, wastewater treatment plants, landfills, land treatment units, and surface impoundments. Of these units, some are to be closed rather than allowed to operate with a permit. This paper focuses on two of the eight land units, the S-3 ponds, the New Hope pond (NHP), which have been closed under RCRA. Initiation of closure of all these units by November 1988 was required by statute.

  8. Transportable Vitrification System RCRA Closure Practical Waste Disposition Saves Time And Money

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, Angie; Boles, Roger; Byars, Woody

    2003-02-26

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) was a large-scale vitrification system for the treatment of mixed wastes. The wastes contained both hazardous and radioactive materials in the form of sludge, soil, and ash. The TVS was developed to be moved to various United States Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to vitrify mixed waste as needed. The TVS consists of four primary modules: (1) Waste and Additive Materials Processing Module; (2) Melter Module; (3) Emissions Control Module; and (4) Control and Services Module. The TVS was demonstrated at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) during September and October of 1997. During this period, approximately 16,000 pounds of actual mixed waste was processed, producing over 17,000 pounds of glass. After the demonstration was complete it was determined that it was more expensive to use the TVS unit to treat and dispose of mixed waste than to direct bury this waste in Utah permitted facility. Thus, DOE had to perform a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the facility and find a reuse for as much of the equipment as possible. This paper will focus on the following items associated with this successful RCRA closure project: TVS site closure design and implementation; characterization activities focused on waste disposition; pollution prevention through reuse; waste minimization efforts to reduce mixed waste to be disposed; and lessons learned that would be integrated in future projects of this magnitude.

  9. RCRA permit modifications and the functional equivalency demonstration: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Kinker, J.; Lyon, W.; Carnes, R.; Loehr, C.; Elsberry, K.; Garcia, P.

    1996-05-01

    Hazardous waste operating permits issued under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) often impose requirements, typically by reference to the original permit application, that specific components and equipment be used. Consequently, changing these items, even for the purpose of routine maintenance, may first require that the owner/operator request a potentially time-consuming and costly permit modification. However, the owner/operator may demonstrate that a modification is not required because the planned changes are functionally equivalent, as defined by RCRA, to the original specifications embodied by the permit. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is scheduled for maintenance and improvements that involve replacement of components. The incinerator`s carbon adsorption unit/high efficiency particulate air filtration system, in particular, was redesigned to improve reliability and minimize maintenance. A study was performed to determine whether the redesigned unit would qualify as functionally equivalent to the original component. in performing this study, the following steps were taken: (a) the key performance factors were identified; (b) performance data describing the existing unit were obtained; (c) performance of both the existing and redesigned units was simulated; and (d) the performance data were compared to ascertain whether the components could qualify as functionally equivalent.

  10. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect

    Annette Schafer, Arthur S. Rood, A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-12-23

    Groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility. The analysis was prepared to support the National Environmental Policy Act environmental assessment for the top two ranked sites for the proposed disposal facility. A four-phase screening and analysis approach was documented and applied. Phase I screening was site independent and applied a radionuclide half-life cut-off of 1 year. Phase II screening applied the National Council on Radiation Protection analysis approach and was site independent. Phase III screening used a simplified transport model and site-specific geologic and hydrologic parameters. Phase III neglected the infiltration-reducing engineered cover, the sorption influence of the vault system, dispersion in the vadose zone, vertical dispersion in the aquifer, and the release of radionuclides from specific waste forms. These conservatisms were relaxed in the Phase IV analysis which used a different model with more realistic parameters and assumptions. Phase I screening eliminated 143 of the 246 radionuclides in the inventory from further consideration because each had a half-life less than 1 year. An additional 13 were removed because there was no ingestion dose coefficient available. Of the 90 radionuclides carried forward from Phase I, 57 radionuclides had simulated Phase II screening doses exceeding 0.4 mrem/year. Phase III and IV screening compared the maximum predicted radionuclide concentration in the aquifer to maximum contaminant levels. Of the 57 radionuclides carried forward from Phase II, six radionuclides were identified in Phase III as having simulated future aquifer concentrations exceeding maximum contaminant limits. An additional seven radionuclides had simulated Phase III groundwater concentrations exceeding 1/100th of their respective maximum contaminant levels and were also retained for Phase IV analysis. The Phase IV analysis predicted that none of the thirteen remaining

  11. 76 FR 51397 - Notice of Lodging of Settlement Agreement Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Notice is hereby given that on August 12, 2011, a proposed Consent... Act (``RCRA''), 42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq., and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know...

  12. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2004-04-12

    /uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

  13. Evaluation of Calendar Year 1996 groundwater and surface water quality data for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring data obtained in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The East Fork Regime encompasses several confirmed and suspected sources of groundwater contamination within industrialized areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 1996 groundwater and surface water monitoring data are presented in Calendar Year 1996 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, along with the required data evaluations specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the East Fork Regime. This report provides additional evaluation of the CY 1996 groundwater and surface water monitoring data with an emphasis on regime-wide groundwater contamination and long-term concentration trends for regulated and non-regulated monitoring parameters.

  14. Groundwater model recalibration and remediation well network design at the F-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, W.R.

    1995-04-01

    On September 30, 1992, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Part B Permit prescribing remediation of contaminated groundwater beneath and downgradient of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site. The remediation outlined in the Part B Permit calls for a three phase approach. For the F-Area Seepage Basins, the first phase requires the ``installation of an adequate number of pumping and injection wells or trenches, as appropriate, to capture and remediate those portions of-the contaminant plume delineated by the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour.`` Geochemical results from 1992 groundwater monitoring were used to delineate this isoconcentration contour in the Corrective Action Program (CAP) (WSRC, 1992a). The 1992 results were used based on SCDHEC written requirement to use the most recent data available at the time the CAP was formulated. The rationale used by SCDHEC in selecting the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour was that it also encompassed most of the other contaminants listed in the Groundwater Protection Standards. After extraction and treatment, the water is required to be reinjected into the aquifer due to the high levels of tritium still present in the treated water. The conceptual plan is to have recirculation of the tritium (as much as can practically be accomplished) to allow more time for radioactive decay before natural discharge to surface water.

  15. Inspection and monitoring plan, contaminated groundwater seeps 317/319/ENE Area, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-11

    During the course of completing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) in the 317/319/East-Northeast (ENE) Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), groundwater was discovered moving to the surface through a series of groundwater seeps. The seeps are located in a ravine approximately 600 ft south of the ANL-E fence line in Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. Samples of the seep water were collected and analyzed for selected parameters. Two of the five seeps sampled were found to contain detectable levels of organic contaminants. Three chemical species were identified: chloroform (14--25 {micro}g/L), carbon tetrachloride (56--340 {micro}g/L), and tetrachloroethylene (3--6 {micro}g/L). The other seeps did not contain detectable levels of volatile organics. The nature of the contaminants in the seeps will also be monitored on a regular basis. Samples of surface water flowing through the bottom of the ravine and groundwater emanating from the seeps will be collected and analyzed for chemical and radioactive constituents. The results of the routine sampling will be compared with the concentrations used in the risk assessment. If the concentrations exceed those used in the risk assessment, the risk calculations will be revised by using the higher numbers. This revised analysis will determine if additional actions are warranted.

  16. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Interim Measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-12-08

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed interim measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MW) groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE proposes to install a small metal sheet pile dam to impound water around and over the BGC groundwater seepline. In addition, a drip irrigation system would be installed. Interim measures will also address the reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from ''hot-spot'' regions associated with the Southwest Plume Area (SWPA). This action is taken as an interim measure for the MWMF in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to reduce the amount of tritium seeping from the BGC southwest groundwater plume. The proposed action of this EA is being planned and would be implemented concurrent with a groundwater corrective action program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). On September 30, 1999, SCDHEC issued a modification to the SRS RCRA Part B permit that adds corrective action requirements for four plumes that are currently emanating from the BGC. One of those plumes is the southwest plume. The RCRA permit requires SRS to submit a corrective action plan (CAP) for the southwest plume by March 2000. The permit requires that the initial phase of the CAP prescribe a remedy that achieves a 70-percent reduction in the annual amount of tritium being released from the southwest plume area to Fourmile Branch, a nearby stream. Approval and actual implementation of the corrective measure in that CAP may take several years. As an interim measure, the actions described in this EA would manage the release of tritium from the southwest plume area until the final actions under the CAP can be implemented. This proposed action is expected to reduce the release of tritium from

  17. Defending Superfund and RCRA imminent hazard cases

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Legal defenses by the government under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (Superfund) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act include common defenses in which there is (1) no imminent or substantial endangerment, (2) inappropriate remedy, (3) action not in accord with the National Contingency Plan that governs Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) remedial actions, (4) not credible or sufficient evidence, (5) not credible scientific conclusion, or (6) government action precluding the relief. Defenses to Superfund reimbursement claims include cases (1) when defendant is not among the class of liable partners, (2) of joint and several liability and the right of contribution, (3) involving releases by an act of God, war, or third party. Defenses to abatement actions include cases in which (1) there is no irreparable harm and adequate remedy at law is available and (2) emergency provisions are not retrospective. Also relevant to EPA enforcement efforts are political pressures and the government's intentions. The author discusses basic defense strategies and implementation tactics. 67 references.

  18. State hazardous waste programs; procedures for revision of state RCRA programs--EPA. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    1983-08-25

    EPA is today proposing to amend its requirements under 40 CFR 271.21(e) (formerly Section 123.13(e)) for the approval and revision of authorized state hazardous waste programs. One purpose is to ensure that states applying for final authorization under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended, (RCRA) do not have to revise their programs and applications to respond to federal regulatory changes occurring while the states' applications are being prepared or processed. The second purpose is to provide all authorized states with one full year (or two years, if there is a need for state legislative action) from the effective date of amended federal regulations to make the revisions in their programs required by such federal amendments. This action would provide the state with an additional six months since the existing regulation requires that program revisions be made within one year (or two years) after the promulgation of amended federal regulations. PMID:10262087

  19. Manufacturing company faces $8 million penalty for alleged RCRA violations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    On October 7, 1994, EPA filed a complaint against Eastman Kodak Company for alleged RCRA violations at Kodak`s manufacturing and hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities located in Rochester, New York. A proposed consent decree accompanied the complaint filed in the US District Court for the Western District of New York (United States v. Eastman Kodak Company, Dockett Number: 94-CV-6503T). According to the terms of the proposed consent decree, Kodak is to pay an $8 million civil penalty by implementing six environmental projects. The company must also upgrade its industrial sewer system and bring all operations into compliance with RCRA regulations. This action indicates EPA`s intent to promote waste reduction and pollution prevention in addition to requiring compliance at large, aging manufacturing facilities.

  20. National spent fuel program preliminary report RCRA characteristics of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel DOE-SNF-REP-002. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report presents information on the preliminary process knowledge to be used in characterizing all Department of Energy (DOE)-owned Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) types that potentially exhibit a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) characteristic. This report also includes the process knowledge, analyses, and rationale used to preliminarily exclude certain SNF types from RCRA regulation under 40 CFR {section}261.4(a)(4), ``Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste,`` as special nuclear and byproduct material. The evaluations and analyses detailed herein have been undertaken as a proactive approach. In the event that DOE-owned SNF is determined to be a RCRA solid waste, this report provides general direction for each site regarding further characterization efforts. The intent of this report is also to define the path forward to be taken for further evaluation of specific SNF types and a recommended position to be negotiated and established with regional and state regulators throughout the DOE Complex regarding the RCRA-related policy issues.

  1. Groundwater Treatment at SRS: An Innovative Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Jorque, M.A.; Golshir, G.H.; Davis, B.

    1998-03-01

    The SRS is located in southwestern South Carolina, occupying an almost circular area of approximately 800 km{sub 2} within Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale counties. The site lies approximately 36 km southeast of Augusta, Georgia, and is bounded by the Savannah River along its southwestern border. Prior to the establishment of the SRS in 1952, the area was largely a rural agricultural community. As part of the defense complex, the SRS produced special nuclear materials for the national defense. From 1955 until 1988, unlined earthen basins were used to dispose of wastewater from the SRS separations facilities located in the F and H areas. Approximately 300 million liters of wastewater was transported annually from the process area through underground piping to the basins. The wastewater was allowed to evaporate and to seep into the underlying formations. There were three basins in the F-Area covering a total of about 3 hectares; while the H-Area was served by four basins covering about 6 hectares. The seepage basins closure was started in 1989 and SCDHEC certified the closures as completed in 1991. Groundwater monitoring conducted in accordance with the provisions of the RCRA Permits determined that the underlying hydrogeologic units were contaminated by tritium, radioactive metals (primarily Cesium{sup 137}, Strontium{sup 90}, and Uranium{sup 235}), nitrate and heavy metals, some of which are defined as hazardous by RCRA. Under the terms and conditions of the RCRA Post-Closure Permits, it was necessary to remediate the contaminated groundwater plumes.

  2. Groundwater Treatment at SRS: An Innovative Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Jorque, M.A.; Golshir, G.H.; Davis, B.

    1998-03-01

    The SRS is located in southwestern South Carolina, occupying an almost circular area of approximately 800 km2 within Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale counties. The site lies approximately 36 km southeast of Augusta, Georgia, and is bounded by the Savannah River along its southwestern border. Prior to the establishment of the SRS in 1952, the area was largely a rural agricultural community. As part of the defense complex, the SRS produced special nuclear materials for the national defense.From 1955 until 1988, unlined earthen basins were used to dispose of wastewater from the SRS separations facilities located in the F and H areas. Approximately 300 million liters of wastewater was transported annually from the process area through underground piping to the basins. The wastewater was allowed to evaporate and to seep into the underlying formations. There were three basins in the F-Area covering a total of about 3 hectares; while the H-Area was served by four basins covering about 6 hectares. The seepage basins closure was started in 1989 and SCDHEC certified the closures as completed in 1991.Groundwater monitoring conducted in accordance with the provisions of the RCRA Permits determined that the underlying hydrogeologic units were contaminated by tritium, radioactive metals (primarily Cesium 137, Strontium 90, and Uranium 235), nitrate and heavy metals, some of which are defined as hazardous by RCRA. Under the terms and conditions of the RCRA Post- Closure Permits, it was necessary to remediate the contaminated groundwater plumes.

  3. 22 CFR 145.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 145.16... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  4. 22 CFR 145.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 145.16... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  5. 22 CFR 145.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 145.16... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  6. 22 CFR 145.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 145.16... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  7. 22 CFR 145.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 145.16... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  8. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL's assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  9. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL`s assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  10. Analysis of TRU waste for RCRA-listed elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, C.; Gerth, D.; Yoshida, T.

    1996-07-01

    Analytical methods for RCRA listed elements on Portland cement type waste have been employed using both microwave and open hot plate digestions with subsequent analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) and cold vapor atomic absorption and fluorescence (CVAA/CVAFS). Four different digestion procedures were evaluated including an open hot plate nitric acid digestion, EPA SW-846 Method 3051, and 2 methods using modifications to Method 3051. The open hot plate and the modified Method 3051, which used aqua regia for dissolution, were the only methods which resulted in acceptable data quality for all 14 RCRA-listed elements. Results for the nitric acid open hot plate digestion were used to qualify the analytical methods for TRU waste characterization, and resulted in a 99% passing score. Direct chemical analysis of TRU waste is being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in an attempt to circumvent the problems associated with strong acid digestion methods. Technology development includes laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), dc arc CID atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-AES), and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS). Analytical methods using the Portland cement matrix are currently being developed for each of the listed techniques. Upon completion of the development stage, blind samples will be distributed to each of the technology developers for RCRA metals characterization.

  11. Mobilization plan for the Y-12 9409-5 tank storage facility RCRA closure plan. Final report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    This mobilization plan identifies the activities and equipment necessary to begin the field sampling for the Oak Ridge Y-12 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility (DTSF) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure. Elements of the plan outline the necessary components of each mobilization task and identify whether SAIC or the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Y-12 Environmental Restoration Division will be responsible for task coordination. Field work will be conducted in two phases: mobilization phase and soil sampling phase. Training and medical monitoring, access, permits and passes, decontamination/staging area, equipment, and management are covered in this document.

  12. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA enforcement and compliance, update as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The module describds enforcement procedures and cites the statutory authority. It describes the two different types of enforcement (i.e., administrative and judicial) and explains when and how EPA can enforce the RCRA regulations in authorized states. It describes the enforcement mechanisms available to EPA. It states the differences between enforcement at interim status, permitted facilities, and Federal facilities. It also identifies relevant resources documents.

  13. Evaluation of Calendar Year 1996 groundwater and surface water quality data for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring data obtained in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The monitoring data were collected for the multiple programmatic purposes of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) and have been reported in Calendar Year 1996 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Annual Monitoring report presents only the results of the monitoring data evaluations required for waste management sites addressed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Regime. The Annual Monitoring Report also serves as a consolidated reference for the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained throughout the Bear Creek Regime under the auspices of the Y-12 GWPP. This report provides an evaluation of the CY 1996 monitoring data with an emphasis on regime-wide groundwater and surface water quality and long-term concentration trends of regulated and non-regulated monitoring parameters.

  14. Phyto remediation groundwater trends at the DOE portsmouth gaseous

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the progress of a phyto-remediation action being performed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-740 Waste Oil Handling Facility to remediate contaminated groundwater under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action. This action was effected by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) decision to use phyto-remediation as the preferred remedy for the X-740 groundwater contamination. This remedy was recognized as a cost-effective, low-maintenance, and promising method to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). During 1999, prior to the tree installation at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in the area were collected from 10 monitoring wells completed in the Gallia Formation. The Gallia is the uppermost water-bearing zone and contains most of the groundwater contamination at PORTS. During the tree installation which took place during the summer of 1999, four new Gallia monitoring wells were installed at the X-740 Area in addition to the 10 Gallia wells which had been installed in the same area during the early 1990's. Manual water level measurements were collected quarterly from these 14 Gallia monitoring wells between 1998 and 2001. These manual water level measurements were collected to monitor the combined impact of the trees on the groundwater prior to root development. Beginning in 2001, water level measurements were collected monthly during the growing season (April-September) and quarterly during the dormant season (October-March). A total of eight water level measurements were collected annually to monitor the phyto-remediation system's effect on the groundwater in the X- 740 Area. The primary function of the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area is to hydraulically prevent further spreading of the TCE plume. This process utilizes deep-rooted plants, such as poplar trees, to extract large

  15. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for RCRA Constituent Analysis of Solidified Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2006-09-21

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents distributes test samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and metals in solid matrices. Each distribution of test samples is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department. The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the RCRA PDP. Participating laboratories demonstrate acceptable performance by successfully analyzing single- blind performance evaluation samples (subsequently referred to as PDP samples) according to the criteria established in this plan. PDP samples are used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). The concentrations of analytes in the PDP samples address levels of regulatory concern and encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in waste characterization samples. The WIPP requires analyses of homogeneous solid wastes to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples. Participating laboratories must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for WIPP samples.

  16. RCRA delisting of agent-decontaminated waste at Dugway Proving Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.; Green, D.R.; Lopez, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The State of Utah has declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, cleanup, testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues are listed as hazardous waste in Utah and several other States, but are not listed under regulations established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the primary law governing management of hazardous waste in the US These residues are identified as hazardous waste due to corrosivity, reactivity, chronic toxicity, and acute toxicity, and are designated as Hazardous Waste No. F999. The RCRA regulations (40 CFR 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other State hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous, but allow generators to petition the regulator to ``delist`` if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. The US Army Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) has initiated a project with the Argonne National Laboratory to demonstrate that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous waste and to achieve delisting. The initial focus is on delisting specific residues from decontamination of wastes generated during materials testing activities and contaminated soil at the US Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), Utah. This activity is referred to as Phase I of the delisting program. Subsequent phases of the delisting program will address additional waste streams at DPG and other Army installations. The purpose of this paper is to outline the Phase I TECOM delisting effort at DPG, identify some of the important technical issues associated with the delisting, and to discuss overall progress to date.

  17. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Third and fourth quarters 1996, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    SRS monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area HWMF as mandated by the permit and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the permit. The facility is describes in the introduction to Module III, Section C, of the permit. The F-Area HWMF well network monitors three district hydrostratigraphic units in the uppermost aquifer beneath the facility. The hydrostratigraphy at the F-Area HWMF is described in permit section IIIC.H.2, and the groundwater monitoring system is described in IIIC.H.4 and Appendix IIIC-B. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B post-closure care permit application for the F-Area HWMF submitted to SCDHEC in December 1990. Sampling and analysis are conducted as required by section IIIC.H.6 at the intervals specified in permit sections IIIC.H.10 and Appendix IIIC-D for the constituents specified in Appendix IIIC-D. Groundwater quality is compared to the GWPS list in section IIIC.H.1 and Appendix IIIC-A.

  18. Interim-status groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-B-63 trench

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.D.

    1995-02-09

    This document outlines the groundwater monitoring plan, under RCRA regulations in 40 CFR 265 Subpart F and WAC173-300-400, for the 216-B-63 Trench. This interim status facility is being sampled under detection monitoring criteria and this plan provides current program conditions and requirements.

  19. Appendix H: Past and Current Groundwater Flow and Contamination beneath Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.

    2008-01-17

    This is being prepared as an appendix for CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. and is part of PNNL support of the RCRA Facility Investigation Report. The document contains a detailed description of groundwater flow and contamination under the Central Plateau, emphasizing the areas around the tank farms.

  20. Common deficiencies in RCRA part B incinerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boomer, B.A.; Trenholm, A.R.

    1987-03-01

    Although requirements are listed in the regulations and guidance is provided in various publications, certain types of information often are deficient in RCRA Part B incinerator applications, resulting in deficiency notices and delays in the permitting process. This paper presents an approach for preparing an incinerator permit application and identifies common deficiencies in the applications. Specific problem areas discussed include engineering descriptions, process monitoring, gaseous emission monitoring, automatic waste feed cutoff systems, waste characterization, sampling and analysis, quality assurance/quality control, and general considerations. The paper also suggest approaches to satisfy requirements for these common problem areas resulting in an application that is more likely to be approved by a permit reviewer.

  1. 40 CFR 124.19 - Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING General Program Requirements § 124.19 Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES... schedule for the appeal and shall state that any interested person may file an amicus brief. Notice...

  2. 40 CFR 124.19 - Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING General Program Requirements § 124.19 Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES... schedule for the appeal and shall state that any interested person may file an amicus brief. Notice...

  3. 40 CFR 124.19 - Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING General Program Requirements § 124.19 Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES... schedule for the appeal and shall state that any interested person may file an amicus brief. Notice...

  4. DOSE ASSESSMENTS FROM THE DISPOSAL OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTES IN RCRA-C DISPOSAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the long-term performance of the RCRA-C disposal cell and potential doses to off-site receptors is used to derive maximum radionuclide specific concentrations in the wastes that would enable these wastes to be disposed of safely using the RCRA-C disposal cell technology....

  5. RCRA Summary Document for the David Witherspoon 1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeffer, J.

    2008-06-10

    , cylinders, and cable) and populations of debris type items (e.g., piles of bricks, small scrap metal, roofing material, scaffolding, and shelving) that are located throughout the DWI 1630 site. The project also generates an additional small volume of secondary waste [e.g., personal protective equipment (PPE), and miscellaneous construction waste] that is bagged and included in bulk soil shipments to the EMWMF. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the EMWMF does not allow for material that does not meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs). The waste being excavated in certain areas of the DWI 1630 site contained soil that did not meet RCRA LDR criteria; therefore this waste had to be segregated for treatment or alternate disposal offsite. This document identifies the approach taken by the DWI 1630 project to further characterize the areas identified during the Phase II Remedial Investigation (RI) as potentially containing RCRA-characteristic waste. This document also describes the methodology used to determine excavation limits for areas determined to be RCRA waste, post excavation sampling, and the treatment and disposal of this material.

  6. Determining eosin as a groundwater migration tracer by capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence using a multiwavelength laser.

    PubMed

    Brumley, William C; Farley, John W

    2003-07-01

    Measurements for determining of the path of groundwater migration remain an important tool in the overall assessment of environmental processes and transport of pollutants. This paper examines a multiwavelength laser for the determination of eosin, a groundwater tracer, using capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) at excitation wavelength 514.5 nm. Eosin was one of four dyes used in a study of adjacent resource conservation and recovery act (RCRA) and Superfund sites (created by the comprehensive environmental response, compensation, and liability act) that routinely relied on spectrofluorimetry for determination as we have previously reported. However, the improved specificity of CE-LIF is further illustrated in this work applied to the analysis of adsorbent pads placed in monitoring wells after dye injection and flushing from injection wells. The multiwavelength laser provided the capability to analyze for several dyes with one laser. The advantages/disadvantages of CE-LIF versus spectrofluorimetry are discussed. Spectrofluorimetry is fast and sensitive and will likely continue to be the primary workhorse technique. CE-LIF could provide confirmation when greater specificity is needed in a regulatory context. PMID:12874868

  7. Capillary electrophoresis/laser-induced fluorescence detection of fluorescein as a groundwater migration tracer.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, P L; Grange, A H; Brumley, W C; Donnelly, J R; Farley, J W

    1998-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been applied to the determination of the groundwater migration tracer dye fluorescein based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection and compared to determinations obtained with traditional spectrofluorimetry. Detection limits of injected dye in the low parts per trillion (ppt) ranges have been accomplished with both CE/LIF based on the Ar ion laser and with a spectrofluorimeter. This approach was used for a real-world problem in determining groundwater migration between adjacent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Superfund sites by the Environmental Sciences Division in response to regional needs and as application of new analytical tools under development. Fluorescent dye was injected into source wells and then was determined in monitoring wells by extracting pads that adsorbed the dye or by directly determining the dye in the water using solid-phase extraction (SPE), a preconcentration technique. The approaches based on CE/LIF exhibits increased specificity over existing approaches due to the separation and unique migration time of the dye. Additional studies were aimed at achieving sub-ppt levels in the water using solid-phase extraction and field-amplified injection techniques. PMID:9761212

  8. RCRA Post Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Waste Unit, Nevada Test Site for the Period October 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley Emer

    1998-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Unit, located in Area 3 of the Nevada Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1996-October 1997 period. Inspections of the U-3fi RCRA Unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. The objective of the neutron logging is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128 meter (420 feet) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 m to 82 m (240 to 270 ft).

  9. 36 CFR 1210.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR Parts 247 through 254... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ((RCRA) (Pub. L....

  10. 36 CFR 1210.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR Parts 247 through 254... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ((RCRA) (Pub. L....

  11. 24 CFR 84.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  12. 36 CFR 1210.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR Parts 247 through 254... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ((RCRA) (Pub. L....

  13. 36 CFR 1210.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR Parts 247 through 254... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ((RCRA) (Pub. L....

  14. 36 CFR 1210.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR Parts 247 through 254... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ((RCRA) (Pub. L....

  15. 24 CFR 84.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  16. 24 CFR 84.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  17. 24 CFR 84.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  18. 24 CFR 84.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1990-03-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 15 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989. This volume discusses the projects. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the samples aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 51 refs., 35 figs., 86 tabs.

  20. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2010-08-01

    The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

  1. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01

    The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

  2. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-12-01

    The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

  3. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    This report describes the progress of 12 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. During this quarter, field activities at the 300 Area process trenches, the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds, the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, and the 216-A-36B Crib consisted of ground-water sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes well development data, sediment analysis, and water-level measurements. Ground-water sampling was begun at this site, and results will be included in next quarter's report. Twelve new wells were installed during the quarter, two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, size at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells are included in this report. Driller's logs and other drilling and site characterization data will be provided in the next quarterly report. At the 2101-M Pond, construction was completed on four wells, and initial ground-water samples were taken. The drilling logs, geophysical logging data, and as-built diagrams are included in this report in Volume 2. 19 refs., 24 figs., 39 tabs.

  4. RESULTS OF GROUNDWATER MONITORING FOR THE 183-H SOLAR EVAPORATION BASINS AND 300 AREA PROCESS TRENCHES JANUARY THRU JUNE 2008

    SciTech Connect

    HARTMAN MJ

    2008-11-04

    This is one of a series of reports on Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) monitoring at the 183-H solar evaporation basins and the 300 Area process trenches. It fulfills the requirement of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-645(11)(g), 'Release from Regulated Units', to report twice each year on the effectiveness of the corrective action program. This report covers the period from January through June 2008. The current objective of corrective action monitoring the 183-H basins is simply to track trends. Although there is short-term variability in contaminant concentrations, trends over the past 10 years are downward. The current Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste [Permit No. WA 7890008967]) and monitoring plan remain adequate for the objective of tracking trends. The objective of groundwater monitoring at the 300 Area process trenches is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the corrective action program by examining the trend of the constituents of interest to confirm that they are attenuating naturally. The overall concentration of uranium in network wells remained above the 30 {micro}g/L drinking water standard in the three downgradient wells screened at the water table. Fluctuations of uranium concentration are caused by changes in river stage. The concentration of cis-1,2-dichloroethene remained above the 70 {micro}g/L drinking water standard in one well (399-1-16B). Concentrations are relatively steady at this well and are not affected by river stage. Trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene concentrations were below detection limits in all wells during the reporting period.

  5. Superfund TIO videos. Set A. Regulatory overview - CERCLA's relationship to other programs: RCRA, Title III, UST, CWA, SDWA. Part 1. Audio-Visual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The videotape is divided into five sections. Section 1 provides definitions and historical information on both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The four types of RCRA regulatory programs - Subtitles C, D, I, and J - are described. Treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) and recycling facilities are also discussed. Section 2 discusses the history behind the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III). The four major provisions of Title III, which are emergency planning, emergency release notification, community right-to-know reporting, and the toxic chemical release inventory are covered. Section 3 outlines the UST program covering notification, record keeping, and the UST Trust Fund. Section 4 outlines the six major provisions of the Clean Water Act (CWA): water quality, pretreatment, prevention of oil and hazardous substance discharges, responses to oil and hazardous substance discharges, discharges of hazardous substances into the ocean, and dredge and fill. Section 5 explains the purpose, regulations, and standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Specific issues such as underground injection, sole source aquifers, and lead contamination are discussed.

  6. RCRA Part B Permit Application for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory - Volume 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pamela R. Cunningham

    1992-07-01

    This section of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Part B permit application describes the waste characteristics Of the transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes at the RWMC waste management units to be permitted: the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility (ILTSF) and the Waste Storage Facility (WSF). The ILTSF is used to store radioactive remote-handled (RH) wastes. The WSF will be used to store radioactive contact-handled (CH) wastes. The Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) was established at the RWMC to provide interim storage of TRU waste. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A defines TRU waste as waste contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram (nCi/g) o f waste material. The TSA serves generators both on and off the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The ILTSF is located at the TSA, and the WSF will be located there also. Most of the wastes managed at the TSA are mixed wastes, which are radioactive wastes regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) that also contain hazardous materials regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. These wastes include TRU mixed wastes and some low-level mixed wastes. Accordingly, the TSA is subject to the permitting requirements of RCRA and the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA). Prior to 1982, DOE orders defined TRU wastes as having transuranium radionuclides in concentrations greater than 10 nCi/g, The low-level mixed wastes managed at the TSA are those wastes with 10 to 100 nCi/g of TRU radionuclides that prior to 1982 were considered TRU waste.

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-12-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

  8. 77 FR 18266 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and Clean...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... operate a storm water runoff collection system; (e) remove and dispose of scrap tires adjacent to the... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and Clean Air Act... compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (``RCRA'') and the Clean Air Act (``CAA'')....

  9. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.

  10. Assessing Risks to Populations at Superfund and Rcra Sites: Characterizing Effects on Populations (Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final document titled, Assessing Risks to Populations at Superfund and RCRA Sites: Characterizing Effects on Populations.

  11. Performance assessment techniques for groundwater recovery and treatment systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, G.L.

    1993-03-01

    Groundwater recovery and treatment (pump and treat systems) continue to be the most commonly selected remedial technology for groundwater restoration and protection programs at hazardous waste sites and RCRA facilities nationwide. Implementing a typical groundwater recovery and treatment system includes the initial assessment of groundwater quality, characterizing aquifer hydrodynamics, recovery system design, system installation, testing, permitting, and operation and maintenance. This paper focuses on methods used to assess the long-term efficiency of a pump and treat system. Regulatory agencies and industry alike are sensitive to the need for accurate assessment of the performance and success of groundwater recovery systems for contaminant plume abatement and aquifer restoration. Several assessment methods are available to measure the long-term performance of a groundwater recovery system. This paper presents six assessment techniques: degree of compliance with regulatory agency agreement (Consent Order of Record of Decision), hydraulic demonstration of system performance, contaminant mass recovery calculation, system design and performance comparison, statistical evaluation of groundwater quality and preferably, integration of the assessment methods. Applying specific recovery system assessment methods depends upon the type, amount, and quality of data available. Use of an integrated approach is encouraged to evaluate the success of a groundwater recovery and treatment system. The methods presented in this paper are for engineers and corporate management to use when discussing the effectiveness of groundwater remediation systems with their environmental consultant. In addition, an independent (third party) system evaluation is recommended to be sure that a recovery system operates efficiently and with minimum expense.

  12. Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

  13. Ranking of septic tank and drainfield sites using travel time to the groundwater table

    SciTech Connect

    Langkopf, B.S.; McCord, J.T.

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Restoration Program at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is tasked with performing assessments and cleanup of waste sites that belong to SNL. SNL`s waste sites are divided into several activities. Septic Tanks and Drainfields (STD) is an activity that includes 23 different sites at SNL/NM. All these sites may have released hazardous wastes into the soil from drains or sewers of buildings. The STD sites must be assessed and, if necessary, remediated according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action process. A modeling study has been completed to help prioritize the sites for future field investigation based on the risk that each site may pose to human health and the environment. Two of the influences on the risk to human health and environment are addressed in this study--the fluid disposal volume and groundwater depth. These two parameters, as well as several others, were used as input into a computer model to calculate groundwater travel time to the water table. The computer model was based on Darcy`s Law and a simple mass balance. To account for uncertainty in the input parameters, a Monte Carlo approach was used to determine the travel times; 1,000 realizations were completed to determine the travel time for each site. The range assigned to each of the input parameters was sampled according to an assigned statistical distribution using the Latin Hypercube Method to arrive at input for the calculations. The groundwater travel times resulting from these calculations were used to rank the sites for future field investigation.

  14. Revised ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 300 area process trenches

    SciTech Connect

    Schalla, R.; Aaberg, R.L.; Bates, D.J.; Carlile, J.V.M.; Freshley, M.D.; Liikala, T.L.; Mitchell, P.J.; Olsen, K.B.; Rieger, J.T.

    1988-09-01

    This document contains ground-water monitoring plans for process-water disposal trenches located on the Hanford Site. These trenches, designated the 300 Area Process Trenches, have been used since 1973 for disposal of water that contains small quantities of both chemicals and radionuclides. The ground-water monitoring plans contained herein represent revision and expansion of an effort initiated in June 1985. At that time, a facility-specific monitoring program was implemented at the 300 Area Process Trenches as part of a regulatory compliance effort for hazardous chemicals being conducted on the Hanford Site. This monitoring program was based on the ground-water monitoring requirements for interim-status facilities, which are those facilities that do not yet have final permits, but are authorized to continue interim operations while engaged in the permitting process. The applicable monitoring requirements are described in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 40 CFR 265.90 of the federal regulations, and in WAC 173-303-400 of Washington State's regulations (Washington State Department of Ecology 1986). The program implemented for the process trenches was designed to be an alternate program, which is required instead of the standard detection program when a facility is known or suspected to have contaminated the ground water in the uppermost aquifer. The plans for the program, contained in a document prepared by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) in 1985, called for monthly sampling of 14 of the 37 existing monitoring wells at the 300 Area plus the installation and sampling of 2 new wells. 27 refs., 25 figs., 15 tabs.

  15. Resource conservation and recovery act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    This is Volume 2 of a two-volume set of documents that describes the progress of 12 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. This volume provides those drilling logs and well inspection/completion reports inadvertently left out of last quarter's report for the 216-A-36B Crib (Appendix A) and as-built diagrams, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled this quarter near the 2101-M Pond. Volume 1 discusses the 12 projects.

  16. RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 1. User's guide. Keyword index

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, D.

    1991-08-01

    The RCRA Permit Policy Compendium is a reference for Regional and State permit writers which consists of Headquarters' permitting policies and procedures. The Compendium volumes include the Users' Guide, a key word index, and reference memoranda, letters, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Directives, and other documents organized chronologically within subject categories. The Compendium was originally compiled in late 1985. The updated Compendium includes documents issued through September 30, 1990. A key word index is included in Vol. I to assist the user in identifying and locating relevant documents. The index, organized in alphabetical order, lists the topic and the documents which are relevant to the topic, identified by title, document number and date. The key word index groups related topics and cross references topics which may be relevent. Subkey words have been identified as a means to specify groups of titles which may fall within a broader key word category. Summaries of documents which had been included in the original Compendium have been deleted. Users of the original Compendium did not find them useful.

  17. 25 Years Of Environmental Remediation In The General Separations Area Of The Savannah River Site: Lessons Learned About What Worked And What Did Not Work In Soil And Groundwater Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, Gerald; Thibault, Jeffrey; Millings, Margaret; Prater, Phil

    2015-03-16

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is owned and administered by the US Department of Energy (DOE). SRS covers an area of approximately 900 square kilometers. The General Separation Area (GSA) is located roughly in the center of the SRS and includes: radioactive material chemical separations facilities, radioactive waste tank farms, a variety of radioactive seepage basins, and the radioactive waste burial grounds. Radioactive wastes were disposed in the GSA from the mid-1950s through the mid-1990s. Radioactive operations at the F Canyon began in 1954; radioactive operations at H Canyon began in 1955. Waste water disposition to the F and H Seepage Basins began soon after operations started in the canyons. The Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) began operations in 1952 to manage solid waste that could be radioactive from all the site operations, and ceased receiving waste in 1972. The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) received radioactive solid waste from 1969 until 1995. Environmental legislation enacted in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s led to changes in waste management and environmental cleanup practices at SRS. The US Congress passed the Clean Air Act in 1970, and the Clean Water Act in 1972; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) was enacted in 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) was enacted by Congress in 1980; the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA) was signed into law in 1992. Environmental remediation at the SRS essentially began with a 1987 Settlement Agreement between the SRS and the State of South Carolina (under the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control - SCDHEC), which recognized linkage between many SRS waste management facilities and RCRA. The SRS manages several of the larger groundwater remedial activities under RCRA for facilities recognized early on as environmental problems. All subsequent

  18. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress Report for the Period April 1 to June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1989. These projects are for the 300 area process trenches (300 area), 183-H solar evaporation basins (100-H area), 200 areas low-level burial grounds, nonradioactive dangerous waste landfill (southeast of the 200 areas), 1301-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 1324-N surface impoundment and 1324-NA percolation pond (100-N area), 1325-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 216-A-10 crib (200-east area), 216-A-29 ditch (200-east area), 216-A-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-3 pond (east of the 200-east area), 2101-M pond (200-east area), grout treatment facility (200-east area).

  19. 75 FR 70947 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... generation, storage, and transport provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, 42 U.S.C. 6901 (RCRA) et seq., the pre-treatment requirements of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Clean Water... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Notice...

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) Part B health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operates several hazardous waste storage and treatment units including a hazardous waste incinerator for managing wastes generated by research programs. Research programs conducted at LLNL generate nonradioactive, radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. LLNL operates several hazardous waste storage and treatment units including a hazardous waste incinerator. Because numerous storage and treatment operations are used to manage these wastes, it was necessary to conduct this health risk assessment. This document presents the results of a detailed evaluation of the hazardous and radioactive waste incinerator and associated waste feed tank. 200 refs., 5 figs., 53 tabs.

  1. Economic impact analysis, RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) interim status standards. Volume IV

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This appendix contains two sets of sample calculations. The first example treats an industry segment, phenolic resins, according to the methodology used by Arthur D. Little, Inc., for the industries for which other contractors did not provide basic data. The second example treats an industry, leather tanning, for which, the basic data were provided by another contractor. The two methods differed somewhat -- particularly in the definition of model plant subcategories and in the way the subcategories are aggregated.

  2. Groundwater Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Sean A.

    A good introductory groundwater textbook must strike a delicate balance in presenting the basics of the physical, chemical, geological, mathematical, and engineering aspects of the groundwater field without being too lengthy or overly detailed. Charles Fitts states that his motivation for writing Groundwater Science was to be able to “…teach concepts and quantitative analyses with a clear, lean, but thorough book.” He has succeeded in striking this balance of having just the right amount of information, and has met his goals of producing a concise book that can be used to teach the concepts and analyses necessary for the study of groundwater.Overall, Groundwater Science would serve well as the text for an introductory groundwater course at the college senior or first-year graduate level. The author and the publisher have made excellent use of two-color, gray and blue-scale images throughout the book. The graphics are crisp and explanatory. Data sets needed to work some of the problems in the book are available as text files from its Web site (http://www.academicpress.com/groundwater). I found these files to be complete and easy to understand. The references are up to date and point the reader to additional information across a wide range of groundwater issues, and also provide a number of examples to illustrate different points made in the book.

  3. Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer - 13158

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, Carl W. Jr.; Conley, S.F.; Carr, Jennifer S.; Schatz, Aaron L.; Brown, W.L.; Hildebrand, R. Douglas

    2013-07-01

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwater monitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons. Historically, the monitoring activities have been very 'people intensive'. Field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms showing information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from two official electronic databases: the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The samplers traditionally used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and other personnel posted the collected information. In Automating Groundwater Sampling at Hanford (HNF-38542-FP Revision 0, Presented at Waste Management 2009 Conference, March 1 - March 5, 2009, Phoenix, AZ), we described the methods, tools, and techniques that would be used in automating the activities associated with measuring water levels. The Field Logging and Electronic Data Gathering (FLEDG) application/database that automates collecting the water-level measurement data has now been implemented at Hanford. In addition to eliminating the need to print out

  4. Exiting RCRA Subtitle C regulation data for supporting a new regulatory path for immobilized mixed debris

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C.L.; Carson, S.D.; Cheng, Wu-Ching

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents analytical and empirical data that provide technical support for the position that mixed debris (debris contaminated with both radioactive and hazardous constituents) treated by immobilization in accordance with 40 CFR 268.45 can exit RCRA Subtitle C requirements at the time the treatment is complete. Pathways analyses and risk assessments of low-level waste and RCRA mixed waste disposal facilities show that these two types of facilities provide equivalent long-term (> 100 years) performance and protection of human health and the environment. A proposed two-tier approach for waste form performance criteria is discussed.

  5. Groundwater exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    Groundwater flow meddles with hydrological, environmental and geological processes. As water scarcity issues mount for people living above ground, the vast stores of freshwater in the subsurface require research attention.

  6. RCRA corrective action for underground storage tanks -- Subtitle C for Subtitle I

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide guidance to DOE and DOE contractor personnel responsible for planning and implementation of corrective measures addressing cleanup of releases of hazardous materials or regulated substances from underground storage tanks regulated under RCRA Subtitle C or Subtitle I.

  7. WASTE ANALYSIS PLAN REVIEWER ADVISOR - AN INTELLIGENT DATABASE TO ASSIST RCRA PERMIT REVIEWERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Waste Analysis Plan Review Advisor (WAPRA) system assists in the review of the Waste Analysis Plan Section of RCRA Part B facility permit applications. pecifically, this program automates two functions of the waste analysis plan review. irst, the system checks all wastes whic...

  8. WASTE ANALYSIS PLAN REVIEW ADVISOR - AN INTELLIGENT DATABASE TO ASSIST RCRA PERMIT REVIEWERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Waste Analysis Plan Review Advisor (WAPRA) system assists in the review of the Waste Analysis Plan Section of RCRA Part B facility permit applications. Specifically, this program automates two functions of the waste analysis plan review. First, the system checks all wastes wh...

  9. 40 CFR 124.19 - Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES and PSD Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... addition, a motion or a response to a motion may be submitted by facsimile if the submission contains no... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES and PSD Permits. 124.19 Section 124.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  10. 40 CFR 124.19 - Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES and PSD Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... addition, a motion or a response to a motion may be submitted by facsimile if the submission contains no... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES and PSD Permits. 124.19 Section 124.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  11. RCRA SUBTITLE D (258): SEISMIC DESIGN GUIDANCE FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    On October 9, 1993, the new RCRA Subtitle D regulation (40CFR Part 258) went into effect. hese regulations are applicable to landfills reclining solid waste (MSW) and establish minimum Federal criteria for the siting, design, operations, and closure of MSW landfills. hese regulat...

  12. RCRA SUBTITLE D (258): SEISMIC DESIGN GUIDANCE FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    On October 9, 1993, the new RCRA Subtitle D regulations (40 CFR Part 258) went into effect. These regulations are applicable to landfills receiving municipal solid waste (MSW) and establish minimum Federal criteria for the siting, design, operation, and closure of MSW landfills....

  13. 40 CFR 270.250 - What is a RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... you to manage hazardous waste. It is issued under 40 CFR part 124, subpart G and subpart J of this...? 270.250 Section 270.250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM RCRA...

  14. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects & Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC`s scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule.

  15. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  16. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Chapter E, Appendix E1, Chapter L, Appendix L1: Volume 12, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project was authorized by the US Department of Energy 5 (DOE) National Security and Military Applications of the Nuclear Energy Authorization Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-164). Its legislative mandate is to provide a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive waste resulting from national defense programs and activities. To fulfill this mandate, the WIPP facility has been designed to perform scientific investigations of the behavior of bedded salt as a repository medium and the interactions between the soft and radioactive wastes. In 1991, DOE proposed to initiate a experimental Test Phase designed to demonstrate the performance of the repository. The Test Phase activities involve experiments using transuranic (TRU) waste typical of the waste planned for future disposal at the WIPP facility. Much of this TRU waste is co-contaminated with chemical constituents which are defined as hazardous under HWMR-7, Pt. II, sec. 261. This waste is TRU mixed waste and is the subject of this application. Because geologic repositories, such as the WIPP facility, are defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as land disposal facilities, the groundwater monitoring requirements of HWMR-7, PLV, Subpart X, must be addressed. HWMR-7, Pt. V, Subpart X, must be addressed. This appendix demonstrates that groundwater monitoring is not needed in order to demonstrate compliance with the performance standards; therefore, HWMR-7, Pt.V, Subpart F, will not apply to the WIPP facility.

  17. Direction of ground-water flow in the surficial aquifer in the vicinity of impact areas G-10 and K-2, Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base, North Carolina, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Stephen L.; Howe, Stephen S.; Terziotti, Silvia

    2004-01-01

    Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune is located in Onslow County in the North Carolina Coastal Plain. In support of North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resource requirements, Camp Lejeune is developing a site closure plan for two Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated open burn/open detonation (OB/OD) facilities located within Impact Area K-2 and Impact Area G-10, respectively. Both Impact Areas are used for training activities involving live artillery fire. The two OB/OD facilities are used to treat RCRA regulated waste munitions. To provide Base officials with information needed for assessing the quality of ground water at these sites, hydrologic data were used to characterize groundwater flow directions and hydraulic gradients in the surficial aquifer underlying the Impact Areas. Water-level data in the unconfined surficial aquifer and potentiometric head data in the underlying Castle Hayne aquifer were compiled from existing and newly drilled wells. Water-table contour maps were developed for Impact Areas K-2 and G-10 to examine the direction of ground-water flow in the surficial aquifer. The primary directions of ground-water flow beneath K-2 are southward and eastward toward discharge zones along the New River and its tributaries. Beneath interior areas of G-10, water in the surficial aquifer flows outward in all directions toward discharge zones along local streams that drain westward to the New River or to streams that drain southward and eastward to the Intracoastal Waterway and the Atlantic Ocean. Long-term water-level data for the period October 1994 through September 2004 at selected Camp Lejeune well sites were used to examine trends in ground-water levels and vertical hydraulic gradients between the surficial and Castle Hayne aquifers. Evaluation of water-level data for three wells in the surficial aquifer indicated no significant trends for this period of record. The apparent water-level declines in two of the three Castle

  18. 78 FR 27430 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act On April 26, 2013, the Department of Justice lodged a proposed consent decree with the United States District Court... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (``RCRA''), 42 U.S.C. 6934(a). The proposed consent decree...

  19. Annual report of 1991 groundwater monitoring data for the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin at the Y-12 Plant: Reporting and statistical evaluation of the subsequent year (sixth) data

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, L.W.; Mercier, T.M.

    1992-02-01

    This annual report has historically been prepared to meet the annual reporting requirements of the Tennessee Department of and Environment and Conservation (TDEC), Hazardous Waste Management Regulation 1200-1-11-.05 (6)(e), for detection monitoring data collected on Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wells in place around facilities which are accorded interim status. The regulatory authority for these units at the Y-12 Plant is currently in transition. A Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) with an effective date of January 1, 1992, has been negotiated with the Department of Energy (DOE) for the Oak Ridge Reservation. This agreement provides a framework for remediation of the Oak Ridge Reservation so that both RCRA and CERCLA requirements are integrated into the remediation process and provides for State, EPA, and DOE to proceed with CERCLA as the lead regulatory requirement and RCRA as an applicable or relevant and appropriate requirement. This report is presented for the RCRA certified wells for two interim status units at the Y-12 Plant. These units are Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin. Kerr Hollow is currently undergoing clean closure under RCRA. The Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) was closed in 1989 under a TDEC approved RCRA closure plan. The relevance of a RCRA Post-Closure Permit to either of these units is a matter of contention between DOE and TDEC since the FFA does not contemplate post-closure permits.

  20. Groundwater Screen

    1993-11-09

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources and release to percolation ponds. The code calculates the limiting soil concentration or effluent release concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: Contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport inmore » the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. Concentration as a function of time at a user specified receptor point and maximum concentration averaged over the exposure interval are also calculated. In addition, the code calculates transport and impacts of radioactive progeny. Input to GWSCREEN is through one, free format ASCII file. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool.« less

  1. RCRA designation of discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kirner, N.P.

    1994-09-01

    Many sealed sources containing americium and beryllium are used throughout construction, industry, and research, and will eventually require disposal. For planning purposes it is necessary to determine whether these sources, when disposed, constitute a mixed waste, i.e., a waste containing hazardous constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and radioactive constituents regulated under the Atomic Energy Act. Waste designation criteria contained in 40 CFR 261 are evaluated in detail in this report. It is determined that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources do not contain any wastes listed in Subpart D of 40 CFR 261, nor do the discarded sources exhibit any hazardous characteristics. Therefore, it is concluded that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources are not a mixed waste under regulations established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Hazardous waste regulatory programs delegated to States, however, may have regulations that differ from those of the Federal government.

  2. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    WAG 6 comprises a shallow land burial facility used for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) and, until recently, chemical wastes. As such, the site is subject to regulation under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). To comply with these regulations, DOE, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), developed a strategy for closure and remediation of WAG 6 by 1997. A key component of this strategy was to complete an RFI by September 1991. The primary objectives of the RFI were to evaluate the site's potential human health and environmental impacts and to develop a preliminary list of alternatives to mitigate these impacts. The WAG 6 one of three solid waste management units evaluated Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) existing waste disposal records and sampling data and performed the additional sampling and analysis necessary to: describe the nature and extent of contamination; characterize key contaminant transport pathways; and assess potential risks to human health and the environment by developing and evaluating hypothetical receptor scenarios. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risks as a result for exposure to radionuclides and chemicals were quantified for each hypothetical human receptor. For environmental receptors, potential impacts were qualitatively assessed. Taking into account regulatory requirements and base line risk assessment results, preliminary site closure and remediation objectives were identified, and a preliminary list of alternatives for site closure and remediation was developed.

  3. 77 FR 54576 - Proposed RCRA Prospective Purchaser Agreement, Order on Consent and Covenant Not To Sue for a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... Party pursuant to Sections 3008, 7003, or 9006 of RCRA, with respect to the Existing Contamination. Existing Contamination is defined as any Waste Material present or existing on or under the Property as...

  4. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2001-03-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

  5. Impacts of proposed RCRA regulations and other related federal environmental regulations on fossil fuel-fired facilities: Final report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    Estimation of the costs associated with implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for non-hazardous and hazardous material disposal in the utility industry are provided. These costs are based on engineering studies at a number of coal-fired power plants in which the costs for hazardous and non-hazardous disposal are compared to the costs developed for the current practice design for each utility. The relationship of the three costs is displayed. The emphasis of this study is on the determination of incremental costs rather than the absolute costs for each case (current practice, non-hazardous, or hazardous). For the purpose of this project, the hazardous design cost was determined for minimum versus maximum compliance.

  6. Impacts of proposed RCRA regulations and other related federal environmental regulations on fossil fuel-fired facilities: Final report, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    Estimation of the costs associated with implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for non-hazardous and hazardous material disposal in the utility industry are provided. These costs are based on engineering studies at a number of coal-fired power plants in which the costs for hazardous and non-hazardous disposal are compared to the costs developed for the current practice design for each utility. The relationship of the three costs is displayed. The emphasis of this study is on the determination of incremental costs rather than the absolute costs for each case (current practice, non-hazardous, or hazardous). For the purpose of this project, the hazardous design cost was determined for both minimum and maximum compliance.

  7. Leaching studies of coal gasification solid waste to meet RCRA requirements for land disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, T.; Boegly, W.J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the research currently underway at ORNL related to the land disposal of coal gasification ash. Included are data on the chemical composition and properties of ash from five of six proposed gasification/liquefaction demonstration plants and of several selected soils. Batch leaching results are presented which determine compliance with RCRA, along with other suggested batch leaching procedures. Leaching studies with ash/soil columns are also presented. The ultimate goal of this study is to provide design information and procedures to insure that solid wastes from gasification plants will comply with RCRA regardless of whether the waste is classified as hazardous or non-hazardous.

  8. Social impact evaluation of the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppitti, James; Dietz, Thomas

    1983-11-01

    Debate over environmental policy often focuses on social impacts of those policies, but few empirical studies examine the impacts of environmental regulations once they are implemented. A quasi-experimental design based on survey data is used to assess the social impacts of the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) on the West Virginia chemical industry. Changes in employment, manufacturing process, product line, and manufacturing costs are evaluated. RCRA seems to have produced changes in manufacturing processes, but we find no statistically significant impacts on.jobs, product line, or manufacturing costs.

  9. Groundwater workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Interstate Conference on Water Policy has released an Executive Report of the 1989 Ground Water Information Management Workshops. The report summarizes workgroup findings and recommendations for action as identified at the four workshops conducted in the winter and spring of 1989 in Little Rock, Ark.; Sacramento, Calif.; Harrisburg, Pa.; and Omaha, Nebr. The workshops, cosponsored by ICWP and the U.S. Geological Survey, attracted over 200 participants from local, state, and federal government, academia, and the private sector.The two primary objectives of the workshop series were to provide participants with information about groundwater data management initiatives at all levels of government, and to elicit information and ideas from participants about improving data management and exchange. The report states that although the individual workshops reflected regional concerns and experiences, collectively they provide a solid foundation for developing a national perspective on groundwater information management needs.

  10. Discussion paper on applicability of oil and grease analysis for RCRA closure criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    A site characterization (SC) was performed for the Building 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility. The initial SC indicated areas which had oil and grease levels above the criteria of the currently proposed RCRA closure plan. After further investigation, it was demonstrated that the oil and grease parameter may not be an accurate indication of a release from this facility and should not be included as a contaminant of concern in the closure criteria.

  11. Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

  12. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is composed of the original 32-acre landfill, plus expansion areas to the north and south that added 16 and 22 acres, respectively, to the facility. The landfill is subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and currently operates under South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Domestic Waste Permit 87A. Fifty-seven wells of the LFW series monitor the groundwater quality in Steed Pond Aquifer (formerly Aquifer Zone I/IIC[sub 2]) (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill. These wells are sampled quarterly for certain indicator parameters, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, volatile organics, and other constituents as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program and to comply with the SCDHEC domestic waste permit. This report reviews the 1992 activities of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program.

  13. Groundwater ecohydrology: phreatophyte root uptake of groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steward, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    An analytic solution is presented for groundwater uptake by phreatophytes. This solution is developed for individual phreatophytes with prescribed mathematical forms of groundwater uptake beneath the plant. As this function is linear, mathematical solutions may be superimposed to simulate groundwater uptake by a field of phreatophytes. A simpler representation of groundwater uptake by a field of phreatophytes is developed through aid of the Analytic Element Method. This, too, may be superimposed as the functions are linear to simulate groundwater flow associated with fields of phreatophytes. Together, this provides a computationally effective means to simulate the detailed local groundwater flow field associated with uptake by a phreatophyte within a regional groundwater flow field. Results illustrate the spatial patterns that emerge from localized groundwater extractions within fields of phreatophytes.

  14. Review Of Low-Flow Bladder Pump And High-Volume Air Piston Pump Groundwater Sampling Systems At Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S. S.; Bailey, G. A.; Jackson, T. O.

    2003-02-25

    Since 1996, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) has run both a portable high-volume air-piston pump system and a dedicated, low-flow bladder pump system to collect groundwater samples. The groundwater contaminants of concern at SNL/NM are nitrate and the volatile organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloethene (PCE). Regulatory acceptance is more common for the high-volume air piston pump system, especially for programs like SNL/NM's, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes logistical and analytical results of the groundwater sampling systems used at SNL/NM. With two modifications to the off-the-shelf low-flow bladder pump, SNL/NM consistently operates the dedicated low-flow system at depths greater than 450 feet below ground surface. As such, the low-flow sampling system requires fewer personnel, less time and materials, and generates less purge and decontamination water than does the high-volume system. However, the bladder pump cannot work in wells with less than 4 feet of water. A review of turbidity and laboratory analytical results for TCE, PCE, and chromium (Cr) from six wells highlight the affect or lack of affects the sampling systems have on groundwater samples. In the PVC wells, turbidity typically remained < 5 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) regardless of the sampling system. In the wells with a stainless steel screen, turbidity typically remained < 5 NTU only with the low-flow system. When the high-volume system was used, the turbidity and Cr concentration typically increased an order of magnitude. TCE concentrations at two wells did not appear to be sensitive to the sampling method used. However, PCE and TCE concentrations dropped an order of magnitude when the high-volume system was used at two other wells. This paper recommends that SNL/NM collaborate with other facilities with similar groundwater depths, continue to pursue regulatory approval for using

  15. Health Risk Assessment for Area 514 RCRA Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, G M; Hall, L C

    2005-05-26

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a USDOE research and development institution for science and technology applied to national security. The specific area that is the subject of this document, Area 514, was the location of active LLNL waste treatment facilities until November 2003, and the operations there were authorized under interim status. The site is being closed pursuant to the requirements of the Resource Conservation Recovery Act. The DTSC-approved ''Closure Plan for Area 514 Treatment and Storage Facility, LLNL 2004'', states clean closure concentrations for certain organic compounds, metals and metalloids. if all soil samples contained measured concentrations less than these levels, it was agreed that the site would meet the requirements for clean closure. However, if the samples had measured concentrations greater than the clean closure levels, a more detailed risk assessment could be prepared to evaluate the potential effects of the actual measured levels. Soil samples collected from 33 locations in Area 514 were analyzed for 37 constituents of potential concern, as identified by the Closure Plan. Many of these compounds and elements were not detected. However, 10 metals or metalloids were present at levels above the clean closure requirements, and 19 organic compounds were identified as contaminants of potential concern. Following the guidance in the Closure Plan, a health risk assessment is presented in this document to demonstrate the low level of potential health effects from the remaining constituents and to support clean closure of the site. Three types of hypothetical receptors were identified: an intrusive construction worker conducting trenching in the area, a bystander worker in a nearby building, and a future resident. Of the worker receptors, the intrusive construction worker was found to have the greater overall chronic exposure, with a theoretical calculated carcinogenic risk of 4 x 10{sup -8}, a chronic hazard index of 8 x

  16. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) environmental checklist forms for 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 304 Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 304 Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The 304 Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

  17. RCRA Facility Investigation Plan K-1004 Area Lab Drain and the K-1007-B Pond - Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    ORGDP, Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc.

    1988-12-01

    Within the confines of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) are hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities; some are in operation while others are no longer in use. these solid waste management units (SWMUs) are subject to assessment by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Plans are scheduled to be submitted for all units during calendar years 1987 and 1988. The RFI Plan - General Document (K/HS-132) includes information applicable to all the ORGDP SMWUs and serves as a reference document for the site-specific RFI plans. This document is the site-specific RFI Plan for the K-1004 Area Lab Drain (ALD) and the K-1007-B Pond. This plan is based upon requirements described in the draft document, RFI Guidance, Vols. I-IV, December 1987 (EPA 530/SW-87-001). This unit is regulated by Section 3004(u) of the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). Contained within this document are geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological data specific to the K-1004 ALD and the K-1007-B Pond. The potential for release of contamination through the various media to receptors is addressed. A sampling plan is proposed to further determine the extent (if any) of release of contamination to the surrounding environment. Included are health and safety procedures to be followed when implementing the sampling plan. Quality control (QC) procedures for remedial action occurring on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are presented in 'The Environmental Surveillance Procedures Quality Control Program, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (ESH/Sub/87-21706/1), and quality assurance (QA) guidelines for ORGDP investigations are contained in The K-25 Remedial Actions Program Quality Assurance Plan, K/HS-231.

  18. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the period October 2000-July 2001

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Tobiason

    2002-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 2000--July 2001 monitoring period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in July 2001. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began eight years ago. Precipitation for the period October 2000 through July 2001 was 9.42 centimeters (cm) (3.71 inches [in]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2001). The prior year annual rainfall (January 2000 through December 2000) was 10.44 cm (4.1 1 in.). The recorded average annual rainfall for this site from 1972 to January 2000 is 14.91 cm (5.87 in.). The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the trenches.

  19. RCRA delisting of agent-decontaminated waste and remediation waste at Dugway Proving Ground: A program update

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.; O`Neill, H.J.

    1996-03-01

    In July 1988, the state of Utah issued regulations that declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, and testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues were designated as corrosive, reactive, toxic, and acute hazardous (Hazardous Waste No. F999). These residues are not listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which is the primary law governing management of hazardous waste in the United States. The RCRAI regulations (40 CFR 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other state hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous but allow generators to petition the regulator to {open_quotes}delist{close_quotes} if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. In 1994, the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command FECOM initiated a project with the Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to demonstrate that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous waste and to achieve delisting. The initial focus is on delisting agent-decontaminated residues and soil with a history of contamination at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), Utah. An overview of the DPG delisting program was presented at the 1995 American Defense Preparedness Association Environmental Symposium. Since that time, much progress has been made. The purpose of this paper is to review the DPG delisting program and discuss overall progress. Emphasis is placed on progress with regard to analytical methods that will be used to demonstrate that the target residues do not contain hazardous amounts of chemical agent.

  20. Technical approach to groundwater restoration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Technical Approach to Groundwater Restoration (TAGR) provides general technical guidance to implement the groundwater restoration phase of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The TAGR includes a brief overview of the surface remediation and groundwater restoration phases of the UMTRA Project and describes the regulatory requirements, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, and regulatory compliance. A section on program strategy discusses program optimization, the role of risk assessment, the observational approach, strategies for meeting groundwater cleanup standards, and remedial action decision-making. A section on data requirements for groundwater restoration evaluates the data quality objectives (DQO) and minimum data required to implement the options and comply with the standards. A section on sits implementation explores the development of a conceptual site model, approaches to site characterization, development of remedial action alternatives, selection of the groundwater restoration method, and remedial design and implementation in the context of site-specific documentation in the site observational work plan (SOWP) and the remedial action plan (RAP). Finally, the TAGR elaborates on groundwater monitoring necessary to evaluate compliance with the groundwater cleanup standards and protection of human health and the environment, and outlines licensing procedures.

  1. Disemployment effects caused by regulation of drilling fluids and produced waters as hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    SciTech Connect

    Flaim, S.J.

    1988-03-01

    This report reviews and compares several studies of the effects on employment of regulating wastes from oil and natural gas exploration and extraction under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The waste management scenarios on which most of the studies were based were developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The analyses show that as many as 500,000-700,000 jobs may be lost in the first year if RCRA Subtitle C rules are applied to drilling fluids and produced waters. As a results, unemployment in major oil-producing states could rise by as much as six percentage points. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. A detection-level hazardous waste ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 200 areas low-level burial grounds and retrievable storage units

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    This plan defines the actions needed to achieve detection-level monitoring compliance at the Hanford Site 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Compliance will be achieved through characterization of the hydrogeology and monitoring of the ground water beneath the LLBG located in the Hanford Site 200 Areas. 13 refs., 20 figs.

  3. Reaching Site Closure for Groundwater under Multiple Regulatory Agencies

    SciTech Connect

    Glucksberg, N.; Shephard, Gene; Peters, Jay; Couture, B.

    2008-01-15

    Groundwater at the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) requires investigation of both radionuclides and chemical constituents in order to achieve closure. Cleanup criteria for groundwater are regulated both by federal and state agencies. These requirements vary in both numerical values as well as the duration of post remediation monitoring. The only consistent requirement is the development of a site conceptual model and an understanding of the hydrogeologic conditions that will govern contaminant transport and identify potential receptors. To successfully reach closure under each agency, it is paramount to understand the different requirements during the planning stages of the investigation. Therefore, the conceptual site model, groundwater transport mechanisms, and potential receptors must be defined. Once the hydrogeology is understood, a long term groundwater program can then be coordinated to meet each regulatory agency requirement to both terminate the NRC license and reach site closure under RCRA. Based on the different criteria, the CTDEP-LR (or RSR criteria) are not only bounding, but also requires the longest duration. As with most decommissioning efforts, regulatory attention is focused on the NRC, however, with the recent industry initiatives based on concern of tritium releases to groundwater at other plants, it is likely that the USEPA and state agencies may continue to drive site investigations. By recognizing these differences, data quality objectives can include all agency requirements, thus minimizing rework or duplicative efforts. CYAPCO intends to complete groundwater monitoring for the NRC and CTDEP-RD by July 2007. However, because shallow remediations are still being conducted, site closure under USEPA and CTDEP-LR is projected to be late 2011.

  4. SUBSURFACE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING TECHNIQUES: A DESK REFERENCE GUIDE - VOLUME I: SOLIDS AND GROUND WATER - APPENDICES A AND B

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many EPA programs, including those under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), require subsurface characterization and monitoring to detect ground-water contamination and provide data to devel...

  5. 76 FR 42138 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    .../a Foremost Fertilizer, Civil Action No. 5:11-cv- 00389-WTH-KRS, was lodged with the United States... (``FDEP'') for violations by Hi-Acres at a retail sales outlet for pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers... Protection v. Hi-Acres, LLC, d/b/a Foremost Fertilizer, Inc. D.J. Ref. 90-7-1-09265. The Consent Decree...

  6. Future of groundwater modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, Christian D.; Panday, Sorab

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing need to better manage water resources, the future of groundwater modeling is bright and exciting. However, while the past can be described and the present is known, the future of groundwater modeling, just like a groundwater model result, is highly uncertain and any prediction is probably not going to be entirely representative. Thus we acknowledge this as we present our vision of where groundwater modeling may be headed.

  7. Management of hazardous waste at RCRA facilities during the flood of `93 -- Methods used and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.; Jacko, R.B.

    1996-11-01

    During the summer of 1993, the state of Iowa experienced severe flooding that caused the release of many hazardous materials into the environment. Six months after the flood, the Iowa section of the RCRA branch, US EPA Region 7, sent inspectors to survey every RCRA facility in Iowa. Information was gathered through questionnaires to determine the flood`s impact and to learn potential lessons that could be beneficial in future flood disasters. The objective of this project was to use the information gathered to determine effective storage methods and emergency procedures for handling hazardous material during flood disasters. Additional data were obtained through record searches, phone interviews, and site visits. Data files and statistics were analyzed, then the evident trends and specific insights observed were utilized to create recommendations for RCRA facilities in the flood plain and for the federal EPA and state regulatory agencies. The recommendations suggest that RCRA regulated facilities in the flood plain should: employ the safest storage methods possible; have a flood emergency plan that includes the most effective release prevention available; and take advantage of several general suggestions for flood protection. The recommendations suggest that the federal EPA and state regulatory agencies consider: including a provision requiring large quantity generators of hazardous waste in the flood plain to include flood procedures in the contingency plans; establishing remote emergency storage areas during the flood disasters; encouraging small quantity generators (SQGs) within the flood plain to establish flood contingency plans; and promoting sound flood protection engineering practices for all RCRA facilities in the flood plain.

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Sites quality assurance project plan: Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) describes the measures that shall be taken to ensure that the environmental data collected during characterization and closure activities of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are meaningful, valid, defensible, and can be used to achieve project objectives. These activities are conducted by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Nevada Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The Nevada ER Project consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The RCRA Industrial Sites subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada ER Project. Currently, this QAPjP is limited to the seven RCRA Industrial Sites identified within this document that are to be closed under an interim status and pertains to all field-investigation, analytical-laboratory, and data-review activities in support of these closures. The information presented here supplements the RCRA Industrial Sites Project Management Plan and is to be used in conjunction with the site-specific subproject sampling and analysis plans.

  9. Evaluating Adult Groundwater Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerakis, Argyrios

    1998-01-01

    One-day groundwater education workshops held to educate soil conservation personnel were assessed for effect on participant knowledge using a quasiexperimental design. Participants were tested on their groundwater knowledge and attitude toward groundwater conservation before and after the training. Participant scores improved significantly in only…

  10. TREATMENT RESEARCH AT THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY IN SUPPORT OF THE RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT LANDFILL BAN PROVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the authorization of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1984, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was required to ban the disposal of hazardous waste to the land. The Congressional mandate to ban was accompanied by a decision or 'hammer' date for...

  11. Groundwater dating for understanding nitrogen in groundwater systems - Time lag, fate, and detailed flow path ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Hadfield, John; Stenger, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Nitrate contamination of groundwater is a problem world-wide. Nitrate from land use activities can leach out of the root zone of the crop into the deeper part of the unsaturated zone and ultimately contaminate the underlying groundwater resources. Nitrate travels with the groundwater and then discharges into surface water causing eutrophication of surface water bodies. To understand the source, fate, and future nitrogen loads to ground and surface water bodies, detailed knowledge of the groundwater flow dynamics is essential. Groundwater sampled at monitoring wells or discharges may not yet be in equilibrium with current land use intensity due to the time lag between leaching out of the root zone and arrival at the sampling location. Anoxic groundwater zones can act as nitrate sinks through microbial denitrification. However, the effect of denitrification on overall nitrate fluxes depends on the fraction of the groundwater flowing through such zones. We will show results from volcanic aquifers in the central North Island of New Zealand where age tracers clearly indicate that the groundwater discharges into large sensitive lakes like Lake Taupo and Lake Rotorua are not yet fully realising current land use intensity. The majority of the water discharging into these lakes is decades and up to over hundred years old. Therefore, increases in dairy farming over the last decades are not yet reflected in these old water discharges, but over time these increased nitrate inputs will eventually work their way through the large groundwater systems and increasing N loads to the lakes are to be expected. Anoxic zones are present in some of these aquifers, indicating some denitrification potential, however, age tracer results from nested piezo wells show young groundwater in oxic zones indicating active flow in these zones, while anoxic zones tend to have older water indicating poorer hydraulic conductivity in these zones. Consequently, to evaluate the effect of denitrification

  12. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  13. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  14. Integrated monitoring plan for the Hanford groundwater monitoring project

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; McDonald, J.P.; Mercer, R.B.; Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.

    1998-09-01

    Groundwater is monitored in hundreds of wells at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of requirements. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project (groundwater project), which is the responsibility of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The groundwater project does not include all of the monitoring to assess performance of groundwater remediation or all monitoring associated with active facilities. This document is the first integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.

  15. F/H seepage basin groundwater influent, effluent, precipitated sludge characterization task technical plan

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, J.L.

    1993-10-29

    A treatability study to support the development of a remediation system which would reduce the contaminant levels in groundwater removed from the aquifers in the vicinity of the F/H seepage basins and southwest of the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River facility was conducted. Proposed changes in the remediation system require an additional study to determine whether precipitated sludge generated from the proposed remediation system will be hazardous as defined by RCRA. Several contaminants, such as lead and mercury, are above the groundwater protection standards. The presence of radionuclides and other contaminants in the sludge does not present a problem provided that the sludge can pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. The study has been developed in such a manner as to cover the possible range of treatment options that may be used.

  16. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Sections 1 through 3: Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    WAG 6 comprises a shallow land burial facility used for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) and, until recently, chemical wastes. As such, the site is subject to regulation under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). To comply with these regulations, DOE, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), developed a strategy for closure and remediation of WAG 6 by 1997. A key component of this strategy was to complete an RFI by September 1991. The primary objectives of the RFI were to evaluate the site`s potential human health and environmental impacts and to develop a preliminary list of alternatives to mitigate these impacts. The WAG 6 one of three solid waste management units evaluated Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) existing waste disposal records and sampling data and performed the additional sampling and analysis necessary to: describe the nature and extent of contamination; characterize key contaminant transport pathways; and assess potential risks to human health and the environment by developing and evaluating hypothetical receptor scenarios. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risks as a result for exposure to radionuclides and chemicals were quantified for each hypothetical human receptor. For environmental receptors, potential impacts were qualitatively assessed. Taking into account regulatory requirements and base line risk assessment results, preliminary site closure and remediation objectives were identified, and a preliminary list of alternatives for site closure and remediation was developed.

  17. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000

    SciTech Connect

    D. F. Emer

    2001-03-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999-October 2000 period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in August 2000. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began seven years ago. The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. Precipitation for the period October 1999 through October 2000 was 10.44 centimeters (cm) (4.11 inches [in.]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2000). The prior year annual rainfall (January 1999 through December 1999) was 10.13cm (3.99 in.). The highest 30-day cumulative rainfall occurred on March 8, 2000, with a total of 6.63 cm (2.61 in.). The heaviest daily precipitation occurred on February 23,2000, with a total of 1.70 cm (0.67 in.) falling in that 24-hour period. The recorded average annual rainfall for this site, from 1972 to January 1999, is 15.06 cm (5.93 in.). All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the

  18. RCRA and Operational Monitoring (ROM). Multi-Year Program Plan and Fiscal Year 95 Work Plan WBS 1.5.3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-17

    This document contains information concerning the RCRA and Operational Monitoring Program at Hanford Reservation. Information presented includes: Schedules for ground water monitoring activities, program cost baseline, program technical baseline, and a program milestone list.

  19. Effects of wetlands creation on groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hensel, B.R.; Miller, M.V.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in groundwater flow were observed near four Experimental Wetland Areas (EWAs) constructed along a reach of the Des Plaines River in northeastern Illinois. These changes were observed during monthly monitoring of groundwater elevation in nested piezometers and shallow observation wells before and after the wetlands were filled with water. A numerical model was calibrated with observed data and used to estimate seepage from the wetlands into the Des Plaines River. After the wetlands became operational, groundwater levels in adjacent wells increased by about 0.5m, while water levels in wells distant from the wetlands decreased. The increase in groundwater levels near the wetlands is a result of seepage from the wetlands. Numerical predictions of seepage from the wetlands are 60-150 m3 day-1 for two wetlands situated over sand and gravel and less than 1 m3 day-1 for two wetlands situated over clayey till. The difference in seepage rates is attributed to two factors. First, the hydraulic conductivity of the sand and gravel unit is greater than that of the till, and thus there is less mounding and a greater capacity for transmitting water beneath the wetlands overlying this deposit. Secondly, the wetlands located over till are groundwater flow-through ponds, whereas the wetlands over the sand and gravel are primarily groundwater recharge areas. The model was used to estimate that seepage from the wetlands will double groundwater discharge into the Des Plaines River and a tributary relative to pre-operational discharge from the study area. Overall, the wetlands have acted as a constant head boundary, stabilizing groundwater flow patterns. ?? 1991.

  20. ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, L. S.

    2007-08-09

    This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

  1. Generators of oily waste settle with EPA and gain right to contribution from other defendants under RCRA

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    In a consent decree filed on June 21, 1994, EPA settled with five of ten defendants named in a suit involving a contaminated oil reprocessing site in Wyoming. The federal government had sued the ten parties under RCRA Section 7003 for creating an {open_quotes}imminent and substantial endangerment to health or the environment{close_quotes}. The consent decree requires the five settling parties to clean up the site and pay a $300,000 civil penalty. In a separate ruling, dated June 2, 1994, the US District Court for the District of Wyoming permitted the parties settling with EPA to proceed against a non-settlors for their respective shares of the cleanup costs. Thus, the ruling determined that a right to contribution exists under RCRA-a right not specifically granted under the statute previously.

  2. Groundwater sustainability strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, Tom; VanderSteen, Jonathan; Sophocleous, Marios A.; Taniguchi, Makoto; Alley, William M.; Allen, Diana M.; Zhou, Yangxiao

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater extraction has facilitated significant social development and economic growth, enhanced food security and alleviated drought in many farming regions. But groundwater development has also depressed water tables, degraded ecosystems and led to the deterioration of groundwater quality, as well as to conflict among water users. The effects are not evenly spread. In some areas of India, for example, groundwater depletion has preferentially affected the poor. Importantly, groundwater in some aquifers is renewed slowly, over decades to millennia, and coupled climate–aquifer models predict that the flux and/or timing of recharge to many aquifers will change under future climate scenarios. Here we argue that communities need to set multigenerational goals if groundwater is to be managed sustainably.

  3. Groundwater contamination field methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ivan

    Half of the drinking water in the United States comes from groundwater; 75% of the nation's cities obtain all or part of their supplies from groundwater; and the rural areas are 95% dependent upon groundwater. Therefore it is imperative that every possible precaution be taken to protect the purity of the groundwater.Because of the increasing interest in prevention of groundwater contamination and the need for nationally recognized methods for investigation of contamination, a symposium entitled “Field Methods for Groundwater Contamination Studies and Their Standardization” was held February 2-7, 1986, in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The symposium was sponsored and organized by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Committee D18 on Soil and Rock and Committee D19 on Water. Gene Collins of the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (Bartlesville, Okla.) was symposium chair, and Ivan Johnson (A. Ivan Johnson, Inc., Consulting, Arvada, Colo.) was vice chair.

  4. RCRA materials analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Detection limits in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Koskelo, A.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of the Technical Task Plan (TTP) that this report supports is research, development, testing and evaluation of a portable analyzer for RCRA and other metals. The instrumentation to be built will be used for field-screening of soils. Data quality is expected to be suitable for this purpose. The data presented in this report were acquired to demonstrate the detection limits for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of soils using instrument parameters suitable for fieldable instrumentation. The data are not expected to be the best achievable with the high pulse energies available in laboratory lasers. The report presents work to date on the detection limits for several elements in soils using LIBS. The elements targeted in the Technical Task Plan are antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, selenium, and zirconium. Data for these elements are presented in this report. Also included are other data of interest to potential customers for the portable LIBS apparatus. These data are for barium, mercury, cesium and strontium. Data for uranium and thorium will be acquired during the tasks geared toward mixed waste characterization.

  5. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents.

  6. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-02-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents.

  7. Phase report 1C, TA-21 operable unit RCRA Facility Investigation, Outfalls Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-28

    This phase report summarizes the results of field investigations conducted in 1992 at Technical Area 21 of Los Alamos National Laboratory, as prescribed by the RCRA Facility Investigation work plan for the Technical Area 21 operable unit (also known as OU 1106). This phase report is the last part of a three-part phase report describing the results of field work conducted in 1992 at this operable unit. Phase Report lA, issued on l4 June l993, summarized site geologic characterization activities. Phase report 1B, issued on 28 January 1994, included an assessment of site-wide surface soil background, airborne emissions deposition, and contamination in the locations of two former air filtration buildings. The investigations assessed in Phase Report 1C include field radiation surveys and surface and near-surface sampling to characterize potential contamination at 25 outfalls and septic systems listed as SWMUs in the RFI work plan. Based on the RFI data, it is recommended that no further action is warranted for 8 SWMUs and further action is recommended for 3 SWMUs addressed in this phase report. For 14 SWMUs which represent no immediate threat to human health or environment, deferral of further action/no further action decisions is recommended until outstanding analytical data are received, sampling of adjacent SWMUs is completed, or decisions are made about the baseline risk assessment approach.

  8. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA) Oak Ridge National Laboratory addendum August 25, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    The RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA) report identified approximately 250 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) that were grouped into 20 Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Identification of each SWMU included information as to location, type, size, dates of operation, type of waste handled, and evidence of releases. Preliminary sampling studies were performed around each WAG to determine if there was evidence of releases beyond its perimeter. Analytical results from the surveys and historical information were the basis for recommendations concerning further actions for each WAG. Remedial investigations (RIs) were recommended for WAGs 1--10 and 17; for WAGs 14, 16, 18, and 20, it was suggested that they be removed from further consideration for remedial action. For the remaining WAGs (11, 12, 13, 15, and 19) the evidence concerning the possible release of contaminants was inconclusive and additional sampling was recommended. The purpose of this Addendum is to report the analytical data obtained from the additional surveys, to make recommendations concerning future remedial actions within these WAGs, and to provide descriptive information for additional sites listed in Table 1.2 of the RFA. Since information concerning the rationale for identifying releases, the sampling survey methodology, and background information for each WAG is presented in the RFA, it is not repeated in this Addendum.

  9. Sulfur polymer cement encapsulation of RCRA toxic metals and metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, C.L. Jr.; Nulf, L.E.; Gorin, A.H.

    1995-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine the suitability of Sulfur Polymer Cement (SPC) encapsulation technology for the stabilization of RCRA toxic metal and metal oxide wastes. In a series of bench-scale experiments, the effects of sodium sulfide additions to the waste mixture, residence time, and temperature profile were evaluated. In addition, an effort was made to ascertain the degree to which SPC affords chemical stabilization as opposed to physical encapsulation. Experimental results have demonstrated that at the 25 wt % loading level, SPC can effectively immobilize Cr, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Hg, Pb, and Se to levels below regulatory limits. SPC encapsulation also has been shown to significantly reduce the leachability of other toxic compounds including PbO, PbO{sub 2}, As{sub 2}O{sub 3}, BaO, and CdO. In addition, data has confirmed sulfide conversion of Hg, Pb, PbO, PbO{sub 2}, and BaO as the product of their reaction with SPC.

  10. Groundwater in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickerson, Daniel L.; Penick, John E.; Dawkins, Karen R.; Van Sickle, Meta

    2007-01-01

    Although clean, potable groundwater constitutes one of our most valuable resources, few students or science educators hold complete and appropriate understandings regarding the concept. Recent studies that focus on secondary students' and preservice science teachers' understandings of groundwater found little difference between the groups'…

  11. Groundwater and Distribution Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekman, John E.

    Presented is a student manual designed for the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical and Adult Education Groundwater and Distribution Training Course. This program introduces waterworks operators-in-training to basic skills and knowledge required for the operation of a groundwater distribution waterworks facility. Arranged according to the general order…

  12. Groundwater and organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, H.E.

    1995-12-01

    Groundwater is a major source of drinking water for many communities. Unfortunately, organic chemicals such as dry cleaning fluids, solvent, fuels, and pesticides have contaminated groundwater in many areas, rendering the groundwater useless as a drinking water resource. In many cases, the groundwater cannot be cleaned up with current technologies, particularly if the groundwater has been contaminated with immiscible (low solubility) organic liquids. In this talk, I will describe the path I have followed from geologist to geochemist and finally to environmental engineer. As a geologist, I studied the chemistry of rock metamorphosis. As a geochemist, I explored for gold and other metals. Now as an environmental engineer, I investigate the behavior of organic liquids in the subsurface. While these fields all appear very different, in reality I have always focused on the interaction of rocks or sediments with the fluids with which they come in contact.

  13. Groundwater quality in the San Francisco Bay groundwater basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Mary C.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. Selected groundwater basins of the San Francisco Bay area constitute one of the study units being evaluated.

  14. Title III list of lists: Consolidated list of chemicals subject to the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act, as ammended. Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This consolidated list has been prepared to help firms handling chemicals determine whether they need to submit reports under sections 302, 304, or 313 of SARA Title III (EPCRA) and, for a specific chemical, what reports may need to be submitted. It will also help firms determine whether they will be subject to accident prevention regulations under CAA section 112(r). Separate lists are also provided of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste streams and unlisted hazardous wastes, and of radionuclides reportable under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). These lists should be used as a reference tool, not as a definitive source of compliance information.

  15. Spring 2009 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post-Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Ann M.

    2009-05-31

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under and approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  16. Groundwater contamination in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tase, Norio

    1992-07-01

    Problems on groundwater contamination in Japan are briefly summarized in this paper. Although normal physical conditions in Japan restrict the possibilities of groundwater contamination, human activities are threatening groundwater resources. A survey by the Environment Agency of Japan showed nationwide spreading of organic substances, such as trichloroethylene as well as nitrogen compounds. Synthetic detergents have also been detected even in rural areas and in deep confined aquifers, although their concentrations are not as high. Public awareness of agrichemical or pesticides abuse, especially from golf courses, is apparent. Other problems such as nitrate-nitrogen, leachate from landfills, and the leaking of underground storage tanks are also discussed.

  17. RCRA Part B permit modifications for cost savings and increased flexibility at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jierree, C.; Ticknor, K.

    1996-10-01

    With shrinking budgets and downsizing, a need for streamlined compliance initiatives became evident at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Therefore, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services (RMRS) at the RFETS successfully and quickly modified the RFETS RCRA Part B Permit to obtain significant cost savings and increased flexibility. This `was accomplished by requesting operations personnel to suggest changes to the Part B Permit which did not diminish overall compliance and which would be most. cost beneficial. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsequently obtained approval of those changes from the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment (CDPHE).

  18. 1993 RCRA Part B permit renewal application, Savannah River Site: Volume 10, Consolidated Incineration Facility, Section C, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Molen, G.

    1993-08-01

    This section describes the chemical and physical nature of the RCRA regulated hazardous wastes to be handled, stored, and incinerated at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site. It is in accordance with requirements of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.13(a) and(b), and 270.14(b)(2). This application is for permit to store and teat these hazardous wastes as required for the operation of CIF. The permit is to cover the storage of hazardous waste in containers and of waste in six hazardous waste storage tanks. Treatment processes include incineration, solidification of ash, and neutralization of scrubber blowdown.

  19. Estimating groundwater recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater recharge is the entry of fresh water into the saturated portion of the subsurface part of the hydrologic cycle, the modifier "saturated" indicating that the pressure of the pore water is greater than atmospheric.

  20. M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwate Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1998, Volumes I, II, & III

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-10-30

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah river Site (SRS) during first and second quarters 1998. This program is required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Report requirements are described in the 1995 RCRA Renewal Permit, effective October 5, 1995, Section IIIB.H.11.b for the M-Area HWMF and Section IIIG.H.11.b for the Met Lab HWMF.

  1. Balancing Acts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Balancing Acts Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). It involves simulated trips down the ...

  2. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  3. ACT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: ACT; Activated Coagulation Time Formal name: Activated Clotting Time Related tests: ... in the blood called platelets and proteins called coagulation factors are activated in a sequence of steps ...

  4. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1992-12-31

    The present invention relates to a method for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. In particular, the invention relates to remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater by the injection of nutrients to stimulate growth of pollutant-degrading microorganisms. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  5. California's Adjudicated Groundwater Basins: History, Current Conditions, Potential Reforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langridge, R.; Brown, A.; Rudestam, K.; Conrad, E.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater adjudications are one approach to managing a groundwater basin in California. While the 2014 Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) established new management requirements for 127 high and medium priority groundwater basins, it exempted all 26 of the state's adjudicated groundwater basins from the Act. The State Water Resources Control Board prioritized the evaluation of these adjudicated basins to assist in aligning the processes and outcomes of adjudication with SGMA's goals for the sustainable management of groundwater. Working with the Board, our research evaluated the history and current condition of all of California's adjudicated basins along with potential future improvements to the adjudication process. Our presentation will provide a summary of our findings and highlight some successful features of the adjudication process along with the challenges adjudicated basins face to achieve long-term sustainable groundwater management. Our discussion will include a review of: whether most adjudications result in groundwater extractions at or near a basins' designated safe yield; whether overdraft conditions are reduced or eliminated over the long term; and the degree of collaboration and inclusion of community stakeholders in the adjudication process. In addition to this overview, we will highlight 3-4 basins with particularly interesting management challenges and solutions. For each of these basins, we will describe the problem that precipitated the need for the adjudication and how adjudication outcomes were influenced by: how the judgment defined and distributed water rights; the management structure and strategies to manage the basin; how safe yield and overdraft are defined and determined; and, importantly, the effectiveness of the adjudication in halting or reversing groundwater overdraft.

  6. Applications of Groundwater Helium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Hilton, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Helium abundance and isotope variations have widespread application in groundwater-related studies. This stems from the inert nature of this noble gas and the fact that its two isotopes ? helium-3 and helium-4 ? have distinct origins and vary widely in different terrestrial reservoirs. These attributes allow He concentrations and 3He/4He isotope ratios to be used to recognize and quantify the influence of a number of potential contributors to the total He budget of a groundwater sample. These are atmospheric components, such as air-equilibrated and air-entrained He, as well as terrigenic components, including in situ (aquifer) He, deep crustal and/or mantle He and tritiogenic 3He. Each of these components can be exploited to reveal information on a number of topics, from groundwater chronology, through degassing of the Earth?s crust to the role of faults in the transfer of mantle-derived volatiles to the surface. In this review, we present a guide to how groundwater He is collected from aquifer systems and quantitatively measured in the laboratory. We then illustrate the approach of resolving the measured He characteristics into its component structures using assumptions of endmember compositions. This is followed by a discussion of the application of groundwater He to the types of topics mentioned above using case studies from aquifers in California and Australia. Finally, we present possible future research directions involving dissolved He in groundwater.

  7. Groundwater Protection through Prevention. A Curriculum for Agricultural Education in Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    Water is one of the natural resources vital to any agricultural system. This material was developed in support of the Iowa Agricultural Science, Technology and Marketing (ASTM) program, focusing on groundwater educational concepts related to the 1987 Iowa Groundwater Protection Act. This material was designed to assist teachers in providing…

  8. Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document.

  9. The effects of groundwater abstraction on low flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, I. E. M.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2012-04-01

    In regions with frequent water stress and large aquifer systems, groundwater often constitutes an essential source of water. If groundwater abstraction exceeds groundwater recharge over a long time and over large areas persistent groundwater depletion can occur. The resulting lowering of groundwater levels can have negative effects on agricultural productivity but also on natural streamflow and associated wetlands and ecosystems, in particular during low-flow events when the groundwater contribution through baseflow is relatively large. In this study we focus on the effects of global groundwater abstraction on low-flow magnitude, frequency and duration for the major rivers of the world for the period 1960-2000. As a basis, we use the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB that calculates all major water balance terms on a daily time step at a 0.5ox0.5o resolution. Currently, PCR-GLOBWB represents groundwater and the associated baseflow by means of a linear reservoir that is parameterized using global lithological data and drainage density. It simulates renewable groundwater storage within each 0.5o cell. Lateral flow between cells is not considered. The specific runoff from the model is subsequently transformed into discharge by means of a kinematic wave routing scheme. In this study we perform a sensitivity analysis in which we evaluate the effects of total water demand for the period 1960-2000 (Wada et al., 2011: doi:10.5194/hess-15-3785-2011). This demand is preferentially met by renewable groundwater storage, secondly by surface water. Any remainder is assumed to stem from non- renewable (i.e. fossil) groundwater resources. Thus, groundwater abstractions act as a direct sink of (renewable) groundwater storage, whereas surface water abstractions act as a direct sink of streamflow. The resulting response is non-trivial as abstractions are variably taken from both groundwater and surface water, where return-flows contribute to a single source: return flow from

  10. Age Distribution of Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, U.; Daughney, C. J.

    2012-04-01

    Groundwater at the discharge point comprises a mixture of water from different flow lines with different travel time and therefore has no discrete age but an age distribution. The age distribution can be assessed by measuring how a pulse shaped tracer moves through the groundwater system. Detection of the time delay and the dispersion of the peak in the groundwater compared to the tracer input reveals the mean residence time and the mixing parameter. Tritium from nuclear weapons testing in the early 1960s resulted in a peak-shaped tritium input to the whole hydrologic system on earth. Tritium is the ideal tracer for groundwater because it is an isotope of hydrogen and therefore is part of the water molecule. Tritium time series data that encompass the passage of the bomb tritium pulse through the groundwater system in all common hydrogeologic situations in New Zealand demonstrate a semi-systematic pattern between age distribution parameters and hydrologic situation. The data in general indicate high fraction of mixing, but in some cases also indicate high piston flow. We will show that still, 45 years after the peak of the bomb tritium, it is possible to assess accurately the parameters of age distributions by measuring the tail of the bomb tritium.

  11. Limits to Global Groundwater Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graaf, I. D.; Van Beek, R.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    In regions with frequent water stress and large aquifer systems, groundwater is often used as an additional fresh water source. For many regions of the world groundwater abstraction exceeds groundwater recharge and persistent groundwater depletion occurs. The most direct effect of groundwater depletion is declining of water tables, leading to reduced groundwater discharge needed to sustain base-flow to e.g. rivers. Next to that, pumping costs increase, wells dry up and land subsidence occurs. These problems are expected to increase in the near future due to growing population and climate changes. This poses the urgent question of what the limits are of groundwater consumption worldwide. We simulate global water availability (5 arc-minute resolution, for 1960-2050) using the hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al. 2011), coupled to a groundwater model based on MODFLOW (de Graaf et al. 2015), allowing for groundwater - surface water interactions. The groundwater model includes a parameterization of world's confined and unconfined aquifer systems needed for a realistic simulation of groundwater head dynamics. Water demands are included (from Wada et al. 2014). We study the limits to water consumption, focusing on locally attainable groundwater and groundwater levels critical to rivers to sustain low flows. We show an increasing trend (1960-2050) in groundwater head declines, due to increase in groundwater demand. Also, stream flow will decrease and low flow conditions will occur more frequent and will be longer in duration in the near future, especially for irrigated areas. Next to that, we provide a global overview of the years it takes until groundwater gets unattainable for e.g. a local farmer (100 m below land-surface used as a proxy), and estimate the increase in pumping cost for the near future. The results show where and when limits of groundwater consumption are reached globally.

  12. Groundwater in times of droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attinger, Sabine; Kumar, Rohini; Musuuza, Jude; Samaniego, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Droughts are characterized as sustained and regionally extensive occurrences of below-average natural water availability. They affect all components of the water cycle: from deficits in soil moisture (agricultural droughts) through reduced groundwater recharge and groundwater levels to low streamflows or dried-up rivers (hydrological droughts). Groundwater discharge is a significant component of streamflow, with groundwater contributing as much as 90 percent of annual streamflow volume in some parts of the U.S., Canada and Europe (Beck et al., 2013). And groundwater systems strongly control the hydrological drought characteristics all over the world (van Lanen et al., 2013). Making use of large scale hydrological models van Lanen demonstrated that groundwater systems substantially affect the duration, particularly of the more extreme drought events. The responsiveness of the groundwater system is as important as climate for hydrological drought development. This urges for an improvement of subsurface modules in conceptual hydrological models to be more useful for water resources assessments. In this talk, we will discuss different subsurface modeling approaches ranging from spatially distributed groundwater models to simpler reservoir-type modeling approaches and the implications the chosen model has on modelled groundwater droughts and base flow characteristics. In particular, we discuss a standardized groundwater drought index (SGI) to characterize the groundwater deficit and the groundwater head anomalies. Based on SGI, we investigate different statistics (severity, area and duration) of individual drought events for the different model approaches. These results will be related to locally measured groundwater data.

  13. Groundwater flow processes and mixing in active volcanic systems: the case of Guadalajara (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Antonio, A.; Mahlknecht, J.; Tamez-Meléndez, C.; Ramos-Leal, J.; Ramírez-Orozco, A.; Parra, R.; Ornelas-Soto, N.; Eastoe, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    Groundwater chemistry and isotopic data from 40 production wells in the Atemajac and Toluquilla valleys, located in and around the Guadalajara metropolitan area, were determined to develop a conceptual model of groundwater flow processes and mixing. Stable water isotopes (δ2H, δ18O) were used to trace hydrological processes and tritium (3H) to evaluate the relative contribution of modern water in samples. Multivariate analysis including cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to elucidate distribution patterns of constituents and factors controlling groundwater chemistry. Based on this analysis, groundwater was classified into four groups: cold groundwater, hydrothermal groundwater, polluted groundwater and mixed groundwater. Cold groundwater is characterized by low temperature, salinity, and Cl and Na concentrations and is predominantly of Na-HCO3-type. It originates as recharge at "La Primavera" caldera and is found predominantly in wells in the upper Atemajac Valley. Hydrothermal groundwater is characterized by high salinity, temperature, Cl, Na and HCO3, and the presence of minor elements such as Li, Mn and F. It is a mixed-HCO3 type found in wells from Toluquilla Valley and represents regional flow circulation through basaltic and andesitic rocks. Polluted groundwater is characterized by elevated nitrate and sulfate concentrations and is usually derived from urban water cycling and subordinately from agricultural return flow. Mixed groundwaters between cold and hydrothermal components are predominantly found in the lower Atemajac Valley. Twenty-seven groundwater samples contain at least a small fraction of modern water. The application of a multivariate mixing model allowed the mixing proportions of hydrothermal fluids, polluted waters and cold groundwater in sampled water to be evaluated. This study will help local water authorities to identify and dimension groundwater contamination, and act accordingly. It may be broadly applicable to

  14. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Grace Road Site (631-22G)

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1998-10-02

    This report summarizes the activities and documents the results of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation conducted at Grace Road Site on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

  15. Record of Decision Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    L. S. Cahn

    2007-05-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) 3-14 tank farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The tank farm was initially evaluated in the OU 3-13 Record of Decision (ROD), and it was determined that additional information was needed to make a final decision. Additional information has been obtained on the nature and extent of contamination in the tank farm and on the impact of groundwater. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability and Compensation Act of 1980 (CERCLA) (42 USC 9601 et seq.), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The selected remedy is intended to be the final action for tank far soil and groundwater at INTEC.

  16. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  17. Groundwater-Seepage Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, Harry G.; Reay, William G.

    1993-01-01

    Instrument measures seepage of groundwater into inland or coastal body of water. Positioned at depth as great as 40 meters, and measures flow at low rate and low pressure differential. Auxiliary pressure meter provides data for correlation of flow of groundwater with tides and sea states. Seepage meter operates independently for several weeks. Its sampling rate adjusted to suit hydrologic conditions; to measure more frequently when conditions changing rapidly. Used in water-quality management and for biological and geological research. Potential industrial uses include measurement of seepage of caustic and corrosive liquids.

  18. Technical framework for groundwater restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This document provides the technical framework for groundwater restoration under Phase II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. A preliminary management plan for Phase II has been set forth in a companion document titled ``Preplanning Guidance Document for Groundwater Restoration``. General principles of site characterization for groundwater restoration, restoration methods, and treatment are discussed in this document to provide an overview of standard technical approaches to groundwater restoration.

  19. Groundwater: A Community Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Susan, Ed.; And Others

    Designed to be a guide for community action, this booklet examines issues and trends related to groundwater contamination. Basic concepts about groundwater and information about problems affecting it are covered under the categories of (1) what is groundwater? (2) availability and depletion; (3) quality and contamination; (4) public health…

  20. 40 CFR 265 interim status indicator-evaluation ground-water monitoring plan for the 216-B-63 trench

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, B.N.; Dudziak, S.

    1989-03-01

    This document outlines a ground-water monitoring plan for the 216-B-63 trench located in the northeast corner of the 200-East Area on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. It has been determined that hazardous materials (corrosives) were disposed of to the trench during past operations. Installation of an interim-status ground-water monitoring system is required to determine whether hazardous chemicals are leaching to the ground water from beneath the trench. This document summarizes the existing data that are available from near the 216-B-63 trench and presents a plan to determine the extent of ground-water contamination, if any, derived from the trench. The plan calls for the installation of four new monitoring wells located near the west end of the trench. These wells will be used to monitor ground-water levels and water quality immediately adjacent to the trench. Two existing RCRA monitoring wells, which are located near the trench and hydraulically upgradient of it, will be used as background wells. 46 refs., 15 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. The munitions provisions of the Federal Facility Compliance Act

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmell, T.A.; Green, D.R.; Queen, R.

    1994-03-01

    The Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA) was signed by President Bush on October 6, 1992. This Act amends the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the primary law governing hazardous waste management in the US The most significant provision of the FFCA was the waiver of sovereign immunity. This waiver subjects Federal facilities to the same ``incentives`` as the private sector for compliance. While the waiver has broad implications for all Federal facilities, other provisions of the FFCA impact specific sectors of the Federal complex. The focus of this paper is the FFCA Munitions Provisions, which have the potential to change some aspects of the structure of munitions management within the military. The Munitions Provisions, contained in Section 107 of the FFCA, modifies Section 3004 of RCRA by adding a new subsection (y) on Munitions. Section 107 requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop, after consultation with the Department of Defense (DOD) and appropriate State officials, regulations identifying when military munitions (including conventional and chemical munitions) become hazardous waste, and to provide for the safe transportation and storage of such waste. The FFCA requires EPA to promulgate the final ``Munitions Rule`` by October 6, 1994. These are the only provisions of the FFCA that require a new rulemaking. It is clear that the Munitions Rule could have a significant effect on the way in which DOD manages munitions. Demilitarization, range management, training activities, and emergency response actions may be affected. It is important for DOD, the Services, and individual installations, to be aware of potential impacts of the FFCA on munitions management operations. The purpose of this paper is to review several important munitions Rule issues, and to discuss potential impacts of these issues.

  2. Trends in groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loftis, Jim C.

    1996-02-01

    The term trend takes on a variety of meanings for groundwater quality in both a temporal and spatial context. Most commonly, trends are thought of as changes over time at either a regional or localized spatial scale. Generally water quality managers are most interested in changes associated with some form of human activity. Carefully defining what is meant by trend is a critical step in trend analysis and may be accomplished by formulating a statistical model which includes a trend component. Although there are a great many regional groundwater studies which provide a snapshot description of water quality conditions over an area at one point in time, there are relatively few which consider changes over time and fewer still which include a statistical analysis of long-term trend. This review covers both regional and localized studies of groundwater quality around the world, including a few snapshots, but focusing primarily on those studies which include an evaluation of temporal changes in groundwater quality. The studies include national assessments, agricultural case studies (the largest group, mostly regional in scope), urban case studies, and point source and hazardous waste case studies.

  3. PATHS groundwater hydrologic model

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.; Schur, J.A.

    1980-04-01

    A preliminary evaluation capability for two-dimensional groundwater pollution problems was developed as part of the Transport Modeling Task for the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP). Our approach was to use the data limitations as a guide in setting the level of modeling detail. PATHS Groundwater Hydrologic Model is the first level (simplest) idealized hybrid analytical/numerical model for two-dimensional, saturated groundwater flow and single component transport; homogeneous geology. This document consists of the description of the PATHS groundwater hydrologic model. The preliminary evaluation capability prepared for WISAP, including the enhancements that were made because of the authors' experience using the earlier capability is described. Appendixes A through D supplement the report as follows: complete derivations of the background equations are provided in Appendix A. Appendix B is a comprehensive set of instructions for users of PATHS. It is written for users who have little or no experience with computers. Appendix C is for the programmer. It contains information on how input parameters are passed between programs in the system. It also contains program listings and test case listing. Appendix D is a definition of terms.

  4. Automated Groundwater Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Glenn A.; Collard, Leonard, B.

    2005-10-31

    The Automated Intruder Analysis has been extended to include an Automated Ground Water Screening option. This option screens 825 radionuclides while rigorously applying the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) methodology. An extension to that methodology is presented to give a more realistic screening factor for those radionuclides which have significant daughters. The extension has the promise of reducing the number of radionuclides which must be tracked by the customer. By combining the Automated Intruder Analysis with the Automated Groundwater Screening a consistent set of assumptions and databases is used. A method is proposed to eliminate trigger values by performing rigorous calculation of the screening factor thereby reducing the number of radionuclides sent to further analysis. Using the same problem definitions as in previous groundwater screenings, the automated groundwater screening found one additional nuclide, Ge-68, which failed the screening. It also found that 18 of the 57 radionuclides contained in NCRP Table 3.1 failed the screening. This report describes the automated groundwater screening computer application.

  5. HANFORD GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    CHARBONEAU, B; THOMPSON, M; WILDE, R.; FORD, B.; GERBER, M.S.

    2006-02-01

    By 1990 nearly 50 years of producing plutonium put approximately 1.70E + 12 liters (450 billion gallons) of liquid wastes into the soil of the 1,518-square kilometer (586-square mile) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The liquid releases consisted of chemicals used in laboratory experiments, manufacturing and rinsing uranium fuel, dissolving that fuel after irradiation in Hanford's nuclear reactors, and in liquefying plutonium scraps needed to feed other plutonium-processing operations. Chemicals were also added to the water used to cool Hanford's reactors to prevent corrosion in the reactor tubes. In addition, water and acid rinses were used to clean plutonium deposits from piping in Hanford's large radiochemical facilities. All of these chemicals became contaminated with radionuclides. As Hanford raced to help win World War II, and then raced to produce materials for the Cold War, these radioactive liquid wastes were released to the Site's sandy soils. Early scientific experiments seemed to show that the most highly radioactive components of these liquids would bind to the soil just below the surface of the land, thus posing no threat to groundwater. Other experiments predicted that the water containing most radionuclides would take hundreds of years to seep into groundwater, decaying (or losing) most of its radioactivity before reaching the groundwater or subsequently flowing into the Columbia River, although it was known that some contaminants like tritium would move quickly. Evidence today, however, shows that many contaminants have reached the Site's groundwater and the Columbia River, with more on its way. Over 259 square kilometers (100 square miles) of groundwater at Hanford have contaminant levels above drinking-water standards. Also key to successfully cleaning up the Site is providing information resources and public-involvement opportunities to Hanford's stakeholders. This large, passionate, diverse, and geographically dispersed community is

  6. Hanford Groundwater Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Charboneau, B.; Thompson, K. M.; Wilde, R.; Ford, B.; Gerber, M.

    2006-07-01

    By 1990 nearly 50 years of producing plutonium put approximately 1.70 E+12 liters (450 billion gallons) of liquid wastes into the soil of the 1,518-square kilometer (586-square mile) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The liquid releases consisted of chemicals used in laboratory experiments, manufacturing and rinsing uranium fuel, dissolving that fuel after irradiation in Hanford's nuclear reactors, and in liquefying plutonium scraps needed to feed other plutonium-processing operations. Chemicals were also added to the water used to cool Hanford's reactors to prevent corrosion in the reactor tubes. In addition, water and acid rinses were used to clean plutonium deposits from piping in Hanford's large radiochemical facilities. All of these chemicals became contaminated with radionuclides. As Hanford raced to help win World War II, and then raced to produce materials for the Cold War, these radioactive liquid wastes were released to the Site's sandy soils. Early scientific experiments seemed to show that the most highly radioactive components of these liquids would bind to the soil just below the surface of the land, thus posing no threat to groundwater. Other experiments predicted that the water containing most radionuclides would take hundreds of years to seep into groundwater, decaying (or losing) most of its radioactivity before reaching the groundwater or subsequently flowing into the Columbia River, although it was known that some contaminants like tritium would move quickly. Evidence today, however, shows that many contaminants have reached the Site's groundwater and the Columbia River, with more on its way. Over 259 square kilometers (100 square miles) of groundwater at Hanford have contaminant levels above drinking-water standards. Also key to successfully cleaning up the Site is providing information resources and public-involvement opportunities to Hanford's stakeholders. This large, passionate, diverse, and geographically dispersed community is

  7. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980`s, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled `du Pont Freon 11`, were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  8. RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site, Interim Change Notice 2

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, Susan M.

    2004-11-05

    This ICN documents the installation of two additional downgradient monitoring wells and two additional upgradient wells. It updates the monitoring network. The project scientist will provide a schedule change request providing the list of additional wells to the sample scheduler.

  9. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, Susan M.

    2006-09-29

    This document was prepared as a groundwater quality assessment plan revision for the single-shell tank systems in Waste Management Area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F. In FY 1996, the groundwater monitoring program was changed from detection-level indicator evaluation to a groundwater quality assessment program when elevated specific conductance in downgradient monitoring well 299 E33-32 was confirmed by verification sampling. During the course of the ensuing investigation, elevated technetium-99 and nitrate were observed above the drinking water standard at well 299-E33-41, a well located between 241-B and 241-BX Tank Farms. Earlier observations of the groundwater contamination and tank farm leak occurrences combined with a qualitative analysis of possible solutions, led to the conclusion that waste from the waste management area had entered the groundwater and were observed in this well. Based on 40 CFR 265.93 [d] paragraph (7), the owner-operator must continue to make the minimum required determinations of contaminant level and rate/extent of migrations on a quarterly basis until final facility closure. These continued determinations are required because the groundwater quality assessment was implemented prior to final closure of the facility.

  10. Results of Groundwater Monitoring for the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins Reporting Period: July-December 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2007-04-10

    This is one of a series of reports on Resource Conservation and Recovery Act monitoring at the 183 H basins. It fulfills a requirement of WAC 173-303-645(11)(g) to report twice each year on the effectiveness of the corrective action program. This report covers the period from July through December 2006. The current objective of corrective action monitoring is simply to track trends. Although there is short-term variability in contaminant concentrations, trends over the past 10 years are downward. The current RCRA permit and monitoring plan remain adequate for the objective of tracking trends.

  11. Evaluation of groundwater dynamic regime with groundwater depth evaluation indexes.

    PubMed

    Genxu, Wang; Jian, Zhou; Kubota, Jumpei; Jianping, Su

    2008-06-01

    An accurate quantitative evaluation of anthropogenic effects on regional groundwater dynamics is critical to the rational planning, management, and use of such resources and in maintaining the sustainability of groundwater-dependent ecosystems. Based on groundwater dynamics, a series of groundwater depth evaluation indexes were created to quantitatively evaluate the effects of anthropogenic activities on the groundwater system. These indexes were based on mathematical relationships relating groundwater depth to surface runoff (gammat), precipitation (rhot), and extraction (deltat). The anthropogenic effects on these relationships were evaluated statistically, with respect to both temporal and spatial variation. The anthropogenic effects on groundwater dynamics within the arid Zhangye Basin, located in the middle reaches of northwest China's Heihe River, were investigated. River valley plains in the western portion of the basin excepted, anthropogenic activities have, since 1995, dramatically altered the basin's groundwater dynamics; in particular, in the mid-upper and lower portions of alluvial-diluvial fans and in localized northerly fine-soil plains regions, the relationship of groundwater to surface runoff and atmospheric precipitation has shifted. This and other changes indicate that anthropogenic effects on groundwater systems in this region show clear spatiotemporal variation. PMID:18686930

  12. Simulating Groundwater-Plant-Atmosphere Interactions in a Semiarid Savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, S.; Miller, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater serves as one of the main water sources for deep rooted phreatophytic vegetation. Such vegetation acts as the linkage between groundwater, land surface and atmosphere. Through plant groundwater uptake and hydraulic redistribution (HR), the dynamics of relatively deep groundwater can influence ET and soil moisture of top soil layers. In this work, we first developed a plant scale model to simulate groundwater uptake and HR driven by the potential gradients along the groundwater-soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (GSPAC). The model included a new plant water stress function based on the 'vulnerability curve' theory in order to integrate the influences of both soil water and groundwater on transpiration. The model was calibrated and validated with measured ET, soil moisture, and leaf water potential data and was able to capture both energy and water dynamics along the GSPAC. We then coupled this plant scale model into a spatial distributed groundwater-land surface model (ParFlow.CLM). The revisions to ParFlow.CLM allow it to explicitly describe root water uptake and HR of different species, allowing for the study of how plant groundwater use and HR influence regional water budget and climate. This new uptake formulation was applied to simulate a heterogeneous savanna system at an AmeriFlux site in California. The site is dominated by blue oaks which can access both soil water and groundwater and grasses which only depend on soil water. The results match previous field measurements indicating that the oaks use most soil water during wet season and switch to groundwater use in dry season to buffer the impacts of drought. Therefore, the water and energy dynamics at this site showed the soil moisture controlled pattern in wet season, and the vegetation and groundwater controlled pattern in dry season. With HR, the rainfall is distributed into deeper soil in wet season by hydraulic descent. Such water will be lifted into shallower soil to promote transpiration in

  13. Vadose Zone Monitoring System as a Tool for Groundwater Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, O.

    2007-05-01

    Subsurface monitoring for groundwater protection from pollution hazards has traditionally been based on culling information from the groundwater. This information is usually retrieved from boreholes penetrating the saturated section of the groundwater. Accordingly, the entire path and fate of pollutants transported from land surface through the vadose zone to the groundwater is evaluated from the chemical and physical state of the water which has been sampled from a well. That monitoring procedure is well founded in both scientific studies and through legislative acts which enforce groundwater monitoring for potential sources of pollution. However, this creates a paradox since, by definition, identification of pollution in groundwater means that the groundwater is already polluted. Moreover, since vertical transport in the vadose zone and lateral flow in the groundwater are very slow processes, pollution identification in a well may take years or decades. As a result, the total mass of pollutant that has penetrated the subsurface may be extremely high by the time it has been identified. Finally, pollution identification in a well usually reveals only the edges of a much larger pollutant plume. Accordingly, identification of pollution in the vadose zone right under the pollution source, long before it shows up in the groundwater, should be the key to groundwater protection. The need for real-time information on the quality of percolating water led to the development of a new vadose- zone monitoring system. The new monitoring system is designed to provide continuous measurements of the soil water content and water potential, while allowing pore-water sampling all along the vadose-zone cross section. The installation technique allows monitoring of the vadose-zone cross section under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. The new monitoring system is comprised of special flexible TDR (FTDR) probes, assembled with special vadose-zone sampling ports (VSPs) that function

  14. Review: Groundwater management and groundwater/surface-water interaction in the context of South African water policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jonathan; Xu, Yongxin

    2012-03-01

    Groundwater/surface-water interaction is receiving increasing focus in Africa due to its importance to ecologic systems and sustainability. In South Africa's 1998 National Water Act (NWA), water-use licenses, including groundwater, are granted only after defining the Reserve, the amount of water needed to supply basic human needs and preserve some ecological integrity. Accurate quantification of groundwater contributions to ecosystems for successful implementation of the NWA proves challenging; many of South Africa's aquifers are in heterogeneous and anisotropic fractured-rock settings. This paper reviews the current conceptualizations and investigative approaches regarding groundwater/surface-water interactions in the context of South African policies. Some selected pitfall experiences are emphasized. The most common approach in South Africa is estimation of average annual fluxes at the scale of fourth-order catchments (˜500 km2) with baseflow separation techniques and then subtracting the groundwater discharge rate from the recharge rate. This approach might be a good start, but it ignores spatial and temporal variability, potentially missing local impacts associated with production-well placement. As South Africa's NWA has already been emulated in many countries including Zambia, Zimbabwe and Kenya, the successes and failures of the South African experience dealing with the groundwater/surface-water interaction will be analyzed to guide future policy directions.

  15. Oahu Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for the island of Oahu. Data is from the following sources: Rotzoll, K., A.I. El-Kadi. 2007. Numerical Ground-Water Flow Simulation for Red Hill Fuel Storage Facilities, NAVFAC Pacific, Oahu, Hawaii - Prepared TEC, Inc. Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.; Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume VII – Island of Oahu Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2009. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. December 2009.

  16. Groundwater monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Ames, Kenneth R.; Doesburg, James M.; Eschbach, Eugene A.; Kelley, Roy C.; Myers, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A groundwater monitoring system includes a bore, a well casing within and spaced from the bore, and a pump within the casing. A water impermeable seal between the bore and the well casing prevents surface contamination from entering the pump. Above the ground surface is a removable operating means which is connected to the pump piston by a flexible cord. A protective casing extends above ground and has a removable cover. After a groundwater sample has been taken, the cord is disconnected from the operating means. The operating means is removed for taking away, the cord is placed within the protective casing, and the cover closed and locked. The system is thus protected from contamination, as well as from damage by accident or vandalism.

  17. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-02-28

    This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and

  18. Directions and rates of ground-water movement in the vicinity of Kesterson Reservoir, San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mandle, R.J.; Kontis, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    A three-dimensional groundwater flow model was used to simulate groundwater flow for a 124 sq mi area in the vicinity of Kesterson Reservoir in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Available data were used to calculate a probable range of groundwater flow rates, but calibration and sensitivity analysis were not done for this model. Flow directions, as inferred from measured groundwater levels and simulated hydraulic heads from all model simulations, indicate that regional groundwater flow is from the south to the north. Kesterson Reservoir acts as a recharge mound superimposed on the regional-flow system. Groundwater moves in the horizontal and vertical direction away from Kesterson Reservoir. Mud and Salt Sloughs act as groundwater discharge areas. Simulated groundwater flow from Kesterson Reservoir did not flow beyond these sloughs. Groundwater from west of Mud Slough seems to flow west toward Los Banos Creek and east toward Mud Slough. Groundwater that travels toward Salt Slough from Kesterson Reservoir probably is lost by evapotranspiration near the surface before reaching Salt Slough. Groundwater between Salt Slough and the San Joaquin River seems to flow north and toward Salt Slough and the San Joaquin River. The canals and duck ponds generally act as sources of groundwater recharge. A method was developed for determining flow directions and distance traveled in three dimensions for discrete time increments using simulated groundwater fluxes. Simulated average horizontal pore velocities away from Kesterson range less than 0.01 to 140 ft/year. The simulated average vertical pore velocities range from 0.01 to 14.7 ft/year. (Author 's abstract)

  19. Contain contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Mutch, R.D. Jr.; Caputi, J.R.; Ash, R.E. IV

    1997-05-01

    Despite recent progress in innovative treatment technologies, many problems with contaminated groundwater still require the use of barrier walls, typically in combination with extraction and treatment systems. New technologies for subsurface barrier walls, mostly based on geomembranes, advancements in self-hardening slurries and permeation grouts with materials such as colloidal silica gel and montan wax emulsions, are being developed at an unprecedented pace. The paper discusses deep soil mixing, jet grouting, slurry trenches, and permeation grouting.

  20. Groundwater Under Vertisols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtzman, D.; Baram, S.; Dahan, O.

    2015-12-01

    Vertisols are cracking clayey soils that: i) usually form in alluvial lowlands where normally, groundwater pools into aquifers; ii) have different types of voids (due to cracking) which make flow and transport of water and gas complex, and iii) are regarded as fertile soils in many areas. The combination of these characteristics results in the unique soil-aquifer phenomena that are highlighted and summarized in this review work. The following four vertisols-aquifer topics will be discussed: 1) Soil cracks as preferential pathways for water and contaminants - Lysimeter to basin-scale observations show the significance of cracks as preferential flow paths in vertisols that bypass matrix blocks in the unsaturated zone. Fresh recharge and groundwater contamination from these fluxes will be reviewed; 2) Soil cracks as deep evaporators and unsaturated-zone salinity - Deep soil samples under uncultivated vertisols in semiarid regions reveal a dry (immobile), saline matrix, partly due to enhanced evaporation through soil cracks. Observations of this phenomenon will be compared and the mechanism of evapoconcentration due to air flow in the cracks is discussed; 3) Impact of cultivation on flushing of the unsaturated zone and aquifer salinization - Land-use change of vertisols from native land to cropland promotes greater fluxes through the saline unsaturated-zone matrix, eventually flushing salts to the aquifer. Different degrees of salt flushing will be presented as well as aquifer salinization on different scales, and a comparison is made with aquifers under other soils; 4) Relatively little nitrate contamination in aquifers under vertisols - A number of observations show that aquifers under cultivated vertisols are somewhat resistant to groundwater contamination by nitrate (the major agriculturally related groundwater problem). Denitrification is probably the main mechanism supporting this resistance, whereas a certain degree of anion-exchange capacity may have a

  1. SSCL groundwater model

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, V.; Bull, J.; Stapleton, G.; Baker, S.; Goss, D.; Coulson, L.

    1994-02-01

    Activation of groundwater due to accelerator operations has been a consideration since the conceptual stages of the SSC. Prior to site selection, an elementary hydrological model assuming a porous medium with a shallow well in proximity to the tunnel was used to determine the radionuclide concentrations in the water pumped from a well. The model assumed that radionuclides produced within a few feet of the tunnel would migrate to the shallow well and be diluted as the well drew water from a conically symmetric region. After the Ellis County site was selected, the compatibility of this model with the site specific geology was evaluated. The host geology at the selected site is low permeability rock, Austin chalk, shale, and marl, however, vertical fractures do exist. Since the host rock has a low permeability, groundwater in proximity to the tunnel would have to travel primarily through fractures. This hydrology is not compatible with the above mentioned model since water does not percolate uniformly from the surrounding rock into local wells. The amount of dilution of activated water will vary significantly depending on the specific relationship of the well to the activation zone. A further complication in the original model is that it assumes the high energy particles escaping from the accelerator enclosure are localized. The model does not provide for particles being lost over a large area as will happen with routine operational losses. These losses will be distributed along the accelerator over the life of the project. The SSCL groundwater model has been recast to account for the site specific hydrology and both point and distributed losses. Using the new groundwater model, the SSC accelerators are designed to limit the activation concentration in the water located one meter outside the accelerator enclosure to meet the federal drinking water standards. This technical note provides the details of this model.

  2. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  3. Groundwater flow processes and mixing in active volcanic systems: the case of Guadalajara (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Antonio, A.; Mahlknecht, J.; Tamez-Meléndez, C.; Ramos-Leal, J.; Ramírez-Orozco, A.; Parra, R.; Ornelas-Soto, N.; Eastoe, C. J.

    2015-02-01

    Groundwater chemistry and isotopic data from 40 production wells in the Atemajac and Toluquilla Valleys, located in and around the Guadalajara metropolitan area, were determined to develop a conceptual model of groundwater flow processes and mixing. Multivariate analysis including cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to elucidate distribution patterns of constituents and factors controlling groundwater chemistry. Based on this analysis, groundwater was classified into four groups: cold groundwater, hydrothermal water, polluted groundwater and mixed groundwater. Cold groundwater is characterized by low temperature, salinity, and Cl and Na concentrations and is predominantly of Na-HCO3 type. It originates as recharge at Primavera caldera and is found predominantly in wells in the upper Atemajac Valley. Hydrothermal water is characterized by high salinity, temperature, Cl, Na, HCO3, and the presence of minor elements such as Li, Mn and F. It is a mixed HCO3 type found in wells from Toluquilla Valley and represents regional flow circulation through basaltic and andesitic rocks. Polluted groundwater is characterized by elevated nitrate and sulfate concentrations and is usually derived from urban water cycling and subordinately from agricultural practices. Mixed groundwaters between cold and hydrothermal components are predominantly found in the lower Atemajac Valley. Tritium method elucidated that practically all of the sampled groundwater contains at least a small fraction of modern water. The multivariate mixing model M3 indicates that the proportion of hydrothermal fluids in sampled well water is between 13 (local groundwater) and 87% (hydrothermal water), and the proportion of polluted water in wells ranges from 0 to 63%. This study may help local water authorities to identify and quantify groundwater contamination and act accordingly.

  4. SDI-Based Groundwater Information Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodaric, B.; Boisvert, E.

    2007-12-01

    Though groundwater data are important inputs to hydrologic decision-making, they are highly distributed and heterogeneous, and thus difficult to access in a coordinated manner. The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) is developing an information system for coordinated groundwater data access, using the standards and technologies of Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI). In mid-stage development, the system is designed to manage and disseminate data produced by GSC scientists, as well as potentially disseminate data produced by other groundwater agencies. The system involves a typical three-tiered, mediator-wrapper architecture that includes a data tier, a mediator tier, and an applications tier. At the data tier local data sources are wrapped by OGC web services (WFS, WMS), which deliver diversely structured data to the mediator tier. The mediator tier acts as: (1) a central registry for the distributed data and other services; (2) a translator of the local data to the standard data format, GroundWater Markup Language; and (3) a consistent set of OGC web services that enable users to access the distributed data as one source. The applications tier involves both GSC and third-party web applications, such as analysis tools or on-line atlases, that provide user interfaces to the system. Apart from the data format standards used to achieve schematic interoperability, the system also deploys some light-weight data content standards to move toward semantic interoperability. These content standards include the definition of common categories for datasets such as standard subject classifications and map layers. A demonstration of the working prototype will be available, as well as discussion of the architecture of the system and the impacts on interoperability. The intent of the development is to grow the system into a national enterprise with a broad range of contributors and users.

  5. Minor element geochemistry of groundwater from an area with prevailing saline groundwater in Chikhwawa, lower Shire valley (Malawi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monjerezi, Maurice; Vogt, Rolf D.; Gebru, Asfaw Gebretsadik; Saka, John D. K.; Aagaard, Per

    Groundwater resources with high salinity content are found in some parts of the lower Shire River valley (Malawi). This paper discusses the geochemistry of minor elements with regards to the prevailing salinity. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses were used to identify factors which relate to both minor elements and samples and were interpreted as reflecting the influence of prevailing saline/brackish groundwater. Concentrations of lead (Pb), boron (B), strontium (Sr) and chromium (Cr) were associated with groundwater with high content of total dissolved solids (TDS). Speciation calculations indicated that dissolved Sr, barium (Ba) and lithium (Li) were mainly in the form of free aqueous ions whereas hydrolysed species were significant for aluminium (Al) and Cr, and carbonate complexes for Pb. Chloride complexes were prevalent for silver (Ag). Solubility of cerussite (PbCO3) and barite (BaSO4) was shown to act as a control on the levels of Pb and Ba, respectively. Thus, Ba concentrations were very low in saline groundwater owing to their high sulphate content. A relatively variable B concentration in the groundwater samples was explained using a binary mixing model of saline and fresh groundwater. The mixing of fresh groundwater with saline groundwater was concomitant with high Na+/Ca2+ ratios and enrichment of B, probably by desorption from clays. The WHO drinking water guidelines for Ba, B, Cr and Pb were exceeded in 6.5%, 9.7%, 16.1% and 64.5% of all the samples, respectively. However, all samples were below the Malawian specification of B in borehole and shallow well water quality (MS 733:2005) of 5.0 mg/L.

  6. Act resilient.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Genie; Bice-Stephens, Wynona

    2014-01-01

    Attendees have reported changing from being fearful to serene, from listless to energized, from disengaged to connected, and becoming markedly less anxious in a few weeks. Anecdotally, self-reported stress levels have been reduced by over 50% after just one class. Attendees learn not to be afraid of their feelings by working with emotions in a playful manner. When a person can act angry, but separate himself from his personal story, the emotional energy exists in a separate form that is not attached to specific events, and can be more easily dealt with and neutralized. Attendees are taught to "take out the emotional trash" through expressive comedy. They become less intimated by their own emotional intensity and triggers as they learn how even metaphorical buckets of anger, shame, guilt and hurt can be emotionally emptied. The added benefit is that this is accomplished without the disclosure of personal information of the requirement to reexperience past pain which can trigger its own cascade of stress. PMID:24706248

  7. A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Sacramento Area Groundwater Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-03-10

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MtBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Ambient Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement the groundwater assessment program in cooperation with local water purveyors. In 2001 and 2002, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basin of Sacramento suburban area, located to the north of the American River and to the east of the Sacramento River. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3

  8. GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.

    SciTech Connect

    PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

    2002-05-31

    THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

  9. Arkansas Groundwater-Quality Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pugh, Aaron L.; Jackson, Barry T.; Miller, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Arkansas is the fourth largest user of groundwater in the United States, where groundwater accounts for two-thirds of the total water use. Groundwater use in the State increased by 510 percent between 1965 and 2005 (Holland, 2007). The Arkansas Groundwater-Quality Network is a Web map interface (http://ar.water.usgs.gov/wqx) that provides rapid access to the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) National Water Information System (NWIS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) STOrage and RETrieval (STORET) databases of ambient water information. The interface enables users to perform simple graphical analysis and download selected water-quality data.

  10. Impacts of proposed RCRA regulations and other related federal environmental regulations on Fossil Fuel-Fired Facilities: Final report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    In order to fulfill its responsibilities, DOE contracted with Engineering-Science to perform a multi-phase engineering and economics study to evaluate the impact of the proposed RCRA regulations and other related federal environmental regulations on coal-fired utilities. This Interim Phase I report presents the findings of the impacts of proposed RCRA and related federal regulations on the utility sector fossil fuel-fired facilities. Subsequent phases involve parallel engineering studies on the industrial sector as well as economic evaluations. The framework of this study was based on the development and analysis (engineering and economic) of four regulatory scenarios for the disposal of fly ash, bottom ash and FGD sludge from the utility industry.

  11. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-10-06

    A groundwater quality assessment plan was prepared for waste management area S-SX at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 265, Subpart F [and by reference of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-400(3)]. The facility was placed in assessment groundwater monitoring program status after elevated waste constituents and indicator parameter measurements (i.e., chromium, technetium-99 and specific conductance) in downgradient monitoring wells were observed and confirmed. A first determination, as allowed under 40 CFR 265.93(d), provides the owner/operator of a facility an opportunity to demonstrate that the regulated unit is not the source of groundwater contamination. Based on results of the first determination it was concluded that multiple source locations in the waste management area could account for observed spatial and temporal groundwater contamination patterns. Consequently, a continued investigation is required. This plan, developed using the data quality objectives process, is intended to comply with the continued investigation requirement. Accordingly, the primary purpose of the present plan is to determine the rate and extent of dangerous waste (hexavalent chromium and nitrate) and radioactive constituents (e.g., technetium-99) in groundwater and to determine their concentrations in groundwater beneath waste management area S-SX. Comments and concerns expressed by the Washington State Department of Ecology on the initial waste management area S-SX assessment report were addressed in the descriptive narrative of this plan as well as in the planned activities. Comment disposition is documented in a separate addendum to this plan.

  12. Groundwater modeling to support risk assessment at Rocky Flats Plant, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Newill, R.J.; Zhang, C.M.; Belcher, W.; Roberts, B.

    1994-12-31

    Operable Unit No. 2 (OU2) of the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), located west of Denver, Colorado, has been the site of extensive environmental investigations related to contamination from past radioactive and chemical waste storage and disposal practices. As part of the OU2 Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) process, numerical groundwater fate and transport modeling using the MODFLOW, MT3D, and ONED3 codes was performed to support the data needs of the OU2 Human Health Risk Assessment. Characterization of OU2 physical conditions indicates that complex subsurface geologic conditions dominate the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution and transport within OU2. Because the sole purpose of the groundwater fate and transport modeling for this project was to support the needs of the human health risk assessment, it was adequate to limit the degree of model complexity to that necessary to provide conservative estimates of contaminant loading to local creeks, thus resulting in conservative estimates of human health risk. To accomplish this, the complex, multi-layer, highly transient site conditions were simplified to an equivalent, single-layer, steady-state system that incorporated the large-scale behavior of the integrated OU2 system.

  13. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. Annual report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is composed of the original 32-acre landfill, plus expansion areas to the north and south that added 16 and 22 acres, respectively, to the facility. The landfill is subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and currently operates under South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Domestic Waste Permit 87A. Fifty-seven wells of the LFW series monitor the groundwater quality in Steed Pond Aquifer (formerly Aquifer Zone I/IIC{sub 2}) (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill. These wells are sampled quarterly for certain indicator parameters, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, volatile organics, and other constituents as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program and to comply with the SCDHEC domestic waste permit. This report reviews the 1992 activities of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program.

  14. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Bates, D.J.

    1992-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory monitors ground-water quality across the Hanford Site for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the impact of Site operations on the environment. Monitoring activities were conducted to determine the distribution of mobile radionuclides and identify chemicals present in ground water as a result of Site operations and whenever possible, relate the distribution of these constituents to Site operations. To comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, additional monitoring was conducted at individual waste sites by the Site Operating Contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), to assess the impact that specific facilities have had on ground-water quality. Six hundred and twenty-nine wells were sampled during 1990 by all Hanford ground-water monitoring activities.

  15. Groundwater inventory and monitoring technical guide: Remote sensing of groundwater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The application of remotely sensed data in conjunction with in situ data greatly enhances the ability of the USDA Forest Service to meet the demands of field staff, customers, and others for groundwater information. Generally, the use of remotely sensed data to inventory and monitor groundwater reso...

  16. The groundwater subsidy to vegetation: groundwater exchanges between landcover patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, L. I.; Gimenez, R.; Jobbagy, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Gran Chaco is a hot, dry plain, that spans over 60 million hectares across Bolivia, Paraguay, Brazil and Argentina. It supports high biodiversity in its dry forest and savannahs, but is rapidly being converted to agriculture in response to growing soy demand and technology including genetic modification and zero-till, that has made cultivation in drier landscapes more viable. Under natural conditions, the deep-rooted, native vegetation of the Chaco effectively captured all rainfall for evapotranspiration resulting in near zero groundwater recharge under the dry forest. Conversion to shallower rooted soy and corn, combined with the fallow period prior to the growing season, reduces evapotranspiration and allows some water to percolate through the root zone and recharge the groundwater system. When this groundwater recharge occurs, it creates groundwater mounding and a hydraulic gradient that drives flow to adjacent landcover patches where recharge does not occur. As the watertable rises, groundwater becomes available to the deep-rooted, dry forest vegetation. We develop a soil and groundwater flow model to simulate infiltration, percolation, evaporation, rootwater uptake, groundwater recharge and the lateral transfer of water between adjacent landcover patches to quantify this groundwater subsidy from converted agricultural lands to remnant patches of dry forest.

  17. Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Dresel, P Evan; Lindberg, Jonathan W.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Thornton, Edward C.

    2000-10-18

    Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

  18. Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

    1999-10-06

    Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

  19. RCRA closure plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk- In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    In June 1987, the RCRA Closure/Postclosure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review and approval. TDEC modified and issued the plan approved on September 30, 1987. Subsequently, this plan was modified again and approved as Y/TS-395, Revised RCRA Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (February 29, 1988). Y/TS-395 was initially intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the Walk-In Pits of BCBG. However, a concept was developed to include the B Area (non-RCRA regulated) in the Walk-In Pits so that both areas would be closed under one cap. This approach included a tremendous amount of site preparation with an underlying stabilization base of 16 ft of sand for blast protection. The plan was presented to the state of Tennessee on March 8, 1990, and the Department of Energy was requested to review other unique alternatives to close the site. This amended closure plan goes further to include inspection and maintenance criteria along with other details.

  20. REGION 10 (EXCEPT ALASKA) GROUNDWATER ACTIVITIES MAP

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a map of Washington, Oregon and Idaho, with inset blow ups of the Puget Sound area, Portland, and Spokane. The map shows RCRA treatment, storage, disposal, and incineration sites, CERCLA sites, TRI sites, NPDES majors, and Sole Source Aquifers Streams and county boundarie...

  1. Tracer attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    The self-purifying capacity of aquifers strongly depends on the attenuation of waterborne contaminants, i.e., irreversible loss of contaminant mass on a given scale as a result of coupled transport and transformation processes. A general formulation of tracer attenuation in groundwater is presented. Basic sensitivities of attenuation to macrodispersion and retention are illustrated for a few typical retention mechanisms. Tracer recovery is suggested as an experimental proxy for attenuation. Unique experimental data of tracer recovery in crystalline rock compare favorably with the theoretical model that is based on diffusion-controlled retention. Non-Fickian hydrodynamic transport has potentially a large impact on field-scale attenuation of dissolved contaminants.

  2. Solutions Remediate Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, NASA workers used chlorinated solvents to clean rocket engine components at launch sites. These solvents, known as dense non-aqueous phase liquids, had contaminated launch facilities to the point of near-irreparability. Dr. Jacqueline Quinn and Dr. Kathleen Brooks Loftin of Kennedy Space Center partnered with researchers from the University of Central Florida's chemistry and engineering programs to develop technology capable of remediating the area without great cost or further environmental damage. They called the new invention Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron (EZVI). The groundwater remediation compound is cleaning up polluted areas all around the world and is, to date, NASA's most licensed technology.

  3. Hanford Site environmental data for calendar year 1990 -- Ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Dresel, P.E.; Bates, D.J.; Merz, J.K.

    1993-03-01

    This report tabulates ground-water radiological and chemical data for calendar year 1990 by the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, reported Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Monitoring, and Operational Monitoring. The Ground-Water Surveillance Project is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the RCRA and Operational Monitoring Projects are conducted by the Westinghouse Hanford Company. This document supplements the reports Hanford Site Ground-Water Monitoring for 1990 (Evans et al. 1992) and mental Report for Calendar Year 1990 (Woodruff and Hanf 1991). The data listings provided here were generated from the Hanford Environmental Information System database.

  4. Using 14C and 3H to understand groundwater flow and recharge in an aquifer window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, A. P.; Cartwright, I.; Gilfedder, B. S.; Cendón, D. I.; Unland, N. P.; Hofmann, H.

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of groundwater residence times and recharge locations are vital to the sustainable management of groundwater resources. Here we investigate groundwater residence times and patterns of recharge in the Gellibrand Valley, southeast Australia, where outcropping aquifer sediments of the Eastern View Formation form an "aquifer window" that may receive diffuse recharge and recharge from the Gellibrand River. To determine recharge patterns and groundwater flowpaths, environmental isotopes (3H, 14C, δ13C, δ18O, δ2H) are used in conjunction with groundwater geochemistry and continuous monitoring of groundwater elevation and electrical conductivity. Despite the water table fluctuating by 0.9-3.7 m annually producing estimated recharge rates of 90 and 372 mm yr-1, residence times of shallow (11-29 m) groundwater determined by 14C ages are between 100 and 10 000 years. 3H activities are negligible in most of the groundwater and groundwater electrical conductivity in individual areas remains constant over the period of study. Although diffuse local recharge is evident, the depth to which it penetrates is limited to the upper 10 m of the aquifer. Rather, groundwater in the Gellibrand Valley predominantly originates from the regional recharge zone, the Barongarook High, and acts as a regional discharge zone where upward head gradients are maintained annually, limiting local recharge. Additionally, the Gellibrand River does not recharge the surrounding groundwater and has limited bank storage. 14C ages and Cl concentrations are well correlated and Cl concentrations may be used to provide a first-order estimate of groundwater residence times. Progressively lower chloride concentrations from 10 000 years BP to the present day are interpreted to indicate an increase in recharge rates on the Barongarook High.

  5. Groundwater seepage landscapes from distant and local sources in experiments and on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, W. A.; McLelland, S. J.; Parsons, D. R.; Murphy, B. J.; Hauber, E.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    Valleys with theater-shaped heads can form due to the seepage of groundwater and as a result of knickpoint (waterfall) erosion generated by overland flow. This ambiguity in the mechanism of formation hampers the interpretation of such valleys on Mars, particularly since there is limited knowledge of material properties. Moreover, the hydrological implications of a groundwater or surface water origin are important for our understanding of the evolution of surface features on Mars, and a quantification of valley morphologies at the landscape scale may provide diagnostic insights on the formative hydrological conditions. However, flow patterns and the resulting landscapes produced by different sources of groundwater are poorly understood. We aim to improve the understanding of the formation of entire valley landscapes through seepage processes from different groundwater sources that will provide a framework of landscape metrics for the interpretation of such systems. We study groundwater seepage from a distant source of groundwater and from infiltration of local precipitation in a series of sandbox experiments and combine our results with previous experiments and observations of the Martian surface. Key results are that groundwater flow piracy acts on valleys fed by a distant groundwater source and results in a sparsely dissected landscape of many small and a few large valleys. In contrast, valleys fed by a local groundwater source, i.e., nearby infiltration, result in a densely dissected landscape. In addition, valleys fed by a distant groundwater source grow towards that source, while valleys with a local source grow in a broad range of directions and have a strong tendency to bifurcate, particularly on flatter surfaces. We consider these results with respect to two Martian cases: Louros Valles shows properties of seepage by a local source of groundwater and Nirgal Vallis shows evidence of a distant source, which we interpret as groundwater flow from Tharsis.

  6. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) General Contingency Plan for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    This contingency plan provides a description of the Y-12 plant and its waste units and prescribes control procedures and emergency response procedures. It lists emergency and spill response equipment, provides information on coordination agreements with local agencies, and describes the evacuation plan and reporting requirements.

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for Production Associated Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Attention is focused on permit applications for the following units: Building 9206 Container Storage Unit; Building 9212 Container Storage Unit; Building 9720-12 Container Storage Unit; and Cyanide Treatment Unit. This report addresses the following areas: facility description; waste characteristics; process information; ground water monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plant, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification.

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for container storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document contains Part B of the Permit Application for Container Storage Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Sections cover the following areas: Facility description; Waste characteristics; Process information; Ground water monitoring; Procedures to prevent hazards; Contingency plan; Personnel training; Closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; Recordkeeping; Other federal laws; Organic air emissions; Solid waste management units; and Certification.

  9. Utilizing Isotopic Uranium Ratios in Groundwater Evaluations at FUSRAP Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, W.T.; Keil, K.G.; Rhodes, M.C.; Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District is evaluating environmental radioactive contamination at several Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites throughout New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana. The investigations follow the process defined in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Groundwater data from the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York were evaluated for isotopic uranium ratios, specifically uranium-234 versus uranium-238 (U- 234 and U-238, respectively), and the results were presented at Waste Management 2006. Since uranium naturally occurs in all groundwater, it can be difficult to distinguish where low-concentration impacts from past releases differ from the high end of a site-specific natural background range. In natural groundwater, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 exceeds 1 (unity) due to the alpha particle recoil effect, in which U-234 is preferentially mobilized to groundwater from adjacent rock or soil. This process is very slow and may take hundreds to thousands of years before a measurable increase is seen in the natural isotopic ratio. If site releases are the source of uranium being measured in groundwater, the U-234 to U-238 ratio is commonly closer to 1, which normally reflects FUSRAP-related, uranium-contaminated wastes and soils. This lower ratio occurs because not enough residence time has elapsed since the 1940's and 1950's for the alpha particle recoil effect to have significantly altered the contamination-derived ratio. An evaluation of NFSS-specific and regional groundwater data indicate that an isotopic ratio of 1.2 has been identified as a signature value to help distinguish natural groundwater, which may have a broad background range, from zones impacted by past releases. (authors)

  10. Sustainable groundwater management in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Steven P.; Rogers, Laurel Lynn; Faunt, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) uses data collection, modeling tools, and scientific analysis to help water managers plan for, and assess, hydrologic issues that can cause “undesirable results” associated with groundwater use. This information helps managers understand trends and investigate and predict effects of different groundwater-management strategies.

  11. Groundwater hydrology--coastal flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Ward E.

    2010-01-01

    How groundwater flow varies when long-term external conditions change is little documented. Geochemical evidence shows that sea-level rise at the end of the last glacial period led to a shift in the flow patterns of coastal groundwater beneath Florida.

  12. Groundwater protection management program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a groundwater protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office has prepared a ``Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan`` (groundwater protection plan) of sufficient scope and detail to reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter 3, for special program planning. The groundwater protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor groundwater resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies project technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA groundwater protection management program. In addition, the groundwater protection plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA sites (long-term care at disposal sites and groundwater restoration at processing sites). This plan will be reviewed annually and updated every 3 years in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  13. Promoting local management in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Steenbergen, Frank

    2006-03-01

    There is a strong case for making greater effort to promote local groundwater management—in addition to other measures that regulate groundwater use. Though scattered, there are several examples—from India, Pakistan, Yemen and Egypt—where groundwater users effectively self-imposed restrictions on the use of groundwater. There are a number of recurrent themes in such spontaneously-developed examples of local regulation: the importance of not excluding potential users; the importance of simple, low transaction cost rules; the power of correct and accessible hydrogeological information; the possibility of making more use of demand and supply management strategies; and the important supportive role of local governments. The case is made, using examples, for actively promoting local groundwater management as an important element in balancing groundwater uses. Two programmes for promoting local groundwater management in South India are described—one focussing on participatory hydrological monitoring, and one focussing on micro-resource planning and training. In both cases the response was very positive and the conclusion is that promoting local groundwater regulation is not difficult, costly or sensitive and can reach the necessary scale quickly.

  14. SUPERFUND GROUNDWATER ISSUE - FACILITATED TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Regional Superfund Ground Water Forum is a group of ground-water scientists representing EPA's Regional Superfund Offices, organized to exchange up to date information related to ground-water remediation at Superfund sites. Facilitated transport is an issue identified by the ...

  15. ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT TO GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of pesticides in the production of agricultural commodities is widespread. Since nearly one-half of the U.S. population relies on groundwater as their source for drinking water, contamination potential of groundwater, because of pesticide manufacture and use, must be unde...

  16. Groundwater: Contamination from Nitrogen Fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in water pose problems for human health and the environment. Groundwater is a major source for human water supplies and for contributing to surface water bodies. Leaching of N fertilizers is a major factor for high NO3-N concentrations in groundwater. Current ...

  17. Linking climate change and groundwater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Projected global change includes groundwater systems, which are linked with changes in climate over space and time. Consequently, global change affects key aspects of subsurface hydrology (including soil water, deeper vadose zone water, and unconfined and confined aquifer waters), surface-groundwat...

  18. High (36)Cl/Cl ratios in Chernobyl groundwater.

    PubMed

    Roux, Céline; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Simonucci, Caroline; Van Meir, Nathalie; Fifield, L Keith; Diez, Olivier; Bassot, Sylvain; Simler, Roland; Bugai, Dmitri; Kashparov, Valery; Lancelot, Joël

    2014-12-01

    After the explosion of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in April 1986, contaminated material was buried in shallow trenches within the exclusion zone. A (90)Sr plume was evidenced downgradient of one of these trenches, trench T22. Due to its conservative properties, (36)Cl is investigated here as a potential tracer to determine the maximal extent of the contamination plume from the trench in groundwater. (36)Cl/Cl ratios measured in groundwater, trench soil water and leaf leachates are 1-5 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical natural (36)Cl/Cl ratio. This contamination occurred after the Chernobyl explosion and currently persists. Trench T22 acts as an obvious modern point source of (36)Cl, however other sources have to be involved to explain such contamination. (36)Cl contamination of groundwater can be explained by dilution of trench soil water by uncontaminated water (rainwater or deep groundwater). With a plume extending further than that of (90)Sr, radionuclide which is impacted by retention and decay processes, (36)Cl can be considered as a suitable tracer of contamination from the trench in groundwater provided that modern release processes of (36)Cl from trench soil are better characterized. PMID:25128774

  19. Issues in groundwater management

    SciTech Connect

    Smerdon, E.T.; Jordon, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that the solution to future water problems in Texas will require more effective management of the water resources. New supplies to meet future needs are not without limit; therefore, the solution to the problem will have to come from better water conservation as well as by providing new supplies. In some cases, conservation and reuse may be the only feasible answer. To accomplish what is needed will require the best efforts of all Texans. And good research programs will be required to discover ways to improve on what has been done in the past. This publication contains the proceedings of a symposium entitled ''Groundwater--Crisis or Opportunity,'' which was held in San Antonio October 29-31, 1984. It was one of several efforts related to water resources undertaken cooperatively in recent years by The University of Texas at Austin and The Texas A and M University System. The papers in this proceedings discuss the groundwater problems of the future in Texas.

  20. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOEpatents

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  1. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Ballard, Sanford

    1994-01-01

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

  2. Groundwater: from mystery to management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    2009-07-01

    Groundwater has been used for domestic and irrigation needs from time immemorial. Yet its nature and occurrence have always possessed a certain mystery because water below the land surface is invisible and relatively inaccessible. The influence of this mystery lingers in some tenets that govern groundwater law. With the birth of modern geology during the late nineteenth century, groundwater science became recognized in its own right. Over the past two centuries, groundwater has lost its shroud of mystery, and its scientific understanding has gradually grown hand-in-hand with its development for human use. Groundwater is a component of the hydrological cycle, vital for human sustenance. Its annual renewability from precipitation is limited, and its chemical quality is vulnerable to degradation by human action. In many parts of the world, groundwater extraction is known to greatly exceed its renewability. Consequently, its rational management to benefit present and future generations is a matter of deep concern for many nations. Groundwater management is a challenging venture, requiring an integration of scientific knowledge with communal will to adapt to constraints of a finite common resource. As scientists and policy makers grapple with the tasks of groundwater management, it is instructive to reflect on the evolution of groundwater knowledge from its initial phase of demystification at the beginning of the nineteenth century, through successive phases of technological conquest, scientific integration, discovery of unintended consequences and the present recognition of an imperative for judicious management. The following retrospective provides a broad context for unifying the technical contributions that make up this focus issue on groundwater resources, climate and vulnerability.

  3. Assessing groundwater policy with coupled economic-groundwater hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Kevin B.; Brown, Casey; Yang, Yi-Chen E.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2014-03-01

    This study explores groundwater management policies and the effect of modeling assumptions on the projected performance of those policies. The study compares an optimal economic allocation for groundwater use subject to streamflow constraints, achieved by a central planner with perfect foresight, with a uniform tax on groundwater use and a uniform quota on groundwater use. The policies are compared with two modeling approaches, the Optimal Control Model (OCM) and the Multi-Agent System Simulation (MASS). The economic decision models are coupled with a physically based representation of the aquifer using a calibrated MODFLOW groundwater model. The results indicate that uniformly applied policies perform poorly when simulated with more realistic, heterogeneous, myopic, and self-interested agents. In particular, the effects of the physical heterogeneity of the basin and the agents undercut the perceived benefits of policy instruments assessed with simple, single-cell groundwater modeling. This study demonstrates the results of coupling realistic hydrogeology and human behavior models to assess groundwater management policies. The Republican River Basin, which overlies a portion of the Ogallala aquifer in the High Plains of the United States, is used as a case study for this analysis.

  4. P-Area Reactor 1993 annual groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the water table at the following locations in P Area: well P 24A in the eastern section of P Area, the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin, the P-Area Coal Pile Runoff Containment Basin, the P-Area Disassembly Basin, the P-Area Burning/Rubble Pit, and the P-Area Seepage Basins. During 1993, pH was above its alkaline standard in well P 24A. Specific conductance was above its standard in one well each from the PAC and PCB series. Lead exceeded its 50 {mu}g/L standard in one well of the PDB series during one quarter. Tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene were detected above their final primary drinking water standards in one well of the PRP well series. Tritium was consistently above its DWS in the PDB and PSB series. Also during 1993, radium-228 exceeded the DWS for total radium in three wells of the PAC series and one well of the PCB series; total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the same standard in a different PCB well. These results are fairly consistent with those from previous years. Unlike results from past years, however, no halogenated volatiles other than trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene exceeded DWS in the PRP well series although gas chromatographic volatile organic analyses were performed throughout the year. Some of the regulated units in P Area appear to need additional monitoring by new wells because there are insufficient downgradient wells, sometimes because the original well network, installed prior to regulation, included sidegradient rather than downgradient wells. No monitoring wells had been installed through 1993 at one of the RCRA/CERCLA units named in the Federal Facilities Agreement, the Bingham Pump Outage Pits.

  5. Reconstruction of Groundwater Depletion Using a Global Scale Groundwater Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, I. E. M.; Van Beek, L. P.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is a crucial part of the global water cycle. It is the world's largest accessible source of fresh water to satisfy human water needs. During times of droughts it sustains river flows and evaporation in areas with shallow water tables. However, most global scale hydrological models do not include a lateral groundwater flow component due to a lack of consistent global-scale hydrogeological information. Such data is needed to arrive at a more realistic physical representation of the groundwater system allowing for the simulation of groundwater head dynamics and lateral flows including abstractions in confined and unconfined aquifers. This improved process description is indispensable to understand the effects of past and future climate variations and human dependence on global water resources. In this study we developed a high resolution (5 arc-minutes) global scale transient groundwater model presenting confined and unconfined aquifers. This model is based on MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) and coupled with the land-surface model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al. 2011) via recharge and surface water levels. The aquifer parameterization is based on available global data-sets on lithology (Hartmann and Moosdorf 2011) and permeability (Gleeson et al. 2011) and newly derived estimates of aquifer depth and thickness of confining layers from an integration of lithological and topographical information. In a sensitivity analysis the model is run with various hydrogeological parameter settings, under natural recharge only. Scenarios of past groundwater abstractions and recharge (Wada et al 2012) are evaluated. Trends and fluctuations of groundwater head and streamflow are studied in response to human groundwater use and climate variability, as well as revealing hotspots and magnitude of global groundwater depletion.

  6. Reconstruction of groundwater depletion using a global scale groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Rens; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; Wada, Yoshi; Bierkens, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater forms an integral part of the global hydrological cycle and is the world's largest accessible source of fresh water to satisfy human water needs. It buffers variable recharge rates over time, thereby effectively sustaining river flows in times of drought as well as evaporation in areas with shallow water tables. Moreover, although lateral groundwater flows are often slow, they cross topographic and administrative boundaries at appreciable rates. Despite the importance of groundwater, most global scale hydrological models do not consider surface water-groundwater interactions or include a lateral groundwater flow component. The main reason of this omission is the lack of consistent global-scale hydrogeological information needed to arrive at a more realistic representation of the groundwater system, i.e. including information on aquifer depths and the presence of confining layers. The latter holds vital information on the accessibility and quality of the global groundwater resource. In this study we developed a high resolution (5 arc-minutes) global scale transient groundwater model comprising confined and unconfined aquifers. This model is based on MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) and coupled with the land-surface model PCR GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011) via recharge and surface water levels. Aquifers properties were based on newly derived estimates of aquifer depths (de Graaf et al., 2014b) and thickness of confining layers from an integration of lithological and topographical information. They were further parameterized using available global datasets on lithology (Hartmann and Moosdorf, 2011) and permeability (Gleeson et al., 2014). In a sensitivity analysis the model was run with various hydrogeological parameter settings, under natural recharge only. Scenarios of past groundwater abstractions and corresponding recharge (Wada et al., 2012, de Graaf et al. 2014a) were evaluated. The resulting estimates of groundwater depletion are lower than

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration site characterization report - area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    The Area 6 North and South Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEPs) are historic disposal units located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the site under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 265.

  8. Evaluation of alternative groundwater-management strategies for the Bureau of Reclamation Klamath Project, Oregon and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Brian J.; Gannett, Marshall W.

    2014-01-01

    The water resources of the upper Klamath Basin, in southern Oregon and northern California, are managed to achieve various complex and interconnected purposes. Since 2001, irrigators in the Bureau of Reclamation Klamath Irrigation Project (Project) have been required to limit surface-water diversions to protect habitat for endangered freshwater and anadromous fishes. The reductions in irrigation diversions have led to an increased demand for groundwater by Project irrigators, particularly in drought years. The potential effects of sustained pumping on groundwater and surface-water resources have caused concern among Federal and state agencies, Indian tribes, wildlife groups, and groundwater users. To aid in the development of a viable groundwater-management strategy for the Project, the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the Klamath Water and Power Agency and the Oregon Water Resources Department, developed a groundwater-management model that links groundwater simulation with techniques of constrained optimization. The overall goal of the groundwater-management model is to determine the patterns of groundwater pumping that, to the extent possible, meet the supplemental groundwater demands of the Project. To ensure that groundwater development does not adversely affect groundwater and surface-water resources, the groundwater-management model includes constraints to (1) limit the effects of groundwater withdrawal on groundwater discharge to streams and lakes that support critical habitat for fish listed under the Endangered Species Act, (2) ensure that drawdowns do not exceed limits allowed by Oregon water law, and (3) ensure that groundwater withdrawal does not adversely affect agricultural drain flows that supply a substantial portion of water for irrigators and wildlife refuges in downslope areas of the Project. Groundwater-management alternatives were tested and designed within the framework of the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement (currently [2013

  9. Solid waste landfills under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document provides guidance for meeting: (1) Guidelines for the Land Disposal of Solid Waste (40 CFR 241); (2) Criteria for Classification of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities and Practices (40 CFR 257); and (3) Criteria for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills (MSWLFs) (40 CFR Part 258). Revisions to 40 CFR 257 and a new Part 258 were published in the Federal Register (56 FR 50978, 10/9/91). The Guidelines for the Land Disposal of Solid Waste set requirements and recommended procedures to ensure that the design, construction, and operation of land disposal sites is done in a manner that will protect human health and the environment. These regulations are applicable to MSWLFs and non-MSWLFs (e.g., landfills used only for the disposal of demolition debris, commercial waste, and/or industrial waste). These guidelines are not applicable to the, land disposal of hazardous, agricultural, and/or mining wastes. These criteria are to be used under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in determining which solid waste disposal facilities pose a reasonable possibility of adversely affecting human health or the environment. Facilities failing to satisfy these criteria will be considered to be open dumps which are prohibited under Section 4005 of RCRA. The Criteria for MSWLFs are applicable only to MSWLFs, including those MSWLFs in which sewage sludge is co-disposed with household waste. Based on specific criteria, certain MSWLFs are exempt from some, or all, of the regulations of 40 CFR 258. MSWLFs that fail to satisfy the criteria specified in 40 CFR 258 are also considered open dumps for the purposes of Section 4005 of RCRA. Through the use of a series of interrelated flow diagrams, this guidance document directs the reader to each design, operation, maintenance, and closure activity that must be performed for MSWLFs and non-MSWLFs.

  10. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  11. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1995-01-24

    An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

  12. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.; Fliermans, Carl B.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  13. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume IV – Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  14. Global scale groundwater flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin; de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Ludovicus; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater sustains water flows in streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands, and thus supports ecosystem habitat and biodiversity, while its large natural storage provides a buffer against water shortages. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component that is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle and allows the simulation of groundwater head dynamics. In this study we present a steady-state MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) groundwater model on the global scale at 5 arc-minutes resolution. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological model (e.g. Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moorsdorff, in press). We force the groundwtaer model with the output from the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the long term net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated calculated groundwater heads and depths with available head observations, from different regions, including the North and South America and Western Europe. Our results show that it is feasible to build a relatively simple global scale groundwater model using existing information, and estimate water table depths within acceptable accuracy in many parts of the world.

  15. Mapping and quantifying groundwater-borne nitrogen inputs to the Choptank River, Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knee, K. L.; Leviton, G.; Ihnacik, R.; Jordan, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Segments of the Choptank River, Chesapeake Bay's largest Eastern-shore tributary, have been listed as "impaired waters" under the Federal Clean Water Act since 1998, and recent studies have shown that the river's water quality has been worsening over time. The Choptank's eutrophication problem is a result of nitrogen loading, which occurs mainly as agriculturally-derived nitrate in groundwater discharge. Groundwater can enter the Choptank's tidal waters (including the main stem and the large, tidal tributary Tuckahoe Creek) in two ways: by feeding its small non-tidal tributary streams or by discharging directly into the tidal waters through the river bottom or banks. This study aimed to distinguish these two pathways of groundwater discharge into the Choptank and assess their importance as nitrogen sources. We mapped activities of radon (Rn), a natural tracer of groundwater discharge, in surface waters throughout the navigable extent of the Choptank upstream of Cambridge, MD. In addition, we conducted point sampling of Rn in tidal and non-tidal tributaries throughout the watershed. Salinity, dissolved oxygen, and nitrate concentrations were measured concurrently with Rn. Rn activities generally increased in the upstream direction in the Choptank's tidal waters, suggesting that much of the groundwater input to the river occurs as base flow higher up in the watershed. Anomalously high radon activities suggested possible locations of high groundwater input. Rn activities in small tributaries were generally higher than in tidal waters, but varied by up to two orders of magnitude over a relatively small spatial scale, indicating variability in the magnitude of groundwater discharge, time elapsed since groundwater emerged into surface waters, and/or Rn activity of the groundwater end member. We investigated relationships between nitrate concentrations and Rn activities in groundwater, tributary and tidal water samples. Finally, we used Rn as a natural tracer to estimate

  16. Impacts of Shallow Groundwater and Soil Texture on Agricultural Drought Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipper, S. C.; Soylu, M. E.; Booth, E.; Steven, L. I.

    2015-12-01

    Meeting increasing global food demands while fostering environmental sustainability requires a detailed understanding of the drivers of yield sensitivity within agroecosystems. In this study, we untangle the roles of soil texture and shallow groundwater as simultaneous drivers of corn yield resistance to excessively wet and dry growing seasons. Specifically, we ask (1) does the presence of groundwater in or near the root zone increase/decrease yield?; and (2) how does yield response to water table depth interact with variability in soil texture and growing season weather conditions? We combine a multi-year field study at a commercial corn field in south-central Wisconsin with ecohydrological modeling using AgroIBIS-VSF to assess the yield response to a broad spectrum of groundwater, soil, and weather conditions. We find that shallow groundwater (<1 m) increases yield sensitivity to overly wet growing season conditions, but acts as a stable reservoir of water to increase drought resistance by providing a groundwater yield subsidy during dry years. Modeling results indicate that coarser soils receive a groundwater yield subsidy at shallower water table depths than finer-grained soils, and that the magnitude of the groundwater yield subsidy tends to be larger. We also find that crops growing on soils with different textures experience a comparable response to changes in growing season precipitation and evapotranspiration demands. Overall, we find that the benefits of shallow groundwater (drought resistance) outweigh the negatives (waterlogging and yield loss) at our study site.

  17. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Chambers, Don P.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater is a vital resource and also a dynamic component of the water cycle. Unconfined aquifer storage is less responsive to short term weather conditions than the near surface terrestrial water storage (TWS) components (soil moisture, surface water, and snow). However, save for the permanently frozen regions, it typically exhibits a larger range of variability over multi-annual periods than the other components. Groundwater is poorly monitored at the global scale, but terrestrial water storage (TWS) change data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission are a reasonable proxy for unconfined groundwater at climatic scales.

  18. Mining's impact on groundwater assessed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detailed studies have indicated that groundwater is contaminated in the immediate vicinity of many mines in the eastern United States. However, no underground mines and very few refuse disposal areas have monitoring systems that can provide adequate warning of impending threats to groundwater quality.This was one of the conclusions of a 3-year study by Geraghty & Miller, Inc., a firm of consulting groundwater geologists and hydrologists based in Syosset, New York. The study focused on mines east of the 100th meridian. These mines will produce an estimated 1.1 billion tons of coal and 200 million tons of waste by 1985.

  19. Groundwater hydrochemistry evolution in cyclone driven hydrological regimes, NW Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypek, G.; Dogramaci, S.; Grierson, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater reserves supply the water needs of many arid regions around the world. Aquifer recharge in these regions is primarily depended on the amount and distribution of rainfall, coupled with exceedingly high rates of evaporation and interactions with both local and regional geomorphology and geology. In semi-arid northwest Australia, the majority of rainfall is delivered by large but infrequent cyclonic events and relatively more frequent but low intensity frontal systems. Changes to rainfall patterns due to global climate change may impact hydrological regimes, recharge rates and groundwater hydrochemistry. These changes may significantly restrict freshwater resources in the future. Between 2008 and 2012, we analysed >400 groundwater, surface and rainwater samples for stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O) and major ion chemistry. We then developed conceptual geochemical models of groundwater evolution for the Hamersley Basin (>100,000 km2) and a salt inventory for the Fortescue Marsh (the largest wetland in NW Australia) [1,2]. Fresh groundwater from the alluvium (-8.02 × 0.83‰) and fractured aquifers (-8.22 × 0.70‰) were hydrochemically similar and characterised by a very narrow range of δ18O [1]. In contrast, δ18O of saline and brine groundwater (TDS >10 g L-1) varies in wide range from +2.5 to -7.2‰ [2]. Most of the fresh and brackish groundwater reflects modern recharge and is evaporated by <20% prior to recharge. In contrast, highly saline and brine groundwater reflects mixing between modern rainfall, brackish water and older deep groundwater. The Fortescue Marsh primarily acts as a terminal basin for surface water from the upper Fortescue River catchment [2]. The stable isotope composition of the deep brine groundwater under the Marsh suggests a complex evolution, which cannot be explained by evaporation under current climatic conditions. The observed salinity and δ18O values may result from progressive evaporation from highly saline

  20. Glycol Ethers As Groundwater Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Benjamin; Johannson, Gunnar; Foster, Gregory D.; Eckel, William P.

    1992-01-01

    Ether derivatives of dihydroxy alcohols, which are formed from ethylene or propylene, comprise an important group of groundwater contaminants known as glycol ethers. Compounds in this group are used as solvents, cleaning agents, and emulsifiers in many chemical products and manufacturing operations. Glycol ethers have been associated with a variety of toxic effects, and some compounds in the group are relatively potent teratogens. The limited information available suggests that glycol ethers are contaminants in groundwater, especially in anaerobic plumes emanating from disposal of mixed industrial and household waste. Most methods used to analyze groundwater samples cannot adequately detect μg/? (ppb) concentrations of glycol ethers, and the existing methods perform worst for the most widely used and toxic species. A new method capable of analyzing μg/? concentrations of glycol ethers was recently developed, and its use is recommended for groundwater samples where glycol ethers are likely to be present.

  1. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.

    1993-07-01

    The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate.

  2. Integrated groundwater quality management in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartjes, F. A.; Otte, P. F.

    2012-04-01

    Traditionally, groundwater assessments and remediations are approached at the scale of individual groundwater plumes. In urban areas, however, this management of individual groundwater plumes is often problematic for technical, practical or financial reasons, since the groundwater quality is often affected by a combination of sources, including (former) industrial activities, spills and leachate from uncontrolled landfills and building materials. As a result, often a whole series of intermingling contamination plumes is found in large volumes of groundwater. In several countries in the world, this led to stagnation of groundwater remediation in urban areas. Therefore, in the Netherlands there is a tendency managing groundwater in urban areas from an integrated perspective and on a larger scale. This so-called integrated groundwater quality management is often more efficient and hence, cheaper, since the organisation of the management of a cluster of groundwater plumes is much easier than it would be if all individual groundwater plumes were managed at different points in time. Integrated groundwater quality management should follow a tailor-made approach. However, to facilitate practical guidance was developed. This guidance relates to the delineation of the domain, the management of sources for groundwater contamination, procedures for monitoring, and (risk-based) assessment of the groundwater quality. Function-specific risk-based groundwater quality criteria were derived to support the assessment of the groundwater quality.

  3. Quantitative assessment of the groundwater-sewer network interaction in Bucharest city (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhemacha, M. A.; Diaconescu, A.; Bica, I.; Gogu, C. R.; Gaitanaru, D.

    2012-04-01

    Groundwater management in urban area must take account of every possible and relevant phenomena arising from the complex interaction between subsurface water, surface water, and urban infrastructure. In Bucharest, the need of the sewer system rehabilitation initiated a study of the interaction between groundwater and the sewer network. Recent conclusions show that the sewer network acts mainly like a drainage system for the groundwater. However, it could be easily proven that several sewer segments located mainly in the unsaturated zone contaminate the groundwater by leakage. The groundwater infiltration in the sewer conduits can cause the decrease of the groundwater level leading to structures instability problems as well as to the increase flow-rates of the sewer system. The last one affects seriously the wastewater treatment plants efficiency. The sewer network leakage cause groundwater pollution and locally could increase the groundwater level triggering buildings instability or other urban operational problems. The current study focuses on the consequences of sealing a part of the sewer system and so disturbing the existing groundwater behavior which may lead to serious consequences. In this framework, the analysis results of a groundwater flow model used to quantify the interaction between the groundwater and the sewer network are presented. The two-layers groundwater flow model simulating the Colentina and Mostistea overlaid sedimentary aquifers covers about 75 km2. Its conceptual model relies on a 3D geological model made by using 23 accurate geological cross-sections of the studied domain. The model set-up and its calibration are done using pumping tests data, groundwater hydraulic heads, and water levels of the sewer system. Infiltration rates into sewers are modeled by applying a modified form of Darcy's law that uses the notion of infiltration factor. This last encompasses the hydraulic conductivity of the clogging layer, the infiltration area and the

  4. Irrigation and groundwater in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertsen, Maurits; Iftikhar Kazmi, Syed

    2010-05-01

    Introduction of large gravity irrigation system in the Indus Basin in late nineteenth century without a drainage system resulted in water table rise consequently giving rise to water logging and salinity problems over large areas. In order to cope with the salinity and water logging problem government initiated salinity control and reclamation project (SCARP) in 1960. Initially 10,000 tube wells were installed in different areas, which not only resulted in the lowering of water table, but also supplemented irrigation. Resulting benefits from the full irrigation motivated framers to install private tube wells. Present estimate of private tube wells in Punjab alone is around 0.6 million and 48 billion cubic meter of groundwater is used for irrigation, contributing is 1.3 billion to the economy. The Punjab meets 40% of its irrigation needs from groundwater abstraction. Today, farmers apply both surface water flows and groundwater from tubewells, creating a pattern of private and public water control. As the importance of groundwater in sustaining human life and ecology is evident so are the threats to its sustainability due to overexploitation, but sufficient information for its sustainable management especially in developing countries is still required. Sustainable use of groundwater needs proper quantification of the resource and information on processes involved in its recharge and discharge. Groundwater recharge is broadly defined as water that reaches the aquifer from any direction (Lerner 1997). Sustainability and proper management of groundwater resource requires reliable quantification of the resource. In order to protect the resource from contamination and over exploitation, identification of recharge sources and their contribution to resource is a basic requirement. Physiochemical properties of some pesticides and their behavior in soil and water can make them potential tracers of subsurface moisture movement. Pesticides are intensively used in the area to

  5. Groundwater Model Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed E. Hassan

    2006-01-24

    Models have an inherent uncertainty. The difficulty in fully characterizing the subsurface environment makes uncertainty an integral component of groundwater flow and transport models, which dictates the need for continuous monitoring and improvement. Building and sustaining confidence in closure decisions and monitoring networks based on models of subsurface conditions require developing confidence in the models through an iterative process. The definition of model validation is postulated as a confidence building and long-term iterative process (Hassan, 2004a). Model validation should be viewed as a process not an end result. Following Hassan (2004b), an approach is proposed for the validation process of stochastic groundwater models. The approach is briefly summarized herein and detailed analyses of acceptance criteria for stochastic realizations and of using validation data to reduce input parameter uncertainty are presented and applied to two case studies. During the validation process for stochastic models, a question arises as to the sufficiency of the number of acceptable model realizations (in terms of conformity with validation data). Using a hierarchical approach to make this determination is proposed. This approach is based on computing five measures or metrics and following a decision tree to determine if a sufficient number of realizations attain satisfactory scores regarding how they represent the field data used for calibration (old) and used for validation (new). The first two of these measures are applied to hypothetical scenarios using the first case study and assuming field data consistent with the model or significantly different from the model results. In both cases it is shown how the two measures would lead to the appropriate decision about the model performance. Standard statistical tests are used to evaluate these measures with the results indicating they are appropriate measures for evaluating model realizations. The use of validation

  6. Hoe Creek groundwater restoration, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, R.R.; Crader, S.E.; Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the summer of 1989, approximately 6.5 million gallons of contaminated groundwater were pumped from 23 wells at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site, near Gillette, Wyoming. The organic contaminants were removed using activated carbon before the water was sprayed on 15.4 acres at the sites. Approximately 2647 g (5.8 lb) of phenols and 10,714 g (23.6 lb) of benzene were removed from the site aquifers. Phenols, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and naphthalene concentrations were measured in 43 wells. Benzene is the only contaminant at the site exceeds the federal standard for drinking water (5 {mu}g/L). Benzene leaches into the groundwater and is slow to biologically degrade; therefore, the benzene concentration has remained high in the groundwater at the site. The pumping operation affected groundwater elevations across the entire 80-acre site. The water levels rebounded quickly when the pumping operation was stopped on October 1, 1989. Removing contaminated groundwater by pumping is not an effective way to clean up the site because the continuous release of benzene from coal tars is slow. Benzene will continue to leach of the tars for a long time unless its source is removed or the leaching rate retarded through mitigation techniques. The application of the treated groundwater to the surface stimulated plant growth. No adverse effects were noted or recorded from some 60 soil samples taken from twenty locations in the spray field area. 20 refs., 52 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Groundwater contamination from stormwater infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, R.; Clark, S.; Parmer, K.

    1995-10-01

    The research summarized here was conducted during the first year of a 3-yr cooperative agreement (CR819573) to identify and control stormwater toxicants, especially those adversely affecting groundwater. The purpose of this research effort was to review the groundwater contamination literature as it relates to stormwater. Prior to urbanization groundwater is recharged by rainfall-runoff and snowmelt infiltrating through pervious surfaces including grasslands and woods. This infiltrating water is relatively uncontaminated. Urbanization, however, reduces the permeable soil surface area through which recharge by infiltration occurs. This results in much less groundwater recharge and greatly increased surface runoff. In addition the waters available for recharge carry increased quantities of pollutants. With urbanization, waters having elevated contaminant concentrations also recharge groundwater including effluent from domestic septic tanks, wastewater from percolation basins and industrial waste injection wells, infiltrating stormwater, and infiltrating water from agricultural irrigation. The areas of main concern that are covered by this paper are: the source of the pollutants, stormwater constituents having a high potential to contaminate groundwater, and the treatment necessary for stormwater.

  8. Groundwater pumping by heterogeneous users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saak, Alexander E.; Peterson, Jeffrey M.

    2012-08-01

    Farm size is a significant determinant of both groundwater-irrigated farm acreage and groundwater-irrigation-application rates per unit land area. This paper analyzes the patterns of groundwater exploitation when resource users in the area overlying a common aquifer are heterogeneous. In the presence of user heterogeneity, the common resource problem consists of inefficient dynamic and spatial allocation of groundwater because it impacts income distribution not only across periods but also across farmers. Under competitive allocation, smaller farmers pump groundwater faster if farmers have a constant marginal periodic utility of income. However, it is possible that larger farmers pump faster if the Arrow-Pratt coefficient of relative risk-aversion is sufficiently decreasing in income. A greater farm-size inequality may either moderate or amplify income inequality among farmers. Its effect on welfare depends on the curvature properties of the agricultural output function and the farmer utility of income. Also, it is shown that a flat-rate quota policy that limits the quantity of groundwater extraction per unit land area may have unintended consequences for the income distribution among farmers.

  9. Utilizing Isotopic Uranium Ratios in Groundwater Evaluations at NFSS

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M.C.; Keil, K.G.; Frederick, W.T.; Papura, T.R.; Leithner, J.S.; Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Buffalo District is currently evaluating environmental contamination at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The NFSS is located in the Town of Lewiston in western New York and has been used to store uranium-contaminated materials since 1944. Most of the radioactive materials are currently contained in an on-site structure, but past contamination remains in soil and groundwater. As a naturally occurring radionuclide, uranium is present in all groundwater. Because contamination levels at the site are quite low, it can be difficult to distinguish zones that have been impacted by the past releases from those at the high end of the natural background range. The differences in the isotopic ratio of uranium-234 (U-234) to uranium-238 (U-238) between natural groundwater systems and affected areas are being used in an innovative way to better define the nature and extent of groundwater contamination at NFSS. In natural groundwater, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 exceeds 1 due to the alpha particle recoil effect, in which U-234 is preferentially mobilized to groundwater from adjacent rock or soil. This process is very slow, and it can be hundreds to thousands of years before a measurable impact is seen in the isotopic ratio. Thus, as a result of the recoil effect, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 will be higher in natural groundwater than in contaminated groundwater. This means that if site releases were the source of the uranium being measured in groundwater at NFSS, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 would be expected to be very close to 1 (the same ratio that exists in wastes and soil at the site), because not enough time has elapsed for the alpha particle recoil effect to have significantly altered that ratio. From an evaluation of site and regional groundwater data, an isotopic ratio

  10. Costs of groundwater contamination

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, W.B.; Raucher, R.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Two factors determine the cost of groundwater contamination: (1) the ways in which water was being used or was expected to be used in the future and (2) the physical characteristics of the setting that constrain the responses available to regain lost uses or to prevent related damages to human health and the environment. Most contamination incidents can be managed at a low enough cost that uses will not be foreclosed. It is important to take into account the following when considering costs: (1) natural cleansing through recharge and dilution can take many years; (2) it is difficult and costly to identify the exact area and expected path of a contamination plume; and (3) treatment or replacement of contaminated water often may represent the cost-effective strategy for managing the event. The costs of contamination include adverse health effects, containment and remediation, treatment and replacement costs. In comparing the costs and benefits of prevention programs with those of remediation, replacement or treatment, it is essential to adjust the cost/benefit numbers by the probability of their actual occurrence. Better forecasts of water demand are needed to predict more accurately the scarcity of new supply and the associated cost of replacement. This research should include estimates of the price elasticity of water demand and the possible effect on demand of more rational cost-based pricing structures. Research and development of techniques for in situ remediation should be encouraged.

  11. Summary of Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-03-01

    This is a summary booklet of the main report: Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005. It is the summary section of the main report with a CD of the entire report included. The main report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the

  12. Introduction on groundwater monitoring system in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Wang, A.; Wang, G.

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater is a reliable source of water for human development, it is also an important element for ecosystem. Following with the rapid economic development, population growth and climate changes, China experiences the pressure on water shortage and related environmental problems in many regions. Especially, due to the increasing reliance on groundwater in semi-arid and arid areas and expected increased groundwater depletion and quality deterioration, it is crucial to assess the groundwater on both quantity and quality dynamics. A nation wide groundwater monitoring system has been setup in the past decades. However, it has limited capacities in a number of areas, including in areas of groundwater depletion. Chinese government pay great attention to groundwater issues and proposed a state groundwater monitoring system, expecting to build up a nation wide monitoring system for the purpose of sustainable water development. Both the current groundwater monitoring system and proposed system are introduced, and problems and expectations are discussed.

  13. Climate change and groundwater: India's opportunities for mitigation and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Tushaar

    2009-07-01

    For millennia, India used surface storage and gravity flow to water crops. During the last 40 years, however, India has witnessed a decline in gravity-flow irrigation and the rise of a booming 'water-scavenging' irrigation economy through millions of small, private tubewells. For India, groundwater has become at once critical and threatened. Climate change will act as a force multiplier; it will enhance groundwater's criticality for drought-proofing agriculture and simultaneously multiply the threat to the resource. Groundwater pumping with electricity and diesel also accounts for an estimated 16-25 million mt of carbon emissions, 4-6% of India's total. From a climate change point of view, India's groundwater hotspots are western and peninsular India. These are critical for climate change mitigation as well as adaptation. To achieve both, India needs to make a transition from surface storage to 'managed aquifer storage' as the center pin of its water strategy with proactive demand- and supply-side management components. In doing this, India needs to learn intelligently from the experience of countries like Australia and the United States that have long experience in managed aquifer recharge.

  14. Thermal footprints in groundwater of central European cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, P.; Menberg, K.; Blum, P.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric thermal pollution in densely populated areas is recognized as a severe problem with consequences for human health, and considerable efforts are being taken to mitigate heat stress in cities. However, anthropogenic activities also influence the thermal environment beneath the ground level, with commonly growing temperatures that affect groundwater ecology and geothermal use efficiency. In our work, we identify the controlling mechanisms for the long-term evolution of such urban heat islands. The shallow groundwater temperatures in several central European cities such as Cologne, Karlsruhe, Munich, Berlin and Zurich were mapped at high spatial and temporal resolution. Thermal anomalies were found to be highly heterogeneous with local hot spots showing temperatures of more than 20°C. Accordingly, these urban regions show a considerable groundwater warming in comparison to undisturbed temperatures of 8-11°C. Examination of potential heat sources by analytical modelling reveals that increased ground surface temperatures and basements of buildings act as dominant drivers for the anthropogenic heat input into the groundwater. The factors are revealed to be case-specific and they may have pronounced local or regional effects. Typical local factors are for example buried district heating networks. In selected cities we find that the average urban heat flux is around one order of magnitude higher than the elevated ground heat flux due to recent climate change. Additionally, such as observed in Zurich, naturally controlled temperature variations can be substantial and they are shown to wash out anthropogenic thermal footprints.

  15. Groundwater vulnerability mapping in Guadalajara aquifers system (Western Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizo-Decelis, L. David; Marín, Ana I.; Andreo, Bartolomé

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater vulnerability mapping is a practical tool to implement strategies for land-use planning and sustainable socioeconomic development coherent with groundwater protection. The objective of vulnerability mapping is to identify the most vulnerable zones of catchment areas and to provide criteria for protecting the groundwater used for drinking water supply. The delineation of protection zones in fractured aquifers is a challenging task due to the heterogeneity and anisotropy of hydraulic conductivities, which makes difficult prediction of groundwater flow organization and flow velocities. Different methods of intrinsic groundwater vulnerability mapping were applied in the Atemajac-Toluquilla groundwater body, an aquifers system that covers around 1300 km2. The aquifer supplies the 30% of urban water resources of the metropolitan area of Guadalajara (Mexico), where over 4.6 million people reside. Study area is located in a complex neotectonic active volcanic region in the Santiago River Basin (Western Mexico), which influences the aquifer system underneath the city. Previous works have defined the flow dynamics and identified the origin of recharge. In addition, the mixture of fresh groundwater with hydrothermal and polluted waters have been estimated. Two main aquifers compose the multilayer system. The upper aquifer is unconfined and consists of sediments and pyroclastic materials. Recharge of this aquifer comes from rainwater and ascending vertical fluids from the lower aquifer. The lower aquifer consists of fractured basalts of Pliocene age. Formerly, the main water source has been the upper unit, which is a porous and unconsolidated unit, which acts as a semi-isotropic aquifer. Intense groundwater usage has resulted in lowering the water table in the upper aquifer. Therefore, the current groundwater extraction is carried out from the deeper aquifer and underlying bedrock units, where fracture flow predominates. Pollution indicators have been reported in

  16. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Chambers, Don P.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2011-01-01

    Most people think of groundwater as a resource, but it is also a useful indicator of climate variability and human impacts on the environment. Groundwater storage varies slowly relative to other non-frozen components of the water cycle, encapsulating long period variations and trends in surface meteorology. On seasonal to interannual timescales, groundwater is as dynamic as soil moisture, and it has been shown that groundwater storage changes have contributed to sea level variations. Groundwater monitoring well measurements are too sporadic and poorly assembled outside of the United States and a few other nations to permit direct global assessment of groundwater variability. However, observational estimates of terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations from the GRACE satellites largely represent groundwater storage variations on an interannual basis, save for high latitude/altitude (dominated by snow and ice) and wet tropical (surface water) regions. A figure maps changes in mean annual TWS from 2009 to 2010, based on GRACE, reflecting hydroclimatic conditions in 2010. Severe droughts impacted Russia and the Amazon, and drier than normal weather also affected the Indochinese peninsula, parts of central and southern Africa, and western Australia. Groundwater depletion continued in northern India, while heavy rains in California helped to replenish aquifers that have been depleted by drought and withdrawals for irrigation, though they are still below normal levels. Droughts in northern Argentina and western China similarly abated. Wet weather raised aquifer levels broadly across western Europe. Rains in eastern Australia caused flooding to the north and helped to mitigate a decade long drought in the south. Significant reductions in TWS seen in the coast of Alaska and the Patagonian Andes represent ongoing glacier melt, not groundwater depletion. Figures plot time series of zonal mean and global GRACE derived non-seasonal TWS anomalies (deviation from the mean of

  17. Review: groundwater in Alaska (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callegary, J.B.; Kikuchi, C.P.; Koch, J.C.; Lilly, M.R.; Leake, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater in the US state of Alaska is critical to both humans and ecosystems. Interactions among physiography, ecology, geology, and current and past climate have largely determined the location and properties of aquifers as well as the timing and magnitude of fluxes to, from, and within the groundwater system. The climate ranges from maritime in the southern portion of the state to continental in the Interior, and arctic on the North Slope. During the Quaternary period, topography and rock type have combined with glacial and periglacial processes to develop the unconsolidated alluvial aquifers of Alaska and have resulted in highly heterogeneous hydrofacies. In addition, the long persistence of frozen ground, whether seasonal or permanent, greatly affects the distribution of aquifer recharge and discharge. Because of high runoff, a high proportion of groundwater use, and highly variable permeability controlled in part by permafrost and seasonally frozen ground, understanding groundwater/surface-water interactions and the effects of climate change is critical for understanding groundwater availability and the movement of natural and anthropogenic contaminants.

  18. Groundwater recharge and agricultural contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Agriculture has had direct and indirect effects on the rates and compositions of groundwater recharge and aquifer biogeochemistry. Direct effects include dissolution and transport of excess quantities of fertilizers and associated materials and hydrologic alterations related to irrigation and drainage. Some indirect effects include changes in water-rock reactions in soils and aquifers caused by increased concentrations of dissolved oxidants, protons, and major ions. Agrilcultural activities have directly or indirectly affected the concentrations of a large number of inorganic chemicals in groundwater, for example NO3-, N2, Cl, SO42-, H+, P, C, K, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra, and As, as well a wide variety of pesticides and other organic compounds. For reactive contaminants like NO3-, a combination of chemical, isotopic, and environmental-tracer analytical approaches might be required to resolve changing inputs from subsequent alterations as causes of concentration gradients in groundwater. Groundwater records derived from multi-component hydrostratigraphic data can be used to quantify recharge rates and residence times of water and dissolved contaminants, document past variations in recharging contaminant loads, and identify natural contaminant-remediation processes. These data indicate that many of the world's surficial aquifers contain transient records of changing agricultural contamination from the last half of the 20th century. The transient agricultural groundwater signal has important implications for long-term trends and spatial heterogeneity in discharge.

  19. Nutrient Loading through Submarine Groundwater Discharge and Phytoplankton Growth in Monterey Bay, CA.

    PubMed

    Lecher, Alanna L; Mackey, Katherine; Kudela, Raphael; Ryan, John; Fisher, Andrew; Murray, Joseph; Paytan, Adina

    2015-06-01

    We quantified groundwater discharge and associated nutrient fluxes to Monterey Bay, California, during the wet and dry seasons using excess (224)Ra as a tracer. Bioassay incubation experiments were conducted to document the response of bloom-forming phytoplankton to submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) input. Our data indicate that the high nutrient content (nitrate and silica) in groundwater can stimulate the growth of bloom-forming phytoplankton. The elevated concentrations of nitrate in groundwater around Monterey Bay are consistent with agriculture, landfill, and rural housing, which are the primary land-uses in the area surrounding the study site. These findings indicate that SGD acts as a continual source of nutrients that can feed bloom-forming phytoplankton at our study site, constituting a nonpoint source of anthropogenic nutrients to Monterey Bay. PMID:25988258

  20. Computer-model analysis of ground-water flow and simulated effects of contaminant remediation at Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Rene A.; Braun, Christopher L.

    2000-01-01

    In June 1993, the Department of the Navy, Southern Division Naval Facilities Engineering Command (SOUTHDIV), began a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) of the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant (NWIRP) in north-central Texas. The RFI has found trichloroethene, dichloroethene, vinyl chloride, as well as chromium, lead, and other metallic residuum in the shallow alluvial aquifer underlying NWIRP. These findings and the possibility of on-site or off-site migration of contaminants prompted the need for a ground-water-flow model of the NWIRP area. The resulting U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) model: (1) defines aquifer properties, (2) computes water budgets, (3) delineates major flowpaths, and (4) simulates hydrologic effects of remediation activity. In addition to assisting with particle-tracking analyses, the calibrated model could support solute-transport modeling as well as help evaluate the effects of potential corrective action. The USGS model simulates steady-state and transient conditions of ground-water flow within a single model layer. The alluvial aquifer is within fluvial terrace deposits of Pleistocene age, which unconformably overlie the relatively impermeable Eagle Ford Shale of Late Cretaceous age. Over small distances and short periods, finer grained parts of the aquifer are separated hydraulically; however, most of the aquifer is connected circuitously through randomly distributed coarser grained sediments. The top of the underlying Eagle Ford Shale, a regional confining unit, is assumed to be the effective lower limit of ground-water circulation and chemical contamination. The calibrated steady-state model reproduces long-term average water levels within +5.1 or ?3.5 feet of those observed; the standard error of the estimate is 1.07 feet with a mean residual of 0.02 foot. Hydraulic conductivity values range from 0.75 to 7.5 feet per day, and average about 4 feet per day. Specific yield values range from 0