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Sample records for act rcra post-closure

  1. Calendar Year 2007 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Annual Monitoring Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - RCRA Post-Closure Permit Nos. TNHW-113, TNHW-116, and TNHW-128

    SciTech Connect

    Elvado Environmental

    2008-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 2007 at the following hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; this S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm, Bear Creek Burial Grounds/Walk-In Pits (BCBG/WIP), Eastern S-3 Site Plume, Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP), Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Baste (CRSDB), few Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and East Chestnut Ridge Waste Pile (ECRWP). Hit monitoring data were obtained in accordance with the applicable Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) hazardous waste post-closure permit (PCP). The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) - Division of Solid Waste Management issued the PCPs to define the requirements for RCRA post-closure inspection, maintenance, and groundwater monitoring at the specified TSD units located within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-116), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-113), and Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-128). Each PCP requires the Submittal of an annual RCRA groundwater monitoring report containing the groundwater sampling information and analytical results obtained at each applicable TSD unit during the preceding CY, along with an evaluation of groundwater low rates and directions and the analytical results for specified RCRA groundwater target compounds; this report is the RCRA annual groundwater monitoring report for CY 2007. The RCRA post-closure groundwater monitoring requirements specified in the above-referenced PCP for the Chestnut Ridge Regime replace those defined in the previous PCP (permit no. TNHW-088), which expired on September 18, 2005, but remained effective until the TDEC issued the new PCP in September 2006. The new PCP defines site-specific groundwater sampling and analysis requirements for the

  2. Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho Cleanup Project

    2006-06-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post-closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report.

  3. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the S-3 Ponds, the Oil Landfarm, and the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (units A, C-West, and Walk-in Pits). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Watershed, (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring program during 1996, and (3) update applicable technical procedures with revised versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). With these modifications, the Y-12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2.0 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. The proposed changes to permit language are provided in Section 3.0 (S-3 Ponds), Section 4.0 (Oil Landfarm), and Section 5.0 (Bear Creek Burial Grounds). Sections 6.0 and 7.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the PCP Attachments.

  4. Fall Semiannual Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    D. F. Gianotto N. C. Hutten

    2007-01-12

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  5. Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-03-17

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria

  6. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR) (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) and Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSPs). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the CRSPs with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) record of decision (ROD), (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA monitoring programs during 1996, (3) replace several of the technical procedures included in the PCP with updated versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), and (4) correct inaccurate regulatory citations and references to permit conditions and permit attachments. With these modifications, the Y- 12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. Section 3.0 contains proposed changes to Section II of the PCP. Modifications to site-specific permit conditions are presented in Section 4.0 (CRSDB), Section 5.0 (CRSPs), and Section 6.0 (KHQ). Sections 7.0 and 8.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the permit attachments.

  7. Fall 2010 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility and the CPP 601/627/640 Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Ann

    2010-11-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report, as agreed between the Idaho Cleanup Project and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. The Permit Condition III.H. portion of this report includes a description and the results of field methods associated with groundwater monitoring of the Waste Calcining Facility. Analytical results from groundwater sampling, results of inspections and maintenance of monitoring wells in the Waste Calcining Facility groundwater monitoring network, and results of inspections of the concrete cap are summarized. The Permit Condition I.U. portion of this report includes noncompliances not otherwise required to be reported under Permit Condition I.R. (advance notice of planned changes to facility activity which may result in a noncompliance) or Permit Condition I.T. (reporting of noncompliances which may endanger human health or the environment). This report also provides groundwater sampling results for wells that were installed and monitored as part of the Phase 1 post-closure period of the landfill closure components in accordance with HWMA/RCRA Landfill Closure Plan for the CPP-601 Deep

  8. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  9. Annual report RCRA post-closure monitoring and inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 hazardous waste trenches, Nevada Test Site, for the period October 1996--October 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches were closed in-place in September 1993. Post-closure monitoring of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches began in October 1993. The post-closure monitoring program is used to verify that the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trench covers are performing properly, and that there is no water infiltrating into or out of the waste trenches. The performance of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches is currently monitored using 30 neutron access tubes positioned on and along the margins of the covers. Soil moisture measurements are obtained in the soils directly beneath the trenches and compared to baseline conditions from the first year of post-closure operation. This report documents the post-closure activities between October 1996 and October 1997.

  10. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for Corrective Action Unit 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley F. Emer

    1999-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada during the October 1997 - October 1998 period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in July 1998. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began six years ago. The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the trenches.

  11. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Year 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Silvas, Alissa J.

    2015-01-01

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for several Corrective Action Units (CAUs). The locations of the sites are shown in Figure 1. This report covers fiscal year 2014 (October 2013–September 2014). The post-closure requirements for these sites are described in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit Number NEV HW0101 and summarized in each CAU-specific section in Section 1.0 of this report. The results of the inspections, a summary of maintenance activities, and an evaluation of monitoring data are presented in this report. Site inspections are conducted semiannually at CAUs 90 and 91 and quarterly at CAUs 92, 110, 111, and 112. Additional inspections are conducted at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches (in.) in a 24-hour period and at CAU 111 if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.0 in. in a 24-hour period. Inspections include an evaluation of the condition of the units, including covers, fences, signs, gates, and locks. In addition to visual inspections, soil moisture monitoring, vegetation evaluations, and subsidence surveys are conducted at CAU 110. At CAU 111, soil moisture monitoring, vegetation evaluations, subsidence surveys, direct radiation monitoring, air monitoring, radon flux monitoring, and groundwater monitoring are conducted. The results of the vegetation surveys and an analysis of the soil moisture monitoring data at CAU 110 are presented in this report. Results of additional monitoring at CAU 111 are documented annually in the Nevada National Security Site Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites and in the Nevada National Security Site Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, which will be prepared in approximately June 2015. All required inspections, maintenance, and monitoring were conducted in accordance with the post-closure requirements of the permit. It is recommended to continue

  12. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON PAD FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 2004 - DECEMBER 2004

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), requires post-closure inspections. CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, is located inside the fence at the Building 6-605 compound. This report covers the annual period January 2004 through December 2004.

  13. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, For Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-01-26

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): (1) CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment; (2) CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well; (3) CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility; (4) CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater; and (5) CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches. The locations of the sites are shown in Figure 1. This report covers fiscal year 2010 (October 2009-September 2010). The post-closure requirements for these sites are described in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit Number NEV HW0021 and summarized in each CAU-specific section in Section 1.0 of this report. Site inspections are conducted semiannually at CAUs 90 and 91 and quarterly at CAUs 92, 110, and 112. Additional inspections are conducted at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches in a 24-hour period. Inspections include an evaluation of the condition of the units and identification of any deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the units. The condition of covers, fencing, signs, gates, and locks is documented. In addition, soil moisture monitoring and subsidence surveys are conducted at CAU 110. The results of the inspections, summary of maintenance activities, results of vegetations surveys, and analysis of monitoring data are presented in this report. Copies of the inspection checklists are included as Appendix A. Field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix B. Photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix C.

  14. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-01-31

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): · CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment · CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well · CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility · CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater · CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches This report covers fiscal year 2009 (October 2008–September 2009). The post-closure requirements for these sites are described in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit Number NEV HW0021 and summarized in each CAU-specific section in Section 1.0 of this report. Site inspections are conducted semiannually at CAUs 90 and 91 and quarterly at CAUs 92, 110, and 112. Additional inspections are conducted at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches in a 24-hour period. Inspections include an evaluation of the condition of the units and identification of any deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the units. The condition of covers, fencing, signs, gates, and locks is documented. In addition, soil moisture monitoring and subsidence surveys are conducted at CAU 110. The results of the inspections, summary of maintenance activities, results of vegetations surveys, and analysis of monitoring data are presented in this report. Copies of the inspection checklists are included as Appendix A. Field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix B. Photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix C.

  15. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, For Fiscal Year 2008 (October 2007-September 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-12-23

    This report is the first combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): • CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment • CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well • CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility • CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater • CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches The locations of the sites are shown in Figure 1. This report covers fiscal year (FY) 2008 (October 2007–September 2008). Because this is the first combined annual report for these CAUs, this report only covers the period not covered in the previous annual report for each CAU. For example, the last report submitted for CAU 91 covered the period January 2007–December 2007; therefore, this report only covers the remainder of FY2008 (January 2008–September 2008) for CAU 91. The post-closure requirements for these sites are described in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit Number NEV HW0021 and summarized in each CAU-specific section in Section 1.0 of this report. Site inspections are conducted semiannually at CAUs 90 and 91 and quarterly at CAUs 92, 110, and 112. Additional inspections are conducted at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches in a 24-hour period. Inspections include an evaluation of the condition of the units and identification of any deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the units. The condition of covers, fencing, signs, gates, and locks is documented. In addition, soil moisture monitoring and subsidence surveys are conducted at CAU 110. The results of the inspections, summary of maintenance activities, results of vegetations surveys, and analysis of monitoring data are presented in this report. Copies of the inspection checklists are included as Appendix A. Field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix B. Photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix C.

  16. Evaluating the use of captive insurance as a financial assurance mechanism under RCRA

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, J.R.; Chan, E.K.; Clark, E.M.; Evans, M.L.; Johnson, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    This paper evaluates the use of insurance coverage underwritten by captive insurance companies to provide financial assurance for closure and post-closure care for facilities regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Regulations under RCRA subtitle C and subtitle D require that owners and operators of both hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDF) and municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLF) demonstrate financial assurance for closure and post-closure care of such facilities. Those requirements help ensure that funds are available to cover the costs of closure and post-closure care, should the owner or operator be unable or unwilling to pay those costs. This paper provides a detailed analysis of how owners and operators use captive insurance companies to demonstrate financial assurance for closure and post-closure care under RCRA. The analysis explores, from a regulator`s point of view, the potential limitations of accepting captive insurance coverage as financial assurance for obligations for closure and post-closure care. The paper also provides: (1) an overview of captive insurance arrangements; (2) specific requirements for insurance for closure and post-closure care under RCRA; (3) state insurance regulations pertaining to the operations of captive insurance companies; and (4) recommendations that EPA and state agencies might consider to improve the current regulations and to ensure that funds will be available to pay for future environmental obligations.

  17. 32 CFR 32.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as described at § 32.49....

  18. 32 CFR 32.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as described at § 32.49....

  19. 32 CFR 32.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as described at § 32.49....

  20. 32 CFR 32.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as described at § 32.49....

  1. 32 CFR 32.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as described at § 32.49....

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analyses and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc.

  3. 10 CFR 600.149 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). 600.149... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of RCRA, as described at § 600.116 of this subpart. Reports and Records...

  4. 10 CFR 600.149 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). 600.149... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of RCRA, as described at § 600.116 of this subpart. Reports and Records...

  5. 38 CFR 49.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... Recovery Act (RCRA). 49.16 Section 49.16 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962), any...

  6. 38 CFR 49.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... Recovery Act (RCRA). 49.16 Section 49.16 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962), any...

  7. 10 CFR 600.149 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). 600.149... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements of RCRA, as described at § 600.116 of this subpart. Reports and Records...

  8. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for Fiscal Year 2011 (October 2010-September 2011)

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-01-18

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): (1) CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment; (2) CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well; (3) CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility; (4) CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater; and (5) CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches. This report covers fiscal year 2011 (October 2010-September 2011). The post-closure requirements for these sites are described in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit Number NEV HW0101 and summarized in each CAU-specific section in Section 1.0 of this report. Site inspections are conducted semiannually at CAUs 90 and 91 and quarterly at CAUs 92, 110, and 112. Additional inspections are conducted at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches in a 24-hour period. Inspections include an evaluation of the condition of the units and identification of any deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the units. The condition of covers, fencing, signs, gates, and locks is documented. In addition, soil moisture monitoring and subsidence surveys are conducted at CAU 110. The results of the inspections, summary of maintenance activities, results of vegetations surveys, and analysis of monitoring data are presented in this report. Copies of the inspection checklists are included as Appendix A. Field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix B. Photographs taken during the inspections are included in Appendix C. It is recommended to continue semiannual inspections at CAUs 90 and 91; quarterly inspections at CAUs 92, 110, and 112; and additional inspections at CAU 92 if precipitation occurs in excess of 0.50 inches in a 24-hour period. At CAU 92, it is recommended to remove the wave barriers, as they have not proven to be necessary to protect the cover. At CAU 110, it is recommended to continue annual vegetation monitoring and soil moisture monitoring, and to reduce the frequency of

  9. Addendum to the post-closure permit application for the Bear Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 plant: Walk-in pits

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In June 1987, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure/Post-Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) located at the Y-12 Plant on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review and approval.The Closure Plan has been modified and revised several times. This document is an addendum to the Post-Closure Permit Application submitted to TDEC in June, 1994. This addendum contains information on the Walk-In Pits of the BCBG which is meant to supplement the information provided in the Post-Closure Permit Application submitted for the BCBG. This document is not intended to be a stand-alone document.

  10. 15 CFR 14.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... (RCRA). 14.16 Section 14.16 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce UNIFORM... Act (RCRA). Under RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, 42 U.S.C. 6962), any State agency or agency of a...

  11. 15 CFR 14.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... (RCRA). 14.16 Section 14.16 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce UNIFORM... Act (RCRA). Under RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, 42 U.S.C. 6962), any State agency or agency of a...

  12. 15 CFR 14.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... (RCRA). 14.16 Section 14.16 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce UNIFORM... Act (RCRA). Under RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, 42 U.S.C. 6962), any State agency or agency of a...

  13. 15 CFR 14.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... (RCRA). 14.16 Section 14.16 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce UNIFORM... Act (RCRA). Under RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, 42 U.S.C. 6962), any State agency or agency of a...

  14. 40 CFR 30.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Public Law 94-580 codified... materials identified in guidelines developed by EPA (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly, State...

  15. 40 CFR 30.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Public Law 94-580 codified... materials identified in guidelines developed by EPA (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly, State...

  16. 40 CFR 30.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Public Law 94-580...

  17. 40 CFR 30.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 30.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Public Law 94-580...

  18. 40 CFR 30.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Public Law 94-580 codified... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... materials identified in guidelines developed by EPA (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly, State...

  19. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for fiscal year 2013 (October 2012 - September 2013)

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    2014-01-31

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment; CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well; CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility; CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater; CAU 111, Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits; and, CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches.

  20. Day-to-day compliance with Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA)

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.E.; Hart, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    Day-to-day compliance with requirements of the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) is an important, yet difficult, component of environmental compliance. Non-compliance with RCRA can result in substantial financial penalties and/or major costs associated with clean-up of contaminated facilities. This session will include a review of all of the major RCRA, hazardous waste generator requirements and selected TSD requirements. Emphasis will be placed on requirements which regulated industries routinely fail and on which penalties for non- compliance may be levied. Specific procedures and suggestions for assuring continued compliance will be presented. Also included is a review of the RCRA waste characterization requirements and means for assuring compliance. Finally, examples of specific RCRA enforcement actions will be presented along with an explanation of how RCRA penalties are calculated and how RCRA penalties can be mitigated.

  1. 14 CFR 1260.116 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 1260.116 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580 codified... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40...

  2. 14 CFR § 1260.116 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 1260.116 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580 codified... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40...

  3. 10 CFR 600.149 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). 600.149 Section 600.149 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements...

  4. 10 CFR 600.149 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). 600.149 Section 600.149 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Recipients' procurements shall comply with applicable requirements...

  5. 14 CFR 1260.116 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act... Requirements § 1260.116 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580...

  6. 38 CFR 49.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962), any State... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions...

  7. 38 CFR 49.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962), any State... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions...

  8. 38 CFR 49.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under the RCRA (Pub. L. 94-580, codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962), any State... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions...

  9. 76 FR 42138 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) In accordance... Conservation and Recovery Act (``RCRA'') Section 3008(a), 42 U.S.C. 6928(a), and the federal regulations... RCRA Section 3004(d), 42 U.S.C. 6924(d), and Fla. Stat. Chapter 403 ] (Environmental Control), Part...

  10. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2007. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2007. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. Two additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2007. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during these additional inspections are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records

  11. Spring 2009 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post-Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Ann M.

    2009-05-31

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under and approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  12. RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Waste Unit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000

    SciTech Connect

    D. F. Emer

    2001-02-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit, located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999 to October 2000 period. Inspections of the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. The objective of the neutron-logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-feet [ft]) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) or to detect changes that maybe indicative of subsidence within the disposal unit itself. Physical inspections of the closure were completed in March and September 2000 and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. The directional survey which is required to be completed every five years was run in the ER3-3 casing to determine if subsidence was occurring in the U-3fi emplacement borehole. Small changes were noted which are attributed to initial settling of the sand pack stemming. No evidence of subsidence within the emplacement borehole was observed. The subsidence survey for the October 1999 to October 2000 monitoring period indicated an increase in elevation of 0.244 centimeters (cm) (0.008 ft) compared to the previous year, July 1999. All changes in subsidence survey data taken to date are so small as to be at the survey instrument resolution level and it is not clear if they represent subsidence or measurement error. There is no clear evidence for any subsidence of the monument. Soil moisture monitoring results indicate dry stable conditions

  13. 14 CFR 1260.116 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). 1260.116 Section 1260.116 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... Agreements With Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations...

  14. 14 CFR 1260.116 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). 1260.116 Section 1260.116 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS... With Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations...

  15. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) new-employee training manual for the Operations Division RCRA personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Barkenbus, B.D.

    1987-03-01

    This manual has been prepared for the training of new employees who will work with RCRA hazardous waste management in the Operations Division. It will be taught by a person who is trained in hazardous waste regulations/procedures. It consists of nine modules. The topics of these modules are: RCRA Training, Hazardous Waste Regulations, Transportation Regulations, Hazardous Waste Management at ORNL, Chemical Hazards and Safety, Hazardous Waste Operations Training, Sampling of Hazardous Waste, Hazardous Waste Identification/Classification, and RCRA Contingency Plans and Emergency Procedures. The on-the-job training areas are identified in the modules. They are an integral part of training.

  16. Area 6 Decontamination Pond Corrective Action Unit 92 Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report for the Period January 2000-December 2000

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Traynor

    2001-03-01

    The Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Corrective Action Unit 92, was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP, 1995]) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (NDEP, 1996) on May 11, 1999. Historically the Decontamination Pond was used for the disposal of partially treated liquid effluent discharged from the Decontamination Facility (Building 6-05) and the Industrial Laundry (Building 6-07) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1996). The Decontamination Pond was constructed and became operational in 1979. Releases of RCRA-regulated hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents have not been discharged to the Decontamination Pond since 1988 (DOE/NV, 1996). The pipe connecting the Decontamination Pond and Decontamination Facility and Industrial Laundry were cut and sealed at the Decontamination Pad Oil/Water Separator in 1992. The Decontamination Pond was closed in place by installing a RCRA cover. Fencing was installed around the periphery to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring at the site consists of quarterly inspections of the RCRA cover and fencing, and a subsidence survey. Additional inspections are conducted if: Precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period, or An earthquake occurs with a magnitude exceeding 4.5 on the Richter scale within 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) of the closure.

  17. 40 CFR 264.603 - Post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Post-closure care. 264.603 Section 264... Miscellaneous Units § 264.603 Post-closure care. A miscellaneous unit that is a disposal unit must be maintained in a manner that complies with § 264.601 during the post-closure care period. In addition, if...

  18. 40 CFR 146.72 - Post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Post-closure care. 146.72 Section 146... Hazardous Waste Injection Wells § 146.72 Post-closure care. (a) The owner or operator of a Class I hazardous waste well shall prepare, maintain, and comply with a plan for post-closure care that meets...

  19. 40 CFR 146.72 - Post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Post-closure care. 146.72 Section 146... Hazardous Waste Injection Wells § 146.72 Post-closure care. (a) The owner or operator of a Class I hazardous waste well shall prepare, maintain, and comply with a plan for post-closure care that meets...

  20. 40 CFR 146.72 - Post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Post-closure care. 146.72 Section 146... Hazardous Waste Injection Wells § 146.72 Post-closure care. (a) The owner or operator of a Class I hazardous waste well shall prepare, maintain, and comply with a plan for post-closure care that meets...

  1. Post-Closure Report for Closed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Units, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada For Fiscal Year 2012 (October 2011–September 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2013-01-17

    This report serves as the combined annual report for post-closure activities for the following closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs): · CAU 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment · CAU 91, Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well · CAU 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility · CAU 110, Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater · CAU 111, Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits · CAU 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches This report covers fiscal year 2012 (October 2011–September 2012).

  2. HANFORD TANK FARM RESOURCE CONVERVATION & RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CORRECTIVE ACTION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.

    2007-01-15

    As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: (1) characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; (2) determine how the contamination will move in the future; (3) estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; (4) develop and implement mitigative measures; and (5) develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper.

  3. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON POND FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2006-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by the NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2005. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2005. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Five additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in) within a 24-hour period during 2005. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2005 are included in Appendix C.

  4. 45 CFR 74.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,...

  5. 43 CFR 12.916 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local... (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). 12.916 Section 12.916 Public Lands: Interior Office... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). Under the Act, any...

  6. 45 CFR 74.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,...

  7. 45 CFR 74.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,...

  8. 45 CFR 74.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,...

  9. 43 CFR 12.916 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local... (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). 12.916 Section 12.916 Public Lands: Interior Office... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). Under the Act, any...

  10. 45 CFR 74.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Section 6002 of Pub. L. No. 94-580 (Codified at 42...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 74.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,...

  11. 43 CFR 12.916 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local... (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). 12.916 Section 12.916 Public Lands: Interior Office... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). Under the Act, any...

  12. 43 CFR 12.916 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local... (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). 12.916 Section 12.916 Public Lands: Interior Office... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). Under the Act, any...

  13. 43 CFR 12.916 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State and local... (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). 12.916 Section 12.916 Public Lands: Interior Office... Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). Under the Act, any...

  14. 40 CFR 258.61 - Post-closure care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Closure and Post-Closure Care § 258.61 Post-closure care... final cover, including making repairs to the cover as necessary to correct the effects of settlement... human health and the environment; (3) Monitoring the ground water in accordance with the requirements...

  15. 40 CFR 258.61 - Post-closure care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Closure and Post-Closure Care § 258.61 Post-closure care... final cover, including making repairs to the cover as necessary to correct the effects of settlement... human health and the environment; (3) Monitoring the ground water in accordance with the requirements...

  16. Small-quantity generator's handbook for managing RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) wastes. Pesticide application

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    This RCRA Handbook was developed for pesticide applicators to provide assistance in complying with pertinent sections of the RCRA requirements. Section 2 summarizes operations of pesticide users and describes potential waste types that could be generated from these operations. Section 3 provides a guide for determining if a particular pesticide waste is subject to these regulations. Section 4 discusses the RCRA generator requirements, while Section 5 describes waste-management strategies for minimizing the amount of hazardous waste generated by the pesticide applicators. Appendix A lists hazardous wastes. Appendix B summarizes RCRA characteristic wastes. Appendix C contains a list of references and contacts for obtaining more information about hazardous wastes and their regulation.

  17. 28 CFR 70.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State... (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). 70.16 Section 70.16 Judicial Administration... Requirements § 70.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C....

  18. 28 CFR 70.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State... (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). 70.16 Section 70.16 Judicial Administration... Requirements § 70.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C....

  19. 28 CFR 70.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State... (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). 70.16 Section 70.16 Judicial Administration... Requirements § 70.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C....

  20. 28 CFR 70.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State... (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). 70.16 Section 70.16 Judicial Administration... Requirements § 70.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C....

  1. 28 CFR 70.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247-254). Accordingly, State... (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962). 70.16 Section 70.16 Judicial Administration... Requirements § 70.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580 codified at 42 U.S.C....

  2. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.T.

    1997-07-01

    This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

  3. 40 CFR 265.280 - Closure and post-closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... contaminants caused by wind erosion; and (4) Compliance with § 265.276 concerning the growth of food-chain... unit as appropriate for its post-closure use; (3) Assure that growth of food chain crops complies...

  4. 40 CFR 265.280 - Closure and post-closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... contaminants caused by wind erosion; and (4) Compliance with § 265.276 concerning the growth of food-chain... unit as appropriate for its post-closure use; (3) Assure that growth of food chain crops complies...

  5. 40 CFR 265.280 - Closure and post-closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... contaminants caused by wind erosion; and (4) Compliance with § 265.276 concerning the growth of food-chain... unit as appropriate for its post-closure use; (3) Assure that growth of food chain crops complies...

  6. Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

  7. 40 CFR 264.117 - Post-closure care and use of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Post-closure care and use of property... FACILITIES Closure and Post-Closure § 264.117 Post-closure care and use of property. (a)(1) Post-closure care... and the environment (e.g., leachate or ground-water monitoring results, characteristics of...

  8. 40 CFR 264.258 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.258... Waste Piles § 264.258 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure, the owner or operator must remove... facility and perform post-closure care in accordance with the closure and post-closure care...

  9. NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA (National Environmental Policy Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) integration

    SciTech Connect

    Sharples, F.E.; Smith, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires that decisions concerning remedial actions at Superfund sites be made through a formal decisionmaking process known as Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS). Many of the elements of this process are similar to the steps in the process required to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Both processes, for example, involve the identification and analysis of alternative courses of action, provide for public disclosure and participation in the processes, and are documented by Records of Decision. This document discusses the applicability of NEPA to federal facility remedial actions and the advisability of integrating the NEPA process with the CERCLA and RCRA processes. Included are points addressed by panelists and recent developments. 3 refs.

  10. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 90: Area 2 Bitcutter Containment Annual Report, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    K. K. Knapp

    2003-09-01

    Area 2 Bitcutter and Post-Shot Containment Wells Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 90 Post-Closure Monitoring requirements are described in Section VII.B.8.b of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Number NEV HW009, Section VII, Revision 1, March 2003. Post-closure care consists of the following: Semiannual inspections of the unit using an inspection checklist; Photographic documentation; Field note documentation; and Preparation and submittal of an annual report. The annual report consists of copies of the inspection checklist, repair records (if any), photographs, and recommendations and conclusions for the period December 2002 to June 2003. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are provided in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is provided in Attachment B, and copies of the inspection photographs are provided in Attachment C.

  11. Area 2 Bitcutter and Post-Shot Injection Wells Corrective Action Unit 90 Post-Closure Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Glen Richardson

    2002-09-01

    Area 2 Bitcutter and Post-Shot Containment Wells Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 90 Post-Closure Monitoring requirements are described in Section VII.B.8.b of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility No. NEV HW009, Revision 4, reissued on November 20, 2000.

  12. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2006. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2006. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. One additional inspection was performed after a precipitation event that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2006. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during this inspection, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklist and field notes completed during this additional inspection is included in Appendix A of this report. Precipitation records for 2006

  13. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 90: Area 2 Bitcutter Containment

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-08-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment, is identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' of 1996. The post-closure requirements for CAU 90 are described in Section VII.B.8.b of the Nevada Test Site ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Number NEV HW0021, dated November 2005. Post-closure activities consist of the following: Semiannual inspections of the site using inspection checklists; Photographic documentation; Field note documentation; and Preparation and submittal of an annual Post-Closure Inspection Report. This annual report covers the period of July 2006 to June 2007 and consists of a summary of the results of the inspections, copies of the inspection checklists and field notes, maintenance and repair records (if any), photographs, and conclusions and recommendations. The inspection checklists are provided in Appendix A, a copy of the field notes is provided in Appendix B, and copies of photographs taken during the inspections are provided in Appendix C.

  14. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure report: Area 2, Bitcutter and Postshot Containment Shops

    SciTech Connect

    Petrello, Jaclyn

    1996-12-01

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for CASs 02-20-01 (Bitcutter/Ps Inj.) and Wells (3) (RCRA) and CAS 02-20-03 (Wastewater Pit) are managed through the RCRA permit, which is renewed every 5 years. Post-closure monitoring requirements are described in that permit.

  15. 40 CFR 264.119 - Post-closure notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operator must identify the type, location, and quantity of the hazardous wastes to the best of his... has been used to manage hazardous wastes; and (ii) Its use is restricted under 40 CFR part 264..., or contaminated soils, he must request a modification to the post-closure permit in accordance...

  16. 40 CFR 264.119 - Post-closure notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operator must identify the type, location, and quantity of the hazardous wastes to the best of his... has been used to manage hazardous wastes; and (ii) Its use is restricted under 40 CFR part 264..., or contaminated soils, he must request a modification to the post-closure permit in accordance...

  17. 40 CFR 264.119 - Post-closure notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operator must identify the type, location, and quantity of the hazardous wastes to the best of his... has been used to manage hazardous wastes; and (ii) Its use is restricted under 40 CFR part 264..., or contaminated soils, he must request a modification to the post-closure permit in accordance...

  18. 40 CFR 264.119 - Post-closure notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operator must identify the type, location, and quantity of the hazardous wastes to the best of his... has been used to manage hazardous wastes; and (ii) Its use is restricted under 40 CFR part 264..., or contaminated soils, he must request a modification to the post-closure permit in accordance...

  19. 40 CFR 264.119 - Post-closure notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operator must identify the type, location, and quantity of the hazardous wastes to the best of his... has been used to manage hazardous wastes; and (ii) Its use is restricted under 40 CFR part 264..., or contaminated soils, he must request a modification to the post-closure permit in accordance...

  20. 40 CFR 258.61 - Post-closure care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements. (a) Following closure of each MSWLF unit, the owner or operator must conduct post-closure care... the final cover; (2) Maintaining and operating the leachate collection system in accordance with the requirements in § 258.40, if applicable. The Director of an approved State may allow the owner or operator...

  1. 40 CFR 258.61 - Post-closure care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements. (a) Following closure of each MSWLF unit, the owner or operator must conduct post-closure care... the final cover; (2) Maintaining and operating the leachate collection system in accordance with the requirements in § 258.40, if applicable. The Director of an approved State may allow the owner or operator...

  2. 40 CFR 258.61 - Post-closure care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements. (a) Following closure of each MSWLF unit, the owner or operator must conduct post-closure care... the final cover; (2) Maintaining and operating the leachate collection system in accordance with the requirements in § 258.40, if applicable. The Director of an approved State may allow the owner or operator...

  3. Overview of the regulation of hazardous chemicals: SDWA (Safe Drinking Water Act), RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act), and CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act)

    SciTech Connect

    Baes, C.F. III

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of nonradioactive hazardous chemicals is carried out under a number of federal environmental laws that regulate either hazardous products, substances, or wastes. Because each law is intended to provide protection from different classes of substances (e.g., wastes vs products) or protect different media (e.g., air, water, land), the standards and levels of protection for different hazardous chemicals may be different. Nevertheless, one agency -- the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) -- has primary responsibility for both promulgating regulations mandated by Congress under the various statutes and enforcement of the regulations. One overriding principal underlies the maze of complex regulations that govern the transport, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous substances: protect human health and the environment. It is beyond the scope of this talk to comprehensively examine all of the regulations and standards that govern the management of hazardous chemicals. Instead this discussion will focus on three statutes, the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), that together provide a basis for a basic understanding of the approach that the EPA takes to regulating hazardous chemicals.

  4. 40 CFR 264.118 - Post-closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) and 264.258(c)(1)(ii) must submit a post-closure plan to the Regional Administrator within 90 days... days after an unexpected event has occurred which has affected the post-closure plan. An owner or....258(c)(1)(ii) must submit a post-closure plan to the Regional Administrator no later than 90...

  5. 40 CFR 264.120 - Certification of completion of post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Closure and Post-Closure § 264.120 Certification of completion of post-closure care. No later than 60 days after completion of the established post-closure care period for each hazardous waste... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of completion of...

  6. 40 CFR 265.120 - Certification of completion of post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Closure and Post-Closure § 265.120 Certification of completion of post-closure care. No later than 60 days after the completion of the established post-closure care period for... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of completion of...

  7. 40 CFR 264.1202 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264... FACILITIES Hazardous Waste Munitions and Explosives Storage § 264.1202 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At... or decontaminated, he or she must close the facility and perform post-closure care in accordance...

  8. 40 CFR 264.197 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.197... Tank Systems § 264.197 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a tank system, the owner or..., then the owner or operator must close the tank system and perform post-closure care in accordance...

  9. 40 CFR 265.1202 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the closure and post-closure requirements that apply to landfills (40 CFR 264.310). ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265... post-closure care. (a) At closure of a magazine or unit which stored hazardous waste under this...

  10. 40 CFR 265.258 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.258... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Waste Piles § 265.258 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure, the owner or... or decontaminated, he must close the facility and perform post-closure care in accordance with...

  11. 40 CFR 265.197 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.197... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Tank Systems § 265.197 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a tank system..., then the owner or operator must close the tank system and perform post-closure care in accordance...

  12. 40 CFR 264.144 - Cost estimate for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost estimate for post-closure care... FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 264.144 Cost estimate for post-closure care. (a) The owner or operator of... contingent closure and post-closure plan, must have a detailed written estimate, in current dollars, of...

  13. Post-closure care of engineered municipal solid waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Amalendu; Bhattacharya, Abhik

    2015-03-01

    Post-closure care is divided into perpetual care (PPC) and long-term care (LTC). Guidelines for post-closure care and associated costs are important for engineered municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. In many states in the USA, landfill owners are required to set aside funds for 30-40 years of LTC. Currently there are no guidelines for PPC, which is also required. We undertook a pilot study, using two landfills (note: average landfill capacity 2.5 million MT MSW waste) in Wisconsin, to establish an approach for estimating the LTC period using field data and PPC funding need. Statistical analysis of time versus concentration data of selected leachate parameters showed that the concentration of most parameters is expected to be at or below the preventive action limit of groundwater and leachate volume will be very low, within 40 years of the LTC period. The gas extraction system may need to be continued for more than 100 years. Due to lack of data no conclusion could be made regarding adequacy of the LTC period for the groundwater monitoring system. The final cover must be maintained for perpetuity. The pilot study shows that although technology is available, the financial liability of maintaining a 'Dry Tomb' design for landfills is significantly higher than commonly perceived. The paper will help landfill professionals to estimate realistic post-closure funding and to develop field-based policies for LTC and PPC of engineered MSW landfills. PMID:25687915

  14. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 90: AREA 2 BITCUTTER CONTAINMENT, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JULY 2004 - JUNE 2005

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment, is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. The post-closure monitoring requirements for CAU 90 are described in Section VII.B.8.b of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Number NEV HW009, Section VII, Revision 1, March 2003. Post-closure activities consist of the following: semiannual inspections of the site using inspection checklists; photographic documentation; field note documentation; and preparation and submittal of an annual Post-Closure Inspection Report. This annual report covers the period of July 2004 to June 2005 and consists of copies of the inspection checklists, maintenance and repair records (if any), photographs, and recommendations and conclusions. The inspection checklists are provided in Appendix A. A copy of the field notes is provided in Appendix B, and copies of photographs are provided in Appendix C.

  15. Loss of interim status (LOIS) under RCRA. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires owners and operators of facilities that treat store, or disposal of hazardous waste (TSDFs) to obtain an operating permit. Recognizing that it would take EPA many years to issue operating permits to all RCRA facilities, Congress created ``interim status`` under Section 3005(e) of the Act. Interim status allows facilities to operate under Subtitle C of RCRA until their permits are issued or denied. This information brief defines interim status and describes how failure to meet interim status requirements may lead to loss of interim status (LOIS).

  16. 15 CFR 14.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.16 Resource Conservation and Recovery... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40...

  17. Contingent post-closure plan, hazardous waste management units at selected maintenance facilities, US Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, is a US Army training installation that provides tactical experience for battalion/task forces and squadrons in a mid- to high-intensity combat scenario. Through joint exercises with US Air Force and other services, the NTC also provides a data source for improvements of training doctrines, organization, and equipment. To meet the training and operational needs of the NTC, several maintenance facilities provide general and direct support for mechanical devices, equipment, and vehicles. Maintenance products used at these facilities include fuels, petroleum-based oils, lubricating grease, various degreasing solvents, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), transmission fluid, brake fluid, and hydraulic oil. Used or spent petroleum-based products generated at the maintenance facilities are temporarily accumulated in underground storage tanks (USTs), collected by the NTC hazardous waste management contractor (HAZCO), and stored at the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Storage Facility, Building 630, until shipped off site to be recovered, reused, and/or reclaimed. Spent degreasing solvents and other hazardous wastes are containerized and stored on-base for up to 90 days at the NTC's Hazardous Waste Storage Facility, Building 703. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an inspection and reviewed the hazardous waste management operations of the NTC. Inspections indicated that the NTC had violated one or more requirements of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and as a result of these violations was issued a Notice of Noncompliance, Notice of Necessity for Conference, and Proposed Compliance Schedule (NON) dated October 13, 1989. The following post-closure plan is the compliance-based approach for the NTC to respond to the regulatory violations cited in the NON.

  18. Contingent post-closure plan, hazardous waste management units at selected maintenance facilities, US Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, is a US Army training installation that provides tactical experience for battalion/task forces and squadrons in a mid- to high-intensity combat scenario. Through joint exercises with US Air Force and other services, the NTC also provides a data source for improvements of training doctrines, organization, and equipment. To meet the training and operational needs of the NTC, several maintenance facilities provide general and direct support for mechanical devices, equipment, and vehicles. Maintenance products used at these facilities include fuels, petroleum-based oils, lubricating grease, various degreasing solvents, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), transmission fluid, brake fluid, and hydraulic oil. Used or spent petroleum-based products generated at the maintenance facilities are temporarily accumulated in underground storage tanks (USTs), collected by the NTC hazardous waste management contractor (HAZCO), and stored at the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Storage Facility, Building 630, until shipped off site to be recovered, reused, and/or reclaimed. Spent degreasing solvents and other hazardous wastes are containerized and stored on-base for up to 90 days at the NTC`s Hazardous Waste Storage Facility, Building 703. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an inspection and reviewed the hazardous waste management operations of the NTC. Inspections indicated that the NTC had violated one or more requirements of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and as a result of these violations was issued a Notice of Noncompliance, Notice of Necessity for Conference, and Proposed Compliance Schedule (NON) dated October 13, 1989. The following post-closure plan is the compliance-based approach for the NTC to respond to the regulatory violations cited in the NON.

  19. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 90: Area 2 Bitcutter Containment, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 90, Area 2 Bitcutter Containment, is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996, as amended February 2008. The post-closure requirements for CAU 90 are described in Section VII.B.8.b of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Number NEV HW0021, dated November 2005. Post-closure activities consist of the following: (1) Semiannual inspections of the site using inspection checklists; (2) Photographic documentation; (3) Field note documentation; and (4) Preparation and submittal of an annual Post-Closure Inspection Report. This annual report covers the period of July 2007 to June 2008 and consists of a summary of the results of the inspections, copies of the inspection checklists and field notes, maintenance and repair records (if any), photographs, and conclusions and recommendations. The inspection checklists are provided in Appendix A, a copy of the field notes is provided in Appendix B, and copies of photographs taken during the inspections are provided in Appendix C.

  20. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure sumamry for the Uranium Treatment Unit

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This closure summary has been prepared for the Uranium Treatment Unit (UTU) located at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The actions required to achieve closure of the UTU area are outlined in the Closure Plan, submitted to and approved by the Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation staff, respectively. The UTU was used to store and treat waste materials that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This closure summary details all steps that were performed to close the UTU in accordance with the approved plan.

  1. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S.; Christy, C.E.; Heath, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used to measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ at depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes, measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics. This paper presents a description and the results of the field tests. The results were used to characterize the lower detection limits, precision and bias of the system, which allowed the DOE to judge the monitoring system`s ability to meet its long-term post-closure radiation monitoring needs. Based on the test results, the monitoring system has been redesigned for fabrication and testing in a potential Phase III of this program. If the DOE feels that this system can meet its needs and chooses to continue into Phase III of this program, this redesigned full scale prototype system will be built and tested for a period of approximately a year. Such a system can be used at a variety of radioactively contaminated sites.

  2. Characterization of MGP (manufactured gas plant) residues using proposed RCRA (Resource Conservation Recovery Act) tests. Topical report, May 1987-February 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, L.R.; Gould, J.E.

    1989-03-01

    The U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed two tests that may affect the regulation of residues associated with manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites which are not currently regulated by the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA): the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and a revised reactivity test which includes interim guidance levels for reactive cyanide and sulfide as well as methods for determining reactive levels. Atlantic Environmental Services, Inc, carried out a research project under the Gas Research Institute program for the management of MGP sites. Several samples were tested using the proposed TCLP to determine the likelihood that MGP residues would be characterized as RCRA wastes under the new procedures. The reactivity tests for cyanide and sulfide also were run on samples collected from MGP sites to determine whether these specific residues would fall based on the revised technique. The results of the study are presented.

  3. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA statutory overview updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The module presents a brief overview of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It explains the relationship between RCRA statutory language and codified regulatory language. It describes the major components of each subtitle of RCRA and identifies the major provisions established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA).

  4. 40 CFR 264.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.1102 Section 264.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 264.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a...

  5. 40 CFR 264.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.1102 Section 264.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 264.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a...

  6. 40 CFR 265.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.1102 Section 265.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 265.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a)...

  7. 40 CFR 265.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.1102 Section 265.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 265.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 265.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.1102 Section 265.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 265.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a)...

  9. 40 CFR 264.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.1102 Section 264.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 264.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a...

  10. 40 CFR 265.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.1102 Section 265.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 265.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 264.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.1102 Section 264.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 264.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a...

  12. 40 CFR 264.197 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.197 Section 264.197 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Tank Systems § 264.197 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a tank system, the owner...

  13. 10 CFR 61.29 - Post-closure observation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Post-closure observation and maintenance. 61.29 Section 61.29 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.29 Post-closure observation and maintenance. Following completion of...

  14. 10 CFR 61.29 - Post-closure observation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Post-closure observation and maintenance. 61.29 Section 61.29 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.29 Post-closure observation and maintenance. Following completion of...

  15. 10 CFR 61.29 - Post-closure observation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Post-closure observation and maintenance. 61.29 Section 61.29 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.29 Post-closure observation and maintenance. Following completion of...

  16. 10 CFR 61.29 - Post-closure observation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Post-closure observation and maintenance. 61.29 Section 61.29 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.29 Post-closure observation and maintenance. Following completion of...

  17. 10 CFR 61.29 - Post-closure observation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Post-closure observation and maintenance. 61.29 Section 61.29 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.29 Post-closure observation and maintenance. Following completion of...

  18. 40 CFR 264.117 - Post-closure care and use of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for each hazardous waste management unit subject to the requirements of §§ 264.117 through 264.120... preceding partial closure of a hazardous waste management unit subject to post-closure care requirements or... post-closure care period applicable to the hazardous waste management unit, or facility, if...

  19. 40 CFR 265.1202 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the closure and post-closure requirements that apply to landfills (40 CFR 264.310). ... post-closure care. (a) At closure of a magazine or unit which stored hazardous waste under this subpart... estimates for closure, and financial responsibility for magazines or units must meet all of the...

  20. 40 CFR 265.1202 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the closure and post-closure requirements that apply to landfills (40 CFR 264.310). ... post-closure care. (a) At closure of a magazine or unit which stored hazardous waste under this subpart... estimates for closure, and financial responsibility for magazines or units must meet all of the...

  1. 40 CFR 265.144 - Cost estimate for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost estimate for post-closure care..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 265.144 Cost estimate for post-closure care. (a) The owner or operator of a hazardous waste disposal unit must have a detailed written estimate,...

  2. 40 CFR 265.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 265.145 Financial assurance for post-closure... waste disposal unit must establish financial assurance for post-closure care of the disposal unit(s). (a... hazardous waste disposal unit in accordance with the approved plan, the Regional Administrator will...

  3. 40 CFR 265.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 265.145 Financial assurance for post-closure... waste disposal unit must establish financial assurance for post-closure care of the disposal unit(s). (a... hazardous waste disposal unit in accordance with the approved plan, the Regional Administrator will...

  4. 40 CFR 265.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 265.145 Financial assurance for post-closure... waste disposal unit must establish financial assurance for post-closure care of the disposal unit(s). (a... hazardous waste disposal unit in accordance with the approved plan, the Regional Administrator will...

  5. Tonopah Test Range Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2002

    SciTech Connect

    R. B. Jackson

    2003-08-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report provides documentation of the semiannual inspections conducted at the following Corrective Action Units (CAU)s: CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill; CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench; CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area; CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes; CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches; CAU 427: Septic Waste Systems 2, 6; and CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, all located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. Post-closure inspections are not required at CAU 400 but are conducted to monitor vegetation and fencing at the site. Site inspections were conducted in May and November 2002. All site inspections were made after Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) approval of the appropriate Closure Report (CR), excluding CAU 400 which did not require a CR, and were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Inspection Plans in the NDEP-approved CRs. Post-closure inspections conducted during 2002 identified several areas requiring maintenance/repairs. Maintenance work and proposed additional monitoring are included in the appropriate section for each CAU. This report includes copies of the Post-Closure Inspection Plans, Post-Closure Inspection Checklists, copies of the field notes, photographs, and the Post-Closure Vegetative Monitoring Report. The Post-Closure Inspection Plan for each CAU is located in Attachment A. Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are in Attachment B. Copies of the field notes from each inspection are included in Attachment C. Attachment D consists of the photographic logs and photographs of the sites. The post-closure vegetative monitoring report for calendar year 2002 is included in Attachment E.

  6. Annual report on performance audit results for POHC (Principal Organic Hazardous Constituents) testing during RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) trial burns. Status report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jayanty, R.K.M.; Tompkins, S.B.; Bryant, V.R.; Howe, G.B.

    1989-12-01

    Audit materials containing Principal Organic Hazardous Constituents (POHSc) have been developed by AREAL for use by federal, state, and local agencies or their contractors to assess the accuracy of measurement methods during Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) trial burn tests. Audit materials are currently available for 27 gaseous organics in 5, 6, 7, and 9 component mixtures at parts-per-billion levels (7 to 10,000 ppb) in compressed gas cylinders in a balance gas of nitrogen. The criteria used for the selection of gaseous organic compounds is described. Stability studies indicate that all of the organics tested (with the exception of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide below 10 ppb levels) are stable enough to be used as reliable audit materials. Subsequent to completion of the stability studies, 202 performance audits have been initiated with the audit materials to assess the accuracy of the Volatile Organic Sampling Training and bag measurement methods during or prior to RCRA trial burn tests. Results of those audits and a summary table of the audit conducted for each POHC and the measurement system audited is described in the report. Audit results obtained with the audit bases during or prior to RCRA trial burn tests are generally within + or - 50% of the audit concentrations.

  7. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S.E.; Christy, C.E.; Heath, R.E.

    1995-10-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. The system designed in Phase I of this development program monitors gamma radiation using a subsurface cesium iodide scintillator coupled to above-ground detection electronics using optical waveguide. The radiation probe can be installed to depths up to 50 meters using cone penetrometer techniques, and requires no downhole electrical power. Multiplexing, data logging and analysis are performed at a central location. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics.

  8. Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Units on the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-05-26

    This letter serves as the post-closure inspection letter report for corrective action units on the Nevada National Security Site for calendar year 2011. Copies of completed inspection checklists are included in this report.

  9. Tonopah Test Range Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2004-04-01

    This post-closure inspection report provides documentation of the semiannual inspection activities, maintenance and repair activities, and conclusions and recommendations for calendar year 2003 for eight corrective action units located on the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada.

  10. 40 CFR 265.1202 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the closure and post-closure requirements that apply to landfills (40 CFR 264.310). ... decontamination of contaminated components, subsoils, structures, and equipment as required in paragraph (a)...

  11. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR THE TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-01

    This post-closure inspection report includes the results of inspections, maintenance and repair activities, and conclusions and recommendations for Calendar Year 2005 for nine Corrective Action Units located on the Tonopah Test Range , Nevada.

  12. Rocky Flats Solar Evaporation Ponds RCRA hybrid-closure case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ogg, R.T.; Everett, L.G.; Cullen, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Solar Evaporation Ponds (SEP)/Operable Unit 4 (OU 4), located at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) sixteen miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, is currently undergoing remediation/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure in accordance with the Rocky Flats Interagency Agreement (IAG) signed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Colorado Department of Health (CDH) on January 22, 1991. Based on the Phase 1 (source and soils) RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) data and interpretations, the DOE and EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG and G) have selected a permanent surface engineered/isolation barrier as the technological option for remediation of the SEP. The DOE and EG and G will utilize all natural materials to create an impermeable barrier/structure to isolate the waste being left in place from impacting human health and the environment for a minimum of 1,000 years. The rationale for utilizing natural materials is two fold; (1) optimize long term performance of the barrier and; (2) design a structure which will be near maintenance free (passive remediation) for 1,000 years. The DOE and EG and G have taken a proactive approach in providing post closure performance assessment for this RCRA closure action. An integrated monitoring system has been designed which will include monitoring the engineered barrier, vadose zone and ground water systems. Rocky Flats will integrate instrumentation, into the permanent engineered barrier which will provide early warning of potential liquid migration through the barrier and into the waste zone.

  13. Rocky Flats Solar Evaporation Ponds RCRA hybrid-closure case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ogg, R.T.; Everett, L.G.; Cullen, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Solar Evaporation Ponds (SEP)/Operable Unit 4 (OU 4), located at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) sixteen miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, is currently undergoing remediation/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure in accordance with the Rocky Flats Interagency Agreement (IAG) signed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Colorado Department of Health (CDH) on January 22, 1991. Based on the ``Phase 1`` (source and soils) RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation (RFM data and interpretations), the DOE and EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG and G) have selected a permanent surface engineered/isolation barrier as the technological option for remediation of the SEP. The DOE and EG and G will utilize all natural materials to create an ``impermeable`` barrier/structure to isolate the waste being left in place from impacting human health and the environment for a minimum of 1,000 years. Their rationale for utilizing natural materials is two fold; (1) optimize long term performance of the barrier and; (2) design a structure which will be near maintenance free (passive remediation) for 1,000 years. The DOE and EG and G have taken a proactive approach in providing post closure performance assessment for this RCRA closure action. An integrated monitoring system has been designed which will include monitoring the engineered barrier, vadose zone and ground water systems. Rocky Flats will integrate instrumentation into the permanent engineered barrier which will provide early warning of potential liquid migration through the barrier and into the waste zone.

  14. THE INTEGRATION OF THE 241-Z BUILDING DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING (D&D) UNDER COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE COMPENSATION & LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) WITH RESOURCE CONSERVATION & RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CLOSURE AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2007-02-20

    The 241-Z treatment and storage tanks, a hazardous waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (TSD) unit permitted pursuant to the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) and Washington State ''Hazardous Waste Management Act, RCW 70.105'', have been deactivated and are being actively decommissioned. The 241-Z TSD unit managed non-listed radioactive contaminated waste water, containing trace RCRA characteristic constituents. The 241-Z TSD unit consists of below grade tanks (D-4, D-5, D-7, D-8, and an overflow tank) located in a concrete containment vault, sample glovebox GB-2-241-ZA, and associated ancillary piping and equipment. The tank system is located beneath the 241-Z building. The 241-Z building is not a portion of the TSD unit. The sample glovebox is housed in the above-grade building. Waste managed at the TSD unit was received via underground mining from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sources. Tank D-6, located in the D-6 vault cell, is a past-practice tank that was taken out of service in 1972 and has never operated as a portion of the RCRA TSD unit. CERCLA actions address Tank D-6, its containment vault cell, and soil beneath the cell that was potentially contaminated during past-practice operations and any other potential past-practice contamination identified during 241-Z closure, while outside the scope of the ''Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plant, 241-Z Treatment and Storage Tanks''.

  15. NGLW RCRA Storage Study

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

    2000-06-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

  16. HANDBOOK: STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR RCRA CORRECTIVE ACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    On November 1984, Congress enacted the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA requires a corrective action program that prevents hazardous constituents from exceeding concentration limits at the compliance point (i.e...

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for container storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document contains Part B of the Permit Application for Container Storage Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Sections cover the following areas: Facility description; Waste characteristics; Process information; Ground water monitoring; Procedures to prevent hazards; Contingency plan; Personnel training; Closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; Recordkeeping; Other federal laws; Organic air emissions; Solid waste management units; and Certification.

  18. Single-laboratory evaluation of the RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) method for analysis of dioxin in hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, F.L.; Vonnahme, T.L.; Hedin, C.M.; Donnelly, J.R.; Niederhut, W.J.

    1985-11-01

    Single-laboratory testing of RCRA Method 8280 for the analysis of chlorinated dibenzop-dioxins and dibenzofurans has been initiated on sample matrices including pottery clay soil, a Missouri soil, a fly ash, a still bottom from a chlorophenol-based herbicide production process, and an industrial process sludge. The analytical method was intended for use in the determination of chlorinated dioxin and dibenzofuran homologs with four, five, or six chlorine atoms per molecule. Revisions to the method that were found necessary for satisfactory analytical performance were developed and incorporated into a revised version of the method. Single-laboratory testing of method 8280 with minor revisions demonstrated satisfactory performance for the target analytes on soil and fly ash samples. Further modification and elaboration of sample cleanup procedures were necessary for analysis of the still bottom and industrial sludge samples.

  19. The Environmental Agency's Assessment of the Post-Closure Safety Case for the BNFL DRIGG Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Streatfield, I. J.; Duerden, S. L.; Yearsley, R. A.

    2002-02-26

    The Environment Agency is responsible, in England and Wales, for authorization of radioactive waste disposal under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) is currently authorized by the Environment Agency to dispose of solid low level radioactive waste at its site at Drigg, near Sellafield, NW England. As part of a planned review of this authorization, the Environment Agency is currently undertaking an assessment of BNFL's Post-Closure Safety Case Development Programme for the Drigg disposal facility. This paper presents an outline of the review methodology developed and implemented by the Environment Agency specifically for the planned review of BNFL's Post-Closure Safety Case. The paper also provides an overview of the Environment Agency's progress in its on-going assessment programme.

  20. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA statutory overview, updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The module presents a brief overview of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It explains the relationship between RCRA statutory language and codified regulatory language. It describes the major components of each subtitle of RCRA and identifies the major provisions established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA).

  1. Criteria for municipal-solid-waste landfills (40 CFR Part 258). Subtitle D of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Location restrictions (Subpart B). Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    In August 1988, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed Solid-Waste Disposal Facilities Criteria (40 CFR Part 258) for municipal-solid-waste landfills. This background document provides the technical support for Subpart 'B' - Location Restrictions of Part 258. The document contains a discussion of the legislative and regulatory background for understanding the current status of Subtitle D. A discussion of other Federal laws, besides the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), that impact the siting of municipal-waste landfills also is presented. The document also presents detailed information on the revised location restrictions. The location restrictions include the following: airport safety; floodplains; wetlands; fault areas; seismic-impact areas; and unstable areas.

  2. Post-Closure Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1324-N Surface Impoundment and 1324-NA Percolation Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2004-04-02

    The 1324-N Surface Impoundment and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Consevation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Surface and underground features of the facilities have been removed and laboratory analyses showed that soil met the closure performance standards. These sites have been backfilled and revegetated.

  3. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for Production Associated Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Attention is focused on permit applications for the following units: Building 9206 Container Storage Unit; Building 9212 Container Storage Unit; Building 9720-12 Container Storage Unit; and Cyanide Treatment Unit. This report addresses the following areas: facility description; waste characteristics; process information; ground water monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plant, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification.

  4. Linkage Between Post-Closure Safety Case Review and the Authorization Process for Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Streatfield, I. J.; Duerden, S. L.; Yearsley, R. A.; Bennett, D. G.

    2003-02-27

    The Environment Agency (the Agency) has responsibilities under the Radioactive Substances Act of 1993 for regulating the disposal and storage of radioactive wastes in England and Wales, including regulation of the disposal site for UK solid low-level waste (LLW) at Drigg in Cumbria, NW England. To help inform the next review of the Drigg disposal authorization, the Agency has required the operator, British Nuclear Fuels plc to submit a Post-Closure Safety Case which will assess the potential long-term impacts from the site. With the aim of using best practice to determine authorization conditions, the Agency contracted Galson Sciences, Ltd to undertake an international survey of authorization procedures for comparable facilities in other countries. This paper provides an overview of the findings from the international survey.

  5. Post-closure permit application for the Kerr Hollow Quarry at the Y-12 plant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) is located on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) property at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project. Until 1992, the primary mission of the Y-12 Plant was the production and fabrication of nuclear weapons components. Activities associated with these functions included production of lithium compounds, recovery of enriched uranium from scrap material, and fabrication of uranium and other materials into finished parts for assemblies. The Kerr Hollow Quarry was used for waste disposal of a variety of materials including water-reactive and shock-sensitive chemicals and compressed gas cylinders. These materials were packaged in various containers and sank under the water in the quarry due to their great weight. Disposal activities were terminated in November, 1988 due to a determination by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation that the quarry was subject to regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1993. Methods of closure for the quarry were reviewed, and actions were initiated to close the quarry in accordance with closure requirements for interim status surface impoundments specified in Tennessee Rules 1200-1-11-.05(7) and 1200-1-11-.05(11). As part of these actions, efforts were made to characterize the physical and chemical nature of wastes that had been disposed of in the quarry, and to remove any containers or debris that were put into the quarry during waste disposal activities. Closure certification reports (Fraser et al. 1993 and Dames and Moore 1993) document closure activities in detail. This report contains the post-closure permit application for the Kerr Hollow Quarry site.

  6. 40 CFR 265.118 - Post-closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must amend the post-closure plan at least 60 days prior to the proposed change in facility design or operation, or no later than 60 days after an unexpected event has occurred which has affected the post... operation, or no more than 60 days after an unexpected event has occurred which has affected the...

  7. 40 CFR 265.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....0; a ratio of the sum of net income plus depreciation, depletion, and amortization to total... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Financial assurance for post-closure..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 265.145 Financial assurance for...

  8. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Silvas, A. J.; Lantow, Tiffany A.

    2015-03-25

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2014 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs; CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports and subsequent correspondence with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The post-closure inspection plans and subsequent correspondence modifying the requirements for each CAU are included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C. Photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix D. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted on May 28, 2014. Maintenance was required at CAU 407. Animal burrows were backfilled and erosion repairs were performed. Vegetation monitoring was performed at CAU 407 in June 2014. The vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix E.

  9. 40 CFR 265.1202 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the closure and post-closure requirements that apply to landfills (40 CFR 264.310). ..., the owner or operator must remove or decontaminate all waste residues, contaminated containment system components, contaminated subsoils, and structures and equipment contaminated with waste, and manage them...

  10. 40 CFR 264.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 264.145 Financial assurance for post-closure care. The owner... days before the date on which hazardous waste is first received for disposal. The trustee must be an... made before the initial receipt of hazardous waste for disposal. A receipt from the trustee for...

  11. 40 CFR 265.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Financial assurance for post-closure care. 265.145 Section 265.145 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES...

  12. 40 CFR 264.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 264.145 Financial assurance for post-closure care. The owner... days before the date on which hazardous waste is first received for disposal. The trustee must be an... made before the initial receipt of hazardous waste for disposal. A receipt from the trustee for...

  13. 40 CFR 264.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Financial assurance for post-closure care. 264.145 Section 264.145 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements §...

  14. 40 CFR 264.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 264.145 Financial assurance for post-closure care. The owner... days before the date on which hazardous waste is first received for disposal. The trustee must be an... made before the initial receipt of hazardous waste for disposal. A receipt from the trustee for...

  15. 40 CFR 264.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 264.145 Financial assurance for post-closure care. The owner... days before the date on which hazardous waste is first received for disposal. The trustee must be an... made before the initial receipt of hazardous waste for disposal. A receipt from the trustee for...

  16. 40 CFR 264.144 - Cost estimate for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility, the owner or operator must adjust the post-closure cost estimate for inflation within 60 days... cost estimate must be updated for inflation within 30 days after the close of the firm's fiscal year... dollars or by using an inflation factor derived from the most recent Implicit Price Deflator for...

  17. 40 CFR 265.144 - Cost estimate for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of the facility, the owner or operator must adjust the post-closure cost estimate for inflation...-closure care cost estimate must be updated for inflation no later than 30 days after the close of the firm... current dollars or by using an inflation factor derived from the most recent Implicit Price Deflator...

  18. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-06-01

    This report provides the results of the semiannual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2007 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following nine CAUs: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR); (3) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (4) CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR); (5) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (6) CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR); (7) CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6 (TTR); (8) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (9) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR). In a letter from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) dated December 5, 2006, NDEP concurred with the request to reduce the frequency of post-closure inspections of CAUs at TTR to an annual frequency. This letter is included in Attachment B. Post-closure inspections were conducted on May 15-16, 2007. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Attachment B, with the exception of CAU 400. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Attachment C, the field notes are included in Attachment D, and the site photographs are included in Attachment E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in May 2007, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Attachment F. Maintenance and/or repairs were performed at CAU 453. Animal burrows observed during the annual inspection at CAU 453 were backfilled on August 1, 2007. At this time, the TTR post-closure site inspections should continue as

  19. Transportation of RCRA hazardous wastes. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA) regulate the transport of hazardous wastes. Under these statutes, specific pretransport regulatory requirements must be met by DOE before the shipment of hazardous wastes, including radioactive mixed wastes. The pretransport requirements are designed to help reduce the risk of loss, leakage, or exposure during shipment of hazardous materials and to communicate information on potential hazards posed by the hazardous material in transport. These goals are accomplished through the tracking of shipments, correctly packaging and labeling containers, and communicating potential hazards. Specific requirements include manifesting, packaging, marking and labeling waste packages; placarding transport vehicles; choosing appropriate waste transporters and shipment destinations; and record keeping and reporting. This information Brief focuses primarily on the transporter requirements both for transportation within a DOE facility and using a commercial transporter to transport RCRA hazardous wastes off-site.

  20. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1988. There are 16 individual hazardous waste facilities covered by the 13 ground-water monitoring projects. The Grout Treatment Facility is included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. The 13 projects discussed in this report were designed according to applicable interim-status ground-water monitoring requirements specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). During this quarter, field activities primarily consisted of sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes sediment analyses in addition to ground-water monitoring results. Twelve new wells were installed during the previous quarter: two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, six at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells include drillers' logs and other drilling and site characterization data, and are provided in Volume 2 or on microfiche in the back of Volume 1. 26 refs., 28 figs., 74 tabs.

  1. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-06-01

    This report provides the results of the semiannual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2006 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following nine CAUs: CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR); CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR); CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR); CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6 (TTR); CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR). Post-closure inspections were conducted on May 9, 2006, May 31, 2006, and November 15, 2006. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Attachment B, with the exception of CAU 400. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Attachment C, the field notes are included in Attachment D, and the site photographs are included in Attachment E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in June 2006, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Attachment F. Maintenance and/or repairs were performed at CAU 400, CAU 407, CAU 426, CAU 453, and CAU 487 in 2006. During the May inspection of CAU 400, it was identified that the east and west sections of chickenwire fencing beyond the standard fencing were damaged; they were repaired in June 2006. Also in June 2006, the southeast corner fence post and one warning sign at CAU 407 were reinforced and reattached, the perimeter fencing adjacent to the gate at CAU 426 was tightened, and large animal

  2. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-05-28

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2009 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following seven CAUs: · CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) · CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) · CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) · CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR) · CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) · CAU 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (TTR) · CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) The annual post-closure inspections were conducted May 5–6, 2009. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Attachment B, with the exception of CAU 400. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Attachment C, the field notes are included in Attachment D, and the site photographs are included in Attachment E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in June 2009, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Attachment F. Maintenance was performed at CAU 453. Animal burrows observed during the annual inspection were backfilled, and a depression was restored to grade on June 25, 2009. Post-closure site inspections should continue as scheduled. Vegetation survey inspections have been conducted annually at CAUs 400, 404, 407, and 426. Discontinuation of vegetation surveys is recommended at the CAU 400 Bomblet Pit and CAU 426, which have been successfully revegetated. Discontinuation of vegetation surveys is also recommended at CAU 404, which has been changed to an administrative closure with no inspections required. Vegetation

  3. RCRA hazardous waste contingency plans

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, T.P. )

    1991-10-01

    This paper reports that the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities (TSDFs) to prepare a contingency plan. The plan is a blueprint for emergency response, and must be designed to minimize health and environmental hazards resulting from fires, explosions or other unplanned hazardous releases. Hazardous waste contingency plans often are neglected and considered an unnecessary regulatory exercise by facility operators. However, an effective contingency plan is a valuable tool for reducing liability, protecting workers and the community, and avoiding costly shutdowns. The requirement under Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) that regulated facilities report to EPA annually on releases to the environment has caused regulators to renew emphasis on the importance of RCRA contingency plans. However, regulatory agencies historically have provided insufficient information on the elements of an adequate contingency plan. Nevertheless, facility operators seriously should consider going beyond minimum regulatory requirements and create a comprehensive contingency plan.

  4. Closure of municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLFs). RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Petts, M.

    1993-07-01

    This RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) information brief answers some questions regarding the 40 CFR 258 and 40 CFR 257 regulations on solid waste disposal facilities and their closure/cover. Section 405 of the Clean Water Act is covered as well as the RCRA.

  5. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-21

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2011 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (3) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (4) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (5) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C, field notes are included in Appendix D, and photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted May 3 and 4, 2011. Maintenance was performed at CAU 424, CAU 453, and CAU 487. At CAU 424, two surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 could not be located during the inspection. The two monuments were located and marked with lava rock on July 13, 2011. At CAU 453, there was evidence of animal burrowing. Animal burrows were backfilled on July 13, 2011. At CAU 487, one use restriction warning sign was missing, and wording was faded on the remaining signs. A large animal burrow was also present. The signs were replaced, and the animal burrow was backfilled on July 12, 2011. As a best management practice, the use restriction warning signs at CAU 407 were replaced with standard Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order signs on July 13, 2011. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2011, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  6. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Silvas, A. J.

    2014-03-03

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2013 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: • CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) • CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) • CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) • CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) • CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports and subsequent correspondence with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The post-closure inspection plans and subsequent correspondence modifying the requirements for each CAU are included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C. Field notes are included in Appendix D. Photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted on May 14, 2013. Maintenance was performed at CAU 400, CAU 424, and CAU 453. At CAU 400, animal burrows were backfilled. At CAU 424, erosion repairs were completed at Landfill Cell A3-3, subsidence was repaired at Landfill Cell A3-4, and additional lava rock was placed in high-traffic areas to mark the locations of the surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 and Landfill Cell A3-8. At CAU 453, two areas of subsidence were repaired and animal burrows were backfilled. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2013. The vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  7. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period July through September 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2007-02-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period July through September 2006. Eighteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) sites were sampled during the reporting quarter.

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) contingency plan for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be continually reviewed and revised if any of the following occur: the facility permit is revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures can be improved, the operations of the facility change in a way that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent`s Office and the Emergency Management Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal units. The 90-day accumulation areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement.

  9. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) general contingency plan for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skaggs, B.E.

    1993-11-01

    The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be continually reviewed and revised if any of the following occur: the facility permit is revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures herein can be improved, the operations of the facility change in a way that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent`s Office and the Emergency Management Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal units. The 90-day accumulation areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement.

  10. Resource conversation and recovery act (RCRA) Contingency Plan for interim status or permitted units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The official mission of the Y-12 Plant is to serve as a manufacturing technology center for key processes such that capabilities are maintained for safe, secure, reliable, and survivable nuclear weapons systems and other applications of national importance. The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be reviewed and revised if necessary if the facility RCRA operating permits are revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures herein can be improved, the facility`s operations change in a manner that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent`s Office and the Emergency Preparedness Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste interim status or permitted treatment, storage, or disposal facilities. The 90-day storage areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement.

  11. Addendum to the post-closure permit application for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant: Walk-in pits. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The revised Closure Plan was initially intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the Walk-In Pits (WIPs) of the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). However, a strategy was developed to include the B Area [a solid waste management unit (SWMU)] with the WIPs so that both areas would be closed under one cap. The plan was presented to the State of Tennessee on March 8, 1990, and the Department of Energy was requested to review other unique alternatives to close the site. Therefore, in November 1992, the Closure Plan for B Area and the WIPs was prepared separately from that of the other sites associated with the BCBG and was presented in a RCRA Closure Plan. The Closure Plan revision issued April 1993 was intended to reflect the placement of the Kerr Hollow Quarry debris at the WIPs, revise the closure data, and acknowledge that the disposition of a monitoring well within the closure site could not be verified. A Post-Closure Permit Application (PCPA) was to include the WIPs; however, at the time of submittal, closure of the WIPs had not been certified. This addendum contains information on the WIPs to accompany the BCBG PCPA. The purpose of this document is to supplement the information provided in the BCBG PCPA. This document is not intended to be a stand-alone document. Only additional information regarding the WIPs is included in the sections of this document, which correspond to sections of the PCPA submitted in June 1994.

  12. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2013-01-28

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2012 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: · CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) · CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) · CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) · CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) · CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR)

  13. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-03-30

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2010 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following seven CAUs: · CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) · CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) · CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) · CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR) · CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) · CAU 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (TTR) · CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR)

  14. Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Units on the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    Boehleke, R. F.

    2014-05-06

    This letter serves as the post-closure inspection letter report for Corrective Action Units (CAUs) on the Nevada National Security Site for calendar year 2013. The inspections identified maintenance and repair is required at the following sites: sign and/or fence repair is necessary at CAUs 113, 137, 139, 140, 143, 262, 370, 371, 372, 374, 476, 478, 529, 542, and 560; animal burrows were identified at CAU 547; and erosion was identified at CAUs 366, 367, 383, 551, and 574. In addition, the following use restrictions were removed during 2013 and will no longer be inspected in 2014: 165, 357, and 528.

  15. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR THE TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-04-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of the semi-annual inspections conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) during Calendar Year 2004. The report includes the inspection and/or repair activities completed at the following nine Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located at TTR, Nevada: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR); (3) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (4) CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR) (5) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (6) CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR); (7) CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2,6 (TTR); (8) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (9) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR). Site inspections were conducted on July 7,2004, and November 9-10,2004. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports (CRs). The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Appendix B, with the exception of CAU 400 and CAU 423. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. In addition, post-closure inspections are not currently required at CAU 423; however, the CR is being revised to include inspection requirements. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Appendix C, the field notes are included in Appendix D, and the site photographs are included in Appendix E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in June 2004, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F. In addition, topographic survey results of two repaired landfill cells in CAU 424 are included in Appendix G. Maintenance and/or repairs were performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill, CAU 407, CAU 424, CAU 427, and CAU 487. CAU 400 repairs included mending the fence, reseeding of a flood damaged area, and

  16. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application for Production Associated Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This is the RCRA required permit application for Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for the following units: Building 9206 Container Storage Unit; Building 9212 Container Storage Unit; Building 9720-12 Container Storage Unit; Cyanide Treatment Unit. All four of these units are associated with the recovery of enriched uranium and other metals from wastes generated during the processing of nuclear materials.

  17. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  18. Hanford Facility RCRA permit handbook

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this Hanford Facility (HF) RCRA Permit Handbook is to provide, in one document, information to be used for clarification of permit conditions and guidance for implementing the HF RCRA Permit.

  19. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-03-19

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2008 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following ten CAUs: CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR) CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6 (TTR) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) CAU 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (TTR) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR)

  20. Issuance of final revised guidance on the use and issuance of administrative orders under Section 7003 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-26

    The directive discusses guidance on the use and issuance of Administrative Orders under Section 7003 of RCRA where there is an emiminent and substantial endangerment to public health and the environment. In order to issue a Section 7003 order, the Administrator must possess evidence that the handling, storage, treatment, transportation or disposal of any solid waste or hazardous waste may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to health or the environment (42 U.S.C. Section 6973). Additionally, Section 7003 requires that the Administrator provide notice to the affected State prior to issuance of the order. Each of these requirements is discussed in the directive.

  1. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Other laws that interface with RCRA, updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The module provides a brief overview of some of the major environmental laws that interface with RCRA: Clean Air Act (CAA); Clean Water Act (CWA); Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA); Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); Pollution Prevention Act (PPA); and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund). It also covers regulations administered by other agencies that interface with RCRA, such as health and safety requirements under the occupational health and safety administration, and the hazardous materials transportation requirements administered by the Department of Transportation.

  2. NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration: Policy vs. practice

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R.P. ); Wolff, T.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Overwhelmed with environmental protection documentation requirements, a number of Federal agencies are grappling with the complexities of attempting to integrate'' the documentation requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). While there is some overlap between the general environmental policy objectives of NEPA, and the much more specific waste cleanup objectives of CERCLA and RCRA, there are also major differences and outright conflicts. This paper identifies both problems and opportunities associated with implementing emerging and evolving Federal agency policy regarding integration of the procedural and documentation requirements of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA. The emphasis is on NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration policy and practice at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The paper provides a comparative analysis of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA processes and discusses special integration issues including scoping, development and analysis of alternatives, risk assessment, tiering, scheduling, and the controversy surrounding applicability of NEPA to CERCLA or RCRA cleanup activities. Several NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration strategy options are evaluated and an annotated outline of an integrated NEPA/CERCLA document is included.

  3. Total System Performance Assessment- License Appication Design Selection (LADS) Phase 1 Analysis for Post-Closure Ventilation (Design Alternative 3)

    SciTech Connect

    N. Erb

    1999-06-21

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the effect of potential changes to the TSPA-VA base case design on long-term repository performance. The design changes that are evaluated in this report include two configurations for post-closure ventilation. bow tie and open loop (Design Alternative 3 or D3). The following paragraphs briefly describe the motivation for evaluating post-closure ventilation. The bow tie configuration for post closure ventilation has been identified as a design alternative to the TSPA-VA base case model (CRWMS M&O, 1998a) that may provide improved performance by reducing the temperature and relative humidity within the waste package drifts. The bow tie configuration for post-closure ventilation is a closed-loop design. In this design. cross drifts are placed in pairs with each drift angling up on opposite sides of the repository. From the side, the cross drifts and side drifts form the shape of a bow tie. Movement of air through the system is driven by convective heating from the waste packages in the cross drifts. The open loop configuration is also being considered for its potential to improve post-closure performance of the repository. As with the bow tie configuration, the open loop is designed to decrease temperature and relative humidity within the waste package drifts. For the open loop configuration, air is drawn into the drifts from outside the mountain. The configuration for the repository with open-loop ventilation is similar to the base case repository design with a few added shafts to increase air flow through the drifts. This report documents the modeling assumptions and calculations conducted to evaluate the long-term performance of Design Alternative 3. The performance measure for this evaluation is dose rate. Results are presented that compare the dose-rate time histories with the new design alternatives to that for the TSPA-VA base case calculation (CRWMS M&O, 1998a).

  4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure report: Area 2 Bitcutter and Postshot Containment Shops Injection Wells, Correction Action Unit 90

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This Closure Report provides documentation of the activities conducted during the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the Bitcutter and Postshot Containment Shops Injection Wells located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Spring Quadrangle (USGS, 1986), Township 10 South, Range 53 East, Nye County, Nevada. This report discusses the Bitcutter Shop Inside Injection Well (CAU 90-A) closure-in-place and the Bitcutter Shop Outside Injection Well (CAU 90-B) and Postshot Containment Shop Injection Well (CAU 90-C) clean closures. This Closure Report provides background information about the unit, the results of the characterization activities and actions conducted to determine the closure design. It also provides a discussion of the drainage analysis, preliminary closure activities, final closure activities, waste management activities, and the Post-Closure Care requirements.

  5. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis within the post closure Performance and Safety Assessment of the French deep geological radwaste disposal: methodology, tool and examples of results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, G.

    2009-04-01

    Within the framework of the December 30, 1991 french act, Andra submitted to the French Parliament in December 2005 a report on the feasibility of a high-level and long-lived radwaste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfodien clay layer (Meuse/Haute-Marne site). Further to 2006 french act, Andra is now involved in licensing of the reversible disposal up to 2015, which requires a great scientific and technical knowledge. Studies are based on many years of research carried out in France, in particular in Andra's Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (MHM URL), and international programs on radwastes, engineered barriers and deep clay formations. Intensive programs on hydraulic, solute transfer and radionuclides behaviour (solubility, retention) were and are carried out on Callovo-Oxfordian argilites (undisturbed and damaged), concrete materials and swelling clay based material, in order to provide a sound database. All these data allowed to perform firstly a sound description of the expected phenomenological evolution of the repository and its geological environment (including release and migration of radionuclides) from operating period to post closure period up to one million years, secondly a sound post-closure performance and safety assessment covering the different waste types (ILLW, HLW). Various safety scenarii were defined to quantify radiological impacts and to evaluate performance of the components and safety functions in post closure using specific indicators (concentration, molar rate, water flux…). According to the RFS III2.f (french safety rule related to deep geological radwaste disposad), there is no risk analysis in post closure and assessments are performed using deterministic situations, models and values. To complete analysis, propagation of uncertainties from models and input data in Performance and Safey Assessment (PA/SA) models is done using both deterministic and multiparametric probabilistic approach, with two main objectives: (i) to

  6. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act: Part B permit application. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Volume one contains the following: Regulatory cross-reference; Hazardous waste permit application part B; Facility description; Waste analysis plan; Facility and process information; Groundwater monitoring; Procedure to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; Personnel training; Closure plans, post-closure plans, and financial requirements; Corrective action for solid waste management units; Other Federal laws; No-migration variance petition; and Certification.

  7. Hazardous substance USTs: RCRA Subtitle 1, Underground Storage Tanks. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, R.

    1994-01-01

    Underground tanks that contain petroleum or hazardous substances may be subject to the Federal Underground Storage Tank (UST) regulations. These regulations, issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under authority of Subtitle I of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) [Section 9003 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA)], established standards for installation, operation, release detection, corrective action, repair, and closure. The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 9007 of RCRA to implement these regulations at DOE facilities with USTs.

  8. Landfill aeration within the scope of post-closure care and its completion.

    PubMed

    Ritzkowski, Marco; Stegmann, Rainer

    2013-10-01

    The time frame required for post-closure care of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills is often assessed over several decades or centuries. One possibility to significantly shorten this period and, at the same time, improve the emission behavior exists with in situ aeration. Positive effects in connection with this method for biological stabilization have been investigated and published elsewhere. However, until today neither generally accepted monitoring guidelines nor completion criteria have been defined. With the paper on hand the authors propose a methodology for the assessment of both, total and remaining stabilization periods for aerated landfills. The central component of this methodology is a carbon balance. The latter is based on a detailed waste characterization in combination with online monitoring of the emissions (gas and leachate). The methodology is exemplarily demonstrated by means of data derived from a full scale project in Northern Germany. Here it could be shown that the predicted aeration period of approximately 6.4years was sufficient to bio-stabilize the landfill. Furthermore, proposals for the completion of landfill aeration are presented. In this connection, carbon balance is of particular importance since the amount of biodegradable organic carbon mainly determines the emission potential. Additional parameters, aiming at a validation of the state of biological stabilization achieved during aeration are proposed and described.

  9. Amchitka Mud Pit Sites 2006 Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report, Amchitka Island, Alaska, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick

    2006-09-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA/NSO) remediated six areas associated with Amchitka mud pit release sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. This included the construction of seven closure caps. To ensure the integrity and effectiveness of remedial action, the mud pit sites are to be inspected every five years as part of DOE's long-term monitoring and surveillance program. In August of 2006, the closure caps were inspected in accordance with the ''Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Plan for Amchitka Island Mud Pit Release Sites'' (Rev. 0, November 2005). This post-closure monitoring report provides the 2006 cap inspection results.

  10. Pre/post-closure assessment of groundwater pharmaceutical fate in a wastewater-facility-impacted stream reach.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul M; Barber, Larry B; Clark, Jimmy M; Duris, Joseph W; Foreman, William T; Furlong, Edward T; Givens, Carrie E; Hubbard, Laura E; Hutchinson, Kasey J; Journey, Celeste A; Keefe, Steffanie H; Kolpin, Dana W

    2016-10-15

    Pharmaceutical contamination of contiguous groundwater is a substantial concern in wastewater-impacted streams, due to ubiquity in effluent, high aqueous mobility, designed bioactivity, and to effluent-driven hydraulic gradients. Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insights into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The USGS conducted a combined pre/post-closure groundwater assessment adjacent to an effluent-impacted reach of Fourmile Creek, Ankeny, Iowa, USA. Higher surface-water concentrations, consistent surface-water to groundwater concentration gradients, and sustained groundwater detections tens of meters from the stream bank demonstrated the importance of WWTF effluent as the source of groundwater pharmaceuticals as well as the persistence of these contaminants under effluent-driven, pre-closure conditions. The number of analytes (110 total) detected in surface water decreased from 69 prior to closure down to 8 in the first post-closure sampling event approximately 30 d later, with a corresponding 2 order of magnitude decrease in the cumulative concentration of detected analytes. Post-closure cumulative concentrations of detected analytes were approximately 5 times higher in proximal groundwater than in surface water. About 40% of the 21 contaminants detected in a downstream groundwater transect immediately before WWTF closure exhibited rapid attenuation with estimated half-lives on the order of a few days; however, a comparable number exhibited no consistent attenuation during the year-long post-closure assessment. The results demonstrate the potential for effluent-impacted shallow groundwater systems to accumulate pharmaceutical contaminants and serve as long-term residual sources, further increasing the risk of adverse ecological effects in groundwater and the near-stream ecosystem.

  11. RIP Input Tables From WAPDEG for LA Design Selection: Continuous Post-Closure Ventilation Design- Open Loop

    SciTech Connect

    K.G> Mon; P.K. Mast; R. Howard; J.H. Lee

    1999-07-21

    The purpose of this calculation is to document (1) the Waste Package Degradation (WAPDEG) version 3.09 (CRWMS M&O 1998b). Software Routine Report for WAPDEG (Version 3.09) simulations used to analyze waste package degradation and failure under the repository exposure conditions characterized by the open loop option of the post-closure ventilation design and, (2) post-processing of these results into tables of waste package degradation time histories suitable for use as input into the Integrated Probabilistic Simulator for Environmental Systems version 5.19.0 1 (RIP) computer program (Golder Associates 1998). Specifically, the WAPDEG simulations discussed in this calculation correspond to waste package emplacement conditions (repository environment and design) defined in the Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (TSPA-VA), with the exception that the open loop option of the post-closure ventilation License Application Design Selection (LADS) Design Alternative (Design Alternative 3b) was analyzed. The open loop post-closure ventilation design alternative, under which airways to the surface remain open after repository closure, could result in substantial cooling and drying of the potential repository. In open loop post-closure ventilation, expanded air heated by waste decay would move up an exhaust shaft, pulling denser, cooler air into the repository through intake shafts. The exchange of air with the atmosphere could remove more heat and moisture. As a result of the enhanced ventilation relative to the TSPA-VA base-case design, different temperature and relative humidity time histories at the waste package surface are calculated (input to the WAPDEG simulations), and consequently different waste package failure histories (as calculated by WAPDEG) result.

  12. Pre/post-closure assessment of groundwater pharmaceutical fate in a wastewater-facility-impacted stream reach.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul M; Barber, Larry B; Clark, Jimmy M; Duris, Joseph W; Foreman, William T; Furlong, Edward T; Givens, Carrie E; Hubbard, Laura E; Hutchinson, Kasey J; Journey, Celeste A; Keefe, Steffanie H; Kolpin, Dana W

    2016-10-15

    Pharmaceutical contamination of contiguous groundwater is a substantial concern in wastewater-impacted streams, due to ubiquity in effluent, high aqueous mobility, designed bioactivity, and to effluent-driven hydraulic gradients. Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insights into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The USGS conducted a combined pre/post-closure groundwater assessment adjacent to an effluent-impacted reach of Fourmile Creek, Ankeny, Iowa, USA. Higher surface-water concentrations, consistent surface-water to groundwater concentration gradients, and sustained groundwater detections tens of meters from the stream bank demonstrated the importance of WWTF effluent as the source of groundwater pharmaceuticals as well as the persistence of these contaminants under effluent-driven, pre-closure conditions. The number of analytes (110 total) detected in surface water decreased from 69 prior to closure down to 8 in the first post-closure sampling event approximately 30 d later, with a corresponding 2 order of magnitude decrease in the cumulative concentration of detected analytes. Post-closure cumulative concentrations of detected analytes were approximately 5 times higher in proximal groundwater than in surface water. About 40% of the 21 contaminants detected in a downstream groundwater transect immediately before WWTF closure exhibited rapid attenuation with estimated half-lives on the order of a few days; however, a comparable number exhibited no consistent attenuation during the year-long post-closure assessment. The results demonstrate the potential for effluent-impacted shallow groundwater systems to accumulate pharmaceutical contaminants and serve as long-term residual sources, further increasing the risk of adverse ecological effects in groundwater and the near-stream ecosystem. PMID:27350092

  13. Pre/post-closure assessment of groundwater pharmaceutical fate in a wastewater‑facility-impacted stream reach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Barber, Larry B.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Duris, Joseph; Foreman, William; Furlong, Edward T.; Givens, Carrie E.; Hubbard, Laura E.; Hutchinson, Kasey J.; Journey, Celeste A.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical contamination of contiguous groundwater is a substantial concern in wastewater-impacted streams, due to ubiquity in effluent, high aqueous mobility, designed bioactivity, and to effluent-driven hydraulic gradients. Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insights into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The USGS conducted a combined pre/post-closure groundwater assessment adjacent to an effluent-impacted reach of Fourmile Creek, Ankeny, Iowa, USA. Higher surface-water concentrations, consistent surface-water to groundwater concentration gradients, and sustained groundwater detections tens of meters from the stream bank demonstrated the importance of WWTF effluent as the source of groundwater pharmaceuticals as well as the persistence of these contaminants under effluent-driven, pre-closure conditions. The number of analytes (110 total) detected in surface water decreased from 69 prior to closure down to 8 in the first post-closure sampling event approximately 30 d later, with a corresponding 2 order of magnitude decrease in the cumulative concentration of detected analytes. Post-closure cumulative concentrations of detected analytes were approximately 5 times higher in proximal groundwater than in surface water. About 40% of the 21 contaminants detected in a downstream groundwater transect immediately before WWTF closure exhibited rapid attenuation with estimated half-lives on the order of a few days; however, a comparable number exhibited no consistent attenuation during the year-long post-closure assessment. The results demonstrate the potential for effluent-impacted shallow groundwater systems to accumulate pharmaceutical contaminants and serve as long-term residual sources, further increasing the risk of adverse ecological effects in groundwater and the near-stream ecosystem.

  14. Methods of calculating the post-closure performance of high-level waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, B.

    1989-02-01

    This report is intended as an overview of post-closure performance assessment methods for high-level radioactive waste repositories and is designed to give the reader a broad sense of the state of the art of this technology. As described here, ''the state of the art'' includes only what has been reported in report, journal, and conference proceedings literature through August 1987. There is a very large literature on the performance of high-level waste repositories. In order to make a review of this breadth manageable, its scope must be carefully defined. The essential principle followed is that only methods of calculating the long-term performance of waste repositories are described. The report is organized to reflect, in a generalized way, the logical order to steps that would be taken in a typical performance assessment. Chapter 2 describes ways of identifying scenarios and estimating their probabilities. Chapter 3 presents models used to determine the physical and chemical environment of a repository, including models of heat transfer, radiation, geochemistry, rock mechanics, brine migration, radiation effects on chemistry, and coupled processes. The next two chapters address the performance of specific barriers to release of radioactivity. Chapter 4 treats engineered barriers, including containers, waste forms, backfills around waste packages, shaft and borehole seals, and repository design features. Chapter 5 discusses natural barriers, including ground water systems and stability of salt formations. The final chapters address optics of general applicability to performance assessment models. Methods of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis are described in Chapter 6, and natural analogues of repositories are treated in Chapter 7. 473 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Sizirici, Banu; Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek

    2011-06-15

    Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

  16. Accelerating RCRA corrective action: The principles of the DOE approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmell, T.A.; Green, D.R.; Ranek, N.L.; Coalgate, J.L.

    1995-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is involved in the remediation of environmental contamination at many of its facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA`s corrective action provisions were established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). In response to the HSWA mandate, EPA established a program for the conduct of RCRA corrective action that was similar to that established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, EPA developed and implemented its ``stabilization`` initiative as a means of quickly addressing immediate risks posed by releases until long term solutions can be applied. To improve the efficiency of environmental restoration at its facilities, DOE is developing guidance and training programs on accelerated environmental restoration under RCRA. A RCRA guidance document, entitled ``Accelerating RCRA Corrective Action at DOE Facilities,`` is currently being developed by DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance. The new guidance document will outline a decision-making process for determining if acceleration is appropriate for individual facilities, for identifying, evaluating, and selecting options for program acceleration, and for implementing selected acceleration options. The document will also discuss management and planning strategies that provide a firm foundation for accelerating RCRA corrective action. These strategies include a number of very basic principles that have proven effective at DOE and other federal facilities, as well as some new approaches. The purpose of this paper is to introduce DOE`s new guidance document, discuss the general approach presented in the guidance for accelerating RCRA corrective action, and to emphasize some of the more important principles of effective management and planning.

  17. House passes RCRA fix by wide margin

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-07

    The House of Representatives has passed a bill to prevent expensive, court-ordered tightening of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act`s (RCRA) land-disposal rules. The measure was initiated last March as part of the Clinton Administration`s {open_quotes}reinventing environmental regulation{close_quotes} initiative and was championed by House Republicans. It passed, 402 to 19, drawing overwhelming support from Democrats. CMA president and CEO Fred Webber hailed the bipartisan approach as the right way to legislate. {open_quotes}We hope this bill can serve as a model for Superfund and other pieces of unfinished business,{close_quotes} he says.

  18. RCRA, Superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Oil Pollution Prevention Regulation and the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (updated February 1998); Directive

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The goal of this module is to explain the purpose, scope, and reporting requirements under the Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) and related regulations and the Oil Pollution Act of 1990.

  19. Costs of RCRA corrective action: Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.; Russell, M.; Hwang Ho-Ling; Goeltz, R. ); Warren, J. )

    1991-09-01

    This report estimates the cost of the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for all non-federal facilities in the United States. RCRA is the federal law which regulates the treatment, storage, disposal, and recovery of hazardous waste. The 1984 amendment to RCRA, known as the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments, stipulates that facilities that treat, store or dispose of hazardous wastes (TSDs) must remediate situations where hazardous wastes have escaped into the environment from their solid waste management units (SWMUs). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA 1990a), among others, believes that the costs of RCRA corrective action could rival the costs of SUPERFUND. Evaluated herein are costs associated with actual remedial actions. The remedial action cost estimating program developed by CH2M Hill is known as the Cost of Remedial Action Model (CORA). It provides cost estimates, in 1987 dollars, by technology used to remediate hazardous waste sites. Rules were developed to categorize each SWMU in the RTI databases by the kinds of technologies that would be used to remediate them. Results were then run through CORA using various assumptions for variable values that could not be drawn from the RTI databases and that did not have CORA supplied default values. Cost estimates were developed under several scenarios. The base case assumes a TSD and SWMU universe equal to that captured in the RTI databases, a point of compliance at the SWMU boundary with no ability to shift wastes from SWMU to SWMU, and a best-as-practical clean-up to health-based standards. 11 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Regulatory review of closure, post-closure and perpetual care funds at the energy solutions, LLC mixed waste facility

    SciTech Connect

    Willoughby III, O.H.; Lukes, G.C.

    2007-07-01

    EnergySolutions, LLC operates its Mixed Waste Facility at Clive, Utah under the provisions of its State-issued Part B Permit. The facility accepts waste that contains both hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Utah is an EPA Agreement State and therefore the Utah Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (DSHW) is authorized to regulate the hazardous waste operations at the facility. The radioactive portion of the waste is regulated by the Utah Division of Radiation Control. 40 CFR 264.142 outlines the facility requirements for Closure Costs. The owner or operator must have a detailed written estimate of the cost of closing the facility in accordance with the rules. For many years the State of Utah had relied on the facility's estimate of closure costs as the amount that needed to be funded. This amount is reviewed annually and adjusted for inflation and for changes at the facility. In 2004 the agency and the facility requested bids from independent contractors to provide their estimate for closure costs. Three engineering firms bid on the project. The facility funded the project and both the agency and the facility chose one of the firms to provide an independent estimate. The engineering firms met with both parties and toured the facility. They were also provided with the current closure cost line items. Each firm provided an estimated cost for closure of the facility at the point in the facility's active life that would make the closure most expensive. Included with the direct costs were indirect line items such as overhead, profit, mobilization, hazardous working conditions and regulatory oversight. The agency and the facility reviewed the independent estimates and negotiated a final Closure and Post-Closure Cost Estimate for the Mixed Waste Facility. There are several mechanisms allowed under the rules to fund the Closure and Post- Closure Care Funds. EnergySolutions has chosen to fund their costs through the use of an insurance policy. Changing mechanisms from

  1. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Other laws that interface with RCRA, updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The module provides a brief overview of some of the major environmental laws that interface with RCRA: Clean Air Act (CAA); Clean Water Act (CWA); Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA); Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); Pollution Prevention Act (PPA); and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund). It also covers regulations administered by other agencies that interface with RCRA, such as health and safety requirements under the Occupational Health and Safety Administration, and the Hazardous Materials Transportation Requirements administered by the Department of Transportation.

  2. RCRA, Superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Statutory overview of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (updated February 1998); Directive

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This module presents a brief overview of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), the statute through which Congress established EPA`s hazardous substance release reporting and cleanup program, known as the Superfund program. This module presents information of the CERCLA statute only, not the regulations promulgated pursuant to the statute.

  3. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches Tonopah Test Range, Nevada Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2001-06-01

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (Corrective Action Unit [CAW 426]) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for corrective Action Unit 426, Cactus Spring Waste Trenches. Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOE/NV--226. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on August 14, 1998. Permeability results of soils adjacent to the engineered cover and a request for closure of CAU 404 were transmitted to the NDEP on April 29, 1999. The CR (containing the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan) was approved by the NDEP on May 13, 1999. Post-closure monitoring at CAU 426 consists of the following: (1) Site inspections done twice a year to evaluate the condition of the unit; (2) Verification that the site is secure; (3) Notice of any subsidence or deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit; (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery; and (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. Site inspections were conducted on June 19, 2000, and November 21, 2000. All inspections were made after NDEP approval of the CR, and were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan in the NDEP-approved CR. This report includes copies of the inspection checklists, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment B, and copies of the inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  4. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-01-01

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Area 9 Unexploded Ordinance Landfill (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 453) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOE/NV--284, August 1999. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on August 5 , 1999. The CR (containing the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan) was approved by the NDEP on September 10,1999. As stated in Section 5.0 of the NDEP-approved CR, post-closure monitoring at CAU 453 consists of the following: (1) Visual site inspections are conducted twice a year to evaluate the condition of the cover. (2) Verification that the site is secure and the condition of the fence and posted warning signs. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized excavation, etc., deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. Site inspections were conducted on May 15, 2001 and November 6, 2001. Both site inspections were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan in the NDEP-approved CR. This report includes copies of the inspection checklists, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment B, and inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  5. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6 Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-01-01

    Post-closure inspection requirements for the Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6 (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 427) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 427, Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOENV-56 1, August 1999. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on August 16, 1999. The CR (containing the Post-Closure Inspection Plan) was approved by the NDEP on August 27, 1999. As stated in Section 5.1 of the NDEP-approved CR, the annual Post-Closure inspection at CAU 427 consists of the following: (1) Verification of the presence of all leachfield and septic tank below-grade markers. (2) Verification that all warning signs are in-place, intact, and readable. (3) Visual observation of the soil and asphalt cover for indications of subsidence, erosion, and unauthorized use. The site inspections were conducted on May 16, 2001, and November 6, 2001. All inspections were made after NDEP approval of the CR, and were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Inspection Plan in the NDEP-approved CR. No maintenance or repairs were conducted at the site. This report includes copies of inspection checklists, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. Copies of the Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment B, and a copy of the inspection photographs is found in Attachments C.

  6. Post-Closure Strategy for Use-Restricted Sites on the Nevada National Security Site, Nevada Test and Training Range, and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Silvas, A. J.

    2014-03-26

    The purpose of this Post-Closure Strategy is to provide a consistent methodology for continual evaluation of post-closure requirements for use-restricted areas on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to consolidate, modify, or streamline the program. In addition, this document stipulates the creation of a single consolidated Post-Closure Plan that will detail the current post-closure requirements for all active use restrictions (URs) and outlines its implementation and subsequent revision. This strategy will ensure effective management and control of the post-closure sites. There are currently over 200 URs located on the NNSS, NTTR, and TTR. Post-closure requirements were initially established in the Closure Report for each site. In some cases, changes to the post-closure requirements have been implemented through addenda, errata sheets, records of technical change, or letters. Post-closure requirements have been collected from these multiple sources and consolidated into several formats, such as summaries and databases. This structure increases the possibility of inconsistencies and uncertainty. As more URs are established and the post-closure program is expanded, the need for a comprehensive approach for managing the program will increase. Not only should the current requirements be obtainable from a single source that supersedes all previous requirements, but the strategy for modifying the requirements should be standardized. This will enable more effective management of the program into the future. This strategy document and the subsequent comprehensive plan are to be implemented under the assumption that the NNSS and outlying sites will be under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the foreseeable future. This strategy was also developed assuming that regulatory control of the sites remains static. The comprehensive plan is not

  7. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-01

    This report presents results of data collected during the annual post-closure site inspection conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area, surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in June 2009. The annual post-closure site inspection included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspection conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated that the site and soil cover were in good condition. Three new fractures were identified in the soil cover and were filled with bentonite chips during the inspection. The vegetation on the soil cover was adequate but showed signs of the area's ongoing drought. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations

  8. Hazardous waste enforcement. [RCRA and Superfund regulatory programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    A change is taking place in the enforcement of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Superfund, a change described by the terms ''environmental results'' and ''cooperation, no confrontation''. Examples are given of environmental results achieved through criminal enforcement. In June 1981, a New York businessman received a two and one-half year prison sentence for dumping PCB-laced oil along North Carolina roads; a second defendant received an 18-month jail term. Other important measures of environmental results achieved by enforcement are 1) commitment of private money and effort for hazardous waste management and 2) the number of facility inspections conducted under RCRA's regulatory program's compliance monitoring system. A new strategy of cooperation between U.S. EPA and the parties affected by RCRA and Superfund should change the pattern which produced the confrontational conflicts of the past. (JMT)

  9. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-09-01

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  10. Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kristofzski, J.R.; Mann, F.M.; Anderson, F.J.; Lober, R.W.

    2007-07-01

    As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: - Characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; - Determine how the contamination will move in the future; - Estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; - Develop and implement mitigative measures; - Develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper. (authors)

  11. Submittal of Final Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Unit 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-02-05

    This letter serves as the post-closure monitoring letter report for the above Corrective Action Unit (CAU) for calendar year 2006. CAU 91 is inspected every six months. The first inspection was conducted on March 23, 2006, and the second inspection was conducted on September 19, 2006. All access roads, fences, gates, and signs were in excellent condition. No settling, cracking, or erosion was observed on the cover, and the use restriction had been maintained. No issues were identified, and no corrective actions were needed. The post-closure inspection checklists for CAU 91 are attached. Photographs and fields notes taken during site inspections are maintained in the project files.

  12. Calendar Year 2002 RCRA & CERCLA Groundwater Monitoring Well summary report

    SciTech Connect

    MARTINEZ, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the calendar year 2002 field activities associated with installing four new groundwater monitoring wells in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. Two groundwater monitoring wells are located around waste management area (WMA) TX-TY to support the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) and two groundwater monitoring wells are located in the 200-UP-1 and 200-ZP-1 operable units (OU) to support the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980'' (CERCLA).

  13. How landfill gas causes RCRA compliance problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kerfoot, H.B.

    1996-06-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires landfill operators to monitor groundwater at their facilities. This regulatory requirement is designed to prevent contamination that can result as rainfall drains through refuse, causing pollutants to leach into the groundwater. Several parameters commonly associated with leachate are monitored under RCRA as indicator parameters, or parameters that represent readily detected indicators of contamination. These parameters include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and alkalinity. Because of its potentially high concentration of VOCs and non-volatile contaminants, landfill leachate represents the greatest threat to groundwater from solid waste facilities. However, other sources can elevate indicator parameters as well. Increasingly lower detection limits can be achieved for VOCs in groundwater, enabling detection of VOCs and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from landfill gas. In addition, CO{sub 2} from landfill gas can increase groundwater alkalinity. Releases of VOCs in landfill gas can be eliminated by minimizing the gas pressure within the landfill, either by installing a gas-collection system or upgrading an existing gas-collection system by adding wells or altering gas flow in portions of the system.

  14. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA corrective action updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The module discusses the regulatory and statutory requirements and authorities governing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action process. There are minimal regulatory requirements at present, but the Agency has issued a proposed rule (55 FR 30798; July 27, 1990) that would establish a comprehensive regulatory framework for implementing the corrective action program. This proposed rule and other guidance developed pursuant to statutory authorities are used to structure corrective action requirements in facility permits and orders. This module describes the current statutory and regulatory structure and discusses the future of the proposed rule.

  15. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2001-06-01

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench (Corrective Action Unit [CAW 404]) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404, Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOE/NV--187. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on September 11, 1998. Permeability results of soils adjacent to the engineered cover and a request for closure of CAU 404 were transmitted to the NDEP on April 29, 1999. The CR (containing the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan) was approved by the NDEP on May 18, 1999. Post-closure monitoring at CAU 404 consists of the following: (1) Site inspections done twice a year to evaluate the condition of the unit; (2) Verification that the site is secure; (3) Notice of any subsidence or deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit; (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery; and (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. Site inspections were conducted on June 19, 2000, and November 21, 2000. The site inspections were conducted after completion of the revegetation activities (October 30, 1997) and NDEP approval of the CR (May 18, 1999). All site inspections were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan in the NDEP-approved CR. This report includes copies of inspection checklists, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment B, and copies of the inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  16. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches Tonopah Test Range, Nevada Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-02-01

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 426) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 426, Cactus Spring Waste Trenches, Tonopah Test Range. Nevada, report number DOE/NV--226, August 1998. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on August 14, 1998. Permeability results of soils adjacent to the engineered cover and a request for closure of CAU 404 were transmitted to the NDEP on April 29, 1999. The CR (containing the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan) was approved by the NDEP on May 13, 1999. As stated in Section 5.0 of the NDEP-approved CRY Post-Closure Monitoring Plan, site monitoring at CAU 426 consists of the following: (1) Visual site inspections done twice a year to evaluate the condition of the cover and plant development. (2) Verification that the site is secure and condition of the fence and posted warning signs. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized excavation, etc., deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. Site inspections were conducted on May 16, 2001, and November 6, 2001. All inspections were made after NDEP approval of the CR, and were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan in the NDEP-approved CR. This report includes copies of the inspection checklists, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment B, and copies of the inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  17. Petroleum USTs: RCRA Subtitle 1, Underground Storage Tanks. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, R.

    1994-01-01

    Underground tanks that contain petroleum or hazardous substances may be subject to the Federal Underground Storage Tank (UST) regulations. These regulations, issued by EPA under authority of Subtitle I of the Resource Conservation and Recovery (RCRA) [Section 9003 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 (HSWA)], establish standards for installation, operation, release detection, corrective action, repair, and closure. The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 9007 of RCRA to implement these regulations at DOE facilities with USTs. DOE prepared a guidance document, Regulated Underground Storage Tanks (DOE/EH-231/0041/0191, June 1992), that describes the UST procedural requirements which regulate tanks and piping for both petroleum and hazardous substance USTs as well as USTs containing radioactive material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 USC 2011). This information Brief supplements the UST guidance by responding to critical questions concerning how the regulations apply to petroleum USTs. It is part of a series of information Briefs which address issues pertinent to specific categories of USTs.

  18. Hazardous substance USTs: RCRA Subtitle 1, Underground Storage Tanks. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    DiCerbo, J.

    1993-05-01

    Underground tanks that contain petroleum or hazardous substances may be subject to the Federal Underground Storage Tank (UST) regulations. These regulations, issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under authority of Subtitle I of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) [Section 9003 of the Hazardous an Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA)], established standards for installation, operation, release detection corrective action, repair, and closure. The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 9007 of RCRA t Implement these regulations at DOE facilities with USTs. DOE prepared a guidance document, Regulated Underground Storage Tanks (DOE/EH-231/004/0191, June 1992) that describes the UST procedural requirements which regulate tanks and piping for both petroleum and hazardous substance USTs as well as USTs containing radioactive material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 195 (42 U.S.C. 2011). This Information Brief supplements the UST guidance by responding to critical questions concerning how the regulations apply to hazardous substance USTs. It is a part of a series of Information Briefs which address issues pertinent to specific categories of USTs.

  19. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    A. T. Urbon

    2001-08-01

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning site is located in the southeast portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site (Figure 1). This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 23, 2001. Because of questionable representativeness and precision of the results, the site was resampled on June 12, 2001. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the December 1997 Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1997). If after six years the rate of degradation appears to be so slow that the greatest concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) present at the site would not decay within 30 years of the site closure, the site will be reevaluated with consideration to enriching the impacted soil at the site to enhance the degradation process. A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report, samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in TPH concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, the data results from 2000 were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2001 consisted of the following: Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2); Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay

  20. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-01-01

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 404) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404. Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench. Tonopah Test Range. Nevada, report number DOE/NV--187, September 1998. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on September 11, 1998. Permeability results of soils adjacent to the engineered cover and a request for closure of CAU 404 were transmitted to the NDEP on April 29, 1999. The CR (containing the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan) was approved by the NDEP on May 18, 1999. As stated in Section 5.0 of the NDEP-approved CRY post-closure monitoring at CAU 404 consists of the following: (1) Visual site inspections done twice a year to evaluate the condition of the cover and plant development. (2) Verification that the site is secure and condition of the fence and posted warning signs. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized excavation, etc., deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. In addition to the above activities, vegetative monitoring of the cover (a plant census) will be done in the first, third and fifth year following revegetation. (Vegetative monitoring will done in fiscal year 2001, and the results reported in the 2002 Post-Closure Inspection Report.) Site inspections were conducted on May 16, 2001, and November 6, 2001. The site inspections were conducted after completion of the revegetation activities (October 30, 1997) and NDEP approval of the CR (May 18, 1999). All site inspections were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan in the NDEP-approved CR. This report includes copies of inspection checklists, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are found

  1. Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Unit 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-01-01

    This letter selves as the post closure monitoring letter report for the above CAU for the period October 2005 - September 2006. Quarterly inspections were conducted on December 12,2005, on March 23, 2006, on June 20,2006, and on September 19,2006, to observe the condition of the gate, use-restriction warning signs, monuments, fencing, trenches, soil covers, and monitoring well covers. The first inspection was conducted on December 12, 2005. Signs, fencing, riprap, monuments, and monitoring well covers were in excellent condition. No cracking, erosion, or subsidence was observed on the covers. No issues or concerns were identified, and no corrective actions were recommended. The second inspection was conducted on March 23, 2006. Signs, fencing, riprap, monuments, and monitoring well covers were in excellent condition. No cracking, erosion, or subsidence was observed on the covers. No issues or concerns were identified, and no corrective actions were recommended. The third inspection was conducted on June 20, 2006. Signs, fencing, riprap, monuments, and monitoring well covers were in excellent condition. No cracking, erosion, or subsidence was observed on the covers. No issues or concerns were identified, and no corrective actions were recommended. The fourth inspection was conducted on September 19, 2006. Signs, fencing, riprap, monuments, and monitoring well covers were in excellent condition. No cracking, erosion, or subsidence was observed on the covers. No issues or concerns were identified, and no corrective actions were recommended.

  2. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2006-08-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report provides the results and inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 Waste Management Division U-3ax/bl Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This report includes an analysis and summary of the site inpsections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at Corrective Action Unit 110, for the annual period July 2005 thrugh June 2006.

  3. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data collected during the annual post-closure site inspection conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area Surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in May of 2008. The annual post-closure site inspection included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspection conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated that the site and soil cover were in good condition. Three new cracks or fractures were observed in the soil cover during the annual inspection and were immediately filled with bentonite chips. The vegetation on the soil cover was adequate, but showed signs of the area's ongoing drought. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The annual subsidence survey was conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in August 2008. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed.

  4. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    This report presents results of data collected during the annual post-closure site inspections conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in May 2011 and July 2012. The annual post-closure site inspections included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspections conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated that the site and soil cover were in good condition. No new fractures or extension of existing fractures were observed and no issues with the fence or gate were identified. The vegetation on the cover continues to look healthy, but the biennial vegetation survey conducted during the 2012 inspection indicated that the total foliar cover was slightly higher in 2009 than in 2012. This may be indicative of a decrease in precipitation observed during the 2-year monitoring period. The precipitation totaled 9.9 inches from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011, and 5 inches from July 1, 2011, through June 30, 2012. This decrease in precipitation is also evident in the soil moisture data obtained from the time domain reflectometry sensors. Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 cover is performing as designed, and evapotranspiration is effectively removing water from the cover.

  5. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 333: U-3auS Disposal Site Annual Report, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    K. K. Knapp

    2003-09-01

    The U-3auS Disposal Site Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 333 is a closed construction landfill located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site. The closure of this site was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) dated June 27, 2001. Post-closure monitoring requirements are described in a letter from NNSA/NV to NDEP dated October 9, 2001, and were approved by the NDEP in a letter from NDEP to NNSA/NV dated November 5, 2001. Post-closure care consists of the following: Semiannual inspections of the unit using an inspection checklist; Photographic documentation of site conditions; Field note documentation; Performing minor site maintenance as necessary; and Preparation and submittal of an annual report. The annual report consists of copies of the inspection checklist, repair records (if any), photographs, and recommendations and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are provided in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment B, and copies of the inspection photographs are provided in Attachment C. Field note documentation is not formally required for this CAU, however in order to be consistent with other reports, it has been added to this report.

  6. RCRA corrective action: Statement of basis and response to comments decision documents

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Statement of Basis (SB) and Response to Comments (RTC) decision documents are prepared when a corrective action is implemented through either a permit or enforcement order [RCRA {section} 3008(h)]. EPA`s Guidance on RCRA Corrective Action Decision Documents presents a standard format for documenting RCRA corrective action decisions. The guidance clarifies the roles and responsibilities of regulatory agencies in developing and issuing decision documents. DOE, for some corrective actions, may be directed to prepare materials for the Statement of Basis. EPA`s guidance is intended to provide consistency in the organization and content of decision documents as well as promote clear and logical presentations of rationales for remedy selection decisions based on facility-specific information and supporting analysis. This Information Brief summarizes EPA`s guidance on SB and RTC decision documents.

  7. Development of a long-term post-closure radiation monitor: Phase 2, Topical report, March 1994--July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S.E.

    1995-07-01

    The long-term monitoring of a hazardous waste site for migration of radionuclides requires installation of radiation sensors at a large number of subsurface locations. The concept under development employs a passive in-ground measurement probe which contains a scintillator coupled to an optical lightguide. The overall goal of the Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitor System (LPRMS) development program is to configure a long-term radiation monitor using commercially available, demonstrated components to the largest extent possible. The development program is planned as a three phase program spanning a total time of 53 months. The problems to be solved during Phase 1 were primarily those associated with selection of the most appropriate components (scintillator, coupling optics, optical fiber, and opto-electronics) to maximize the signal reaching the detectors and thereby minimizing the integration time required to obtain a reliable measure of radiation. Phase 2 (the current Phase) encompassed the fabrication and testing of the prototype LPRMS probe at a contaminated DOE site, the Fernald Environmental Management Project, in southwestern Ohio. Uranium isotopes are the primary contaminants of concern at this site. The single probe and opto-electronic device were used to made measurements in-situ at relatively shallow subsurface depths. The end objective of Phase 2 was the design of a full-scale prototype system which incorporates all the features expected to be necessary on a commercial system, including 50 meter depth of measurement, multiplexing of multiple probes, and remote transmission of data. This full-scale prototype will be fabricated and field tested for 12 months during Phase 3, and a commercial design will be developed based upon the data gathered and experience gained during the entire program.

  8. RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Narbutovskih, Susan M.

    2001-01-01

    This document describes the groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area C located in the 200 East Area of the DOE Hanford Site. This plan is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA).

  9. Implementing RCRA during facility deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Lebaron, G.J.

    1997-09-07

    RCRA regulations require closure of permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations, and this may essentially necessitate decommissioning to complete closure. A more cost effective way to handle the facility would be to significantly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by taking it from its operational status to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to decommissioning. This paper presents an innovative approach to the cost effective deactivation of a large, complex chemical processing facility permitted under RCRA. The approach takes into account risks to the environment posed by this facility in comparison to risks posed by neighboring facilities at the site. The paper addresses the manner in which: 1) stakeholders and regulators were involved; 2) identifies a process by which the project proceeds and regulators and stakeholders were involved; 3) end points were developed so completion of deactivation was clearly identified at the beginning of the project, and 4) innovative practices were used to deactivate more quickly and cost effectively.

  10. Interim-Status RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 PUREX Cribs

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, Jon W.; Elmore, Rebecca P.

    2005-07-21

    This document presents a groundwater monitoring program for three Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) waste management units at the Hanford Site combined under one groundwater quality assessment program. The units are the 216 A 10, 216 A 36B, and 216 A-37-1 cribs (the RCRA PUREX cribs). The three cribs have been grouped together based on their proximity to one another, similar construction and waste history, and similar hydrogeologic regime. The RCRA PUREX cribs are located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This document replaces the previous RCRA monitoring plan (Lindberg 1997-PNNL-11523, Rev.0) for these cribs.

  11. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (40 cfr parts 264/265, subparts a-e) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The management of hazardous waste at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) plays a large and critical role in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulatory scheme. The training module presents an overview of the general TSDF standards found in 40 CFR Parts 264/265, Subparts A through E.

  12. RCRA toxicity characterization of discarded electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Musson, Stephen E; Vann, Kevin N; Jang, Yong-Chul; Mutha, Sarvesh; Jordan, Aaron; Pearson, Brian; Townsend, Timothy G

    2006-04-15

    The potential for discarded electronic devices to be classified as toxicity characteristic (TC) hazardous waste under provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was examined. The regulatory TCLP method and two modified TCLP methods (in which devices were disassembled and leached in or near entirety) were utilized. Lead was the only element found to leach at concentrations greater than its TC limit (5 mg/L). Thirteen different types of electronic devices were tested using either the standard TCLP or modified versions. Every device type leached lead above 5 mg/L in at least one test and most devices leached lead above the TC limit in a majority of cases. Smaller devices that contained larger amounts of plastic and smaller amounts of ferrous metal (e.g., cellular phones, remote controls) tended to leach lead above the TC limit at a greater frequency than devices with more ferrous metal (e.g., computer CPUs, printers).

  13. SEMINAR PROCEEDINGS: RCRA CORRECTIVE ACTION STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The seminar publication provides an overview of many technologies that can be used in applying the stabilization concept to RCRA cleanup activities. Technologies discussed include covers, grouting, slurry walls, hydrofracture, horizontal well drilling, a vacuum extraction, and b...

  14. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Permits and interim status (40 cfr part 270) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Owners/operators of facilities that treat, store, or dispose of hazardous waste must obtain an operating permit, as required by Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The module presents an overview of the RCRA permitting process and the requirements that apply to TSDFs operating under interim status until a permit is issued. The regulations governing the permit process are found in 40 CFR Parts 124 through 270.

  15. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste identification (40 cfr part 261) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The module introduces a specific hazardous waste identification process, which involves asking and analyzing a series of questions about any waste being evaluated. It analyzes in detail the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of `hazardous waste.` It explains concepts that are essential to identifying a RCRA hazardous waste: hazardous waste listing, hazardous waste characteristics, the `mixture` and `derived-from` rules, the `contained-in` policy, and the hazardous waste identification rules (HWIR).

  16. CY2003 RCRA GROUNDWATER MONITORING WELL SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    MARTINEZ, C.R.

    2003-12-16

    This report describes the calendar year (CY) 2003 field activities associated with the installation of two new groundwater monitoring wells in the A-AX Waste Management Area (WMA) and four groundwater monitoring wells in WMA C in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. All six wells were installed by Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH) for CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) in support of Draft Hanford Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) M-24-00 milestones and ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) groundwater monitoring requirements. Drilling data for the six wells are summarized in Table 1.

  17. On the use of the post-closure methods uncertainty band to evaluate the performance of land surface models against eddy covariance flux data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingwersen, J.; Imukova, K.; Högy, P.; Streck, T.

    2015-04-01

    The energy balance of eddy covariance (EC) flux data is normally not closed. Therefore, at least if used for modelling, EC flux data are usually post-closed, i.e. the measured turbulent fluxes are adjusted so as to close the energy balance. At the current state of knowledge, however, it is not clear how to partition the missing energy in the right way. Eddy flux data therefore contain some uncertainty due to the unknown nature of the energy balance gap, which should be considered in model evaluation and the interpretation of simulation results. We propose to construct the post-closure methods uncertainty band (PUB), which essentially designates the differences between non-adjusted flux data and flux data adjusted with the three post-closure methods (Bowen ratio, latent heat flux (LE) and sensible heat flux (H) method). To demonstrate this approach, simulations with the NOAH-MP land surface model were evaluated based on EC measurements conducted at a winter wheat stand in southwest Germany in 2011, and the performance of the Jarvis and Ball-Berry stomatal resistance scheme was compared. The width of the PUB of the LE was up to 110 W m-2 (21% of net radiation). Our study shows that it is crucial to account for the uncertainty in EC flux data originating from lacking energy balance closure. Working with only a single post-closing method might result in severe misinterpretations in model-data comparisons.

  18. On the use of the post-closure method uncertainty band to evaluate the performance of land surface models against eddy covariance flux data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingwersen, J.; Imukova, K.; Högy, P.; Streck, T.

    2014-12-01

    The energy balance of eddy covariance (EC) flux data is normally not closed. Therefore, at least if used for modeling, EC flux data are usually post-closed, i.e. the measured turbulent fluxes are adjusted so as to close the energy balance. At the current state of knowledge, however, it is not clear how to partition the missing energy in the right way. Eddy flux data therefore contain some uncertainty due to the unknown nature of the energy balance gap, which should be considered in model evaluation and the interpretation of simulation results. We propose to construct the post-closure method uncertainty band (PUB), which essentially designates the differences between non-adjusted flux data and flux data adjusted with the three post-closure methods (Bowen ratio, latent heat flux (LE) and sensible heat flux (H) method). To demonstrate this approach, simulations with the NOAH-MP land surface model were evaluated based on EC measurements conducted at a winter wheat stand in Southwest Germany in 2011, and the performance of the Jarvis and Ball-Berry stomatal resistance scheme was compared. The width of the PUB of the LE was up to 110 W m-2 (21% of net radiation). Our study shows that it is crucial to account for the uncertainty of EC flux data originating from lacking energy balance closure. Working with only a single post-closing method might result in severe misinterpretations in model-data comparisons.

  19. SEMINAR PUBLICATION: DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF RCRA/CERCLA FINAL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover systems are an essential part of all land disposal facilities. Covers control moisture infiltration from the surface into closed facilities and limit the formation of leachate and its migration to ground water. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subparts G, K...

  20. RCRA and operational monitoring 1994 fiscal year work plan, WBS 1.5.3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the direct funded Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.5.3. The ROM Program Office is a Branch of liquid Waste Disposal, a part of Restoration and Remediation of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) takes it direction from the Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP). The FYWP provides the near term, enhanced details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Changs Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by the FYWP.

  1. Successful completion of a RCRA closure for the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lippitt, J.M.; Kolthoff, K.

    1995-02-01

    This paper discusses the successful completion of a RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) closure of a HF (hydrofluoric acid) tank car at FEMP, which is on the national priorities list of hazardous waste sites and is undergoing CERCLA remediation. The HF tank car closure was conducted by FERMCO. Through a combination of sound planning and team work, the HF tank car was closed safely and ahead of schedule. During > 22,000 hr field work required for construction modifications and neutralization of 9,600 gallons of HF and decontamination rinseates, there were no OSHA recordable incidents. The system design avoided additional costs by maximizing use of existing equipment and facilities. This successful closure of the HF tank car demonstrates FEMP`s commitment to reducing risks and cleaning up the facility in a manner consistent with objectives of RCRA regulations and the Ohio EPA hazardous waste rules. This in turn facilitated ongoing negotiations with Ohio EPA to integrate RCRA closure and the ongoing CERCLA remediation activities. This paper addresses why the unit was clean closed under an approved RCRA Closure Plan. Integration of EPA regulations for RCRA and CERCLA programs and the DOE-Orders impacting design, construction and operation of an acid neutralization system is also reviewed. The paper concludes with a discussion of lessons learned in the process in preparing the closure plant and through final project close out.

  2. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2008-09-01

    This report presents data collected during the annual post-closure site inspection conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area Surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in May 2007. The annual post-closure site inspection included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspection conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated the site and soil cover were in good condition. No new cracks or fractures were observed in the soil cover during the annual inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover was observed during the last quarterly inspection in December 2006. This crack was filled with bentonite as part of the maintenance activities conducted in February 2007 and will be monitored during subsequent annual inspections. The vegetation on the soil cover was adequate but showing signs of the area's ongoing drought. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. New DOE Office of Legacy Management signs with updated emergency phone numbers were installed as part of this annual inspection, no issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The annual subsidence survey was conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C as part of the maintenance activities conducted in February 2007. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. A vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas was conducted as part of the annual inspection in May 2007. The vegetation survey indicated that revegetation continues to be successful, although stressed due to the area's prevailing drought conditions. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and to identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action to maintain a viable vegetation

  3. Metals reclaimer urges agency to put RCRA on track

    SciTech Connect

    Borner, A.J. ); Perry, B.

    1991-11-01

    Twenty-five years ago, the nation yawned, tentatively scratched, then hiccuped its first official awareness of an environmental tumor with the passage of the 1965 Solid Waste Disposal Act. This was the first federal law requiring environmentally sound disposal of household, municipal, commercial and industrial refuse. Earth Day '70 rallies goaded a still sleepy congress into amending the law with the 1970 Resource Recovery Act-a legislative misnomer that would be compounded in 1976 by passage of RCRA. In 1980, RCRA again was amended, and the ruse of a nation struggling toward conservation and recovery continued. EPA's and the Department of Justice's (DOJ) indecision over whether Marine Shale Processors Inc. (St. Rose, La.) is an exempt recycler or a TSDF requiring the permits and scrutiny that status implies is evidence of this ruse. This article explores the risks, frustrations and opportunities encountered by a company that boldly has opted to enter the hazardous waste recycling market despite regulatory uncertainties, competitive disadvantages and difficulties breaking potential clients' disposal habits that include deep-well injection and landfilling valuable resources.

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (904-113G)

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment (RFI/RI/BRA) for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (FDTF) (904-113G).

  5. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Solid and hazardous waste exclusions (40 cfr section 261.4) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The Resources Conservation and Recovery Act`s (RCRA) Subtitle C hazardous waste management program is a comprehensive and carefully constructed system to ensure wastes are managed safely and lawfully. This program begins with a very specific, formal process to categorize wastes accurately and appropriately called waste identification. The module explains each waste exclusion and its scope, so you can apply this knowledge in determining whether a given waste is or is not regulated under RCRA Subtitle C.

  6. Completion of five years of safe CO2 injection and transition into the post-closure phase at the Ketzin pilot site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Sonja; Moeller, Fabian; Streibel, Martin; Liebscher, Axel; Ketzin Group

    2014-05-01

    The injection of CO2 at the Ketzin pilot site in Germany ended after five years in August 2013. We present the key results from site operation and outline future activities within the post-closure phase. From June 2008 onwards, a total amount of 67 kt of CO2 was safely injected into a saline aquifer (Upper Triassic sandstone) at a depth of 630 m - 650 m. The CO2 used was mainly of food grade quality (purity > 99.9%). In addition, 1.5 kt of CO2 from the pilot capture facility "Schwarze Pumpe" (power plant CO2 with purity > 99.7%) was injected in 2011. During regular operation, the CO2 was pre-heated on-site to 45°C before injection in order to avoid pressure build-up within the reservoir. During the final months of injection a "cold-injection" experiment with a stepwise decrease of the injection temperature down to 10°C was conducted between March and July 2013. In summer 2013, the injection of a mixture of 95% CO2 and 5% N2 was also tested. After ceasing the injection in August the injection facility and pipeline were removed in December 2013. Geological storage of CO2 at the Ketzin pilot site has so far proceeded in a safe and reliable manner. As a result of one of the most comprehensive R&D programs worldwide, a combination of different geochemical and geophysical monitoring methods is able to detect even small quantities of CO2 and map their spatial extent. After the cessation of CO2 injection a series of activities and further investigations are involved in the post-closure phase. The aim is that Ketzin will for the first time ever close the complete life-time cycle of a CO2 storage site at pilot scale. The five wells (1 injection/observation well, 4 pure observation wells) will be successively abandoned within the next few years while monitoring is continuing. The partial plugging of one observation well in the reservoir section was already completed in fall 2013. The new four-years project COMPLETE (CO2 post-injection monitoring and post-closure phase at

  7. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the period October 2000-October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Tobiason

    2002-02-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Injection Well during the October 2000 to October 2001 period. The U-3fi Injection Well is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. Inspections of the Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste disposal unit closure. The objective of the neutron-logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-ft) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) or to detect changes that may be indicative of subsidence within the disposal unit itself.

  8. Validation of a physically based catchment model for application in post-closure radiological safety assessments of deep geological repositories for solid radioactive wastes.

    PubMed

    Thorne, M C; Degnan, P; Ewen, J; Parkin, G

    2000-12-01

    The physically based river catchment modelling system SHETRAN incorporates components representing water flow, sediment transport and radionuclide transport both in solution and bound to sediments. The system has been applied to simulate hypothetical future catchments in the context of post-closure radiological safety assessments of a potential site for a deep geological disposal facility for intermediate and certain low-level radioactive wastes at Sellafield, west Cumbria. In order to have confidence in the application of SHETRAN for this purpose, various blind validation studies have been undertaken. In earlier studies, the validation was undertaken against uncertainty bounds in model output predictions set by the modelling team on the basis of how well they expected the model to perform. However, validation can also be carried out with bounds set on the basis of how well the model is required to perform in order to constitute a useful assessment tool. Herein, such an assessment-based validation exercise is reported. This exercise related to a field plot experiment conducted at Calder Hollow, west Cumbria, in which the migration of strontium and lanthanum in subsurface Quaternary deposits was studied on a length scale of a few metres. Blind predictions of tracer migration were compared with experimental results using bounds set by a small group of assessment experts independent of the modelling team. Overall, the SHETRAN system performed well, failing only two out of seven of the imposed tests. Furthermore, of the five tests that were not failed, three were positively passed even when a pessimistic view was taken as to how measurement errors should be taken into account. It is concluded that the SHETRAN system, which is still being developed further, is a powerful tool for application in post-closure radiological safety assessments.

  9. Approach for addressing dioxin in soils at CERCLA and RCRA sites. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-13

    The purpose of this Directive is to recommend preliminary remediation goals (PRGs) or starting points for setting cleanup levels for dioxin in soil at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action sites. These recommended levels are to be used pending the release of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) comprehensive dioxin reassessment report and cross-program assessment of the impacts of the report.

  10. RCRA Part A permit characterization plan for the U-2bu subsidence crater. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This plan presents the characterization strategy for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 109, U-2bu Subsidence Crater (referred to as U-2bu) in Area 2 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The objective of the planned activities is to obtain sufficient characterization data for the crater soils and observed wastes under the conditions of the current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A permit. The scope of the characterization plan includes collecting surface and subsurface soil samples with hand augers and for the purpose of site characterization. The sampling strategy is to characterize the study area soils and look for RCRA constituents. Observable waste soils and surrounding crater soils will be analyzed and evaluated according to RCRA closure criteria. Because of the status of the crater a RCRA Part A permit site, acquired radionuclide analyses will only be evaluated in regards to the health and safety of site workers and the disposition of wastes generated during site characterization. The U-2bu Subsidence Crater was created in 1971 by a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground nuclear test, event name Miniata, and was used as a land-disposal unit for radioactive and hazardous waste from 1973 to 1988.

  11. RCRA groundwater monitoring data. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between April and June 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the April through June quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  12. SALTSTONE BATCH 0 TCLP RCRA METAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A

    2007-06-14

    A saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material. After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  13. RCRA closure of mixed waste impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, F.J.; Greengard, T.C.; Arndt, M.B.

    1989-11-01

    A case study of a RCRA closure action at the Rocky Flats Plant is presented. Closure of the solar evaporation ponds involves removal and immobilization of a mixed hazardous/radioactive sludge, treatment of impounded water, groundwater monitoring, plume delineation, and collection and treatment of contaminated groundwater. The site closure is described within the context of regulatory negotiations, project schedules, risk assessment, clean versus dirty closure, cleanup levels, and approval of closure plans and reports. Lessons learned at Rocky Flats are summarized.

  14. RCRA/UST, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste identification (40 CFR part 261) updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This module introduces a specific hazardous waste identification process, which involves asking and analyzing a series of questions about any waste being evaluated. Analyzes in detail the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of hazardous waste. It explains the following concepts that are essential to identifying a RCRA hazardous waste: hazardous waste listing, hazardous waste characteristics, the mixture and derived-from rules, the contained-in policy, and the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule (HWIR).

  15. Post Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 Waste Management Division U-3ax/bl Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D. F. Emer

    2002-08-01

    This inspection and monitoring report has been prepared for the Area 3 Waste Management Division (WMD) U-3ax/bl Crater Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110 in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. This inspection and monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110, located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. This report is the first post-closure report on the Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater, and covers the period January 2001 to June 2002. Inspections of the Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater cover area are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the cover, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit cover. The objective of the soil moisture monitoring program is to monitor the stability of soil moisture conditions within the upper 2.4 meters (m) (8 feet [ft]) of the cover and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement exceeding the design's performance expectations.

  16. Observation and Responses to Post-Closure Instances of Localized Instability and Subsidence at the DOE Legacy Management Rocky Flats Site, Colorado-13052

    SciTech Connect

    DiSalvo, Rick; Darr, Bob; Boylan, John; Surovchak, Scott

    2013-07-01

    The former Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado began operations as part of the nation's nuclear weapons complex in the early 1950's. By the 1980's the associated heavily industrialized area covered approximately 1.2 km{sup 2} (300 acres) and was surrounded by an approximately 25.3 km{sup 2} (6,245 acre) security buffer zone. The federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priority List in 1989. To complete closure, all buildings and other structures that composed the Rocky Flats industrial complex were removed from the surface, but remnants remain in the subsurface. Contouring and grading to return the surface to approximate conditions that were present prior to the plant's construction was completed in 2005. A goal of the final land configuration was to provide long-term surface and subsurface land stability. Several instances of localized surface subsidence or instability have occurred since the final configuration. The localized nature and the relatively small areas of observed subsidence and instability indicate that, overall, the final configuration is performing well, but responses to these occurrences and the observations that followed may be useful in planning for the closure and designing the final land configuration and post-closure monitoring at other sites. (authors)

  17. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA; NNSA NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-04-01

    This post-closure inspection and monitoring report has been prepared according to the stipulations laid out in the Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA)--Surface (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV], 2001), and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This report provides an analysis and summary of site inspections, subsidence surveys, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data for CAU 417, which is located in Hot Creek Valley, Nye County, Nevada. This report covers Calendar Year 2004. Inspections at CAU 417 are conducted quarterly to document the physical condition of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 soil covers, monuments, signs, fencing, and use restricted areas. The physical condition of fencing, monuments, and signs is noted, and any unusual conditions that could impact the integrity of the covers are reported. The objective of the soil moisture monitoring program is to monitor the stability of soil moisture conditions within the upper 1.2 meters (m) (4 feet [ft]) of the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) cover and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement exceeding the cover design performance expectations.

  18. Selective removal/recovery of RCRA metals from waste and process solutions using polymer filtration{trademark} technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.

    1997-10-01

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals are found in a number of process and waste streams at many DOE, U.S. Department of Defense, and industrial facilities. RCRA metals consist principally of chromium, mercury, cadmium, lead, and silver. Arsenic and selenium, which form oxyanions, are also considered RCRA elements. Discharge limits for each of these metals are based on toxicity and dictated by state and federal regulations (e.g., drinking water, RCRA, etc.). RCRA metals are used in many current operations, are generated in decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations, and are also present in old process wastes that require treatment and stabilization. These metals can exist in solutions, as part of sludges, or as contaminants on soils or solid surfaces, as individual metals or as mixtures with other metals, mixtures with radioactive metals such as actinides (defined as mixed waste), or as mixtures with a variety of inert metals such as calcium and sodium. The authors have successfully completed a preliminary proof-of-principle evaluation of Polymer Filtration{trademark} (PF) technology for the dissolution of metallic mercury and have also shown that they can remove and concentrate RCRA metals from dilute solutions for a variety of aqueous solution types using PF technology. Another application successfully demonstrated is the dilute metal removal of americium and plutonium from process streams. This application was used to remove the total alpha contamination to below 30 pCi/L for the wastewater treatment plant at TA-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and from nitric acid distillate in the acid recovery process at TA-55, the Plutonium Facility at LANL (ESP-CP TTP AL16C322). This project will develop and optimize the PF technology for specific DOE process streams containing RCRA metals and coordinate it with the needs of the commercial sector to ensure that technology transfer occurs.

  19. Glossary of CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms and acronyms. Environmental Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This glossary contains CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms that are most often encountered in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Emergency Preparedness activities. Detailed definitions are included for key terms. The CERCLA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended and related federal rulemakings. The RCRA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and related federal rulemakings. The TSCA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA) and related federal rulemakings. Definitions related to TSCA are limited to those sections in the statute and regulations concerning PCBs and asbestos.Other sources for definitions include additional federal rulemakings, assorted guidance documents prepared by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), guidance and informational documents prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and DOE Orders. The source of each term is noted beside the term. Terms presented in this document reflect revised and new definitions published before July 1, 1993.

  20. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-06-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted.

  1. Submittal of Final Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Unit 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0, December 2007

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-01-31

    This letter serves as the post-closure monitoring letter report for the above Corrective Action Unit (CAU) for calendar year 2007. CAU 91 is inspected every six months. The first inspection was conducted on March 29,2007, and the second inspection was conducted on September 27, 2007. Vegetation growth around the edge of the aboveground monument concrete pad was observed during the March inspection. This vegetation was removed on May 24,2007. All access roads, fences, gates, and signs were in excellent condition. No settling, cracking, or erosion was observed on the cover, and the use restriction had been maintained. No issues were identified, and no corrective actions were needed as a result of the September inspection. The post-closure inspection checklists for CAU 91 are attached. Photographs and field notes taken during site inspections are maintained in the project files.

  2. 76 FR 76158 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; RCRA Expanded...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; RCRA Expanded... approved Information Collection Request (ICR) concerning RCRA public participation. This ICR is scheduled... Docket ID No. EPA-HQ- RCRA-2011-0890, by one of the following methods:...

  3. Potential for post-closure radionuclide redistribution due to biotic intrusion: aboveground biomass, litter production rates, and the distribution of root mass with depth at material disposal area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    French, Sean B; Christensen, Candace; Jennings, Terry L; Jaros, Christopher L; Wykoff, David S; Crowell, Kelly J; Shuman, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) is disposed of at LANL's Technical Area (T A) 54, Material Disposal Area (MDA) G. The ability of MDA G to safely contain radioactive waste during current and post-closure operations is evaluated as part of the facility's ongoing performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA). Due to the potential for uptake and incorporation of radio nuclides into aboveground plant material, the PA and CA project that plant roots penetrating into buried waste may lead to releases of radionuclides into the accessible environment. The potential amount ofcontamination deposited on the ground surface due to plant intrusion into buried waste is a function of the quantity of litter generated by plants, as well as radionuclide concentrations within the litter. Radionuclide concentrations in plant litter is dependent on the distribution of root mass with depth and the efficiency with which radionuclides are extracted from contaminated soils by the plant's roots. In order to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G, surveys are being conducted to assess aboveground biomass, plant litter production rates, and root mass with depth for the four prominent vegetation types (grasses, forbs, shrubs and trees). The collection of aboveground biomass for grasses and forbs began in 2007. Additional sampling was conducted in October 2008 to measure root mass with depth and to collect additional aboveground biomass data for the types of grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees that may become established at MDA G after the facility undergoes final closure, Biomass data will be used to estimate the future potential mass of contaminated plant litter fall, which could act as a latent conduit for radionuclide transport from the closed disposal area. Data collected are expected to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G and ultimately aid in the assessment and subsequent

  4. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA state programs updated June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The module outlines the requirements and procedures for a state to become authorized to manage and oversee its own RCRA program. It also describes how the state authorization system can affect the applicability of certain rules. When one has completed the module they will be familiar with the state authorization process for hazardous waste management programs.

  5. Historical development and evolution of EPRI's post-closure dose assessment of potential releases to the biosphere from the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham; Kozak, Matthew W

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes the development and evolution of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) post-closure dose assessment for potential releases of radionuclides from the proposed High Level Waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The starting point for this work was the 1995 publication of Technical Bases for Yucca Mountain Standards by the Commission on Geosciences, Environment and Resources of the National Research Council. This report proposed the development and application of an individual risk-based standard for releases from the repository to replace the existing one, which was based on radionuclide release limits. This in turn implied the development and application of methods to assess radiation doses to humans. Accordingly, EPRI produced a methodology for such dose assessment as part of its Total System Performance Assessment program for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. The methodology initially addressed releases via groundwater and then releases associated with extrusive igneous events. The methodology was updated and applied over the following years to take account of regulatory developments, changes in estimates of the source term to the biosphere, peer review through international model comparison exercises, new site generic data, and new data concerning conditions at the point of compliance in Amargosa Valley. The main outputs were Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors, which relate radionuclide levels in environmental media to the annual individual doses to a member of a hypothetical critical group and to the regulator-defined Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual. Most recently, consideration has been given to uncertainty in the dose estimates based on a probabilistic analysis. The paper provides a perspective on the evolution of the dose assessments in response to the developments listed above. PMID:22048489

  6. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2006-08-01

    This report provides a summary and analysis of visual site inspections and soil gas sampling results for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 342, Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit. CAU 342 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 and consists of Corrective Action Site 23-56-01, Former Mercury Fire Training Pit. This report covers calendar years 2004 and 2005. Visual site inspections were conducted on May 20 and November 14, 2004, and May 17 and November 15, 2005. No significant findings were observed during these inspections. The site was in good condition, and no repair activities were required. Soil gas samples were collected on November 29, 2005, for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and samples were collected on December 1, 2005, for analysis of base gases. Base gas concentrations in the monitoring well show a high concentration of carbon dioxide and a low concentration of oxygen, which is an indication of biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the soil. Results for VOCs and SVOCs are unchanged, with VOCs below or near laboratory method detection limits and no SVOCs detected above laboratory method detection limits. Post-closure monitoring was required for six years after closure of the site. Therefore, since 2005 was the sixth year of monitoring, the effectiveness of natural attenuation of the TPH-impacted soil by biodegradation was evaluated. The base gas concentrations indicate that biodegradation of TPH in the soil is occurring; therefore, it is recommended that monitoring be discontinued. Visual site inspections should continue to be performed biannually to ensure that the signs are in place and readable and that the use restriction has been maintained. The results of the site inspections will be documented in a letter report and submitted annually.

  7. Historical development and evolution of EPRI's post-closure dose assessment of potential releases to the biosphere from the proposed HLW repository at Yucca Mountain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham; Kozak, Matthew W

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes the development and evolution of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) post-closure dose assessment for potential releases of radionuclides from the proposed High Level Waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The starting point for this work was the 1995 publication of Technical Bases for Yucca Mountain Standards by the Commission on Geosciences, Environment and Resources of the National Research Council. This report proposed the development and application of an individual risk-based standard for releases from the repository to replace the existing one, which was based on radionuclide release limits. This in turn implied the development and application of methods to assess radiation doses to humans. Accordingly, EPRI produced a methodology for such dose assessment as part of its Total System Performance Assessment program for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. The methodology initially addressed releases via groundwater and then releases associated with extrusive igneous events. The methodology was updated and applied over the following years to take account of regulatory developments, changes in estimates of the source term to the biosphere, peer review through international model comparison exercises, new site generic data, and new data concerning conditions at the point of compliance in Amargosa Valley. The main outputs were Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors, which relate radionuclide levels in environmental media to the annual individual doses to a member of a hypothetical critical group and to the regulator-defined Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual. Most recently, consideration has been given to uncertainty in the dose estimates based on a probabilistic analysis. The paper provides a perspective on the evolution of the dose assessments in response to the developments listed above.

  8. SACM and the RCRA stabilization initiative: Similarities of principles and applicability

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) provide standards for the remediation of environmental media contaminated with hazardous substances or hazardous waste, respectively. In both cases, prior to the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) development of the two subject reform initiatives, existing formal processes specified the level of site investigation required, the process for reaching a decision on the method of remediation, public participation in the decision process, and enforcement authorities that include orders and schedules of compliance. Traditionally, implementation of these processes has resulted in a great amount of time, effort, and money being expended before actual remediation began. Following criticism from the public and the regulated community, the EPA has proposed streamlining reforms for hazardous waste site cleanup under both CERCLA and RCRA that will begin remediation sooner with lower costs. The purpose of this Information Brief is to discuss the common goals, processes, and strategies of the Superfund Accelerated Cleanup Model (SACM) and the RCRA Stabilization Initiative.

  9. RCRA enforcement policy compendium. Volumes 1, 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The compendium is a compilation of documents originated by the Office of Waste Programs Enforcement, RCRA Enforcement Division. Documents contained in the compendium were issued after 1980 and are related to RCRA Enforcement. The compendium also consists of documents originated by the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response, Office of Enforcement, and Office of Solid Waste.

  10. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period July 1, 1991 through September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and 40 CFR 265, Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (EPA 1989). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303 (Ecology 1991). This submittal provides data obtained from groundwater monitoring activities for July 1, 1991 through September 30, 1991. This report contains groundwater monitoring data from Hanford Site groundwater projects. A RCRA network is currently being established at the 100-D Pond. Groundwater chemistry analyses have not yet been performed.

  11. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 pond RCRA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D.B.; Chou, C.J.

    1998-06-01

    The 216-B-3 pond system was a series of ponds for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation since 1945, the B Pond system has been a RCRA facility since 1986, with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994, discharges were diverted from the main pond, where the greatest potential for contamination was thought to reside, to the 3C expansion pond. In 1997, all discharges to the pond system were discontinued. In 1990, the B Pond system was elevated from detection groundwater monitoring to an assessment-level status because total organic halogens and total organic carbon were found to exceed critical means in two wells. Subsequent groundwater quality assessment failed to find any specific hazardous waste contaminant that could have accounted for the exceedances, which were largely isolated in occurrence. Thus, it was recommended that the facility be returned to detection-level monitoring.

  12. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1301-N, 1324-N/NA, and 1325-N RCRA Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2002-06-08

    The 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, the 1324-N Surface Impoundment, and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100 N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The closure plans for these facilities stipulate that groundwater is monitored according to the 100-N Pilot Project: Proposed Consolidated Groundwater Monitoring Program (BHI-00725). This document supplements the consolidated plan by providing information on sampling and analysis protocols, quality assurance, data management, and a conceptual model for the RCRA sites. Monitoring well networks, constituents, and sampling frequency remain the same as in the consolidated plan or the previous groundwater monitoring plan (Hartman 1996).

  13. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This quarterly report contains data received between January and March 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported. Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment.

  14. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) waste oversight: Lead

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Historically, in the nuclear industry, water, concrete, steel, and lead have been common materials used for radiation shielding purposes. Lead, a high-density material, is a very effective shield for gamma radiation and has been utilized extensively at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in association with radioisotope production and nuclear research. During these activities, lead became an inherent part of the radioactive waste and was disposed of in massive quantities by land burial.

  15. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2006-08-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report (PCIMR) provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 WMD [Waste Management Division] U-3ax/bl Crater. This PCIMR includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110, for the annual period July 2005 through June 2006. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, cover vegetation, perimeter fence, and UR warning signs was good. Settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VILB.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW009 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2000). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (6 inches) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection. Along the east edge of the cover (repaired previously in August 2003, December 2003, May 2004, October 2004), an area of settling was observed during the December 2005 inspection to again be above the action level, and required repair. This area and two other areas of settling on the cover that were first observed during the December 2005 inspection were repaired in February 2006. The semiannual subsidence surveys were done in September 2005 and March 2006. No significant subsidence was observed in the survey data. Monument 5 shows the greatest amount of subsidence (-0.015 m [-0.05 ft] compared to the baseline survey of 2000). This amount is negligible and near the resolution of the survey instruments; it does not indicate that subsidence is occurring on the cover. Soil moisture results obtained to date indicate that the CAU 110 cover is performing as expected. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) data indicated an increase in soil moisture (1

  16. Soil radium, soil gas radon and indoor radon empirical relationships to assist in post-closure impact assessment related to near-surface radioactive waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Cave, M R; Miles, J C H; Sumerling, T J

    2011-03-01

    Least squares (LS), Theil's (TS) and weighted total least squares (WTLS) regression analysis methods are used to develop empirical relationships between radium in the ground, radon in soil and radon in dwellings to assist in the post-closure assessment of indoor radon related to near-surface radioactive waste disposal at the Low Level Waste Repository in England. The data sets used are (i) estimated ²²⁶Ra in the < 2 mm fraction of topsoils (eRa226) derived from equivalent uranium (eU) from airborne gamma spectrometry data, (ii) eRa226 derived from measurements of uranium in soil geochemical samples, (iii) soil gas radon and (iv) indoor radon data. For models comparing indoor radon and (i) eRa226 derived from airborne eU data and (ii) soil gas radon data, some of the geological groupings have significant slopes. For these groupings there is reasonable agreement in slope and intercept between the three regression analysis methods (LS, TS and WTLS). Relationships between radon in dwellings and radium in the ground or radon in soil differ depending on the characteristics of the underlying geological units, with more permeable units having steeper slopes and higher indoor radon concentrations for a given radium or soil gas radon concentration in the ground. The regression models comparing indoor radon with soil gas radon have intercepts close to 5 Bq m⁻³ whilst the intercepts for those comparing indoor radon with eRa226 from airborne eU vary from about 20 Bq m⁻³ for a moderately permeable geological unit to about 40 Bq m⁻³ for highly permeable limestone, implying unrealistically high contributions to indoor radon from sources other than the ground. An intercept value of 5 Bq m⁻³ is assumed as an appropriate mean value for the UK for sources of indoor radon other than radon from the ground, based on examination of UK data. Comparison with published data used to derive an average indoor radon: soil ²²⁶Ra ratio shows that whereas the published data are

  17. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA enforcement and compliance updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The module describes enforcement procedures and cites the statutory authority and describes the two different types of enforcement (i.e., administrative and judicial). It explains when and how EPA can enforce the RCRA regulations in authorized states. It describes the enforcement mechanisms available to EPA. It states the differences between enforcement at interim status and permitted facilities. It describes enforcement at federal facilities and identifies relevant resource documents.

  18. Guidance document publications list - Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document provides a listing of Guidance Documents from the RCRA/CERCLA Division for August 1995. Documents are listed under the following categories: RCRA Guidance Manuals; RCRA Information Briefs; CERCLA Guidance Manuals; CERCLA Regulatory Bulletins; RCRA/CERCLA Guidance Manuals; TSCA Guidance Manuals; TSCA Information Briefs; and, Cross Cut Manuals.

  19. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jungers, D.K.

    1994-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between November 20 and February 25, 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  20. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1 through December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and {open_quotes}Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities{close_quotes} (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 265), as amended. Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. The location of each facility is shown. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between October and December 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  1. Results of RCRA groundwater quality assessment at the 216-B-3 Pond Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D.B.; Teel, S.S.

    1997-06-01

    This document describes a groundwater quality assessment of the 216-B-3 pond system, a Resources Conservation and Recovery act of 1976 (RCRA) waste facility. In 1990, sampling and chemical analysis of groundwater underlying the facility indicated that the contamination indicator parameters, total organic halogens (TOX), and total organic carbon (TOC) had exceeded established limits in two wells. This discovery placed the facility into RCRA groundwater assessment status and subsequently led to a more detailed hydrochemical analysis of groundwater underlying the facility. Comprehensive chemical analyses of groundwater samples from 1994 through 1996 revealed one compound, tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TRIS2CH), that may have contributed to elevated TOX concentrations. No compound was identified as a contributor to TOC. Detailed evaluations of TOX, TOC, and TRIS2CH and comparison of occurrences of these parameters led to conclusions that (1) with few exceptions, these constituents occur at low concentrations below or near limits of quantitation; (2) it is problematic whether the low concentrations of TRIS2CH represent a contaminant originating from the facility or if it is a product of well construction; and (3) given the low and diminishing concentration of TOX, TOC, and TRIS2CH, no further investigation into the occurrent of these constituents is justified. Continued groundwater monitoring should include an immediate recalculation of background critical means of upgradient/downgradient comparisons and a return to seminannual groundwater monitoring under a RCRA indicator parameter evaluation program.

  2. The Integration of the 241-Z Building Decontamination and Decommissioning Under Cercla with RCRA Closure at the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mattlin, E.; Charboneau, S.; Johnston, G.; Hopkins, A.; Bloom, R.; Skeels, B.; Klos, D.B.

    2007-07-01

    The 241-Z treatment and storage tanks, a hazardous waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (TSD) unit permitted pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act, RCW 70.105, , have been deactivated and are being actively decommissioned under the provisions of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO), RCRA and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq. The 241-Z TSD unit managed non-listed radioactive contaminated waste water, containing trace RCRA characteristic constituents. The 241-Z TSD unit consists of below grade tanks (D-4, D-5, D-7, D-8, and an overflow tank) located in a concrete containment vault, sample glovebox GB-2-241-ZA, and associated ancillary piping and equipment. The tank system is located beneath the 241-Z building. The 241-Z building is not a portion of the TSD unit. The sample glovebox is housed in the above-grade building. Waste managed at the TSD unit was received via underground piping from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sources. Tank D-6, located in the D-6 vault cell, is a past-practice tank that was taken out of service in 1972 and has never operated as a portion of the RCRA TSD unit. CERCLA actions will address Tank D-6, its containment vault cell, and soil beneath the cell that was potentially contaminated during past-practice operations and any other potential past-practice contamination identified during 241-Z closure, while outside the scope of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan, 241-Z Treatment and Storage Tanks. Under the RCRA closure plan, the 241-Z TSD unit is anticipated to undergo clean closure to the performance standards of the State of Washington with respect to dangerous waste contamination from RCRA operations. The TSD unit will be clean closed if physical closure activities identified in the plan achieve clean closure standards for all 241-Z

  3. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the CPP-602 Laboratory Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho Cleanup Project

    2009-09-30

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure (HWMA/RCRA) Plan for the CPP-602 laboratory lines was developed to meet the tank system closure requirements of the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.008 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 264, Subpart G. CPP-602 is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The lines in CPP-602 were part of a liquid hazardous waste collection system included in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Liquid Waste Management System Permit. The laboratory lines discharged to the Deep Tanks System in CPP-601 that is currently being closed under a separate closure plan. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards. The closure approach for the CPP-602 laboratory lines is to remove the lines, components, and contaminants to the extent practicable. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Site CPP-117 includes the CPP-602 waste trench and the area beneath the basement floor where waste lines are direct-buried. Upon completion of rinsing or mopping to remove contamination to the extent practicable from the waste trench and rinsing the intact buried lines (i.e., stainless steel sections), these areas will be managed as part of CERCLA Site CPP-117 and will not be subject to further HWMA/RCRA closure activities. The CPP-602 building is being decontaminated and decommissioned under CERCLA as a non-time critical removal action in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement/Consent Order. As such, all waste generated by this CERCLA action, including closure-generated waste, will be managed in coordination with that CERCLA action in substantive compliance with HWMA/RCRA regulations. All waste will be subject to a hazardous waste determination for the purpose of supporting appropriate management and will be managed in accordance

  4. Requirements for satellite accumulation areas. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J.

    1993-07-01

    In 1980, EPA promulgated hazardous waste management regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which included standard for generators of hazardous waste. With respect to storage of hazardous waste on-site by generators, these regulations originally made no distinction between the initial accumulation of hazardous waste at various points of generation (i.e., ``satellite`` accumulation) and storage at locations where hazardous waste is consolidated for on-site management or transportation off-site. EPA amended the hazardous waste generator regulations on December 20, 1984, to allow generators to store hazardous waste in satellite areas as long as certain conditions were met. State programs, however, do not have to allow for the accumulation of hazardous waste in satellite areas or may have more stringent requirements for these waste accumulation areas. A satellite accumulation area is a storage location at or near any point of generation where hazardous wastes initially accumulate, which is under the control of the operator of the process generating the waste. Wastes stored in these areas are subject to regulatory requirements that are less stringent than requirements applicable to hazardous wastes stored in permitted, interim status, or 90-day storage areas meeting the applicable provisions of 40 CFR 264, 265, or 262.34(a), respectively.

  5. General requirements for RCRA regulated hazardous waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended, requires that tanks used for the storage or treatment of hazardous waste (HazW) be permitted, and comply with the requirements contained within the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) TItle 40 in Subpart J of Part 264/265, unless those tanks have been exempted. Subpart J specifies requirements for the design, construction, installation, operation, inspection, maintenance, repair, release, response, and closure of HazW tanks. Also, the regulations make a distinction between new and existing tanks. Effective December 6, 1995, standards for controlling volatile organic air emissions will apply to non-exempt HazW tanks. HazW tanks will have to be equipped with a cover or floating roof, or be designed to operate as a closed system, to be in compliance with the air emission control requirements. This information brief describes those tanks that are subject to the Subpart J requirements, and will also discuss secondary containment, inspection, restrictions on waste storage, release response, and closure requirements associated with regulated HazW tanks.

  6. Conducting RCRA inspections at mixed-waste facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, E.

    1991-07-01

    The document gives an overview of the regulation of radioactive mixed waste and provides RCRA inspectors with information on radiation, health physics, and training and access requirements for inspections of mixed waste facilities.

  7. RCRA implementation plan (RIP): Fiscal years 1996--1997

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The report defines the national policy and strategic goals and priority activities for the RCRA solid and hazardous waste program. Includes both changes and clarifications to the fiscal year 1994 RCRA implementation plan and the fiscal year 1995 addendum. It provides additional guidance in waste minimization, corrective action, state grants, beginning of the year plans, Indian programs, environmental justice, information management, state authorization, permitting/closure, and subtitle D activities.

  8. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Groundwater monitoring (40 cfr parts 264/265, subpart f) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The module presents the requirements for groundwater monitoring at interim status and permitted treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The goal of the module is to explain the standards and specific requirements for groundwater monitoring programs at interim status and permitted facilities.

  9. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005

    SciTech Connect

    2006-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit and 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits 9, an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action. Quarterly post-closure inspections are performed at the CASs that were closed in place at UC-I, UC-3, and UC-4. During calendar year 2005, site inspections were performed on March 15, June 16, September 22, and December 7. The inspections conducted at the UC-1 CMP documented that the site was in good condition and continued to show integrity of the cover unit. No new cracks or fractures were observed until the December inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover showed evidence of lateral expansion; however, it is not at an actionable level. The crack will be sealed by filling with

  10. EVOLUTION OF CHEMICAL CONDITIONS AND ESTIMATED SOLUBILITY CONTROLS ON RADIONUCLIDES IN THE RESIDUAL WASTE LAYER DURING POST-CLOSURE AGING OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, M.; Millings, M.

    2012-08-28

    This document provides information specific to H-Area waste tanks that enables a flow and transport model with limited chemical capabilities to account for varying waste release from the tanks through time. The basis for varying waste release is solubilities of radionuclides that change as pore fluids passing through the waste change in composition. Pore fluid compositions in various stages were generated by simulations of tank grout degradation. The first part of the document describes simulations of the degradation of the reducing grout in post-closure tanks. These simulations assume flow is predominantly through a water saturated porous medium. The infiltrating fluid that reacts with the grout is assumed to be fluid that has passed through the closure cap and into the tank. The results are three stages of degradation referred to as Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. A reaction path model was used so that the transitions between each stage are noted by numbers of pore volumes of infiltrating fluid reacted. The number of pore volumes to each transition can then be converted to time within a flow and transport model. The bottoms of some tanks in H-Area are below the water table requiring a different conceptual model for grout degradation. For these simulations the reacting fluid was assumed to be 10% infiltrate through the closure cap and 90% groundwater. These simulations produce an additional four pore fluid compositions referred to as Conditions A through D and were intended to simulate varying degrees of groundwater influence. The most probable degradation path for the submerged tanks is Condition C to Condition D to Oxidized Region III and eventually to Condition A. Solubilities for Condition A are estimated in the text for use in sensitivity analyses if needed. However, the grout degradation simulations did not include sufficient pore volumes of infiltrating fluid for the grout to evolve to Condition A. Solubility controls for use

  11. An example of system integration for RCRA policy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.; Goeltz, R. ); Schmidt, K. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of various computer technologies and software systems used on a project to estimate the costs of remediating Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) that fall under the corrective action provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The project used two databases collected by Research Triangle Institute (RTI) that contain information on SWMUs and a PC-based software system called CORA that develops cost estimates for remediating SWMUs. The project team developed rules to categorize every SWMU in the databases by the kinds of technologies required to clean them up. These results were input into CORA, which estimated costs associated with the technologies. Early on, several computing challenges presented themselves. First, the databases have several hundred thousand records each. Second, the categorization rules could not be written to cover all combinations of variables. Third, CORA is run interactively and the analysis plan called for running CORA tens of thousands of times. Fourth, large data transfers needed to take place between RTI and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Solutions to these problems required systems integration. SWMU categorization was streamlined by using INTERNET as was the data transfer. SAS was used to create files used by a program called SuperKey that was used to run CORA. Because the analysis plan required the generation of hundreds of thousands of cost estimates, memory management software was needed to allow the portable IBM P70 to do the job. During the course of the project, several other software packages were used, including: SAS System for Personal Computers (SAS/PC), DBase III, LOTUS 1-2-3, PIZAZZ PLUS, LOTUS Freelance Plus, and Word Perfect. Only the comprehensive use of all available hardware and software resources allowed this project to be completed within the time and budget constraints. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. RCRA implementation plan: Fiscal year 1995: Addendum containing changes, clarifications, or additions to FY 1994 rip

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    The report provides additional information to supplement the `RCRA implementation plan: fiscal year 1994`. It describes the objectives and priorities EPA has set for the RCRA program. It also discusses waste minimization, environmental justice, corrective action, and biennial reporting.

  13. The WIPP RCRA Part B permit application for TRU mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.E.; Snider, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    In August 1993, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) issued a draft permit for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to begin experiments with transuranic (TRU) mixed waste. Subsequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to cancel the on-site test program, opting instead for laboratory testing. The Secretary of the NMED withdrew the draft permit in 1994, ordering the State`s Hazardous and Radioactive Waste Bureau to work with the DOE on submittal of a revised permit application. Revision 5 of the WIPP`s Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application was submitted to the NMED in May 1995, focusing on disposal of 175,600 m{sup 3} of TRU mixed waste over a 25 year span plus ten years for closure. A key portion of the application, the Waste Analysis Plan, shifted from requirements to characterize a relatively small volume of TRU mixed waste for on-site experiments, to describing a complete program that would apply to all DOE TRU waste generating facilities and meet the appropriate RCRA regulations. Waste characterization will be conducted on a waste stream basis, fitting into three broad categories: (1) homogeneous solids, (2) soil/gravel, and (3) debris wastes. Techniques used include radiography, visually examining waste from opened containers, radioassay, headspace gas sampling, physical sampling and analysis of homogeneous wastes, and review of documented acceptable knowledge. Acceptable knowledge of the original organics and metals used, and the operations that generated these waste streams is sufficient in most cases to determine if the waste has toxicity characteristics, hazardous constituents, polychlorinated biphenyls (PBCs), or RCRA regulated metals.

  14. Self-assembled monolayers on mosoporous supports (SAMMS) for RCRA metal removal

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiangdong; Liu, Jun; Fryxell, G.

    1997-10-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area has declared mercury removal and stabilization as the first and fourth priorities among 30 prioritized deficiencies. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal and mercury removal has also been identified as a high priority at DOE sites such as Albuquerque, Idaho Falls, Oak Ridge, Hanford, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River. Under this task, a proprietary new technology, Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports (SAMMS), for RCRA metal ion removal from aqueous wastewater and mercury removal from organic wastes such as vacuum pump oils is being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The six key features of the SAMMS technology are (1) large surface area (>900 m{sup 2}/g) of the mesoporous oxides (SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}) ensures high capacity for metal loading (more than 1 g Hg/g SAMMS); (2) molecular recognition of the interfacial functional groups ensures the high affinity and selectivity for heavy metals without interference from other abundant cations (such as calcium and iron) in wastewater; (3) suitability for removal of mercury from both aqueous wastes and organic wastes; (4) the Hg-laden SAMMS not only pass TCLP tests, but also have good long-term durability as a waste form because the covalent binding between mercury and SAMMS has good resistance to ion exchange, oxidation, and hydrolysis; (5) the uniform and small pore size (2 to 40 nm) of the mesoporous silica prevents bacteria (>2000 nm) from solubilizing the bound mercury; and (6) SAMMS can also be used for RCRA metal removal from gaseous mercury waste, sludge, sediment, and soil.

  15. Monitoring Plan for RCRA Groundwater Assessment at the 216-U-12 Crib

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2005-09-20

    This document contains a revised and updated monitoring plan for RCRA interim status groundwater assessment, site hydrogeology, and a conceptual model of the RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal unit. Monitoring under interim status is expected to continue until the 216-U-12 crib is incorporated as a chapter into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit or administratively closed as proposed to EPA and Ecology.

  16. 40 CFR 124.19 - Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING General Program Requirements § 124.19 Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD Permits. (a) Within 30 days after a RCRA, UIC, NPDES, or PSD final permit decision (or...

  17. 40 CFR 124.19 - Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING General Program Requirements § 124.19 Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD Permits. (a) Within 30 days after a RCRA, UIC, NPDES, or PSD final permit decision (or...

  18. 40 CFR 124.19 - Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD Permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING General Program Requirements § 124.19 Appeal of RCRA, UIC, NPDES, and PSD Permits. (a) Within 30 days after a RCRA, UIC, NPDES, or PSD final permit decision (or...

  19. Submittal of Final Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Unit 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0, December 2007; DOE/NV--1103

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-01-30

    This letter serves as the post-closure monitoring letter report for the above Corrective Action Unit (CAU) for the period October 2006-September 2007. Quarterly inspections were conducted on December 20,2006; March 29,2007; June 13,2007; and September 27, 2007, to observe the condition of the gate, use restriction warning signs, monuments, fencing, trenches, soil covers, and monitoring well covers. The first inspection was conducted on December 20,2006. Signs, fencing, riprap, monuments, and monitoring well covers were in excellent condition. No cracking, erosion, or subsidence was observed on the covers. No issues or concerns were identified, and no corrective actions were recommended. The second inspection was conducted on March 29,2007. Signs, fencing, riprap, monuments, and monitoring well covers were in excellent condition. No cracking, erosion, or subsidence was observed on the covers. Vegetation that was observed to be growing in several locations on the cover was the only identified concern, for which removal was recommended. Vegetation was removed on May 24,2007. The third inspection was conducted on June 13,2007. Signs, fencing, riprap, monuments, and monitoring well covers were in excellent condition. No cracking, erosion, or subsidence was observed on the covers. No issues or concerns were identified, and no corrective actions were recommended. The fourth inspection was conducted on September 27,2007. Signs, fencing, riprap, monuments, and monitoring well covers were in excellent condition. No cracking, erosion, or subsidence was observed on the covers. No issues or concerns were identified, and no corrective actions were recommended. The post-closure inspection checklists for CAU 112 are attached. Photographs and field notes taken during site inspections are maintained in the project files.

  20. The marriage of RCRA and CERCLA at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, D.C.; Brooks, L.M.

    1998-11-01

    A key goal of the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) signed in July of 1996 was to provide a seamless marriage of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (and other media specific programs) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the implementing agencies of each. This paper examines the two years since the signing of RFCA and identifies the successes, failures, and stresses of the marriage. RFCA has provided an excellent vehicle for regulatory and substantive progress at the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats facility. The key for a fully successful marriage is to build on the accomplishments to date and to continually improve the internal and external systems and relationships. To date, the parties can be proud of both the substantial accomplishment of substantive environmental work and the regulatory systems that have enabled the work.

  1. Revised legislation and new regulations for U.S. regulatory agencies: How it will economically impact the environmental industry, with a focus on the RCRA Corrective Action and Superfund programs

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, M.

    1996-12-31

    The 103rd and 104th Congresses have seen the vigorous discussion of several key environmental statutes and programs that have significant impact on the environmental services market. Superfund, RCRA Corrective Action, RCRA`s waste management standards for various hazardous wastes, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act have all been addressed in some manner. While, as of the date of this manuscript (late April, 1996), few actual legislative changes have occurred, the texture of the discussions is illustrative of where many of these programs are going. These changes have significant potential impacts on the environmental services market, and those impacts should generally be positive. The remainder of this discussion will focus on the two major remedial statues/programs; RCRA Corrective Action and Superfund.

  2. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.; McDonald, John P.

    2005-11-01

    The 216-B-3 Pond system was a series of ponds used for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation from 1945 to 1997, the B Pond System has been a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility since 1986, with RCRA interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994 the expansion ponds of the facility were clean closed, leaving only the main pond and a portion of the 216-B-3-3 ditch as the currently regulated facility. In 2001, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued a letter providing guidance for a two-year, trial evaluation of an alternate, intrawell statistical approach to contaminant detection monitoring at the B Pond system. This temporary variance was allowed because the standard indicator-parameters evaluation (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and accompanying interim status statistical approach is ineffective for detecting potential B-Pond-derived contaminants in groundwater, primarily because this method fails to account for variability in the background data and because B Pond leachate is not expected to affect the indicator parameters. In July 2003, the final samples were collected for the two-year variance period. An evaluation of the results of the alternate statistical approach is currently in progress. While Ecology evaluates the efficacy of the alternate approach (and/or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit), the B Pond system will return to contamination-indicator detection monitoring. Total organic carbon and total organic halides were added to the constituent list beginning with the January 2004 samples. Under this plan, the following wells will be monitored for B Pond: 699-42-42B, 699-43-44, 699-43-45, and 699-44-39B. The wells will be sampled semi-annually for the contamination indicator parameters (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and annually for

  3. STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION OF CERCLA AND RCRA WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Handbook provides U.S. EPA regional staff responsible for reviewing CERCLA remedial action plans and RCRA permit applications with a tool for interpreting information on stabilization/solidification treatment. As a practical day-to-day reference guide, it will also provide t...

  4. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-26

    WMA TX-TY contains underground, single-shell tanks that were used to store liquid waste that contained chemicals and radionuclides. Most of the liquid has been removed, and the remaining waste is regulated under the RCRA as modi¬fied in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington State’s Hazardous Waste Management Act . WMA TX-TY was placed in assessment monitoring in 1993 because of elevated specific conductance. A groundwater quality assessment plan was written in 1993 describing the monitoring activities to be used in deciding whether WMA TX-TY had affected groundwater. That plan was updated in 2001 for continued RCRA groundwater quality assessment as required by 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(7). This document further updates the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY by including (1) information obtained from ten new wells installed at the WMA after 1999 and (2) information from routine quarterly groundwater monitoring during the last five years. Also, this plan describes activities for continuing the groundwater assessment at WMA TX TY.

  5. RCRA permit modifications and the functional equivalency demonstration: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Kinker, J.; Lyon, W.; Carnes, R.; Loehr, C.; Elsberry, K.; Garcia, P.

    1996-05-01

    Hazardous waste operating permits issued under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) often impose requirements, typically by reference to the original permit application, that specific components and equipment be used. Consequently, changing these items, even for the purpose of routine maintenance, may first require that the owner/operator request a potentially time-consuming and costly permit modification. However, the owner/operator may demonstrate that a modification is not required because the planned changes are functionally equivalent, as defined by RCRA, to the original specifications embodied by the permit. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is scheduled for maintenance and improvements that involve replacement of components. The incinerator`s carbon adsorption unit/high efficiency particulate air filtration system, in particular, was redesigned to improve reliability and minimize maintenance. A study was performed to determine whether the redesigned unit would qualify as functionally equivalent to the original component. in performing this study, the following steps were taken: (a) the key performance factors were identified; (b) performance data describing the existing unit were obtained; (c) performance of both the existing and redesigned units was simulated; and (d) the performance data were compared to ascertain whether the components could qualify as functionally equivalent.

  6. Transportable Vitrification System RCRA Closure Practical Waste Disposition Saves Time And Money

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, Angie; Boles, Roger; Byars, Woody

    2003-02-26

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) was a large-scale vitrification system for the treatment of mixed wastes. The wastes contained both hazardous and radioactive materials in the form of sludge, soil, and ash. The TVS was developed to be moved to various United States Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to vitrify mixed waste as needed. The TVS consists of four primary modules: (1) Waste and Additive Materials Processing Module; (2) Melter Module; (3) Emissions Control Module; and (4) Control and Services Module. The TVS was demonstrated at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) during September and October of 1997. During this period, approximately 16,000 pounds of actual mixed waste was processed, producing over 17,000 pounds of glass. After the demonstration was complete it was determined that it was more expensive to use the TVS unit to treat and dispose of mixed waste than to direct bury this waste in Utah permitted facility. Thus, DOE had to perform a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the facility and find a reuse for as much of the equipment as possible. This paper will focus on the following items associated with this successful RCRA closure project: TVS site closure design and implementation; characterization activities focused on waste disposition; pollution prevention through reuse; waste minimization efforts to reduce mixed waste to be disposed; and lessons learned that would be integrated in future projects of this magnitude.

  7. The mixture rule under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), wastes may be classified as hazardous wastes or solid (non-hazardous) wastes. Each classification of wastes has its own applicable handling requirements. In accordance with the definition of hazardous waste under RCRA, waste mixtures containing a hazardous and solid waste component are hazardous wastes, unless certain exceptions apply. The primary purpose of the RCRA waste mixture provisions are to ensure that the Subtitle C (hazardous waste) requirements are applied consistently to both hazardous wastes and waste mixtures. These provisions were intended to discourage the commingling of the hazardous wastes with non-hazardous solid wastes simply to avoid Subtitle C regulation.

  8. Oil & gas exploration and production waste - RCRA exemptions and non-exempts

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.; Alam, W.

    1995-12-01

    Petroleum industry generates substantial amounts of wastes that is related to exploration, drilling, production, and development activities. Management of these wastes is essential to ensure protection of human health and the environment and also to comply with the regulations that govern them. These regulation were 7. based mainly upon a study done by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the impact of these wastes on environment while considering the economic impact of subjecting these wastes to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle C regulations. Based on this study, exemption is granted to petroleum wastes that results from exploration, drilling, production, and development activities. Under this exemption petroleum wastes are not considered hazardous wastes. To address the diverse environmental and programmatic issues posed by these petroleum wastes, EPA has taken a three-pronged approach: (1) Improving Federal programs under authorities in Subtitle D of RCRA, the Clean Water Act (CWA), and the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA); (2) Working with States to encourage changes in their regulations and enforcement to improve some programs; and (3) Working with congress to develop any additional statutory authorities that may be required. Confusion about the exempt and non-exempt status of wastes from the exploration and production (E & P) activities in the petroleum industry seem to be quite prevalent, especially in light of the State and local requirements being different in many cases. This paper is an attempt to clarify the exempt and non-exempt status of wastes and to provide a clear understanding of the regulations that the industry must abide by in order to comply with both State and Federal requirements. Acceptable methods of waste handling and management are also discussed in this paper which should help the industry in pollution prevention and resource conservation aspect of waste management.

  9. Defending Superfund and RCRA imminent hazard cases

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Legal defenses by the government under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (Superfund) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act include common defenses in which there is (1) no imminent or substantial endangerment, (2) inappropriate remedy, (3) action not in accord with the National Contingency Plan that governs Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) remedial actions, (4) not credible or sufficient evidence, (5) not credible scientific conclusion, or (6) government action precluding the relief. Defenses to Superfund reimbursement claims include cases (1) when defendant is not among the class of liable partners, (2) of joint and several liability and the right of contribution, (3) involving releases by an act of God, war, or third party. Defenses to abatement actions include cases in which (1) there is no irreparable harm and adequate remedy at law is available and (2) emergency provisions are not retrospective. Also relevant to EPA enforcement efforts are political pressures and the government's intentions. The author discusses basic defense strategies and implementation tactics. 67 references.

  10. State hazardous waste programs; procedures for revision of state RCRA programs--EPA. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    1983-08-25

    EPA is today proposing to amend its requirements under 40 CFR 271.21(e) (formerly Section 123.13(e)) for the approval and revision of authorized state hazardous waste programs. One purpose is to ensure that states applying for final authorization under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended, (RCRA) do not have to revise their programs and applications to respond to federal regulatory changes occurring while the states' applications are being prepared or processed. The second purpose is to provide all authorized states with one full year (or two years, if there is a need for state legislative action) from the effective date of amended federal regulations to make the revisions in their programs required by such federal amendments. This action would provide the state with an additional six months since the existing regulation requires that program revisions be made within one year (or two years) after the promulgation of amended federal regulations.

  11. ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

    2003-02-27

    The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information.

  12. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1, 1993 through March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. This quarterly report contains data received between March 8 and May 24, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  13. National spent fuel program preliminary report RCRA characteristics of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel DOE-SNF-REP-002. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report presents information on the preliminary process knowledge to be used in characterizing all Department of Energy (DOE)-owned Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) types that potentially exhibit a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) characteristic. This report also includes the process knowledge, analyses, and rationale used to preliminarily exclude certain SNF types from RCRA regulation under 40 CFR {section}261.4(a)(4), ``Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste,`` as special nuclear and byproduct material. The evaluations and analyses detailed herein have been undertaken as a proactive approach. In the event that DOE-owned SNF is determined to be a RCRA solid waste, this report provides general direction for each site regarding further characterization efforts. The intent of this report is also to define the path forward to be taken for further evaluation of specific SNF types and a recommended position to be negotiated and established with regional and state regulators throughout the DOE Complex regarding the RCRA-related policy issues.

  14. Characterizing cemented TRU waste for RCRA hazardous constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Yeamans, D.R.; Betts, S.E.; Bodenstein, S.A.

    1996-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has characterized drums of solidified transuranic (TRU) waste from four major waste streams. The data will help the State of New Mexico determine whether or not to issue a no-migration variance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) so that WIPP can receive and dispose of waste. The need to characterize TRU waste stored at LANL is driven by two additional factors: (1) the LANL RCRA Waste Analysis Plan for EPA compliant safe storage of hazardous waste; (2) the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) The LANL characterization program includes headspace gas analysis, radioassay and radiography for all drums and solids sampling on a random selection of drums from each waste stream. Data are presented showing that the only identified non-metal RCRA hazardous component of the waste is methanol.

  15. 22 CFR 145.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 145.16... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94... materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts...

  16. 32 CFR 32.49 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 32.49....49 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40...

  17. 32 CFR 32.49 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 32.49....49 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40...

  18. 22 CFR 145.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 145.16... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94... materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts...

  19. 22 CFR 145.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 145.16... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94... materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts...

  20. 32 CFR 32.49 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 32.49....49 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40...

  1. 22 CFR 145.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 145.16... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  2. 22 CFR 145.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 145.16... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  3. Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA.

  4. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL's assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  5. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL`s assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  6. Mobilization plan for the Y-12 9409-5 tank storage facility RCRA closure plan. Final report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    This mobilization plan identifies the activities and equipment necessary to begin the field sampling for the Oak Ridge Y-12 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility (DTSF) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure. Elements of the plan outline the necessary components of each mobilization task and identify whether SAIC or the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Y-12 Environmental Restoration Division will be responsible for task coordination. Field work will be conducted in two phases: mobilization phase and soil sampling phase. Training and medical monitoring, access, permits and passes, decontamination/staging area, equipment, and management are covered in this document.

  7. Post-Closure Evaluation of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site in Support of the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-04-26

    The post-closure performance of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and Area 5 RWMS are evaluated for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement using current performance assessment and composite analysis methods and models. Two alternatives with different future waste volumes and inventories are evaluated. The No Action Alternative evaluates the inventory disposed through fiscal year (FY) 2010 plus an additional 4.5E5 cubic meters (m3) (1.59E7 cubic feet [ft3]) of waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS. The Expanded Operations Alternative evaluates the FY 2010 inventory plus an additional 1.42E6 m3 (5.03E7 ft3) of waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS and 4.93E4 m3 (1.74E6 ft3) disposed at the Area 3 RWMS. Both the No Action and Expanded Operations Alternatives have a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, “Radioactive Waste Management.” No significant difference between the two alternatives was found because the waste concentrations are similar. The performance assessment model assesses radiological risk for residents at the RWMS boundary where risk is more closely related to waste concentration than total waste inventory. Results for the composite analysis also indicate that the dose constraint and dose limit can be met for both alternatives.

  8. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 110: AREA 3 WMD U-3AX/BL CRATER, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA FOR THE PERIOD JULY 2004 - JUNE 2005

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-08-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring report provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 Waste Management Division (WMD) U-3ax/bl Crater. This report includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110, for the annual period July 2004 through June 2005. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, cover vegetation, perimeter fence, and use restriction warning signs was good. Settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VII.B.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW009 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2000). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (cm) (6 inches [in]) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection.

  9. Post-Closure Land Jurisdiction Transfer to the US Fish and Wildlife Service at Rocky Flats: Surviving the Safari Through Old Records and Other Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Schiesswohl, S.; Hanson, M.

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Rocky Flats Site (Rocky Flats), located near Denver, Colorado, was listed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Subsequent cleanup and closure activities were completed in October 2005 and the final remedy was selected in September 2006. The remedy is 'no further action' for the generally un-impacted Peripheral Operable Unit (OU), formerly known as the Buffer Zone, and institutional and physical controls with continued monitoring for the Central OU, formerly the industrialized area. The Peripheral OU has been deleted from the NPL and jurisdiction over the majority of land in that OU (3,953 acres) was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) on July 12, 2007, to establish the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge. The remaining approximately 929 acres in the Peripheral OU were retained by DOE's Office of Legacy Management where outstanding mineral leases and mining operations exist. As mineral rights are purchased or mining operations and mineral leases are completed and fully reclaimed, jurisdiction of portions of the 929 acres will also be transferred to USFWS for inclusion into the refuge. During the almost 2 years since cleanup and closure work was completed at Rocky Flats, DOE and USFWS have worked the specific legal parameters, timing, and constraints of the 3,953-acre transfer. Many lessons have been learned, based on these early experiences. (authors)

  10. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: RCRA enforcement and compliance, update as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The module describds enforcement procedures and cites the statutory authority. It describes the two different types of enforcement (i.e., administrative and judicial) and explains when and how EPA can enforce the RCRA regulations in authorized states. It describes the enforcement mechanisms available to EPA. It states the differences between enforcement at interim status, permitted facilities, and Federal facilities. It also identifies relevant resources documents.

  11. Borehole Data Package for Calendar Year 2000 - 2001 RCRA Wells at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Johnson, Vernon G.

    2001-08-15

    Six new resource conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the single-shell tank farm Waste Management Area S-SX in July 2000 through March 2001 in partial fulfillment of Tri-Party Agreement milestones M-24-00L and M-24-00M. This document describes the drilling, construction, sampling and analyses of samples from the wells.

  12. Revised RCRA closure plan for the Interim Drum Yard (S-030) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.M.

    1994-09-01

    The Interim Drum Yard (IDY) facility is a containerized waste storage area located in the Y-12 exclusion area. It was used to store waste materials which are regulated by RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act); uranyl nitrate solutions were also stored there. The closure plan outlines the actions required to achieve closure of IDY and is being submitted in accordance with TN Rule 1200-1-11.05(7) and 40 CFR 265.110.

  13. Calendar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The East Fork Regime encompasses several confirmed and suspected sources of groundwater contamination within industrialized areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Groundwater and surface water monitoring in the East Fork Regime are performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Included are the groundwater monitoring data obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the East Fork Regime issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on August 30, 1996. The post-closure permit addresses post-closure monitoring requirements for two closed RCRA-regulated surface impoundments: the S-3 Ponds and New Hope Pond.

  14. Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-02-01

    This report contains the groundwater monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation Wd Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the PCP defines the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring requirements for the portion of the groundwater contaminant plume that has migrated into the East Fork Regime ftom the S-3 Ponds, a closed RCW-regulated former surface impoundment located in Bear Creek Valley near the west end of the Y-12 Plant. In addition to the RCIL4 post-closure corrective action monitoring results, this report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 1997 to fulfill requirements of DOE Order 5400.1.

  15. RCRA delisting of agent-decontaminated waste at Dugway Proving Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.; Green, D.R.; Lopez, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The State of Utah has declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, cleanup, testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues are listed as hazardous waste in Utah and several other States, but are not listed under regulations established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the primary law governing management of hazardous waste in the US These residues are identified as hazardous waste due to corrosivity, reactivity, chronic toxicity, and acute toxicity, and are designated as Hazardous Waste No. F999. The RCRA regulations (40 CFR 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other State hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous, but allow generators to petition the regulator to ``delist`` if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. The US Army Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) has initiated a project with the Argonne National Laboratory to demonstrate that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous waste and to achieve delisting. The initial focus is on delisting specific residues from decontamination of wastes generated during materials testing activities and contaminated soil at the US Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), Utah. This activity is referred to as Phase I of the delisting program. Subsequent phases of the delisting program will address additional waste streams at DPG and other Army installations. The purpose of this paper is to outline the Phase I TECOM delisting effort at DPG, identify some of the important technical issues associated with the delisting, and to discuss overall progress to date.

  16. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for RCRA Constituent Analysis of Solidified Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2006-09-21

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents distributes test samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and metals in solid matrices. Each distribution of test samples is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD; DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department. The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the RCRA PDP. Participating laboratories demonstrate acceptable performance by successfully analyzing single- blind performance evaluation samples (subsequently referred to as PDP samples) according to the criteria established in this plan. PDP samples are used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). The concentrations of analytes in the PDP samples address levels of regulatory concern and encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in waste characterization samples. The WIPP requires analyses of homogeneous solid wastes to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by laboratories that demonstrate acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses, and the samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples. Participating laboratories must analyze PDP samples using the same procedures used for WIPP samples.

  17. 40 CFR 270.67 - RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units. 270.67 Section 270.67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Special Forms of Permits § 270.67 RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units....

  18. 40 CFR 271.24 - Interim authorization under section 3006(g) of RCRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... revised Corrective Action Management Unit rule (except 40 CFR 264.555) promulgated on January 22, 2002 and... 3006(g) of RCRA. 271.24 Section 271.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements for Final Authorization § 271.24 Interim authorization under section 3006(g) of RCRA. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 270.250 - What is a RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... you to manage hazardous waste. It is issued under 40 CFR part 124, subpart G and subpart J of this... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is a RCRA standardized permit... WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM RCRA...

  20. 40 CFR 271.24 - Interim authorization under section 3006(g) of RCRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... revised Corrective Action Management Unit rule (except 40 CFR 264.555) promulgated on January 22, 2002 and... 3006(g) of RCRA. 271.24 Section 271.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements for Final Authorization § 271.24 Interim authorization under section 3006(g) of RCRA. (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 124.200 - What is a RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facility, that EPA has promulgated in 40 CFR part 267 (Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is a RCRA standardized permit... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING Procedures for RCRA Standardized Permit General Information...

  2. 40 CFR 270.250 - What is a RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... you to manage hazardous waste. It is issued under 40 CFR part 124, subpart G and subpart J of this... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is a RCRA standardized permit... WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM RCRA...

  3. 40 CFR 270.67 - RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units. 270.67 Section 270.67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Special Forms of Permits § 270.67 RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units....

  4. 40 CFR 270.250 - What is a RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... you to manage hazardous waste. It is issued under 40 CFR part 124, subpart G and subpart J of this... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is a RCRA standardized permit... WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM RCRA...

  5. 40 CFR 124.200 - What is a RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facility, that EPA has promulgated in 40 CFR part 267 (Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is a RCRA standardized permit... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING Procedures for RCRA Standardized Permit General Information...

  6. 40 CFR 124.200 - What is a RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facility, that EPA has promulgated in 40 CFR part 267 (Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is a RCRA standardized permit... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING Procedures for RCRA Standardized Permit General Information...

  7. 40 CFR 124.200 - What is a RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facility, that EPA has promulgated in 40 CFR part 267 (Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is a RCRA standardized permit... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING Procedures for RCRA Standardized Permit General Information...

  8. 40 CFR 270.67 - RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units. 270.67 Section 270.67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Special Forms of Permits § 270.67 RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units....

  9. 40 CFR 270.67 - RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units. 270.67 Section 270.67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Special Forms of Permits § 270.67 RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units....

  10. 40 CFR 270.67 - RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units. 270.67 Section 270.67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Special Forms of Permits § 270.67 RCRA standardized permits for storage and treatment units....

  11. 40 CFR 271.24 - Interim authorization under section 3006(g) of RCRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... revised Corrective Action Management Unit rule (except 40 CFR 264.555) promulgated on January 22, 2002 and... 3006(g) of RCRA. 271.24 Section 271.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements for Final Authorization § 271.24 Interim authorization under section 3006(g) of RCRA. (a)...

  12. 40 CFR 271.24 - Interim authorization under section 3006(g) of RCRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... revised Corrective Action Management Unit rule (except 40 CFR 264.555) promulgated on January 22, 2002 and... 3006(g) of RCRA. 271.24 Section 271.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements for Final Authorization § 271.24 Interim authorization under section 3006(g) of RCRA. (a)...

  13. 40 CFR 270.250 - What is a RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... you to manage hazardous waste. It is issued under 40 CFR part 124, subpart G and subpart J of this... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is a RCRA standardized permit... WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM RCRA...

  14. 40 CFR 124.200 - What is a RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facility, that EPA has promulgated in 40 CFR part 267 (Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What is a RCRA standardized permit? 124... PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING Procedures for RCRA Standardized Permit General Information...

  15. 40 CFR 271.24 - Interim authorization under section 3006(g) of RCRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... revised Corrective Action Management Unit rule (except 40 CFR 264.555) promulgated on January 22, 2002 and... 3006(g) of RCRA. 271.24 Section 271.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Requirements for Final Authorization § 271.24 Interim authorization under section 3006(g) of RCRA. (a)...

  16. 40 CFR 270.250 - What is a RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... you to manage hazardous waste. It is issued under 40 CFR part 124, subpart G and subpart J of this... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is a RCRA standardized permit... WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM RCRA...

  17. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-11-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

  18. DOSE ASSESSMENTS FROM THE DISPOSAL OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTES IN RCRA-C DISPOSAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the long-term performance of the RCRA-C disposal cell and potential doses to off-site receptors is used to derive maximum radionuclide specific concentrations in the wastes that would enable these wastes to be disposed of safely using the RCRA-C disposal cell technology....

  19. RCRA Summary Document for the David Witherspoon 1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeffer, J.

    2008-06-10

    , cylinders, and cable) and populations of debris type items (e.g., piles of bricks, small scrap metal, roofing material, scaffolding, and shelving) that are located throughout the DWI 1630 site. The project also generates an additional small volume of secondary waste [e.g., personal protective equipment (PPE), and miscellaneous construction waste] that is bagged and included in bulk soil shipments to the EMWMF. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the EMWMF does not allow for material that does not meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs). The waste being excavated in certain areas of the DWI 1630 site contained soil that did not meet RCRA LDR criteria; therefore this waste had to be segregated for treatment or alternate disposal offsite. This document identifies the approach taken by the DWI 1630 project to further characterize the areas identified during the Phase II Remedial Investigation (RI) as potentially containing RCRA-characteristic waste. This document also describes the methodology used to determine excavation limits for areas determined to be RCRA waste, post excavation sampling, and the treatment and disposal of this material.

  20. Post Closure Safety of the Morsleben Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Preuss, J.; Eilers, G.; Mauke, R.; Moeller-Hoeppe, N.; Engelhardt, H.-J.; Kreienmeyer, M.; Lerch, C.; Schrimpf, C.

    2002-02-26

    After the completion of detailed studies of the suitability the twin-mine Bartensleben-Marie, situated in the Federal State of Saxony-Anhalt (Germany), was chosen in 1970 for the disposal of low and medium level radioactive waste. The waste emplacement started in 1978 in rock cavities at the mine's fourth level, some 500 m below the surface. Until the end of the operational phase in 1998 in total about 36,800 m{sup 3} of radioactive waste was disposed of. The Morsleben LLW/ILW repository (ERAM) is now under licensing for closure. After completing the licensing procedure the repository will be sealed and backfilled to exclude any undue future impact onto man or the environment. The main safety objective is to protect the biosphere from the harmful effects of the disposed radionuclides. Furthermore, classical or conventional requirements call for ruling out or minimizing other unfavorable environmental effects. The ERAM is an abandoned rock salt and potash mine. As a consequence it has a big void volume, however small parts of the cavities are backfilled with crushed salt rocks. Other goals of the closure concept are therefore a long-term stabilization of the cavities to prevent a dipping or buckling of the ground surface. In addition, groundwater protection shall be assured. For the sealing of the repository a closure concept was developed to ensure compliance with the safety protection objectives. The concept anticipates the backfilling of the cavities with hydraulically setting backfill materials (salt concretes). The reduction of the remaining void volume in the mine causes in the case of brine intrusions a limitation of the leaching processes of the exposed potash seams. However, during the setting process the hydration heat of the concrete will lead to an increase of the temperature and hence to thermally induced stresses of the concrete and the surrounding rocks. Therefore, the influence of these stresses and deformations on the stability of the salt body and the integrity of the geological barrier was examined by 2D and 3D thermo-mechanical computations. The compliance of the safety objectives are proved on the basis of safety evidence criteria. It can be concluded that the closure concept is able to serve all conventional and radiological safety objectives.

  1. Barriers and post closure monitoring. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kovarik, F.S.; Killough, J.; Mohanty, K.; Rajagopolan, R.

    1993-04-01

    A feasibility study (Phase I) was performed investigating the application of chemical gels used for profile control in the petroleum industry to zone isolation and the in situ clean up of hazardous waste. The transfer and application of petroleum technology to serious environmental problems facing the US could not only reduce remediation costs to a small fraction of that incurred with existing barrier containment methods, but these techniques can be adapted to isolate blocks or zones in a manner not currently feasible. DuPont and Pfizer were the industry collaborators on this project, and supplied gel materials as well as technical guidance and support. This study investigated {open_quotes}worst case{close_quotes} scenarios. A detailed review of chemical gels used for profile control in petroleum applications was assembled and included information on how gel systems can be used as model compounds in hazardous waste containment. Example data are presented to provide insight into the physical characteristics of gel systems. IIOR collaborated with LANL personnel on the design and implementation of field scale barrier experiments, and on the design of laboratory experiments that characterize barrier systems. Chemical gel barrier systems used at the LANL field test were characterized at their original composition. Composite barriers using DuPont LUDOX SM{reg_sign} colloidal silica gel, zeolite and sand and Pfizer FLOPAAM 133OS{reg_sign} hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) gel, peat, bentonite and sand were unconsolidated. A barrier consisting of LUDOX and sand was semi-consolidated. This study indicates that X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) Scanning and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) can be used successfully to study the structure, stability and transport properties of barrier systems.

  2. 24 CFR 84.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247 through 254)....

  3. 36 CFR 1210.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ((RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580... identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR Parts 247 through...

  4. 36 CFR 1210.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ((RCRA) (Pub. L. 94-580... identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR Parts 247 through...

  5. 24 CFR 84.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247 through 254)....

  6. 24 CFR 84.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L. 94... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247 through 254)....

  7. 24 CFR 84.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  8. 24 CFR 84.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR parts 247 through 254). Accordingly... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resource Conservation and Recovery... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (Pub. L....

  9. 36 CFR 1210.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR Parts 247 through 254... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resource Conservation and... Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ((RCRA) (Pub. L....

  10. 40 CFR 124.203 - How may I switch from my individual RCRA permit to a standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RCRA permit to a standardized permit? 124.203 Section 124.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING Procedures for RCRA Standardized Permit Applying for A Standardized Permit § 124.203 How may I switch from my individual RCRA permit to...

  11. 40 CFR 124.203 - How may I switch from my individual RCRA permit to a standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RCRA permit to a standardized permit? 124.203 Section 124.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING Procedures for RCRA Standardized Permit Applying for A Standardized Permit § 124.203 How may I switch from my individual RCRA permit to...

  12. 40 CFR 124.203 - How may I switch from my individual RCRA permit to a standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RCRA permit to a standardized permit? 124.203 Section 124.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING Procedures for RCRA Standardized Permit Applying for A Standardized Permit § 124.203 How may I switch from my individual RCRA permit to...

  13. 40 CFR 124.203 - How may I switch from my individual RCRA permit to a standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RCRA permit to a standardized permit? 124.203 Section 124.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING Procedures for RCRA Standardized Permit Applying for A Standardized Permit § 124.203 How may I switch from my individual RCRA permit to...

  14. 40 CFR 124.203 - How may I switch from my individual RCRA permit to a standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RCRA permit to a standardized permit? 124.203 Section 124.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS PROCEDURES FOR DECISIONMAKING Procedures for RCRA Standardized Permit Applying for A Standardized Permit § 124.203 How may I switch from my individual RCRA permit to...

  15. RCRA corrective measures using a permeable reactive iron wall US Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Schmithors, W.L.; Vardy, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    A chromic acid release was discovered at a former electroplating shop at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Initial investigative activities indicated that chromic acid had migrated into the subsurface soils and groundwater. In addition, trichloroethylene (TCE) was also discovered in groundwater during subsequent investigations of the hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) plume. Corrective measures were required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The in-situ remediation method, proposed under RCRA Interim Measures to passively treat the groundwater contaminants, uses reactive zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate the chlorinated compounds and to mineralize the hexavalent chromium. A 47 meter by 0.6 meter subsurface permeable iron wall was installed downgradient of the source area to a depth of 7 meters using a direct trenching machine. The iron filings were placed in the ground as the soils were excavated from the subsurface. This is the first time that direct trenching was used to install reactive zero-valent iron filings. Over 250 metric tons of iron filings were used as the reactive material in the barrier wall. Installation of the iron filings took one full day. Extensive negotiations with regulatory agencies were required to use this technology under the current facility Hazardous Waste Management Permit. All waste soils generated during the excavation activities were contained and treated on site. Once contaminant concentrations were reduced the waste soils were used as fill material.

  16. ISOCAM observations of the RCrA star formation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, G.; Huldtgren, M.; Kaas, A. A.; Bontemps, S.; Nordh, L.; Abergel, A.; André, P.; Boulanger, F.; Burgdorf, M.; Casali, M. M.; Cesarsky, C. J.; Davies, J.; Falgarone, E.; Montmerle, T.; Perault, M.; Persi, P.; Prusti, T.; Puget, J. L.; Sibille, F.

    1999-10-01

    The results of an ISOCAM survey of the RCrA star formation region are presented. The survey was carried out in two broad-band filters, LW2 (5-8.5 mu m) and LW3 (12-18 mu m). Although it was not possible to map the densest, central region due to saturation problems, 21 sources were identified which showed mid-IR excesses. Most of these sources have not previously been recognised as YSOs (Young Stellar Objects), mainly because they are relatively faint. We find evidence for a population of very low mass stars which are probably brown dwarfs in their early contraction phases. ISO is an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  17. Superfund TIO videos. Set A. Regulatory overview - CERCLA's relationship to other programs: RCRA, Title III, UST, CWA, SDWA. Part 1. Audio-Visual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The videotape is divided into five sections. Section 1 provides definitions and historical information on both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The four types of RCRA regulatory programs - Subtitles C, D, I, and J - are described. Treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) and recycling facilities are also discussed. Section 2 discusses the history behind the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III). The four major provisions of Title III, which are emergency planning, emergency release notification, community right-to-know reporting, and the toxic chemical release inventory are covered. Section 3 outlines the UST program covering notification, record keeping, and the UST Trust Fund. Section 4 outlines the six major provisions of the Clean Water Act (CWA): water quality, pretreatment, prevention of oil and hazardous substance discharges, responses to oil and hazardous substance discharges, discharges of hazardous substances into the ocean, and dredge and fill. Section 5 explains the purpose, regulations, and standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Specific issues such as underground injection, sole source aquifers, and lead contamination are discussed.

  18. Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-02-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCIU) post- closure permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), and as otherwise required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. In July 1997, the Temessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved several modifications to the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring requirements specified in the PCP. This report has been prepared in accordimce with these modified requirements.

  19. RCRA Part B Permit Application for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory - Volume 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pamela R. Cunningham

    1992-07-01

    This section of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Part B permit application describes the waste characteristics Of the transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes at the RWMC waste management units to be permitted: the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility (ILTSF) and the Waste Storage Facility (WSF). The ILTSF is used to store radioactive remote-handled (RH) wastes. The WSF will be used to store radioactive contact-handled (CH) wastes. The Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) was established at the RWMC to provide interim storage of TRU waste. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A defines TRU waste as waste contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram (nCi/g) o f waste material. The TSA serves generators both on and off the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The ILTSF is located at the TSA, and the WSF will be located there also. Most of the wastes managed at the TSA are mixed wastes, which are radioactive wastes regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) that also contain hazardous materials regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. These wastes include TRU mixed wastes and some low-level mixed wastes. Accordingly, the TSA is subject to the permitting requirements of RCRA and the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA). Prior to 1982, DOE orders defined TRU wastes as having transuranium radionuclides in concentrations greater than 10 nCi/g, The low-level mixed wastes managed at the TSA are those wastes with 10 to 100 nCi/g of TRU radionuclides that prior to 1982 were considered TRU waste.

  20. Annual report of 1995 groundwater monitoring data for the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) and the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) are inactive waste management sites located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The KHQ and CRSDB are regulated as treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The facilities were granted interim status in calendar year (CY) 1986 under Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Hazardous Waste Management Rule 1200-1-11-.05. Historical environmental monitoring data and baseline characterization under interim status indicated that releases of contaminants to groundwater had not occurred; thus, the detection monitoring was implemented at the sites until either clean closure was completed or post-closure permits were issued. The CRSDB was closed in Cy 1989 under a TDEC-approved RCRA closure plan. A revised RCRA PCPA for the CRSDB was submitted by DOE personnel to TDEC staff in September 1994. A final post-closure permit was issued by the TDEC on September 18, 1995. Closure activities at KHQ under RCRA were completed in October 1993. The Record of Decision will also incorporate requirements of the RCRA post-closure permit once it is issued by the TDEC.

  1. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.

  2. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  3. Assessing Risks to Populations at Superfund and Rcra Sites: Characterizing Effects on Populations (Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final document titled, Assessing Risks to Populations at Superfund and RCRA Sites: Characterizing Effects on Populations.

  4. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

  5. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, For the Period July 2007-June 2008

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-08-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report (PCIMR) provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 WMD [Waste Management Division] U-3ax/bl Crater. This PCIMR includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110 for the period July 2007 through June 2008. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, perimeter fence, and use restriction (UR) warning signs was good. However, settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VII.B.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW021 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2005). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (6 inches) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection. Two areas of settling and cracks were observed on the south and east edges of the cover during the September 2007 inspection that exceeded the action level and required repair. The areas were repaired in October 2007. Additional settling and cracks were observed along the east side of the cover during the December 2007 inspection that exceeded the action level, and the area was repaired in January 2008. Significant animal burrows were also observed during the March 2008 inspection, and small mammal trapping and relocation was performed in April 2008. The semiannual subsidence surveys were performed in September 2007 and March 2008. No significant subsidence was observed in the survey data. Monument 5 shows the greatest amount of subsidence (-0.02 m [-0.08 ft] compared to the baseline survey of 2000). This amount is negligible and near the resolution of the survey instruments; it does not indicate that subsidence is occurring overall on

  6. Temporal trend analysis of RCRA groundwater monitoring data

    SciTech Connect

    Need, E.A. )

    1994-04-01

    Statistical analysis of RCRA groundwater monitoring data at a uranium hexafluoride processing facility showed a statistically significant increase in the concentration of gross beta activity in monitor wells downgradient of surface impounds storing calcium fluoride sludge and high pH water. Because evidence of leakage had not been detected in lysimeters installed beneath the impounds, the operator sought an evaluation of other potential causes of the result, including natural variability. This study determined that all five data sets showed either long-term excursionary (spike-like), or seasonal forms of temporal variation. Gross beta had an upward long-term trend with multiple excursions that almost appeared to be seasonal. Gross alpha had an upward long-term trend with multiple excursions that were clearly not seasonal. Specific conductance had both upward and downward long-term trends but no other variations. pH had a downward long-term trend with multiple excursions that were clearly not seasonal. Fluoride had a downward long-term trend without excursions but with clear seasonal variations. The gross beta result that appeared to be a significant change was a spike event on the upward long-term trend.

  7. Annual report of 1991 groundwater monitoring data for the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin at the Y-12 Plant: Reporting and statistical evaluation of the subsequent year (sixth) data

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, L.W.; Mercier, T.M.

    1992-02-01

    This annual report has historically been prepared to meet the annual reporting requirements of the Tennessee Department of and Environment and Conservation (TDEC), Hazardous Waste Management Regulation 1200-1-11-.05 (6)(e), for detection monitoring data collected on Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wells in place around facilities which are accorded interim status. The regulatory authority for these units at the Y-12 Plant is currently in transition. A Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) with an effective date of January 1, 1992, has been negotiated with the Department of Energy (DOE) for the Oak Ridge Reservation. This agreement provides a framework for remediation of the Oak Ridge Reservation so that both RCRA and CERCLA requirements are integrated into the remediation process and provides for State, EPA, and DOE to proceed with CERCLA as the lead regulatory requirement and RCRA as an applicable or relevant and appropriate requirement. This report is presented for the RCRA certified wells for two interim status units at the Y-12 Plant. These units are Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin. Kerr Hollow is currently undergoing clean closure under RCRA. The Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) was closed in 1989 under a TDEC approved RCRA closure plan. The relevance of a RCRA Post-Closure Permit to either of these units is a matter of contention between DOE and TDEC since the FFA does not contemplate post-closure permits.

  8. Borehole Data Package for RCRA Well 299-W22-47 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2006-04-17

    One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) S-SX in fiscal year (FY) 2005 to fulfill commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for the new well, well 299-W22-47, was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/ Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, spectral gamma ray logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, aquifer testing, and sample collection/analysis activities. Appendix A contains the Well Summary Sheets, the Well Construction Summary Report, the geologist's Borehole Log, well development and pump installation records, and well survey results. Appendix B contains analytical results from groundwater samples collected during drilling. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma ray logs and borehole deviation surveys.

  9. 77 FR 518 - Notice of Lodging of the Consent Decree Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... of Lodging of the Consent Decree Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Clean Water... Conservation and Recovery Act (``RCRA'') violations stemming from its failure to meet cathodic protection... resolves Erie's Clean Water Act (``CWA'') violations stemming from its failure to prepare and...

  10. 78 FR 68093 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree; Pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree; Pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Clean Water Act On October 28, 2013, the Department of Justice lodged a proposed Consent Decree (``Decree... Waste et seq. (Section 3005 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (``RCRA''), 42 U.S.C....

  11. 41 CFR 105-72.206 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Resource Conservation...-72.206 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40...

  12. 41 CFR 105-72.206 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Resource Conservation...-72.206 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40...

  13. 41 CFR 105-72.206 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resource Conservation...-72.206 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA... recycled materials identified in guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40...

  14. Effectiveness evaluation of three RCRA caps at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Shevenell, L.A.; Goldstrand, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Because installation of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)- engineered caps is costly, it is prudent to evaluate the effectiveness of this procedure for hydrologically isolating contaminants. The objective for installation of five-part engineered caps at the Y-12 Plant was to (1) satisfy the regulatory compliance issues, (2) minimize the risk of direct contact with the wastes, and (3) reduce rainfall infiltration. Although the original objectives of installing the caps were not to alter groundwater flow, a potential effect of reducing infiltration is to minimize leaching, thus retarding groundwater contaminant migration from the site. Hence, cap effectiveness with respect to reduced groundwater contaminant migration is evaluated using groundwater data in this report. Based on the available data at the Y-12 capped areas, evaluation of cap effectiveness includes studying water level and chemical variability in nearby monitoring wells. Three caps installed during 1989 are selected for evaluation in this report. These caps are located in three significantly different hydrogeologic settings: overlying a karst aquifer (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits [CRSP]), overlying shales located on a hill slope (Oil Landfarm Waste Management Area [OLWMA]), and overlying shales in a valley floor which is a site of convergent groundwater flow (New Hope Pond [NHP]). Presumably, the caps have been effective in minimizing risk of direct contact with the wastes and halting direct rainfall infiltration into the sites over the extent of the capped areas, but no evidence is presented in this report to directly demonstrate this. The caps installed over the three sites appear to have had a minimal effect on groundwater contaminant migration from the respective sites. Following cap construction, no changes in the configuration of the water table were observed. Migration of contaminant plumes occurred at all three sites, apparently without regard to the timing of cap installation.

  15. Impact of the resource conservation and recovery act on energy facility siting

    SciTech Connect

    Tevepaugh, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 is a multifaceted approach to the management of both solid and hazardous waste. The focus of this research is on the RCRA mandated proposed regulations for the siting of hazardous waste disposal facilities. This research is an analysis of the interactions among hazardous waste disposal facilities, energy supply technologies and land use issues. This study addresses the impact of RCRA hazardous waste regulations in a descriptive and exploratory manner. A literature and legislative review, interviews and letters of inquiry were synthesized to identify the relationship between RCRA hazardous waste regulations and the siting of selected energy supply technologies. The results of this synthesis were used to determine if and how RCRA influences national land use issues. It was found that the interaction between RCRA and the siting of hazardous waste disposal facilities required by energy supply technologies will impact national land use issues. All energy supply technologies reviewed generate hazardous waste. The siting of industrial functions such as energy supply facilities and hazardous waste disposal facilities will influence future development patterns. The micro-level impacts from the siting of hazardous waste disposal facilities will produce a ripple effect on land use with successive buffer zones developing around the facilities due to the interactive growth of the land use sectors.

  16. Financial responsibilities under RCRA. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Commerce, Transportation, and Tourism of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on H. R. 3692, November 13, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Representatives of environmental organizations, the Hazardous Waste Treatment Council, and regulators were among those testifying at a hearing on H.R. 3692, which amends the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. The bill is in response to concerns that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not compiled with the intent of RCRA in its failure to move beyond interim permits to issue final permits to land disposal facilities accepting hazardous wastes. Reported leakage and environmental risks from sites operating under interim permits raises questions about how disposal companies could deal with liability claims. At issue was whether Congress needs to take new action to develop regulations under which financially responsible companies can operate or whether new EPA rules can solve the problem. A spokesman for EPA reviewed the liability insurance problem and the status of the insurance market in this context. Material submitted for the record follows the text of H.R. 3692 and the testimony of 11 witnesses.

  17. Exiting RCRA Subtitle C regulation data for supporting a new regulatory path for immobilized mixed debris

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C.L.; Carson, S.D.; Cheng, Wu-Ching

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents analytical and empirical data that provide technical support for the position that mixed debris (debris contaminated with both radioactive and hazardous constituents) treated by immobilization in accordance with 40 CFR 268.45 can exit RCRA Subtitle C requirements at the time the treatment is complete. Pathways analyses and risk assessments of low-level waste and RCRA mixed waste disposal facilities show that these two types of facilities provide equivalent long-term (> 100 years) performance and protection of human health and the environment. A proposed two-tier approach for waste form performance criteria is discussed.

  18. Addendum to the RCRA Assessment Report for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-10-07

    The initial Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment report for Waste Management Area S-SX (PNNL-11810) was issued in January 1998. The report stated a plan for conducting continued assessment would be developed after addressing Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) comments on initial findings in PNNL-11810. Comments from Ecology were received by US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) on September 24, 1998. Shortly thereafter, Ecology and DOE began dispute resolution and related negotiations about tank farm vadose issues. This led to proposed new Tri-Party Agreement milestones covering a RCRA Facility Investigation-Corrective Measures Study (RFI/CMS) of the four single-shell tank farm waste management areas that were in assessment status (Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY, S-SX, T and TX-TY). The RCRA Facility Investigation includes both subsurface (vadose zone and groundwater) and surface (waste handling facilities and grounds) characterization. Many of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 are more appropriate for, and in many cases are superseded by, the RFI/CMS at Waste Management Area S-SX. The proposed Tri-Party Agreement milestone changes that specify the scope and schedule for the RFI/CMS work plans (Tri-Party Agreement change number M-45-98-0) were issued for public comment in February 1999. The Tri-Party Agreement narrative indicates the ongoing groundwater assessments will be integrated with the RFI/CMS work plans. This addendum documents the disposition of the Ecology comments on PNNL-11810 and identifies which comments were more appropriate for the RFI/CMS work plan.

  19. 40 CFR 270.320 - How do I modify my RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... found in 40 CFR 124.211 through 124.214. ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I modify my RCRA standardized...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM...

  20. 40 CFR 270.320 - How do I modify my RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... found in 40 CFR 124.211 through 124.214. ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I modify my RCRA standardized...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM...

  1. Data Quality Objective Summary Report for Waste Disposition CY2003 Waste Management Area C RCRA Wells

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS, G.S.

    2003-05-12

    The purpose of the data quality objective (DQO) summary report is to develop a sampling plan designed for waste disposition of soil cuttings and other drilling-related wastes that will result from the drilling of 4 new RCRA groundwater monitoring wells.

  2. 40 CFR 270.320 - How do I modify my RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... found in 40 CFR 124.211 through 124.214. ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I modify my RCRA standardized...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM...

  3. 40 CFR 270.320 - How do I modify my RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... found in 40 CFR 124.211 through 124.214. ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I modify my RCRA standardized...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM...

  4. 40 CFR 270.320 - How do I modify my RCRA standardized permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... found in 40 CFR 124.211 through 124.214. ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I modify my RCRA standardized...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM...

  5. RCRA corrective action for underground storage tanks -- Subtitle C for Subtitle I

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide guidance to DOE and DOE contractor personnel responsible for planning and implementation of corrective measures addressing cleanup of releases of hazardous materials or regulated substances from underground storage tanks regulated under RCRA Subtitle C or Subtitle I.

  6. WASTE ANALYSIS PLAN REVIEW ADVISOR - AN INTELLIGENT DATABASE TO ASSIST RCRA PERMIT REVIEWERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Waste Analysis Plan Review Advisor (WAPRA) system assists in the review of the Waste Analysis Plan Section of RCRA Part B facility permit applications. Specifically, this program automates two functions of the waste analysis plan review. First, the system checks all wastes wh...

  7. RCRA SUBTITLE D (258): SEISMIC DESIGN GUIDANCE FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    On October 9, 1993, the new RCRA Subtitle D regulations (40 CFR Part 258) went into effect. These regulations are applicable to landfills receiving municipal solid waste (MSW) and establish minimum Federal criteria for the siting, design, operation, and closure of MSW landfills....

  8. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  9. Combination RCRA groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 PUREX cribs

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, J.W.

    1997-06-01

    This document presents a groundwater quality assessment monitoring plan, under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulatory requirements for three RCRA sites in the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area: 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 cribs (PUREX cribs). The objectives of this monitoring plan are to combine the three facilities into one groundwater quality assessment program and to assess the nature, extent, and rate of contaminant migration from these facilities. A groundwater quality assessment plan is proposed because at least one downgradient well in the existing monitoring well networks has concentrations of groundwater constituents indicating that the facilities have contributed to groundwater contamination. The proposed combined groundwater monitoring well network includes 11 existing near-field wells to monitor contamination in the aquifer in the immediate vicinity of the PUREX cribs. Because groundwater contamination from these cribs is known to have migrated as far away as the 300 Area (more than 25 km from the PUREX cribs), the plan proposes to use results of groundwater analyses from 57 additional wells monitored to meet environmental monitoring requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 to supplement the near-field data. Assessments of data collected from these wells will help with a future decision of whether additional wells are needed.

  10. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects & Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC`s scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule.

  11. RCRA designation of discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kirner, N.P.

    1994-09-01

    Many sealed sources containing americium and beryllium are used throughout construction, industry, and research, and will eventually require disposal. For planning purposes it is necessary to determine whether these sources, when disposed, constitute a mixed waste, i.e., a waste containing hazardous constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and radioactive constituents regulated under the Atomic Energy Act. Waste designation criteria contained in 40 CFR 261 are evaluated in detail in this report. It is determined that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources do not contain any wastes listed in Subpart D of 40 CFR 261, nor do the discarded sources exhibit any hazardous characteristics. Therefore, it is concluded that discarded americium/beryllium sealed sources are not a mixed waste under regulations established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Hazardous waste regulatory programs delegated to States, however, may have regulations that differ from those of the Federal government.

  12. RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Air emissions standards, updated as of July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The module provides a regulatory overview of the RCRA air emission standards as they apply to hazardous waste facilities. It outlines the history of RCRA air emission standards as well as the air emission controls required by the standards. It explains the differences between the parts 264/265, Subpart AA BB, CC, air emission standards and summarizes the requirements of each of these Subparts. It identifies the types of units subject to these requirements as well as specific exemptions.

  13. Calandar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a portion of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (unless otherwise noted, directions are in reference to the Y-12 Plant administrative grid) that contains several sites used for management of hazardous and nonhazardous wastes associated with plant operations. Groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in the Bear Creek Regime is performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). This report contains the information and monitoring data required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (post-closure permit), as modified and issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in September 1995 (permit no. TNHW-087). In addition to the signed certification statement and the RCRA facility information summarized below, permit condition II.C.6 requires the annual monitoring report to address groundwater monitoring activities at the three RCRA Hazardous Waste Disposal Units (HWDUs) in the Bear Creek Regime that are in post-closure corrective action status (the S-3 Site, the Oil Landfarm, and the Bear Creek Burial Grounds/Walk-In Pits).

  14. Calendar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge west of Scarboro Road and east of an unnamed drainage feature southwest of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (unless otherwise noted, directions are in reference to the Y-12 Plant administrative grid). The Chestnut Ridge Regime contains several sites used for management of hazardous and nonhazardous wastes associated with plant operations. Groundwater and surface water quality monitoring associated with these waste management sites is performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Included in this annual monitoring report are the groundwater monitoring data obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit for the Chestnut Ridge Regime (post-closure permit) issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in June 1996. Besides the signed certification statement and the RCRA facility information summarized below, condition II.C.6 of the post-closure permit requires annual reporting of groundwater monitoring activities, inclusive of the analytical data and results of applicable data evaluations, performed at three RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) units: the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (Sediment Disposal Basin), the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (Security Pits), and Kerr Hollow Quarry.

  15. Social impact evaluation of the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppitti, James; Dietz, Thomas

    1983-11-01

    Debate over environmental policy often focuses on social impacts of those policies, but few empirical studies examine the impacts of environmental regulations once they are implemented. A quasi-experimental design based on survey data is used to assess the social impacts of the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) on the West Virginia chemical industry. Changes in employment, manufacturing process, product line, and manufacturing costs are evaluated. RCRA seems to have produced changes in manufacturing processes, but we find no statistically significant impacts on.jobs, product line, or manufacturing costs.

  16. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1, 1993 through June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jungers, D.K.

    1993-10-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between May 24 and August 20, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from samples collected during the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  17. Borehole Data Package for Two RCRA Wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area T, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2006-04-17

    One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring and assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) T in calendar year 2005 in partial fulfillment of commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for increased monitoring capability at this WMA was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. The initial borehole, 299-W11-25B, was located about 20 ft from existing downgradient well 299 W11-39. The specific objective for the borehole was to determine the vertical distribution of contaminants in the unconfined aquifer at the northeast corner of WMA T. The permanent casing in borehole 299-W11-25B was damaged beyond repair during well construction and replacement borehole, 299-W11-46, was drilled about 10 ft from borehole 299-W11-25B (Figure 1). Borehole 299-W11-46 was completed as a RCRA monitoring well. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, geophysical logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, groundwater sampling and analysis activities, and preliminary results of slug tests associated with wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46. Appendix A contains geologists logs, Well Construction Summary Reports, Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams), and Well Development and Testing Data sheets. Appendix B contains the results of chemical analysis of groundwater samples. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma-ray logs and borehole deviation surveys and Appendix D contains initial results of slug tests. The non-conformance report for borehole 299-W11-46 is provided in Appendix E.

  18. Discussion paper on applicability of oil and grease analysis for RCRA closure criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    A site characterization (SC) was performed for the Building 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility. The initial SC indicated areas which had oil and grease levels above the criteria of the currently proposed RCRA closure plan. After further investigation, it was demonstrated that the oil and grease parameter may not be an accurate indication of a release from this facility and should not be included as a contaminant of concern in the closure criteria.

  19. US Department of Energy`s Federal Facility Compliance Act Chief Financial Officer`s Report to Congress for fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992 (FFCAct) (Public Law 102-386) was enacted into law on October 6, 1992. In addition to amending the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the FFCAct requires the US Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare an annual report from the Chief Financial Officer to the Congress on compliance activities undertaken by the DOE with regard to mixed waste streams and provide an accounting of the fines and penalties imposed upon the DOE for violations involving mixed waste. This document has been prepared to report the necessary information. Mixed waste is defined by the FFCAct to include those wastes containing both hazardous waste as defined in the RCRA and source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. Section 2001 et seq.). Section 2 of this report briefly summarizes DOE Headquarters` activities conducted during Fiscal Year 1993 (FY 1993) to comply with the requirements of the FFCAct. Section 3 of this report provides an overview of the site-specific RCRA compliance activities, relating to mixed waste streams, conducted in FY 1993 for those sites that currently generated or store mixed waste that are subject to regulation under RCRA. Section 4 provides information on notifications of alleged RCRA violations involving mixed waste imposed upon the DOE during FY 1993 and an accounting of any fines and penalties associated with these violations. Appendix A provides site-specific summaries of RCRA compliance activities, relating to mixed waste streams, conducted in FY 1993 for those sites that currently generate or store mixed waste that are subject to regulation under RCRA.

  20. Health Risk Assessment for Area 514 RCRA Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, G M; Hall, L C

    2005-05-26

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a USDOE research and development institution for science and technology applied to national security. The specific area that is the subject of this document, Area 514, was the location of active LLNL waste treatment facilities until November 2003, and the operations there were authorized under interim status. The site is being closed pursuant to the requirements of the Resource Conservation Recovery Act. The DTSC-approved ''Closure Plan for Area 514 Treatment and Storage Facility, LLNL 2004'', states clean closure concentrations for certain organic compounds, metals and metalloids. if all soil samples contained measured concentrations less than these levels, it was agreed that the site would meet the requirements for clean closure. However, if the samples had measured concentrations greater than the clean closure levels, a more detailed risk assessment could be prepared to evaluate the potential effects of the actual measured levels. Soil samples collected from 33 locations in Area 514 were analyzed for 37 constituents of potential concern, as identified by the Closure Plan. Many of these compounds and elements were not detected. However, 10 metals or metalloids were present at levels above the clean closure requirements, and 19 organic compounds were identified as contaminants of potential concern. Following the guidance in the Closure Plan, a health risk assessment is presented in this document to demonstrate the low level of potential health effects from the remaining constituents and to support clean closure of the site. Three types of hypothetical receptors were identified: an intrusive construction worker conducting trenching in the area, a bystander worker in a nearby building, and a future resident. Of the worker receptors, the intrusive construction worker was found to have the greater overall chronic exposure, with a theoretical calculated carcinogenic risk of 4 x 10{sup -8}, a chronic hazard index of 8 x

  1. RCRA Facility Investigation Plan K-1004 Area Lab Drain and the K-1007-B Pond - Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    ORGDP, Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc.

    1988-12-01

    Within the confines of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) are hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities; some are in operation while others are no longer in use. these solid waste management units (SWMUs) are subject to assessment by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Plans are scheduled to be submitted for all units during calendar years 1987 and 1988. The RFI Plan - General Document (K/HS-132) includes information applicable to all the ORGDP SMWUs and serves as a reference document for the site-specific RFI plans. This document is the site-specific RFI Plan for the K-1004 Area Lab Drain (ALD) and the K-1007-B Pond. This plan is based upon requirements described in the draft document, RFI Guidance, Vols. I-IV, December 1987 (EPA 530/SW-87-001). This unit is regulated by Section 3004(u) of the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). Contained within this document are geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological data specific to the K-1004 ALD and the K-1007-B Pond. The potential for release of contamination through the various media to receptors is addressed. A sampling plan is proposed to further determine the extent (if any) of release of contamination to the surrounding environment. Included are health and safety procedures to be followed when implementing the sampling plan. Quality control (QC) procedures for remedial action occurring on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are presented in 'The Environmental Surveillance Procedures Quality Control Program, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (ESH/Sub/87-21706/1), and quality assurance (QA) guidelines for ORGDP investigations are contained in The K-25 Remedial Actions Program Quality Assurance Plan, K/HS-231.

  2. 75 FR 70947 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... (RCRA) et seq., the pre-treatment requirements of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Clean Water... the State of $75,000 and Garvey will be required to sell his collection of classic cars, boats, and... Environmental Protection Agency, Region 7, 901 N. 5th St., Kansas City, KS 66101. During the public...

  3. RCRA delisting of agent-decontaminated waste and remediation waste at Dugway Proving Ground: A program update

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.; O`Neill, H.J.

    1996-03-01

    In July 1988, the state of Utah issued regulations that declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, and testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues were designated as corrosive, reactive, toxic, and acute hazardous (Hazardous Waste No. F999). These residues are not listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which is the primary law governing management of hazardous waste in the United States. The RCRAI regulations (40 CFR 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other state hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous but allow generators to petition the regulator to {open_quotes}delist{close_quotes} if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. In 1994, the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command FECOM initiated a project with the Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to demonstrate that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous waste and to achieve delisting. The initial focus is on delisting agent-decontaminated residues and soil with a history of contamination at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), Utah. An overview of the DPG delisting program was presented at the 1995 American Defense Preparedness Association Environmental Symposium. Since that time, much progress has been made. The purpose of this paper is to review the DPG delisting program and discuss overall progress. Emphasis is placed on progress with regard to analytical methods that will be used to demonstrate that the target residues do not contain hazardous amounts of chemical agent.

  4. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5, Technical Memorandums 06-09A, 06-10A, and 06-12A: Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring).

  5. RCRA Facility investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5, Technical Memorandums 06-09A, 06-10A, and 06-12A

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a detailed summary of the activities carried out to sample groundwater at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The analytical results for samples collected during Phase 1, Activity 2 of the WAG 6 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) are also presented. In addition, analytical results for Phase 1, activity sampling events for which data were not previously reported are included in this TM. A summary of the groundwater sampling activities of WAG 6, to date, are given in the Introduction. The Methodology section describes the sampling procedures and analytical parameters. Six attachments are included. Attachments 1 and 2 provide analytical results for selected RFI groundwater samples and ORNL sampling event. Attachment 3 provides a summary of the contaminants detected in each well sampled for all sampling events conducted at WAG 6. Bechtel National Inc. (BNI)/IT Corporation Contract Laboratory (IT) RFI analytical methods and detection limits are given in Attachment 4. Attachment 5 provides the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Analytical Chemistry Division (ACD) analytical methods and detection limits and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) quarterly compliance monitoring (1988--1989). Attachment 6 provides ORNL/ACD groundwater analytical methods and detection limits (for the 1990 RCRA semi-annual compliance monitoring).

  6. Disemployment effects caused by regulation of drilling fluids and produced waters as hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    SciTech Connect

    Flaim, S.J.

    1988-03-01

    This report reviews and compares several studies of the effects on employment of regulating wastes from oil and natural gas exploration and extraction under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The waste management scenarios on which most of the studies were based were developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The analyses show that as many as 500,000-700,000 jobs may be lost in the first year if RCRA Subtitle C rules are applied to drilling fluids and produced waters. As a results, unemployment in major oil-producing states could rise by as much as six percentage points. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. CERCLA and RCRA requirements affecting cleanup of a hazardous waste management unit at a Superfund site: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, T.J.

    1995-03-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) attempted to address both RCRA and CERCLA requirements at the fire training facility (FTF) by integrating a CERCLA removal action work plan with a RCRA closure plan. While the regulatory agencies involved with the FTF cleanup agreed the integrated document was a good idea, implementation proved complicated, owing to disposition of clean debris from a Superfund site, treatment of contaminated media, duration of cleanup activities, and cleanup certification. While all the complications have not been resolved, solutions to all have been proposed to Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA. Both agencies have worked closely with FEMP to find the most effective fulfillment of RCRA and CERCLA requirements.

  8. 40 CFR 264.603 - Post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....603 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES... treatment or storage unit has contaminated soils or ground water that cannot be completely removed...

  9. 40 CFR 265.119 - Post-closure notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or operator must identify the type, location and quantity of the hazardous wastes to the best of his... has been used to manage hazardous wastes; and (ii) Its use is restricted under 40 CFR part 265... all contaminated structures, equipment, and soils, he must request a modification to the approved...

  10. 40 CFR 265.119 - Post-closure notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or operator must identify the type, location and quantity of the hazardous wastes to the best of his... has been used to manage hazardous wastes; and (ii) Its use is restricted under 40 CFR part 265... all contaminated structures, equipment, and soils, he must request a modification to the approved...

  11. 40 CFR 265.119 - Post-closure notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or operator must identify the type, location and quantity of the hazardous wastes to the best of his... has been used to manage hazardous wastes; and (ii) Its use is restricted under 40 CFR part 265... all contaminated structures, equipment, and soils, he must request a modification to the approved...

  12. 40 CFR 265.119 - Post-closure notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or operator must identify the type, location and quantity of the hazardous wastes to the best of his... has been used to manage hazardous wastes; and (ii) Its use is restricted under 40 CFR part 265... all contaminated structures, equipment, and soils, he must request a modification to the approved...

  13. 40 CFR 265.119 - Post-closure notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or operator must identify the type, location and quantity of the hazardous wastes to the best of his... has been used to manage hazardous wastes; and (ii) Its use is restricted under 40 CFR part 265... all contaminated structures, equipment, and soils, he must request a modification to the approved...

  14. 40 CFR 265.280 - Closure and post-closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... contaminants caused by wind erosion; and (4) Compliance with § 265.276 concerning the growth of food-chain..., including amount, frequency, and pH of precipitation; (5) Geological and soil profiles and surface and subsurface hydrology of the site, and soil characteristics, including cation exchange capacity, total...

  15. 40 CFR 265.280 - Closure and post-closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... contaminants caused by wind erosion; and (4) Compliance with § 265.276 concerning the growth of food-chain..., including amount, frequency, and pH of precipitation; (5) Geological and soil profiles and surface and subsurface hydrology of the site, and soil characteristics, including cation exchange capacity, total...

  16. 40 CFR 264.603 - Post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... treatment or storage unit has contaminated soils or ground water that cannot be completely removed or....603 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL...

  17. 40 CFR 264.603 - Post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... treatment or storage unit has contaminated soils or ground water that cannot be completely removed or....603 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL...

  18. 40 CFR 264.603 - Post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... treatment or storage unit has contaminated soils or ground water that cannot be completely removed or....603 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL...

  19. 40 CFR 146.72 - Post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... appropriate over the life of the well, but no later than the date of the closure report required under § 146... well, and the owner of the surface or subsurface property on or in which a Class I hazardous...

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF DOE'S POST-CLOSURE MONITORING NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    The 2006 plan sets an ambitious agenda for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the remediation of sites contaminated by decades of nuclear weapons production activities. The plan's primary objective is to reduce overall clean up costs by first eliminating the environmental problems that are most expensive to control and safely maintain. In the context of the 2006 Plan, closure refers to the completion of area or facility specific cleanup projects. The cleanup levels are determined by the planned future use of the site or facility. Use restrictions are still undecided for most sites but are highly probable to exclude residential or agricultural activities. Most of the land will be remediated to ''industrial use'' levels with access restrictions and some areas will be closed-off through containment. Portions of the site will be reserved for waste disposal, either as a waste repository or the in-situ immobilization of contaminated soil and groundwater, and land use will be restricted to waste disposal only. The land used for waste disposal will require monitoring and maintenance activities after closure. Most of the land used for industrial use may also require such postclosure activities. The required postclosure monitoring and maintenance activities will be imposed by regulators and stakeholders. Regulators will not approve closure plans without clearly defined monitoring methods using approved technologies. Therefore, among all other more costly and labor-intensive closure-related activities, inadequate planning for monitoring and lack of appropriate monitoring technologies can prevent closure. The purpose of this project is to determine, document, and track the current and evolving postclosure monitoring requirements at DOE-EM sites. This information will aid CMST-CP in guiding its postclosure technology development and deployment efforts.

  1. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

  2. Data Quality Objective Summary Report for Waste Disposition CY2003 Waste Management Area A-AX RCRA Wells

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS, G.S.

    2003-05-03

    The purpose of this data quality objective (DQO) summary report is to develop a sampling plan designed for waste disposition of soil cuttings and drilling-related wastes that will result from the drilling of two new RCRA wells, C4122 and C4123.

  3. Evaluation of an Alternative Statistical Method for Analysis of RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Charissa J.

    2004-06-24

    Statistical methods are required in groundwater monitoring programs to determine if a RCRA-regulated unit affects groundwater quality beneath a site. This report presents the results of the statistical analysis of groundwater monitoring data acquired at B Pond and the 300 Area process trenches during a 2-year trial test period.

  4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Sites quality assurance project plan: Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) describes the measures that shall be taken to ensure that the environmental data collected during characterization and closure activities of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are meaningful, valid, defensible, and can be used to achieve project objectives. These activities are conducted by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Nevada Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The Nevada ER Project consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The RCRA Industrial Sites subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada ER Project. Currently, this QAPjP is limited to the seven RCRA Industrial Sites identified within this document that are to be closed under an interim status and pertains to all field-investigation, analytical-laboratory, and data-review activities in support of these closures. The information presented here supplements the RCRA Industrial Sites Project Management Plan and is to be used in conjunction with the site-specific subproject sampling and analysis plans.

  5. Management of hazardous waste at RCRA facilities during the flood of `93 -- Methods used and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.; Jacko, R.B.

    1996-11-01

    During the summer of 1993, the state of Iowa experienced severe flooding that caused the release of many hazardous materials into the environment. Six months after the flood, the Iowa section of the RCRA branch, US EPA Region 7, sent inspectors to survey every RCRA facility in Iowa. Information was gathered through questionnaires to determine the flood`s impact and to learn potential lessons that could be beneficial in future flood disasters. The objective of this project was to use the information gathered to determine effective storage methods and emergency procedures for handling hazardous material during flood disasters. Additional data were obtained through record searches, phone interviews, and site visits. Data files and statistics were analyzed, then the evident trends and specific insights observed were utilized to create recommendations for RCRA facilities in the flood plain and for the federal EPA and state regulatory agencies. The recommendations suggest that RCRA regulated facilities in the flood plain should: employ the safest storage methods possible; have a flood emergency plan that includes the most effective release prevention available; and take advantage of several general suggestions for flood protection. The recommendations suggest that the federal EPA and state regulatory agencies consider: including a provision requiring large quantity generators of hazardous waste in the flood plain to include flood procedures in the contingency plans; establishing remote emergency storage areas during the flood disasters; encouraging small quantity generators (SQGs) within the flood plain to establish flood contingency plans; and promoting sound flood protection engineering practices for all RCRA facilities in the flood plain.

  6. Savannah River Site RCRA Facility Investigation plan: Road A Chemical Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The nature of wastes disposed of at the Road A Chemical Basin (RACB) is such that some degree of soil contamination is probable. Lead has also been detected in site monitoring wells at concentrations above SRS background levels. A RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) is proposed for the RACB and will include a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of soil cores, installation of groundwater monitoring wells, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of groundwater samples, and collection of chemical and radiological analyses of surface water and sediment samples. Upon completion of the proposed RFI field work and chemical and radiological analyses, and RFI report should be prepared to present conclusions on the nature and extent of contamination at the site, and to make recommendations for site remediation. If contamination is detected at concentrations above SRS background levels, a receptor analysis should be done to evaluate potential impacts of site contamination on nearby populations.

  7. X-ray Sources in the RCrA Dark Cloud Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon; Garmire, Audrey

    2002-04-01

    The RCrA Dark Cloud Complex was observed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory on 7 October 2000 for 19706 s using the ACIS-I array in faint mode. The image covers 286 sq. arc min centered on the Coronet Cluster, the thckest part of the Dark Cloud. A total of 102 X-ray point sources were detected above a threshold of 7x10**(-16) ergs/cm^2/s in the 0.4 - 8.0 keV band assuming a Raymond and Smith plasma with a temperature of 6.7 M deg and Solar abundance. About one third are identified with cataloged optical and infrared sources with 14% detected only in the infrared. X-ray Spectra of the brightest 10 sources will be presented. A comparison with other young stellar complexes will be made.

  8. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah Sd

    2002-02-12

    The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is the first in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from RCRA borehole bore samples and composite samples. Intact cores from two RCRA boreholes (299-W22-48 and 299-W22-50) near the SX Tank Farm and four, large-quantity grab samples from outcrop sediment on and off the Hanford Site were sampled to better understand the fate of contaminants in the vadose zone beneath underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. Borehole and outcrop samples analyzed for this report are located outside the tank farms, and therefore may be considered standard or background samples from which to compare contaminated sediments within the tank farms themselves. This report presents our interpretation of the physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties of the uncontaminated vadose zone sediments, and variations in the vertical distribution of these properties. The information presented in this report is intended to support preparation of the S-SX Field Investigation Report to be prepared by CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. as well as future remediation actions at the S-SX Tank Farm.

  9. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  10. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  11. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Sections 1 through 3

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-01

    WAG 6 comprises a shallow land burial facility used for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) and, until recently, chemical wastes. As such, the site is subject to regulation under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). To comply with these regulations, DOE, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), developed a strategy for closure and remediation of WAG 6 by 1997. A key component of this strategy was to complete an RFI by September 1991. The primary objectives of the RFI were to evaluate the site's potential human health and environmental impacts and to develop a preliminary list of alternatives to mitigate these impacts. The WAG 6 one of three solid waste management units evaluated Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) existing waste disposal records and sampling data and performed the additional sampling and analysis necessary to: describe the nature and extent of contamination; characterize key contaminant transport pathways; and assess potential risks to human health and the environment by developing and evaluating hypothetical receptor scenarios. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risks as a result for exposure to radionuclides and chemicals were quantified for each hypothetical human receptor. For environmental receptors, potential impacts were qualitatively assessed. Taking into account regulatory requirements and base line risk assessment results, preliminary site closure and remediation objectives were identified, and a preliminary list of alternatives for site closure and remediation was developed.

  12. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Sections 1 through 3: Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    WAG 6 comprises a shallow land burial facility used for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) and, until recently, chemical wastes. As such, the site is subject to regulation under RCRA and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). To comply with these regulations, DOE, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), developed a strategy for closure and remediation of WAG 6 by 1997. A key component of this strategy was to complete an RFI by September 1991. The primary objectives of the RFI were to evaluate the site`s potential human health and environmental impacts and to develop a preliminary list of alternatives to mitigate these impacts. The WAG 6 one of three solid waste management units evaluated Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) existing waste disposal records and sampling data and performed the additional sampling and analysis necessary to: describe the nature and extent of contamination; characterize key contaminant transport pathways; and assess potential risks to human health and the environment by developing and evaluating hypothetical receptor scenarios. Estimated excess lifetime cancer risks as a result for exposure to radionuclides and chemicals were quantified for each hypothetical human receptor. For environmental receptors, potential impacts were qualitatively assessed. Taking into account regulatory requirements and base line risk assessment results, preliminary site closure and remediation objectives were identified, and a preliminary list of alternatives for site closure and remediation was developed.

  13. Data Package for Calendar Year 2002 RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Wells at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.

    2003-04-15

    Two new RCRA groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the single-shell tank farm at Waste Management Area TX-TY in October and November 2002. This document provides the information on drilling and construction of these wells. Two new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring wells were installed at the single-shell tank farm Waste Management Area (WMA) TX-TY in October and November 2002 in fulfillment of Tri-Party Agreement (Ecology et al. 1998) Milestone M-24-00N. The well names are 299-W14-19 and 299-W15-44; the corresponding well numbers are C3957 and C3956, respectively. Well 299-W14-19 is located east of the central part of the TX Tank Farm and is a downgradient well filling a gap in the monitoring network between wells 299-W14-14 and 299-W14-6. Well 299-W15-44 is located at the southwest corner of the TX Tank Farm in an area where groundwater flow has been artificially altered toward the southwest by the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit pump-and-treat system. The well is in the cone of depression of the 200-ZP-1 extraction wells and is downgradient of WMA TX-TY. The locations of all wells in the WMA TX-TY monitoring network are shown on Figure 1. The original assessment monitoring plan for WMA TX-TY was issued in 1993 (Caggiano and Chou 1993). That plan was updated for the continued assessment at WMA TX-TY in 2001 (Hodges and Chou 2001). The updated plan provides justification for the new wells. The new wells were constructed to the specifications and requirements described in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-160 and WAC 173-303, the updated assessment plan for WMA TX-TY (Hodges and Chou 2001), and the description of work for well drilling and construction. This document compiles information on the drilling and construction, geophysical logging, and sediment and groundwater sampling applicable to the installation of wells 299-W14-19 and 299-W15-44. The information on drilling and construction, well development, and pump

  14. RCRA and Operational Monitoring (ROM). Multi-Year Program Plan and Fiscal Year 95 Work Plan WBS 1.5.3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-17

    This document contains information concerning the RCRA and Operational Monitoring Program at Hanford Reservation. Information presented includes: Schedules for ground water monitoring activities, program cost baseline, program technical baseline, and a program milestone list.

  15. RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Air emission standards (40 cfr parts 264/265, subparts aa, bb, and cc) updated July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The module provides a regulatory overview of the RCRA air emission standards as they apply to hazardous waste facilities. It outlines the history of RCRA air emission standards as well as the air emission controls required by the standards. It explains the difference in the parts 264/265 and subparts AA, BB and CC, air emission standards. It summarizes the requirements of each of these subparts and identifies the types of units subject to these requirements as well as specific exemptions.

  16. Generators of oily waste settle with EPA and gain right to contribution from other defendants under RCRA

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    In a consent decree filed on June 21, 1994, EPA settled with five of ten defendants named in a suit involving a contaminated oil reprocessing site in Wyoming. The federal government had sued the ten parties under RCRA Section 7003 for creating an {open_quotes}imminent and substantial endangerment to health or the environment{close_quotes}. The consent decree requires the five settling parties to clean up the site and pay a $300,000 civil penalty. In a separate ruling, dated June 2, 1994, the US District Court for the District of Wyoming permitted the parties settling with EPA to proceed against a non-settlors for their respective shares of the cleanup costs. Thus, the ruling determined that a right to contribution exists under RCRA-a right not specifically granted under the statute previously.

  17. Feasibility study of X-ray K-edge analysis of RCRA heavy metal contamination of sludge packaged in drums

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.

    1999-10-01

    A study has been completed to assess the capabilities of X-ray K-edge analysis in the measurement of RCRA metal contamination of sludge packaged in drums. Results were obtained for mercury and lead contamination. It was not possible to measure cadmium contamination using this technique. No false positive signals were observed. In cases where uniformity of the sludge can be assumed, this analysis can provide a quick, accurate measurement of heavy-metal contamination.

  18. Borehole Data Package for Calendar Year 2000-2001 RCRA Wells at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area T

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Hodges, Floyd N.

    2001-08-15

    This document compiles information of the drilling and construction, well development, pump installation, and sediment and groundwater sampling applicable to the installation of five new RCRA wells in calendar year 2000 - 2001. Appendix A contains the Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams); the Well Construction Summary Reports, and the geologist's logs; Appendix B contains physical properties data; and Appendix C contains the borehole geophysical logs.

  19. RCRA, Superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (updated February 1998)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    Topics addressed include the following: Regulatory Summary (Role and Definition of Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements); Types of ARARs; Extent of ARARs: On-Site vs. Off-Site Management; Remedial vs. Removal Actions; To-Be-Considered Guidelines and Other Controls; ARAR Identification (ARAR Identification Process); Federal ARARs: RCRA, CAA, CWA, SDWA, TSCA; State and Local ARARs and ARAR Waivers; and Module Summary.

  20. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents.

  1. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-02-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents.

  2. Phase report 1C, TA-21 operable unit RCRA Facility Investigation, Outfalls Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-28

    This phase report summarizes the results of field investigations conducted in 1992 at Technical Area 21 of Los Alamos National Laboratory, as prescribed by the RCRA Facility Investigation work plan for the Technical Area 21 operable unit (also known as OU 1106). This phase report is the last part of a three-part phase report describing the results of field work conducted in 1992 at this operable unit. Phase Report lA, issued on l4 June l993, summarized site geologic characterization activities. Phase report 1B, issued on 28 January 1994, included an assessment of site-wide surface soil background, airborne emissions deposition, and contamination in the locations of two former air filtration buildings. The investigations assessed in Phase Report 1C include field radiation surveys and surface and near-surface sampling to characterize potential contamination at 25 outfalls and septic systems listed as SWMUs in the RFI work plan. Based on the RFI data, it is recommended that no further action is warranted for 8 SWMUs and further action is recommended for 3 SWMUs addressed in this phase report. For 14 SWMUs which represent no immediate threat to human health or environment, deferral of further action/no further action decisions is recommended until outstanding analytical data are received, sampling of adjacent SWMUs is completed, or decisions are made about the baseline risk assessment approach.

  3. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA) Oak Ridge National Laboratory addendum August 25, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    The RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA) report identified approximately 250 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) that were grouped into 20 Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Identification of each SWMU included information as to location, type, size, dates of operation, type of waste handled, and evidence of releases. Preliminary sampling studies were performed around each WAG to determine if there was evidence of releases beyond its perimeter. Analytical results from the surveys and historical information were the basis for recommendations concerning further actions for each WAG. Remedial investigations (RIs) were recommended for WAGs 1--10 and 17; for WAGs 14, 16, 18, and 20, it was suggested that they be removed from further consideration for remedial action. For the remaining WAGs (11, 12, 13, 15, and 19) the evidence concerning the possible release of contaminants was inconclusive and additional sampling was recommended. The purpose of this Addendum is to report the analytical data obtained from the additional surveys, to make recommendations concerning future remedial actions within these WAGs, and to provide descriptive information for additional sites listed in Table 1.2 of the RFA. Since information concerning the rationale for identifying releases, the sampling survey methodology, and background information for each WAG is presented in the RFA, it is not repeated in this Addendum.

  4. Determination of biodegradability kinetics of RCRA compounds using respirometry for structure-activity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, H.H.; Desai, S.; Govind, R.

    1990-01-01

    Electrolytic respirometry is attaining prominence in biodegradation studies and is becoming one of the more suitable experimental methods for measuring the biodegradability and the kinetics of biodegradation of toxic organic compounds by the sewage, sludge, and soil microbiota and for determining substrate inhibitory effects to microorganisms in wastewater treatment systems. The purpose of the study was to obtain information on biological treatability of the benzene, phenol, phthalate, ketone organics and of the Superfund CERCLA organics bearing wastes in wastewater treatment systems which will support the development of an EPA technical guidance document on the discharge of the above organics to POTWs. The paper discusses the experimental design and procedural steps for the respirometric biodegradation and toxicity testing approach for individual organics or specific industrial wastes at different concentration levels in a mineral salts medium. A developed multi-level protocol is presented for determination of the biodegradability, microbial acclimation to toxic substrates and first order kinetic parameters of biodegradation for estimation of the Monod kinetic parameter of toxic organic compounds, in order to correlate the extent and rate of biodegradation with a predictive model based on chemical properties and molecular structure of these compounds. Respirometric biodegradation/inhibition and biokinetic data are provided for representative RCRA alkyl benzene and ketone organics.

  5. Sulfur polymer cement encapsulation of RCRA toxic metals and metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, C.L. Jr.; Nulf, L.E.; Gorin, A.H.

    1995-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine the suitability of Sulfur Polymer Cement (SPC) encapsulation technology for the stabilization of RCRA toxic metal and metal oxide wastes. In a series of bench-scale experiments, the effects of sodium sulfide additions to the waste mixture, residence time, and temperature profile were evaluated. In addition, an effort was made to ascertain the degree to which SPC affords chemical stabilization as opposed to physical encapsulation. Experimental results have demonstrated that at the 25 wt % loading level, SPC can effectively immobilize Cr, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Hg, Pb, and Se to levels below regulatory limits. SPC encapsulation also has been shown to significantly reduce the leachability of other toxic compounds including PbO, PbO{sub 2}, As{sub 2}O{sub 3}, BaO, and CdO. In addition, data has confirmed sulfide conversion of Hg, Pb, PbO, PbO{sub 2}, and BaO as the product of their reaction with SPC.

  6. ACT: Acting Out Central Theme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kise, Joan Duff

    1982-01-01

    The author describes ACT (Acting Out Central Theme), a method for dealing with psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains in slow readers. The ACT approach involves three sessions which focus on discussion of a theme such as friendship, presentaton of the theme as a skit, and assignment of topics to individual students. (SW)

  7. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D. Brent; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2000-11-28

    The 216-B-3 Pond was a series of ponds for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In 1990, groundwater monitoring at B Pond was elevated from "detection" to assessment status because total organic halides and total organic carbon were found to exceed critical means in two wells. Groundwater quality assessment, which ended in 1996, failed to find any specific hazardous waste contaminant that could have accounted for the isolated occurrences of elevated total organic halides and total organic carbon. Hence, the facility was subsequently returned to detection-level monitoring in 1998. Exhaustive groundwater analyses during the assessment period indicated that only two contaminants, tritium and nitrate, could be positively attributed to the B Pond System, with two others (arsenic and I-129) possibly originating from B Pond. Chemical and radiological analyses of soil at the main pond and 216-B-3-3 ditch has not revealed significant contamination. Based on the observed, minor contamination in groundwater and in the soil column, three parameters were selected for site-specific, semiannual monitoring; gross alpha, gross beta, and specific conductance. Total organic halides and total organic carbon are included as constituents because of regulatory requirements. Nitrate, tritium, arsenic, and iodine-129 will be monitored under the aegis of Hanford site-wide monitoring. Although the B Pond System is not scheduled to advance from RCRA interim status to final status until the year 2003, a contingency plan for an improved monitoring strategy, which will partially emulate final status requirements, will be contemplated before the official change to final status. This modification will allow a more sensible and effective screening of groundwater for the facility.

  8. Juggling Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudalevige, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Two education bills from George W. Bush's first term are long overdue for reauthorization. One, of course, is the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), passed in late 2001. The other is the Education Sciences Reform Act (ESRA), which in November 2002 replaced the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) with a new Institute of Education…

  9. Title III list of lists: Consolidated list of chemicals subject to the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act, as ammended. Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This consolidated list has been prepared to help firms handling chemicals determine whether they need to submit reports under sections 302, 304, or 313 of SARA Title III (EPCRA) and, for a specific chemical, what reports may need to be submitted. It will also help firms determine whether they will be subject to accident prevention regulations under CAA section 112(r). Separate lists are also provided of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste streams and unlisted hazardous wastes, and of radionuclides reportable under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). These lists should be used as a reference tool, not as a definitive source of compliance information.

  10. RCRA Part B permit modifications for cost savings and increased flexibility at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jierree, C.; Ticknor, K.

    1996-10-01

    With shrinking budgets and downsizing, a need for streamlined compliance initiatives became evident at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Therefore, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services (RMRS) at the RFETS successfully and quickly modified the RFETS RCRA Part B Permit to obtain significant cost savings and increased flexibility. This `was accomplished by requesting operations personnel to suggest changes to the Part B Permit which did not diminish overall compliance and which would be most. cost beneficial. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsequently obtained approval of those changes from the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment (CDPHE).

  11. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  12. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  13. ACT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: ACT; Activated Coagulation Time Formal name: Activated Clotting Time Related tests: ... in the blood called platelets and proteins called coagulation factors are activated in a sequence of steps ...

  14. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  15. Enforcement actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.M.; Baxter, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    The Army continues to receive enforcement actions (EAS) that detract from its image as a conscientious adherent to environmental laws. In some cases, receipt of violations may indicate the persistent presence of systemic problems. In the past 2 years, the Army has been investigating its EAs to determine whether some problems are more prevalent than others and what can be done to resolve them. This report addresses EAs issued to the Army pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and similar state laws and their implementing regulations. RCRA is similar to other regulatory programs reviewed by the Logistics Management Institute, in that the root causes were in procedural and oversight failures. Thus, action taken to address the systemic problems in any of the environmental program areas should relieve compliance problems in all areas. The systemic problems occur in four general areas: maintaining knowledgeable staff; spreading awareness of requirements to operators and supervisors who are not part of the environmental staff; improving oversight of environmentally sensitive operations conducted by both government and contractor personnel; and, once people have the appropriate knowledge, holding them responsible for applying it. We recommend that the Army hold individuals having responsibility for the operation and oversight of environmentally sensitive facilities accountable for proper performance, devise means to make RCRA training more effective, and require certifications and continuing professional development of environmental professionals.

  16. Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document.

  17. Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-02-01

    This report contains the groundwater monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). In July 1997, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved modifications to several of the permit conditions that address RCRA pow-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (Security Pits), and RCIU4 post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (Sediment Disposal Basin) and Kerr Hollow Quarry. This report has been prepared in accordance with these modified permit requirements. Also included in this report are the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 1997 for the purposes ofi (1) detection monitoring at nonhazardous solid waste disposal facilities (SWDFS) in accordance with operating permits and applicable regulations, (2) monitoring in accordance with Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Recove~ Act Records of Decision (now pefiormed under the Integrated Water Quality Program for the Oak Ridge Reservation), and (3) monitoring needed to comply with U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.1.

  18. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Grace Road Site (631-22G)

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1998-10-02

    This report summarizes the activities and documents the results of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation conducted at Grace Road Site on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

  19. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site, Washington, Interim Change Notice 3

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ronald M.

    2006-01-20

    This ICN updates the assessment plan to reflect the current wells in the monitoring system and the current constituent list for WMA S-SX in compliance with RCRA assessment monitoring. This ICN supplements all previous ICNs. This document was prepared under the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014).

  20. The munitions provisions of the Federal Facility Compliance Act

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmell, T.A.; Green, D.R.; Queen, R.

    1994-03-01

    The Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA) was signed by President Bush on October 6, 1992. This Act amends the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the primary law governing hazardous waste management in the US The most significant provision of the FFCA was the waiver of sovereign immunity. This waiver subjects Federal facilities to the same ``incentives`` as the private sector for compliance. While the waiver has broad implications for all Federal facilities, other provisions of the FFCA impact specific sectors of the Federal complex. The focus of this paper is the FFCA Munitions Provisions, which have the potential to change some aspects of the structure of munitions management within the military. The Munitions Provisions, contained in Section 107 of the FFCA, modifies Section 3004 of RCRA by adding a new subsection (y) on Munitions. Section 107 requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop, after consultation with the Department of Defense (DOD) and appropriate State officials, regulations identifying when military munitions (including conventional and chemical munitions) become hazardous waste, and to provide for the safe transportation and storage of such waste. The FFCA requires EPA to promulgate the final ``Munitions Rule`` by October 6, 1994. These are the only provisions of the FFCA that require a new rulemaking. It is clear that the Munitions Rule could have a significant effect on the way in which DOD manages munitions. Demilitarization, range management, training activities, and emergency response actions may be affected. It is important for DOD, the Services, and individual installations, to be aware of potential impacts of the FFCA on munitions management operations. The purpose of this paper is to review several important munitions Rule issues, and to discuss potential impacts of these issues.