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Sample records for act toxic substances

  1. Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  2. TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TEST SUBMISSIONS (TSCATS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions (TSCATS) is an online index to unpublished, nonconfidential studies covering chemical testing results and adverse effects of chemicals on health and ecological systems. The studies are submitted by U.S. industry to EPA under several s...

  3. 77 FR 18248 - Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry; Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry; Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes a list of information... in the Navajo Nation--New--Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) and Centers...

  4. 40 CFR 261.8 - PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false PCB wastes regulated under Toxic... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE General § 261.8 PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act. The disposal of PCB-containing dielectric fluid and...

  5. 40 CFR 261.8 - PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false PCB wastes regulated under Toxic... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE General § 261.8 PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act. The disposal of PCB-containing dielectric fluid and...

  6. 40 CFR 261.8 - PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false PCB wastes regulated under Toxic... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE General § 261.8 PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act. The disposal of PCB-containing dielectric fluid and...

  7. 40 CFR 261.8 - PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false PCB wastes regulated under Toxic... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE General § 261.8 PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act. The disposal of PCB-containing dielectric fluid and...

  8. 19 CFR 12.118 - Toxic Substances Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... States of a chemical substance in bulk or as part of a mixture, or article containing a chemical... of the Treasury in consultation with the Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”)....

  9. 48 CFR 1552.235-78 - Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Data Security for Toxic... CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.235-78 Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act...: Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997)...

  10. 48 CFR 1552.235-78 - Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Data Security for Toxic... CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.235-78 Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act...: Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997)...

  11. 48 CFR 1552.235-78 - Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Data Security for Toxic... CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.235-78 Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act...: Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997)...

  12. 48 CFR 1552.235-78 - Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Data Security for Toxic... CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.235-78 Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act...: Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997)...

  13. 48 CFR 1552.235-78 - Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Data Security for Toxic... CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.235-78 Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act...: Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997)...

  14. 76 FR 38169 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... FR 22402) (FRL-7312-2), and later amended by a final rule titled ``Revocation of TSCA Section 4... 12, 2006 (71 FR 18650) (FRL-7751-7). Section 4(d) of TSCA (15 U.S.C. 2603(d)) requires EPA to publish... AGENCY Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data AGENCY:...

  15. 78 FR 69414 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... October 21, 2011 (76 FR 65385) (FRL-8885-5) (docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPPT-2009-0112). The table in this... AGENCY Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces EPA's receipt of test data on...

  16. 78 FR 72818 - Electronic Reporting Under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... Reporting Under the Toxic Substances Control Act; Proposed Rule. Federal Register (77 FR 22707, April 17... Electronic Reporting; Revisions to Notification Regulations; Final Rule. Federal Register (75 FR 773, January... (70 FR 59855, October 13, 2005) (FRL-7977-1). VII. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews A....

  17. Environmental Guidance Program reference book: Toxic substances control act. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  18. Toxic Substances Control Act. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  19. Toxic substances Control Act inspection manual. Vol. 1 and Vol. 2. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Volume one: Toxic Substances Control Act base manual provides general information relating to the act. Inspector authorities and responsibilities are discussed along with the elements and scope of inspections. Procedures which are common to all inspections are outlined in detail: Pre-Inspection Preparation, Entry, Opening Conference, Records Inspection, Documentary Support, Sampling, Chain of Custody, Safety, Closing Conference, and Report Preparation. Special procedures are listed, and all TSCA forms are presented and explained. Information is also included on data systems, warrants, shipping samples, and testifying in court. Volume two: provides the specific information necessary for conducting a comprehensive inspection for PCBs. An Enforcement Strategy details EPA plans and provides an overview of the regulation. Inspecting, sampling, and reporting procedures for PCBs in specific industries are provided.

  20. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) chemical substances inventory: PMN number to EPA accession number link (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The PMN Number to EPA Accession Number Link Diskette provides a cross-reference of these numbers for commenced PMNs on the confidential portion of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Master Inventory File. Neither this cross-reference nor the additional information included is TSCA Confidential Business Information. Provided on the diskette for each confidential commenced PMN are the PMN Case Number, EPA Accession Number, Generic Name, and EPA special flags. For more detailed information on the confidential portion of the TSCA Inventory, including generic names, users can consult the introductory material of the printed TSCA Inventory: 1985 Edition and its 1990 Supplement. New versions of this file may be issued in the future.

  1. Uranium effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, J.T.; Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Ho, T.C.

    1993-07-01

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator has been undergoing a series of routine tests to determine uranium partitioning to the stack, scrubber waters, and bottom ash. This paper discusses the results of the most recent experiment in which relatively high rates of uranium stack gas emissions were identified: 6.11 g/h or 8 wt % based on the uranium feed. These data are compared with earlier data, and an empirical correlation is suggested between the stack emissions of uranium and the product of the uranium and chlorine concentration of the feed. This is consistent with certain findings with other metals, in which increasing chlorine feed contents led to increasing emissions.

  2. Toxic substances handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junod, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    Handbook, published in conjunction with Toxic Substances Alert Program at NASA Lewis Research Center, profiles 187 toxic chemicals in their relatively pure states and include 27 known or suspected carcinogens.

  3. Review of organic nitrile incineration at the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) operates the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly called the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, where uranium was enriched under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Currently, ETTP missions include environmental management, waste management (WM), and the development of new technologies. As part of its WM mission, ETTP operates the TSCA (Toxic Substances Control Act) Incinerator (TSCAI) for treatment of hazardous waste and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contaminated with low-level radioactivity. Beginning in the autumn of 1995, employees from diverse ETTP buildings and departments reported experiencing headaches, fatigue, depression, muscle aches, sleeplessness, and muscle tremors. These symptoms were judged by a physician in the ETTP Health Services Department to be consistent with chronic exposures to hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was called in to perform a health hazard evaluation to ascertain whether the employees` illnesses were in fact caused by occupational exposure to HCN. The NIOSH evaluation found no patterns for employees` reported symptoms with respect to work location or department. NIOSH also conducted a comprehensive air sampling study, which did not detect airborne cyanides at the ETTP. Employees, however, expressed concerns that the burning of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have produced HCN as a combustion product. Therefore, LMES and DOE established a multidisciplinary team (TSCAI Technical Review Team) to make a more detailed review of the possibility that combustion of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have either released nitriles or created HCN as a product of incomplete combustion (PIC).

  4. Toxic substances alert program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junod, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    A toxicity profile is provided, of 187 toxic substances procured by NASA Lewis Research Center during a 3 1/2 year period, including 27 known or suspected carcinogens. The goal of the program is to assure that the center's health and safety personnel are aware of the procurement and use of toxic substances and to alert and inform the users of these materials as to the toxic characteristics and the control measures needed to ensure their safe use. The program also provides a continuing record of the toxic substances procured, who procured them, what other toxic substances the user has obtained in the past, and where similar materials have been used elsewhere at the center.

  5. 77 FR 22707 - Electronic Reporting Under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Regulatory Review'' (76 FR 3821, January 21, 2011). EPA has prepared an economic analysis of this action.... EPA. Electronic Toxic Control Act (eTSCA)/e-PMN Reporting Tool User's Guide. 7. EPA. Economic Analysis... submitters would ultimately exceed the transition costs (see Economic Analysis referenced in Unit IV.)....

  6. The findings of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Medical Waste Tracking Act report.

    PubMed Central

    Lichtveld, M Y; Rodenbeck, S E; Lybarger, J A

    1992-01-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) report "The Public Health Implications of Medical Waste: A Report to Congress" has been finalized and submitted to Congress. The report is a comprehensive review of all available data and information on the subject. Based on the data developed in the report, ATSDR concludes that the general public is not likely to be adversely affected by medical waste generated in the traditional health setting. However, the increase of in-home health care and other sources of nonregulated medical waste (e.g., intravenous drug users) provides opportunities for the general public to contact medical waste. In addition, ATSDR concludes that public health concerns exist for selected occupations involved with medical waste. These populations include janitorial and laundry workers, nurses, emergency medical personnel, and refuse workers. The ATSDR report also defines what material should be managed as medical waste and identifies research needs related to medical waste. PMID:1486856

  7. 76 FR 38170 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... issue of March 16, 2006 (71 FR 13708) (FRL-7335-2). Section 4(d) of TSCA (15 U.S.C. 2603(d)) requires... Toxicity to Fish. 9. Acute Toxicity to Aquatic Invertebrates. 10. Toxicity to Aquatic Plants, e.g.,...

  8. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Operations, Level III

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    A Level III pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator to evaluate pollution prevention (P2) options for various waste streams: The main objective of this study was to identify and evaluate options to reduce the quantities of each waste stream generated by the TSCA Incinerator operations to realize significant environmental and/or economic benefits from P2. For each of the waste streams, P2 options were evaluated following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hierarchy to (1) reduce the quantity of waste generated, (2) recycle the waste, and/or (3) use alternate waste treatment or segregation methods. This report provides process descriptions, identification and evaluation of P2 options, and final recommendations.

  9. 40 CFR 261.8 - PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE General § 261.8 PCB wastes... hazardous only because they fail the test for the Toxicity Characteristic (Hazardous Waste Codes...

  10. 78 FR 64210 - Extension of Review Periods Under the Toxic Substances Control Act; Certain Chemicals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ...Due to the federal government shutdown related to the lack of authorized funding (i.e., a Fiscal Year 2014 Appropriations Bill or a Continuing Resolution), EPA is extending the review periods for all Premanufacture Notices (PMNs), Significant New Use Notices (SNUNs), Microbial Commercial Activity Notices (MCANs), and exemption notices submitted to the Agency under section 5 of the Toxic......

  11. Toxic Substances in the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of toxic substances, examining pesticides and herbicides, heavy metals, industrial chemicals, and household substances. Includes a list of major toxic substances (indicating what they are, where they are found, and health concerns) and a student activity on how pesticides enter the food chain. (JN)

  12. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)/Radioactive Waste Annual Inventory for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect

    no author on report

    2014-06-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act, 40 CFR 761.65(a)(1) provides an exemption from the one year storage time limit for PCB/radioactive waste. PCB/radioactive waste may exceed the one year time limit provided that the provisions at 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(ii) and 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(iii) are followed. These two subsections require, (ii) "A written record documenting all continuing attempts to secure disposal is maintained until the waste is disposed of" and (iii) "The written record required by subsection (ii) of this section is available for inspection or submission if requested by EPA." EPA Region 10 has requested the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit an inventory of radioactive-contaminated PCB waste in storage at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the previous calendar year. The annual inventory is separated into two parts, INL without Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) (this includes Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, and the Naval Reactors Facility), and AMWTP.

  13. Impacts & Compliance Implementation Plans & Required Deviations for Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Regulation of Double Shell Tanks (DST)

    SciTech Connect

    MULKEY, C.H.

    2000-08-22

    In May 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held meetings regarding the management of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Hanford tank waste. It was decided that the radioactive waste currently stored in the double-shell tanks (DSTs) contain waste which will become subject to the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) (40 CFR 761). As a result, DOE-ORP directed the River Protection Project tank farm contractor (TFC) to prepare plans for managing the PCB inventory in the DSTs. Two components of the PCB management plans are this assessment of the operational impacts of TSCA regulation and the identifications of deviations from TSCA that are required to accommodate tank farm unique limitations. This plan provides ORP and CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) with an outline of TSCA PCB requirements and their applicability to tank farm activities, and recommends a compliance/implementation approach. Where strict compliance is not possible, the need for deviations from TSCA PCB requirements is identified. The purpose of assembling this information is to enhance the understanding of PCB management requirements, identify operational impacts and select impact mitigation strategies. This information should be useful in developing formal agreements with EPA where required.

  14. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)/Radioactive Waste Annual Inventory for Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, Deborah L.

    2015-06-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act, 40 CFR 761.65(a)(1) provides an exemption from the one year storage time limit for PCB/radioactive waste. PCB/radioactive waste may exceed the one year time limit provided that the provisions at 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(ii) and 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(iii) are followed. These two subsections require, (ii) "A written record documenting all continuing attempts to secure disposal is maintained until the waste is disposed of" and (iii) "The written record required by subsection (ii) of this section is available for inspection or submission if requested by EPA." EPA Region 10 has requested the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit an inventory of radioactive-contaminated PCB waste in storage at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the previous calendar year. The annual inventory is separated into two parts, INL without Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) (this includes Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, and the Naval Reactors Facility), and AMWTP.

  15. 40 CFR 2.306 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Toxic Substances Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mixture; and toxicological, clinical, and ecological studies of a chemical substance or mixture; (B) Any... some third person. (c) Basic rules which apply without change. Sections 2.201 through 2.203, 2.206, 2.207, and 2.210 through 2.215 apply without change to information to which this section applies....

  16. Reauthorization of Toxic Substances Control Act for fiscal year 1984. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Commerce, Transportation, and Tourism of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, April 21, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    A hearing to reauthorize the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) reviewed evidence that few new chemicals introduced into the consumer market are tested for toxicity and that no testing rules have been issued in the seven years of TSCA's existence in contrast to the testing record of some European countries. The 13 witnesses represented the Chamber of Commerce, conservation and environmental groups and agencies, and manufacturers of potentially toxic materials. The latter cited the economic burden on small businesses and the constraints on innovation that TSCA has had. Others stressed potential health hazards from untested materials and the poor record of TSCA implementation. (DCK)

  17. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, A.; Sarofim, A.F.; Palmer, C.A.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Lighty, J.; Veranth, J.; Helble, J.J.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Ames, M.R.; Finkelman, R.; Mamani-Paco, M.; Sterling, R.; Mroczkowsky, S.J.; Panagiotou, T.; Seames, W.

    1999-05-10

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environ-mental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 January 1999 to 31 March 1999. During this period, a full Program Review Meeting was held at the University of Arizona. At this meeting, the progress of each group was reviewed, plans for the following 9 month period were discussed, and action items (principally associated with the transfer of samples and reports among the various investigators) were identified.

  18. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    SciTech Connect

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  19. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator emissions tests of January 16 and 18, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, J.T. ); Bostick, W.D.; Coroneos, A.C.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L. )

    1992-02-01

    On January 16 and 18, 1991, special emissions tests were conducted at the Oak Ridge, K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. Both tests were approximately 6 h long and were performed at TSCA temperatures (1200{degrees}C, secondary combustion chamber (SSC)). Liquid feed and effluent samples were collected every 30 min. A filter was used to collect particles from stack gases to study morphology and composition during the first test. Isokinetic air samples were also taken during the second test. Metals emissions from the second test were evaluated using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 5 sampling train. The aqueous waste was collected and fed in batches to the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF), where it was treated by iron coprecipitation and polymer flocculation and data were collected. In the first test (1-16-91), the aqueous and organic wastes were fed directly to the kiln or primary combustion chamber (PCC). In the second test (1-18-91), the remaining organic waste from the first test was fed into the SSC, and other organic waste was fed into the PCC. One objective of the two tests was to determine if feeding the same organic waste into the two combustion chambers made a difference in a partitioning of uranium and other metals. No evaluation of radionuclides other than uranium was made. The partition coefficient of uranium to the quench water was 0.3 on January 16 and 0.35 on January 18; so directing Tank 306A to the feed to the primary vs the secondary combustion chamber appears to have made little difference. The partition coefficient of uranium to the stack on January 18 was 0.0039. 5 refs., 15 figs., 26 tabs.

  20. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator emissions tests of January 16 and 18, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, J.T.; Bostick, W.D.; Coroneos, A.C.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L.

    1992-02-01

    On January 16 and 18, 1991, special emissions tests were conducted at the Oak Ridge, K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. Both tests were approximately 6 h long and were performed at TSCA temperatures [1200{degrees}C, secondary combustion chamber (SSC)]. Liquid feed and effluent samples were collected every 30 min. A filter was used to collect particles from stack gases to study morphology and composition during the first test. Isokinetic air samples were also taken during the second test. Metals emissions from the second test were evaluated using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 5 sampling train. The aqueous waste was collected and fed in batches to the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF), where it was treated by iron coprecipitation and polymer flocculation and data were collected. In the first test (1-16-91), the aqueous and organic wastes were fed directly to the kiln or primary combustion chamber (PCC). In the second test (1-18-91), the remaining organic waste from the first test was fed into the SSC, and other organic waste was fed into the PCC. One objective of the two tests was to determine if feeding the same organic waste into the two combustion chambers made a difference in a partitioning of uranium and other metals. No evaluation of radionuclides other than uranium was made. The partition coefficient of uranium to the quench water was 0.3 on January 16 and 0.35 on January 18; so directing Tank 306A to the feed to the primary vs the secondary combustion chamber appears to have made little difference. The partition coefficient of uranium to the stack on January 18 was 0.0039. 5 refs., 15 figs., 26 tabs.

  1. K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Ch.A.; Tiepel, E.W.; Swientoniewski, M.D.; Crow, K.R.

    2008-07-01

    This paper will discuss the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. The incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (blow down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinerator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 7.95 to 17 cubic meters per hour (m3/hr) (35 to 75 gallons per minute; gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, micro-filtration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to

  2. K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect

    Swientoniewski M.D.

    2008-02-24

    This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other

  3. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mandate Congressional Testimony Board of Scientific Counselors Regional Offices Program Overview ATSDR en Español A-Z Index Multimedia Tools Special Initiatives Publications Sites Toxic Substances Health Registries ...

  4. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    A KOLKER; AF SAROFIM; CL SENIOR; FE HUGGINS; GP HUFFMAN; I OLMEZ; J LIGHTY; JOL WENDT; JOSEPH J HELBLE; MR AMES; N YAP; R FINKELMAN; T PANAGIOTOU; W SEAMES

    1998-12-08

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, the Lignite Research Council, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO combustion systems, and new power generation x plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 July 1998 through 30 September 1998. During this period distribution of all three Phase II coals was completed. Standard analyses for the whole coal samples were also completed. Mössbauer analysis of all project coals and fractions received to date has been completed in order to obtain details of the iron mineralogy. The analyses of arsenic XAFS data for two of the project coals and for some high arsenic coals have been completed. Duplicate splits of the Ohio 5,6,7 and North Dakota lignite samples were taken through all four steps of the selective leaching procedure. Leaching analysis of the Wyodak coal has recently commenced. Preparation of polished coal/epoxy pellets for probe/SEM studies is underway. Some exploratory mercury LIII XAFS work was carried

  5. Food and Gill Exchange of Toxic Substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    Food and Gill Exchange of Toxic Substances (FGETS) is a FORTRAN simulation model that predicts temporal dynamics of fish whole body concentration (ug chemical/(g live weight fish)) of non ionic, non metabolized, organic chemicals that are bioaccumulated from either: (a) water onl...

  6. 40 CFR 798.6560 - Subchronic delayed neuro-toxicity of organophosphorus substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Subchronic delayed neuro-toxicity of organophosphorus substances. 798.6560 Section 798.6560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Neurotoxicity § 798.6560 Subchronic...

  7. 40 CFR 798.6560 - Subchronic delayed neuro-toxicity of organophosphorus substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Subchronic delayed neuro-toxicity of organophosphorus substances. 798.6560 Section 798.6560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Neurotoxicity § 798.6560 Subchronic...

  8. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c) (1)(ii)(C... with additional strips and should fit snugly around the trunk of the animal. The ends of the sleeve...

  9. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... that does not require animals, are presented in the CPSC's animal testing policy set forth in 16 CFR... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c)...

  10. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c) (1)(ii)(C... with additional strips and should fit snugly around the trunk of the animal. The ends of the sleeve...

  11. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... testing toxic substances. Guidelines for testing the toxicity of substances, including testing that does not require animals, are presented in the CPSC's animal testing policy set forth in 16 CFR 1500.232. A... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances....

  12. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c) (1)(ii)(C... with additional strips and should fit snugly around the trunk of the animal. The ends of the sleeve...

  13. VERIFICATION OF A TOXIC ORGANIC SUBSTANCE TRANSPORT AND BIOACCUMULATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field verification of the Toxic Organic Substance Transport and Bioaccumulation Model (TOXIC) was conducted using the insecticide dieldrin and the herbicides alachlor and atrazine as the test compounds. The test sites were two Iowa reservoirs. The verification procedure include...

  14. Toxic Substances Registry System Index of Material Safety Data Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The July 1997 revision of the Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored at KSC.

  15. Progress report and technology status development of an EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha/beta particulate monitor for use on the East Tennessee Technology Park Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, J.T.; Singh, S.P.N.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to modify and evaluate a commercially available EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha-beta radionuclide particulate monitor for the high-temperature and moisture-saturation conditions of the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Site) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator stack. The monitor was originally outfitted for operation at gas temperatures of 150 F on the defunct Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) controlled air incinerator, and the objective was to widen its operating envelope. A laboratory apparatus was constructed that simulated the effects of water-saturated air at the TSCA Incinerator stack-gas temperatures, 183 F. An instrumented set of heat exchangers was constructed to then condition the gas so that the radionuclide monitor could be operated without condensation. Data were collected under the conditions of the elevated temperatures and humidities and are reported herein, and design considerations of the apparatus are provided. The heat exchangers and humidification equipment performed as designed, the Mylar film held, and the instrument suffered no ill effects. However, for reasons as yet undetermined, the sensitivity of the radionuclide detection diminishes as the gas temperature is elevated, whether the gas is humidified or not. The manufacturer has had no experience with (a) the operation of the monitor under these conditions and (b) any commercial market that might exist for an instrument that operates under these conditions. The monitor was not installed into the radiologically contaminated environment of the TSCA Incinerator stack pending resolution of this technical issue.

  16. Persistent toxic substances in Mediterranean aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Miniero, Roberto; Abate, Vittorio; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Davoli, Enrico; De Felip, Elena; De Filippis, Stefania P; Dellatte, Elena; De Luca, Silvia; Fanelli, Roberto; Fattore, Elena; Ferri, Fabiola; Fochi, Igor; Rita Fulgenzi, Anna; Iacovella, Nicola; Iamiceli, Anna Laura; Lucchetti, Dario; Melotti, Paolo; Moret, Ivo; Piazza, Rossano; Roncarati, Alessandra; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Zambon, Stefano; di Domenico, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Fish and fishery products may represent one of the main sources of dietary exposure to persistent toxic substances (PTSs) such as polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls; polybromodiphenyl ethers; organochlorine pesticides; perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate; and inorganic mercury and methyl mercury. In this study, PTS contamination of Mediterranean fish and crustaceans caught in Italian coastal waters was investigated in order to increase the representativeness of the occurrence database for wild species. The objectives were to verify the suitability of regulatory limits for PTSs, identify background concentrations values, if any, and examine the possible sources of variability when assessing the chemical body burdens of aquatic species. Twelve wild species of commercial interest and two farmed fish species were chosen. Excluding methyl mercury, chemical concentrations found in wild species fell generally towards the low ends of the concentration ranges found in Europe according to EFSA database and were quite lower than the tolerable maximum levels established in the European Union; farmed fish always showed contamination levels quite lower than those detected in wild species. The data obtained for wild species seemed to confirm the absence of local sources of contamination in the chosen sampling areas; however, species contamination could exceed regulatory levels even in the absence of specific local sources of contamination as a result of the position in the food web and natural variability in species' lifestyle. A species-specific approach to the management of contamination in aquatic organisms is therefore suggested as an alternative to a general approach based only on contaminant body burden. A chemical-specific analysis performed according to organism position in the food chain strengthened the need to develop this approach. PMID:25020099

  17. Toxic Substances in the Environment. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Ronald J.

    Modern society is very dependent upon numerous chemical substances. Chemicals have a wide variety of uses, including drugs to prolong our lives and pesticides to control insect and weed pests. Life would be drastically different without the availability of these chemical substances but, while the benefits of chemicals should be appreciated, the…

  18. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity) is disclosed. Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. Mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics, are also disclosed.

  19. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Jul. 1992 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  20. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Oct. 1992 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  1. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Jan. 1993 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  2. Testing toxic substances for protection of the environment.

    PubMed

    Draggan, S; Giddings, J M

    1978-01-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act requires pre-production testing of chemicals for potential hazards to human and environmental health. Effective control of chemicals requires evaluations of chemical hazard that go beyond determinations of toxicity to humans to include the effects, transport, and fat of chemicals in the environemnt. Formulation of meaningful hazard evaluations depends on integrating information from tests of chemical effects, transport, and fate or by developing testing tools that integrate these factors during experimentation. Chemical effects may be acute or chronic and they may be observed individual organisms, populations or organisms, or in total ecosystems. Chemical transport through the environment depends on physico-chemical characteristics of the chemical and the medium (soil, water, or air) as well as environmental factors and biotic processes. The ultimate fate of chemicals (persistence, transformation, or degradation) is determined by numerous physical and biological processes occurring in the environment, and must be acknowledged to effectively determine the hazard. Many techniques are available for the separate and routine evaluation of the effects, transport and fate of environmental contaminants. However, separate identification of the importance and magnitude of each of these factors limits their utility in assessments of chemical hazard. The microcosm (model ecosystem) method integrates many of these tests in replicable experimental units, and may provide substantial information on chemical hazard in ecosystem context. PMID:622550

  3. S. 2637: A Bill to amend the Toxic Substances Control Act to reduce the levels of lead in the environment, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, May 16, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the Senate of the United States on May 16, 1990 to amend the Toxic Substances Control Act to reduce the levels of lead in the environment. Provisions are provided on the following: restrictions on continuing uses of certain lead-containing products; inventory of lead-containing products; product labeling; recycling of lead-acid batteries; prohibited acts; lead abatement and measurement; establishment of national centers for the prevention of lead poisoning; reporting of blood-lead levels and blood-lead laboratory reference project; update to 1988 report to Congress on childhood lead poisoning; conforming amendments; and authorization of appropriations.

  4. Analysis of the impact of the regulation of toxic substances on Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Pigg, J.

    1980-10-01

    In recent years, Congress has passed two regulatory acts, namely the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) and the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) which seek to control the manufacture, use, and disposal of hazardous chemical substances. These acts can have a significant impact on Sandia's missions and will particularly affect those organizations involved in materials development and selection. The primary purpose of this report is to describe in some detail the impact of these acts on Sandia's corporate goals and make recommendations on what our response should be. Also described in this report is the present position of Sandia with respect to these regulatory acts and the policies and actions that Sandia has taken to date in an effort to minimize their impact.

  5. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics.

  6. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  7. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) listed in this index reflect product inventories and associated MSDSs which have been submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry database maintained by the Base Operations Contractor at the Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this index is to provide a means to access information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  8. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) listed reflect product inventories and associated MSDSs which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry data base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of NASA Kennedy. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at NASA Kennedy. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  9. Toxic Substances Registry System. Index of Material Safety Data Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The October 1994 revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSD's) is presented. The listed MSD's which were submitted to the TSRS are maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  10. Mercury toxicity. Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Because mercury has several forms and because it produces subtle effects at chronic low-level exposures, mercury toxicity can be a difficult diagnosis to establish. Elemental mercury vapor accounts for most occupational and many accidental exposures. The main source of organic methyl mercury exposure in the general population is fish consumption. Children are at increased risk of exposure to elemental mercury vapor in the home because it tends to settle to the floor. The chemical and physical forms of mercury determine its absorption, metabolism, distribution and excretion pathways. The central nervous system and kidneys are key targets of mercury toxicity. Chelation therapy has been used successfully in treating patients who have ingested mercury salts or inhaled elemental mercury. There is no antidote for patients poisoned with organic mercury.7 references.

  11. Toxic substances registry system. Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The January 1995 revision of the index of material safety data sheets is presented. The index of toxic substances is divided by maufacturer, tradename, stock number, and distributor. This index provides a means of accessing information including hazards, uses, and chemical composition of materials stored and used at KSC's Biomedical Operations and Research Office.

  12. Development of a test system for screening toxic substances: a comparison using organic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a test system for screening toxic substances by predicting their aquatic ecosystem effects. The system studied was a static, one liter microcosm with a diverse species assemblage. The microcosm was composed of biotic inoculum, chemically defined medium and sediment. The biotic inoculum contained primary producers, grazers, carnivores and decomposers. Three different types of sediment were studied: sand, clay, and clay plus sand. Four organic chemicals: phenol, triethylene glycol (TEG), quinoline and naphthoquinone were evaluated with this test system. The toxicities of TEG, quinoline and naphthoquinone were compared for each sediment type. Toxicity was evaluated in terms of the chemical's effects on primary productivity and heterotrophic activity though other effects are also noted. Naphthoquinone concentration exhibited no correlation between ecosystem property values and therefore, could not be ranked. Phenol exhibited the greatest toxicity to net production immediately after the toxicant addition. Quinoline was most toxic to net production over the longer time scale. TEG exhibited the least toxicity to net production, however, TEG exhibited higher toxicity to heterotrophic activity than either quinoline or phenol. Although the type of sediment used in the microcosms did not change the relative toxicities of the chemicals, the microcosms with clay sediment always were observed to exhibit lower net production and higher variability.

  13. Rice seed toxicity tests for organic and inorganic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.

    1994-01-01

    Plant seed toxicity tests can be used to evaluate hazardous waste sites and to assess toxicity of complex effluents and industrial chemicals. Conventional plant seed toxicity tests are performed using culture dishes containing filter paper. Some reports indicate that filter papers might interfere with the toxicity of inorganic substances. In this study, a plastic seed tray was used. Rice was used as the test species. A comparison of results in the literature and this study revealed that variation of test species, methods, exposure duration, and other factors may affect the test results. The results of this study showed that the order of decreasing toxicity of metal ions was Cu>Ag>Ni>Cd>Cr(VI)>Pb>Zn>Mn>NaF for rice. The test results were similar to those reported in the literature for lettuce Ag>Ni>Cd,Cu>Cr (VI)>Zn>Mn, millet Cu,Ni>Cd>Cr(VI)>Zn>Mn, and ryegrass Cu>Ni>Mn>>Pb>Cd>Zn> Al>Hg>Cr>Fe. The order of decreasing toxicity of organic herbicides was paraquat, 2,4-D>>glyphosate>bromacil.

  14. Reducing groundwater pollution by toxic substances: Procedures and policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterstone, Marvin

    1987-11-01

    One major source of water-related health problems is the improper disposal of toxic substances in the environment. Toxic materials leaching from unregulated and unlined pits, ponds, lagoons, and landfills have created a widespread environmental nightmare in the United States and many other parts of the world. At present, there are two major and interrelated components of this problem in the United States. The first is the issue of cleaning up abandoned disposal sites that pose actual or potential threats to water supplies. The second aspect of the problem concerns the necessity of siting proper management, treatment, or disposal facilities in the future. Priorities must be set to allow efficient, effective, and equitable allocation of the scarce resources that are available for accomplishing these tasks. This article examines a number of the issues involved in setting these priorities, and presents the results obtained from a study of risk estimation and evaluation in the context of groundwater contamination by toxic substances. The article introduces a new concept of risk estimation, which is shown to produce more accurate and credible risk analyses. Finally, the relationships between risk credibility and public perceptions of procedural fairness and equity are examined as these factors bear on the institutional aspects of implementing policies for site cleanup and/or facility siting.

  15. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) listed in this index reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substances Registry database maintained by the Base Operations Contractor at the Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this index is to provide KSC government, contractor, and tenant organizations a means to access information on the hazards associated with these chemicals. The Toxic Substance Registry Service (TSRS) was established to manage information dealing with the storage and use of toxic and otherwise hazardous materials at KSC. As a part of this service, the BOC Environmental Health Services maintains a central repository of MSDS's which were provided to TSRS. The data on the TSRS are obtained from NASA, contractor, and tenant organizations who use or store hazardous materials at KSC. It is the responsibility of these organizations to conduct inventories, obtain MSDS's, distribute Hazard Communication information to their employees, and otherwise implement compliance with appropriate Federal, State, and NASA Hazard Communication and Worker Right-to-Know regulations and policies.

  16. USGS TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION -- FORMS OF OCCURRENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Allan Kolker; Stanley J. Mroczkowski; Curtis A. Palmer; Robert B. Finkelman

    1999-04-01

    Detailed information on trace-element modes of occurrence in coal is essential to understanding and predicting trace-element transformations taking place during coal combustion. The USGS has developed quantitative and semi-quantitative methods for determining the mode of occurrence of trace elements in coal. This information is needed to generate predictive models for trace-element behavior, the ultimate goal of DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95101 ``Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion--A Comprehensive Assessment'' awarded to PSI, Inc. USGS activities in support of this contract have a direct bearing on the predictive equations being developed as the primary product of the PSI program.

  17. Monitoring of toxic substances in the Hong Kong marine environment.

    PubMed

    Kueh, C S W; Lam, J Y C

    2008-01-01

    A long-term programme for monitoring toxic substances in the marine environment was established in Hong Kong in 2004, focusing on chemicals of potential ecological and health concern. The programme ran on 3-year cycles, with the first two years monitoring marine water, sediment, biota, and the third year monitoring pollution sources. Twenty-four priority chemicals were measured, including dioxins/furans, dioxin-like PCBs, total PCBs, PAHs, DDTs, HCHs, TBTs, phenol, nonylphenol (NP), NP ethoxylates, PBDEs and metals. Results from the first three years of monitoring indicate that toxic substances in the Hong Kong marine environment were within the range reported for the coastal waters in China and other regions, but generally lower than in the Pearl River Estuary. The levels met the standards for protecting aquatic life and human consumption. Sewage effluent, stormwater and river water were possible sources of phenolic compounds; whereas air deposition or regional pollution, rather than local discharges, may contribute to the dioxins/furans, PAHs and PCBs found in the marine environment. PMID:18358499

  18. 16 CFR 1500.129 - Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act. 1500.129 Section 1500.129 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.129 Substances named in...

  19. Abuse deterrent formulations and the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Frank L

    2006-06-01

    The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) has reduced the diversion of controlled substances at the manufacturing and distribution levels. Recent increased diversion has occurred at the retail level. Levels of diversion and abuse of controlled substances with similar abuse potential and therapeutic indications often parallel availability for medical use, while rates of diversion and abuse may be influenced by factors related to specific products, including their formulations and risk management plans. Abuse deterrent formulations may reduce abuse and attendant adverse health consequences even if the products are diverted. Their development should consider how, to what extent and by whom products containing the targeted substance are abused. It should take into consideration all potential types of abuse including "as is", multiple doses, alternate routes of administration, physical or chemical separation of the active ingredient, compromised extended release mechanisms and abuse in combination with other substances. Industry incentives for developing abuse-resistant formulations include enhanced corporate image and potentially less restrictive scheduling or risk management plans. Scheduling is substance specific, but the CSA includes products/formulations that are differentially scheduled. Issues to be considered for differential scheduling under the CSA include: (1) whether there is legal authority to do so; (2) application of standard scheduling criteria to individual products; (3) product specific data for "eight factor analyses"; (4) development of predictive data and standards accepted by the scientific and regulatory communities; (5) use of predictive data or post marketing surveillance data; (6) international treaty obligations. These issues must be addressed before differential scheduling can be considered. PMID:16529882

  20. CALSITES, ANNUAL WORK PLAN (AWP), CA DEPARTMENT OF TOXIC SUBSTANCE CONTROL(DTSC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) has developed an electronic database system with information about sites that are known to be contaminated with hazardous substances as well as information on uncharacterized properties where further studies may reveal...

  1. Sequential assessment via daphnia and zebrafish for systematic toxicity screening of heterogeneous substances.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun Hyuk; Park, Chang-Beom; Kang, Benedict J; Kim, Young Jun; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-09-01

    Environment and organisms are persistently exposed by a mixture of various substances. However, the current evaluation method is mostly based on an individual substance's toxicity. A systematic toxicity evaluation of heterogeneous substances needs to be established. To demonstrate toxicity assessment of mixture, we chose a group of three typical ingredients in cosmetic sunscreen products that frequently enters ecosystems: benzophenone-3 (BP-3), ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC), and titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2 NP). We first determined a range of nominal toxic concentration of each ingredient or substance using Daphnia magna, and then for the subsequent organismal level phenotypic assessment, chose the wild-type zebrafish embryos. Any phenotype change, such as body deformation, led to further examinations on the specific organs of transgenic zebrafish embryos. Based on the systematic toxicity assessments of the heterogeneous substances, we offer a sequential environmental toxicity assessment protocol that starts off by utilizing Daphnia magna to determine a nominal concentration range of each substance and finishes by utilizing the zebrafish embryos to detect defects on the embryos caused by the heterogeneous substances. The protocol showed additive toxic effects of the mixtures. We propose a sequential environmental toxicity assessment protocol for the systematic toxicity screening of heterogeneous substances from Daphnia magna to zebrafish embryo in-vivo models. PMID:27288628

  2. Toxic Substances Registry System: Index of Material Safety Data Sheets. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The January 1998 revision of the Index of Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored at KSC.

  3. Toxic Substances Registry System: Index of Material Safety Data Sheets. Volume 1; Manufacturer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The April 1998 revision of the Index of Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored at KSC.

  4. Toxic Substances Registry System: Index of Material Safety Data Sheets. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The October 1997 revision of the Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on the hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored and used at KSC.

  5. Occupational diseases associated with toxic substances and their effects upon the energy industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, C.W.

    1984-02-01

    In recent years the concept of ''toxic substances'' and the potential effects therefrom have attracted the attention and concern of the nation. Asbestosis put both society and industry on alert of the potential hazards inherent in the continued development of new chemicals and substances being employed in the work environment. Asbestosis is not the only causative element of occupational diseases. Other toxic substances currently raising concern include Agent Orange, DES (diethylstilbesterol), cotton dust, silicon and, of particular concern to the petroleum industry, benzene.

  6. Toxic substances form coal combustion--a co prehemsice assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.

    1997-04-01

    The Clean Coal Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on emission of these pollutants from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling their formation and partition will be needed. A new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) has been developed by a broad consortium to be useful to regulators and utility planners. During the last quarter coal analysis was completed on the final program coal, from the Wyodak Seam of the Powder River Basin, Combustion testing continued, including data collected on the self-sustained combustor. Efforts were directed to identify the governing mechanisms for trace element vaporization from the program coals. Mercury speciation and measurements were continued. Review of the existing trace element and organics emission literature was completed. And, model development was begun.

  7. Hazardous waste management. Volume 1: Law of toxics and toxic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, G.S.; Bartlett, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The book spells out specific requirements of various laws, who is responsible for covering costs, the rights of corporations in dealing with enforcement agencies, and liabilities and penalties. CONTENTS: Hazardous Waste Management. Constitutional Framework of Hazardous Waste Legislation. Options in Hazardous Waste Management-Overview. From Cradle to Grave: Legislative History. Summary and Analysis of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, as Amended. Hazardous Waste Management Program Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Legal Development of Remedies for Toxic Tort Plaintiffs-Common Law Remedies. Legal Development of Remedies of Hazardous Waste Victims-Statutory Remedies. Economic Issues and Aspects of Hazardous Waste Management.

  8. [Nutrition and health--toxic substances in food].

    PubMed

    Rietjens, I M; Alink, G M

    2003-11-29

    With respect to food, the most important factors causing adverse health effects are: an unbalanced diet, resulting in obesity or vitamin deficiencies, overconsumption of alcohol or fat, the presence of microbial contamination and the presence of natural toxins. Two additional factors, the presence of environmental contaminants and products formed on heating food, may also be of importance. It is generally assumed that, when combined, food-related factors contribute to around 35% of overall cancer incidence. The most important groups of health-threatening compounds to be found in the food chain include natural toxins, such as those produced by plants (phytotoxins), fungi (mycotoxins), marine algae (phycotoxins) and by bacteria, and toxins present in animals for human consumption, especially fish. A second important group of toxic compounds in food consists of environmental contaminants, including heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants, such as dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls, all of which may unintentionally end up in the food chain. A third group of toxins present in food are those substances produced when food is heated, and include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines and acrylamide. PMID:14677477

  9. Mitigation of Fe(0) nanoparticles toxicity to Trichosporon cutaneum by humic substances.

    PubMed

    Pádrová, Karolína; Maťátková, Olga; Šiková, Michaela; Füzik, Tibor; Masák, Jan; Čejková, Alena; Jirků, Vladimír

    2016-01-25

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) are a relatively new option for the treatment of contaminated soil and groundwater. However, because of their apparent toxicity, nZVI in high concentrations are known to interfere with many autochthonous microorganisms and, thus, impact their participation in the remediation process. The effect of two commercially available nZVI products, Nanofer 25 (non-stabilized) and Nanofer 25S (stabilized), was examined. Considerable toxicity to the soil yeast Trichosporon cutaneum was observed. Two chemically different humic substances (HSs) were studied as a possible protection agent that mitigates nZVI toxicity: oxidized oxyhumolite X6 and humic acid X3A. The effect of addition of HSs was studied in different phases of the experiment to establish the effect on cells and nZVI. SEM and TEM images revealed an ability of both types of nZVI and HSs to adsorb on surface of the cells. Changes in cell surface properties were also observed by zeta potential measurements. Our results indicate that HSs can act as an electrosteric barrier, which hinders mutual interaction between nZVI and treated cell. Thus, the application of HS seems to be a promising solution to mitigating the toxic action of nZVI. PMID:26455640

  10. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Removal of [123I]Ioflupane From Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-11

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes [123I]ioflupane from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act. This action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act which requires that such actions be made on the record after an opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, [123I]ioflupane was, by definition, a schedule II controlled substance because it is derived from cocaine via ecgonine, both of which are schedule II controlled substances. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle [123I]ioflupane. PMID:26364325

  11. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION: A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Senior; T. Panagiotou; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; F.E. Huggins; G.P Huffman; N. Yap; M.R. Ames; I.Olmez; T. Zeng; A.F. Sarofim; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; J.J. Helble

    1998-07-16

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (W) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO{sub x} combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from the submission of the draft Phase 1 Final Report through the end of June, 1998. During this period two of the three Phase 2 coals were procured and pulverized samples were distributed to team members. Analysis of Phase 1 X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data, particularly of mercury in sorbent samples, continued. An improved method for identifying mercury compounds on sorbents was developed, leading to a clearer understanding of forms of mercury in char and sorbents exposed to flue gas. Additional analysis of Phase 1 large scale combustion data was performed to investigate mechanistic information related to the fate of the radionuclides Cs, Th, and Co. Modeling work for this period was focused on building and testing a sub-model for vaporization

  12. Saving two birds with one stone: using active substance avian acute toxicity data to predict formulated plant protection product toxicity.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Samuel K; Edwards, Peter; Wheeler, James R

    2014-07-01

    Environmental safety assessments for exposure of birds require the provision of acute avian toxicity data for both the pesticidal active substance and formulated products. As an example, testing on the formulated product is waived in Europe using an assessment of data for the constituent active substance(s). This is often not the case globally, because some countries require acute toxicity tests with every formulated product, thereby triggering animal welfare concerns through unnecessary testing. A database of 383 formulated products was compiled from acute toxicity studies conducted with northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) or Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) (unpublished regulatory literature). Of the 383 formulated products studied, 159 contained only active substances considered functionally nontoxic (median lethal dose [LD50] > highest dose tested). Of these, 97% had formulated product LD50 values of >2000 mg formulated product/kg (limit dose), indicating that no new information was obtained in the formulated product study. Furthermore, defined (point estimated) LD50 values for formulated products were compared with LD50 values predicted from toxicity of the active substance(s). This demonstrated that predicted LD50 values were within 2-fold and 5-fold of the measured formulated product LD50 values in 90% and 98% of cases, respectively. This analysis demonstrates that avian acute toxicity testing of formulated products is largely unnecessary and should not be routinely required to assess avian acute toxicity. In particular, when active substances are known to be functionally nontoxic, further formulated product testing adds no further information and unnecessarily increases bird usage in testing. A further analysis highlights the fact that significant reductions (61% in this dataset) could be achieved by using a sequential testing design (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development test guideline 223), as opposed to established single

  13. CAPABILITY OF GC/FT-IR TO IDENTIFY TOXIC SUBSTANCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLE EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The minimum identifiable quantities of 55 toxic substances have been determined by packed column gas chromatography/Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (GC/FT-IR) at conditions compatible with environmental extract analysis. Identification of each GC effluent component was ac...

  14. [The importance of using biological test objects in studying the toxicity of surface-active substances].

    PubMed

    Mudryĭ, I V; Debrivnaia, I E

    1996-01-01

    The Azotobacter agilis [correction of azobacter agile] culture appeared to be the most sensitive one among the studied test objects. Buckwheat as a test plant can be recommended in studying the toxicity of surface-active substances. PMID:9035856

  15. Hazardous waste management. Volume 1: Law of toxics and toxic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, G.S.; Bartlett, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The book spells out specific requirements of various laws, who is responsible for covering costs, the rights of corporations in dealing with enforcement agencies, and liabilities and penalties. Readers are guided in understanding the intent of the law, areas in which it applies, and areas which are as yet undefined. The contents include; hazardous waste management, constitutional framework of hazardous waste legislation, options in hazardous waste management - overview; from cradle to grave legislative history, summary and analysis of resource conservation and recovery act of 1976, as amended; hazardous waste management program under the resource conservation and recovery act, legal development of remedies for toxic tort plaintiffs - Common Law remedies; legal development of remedies of hazardous waste victims - statutory remedies; economic issues and aspects of hazardous waste management.

  16. Toxic substances from coal combustion--forms of occurrence analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, S.S.; Palmer, C.A.; Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.B.; Kolb, K.C.; Belkin, H.E.; Willet, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project was to provide analytical support for the Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI) projects being performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-95101 entitled `Toxic Substances from Coal Combustion - A Comprehensive Assessment`. The Pittsburgh, Elkhorn/Hazard, and Illinois No. 6 program coals were examined to determine the mode of occurrence of selected trace elements (As, Se, Cr, Hg, and Ni) using selective leaching, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction techniques. Preliminary work was also completed for the Wyodak coal. Among other findings, our results indicate that the bulk of the arsenic in the Pittsburgh and Illinois No. 6 coals is in pyrite. High percentages (60-80%) of arsenic were leached by nitric acid, and microprobe data confirm the presence of arsenic in pyrite in each of these coals (concentrations ranging from <0.01 to 0.09 wt.% of the pyrite grains). In the Elkhorn/Hazard coal, arsenic may have several modes of occurrences. About 30 percent of the arsenic in the Elkhorn/Hazard coal was leached by hydrochloric acid, possibly indicating the presence of arsenates that were formed by the oxidation of pyrite. About 25 percent of the arsenic in the Elkhorn/Hazard coal was leached by nitric acid, suggesting an association with pyrite. Only sixty percent of the total arsenic in the Elkhorn/Hazard coal was leached. The low percentage of leachable arsenic may be accounted for by unleached pyrite grains, which were detected in solid residues from the nitric acid leach. In the Pittsburgh, Elkhorn/Hazard, and Illinois No. 6 coals, 20 to 25 percent of the chromium was leached by hydrofluoric acid, indicating some association with silicates (possibly illite). Microprobe analysis of these coals confirmed the presence of chromium in illite and possibly in other clays, at concentrations that were near the detection limits. Results related to the forms of occurrences of the other trace elements (Se, Hg, and Ni

  17. Toxic Substances from Coal Combustion - Forms of Occurrence Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Allan Kolker; Curtis A. Palmer; Harvey E. Belkin; Jason Willet; Kathleen C. Kolb; Robert B. Finkelman; Sharon S. Crowley; Stanley J. Mroczkowski

    1998-12-14

    In a cooperative agreement with DOE (Contract No. DE- AC22- 95101), the USGS has participated with Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI) in a project entitled "Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion -A Comprehensive Assessment". Samples from the Pittsburgh, Elkhorn/ Hazard, Illinois No. 6, and Wyodak program coals were examined to determine the mode of occurrence of selected trace elements (As, Se, Cr, Hg, and Ni) using selective leaching, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X- ray diffraction techniques. Among other findings, our results indicate that the bulk of the arsenic in the Pittsburgh and Illinois No. 6 coals is in pyrite. High percentages (60- 80%) of arsenic were leached by nitric acid, and microprobe data confirm the presence of arsenic in pyrite in each of these coals (concentrations ranging from <0.01 to 0.09 wt.% of the pyrite grains). In the Elkhorn/ Hazard coal, arsenic may have several modes of occurrences. About 30 percent of the arsenic in the Elkhorn/ Hazard coal was leached by hydrochloric acid, possibly indicating the presence of arsenates that were formed by the oxidation of pyrite. About 25 percent of the arsenic in the Elkhorn/ Hazard coal was leached by nitric acid, suggesting an association with pyrite. Only sixty percent of the total arsenic in the Elkhorn/ Hazard coal was leached. The low percentage of leachable arsenic may be accounted for by unleached pyrite grains, which were detected in solid residues from the nitric acid leach. In the Wyodak coal, arsenic probably occurs in iron oxides or carbonates (35 % arsenic leached by HCl) and clays (15% arsenic leached by HF). Arsenic in the Wyodak coal may also have an organic association, as indicated by low totals for leaching (50% unleached arsenic). In the four program coals 20 to 45 percent of the chromium was leached by hydrofluoric acid, suggesting an association with silicates (probably illite). Microprobe analysis of the Pittsburgh, Elkhorn/ Hazard, and Illinois

  18. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Senior, C.L.; Panagiotou, T.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Yap, N.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Seames, W.; Ames, M.R.; Sarofim, A.F.; Lighty, J.; Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.; Palmer, C.A.; Mroczkowsky, S.J.; Helble, J.J.; Mamani-Paco, R.

    1999-07-30

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the period from 1 April 1999 to 30 June 1999. During this quarter low temperature ashing and elemental analysis of the three Phase II coals were completed. Results from MIT and USGS are comparable. Plans were made for measurements of loss of trace elements during devolatilization and for single particle combustion studies at the University of Utah. The iodated charcoal trap was tested on coal combustion flue gas and was shown to collect both Hg and Se in from the vapor phase with 100% efficiency. Data from the University of Arizona self-sustained combustor were analyzed from the combustion of three coals: Ohio, Wyodak and Illinois No. 6. Ash size distributions and enrichment factors for selected trace elements were calculated. The correlation between the concentration of the more volatile trace elements in the ash and the

  19. 78 FR 17213 - Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Availability of Final Toxicological Profile

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... of the 275 priority substances was announced in the Federal Register on November 3rd, 2011 (76 FR... published in the Federal Register on April 27, 2011 (76 FR 23600), with notice of a 90-day public comment... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Availability of Final...

  20. Toxic substances: Effects on fish. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed upon using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN WHOLE EFFLUENT TOXICITY AND THE PRESENCE OF PRIORITY SUBSTANCES IN COMPLEX INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to examine broad-scale correlation between presence of priority substances and whole effluent toxicity (WET) across a range of industry types. Using regression analysis, we examined how chemical-based inferred toxicity predicted measured WET of the e...

  2. Guideline for the out-of-hospital management of human exposures to minimally toxic substances.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    All substances are capable of producing toxicity, so nothing is completely non-toxic. Minimally toxic substances are those which produce little toxicity, minor self-limited toxicity, or clinically insignificant effects at most doses. Examples include silica gel, A&D ointment, chalk, lipstick, and non-camphor lip balms, watercolors, hand dishwashing detergents, non-salicylate antacids (excluding magnesium or sodium bicarbonate containing products), calamine lotion, clay, crayons, diaper rash creams and ointments, fabric softeners/sheets, glow products, glue (white, arts, and crafts type), household plant food, oral contraceptives, pen ink, pencils, starch/sizing, throat lozenges without local anesthetics, topical antibiotics, topical antifungals, topical steroids, topical steroids with antibiotics, and water-based paints. Minimally toxic exposures have the following characteristics: (1) The information specialist has confidence in the accuracy of the history obtained and the ability to communicate effectively with the caller. (2) The information specialist has confidence in the identity of the product(s) or substance(s) and a reasonable estimation of the maximum amount involved in the exposure. (3) The risks of adverse reactions or expected effects are acceptable to both the information specialist and the caller based on available medical literature and clinical experience. (4) The exposure does not require a healthcare referral since the potential effects are benign and self-limited. However, decisions regarding patient disposition should take into account the patient's intent, symptoms, and social environment. In addition, individual patient circumstances (e.g., pregnancy, pre-existing medical conditions, therapeutic interventions) need to be considered. Minimally toxic exposures may vary in route (dermal, inhalation, ingestion, ocular), chronicity (acute, chronic), and substance composition (single or multi-ingredient, single or multiple product). Future

  3. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Senior; T. Panagiotou; F.E. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F Sarofim; J. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowsky; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco

    1999-11-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 July 1999 to 30 September 1999. During this period the MIT INAA procedures were revised to improve the quality of the analytical results. Two steps have been taken to reduce the analytical errors. A new nitric acid leaching procedure, modified from ASTM procedure D2492, section 7.3.1 for determination of pyritic sulfur, was developed by USGS and validated. To date, analytical results have been returned for all but the last complete round of the four-step leaching procedure. USGS analysts in Denver have halted development of the cold vapor atomic fluorescence technique for mercury analysis procedure in favor of a new direct analyzer for Hg that the USGS is in the process of acquiring. Since early June, emphasis at USGS has been placed on microanalysis of clay minerals in project coals in preparation

  4. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION-A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Senior; F. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Shah; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F. Sarofim; S. Swenson; J.S. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowski; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco; R. Sterling; G. Dunham; S. Miller

    2001-06-30

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). The work discussed in this report covers the Phase II program. Five coals were studied (three in Phase I and two new ones in Phase II). In this work UK has used XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopies to characterize elements in project coals. For coals, the principal use was to supply direct information about certain hazardous and other key elements (iron) to complement the more complete indirect investigation of elemental modes of occurrence being carried out by colleagues at USGS. Iterative selective leaching using ammonium acetate, HCl, HF, and HNO3, used in conjunction with mineral identification/quantification, and microanalysis of individual mineral grains, has allowed USGS to delineate modes of occurrence for 44 elements. The Phase II coals show rank-dependent systematic differences in trace-element modes of occurrence. The work at UU

  5. Toxicity of binary mixtures of metals and pyrethroid insecticides to Daphnia magna Straus. Implications for multi-substance risks assessment.

    PubMed

    Barata, Carlos; Baird, D J; Nogueira, A J A; Soares, A M V M; Riva, M C

    2006-06-10

    Two different concepts, termed concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA), describe general relationships between the effects of single substances and their corresponding mixtures allowing calculation of an expected mixture toxicity on the basis of known toxicities of the mixture components. Both concepts are limited to cases in which all substances in a mixture influence the same experimental endpoint, and are usually tested against a "fixed ratio design" where the mixture ratio is kept constant throughout the studies and the overall concentration of the mixture is systematically varied. With this design, interaction among toxic components across different mixture ratios and endpoints (i.e. lethal versus sublethal) is not assessed. In this study lethal and sublethal (feeding) responses of Daphnia magna individuals to single and binary combinations of similarly and dissimilarly acting chemicals including the metals (cadmium, copper) and the pyrethroid insecticides (lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin) were assayed using a composite experimental design to test for interactions among toxic components across mixture effect levels, mixture ratios, lethal and sublethal toxic effects. To account for inter-experiment response variability, in each binary mixture toxicity assay the toxicity of the individual mixture constituents was also assessed. Model adequacy was then evaluated comparing the slopes and elevations of predicted versus observed mixture toxicity curves with those estimated for the individual components. Model predictive abilities changed across endpoints. The IA concept was able to predict accurately mixture toxicities of dissimilarly acting chemicals for lethal responses, whereas the CA concept did so in three out of four pairings for feeding response, irrespective of the chemical mode of action. Interaction effects across mixture effect levels, evidenced by crossing slopes, were only observed for the binary mixture Cd and Cu for lethal effects

  6. Identification of toxic substances in United Kingdom estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.V.; Thain, J.E.; Waldock, M.J.

    1999-03-01

    The organic load of bulk water samples, collected from five industrially impacted estuaries, was extracted using solid-phase extraction. Where toxicity was demonstrated using a Tisbe battagliai bioassay, a toxicity directed fractionation scheme was applied to isolate causal compounds. To reduce the complexity of the extracts toxicity profiles were obtained following solid-phase fractionation and reverse-phase HPLC. Candidate toxic contaminants were identified by GC-MS. All procedures were evaluated with a series of reference compounds of widely differing polarity. The method was successful in identifying a number of compounds, which traditionally have not been selected for inclusion in monitoring programs, as the probable cause of detrimental environmental effect. The results suggest that chlorinated phenols are a major contributor to poor water quality in the lower reaches of the river Tyne and alkylphenol surfactant metabolites in the river Tees. Other compounds, as yet unidentified, also contribute to poor water quality. It is suggested that the identified compounds should now be surveyed more widely and considered for inclusion in future monitoring programs.

  7. Testing decisions of the TSCA Interagency Testing Committee for chemicals on the Canadian Environmental Protection Act Domestic Substances List and Priority Substances List: Di-tert-butylphenol, ethyl benzene, brominated flame retardants, phthalate esters, chloroparaffins, chlorinated benzenes, and anilines

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    In 1976, under section 4(e) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the US Congress created the TSCA Interagency Testing Committee (ITC) to decide which chemicals should be recommended to the Administrator of the US Environmental Protection Agency for testing. In 1988, under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA), the Government of Canada created the Domestic Substances List and Priority Substances List. This paper briefly describes the ITC, the different ITC testing decisions and a few of the ITC`s 11,150 testing decisions for the 21,413 chemicals on the CEPA Domestic Substances List and some of the 24 testing decisions for the 44 chemicals and chemical groups on the CEPA.

  8. Characterization of Combinatorial Effects of Toxic Substances by Cell Cultivation in Micro Segmented Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Kürsten, D.; Funfak, A.; Schneider, S.; Köhler, J. M.

    This chapter reviews the application of micro segmented flow for the screening of toxic effects on bacteria, eukaryotic microorganisms, human cells and multicellular systems. Besides, the determination of complete dose/response functions of toxic substances with a minimum of cells and chemicals, it is reviewed how two- and multi-dimensional concentration spaces can be screened in order to evaluate combinatorial effects of chemicals on cells. The challenge for the development of new and miniaturized methods is derived from the increase of the number of different used substances in technique, agriculture and medicine, from the increasing release of new substances and nanomaterials into our environment and from the improvement of the insight of toxicity of natural substances and the interferences between different substances resulting in toxic effects on different organisms, cells and tissues. The application of two-dimensional toxicological screenings on selected examples of effector combinations is described. Examples for the detection of an independent, an additive and a synergistic interference between two substances are given. In addition, it is shown that the screening for toxicological effects in complete two-dimensional concentration spaces allows the detection of complex response behaviour—for example, the formation of tolerances and stimulation peaks—which thereby can be characterized. The characterization of interference of toxic organic substances with silver nanoparticles is reported as an example for the potential of micro segmented-flow technique for evaluating the toxicological impact of new materials. Finally, it is demonstrated that the technique can be applied for different organisms like simple bacteria, single cell alga such as Chlorella vulgaris and multicellular systems up to the development of complete organisms beginning from eggs.

  9. Tracking toxic substances at industrial facilities: Engineering mass balance versus materials accounting. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In response to a congressional mandate, this book examines whether knowing the amounts of toxic substances entering and leaving manufacturing facilities is useful in evaluating chemical releases to the environment, waste reduction progress, and chemical management practices. Tracking these substances with rigorous engineering data is compared with a less resource-intensive alternative to determine the feasibility and potential usefulness to the public and the government.

  10. Silica gel as a particulate carrier of poorly water-soluble substances in aquatic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Breitholtz, Magnus; Ricklund, Niklas; Bengtsson, Bengt-Erik; Persson, N Johan

    2007-05-31

    Aquatic toxicity tests were originally developed for water-soluble substances. However, many substances are hydrophobic and thus poorly water-soluble, resulting in at least two major implications. Firstly, toxicity may not be reached within the range of water solubility of the tested compound(s), which may result in the formation of solids or droplets of the tested substance and consequently an uneven exposure. Secondly, because of multi-phase distribution of the tested substance it may be complicated to keep exposure concentrations constant. To overcome such problems, we have introduced silica gel as a particulate carrier in a toxicity test with the benthic copepod Nitocra spinipes. The main objective of the current study was to evaluate whether a controlled exposure could be achieved with the help of silica gel for testing single poorly water-soluble substances. A secondary objective was to evaluate whether an equilibrium mass balance model could predict internal concentrations that were consistent with the toxicity data and measured internal concentrations of two model hydrophobic substances, i.e., the polybrominated diphenyl ethers BDE-47 and BDE-99. Larval N. spinipes were exposed for 6 days to BDE-47 and BDE-99, respectively, in the silica gel test system and, for comparative reasons, in a similar and more traditional semi-static water test system. Via single initial amounts of the model substances administered on the silica gel, effects on both larval development and mortality resulted in higher and more concentration-related toxicity than in the water test system. We conclude that the silica gel test system enables a more controlled exposure of poorly water-soluble substances than the traditional water test system since the concentration-response relationship becomes distinct and there is no carrier solvent present during testing. Also, the single amount of added substance given in the silica gel test system limits the artefacts (e.g., increased chemical

  11. Status of scrap (recyclable) dental amalgams as environmental health hazards or toxic substances.

    PubMed

    Rogers, K D

    1989-07-01

    This article presents information garnered after an investigation by the Environmental Protection Agency in 1987 of dentists and others who had sold scrap dental amalgam to refiners who had "arranged for the disposal or treatment ... of hazardous substances," and were responsible for adverse consequences associated with their subsequent management and refining. Information about the health hazard status of scrap dental amalgams was obtained by: interviews with toxicologists, review of published lists of toxic and hazardous materials, and survey of biomedical publications (1977 through 1987) concerning toxicity or health hazards associated with dental amalgams. The conclusions were that scrap dental amalgam is not: a waste substance to be disposed of, but is a product of commercial value; identified or regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the Department of Transportation, the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, the US Public Health Service, or the Centers for Disease Control as an environmental health hazard or toxic substance; identified by toxicologists and persons responsible for solid waste regulation as a toxic substance or environmental health hazard; nor proved by scientific study to be toxic or hazardous in the manner and form in which it is collected and stored by dentists and subsequently sold to metal refiners. PMID:2668374

  12. Toxic substances: Effects on fish. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed upon using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Long-acting Preparations in Substance Abuse Management: A Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Aditya; Singh, Shubh Mohan; Sarkar, Siddharth

    2013-01-01

    Many pharmacological approaches have been used in managing substance use disorders. Conventional pharmacological agents have relatively short durations of action which make them vulnerable to non-adherence and relapse to substance use disorder. To overcome this problem, long-acting preparations have been developed with the aim of reducing the frequency of use and hence improving adherence. This review takes a broad overview of the long-acting preparations available for the management of substance use disorders. The pharmacology, advantages and disadvantages of these preparations are discussed. Many of these preparations hold promise for improving patient outcomes. PMID:23833336

  14. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    A KOLKER; AF SAROFIM; CA PALMER; FE HUGGINS; GP HUFFMAN; J LIGHTY; JJ HELBLE; JOL WENDT; MR AMES; N YAP; R FINKELMAN; R. MAMANI-PACO; SJ MROCZKOWSKY; T PANAGIOTOU; W SEAMES

    1999-01-28

    The technical objectives of this project are: (a) To identify the effect of the mode-of-occurrence of toxic elements in coal on the partitioning of these elements among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash during the combustion of pulverized coal, (b) To identify the mechanisms governing the post-vaporization interaction of toxic elements and major minerals or unburnt char, (c) To determine the effect of combustion environment (i.e., fuel rich or fuel lean) on the partitioning of trace elements among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash during the combustion of pulverized coal, (d) To model the partitioning of toxic elements among various chemical species in the vapor phase and between the vapor phase and complex aluminosilicate melts, (e) To develop the new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM), applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO{sub x} combustion systems, and new power generation plants. A description of the work plan for accomplishing these objectives is presented in Section 2.1 of this report. The work discussed in this report covers the reporting period from 1 October 1998 to 31 December 1998. During this quarter, basic coal testing at USGS was completed. Total sulfur contents range from 0.43 wt-% in the Wyodak to 2.68 wt-% in the Ohio sample. In the North Dakota and Ohio samples, about half of the total sulfur is pyritic and half is organic. The North Dakota sample also contains a minor amount of sulfate, consistent with the presence of barite in this sample. In the Wyodak sample, the majority of the sulfur is organic. Preliminary mineralogy of the three Phase II coals was determined by SEM/EDX. The Ohio coal contains all of the five most common major phases: quartz, illitic clay, kaolinitic clay, pyrite and calcite. Based on this preliminary work, the North Dakota sample appears to lack both kaolinite and calcite, and the Wyodak sample appears to lack calcite. Subsequent SEM work will attempt to reconfirm

  15. 40 CFR 1.43 - Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Office of Prevention, Pesticides and... STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.43 Office of Prevention, Pesticides and... matters pertaining to assessment and regulation of pesticides and toxic substances and is responsible...

  16. 40 CFR 1.43 - Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Office of Prevention, Pesticides and... STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.43 Office of Prevention, Pesticides and... matters pertaining to assessment and regulation of pesticides and toxic substances and is responsible...

  17. 40 CFR 1.43 - Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office of Prevention, Pesticides and... STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.43 Office of Prevention, Pesticides and... matters pertaining to assessment and regulation of pesticides and toxic substances and is responsible...

  18. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL MODEL OF TOXIC SUBSTANCES IN THE GREAT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physico-chemical model of the fate of toxic substances in the Great Lakes is constructed from mass balance principles and incorporates principal mechanisms of particulate sorption-desorption, sediment-water and atmosphere-water interactions, and chemical and biochemical decay. ...

  19. EVALUATION OF HYPERFILTRATION FOR SEPARATION OF TOXIC SUBSTANCES IN TEXTILE PROCESS WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of hyperfiltration for separation of toxic substances in textile process water. Three membranes (cellulose acetate, polyether/amide, and dynamic zirconium oxide/polyacrylic acid) were used to separate process water from scour and dye oper...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A PROTOCOL FOR TESTING EFFECTS OF TOXIC SUBSTANCES ON PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to devise a rapid, simple, reproducible bioassay procedure to determine effects of so-called 'toxic substances in the environment' on vegetation and provide a standardized procedure for evaluation and comparison of effects of diverse compounds. Eight diffe...

  1. Toxic metals in WEEE: characterization and substance flow analysis in waste treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Masahiro; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Terazono, Atsushi

    2013-10-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has received extensive attention as a secondary source of metals. Because WEEE also contains toxic substances such as heavy metals, appropriate management of these substances is important in the recycling and treatment of WEEE. As a basis for discussion toward better management of WEEE, this study characterizes various types of WEEE in terms of toxic metal contents. The fate of various metals contained in WEEE, including toxic metals, was also investigated in actual waste treatment processes. Cathode-ray tube televisions showed the highest concentration and the largest total amount of toxic metals such as Ba, Pb, and Sb, so appropriate recycling and disposal of these televisions would greatly contribute to better management of toxic metals in WEEE. A future challenge is the management of toxic metals in mid-sized items such as audio/visual and ICT equipment because even though the concentrations were not high in these items, the total amount of toxic metals contained in them is not negligible. In the case of Japan, such mid-sized WEEE items as well as small electronic items are subject to municipal solid waste treatment. A case study showed that a landfill was the main destination of toxic metals contained in those items in the current treatment systems. The case study also showed that changes in the flows of toxic metals will occur when treatment processes are modified to emphasize resource recovery. Because the flow changes might lead to an increase in the amount of toxic metals released to the environment, the flows of toxic metals and the materials targeted for resource recovery should be considered simultaneously. PMID:22921510

  2. [Using mass spectrometry as a tool for testing for toxic substances in foods: toward food safety].

    PubMed

    Romero González, Roberto; Fernández Moreno, José Luis; Plaza Bolaños, Patricia; Garrido Frenich, Antonia; Martínez Vidal, José Luis

    2007-01-01

    A large number of toxic substances, such as pesticides, antibiotics and toxins from different sources (natural or man-made) and different degrees of toxicity for human health can be found in foods. This type of compounds are generally found at very low concentrations in highly complex matrices, it therefore being necessary for the most highly reliable methodologies possible to be sued. In this regard, the use of gas and liquid chromatography techniques coupled to mass spectrometry detectors has made it possible to properly detect this type of substances in foods at extremely low concentrations. Therefore, depending upon the characteristics of the contaminant, one must select the chromatography technique which affords the possibility of best separating the contaminant from the interfering substances present in the matrix, as well as from the contaminants amongst one another. This methodology provides highly valuable data enhancing our knowledge of public health through food safety. PMID:18274351

  3. Removal of toxic substances by a selective membrane plasma separator.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Hajime; Hattori, Tomoko; Igarashi, Toshiko; Okuyama, Manabu; Tajimi, Kimitaka

    2014-06-01

    We devised a method of plasma exchange with dialysis (PED), in which selective plasma exchange (sPE) is performed using a selective membrane plasma separator (EC-2A) with an albumin-sieving coefficient of 0.3 while the dialysate flows outside the hollow fibers, and reported the usefulness of the system for treating acute liver failure. Thereafter, EC-4A with an albumin-sieving coefficient of 0.6 was developed, which was expected to be even more effective for removing protein-bound substances. In order to examine whether or not EC-4A might be applicable to blood purification therapy against drug poisoning, we compared the efficacies of sPE, PED, and direct hemoperfusion (DHP) using an activated carbon column for the removal of phenobarbital and lithium. Subjects undergoing the extracorporeal circulation study were assigned to the sPE group, PED group, or DHP group, and the changes in the blood concentrations of phenobarbital and lithium were measured over 180 min. A significant decrease of the phenobarbital concentration over time was seen in the PED group, as compared to that in the sPE group (P < 0.0001), while no significant difference in the concentration was observed between the PED and DHP groups. The PED group showed a significant decrease of the lithium concentration over time, as compared to the DHP group (P < 0.0001), while no significant difference in the concentration was observed between the PED and sPE groups. Thus, PED was as effective as DHP for removing phenobarbital and was as effective as sPE for removing lithium. These results suggest that PED therapy using EC-4A may be a feasible modality for the treatment of drug poisoning. PMID:24965293

  4. Aquatic toxicity of forty industrial chemicals: Testing in support of hazardous substance spill prevention regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, M. W.; Ward, C. H.

    1981-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is presently developing hazardous substance spill regulations to help prevent water pollution. Aquatic animal toxicity data are used as criteria for the designation and categorization of substances as hazardous, even though this type of data is not available for many industrial chemicals. Static 96-hr. toxicity tests were conducted with 40 such chemicals to provide basic toxicity data for regulatory decision making. Thirty-two of the 40 chemicals tested were hazardous to aquatic life as determined by 96-hr. LC 50's less than or equal to 500 mg/l. All 40 chemicals were tested with the fresh-water fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, and ten chemicals were also tested with the salt-water grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio.

  5. Acute toxicity of selected crude and refined shale oil derived and petroleum-derived substances

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.H.; Haschek, W.M.; Witschi, H.

    1980-01-01

    General information was obtained on the toxicity of selected samples of crude Paraho shale oil and some of its derivatives, some crude petroleums, and 3 refined petroleum products. Five tests were used to determine the acute toxicity of these substances: acute lethality in mice following oral or intraperitoneal administration of a single dose; acute dermal toxicity of a single dose in rats; delayed-type allergic contact hypersensitivity in guinea pigs; primary eye irritation and primary skin irritation of a single dose in rabbits. Histopathologic changes induced in mice following intraperitoneal injection of a single large dose of crude shale oil and two of its hydrotreated derivatives were examined. Studies also have been initiated to examine the tumor inducing potential of selected samples. The test system used was the mouse lung adenoma bioassay. The present report describes our findings and shows that all compounds tested have very low or no acute toxic effects in laboratory animals.

  6. Monitoring of troponin release from cardiomyocytes during exposure to toxic substances using surface plasmon resonance biosensing.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Henrik; Kågedal, Bertil; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik

    2010-10-01

    Troponin T (TnT) is a useful biomarker for studying drug-induced toxicity effects on cardiac cells. We describe how a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was applied to monitor the release of TnT from active HL-1 cardiomyocytes in vitro when exposed to cardiotoxic substances. Two monoclonal human TnT antibodies were compared in the SPR immunosensor to analyse the TnT release. The detection limit of TnT was determined to be 30 ng/ml in a direct assay set-up and to be 10 ng/ml in a sandwich assay format. Exposure of the cardiomyocytes to doxorubicin, troglitazone, quinidine and cobalt chloride for periods of 6 and 24 h gave significant SPR responses, whereas substances with low toxicity showed insignificant effects (ascorbic acid, methotrexate). The SPR results were verified with a validated immunochemiluminescence method which showed a correlation of r (2) = 0.790. PMID:20694813

  7. Schedules of controlled substances: extension of temporary placement of methylone into schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. Final order.

    PubMed

    2012-10-18

    This Final Order is issued by the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to extend the temporary scheduling of methylone (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylcathinone) including its salts, isomers, and salts of isomers whenever the existence of such salts, isomers, and salts of isomers is possible, into Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). The temporary scheduling of methylone is due to expire on October 20, 2012. This document will extend the temporary scheduling of methylone to April 20, 2013, or until rulemaking proceedings are completed, whichever occurs first. PMID:23077760

  8. Did mineral surface chemistry and toxicity contribute to evolution of microbial extracellular polymeric substances?

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Campbell, Jay M; Zhang, Nianli; Hickey, William J; Sahai, Nita

    2012-08-01

    Modern ecological niches are teeming with an astonishing diversity of microbial life in biofilms closely associated with mineral surfaces, which highlights the remarkable success of microorganisms in conquering the challenges and capitalizing on the benefits presented by the mineral-water interface. Biofilm formation capability likely evolved on early Earth because biofilms provide crucial cell survival functions. The potential toxicity of mineral surfaces toward cells and the complexities of the mineral-water-cell interface in determining the toxicity mechanisms, however, have not been fully appreciated. Here, we report a previously unrecognized role for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which form biofilms in shielding cells against the toxicity of mineral surfaces. Using colony plating and LIVE/DEAD staining methods in oxide suspensions versus oxide-free controls, we found greater viability of wild-type, EPS-producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 compared to their isogenic knockout mutant with defective biofilm-producing capacity. Oxide toxicity was specific to its surface charge and particle size. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and assays for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) on mineral surfaces suggested that EPS shield via both physical and chemical mechanisms. Intriguingly, qualitative as well as quantitative measures of EPS production showed that toxic minerals induced EPS production in bacteria. By determining the specific toxicity mechanisms, we provide insight into the potential impact of mineral surfaces in promoting increased complexity of cell surfaces, including EPS and biofilm formation, on early Earth. PMID:22934560

  9. Toxic Effect of a Marine Bacterium on Aquatic Organisms and Its Algicidal Substances against Phaeocystis globosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiuchan; Chen, Lina; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Ling; Yin, Pinghe; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms have caused enormous damage to the marine ecosystem and the coastal economy in China. In this paper, a bacterial strain B1, which had strong algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa, was isolated from the coastal waters of Zhuhai in China. The strain B1 was identified as Bacillus sp. on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequence and morphological characteristics. To evaluate the ecological safety of the algicidal substances produced by strain B1, their toxic effects on marine organisms were tested. Results showed that there were no adverse effects observed in the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, Chaetoceros muelleri, and Isochrystis galbana after exposure to the algicidal substances at a concentration of 1.0% (v/v) for 96 h. The 48h LC50 values for Brachionus plicatilis, Moina mongolica Daday and Paralichthys olivaceus were 5.7, 9.0 and 12.1% (v/v), respectively. Subsequently, the algicidal substances from strain B1 culture were isolated and purified by silica gel column, Sephadex G-15 column and high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and PeakView Software, the purified substances were identified as prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine. Algicidal mechanism indicated that prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine inhibited the growth of P. globosa by disrupting the antioxidant systems. In the acute toxicity assessment using M. mongolica, 24h LC50 values of prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine were 7.0 and 13.8 g/L, respectively. The active substances produced by strain B1 can be considered as ecologically and environmentally biological agents for controlling harmful algal blooms. PMID:25646807

  10. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium.

    PubMed

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  11. Extinction in periodic competitive stage-structured Lotka-Volterra model with the effects of toxic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Chen, Fengde

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a periodic competitive stage-structured Lotka-Volterra model with the effects of toxic substances. It is shown that toxic substances play an important role in the extinction of species. We obtain a set of sufficient conditions which guarantee that one of the components is driven to extinction while the other is globally attractive. The numerical simulation of an example verifies our main results.

  12. Do toxic substances pose a threat to rehabilitation of lake trout in the Great Lakes? A review of the literature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zint, Michaela T.; Taylor, William W.; Carl, Leon; Edsall, Carol C.; Heinrich, John; Sippel, Al; Lavis, Dennis; Schaner, Ted

    1995-01-01

    Toxic substances have been suspected of being one of the causes of Great Lakes lake trout reproductive failure. Because toxic substances are present in the Great Lakes basin, managers should be aware of the role of contaminants in preventing lake trout rehabilitation. This paper summarizes studies which have sought to establish a relation between toxic substances and lake trout mortality or morbidity, and offers recommendations for future research and management. The review suggests that exposure to toxic substances has the possibility of affecting the species' rehabilitation. A variety of toxic substances, specifically organochlorine compounds, concentrated in lake trout eggs, fry, and the environment, have affected the hatching success of lake trout in the laboratory, but the strength of the relation between toxic substances and lake trout mortality and morbidity in the field remains unclear. In order to clarify this relation, more information is needed on lake trout physiology, biochemistry, behavior, and genetics. An interdisciplinary workshop should be convened to evaluate existing evidence by epidemiological methods, to set priorities for further research, and to develop management strategies.

  13. Study of apoptosis in human lymphocytes by toxic substances implicated in toxic oil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, S; Cárdaba, B; del Pozo, V; de Andrés, B; Cortegano, I; Jurado, A; Tramón, P; Palomino, P; Lahoz, C

    1997-03-14

    Toxic Oil Syndrome is a multisystemic disease that occurred in epidemic proportions in Spain in 1981 caused by the ingestion of rapeseed oil denatured with aniline. Several data implicate T cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. We evaluated the mechanisms of cytotoxicity in human lymphocytes of TOS-related products: aniline, 3-(N-phenylamino)-1,2-propanediol and its mono- and di-oleyl esters and eosinophilia myalgia-related product such as 3-(phenylamino)-L-alanine, which is chemically similar to 3-(N-phenylamino)-1,2-propanediol, and has been found in manufactured L-tryptophan. Our results show that only di-oleyl ester of 3-(N-phenylamino)-1,2-propanediol induces apoptosis in human lymphocytes, in a concentration and time-dependent way, confirmed by morphology, expression of phosphatidylserine in membrane and analysis of DNA degradation. PMID:9074655

  14. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  15. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  19. Predicting the formation and the dispersion of toxic combustion products from the fires of dangerous substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevrlý, V.; Bitala, P.; Danihelka, P.; Dobeš, P.; Dlabka, J.; Hejzlar, T.; Baudišová, B.; Míček, D.; Zelinger, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Natural events, such as wildfires, lightning or earthquakes represent a frequent trigger of industrial fires involving dangerous substances. Dispersion of smoke plume from such fires and the effects of toxic combustion products are one of the reference scenarios expected in the framework of major accident prevention. Nowadays, tools for impact assessment of these events are rather missing. Detailed knowledge of burning material composition, atmospheric conditions, and other factors are required in order to describe quantitatively the source term of toxic fire products and to evaluate the parameters of smoke plume. Nevertheless, an assessment of toxic emissions from large scale fires involves a high degree of uncertainty, because of the complex character of physical and chemical processes in the harsh environment of uncontrolled flame. Among the others, soot particle formation can be mentioned as still being one of the unresolved problems in combustion chemistry, as well as decomposition pathways of chemical substances. Therefore, simplified approach for estimating the emission factors from outdoor fires of dangerous chemicals, utilizable for major accident prevention and preparedness, was developed and the case study illustrating the application of the proposed method was performed. ALOFT-FT software tool based on large eddy simulation of buoyant fire plumes was employed for predicting the local toxic contamination in the down-wind vicinity of the fire. The database of model input parameters can be effectively modified enabling the simulation of the smoke plume from pool fires or jet fires of arbitrary flammable (or combustible) gas, liquid or solid. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic via the project LD11012 (in the frame of the COST CM0901 Action) and the Ministry of Environment of the Czech Republic (project no. SPII 1a10 45/70).

  20. Did Mineral Surface Chemistry and Toxicity Contribute to Evolution of Microbial Extracellular Polymeric Substances?

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jay M.; Zhang, Nianli; Hickey, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Modern ecological niches are teeming with an astonishing diversity of microbial life in biofilms closely associated with mineral surfaces, which highlights the remarkable success of microorganisms in conquering the challenges and capitalizing on the benefits presented by the mineral–water interface. Biofilm formation capability likely evolved on early Earth because biofilms provide crucial cell survival functions. The potential toxicity of mineral surfaces toward cells and the complexities of the mineral–water–cell interface in determining the toxicity mechanisms, however, have not been fully appreciated. Here, we report a previously unrecognized role for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which form biofilms in shielding cells against the toxicity of mineral surfaces. Using colony plating and LIVE/DEAD staining methods in oxide suspensions versus oxide-free controls, we found greater viability of wild-type, EPS-producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 compared to their isogenic knockout mutant with defective biofilm-producing capacity. Oxide toxicity was specific to its surface charge and particle size. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and assays for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) on mineral surfaces suggested that EPS shield via both physical and chemical mechanisms. Intriguingly, qualitative as well as quantitative measures of EPS production showed that toxic minerals induced EPS production in bacteria. By determining the specific toxicity mechanisms, we provide insight into the potential impact of mineral surfaces in promoting increased complexity of cell surfaces, including EPS and biofilm formation, on early Earth. Key Words: Mineral toxicity—Bacteria—EPS evolution—Biofilms—Cytotoxicity—Silica—Anatase—Alumina. Astrobiology 12, 785–798. PMID:22934560

  1. ATSDR evaluation of health effects of chemicals. VI. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Fay, M; Donohue, J M; De Rosa, C

    1999-12-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (also known as DEHP, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, or BEHP; CAS Registry Number 117-81-7) is a widely-used plasticizer. It is found in numerous plastic articles, such as paints, inks, floor tiles, upholstery, shower curtains, footwear, plastic bags, food-packaging materials, toys, and medical tubing. Not surprisingly, DEHP appears at many waste sites. As part of its mandate, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) prepares toxicological profiles on hazardous chemicals that are of greatest public health concern at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priority List (NPL) sites. These profiles comprehensively summarize toxicological and environmental information. This article constitutes the release of the bulk of ATSDR's profile for DEHP (ATSDR, 1993) into the mainstream scientific literature. An extensive listing of human and animal health effects, organized by route, duration, and endpoint, is presented. Toxicological information on toxicokinetics, biomarkers, interactions, sensitive subpopulations, reducing toxicity after exposure, and relevance to public health is also included. Environmental information encompasses physical properties, production and use, environmental fate, levels seen in the environment, analytical methods, and a listing of regulations. ATSDR, at the behest of Congress and therefore the citizenry, prepares these profiles to inform the public about site contaminants. PMID:10786378

  2. Workgroup report: review of fish bioaccumulation databases used to identify persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic substances.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Anne V; Burkhard, Lawrence P; Arnot, Jon; Mekenyan, Ovanes; Howard, Philip H; Russom, Christine; Boethling, Robert; Sakuratani, Yuki; Traas, Theo; Bridges, Todd; Lutz, Charles; Bonnell, Mark; Woodburn, Kent; Parkerton, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Chemical management programs strive to protect human health and the environment by accurately identifying persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic substances and restricting their use in commerce. The advance of these programs is challenged by the reality that few empirical data are available for the tens of thousands of commercial substances that require evaluation. Therefore, most preliminary assessments rely on model predictions and data extrapolation. In November 2005, a workshop was held for experts from governments, industry, and academia to examine the availability and quality of in vivo fish bioconcentration and bioaccumulation data, and to propose steps to improve its prediction. The workshop focused on fish data because regulatory assessments predominantly focus on the bioconcentration of substances from water into fish, as measured using in vivo tests or predicted using computer models. In this article we review of the quantity, features, and public availability of bioconcentration, bioaccumulation, and biota-sediment accumulation data. The workshop revealed that there is significant overlap in the data contained within the various fish bioaccumulation data sources reviewed, and further, that no database contained all of the available fish bioaccumulation data. We believe that a majority of the available bioaccumulation data have been used in the development and testing of quantitative structure-activity relationships and computer models currently in use. Workshop recommendations included the publication of guidance on bioconcentration study quality, the combination of data from various sources to permit better access for modelers and assessors, and the review of chemical domains of existing models to identify areas for expansion. PMID:17384774

  3. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Brownfields/ land-reuse site tool.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Gary D; Berman, Laurel; Leann, Kathryn; Bing, Lemley

    2012-12-01

    As part of our continuing effort to highlight innovative approaches to improving the health and environment of communities, the Journal is pleased to bring back the bimonthly column from the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The ATSDR, based in Atlanta, Georgia, is a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and shares a common office of the Director with the National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ATSDR serves the public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent harmful exposures and diseases related to toxic substances. The purpose of this column is to inform readers of ATSDR's activities and initiatives to better understand the relationship between exposure to hazardous substances in the environment and their impact on human health and how to protect public health. We believe that the column will provide a valuable resource to our readership by helping to make known the considerable resources and expertise that ATSDR has available to assist communities, states, and others to assure good environmental health practice for all is served. The conclusions of this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the views of ATSDR, CDC, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Gary D. Perlman is an environmental health scientist for ATSDR. He is a commissioned officer with the U.S. Public Health Service and has been deployed in support of numerous environmental disasters including hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Isabelle, and Irene, as well as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Laurel Berman is the national brownfields coordinator with ATSDR. She coordinates the ATSDR Brownfields/Land-Reuse Health Initiative. Kathryn Leann Lemley Bing is an environmental health scientist and an ATSDR regional representative in Atlanta. She has specialized

  4. Pollutant toxicity and detoxification by humic substances: mechanisms and quantitative assessment via luminescent biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Kudryasheva, N S; Tarasova, A S

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers mechanisms of detoxification of pollutant solutions by water-soluble humic substances (HSs), natural detoxifying agents. The problems and perspectives of bioassay application for toxicity monitoring of complex solutions are discussed from ecological point of view. Bioluminescence assays based on marine bacteria and their enzymes are of special attention here; they were shown to be convenient tools to study the detoxifying effects on cellular and biochemical levels. The advantages of bioluminescent enzymatic assay for monitoring both integral and oxidative toxicities in complex solutions of model pollutants and HS were demonstrated. The efficiencies of detoxification of the solutions of organic oxidizers and salts of metals (including radioactive ones) by HS were analyzed. The dependencies of detoxification efficiency on time of exposure to HS and HS concentrations were demonstrated. Antioxidant properties of HS were considered in detail. The detoxifying effects of HS were shown to be complex and regarded as 'external' (binding and redox processes in solutions outside the organisms) and/or 'internal' organismal processes. The paper demonstrates that the HS can stimulate a protective response of bacterial cells as a result of (1) changes of rates of biochemical reactions and (2) stabilization of mucous layers outside the cell walls. Acceleration of auto-oxidation of NADH, endogenous reducer, by HS was suggested as a reason for toxicity increase in the presence of HS due to abatement of reduction ability of intracellular media. PMID:25146119

  5. The role of exopolymeric substances in the bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag nanoparticles to algae.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kaijun; Hu, Yi; Zhang, Luqing; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2016-01-01

    Exopolymeric substances (EPS) have an important role in bioaccumulation and toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) to algae, which warrants specific studies. The interaction of EPS with citrate and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) coated AgNPs (C-AgNPs and P-AgNPs, respectively) and its roles in bioaccumulation and toxicity of the AgNPs to Chlorella pyrenoidosa were investigated. The amino and aromatic carboxylic groups in the EPS were involved in the EPS-AgNP interactions. Compared with Ag(+), C-AgNPs had comparable total bioaccumulation but greater absorption by intact algae with EPS; P-AgNPs had the smallest total bioaccumulation and were mainly adsorbed on algal surfaces. With EPS removed, the total bioaccumulations and surface adsorptions for the three Ag species decreased but the cell internalizations increased; the 96 h half growth inhibition concentrations decreased, indicating EPS alleviated the algal toxicity of Ag. The cell-internalized but not the adsorbed AgNPs could contribute to the nanotoxicity. The EPS could bind both AgNPs and Ag(+), and thus inhibited the cell internalization and the nanotoxicity. However, the EPS-bound Ag on the cell surfaces would migrate along with the algae and be biologically amplified in the aquatic food chains, presenting ecological risks. These results are helpful for understanding the fate and ecological effects of NPs. PMID:27615743

  6. Was Mineral Surface Complexity and Toxicity an Impetus for Evolution of Microbial Extracellular Polymeric Substances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, N.; Xu, J.; Zhu, C.; Campbell, J.; Hickey, W.; Zhang, N.

    2011-12-01

    Modern ecological niches are teeming with an astonishing diversity of microbial life closely associated with mineral surfaces, highlighting the remarkable success of microorganisms in conquering the challenges and capitalizing on the benefits presented by the mineral-water interface. Such community-living is enabled by an extracellular, polymeric, biofilm matrix developed at cell surfaces. Despite the energetic penalties, biofilm formation capability likely evolved on early Earth because of crucial cell survival functions, of which recognized roles include facilitating cell-attachment at mineral surfaces, intercellular signaling and lateral gene transfer, protection from dessication in tidal pools, and screening toxic UV light and toxic soluble metals. Cell-attachment to mineral surfaces was likely critical for cell survival and function, but the potential toxicity of mineral surfaces towards cells and the complexities of the mineral-water-cell interface in promoting biofilm formation, have not been fully appreciated. We examined the effects of nanoparticulate oxides (amorphous SiO2, anatase β-TiO2, and γ-Al2O3) on EPS- and biofilm-producing wild-type strains and their isogenic knock-out mutants which are defective in EPS-producing ability. In detail, we used Gram-negative wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and its EPS knock-out mutant Δ-psl, and the Gram-positive wild-type Bacillus subtilis NCIB3610 and its EPS-knock-out mutant yhxBΔ. We conducted bacterial growth experiments in the presence of each oxide in order to determine the viability of each cell type relative to oxide-free controls. The amount of EPS generated in the presence of oxides was also quantified and qualitatively analyzed by fluorescent stains. The results indicated a previously unrecognized role for microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in shielding both Gram-negative and Gram-positive cells against the toxic effects of mineral surfaces. This role is distinct from the

  7. The relationship between developmental toxicity and aromatic-ring class profile of high-boiling petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Murray, F Jay; Roth, Randy N; Nicolich, Mark J; Gray, Thomas M; Simpson, Barry J

    2013-11-01

    In response to the US EPA HPV Challenge Program, this study was conducted to: (1) evaluate the relationship between PAC content and the developmental toxicity of high-boiling petroleum substances (HBPS) and (2) develop mathematical models to predict the developmental toxicity of similar untested substances based on their aromatic ring class (ARC) profiles. For this investigation, 68 developmental toxicity studies were reviewed. The ARC models relied on data from 21 rat dermal developmental toxicity studies conducted with similar experimental designs to ensure a consistent data set for comparison. The most sensitive general endpoints of developmental toxicity (i.e., decreased fetal survival and growth) were chosen for modeling. The ARC models demonstrated a strong correlation between the predicted vs. observed values for specific sensitive endpoints of these developmental toxicities (percent resorptions, r=0.99; live fetuses per litter, r=0.98; fetal body weight, r=0.94). Such associations provide a promising approach for predicting the developmental toxicity of untested HBPS. Efforts to corroborate the ARC models using test substances that were not used to build the ARC models produced mixed results, and further development and refinement of the ARC models is recommended before they can be reliably applied to all HBPS. PMID:23680405

  8. Strategies for eliminating and reducing persistent bioaccumulative toxic substances: common approaches, emerging trends, and level of success.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kate

    2006-12-01

    This paper reviews nine of the best-known strategies for eliminatine and reducing substances in the category known as "persistent bioaccumulative toxic substances" (PBTSs). The nine strategies are as follows: 1) Ontario's Candidate Substances List for Bans and Phase-outs (1992), 2) Canada's ARET Program (1994), 3) Canada's Toxic Substances Management Policy (1995), 4) the Commission for Environmental Cooperation's Sound Management of Chemicals Initiative (1995), 5) the Great Lakes Binational Toxics Strategy (1997), 6) the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) draft National PBT Strategy (1998), 7) U.S. EPA's Waste Minimization Program (1998), 8) the U.N. Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (2001), and 9) Washington State's Rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxins (2006). The review describes the commonalities among the strategies, including their goals and principles, design approaches, and other common elements. It also discusses several emerging trends, such as the increasing importance of economic considerations, human health information, and nonregulatory management approaches. The paper concludes with a discussion of how effective the strategies have been at achieving their goals of elimination and reduction of persistent bioaccumulative toxic substances. PMID:17190337

  9. Toxins Secreted by Bacillus Isolated from Lung Adenocarcinomas Favor the Penetration of Toxic Substances.

    PubMed

    Merlos, Alexandra; Rodríguez, Pau; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Winterhalter, Mathias; Benz, Roland; Vinuesa, Teresa; Moya, Juan A; Viñas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to explore the eventual role of bacteria in the induction of lung cancer by smoking habits. Viable bacteria closely related to the genus Bacillus were detected at high frequencies in lung-cancer biopsies. Similar, if not identical, microbes were isolated from cigarettes and in smog. Bacteria present in cigarettes could be transferred to a physiological solution via a "smoker" device that mimicked their potential transfer during smoking those bacteria produce exotoxins able to open transmembrane pores. These channels can be used as a way to penetrate cells of benzopyrenes and other toxic substances present in tobacco products. We hypothesize that Bacillaceae present in tobacco play a key role in the development of lung cancer. PMID:26635767

  10. Integration of site-specific health information: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry health assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.

    1990-12-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry is required to conduct a health assessment of any site that is listed on or proposed for the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List. Sixteen US Department of Energy (DOE) sites currently fall into this category. Health assessments contain a qualitative description of impacts to public health and the environment from hazardous waste sites, as well as recommendations for actions to mitigate or eliminate risk. Because these recommendations may have major impacts on compliance activities at DOE facilities, the health assessments are an important source of information for the monitoring activities of DOE's Office of Environmental Compliance (OEC). This report provides an overview of the activities involved in preparing the health assessment, its role in environmental management, and its key elements.

  11. Consequence analysis for accidental releases of toxic substances in a complex terrain with shoreline in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Ghim, Y.S.; Oh, H.S.; Moon, K.C.

    1999-07-01

    Offsite consequences resulting from various scenarios involving release of toxic substances in the Yochon Industrial Estate located in the Yosu Peninsula with complex terrain and intricate shorelines are estimated using ALOHA (Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres) and RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System). ALOHA analyses by assuming the worst-case release scenarios for selected chemicals in the worst-case and alternative meteorological conditions indicate the impact on several thousand people in the nearby area. RAMS simulation is performed in order to consider the influence of terrain and shoreline. Receptors behind the terrain, 5 to 6 km distant from the source, also show high concentration when the wind blows to the terrain as well as receptors in front of the terrain in the nearby area. With considering the diurnal variations of meteorological variables, it is predicted that complicated wind patterns with low speeds could cause high concentration over the entire area adjacent to the Estate.

  12. Toxins Secreted by Bacillus Isolated from Lung Adenocarcinomas Favor the Penetration of Toxic Substances

    PubMed Central

    Merlos, Alexandra; Rodríguez, Pau; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Winterhalter, Mathias; Benz, Roland; Vinuesa, Teresa; Moya, Juan A.; Viñas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to explore the eventual role of bacteria in the induction of lung cancer by smoking habits. Viable bacteria closely related to the genus Bacillus were detected at high frequencies in lung-cancer biopsies. Similar, if not identical, microbes were isolated from cigarettes and in smog. Bacteria present in cigarettes could be transferred to a physiological solution via a “smoker” device that mimicked their potential transfer during smoking those bacteria produce exotoxins able to open transmembrane pores. These channels can be used as a way to penetrate cells of benzopyrenes and other toxic substances present in tobacco products. We hypothesize that Bacillaceae present in tobacco play a key role in the development of lung cancer. PMID:26635767

  13. Toxic substances in the environment affecting respiratory function of people in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Hallenborg, C.P.; Marsh, N.; Moser, S.

    1991-03-01

    In this trilogy the authors have collected data from authors who are concerned with patients with respiratory complaints. Surprisingly there are unique problems in the residents of our State. The full impact of problems known to cause respiratory illnesses, such as asbestosis, will not be known for years to come. Other problems such as the effect of sugarcane burning are just now being identified and may show a parallel to the inhalation of asbestos dust. VOG may be simply an irritant or it may explain in part the high incidence of asthma in our State. Clearly more work needs to be done to explain the pathophysiology, the risk and possible treatment for the consequences on people of these putative toxic substances.

  14. Application of in silico modelling to estimate toxicity of migrating substances from food packaging.

    PubMed

    Price, Nicholas; Chaudhry, Qasim

    2014-09-01

    This study derived toxicity estimates for a set of 136 chemical migrants from food packaging materials using in silico (computational) modelling and read across approaches. Where available, the predicted results for mutagenicity and carcinogenicity were compared with published experimental data. As the packaging compounds are subject to safety assessment, the migrating substances were more likely to be negative for both the endpoints. A set of structural analogues with positive experimental data for carcinogenicity and/or mutagenicity was therefore used as a positive comparator. The results showed that a weight of evidence assembled from different in silico models and read-across from already-tested structurally similar compounds can provide a rapid and reliable means for rapid screening of new yet-untested intentional or unintentional chemical compounds that may migrate to packaged foodstuffs. PMID:24923263

  15. EFFECT OF CHEMICAL CARRIERS ON AVIAN LC(50) TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The subacute dietary (LC50) toxicity of a pesticide as prescribed by the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act and of toxic substances as defined by the Toxic Substances Control Act is a routine data point for many chemicals. The methods under which the LC50 data are ...

  16. Flow-through bioassay for measuring bioaccumulation of toxic substances from sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac, Michael J.; Edsall, Carol C.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Sayers, Richard E., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Over 10 million cubic meters of sediment are dredged annually from Great Lakes waterways. Because much of this material is taken from harbors, connecting channels, and other nearshore areas that often are contaminated with toxic substances, the sediments proposed for dredging need to be evaluated for the presence of bioavailable contaminants and the potential for toxicity to the biota. Sound decisions on the appropriate disposal of the dredged material can be made only after such an evaluation. Presently, no standardized procedure exists for evaluating dredged material in freshwater systems although current criteria for discharge of dredged material into marine water have been developed (USEPA/CE 1977). In the ocean discharge guideline, it is recommended that bioassays be conducted on liquid, solid, and suspended particulate phases of dredged material. because it appears that the solid phase has the greatest potential for environmental damage and because measurement of bioaccumulation must be made to evaluate sediments for disposal (USEPA/CE 1977, Seeyle and Mac 1983), we developed a bioassay for testing the solid phase of dredged material that measures the survival of organisms and, perhaps more important, the bioaccumulation of toxic substances by aquatic organisms from naturally contaminated sediments (Peddicord et al. 1980; Rubinstein et al. 1980, 1983; Seeyle st al. 1982), several have used testing methods that result in unacceptable mortality to control organisms (Bahnick et al. 1981, Prater et al. 1983). Our bioassay is intended to estimate the potential for bioaccumlation of contaminants from sediments that are not acutely toxic to test organisms, but are suspected of containing persistent contaminants. By using test organisms that are not highly susceptible to toxic compounds, the bioaccumulation test allows estimation of the potential food-chain accumulation of contaminants that may occur in local biota from surficial sediments. In practice

  17. The Affordable Care Act, Substance Use Disorders, and Low-Income Clients: Implications for Social Work.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Heather A; Wahler, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    Social workers are leaders in the substance abuse services field and may often work in substance use disorder (SUD) education, prevention, assessment, treatment, or resource coordination and case management roles. As the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (2010) drives changes in the fields of health and behavioral health, social workers have an opportunity to lead structural changes at the micro and macro levels that will have a positive impact on low-income clients with SUDs. In this article, authors examine the current state of SUDs and health care access, the impact of the ACA on the field, and implications for social work practice and education. Social workers should seek specialized education and credentialing in SUD services, know how to help clients apply for health care coverage, and advocate for integrated substance abuse treatment and health care programs and an expansion of Medicaid in their local communities. Social workers are well positioned to be a voice for clients to ensure that the current structural changes result in a better, integrated system of care that is able to respond to the needs of low-income clients with SUDs. PMID:27501640

  18. Assessment of quantitative structure-activity relationship of toxicity prediction models for Korean chemical substance control legislation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Yon; Shin, Seong Eun; No, Kyoung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives For successful adoption of legislation controlling registration and assessment of chemical substances, it is important to obtain sufficient toxicological experimental evidence and other related information. It is also essential to obtain a sufficient number of predicted risk and toxicity results. Particularly, methods used in predicting toxicities of chemical substances during acquisition of required data, ultimately become an economic method for future dealings with new substances. Although the need for such methods is gradually increasing, the-required information about reliability and applicability range has not been systematically provided. Methods There are various representative environmental and human toxicity models based on quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Here, we secured the 10 representative QSAR-based prediction models and its information that can make predictions about substances that are expected to be regulated. We used models that predict and confirm usability of the information expected to be collected and submitted according to the legislation. After collecting and evaluating each predictive model and relevant data, we prepared methods quantifying the scientific validity and reliability, which are essential conditions for using predictive models. Results We calculated predicted values for the models. Furthermore, we deduced and compared adequacies of the models using the Alternative non-testing method assessed for Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals Substances scoring system, and deduced the applicability domains for each model. Additionally, we calculated and compared inclusion rates of substances expected to be regulated, to confirm the applicability. Conclusions We evaluated and compared the data, adequacy, and applicability of our selected QSAR-based toxicity prediction models, and included them in a database. Based on this data, we aimed to construct a system that can be used

  19. ACT HEALTHY: A Combined Cognitive-Behavioral Depression and Medication Adherence Treatment for HIV-Infected Substance Users

    PubMed Central

    Daughters, Stacey B.; Magidson, Jessica F.; Schuster, Randi M.; Safren, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    The two most common comorbid conditions with HIV are substance use disorders and depression, and individuals with comorbid HIV, depression, and substance dependence face a more chronic and treatment-resistant course. As an example of how to adapt evidence-based approaches to a complex comorbid population, the current case study examined the integration of a combined depression and HIV medication adherence treatment. The resulting intervention, ACT HEALTHY, combines a brief behavioral activation approach specifically developed to treat depression in individuals receiving residential substance abuse treatment (LETS ACT; Daughters et al., 2008) with a brief cognitive-behavioral approach to improving HIV medication adherence (Life-Steps; Safren et al., 1999; Safren et al., 2009). The current case series demonstrates the use of ACT HEALTHY among 3 depressed HIV-positive, low-income African Americans entering residential substance abuse treatment. PMID:21709737

  20. The Controlled Substances Act: how a "big tent" reform became a punitive drug law.

    PubMed

    Courtwright, David T

    2004-10-01

    The 1970 Controlled Substances Act was part of an omnibus reform package designed to rationalize, and in some respects to liberalize, American drug policy. While the legislation provided additional resources for law enforcement and a systematic means for regulating the use of most psychoactive drugs, it also did away with mandatory minimum sentences and provided more support for treatment and research. Over the next three decades, and in response to public alarm about drug abuse, the US Congress continuously amended the law to produce a more punitive system of drug control. The amendments, which gave the Drug Enforcement Administration greater control over scheduling and maintenance and which substantially increased penalties for illicit trafficking, transformed the law into the legal foundation of America's "drug war," as the stricter criminal approach came to be known. By the 1980s, the flexibility and innovative spirit of the original Controlled Substances Act (and that of Nixon-era drug strategy generally) had largely disappeared from American drug policy. PMID:15380284

  1. 40 CFR 792.113 - Mixtures of substances with carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixtures of substances with carriers. 792.113 Section 792.113 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and Reference Substances § 792.113 Mixtures of substances...

  2. 75 FR 16488 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR); Notice of National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership...

  3. 75 FR 41505 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR) ATSDR-263; Notice of National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical...

  4. 75 FR 75474 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR); Notice of National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership...

  5. 75 FR 59727 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR); Notice of National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership...

  6. Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion - Phase I Coal Selection and Chaacterization

    SciTech Connect

    A. Kolker; A. Sarofim; C.A. Palmer; C.L. Senior; F.E. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; I. Olmez; N. Shah; R. Finkelman; S. Crowley; T. Zeng

    1998-07-16

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. Over the past decade, a large database identifying the partitioning and emitted concentrations of several toxic metals on the list of HAPs has been developed. Laboratory data have also been generated to help define the general behavior of several elements in combustion systems. These data have been used to develop empirical and probabalistic models to predict emissions of trace metals from coal-fired power plants. While useful for providing average emissions of toxic species, these empirically based models fail when extrapolated beyond their supporting database. This represents a critical gap; over the coming decades, new fuels and combustion systems will play an increasing role in our nation's power generation system. For example, new fuels, such as coal blends or beneficiated fuels, new operating conditions, such as low-NO burners or staged combustion, or new power x systems, for example, those being developed under the DoE sponsored Combustion 2000 programs and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems, are all expected to play a role in power generation in the next century. The need for new predictive tools is not limited to new combustion systems, however. Existing combustion systems may have to employ controls for HAPs, should regulations be imposed. Testing of new control methods, at pilot and full scale, is expensive. A sound under-standing of the chemical transformations of both organic and inorganic HAPs will promote the development of new control methods in a cost-effective manner. To ensure that coal-fired power generation proceeds in an environmentally benign fashion, methods for the prediction and

  7. Urgent need to reevaluate the latest World Health Organization guidelines for toxic inorganic substances in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Frisbie, Seth H; Mitchell, Erika J; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has established guidelines for drinking-water quality that cover biological and chemical hazards from both natural and anthropogenic sources. In the most recent edition of Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality (2011), the WHO withdrew, suspended, did not establish, or raised guidelines for the inorganic toxic substances manganese, molybdenum, nitrite, aluminum, boron, nickel, uranium, mercury, and selenium. In this paper, we review these changes to the WHO drinking-water guidelines, examining in detail the material presented in the WHO background documents for each of these toxic substances. In some cases, these WHO background documents use literature reviews that do not take into account scientific research published within the last 10 or more years. In addition, there are instances in which standard WHO practices for deriving guidelines are not used; for example, rounding and other mathematical errors are made. According to published meeting reports from the WHO Chemical Aspects Working Group, the WHO has a timetable for revising some of its guidelines for drinking-water quality, but for many of these toxic substances the planned changes are minimal or will be delayed for as long as 5 years. Given the limited nature of the planned WHO revisions to the inorganic toxic substances and the extended timetable for these revisions, we suggest that governments, researchers, and other stakeholders might establish independent recommendations for inorganic toxic substances and possibly other chemicals to proactively protect public health, or at the very least, revert to previous editions of the Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, which were more protective of public health. PMID:26268322

  8. Variation in sensitivity of aquatic species to toxicants: Practical consequences for effect assessment of chemical substances

    SciTech Connect

    Vaal, M.A.; Van Leeuwen, C.J.; Hoekstra, J.A.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    2000-04-01

    This study addresses the relation between the sensitivity of aquatic species and mode of action of different classes or organic chemicals. The authors analyzed large data sets of ecotoxicological information to reveal the interspecies variation in sensitivity, to relate this variation to the compounds' mode of action, and to explain the observed patterns using general biological information. Here the authors present a general framework and recommendations for risk assessment procedures. The authors recommend the use of toxicologically based classification schemes at an early stage of the risk assessment procedure. Screening programs are most efficiently run when only one species per compound is tested to prioritize substances. The toxicity of compounds belonging to the class of nonpolar narcotics is highly predictable and shows little interspecies variation. For these compounds quantitative structure-activity relationships (WSARs) can be used to estimate effect levels. Most effort should be put into testing reactive compounds and compounds with a specific mode of action as toxicity to some species can be 10{sup 5}--10{sup 6} times higher compared with less sensitive species. The use of assessment factors in effect assessment procedures may lead to an underestimation of effects on the more sensitive species. For many priority pollutants there is little information on their ecotoxicity. Predictive techniques are needed to compensate for this lack of data. Knowledge of the relation between modes of action of compounds and interspecies variation in sensitivity should be integrated in risk assessment procedures in order to make more efficient use of the limited financial resources available.

  9. Chitosan nanoparticles loaded the herbicide paraquat: the influence of the aquatic humic substances on the colloidal stability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Renato; Clemente, Zaira; de Oliveira, Jhones Luis; Campos, Estefânia Vangelie Ramos; Chalupe, Victor C; Jonsson, Claudio M; de Lima, Renata; Sanches, Gabriela; Nishisaka, Caroline S; Rosa, André H; Oehlke, Kathleen; Greiner, Ralf; Fraceto, Leonardo F

    2015-04-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles have been developed for several applications, among them as carrier system of pesticides. However, few studies have investigated the fate of these materials in the environment in relation to colloidal stability and toxicity. In nature, humic substances are the main agents responsible for complexation with metals and organic compounds, as well as responsible for the dynamics of these nanoparticles in aquatic and terrestrial environments. In this context, the evaluation of the influence of aquatic humic substances (AHS) on the colloidal stability and toxicity of polymeric nanoparticles of chitosan/tripolyphosphate with or without paraquat was performed. In this study, the nanoparticles were prepared by the ionic gelation method and characterized by size distribution measurements (DLS and NTA), zeta potential, infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Allium cepa genotoxicity studies and ecotoxicity assays with the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata were used to investigate the effect of aquatic humic substances (AHS) on the toxicity of this delivery system. No changes were observed in the physical-chemical stability of the nanoparticles due to the presence of AHS using DLS and NTA techniques. However some evidence of interaction between the nanoparticles and AHS was observed by infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies. The ecotoxicity and genotoxicity assays showed that humic substances can decrease the toxic effects of nanoparticles containing paraquat. These results are interesting because they are important for understanding the interaction of these nanostructured carrier systems with species present in aquatic ecosystems such as humic substances, and in this way, opening new perspectives for studies on the dynamics of these carrier systems in the ecosystem. PMID:25636059

  10. Microsensors for In-Situ, Real-Time Detection and Characterization of Toxic Organic Substances

    SciTech Connect

    Rajic, S.

    2001-05-14

    We have further developed and demonstrated the novel ORNL micro-calorimetric spectroscopy technique for the detections and characterization of toxic organic substances. In this technique target molecules were allowed to adsorb on the surface of sub-femtojoule sensitive micromechanical thermal detectors. The adsorption of molecules on the thermal detector surface causes a differential surface stress resulting in an initial ''trigger''. By exposing the thermal detector microstructure elements to different photon wavelengths, an extremely sensitive and unique photothermal signature response was obtained. We adsorbed sub-monolayer levels of target chemicals onto the bi-material detector surfaces. We obtained infrared photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of several organics such as diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), and trinitrotoluene (TNT) over the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 {micro}m. We found that in the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 {micro}m the photothermal spectra of DIMP and TNT exhibit a number of peaks and are in excellent agreement with traditional infrared absorption spectra found in the literature. Chemical detectors based on micro-calorimetric spectroscopy can be used to sensitively sense a relatively small number of molecules adsorbed on a thermal detector surface. This photothermal signature resulting from photon irradiation and subsequent thermal transfer can be used for improved chemical characterization.

  11. Toxicity testing of NCSRP priority substances for the development of soil quality criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Cureton, P.M.; Balch, G.; Lintott, D.; Poirrier, K.; Goudey, S.

    1994-12-31

    The effects of 14 National Contaminated Sites Remediation Program (NCSRP) priority substances was measured on emergence and root elongation in lettuce (Lactuca saliva) and radish (Raphanus saliva) and on survival of the earthworm Eisenia foetida. The worm and seedling emergence tests were conducted in an artificial soil mixture composed of 10% peat moss, 20% kaolinite clay, and 70% silica sand (70 mesh) spiked with the contaminant. The root elongation tests were conducted on filter paper moistened with the contaminant solution. The following endpoints were derived on nominal and measured concentrations: NOEC, LOEC, the LC{sub 50} and LC{sub 25} for earthworm mortality and the EC{sub 50} and EC{sub 25} for emergence and root elongation. The contaminants tested included: arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, zinc, vanadium, benzo(a)pyrene, cyanide, naphthalene, ethylene glycol, pentachlorophenol, and phenol. Each test was repeated three times using different batches of freshly prepared soil, seed lots and worm cultures. The authors will present the findings and discuss the application of toxicity test results in developing generic soil quality criteria.

  12. California Dept. of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) Update of the Schools Naturally Occurring Asbestos Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, M.

    2012-12-01

    Prior to acquisition and/or construction of prospective school sites, the California Education Code mandates that school districts complete environmental assessments and cleanups for prospective new or expanding school sites in order to qualify for state funding. If prospective school sites are determined to have environmental contamination from hazardous materials, including naturally occurring hazardous materials such as naturally occurring asbestos (NOA), where there may be unacceptable potential health risks, the school sites must be properly mitigated prior to occupancy for protection of human health and the environment. NOA is of special concern for schools, because children who are exposed to asbestos may be at increased risk of developing asbestos-related diseases over time. In order to protect human health, the Department of Toxic Substances Control's (DTSC) goals at school sites are to: 1) identify the presence of NOA in school site soils using exposure-reducing soil thresholds; 2) manage potential NOA exposures using mitigation measures to reduce generation of airborne asbestos fibers from soils on school sites; and 3) ensure long-term monitoring and protection of mitigation measures via Operations & Maintenance activities. DTSC is currently in the process of revising its Interim Guidance Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) at School Sites - September 2004. The revisions include: 1) updating the guidance to consider incremental sampling for use at NOA sites in consultation with DTSC's project manager and technical staff, and 2) documenting a tiered approach to addressing high and low activity areas on a school.

  13. Schedules of controlled substances: placement of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine into Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-12-20

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Deputy Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) places the substance 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT), including its salts, isomers and salts of isomers whenever the existence of such salts, isomers, and salts of isomers is possible, into schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). This action by the DEA Deputy Administrator is based on a scheduling recommendation from the Assistant Secretary for Health of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and a DEA review indicating that 5-MeO-DMT meets the criteria for placement in schedule I of the CSA. This final rule will impose the criminal sanctions and regulatory controls of schedule I substances under the CSA on the manufacture, distribution, dispensing, importation, exportation, and possession of 5-MeO-DMT. PMID:21171485

  14. Ecotoxicity quantitative structure-activity relationships for alcohol ethoxylate mixtures based on substance-specific toxicity predictions.

    PubMed

    Boeije, G M; Cano, M L; Marshall, S J; Belanger, S E; Van Compernolle, R; Dorn, P B; Gümbel, H; Toy, R; Wind, T

    2006-05-01

    Traditionally, ecotoxicity quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for alcohol ethoxylate (AE) surfactants have been developed by assigning the measured ecotoxicity for commercial products to the average structures (alkyl chain length and ethoxylate chain length) of these materials. Acute Daphnia magna toxicity tests for binary mixtures indicate that mixtures are more toxic than the individual AE substances corresponding with their average structures (due to the nonlinear relation of toxicity with structure). Consequently, the ecotoxicity value (expressed as effects concentration) attributed to the average structures that are used to develop the existing QSARs is expected to be too low. A new QSAR technique for complex substances, which interprets the mixture toxicity with regard to the "ethoxymers" distribution (i.e., the individual AE components) rather than the average structure, was developed. This new technique was then applied to develop new AE ecotoxicity QSARs for invertebrates, fish, and mesocosms. Despite the higher complexity, the fit and accuracy of the new QSARs are at least as good as those for the existing QSARs based on the same data set. As expected from typical ethoxymer distributions of commercial AEs, the new QSAR generally predicts less toxicity than the QSARs based on average structure. PMID:16256196

  15. Assessing the mammalian toxicity of high-boiling petroleum substances under the rubric of the HPV program.

    PubMed

    Gray, Thomas M; Simpson, Barry J; Nicolich, Mark J; Murray, F Jay; Verstuyft, Allen W; Roth, Randy N; McKee, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In 1998, the US EPA announced the HPV Challenge Program, a voluntary chemical data collection effort. The Petroleum HPV Testing Group (PHPVTG(1)) volunteered to provide data on approximately 110 high boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), i.e. substances with final boiling points ≥ approximately 650°F (343°C). These HBPS are substances of unknown and variable composition (UVCBs) that are composed of numerous individual constituents. Toxicity studies have shown that some HBPS can produce systemic (repeat-dose) and developmental effects, and some are mutagenic under in vitro conditions. The papers in this supplement show that these effects are related to the profiles of aromatic constituents in these substances. Further, it is shown that the effects on selected repeat-dose and developmental toxicity endpoints and mutagenic activity in bacterial assays can be predicted from compositional information using models based on the aromatic-ring class profile, "ARC profile" as defined by gas chromatographic separation of the DMSO-soluble fraction of the starting materials. This chromatographic method and the predictive models provide an efficient means of characterizing for screening purposes the potential for repeat-dose, developmental effects and bacterial mutagenicity of HBPS and can reduce the number of animal tests that would be required if these tests were conducted on all 110 HBPS. PMID:23247262

  16. The mechanism of increased renal susceptibility to toxic substances in the elderly. Part I. The role of increased vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Jerkić, M; Vojvodić, S; López-Novoa, J M

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms of increased susceptibility to nephrotoxins in aging are complex and incompletely understood. It is very important to try to increase our knowledge of them because adults become increasingly vulnerable to nephrotoxic substances, as they grow older. In addition, the percentage of elderly people will increase markedly in the near future, at least in the developed countries. Drugs such as diuretics, laxatives, NSAIDs, aminoglycosides and other nephrotoxic antibiotics, and converting enzyme inhibitors are used a lot by aging people and can produce severe renal problems. Beside drugs, the clinical use of radiocontrast agents also rises in older patients. It seems that the main mechanism of the increased renal susceptibility to toxic substances in the elderly is a disbalance between vasoconstrictor and vasodilator factors (in favor of vasoconstrictor ones). Increased propensity to vasoconstriction (to Ang II, ET and PAF), as well as increased levels of oxidatively modified biomolecules in the elderly, may enhance susceptibility of old kidney to toxic substances. In addition, all mechanisms that influence both mesangial and fibroblast cell proliferation and over-production of extracellular matrix might also be involved in the processes that make the old kidney prone to drug-induced chronic toxic injury. PMID:11989542

  17. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bool, L.E. III; Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.

    1997-01-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UKy), the University of Connecticut, and Princeton University to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI`s existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). During the past quarter the final program coal, from the Wyodak seam in the Powder River Basin, was acquired and distributed. Extensive coal characterization and laboratory work is underway to develop and test new sub-models. Coal characterization in the past quarter included direct identification of the modes of occurrence of various trace inorganic species in coal and ash using unique analytical techniques such as XAFS analysis and selective leaching. Combustion testing of the bituminous coals continued and additional data were obtained on trace element vaporization in the combustion zone. Studies of post-combustion trace element transformations, such as mercury speciation in the flue gas, were also begun in the last quarter.

  18. Humic substances alleviate the aquatic toxicity of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles to organisms of different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuang; Quik, Joris T K; Song, Lan; Van Den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; Wouterse, Marja; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-06-01

    The present study investigated how humic substances (HS) modify the aquatic toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as these particles agglomerate in water and interact with HS. An alga species (Raphidocelis subcapitata), a cladoceran species (Chydorus sphaericus), and a freshwater fish larva (Danio rerio), representing organisms of different trophic levels, were exposed to colloids of the polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated AgNPs in the presence and absence of HS. Results show that the presence of HS alleviated the aquatic toxicity of the AgNP colloids to all the organisms in a dose-dependent manner. The particle size distribution of the AgNPs' colloidal particles shifted to lower values due to the presence of HS, implying that the decrease in the toxicity of the AgNP colloids cannot be explained by the variation of agglomeration size. The surface charge of the AgNPs was found to be more negative in the presence of high concentrations of HS, suggesting an electrostatic barrier by which HS might limit interactions between particles and algae cells; indeed, this effect reduced the algae toxicity. Observations on silver ions (Ag(+)) release show that HS inhibit AgNP dissolution, depending on the concentrations of HS. When toxic effects were expressed as a function of each Ag-species, toxicity of the free Ag(+) was found to be much higher than that of the agglomerated particles. PMID:25683234

  19. Principles and Procedures for Evaluating the Toxicity of Household Substances. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Life Sciences.

    This report was prepared for use by the professional toxicologist. It contains chapters on ingestion exposure, dermal and dye toxicity tests, inhalation exposure, chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity tests, mutagenicity tests, reproduction and teratogenicity tests, and behavioral toxicity tests. In addition, regulations under the Federal Hazardous…

  20. 75 FR 42130 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Resource...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; Safe Drinking Water Act; Toxic Substances Control Act; and the Reporting Requirements of the...''); Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1311 to 1387 (``CWA''); Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (``RCRA''),...

  1. Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act by the Council on Environmental Quality. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Toxic Substances and Environmental Oversight of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh congress, Second Session, July 21, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Daniel W. Cannon of the National Association of Manufacturers, Alan A. Hill of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), and Nicholas C. Yost of the Center for Law in the Pubilc Interest testified on implementation procedures of the National Energy Policy Act (NEPA)., with particular attention on the results of administration orders of 1978 to streamline environmental-impact-statement requirements. Hill reported that there will be no requests for substantial revisions of NEPA. Yost reviewed the evolution of NEPA regulations, and noted the fact that having all affected parties participating in the negotiations resulted in a positive compliance response. Cannon suggested an amendment that would make CEQ the final arbiter rather than the courts and would prevent extensive litigation by special interest groups. (DCK)

  2. [Pathomorphological picture of various internal organs of rats after long-term exposure to toxic substances in raw coke gas].

    PubMed

    Madej, J A; Houszka, M; Peryt, A

    1987-01-01

    The authors carried out morphological evaluation of a long-term action of toxic substances at low concentrations (about 1 NDS), contained in raw coke oven gas, i.e. gases: CO, H2S, SO2, NH3 and benzene, as well as dusts containing: C, SiO2, Pb and Cd on the liver and kidneys of three-month old male rats of the Wistar strain. The animals were exposed to the above toxic substances in an experimental chamber for 24 hr, and for 8 hr every day during 12 and 18 months. It was found that pathogenic action of the substances contained in raw coke oven gas was not the total action of all chemical components, but their complicated resultant. Significant differences in the intensity of morphological changes in lungs were observed between rats exposed for 8 hr ans 24 hr/day, in favour of the former. Such a relationship was not observed between 12 and 18 month exposition. Besides the catarrh of the air passages and cellular-fibrous changes in pulmonary alveoli, focal metaplasia of cells of bronchial epithelium was observed, which suggested the possibility of carcinogenic action of coke oven gases and dusts. No distinct morphological differences were found in the liver and kidneys between 8 and 24 hr exposition, whereas great differences were found between 12 and 18 months exposition. Chronic interstitial pyelitis was observed in kidneys after 18 month exposition. PMID:3697342

  3. Optimizing electric utility air toxics compliance with other titles of the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, A.P.; South, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of regulatory issues under Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments that could affect electric utilities. Title III contains provisions relating to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and provides special treatment for electric utilities. Generally, this discussion documents that if utility toxic emissions are regulated, one of the chief difficulties confronting utilities will be the lack of coordination between Title III and other titles of the Act. The paper concludes that if the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determines that regulation of utility HAPs is warranted under Title III, savings can be realized from flexible compliance treatment.

  4. 2001 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Emergency Planning & Community Right to Know Act SEC 313

    SciTech Connect

    ZALOUDEK, D.E.

    2002-06-24

    Pursuant to section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA), and Executive Order 13148, Greening the Government Through Leadership in Environmental Management, the US Department of Energy has prepared and submitted a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory for the Hanford Site covering activities performed during calendar year 2001. EPCRA Section 313 requires facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use listed toxic chemicals in quantities exceeding established threshold levels to report total annual releases of those chemicals. During calendar year 2001, Hanford Site activities resulted in one chemical used in amounts exceeding an activity threshold. Accordingly, the Hanford Site 2001 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory, DOE/RL-2002-37, includes total annual amount of lead released to the environment, transferred to offsite locations, and otherwise managed as waste.

  5. 2003 HANFORD SITE TOXIC CHEMICAL RELEASE INVENTORY EMERGENCY PLANNING & COMMUNITY RIGHT TO KNOW ACT SECTION 313

    SciTech Connect

    ZALOUDEK, D.E.

    2004-06-16

    Pursuant to section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA), and Executive Order 13148, ''Greening the Government Through Leadership in Environmental Management'', the U.S. Department of Energy has prepared and submitted a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory for the Hanford Site covering activities performed during calendar year 2003. EPCRA Section 313 requires facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use listed toxic chemicals in quantities exceeding established threshold levels to report total annual releases of those chemicals. During calendar year 2003, Hanford Site activities resulted in two chemicals used in amounts exceeding an activity threshold; ethylene glycol, Chemical Abstract Services Registry (CAS) Number 107-21-1 and lead, CAS Number 7439-92-1. Accordingly, the 2003 Hanford Site Toxic Chemical Release Inventory, DOE/RL-2004-20, includes total annual amounts of ethylene glycol and lead released to the environment, transferred to offsite locations, and otherwise managed as waste.

  6. 77 FR 48858 - Significant New Use Rules on Certain Chemical Substances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...EPA is promulgating significant new use rules (SNURs) under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) for 25 chemical substances which were the subject of premanufacture notices (PMNs). Fourteen of these chemical substances are subject to TSCA section 5(e) consent orders issued by EPA. This action requires persons who intend to manufacture, import, or process any of these 25 chemical substances......

  7. 77 FR 58665 - Significant New Use Rules on Certain Chemical Substances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ...EPA is promulgating significant new use rules (SNURs) under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) for 107 chemical substances which were the subject of premanufacture notices (PMNs). Eight of these chemical substances are subject to TSCA consent orders issued by EPA. This action requires persons who intend to manufacture, import, or process any of these 107 chemical substances for an......

  8. UTILITY OF TOXICITY TESTS TO MEASURE EFFECTS OF SUBSTANCES ON MARINE ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity tests using single species, microcosms, and communities of test species are described for laboratory evaluations of marine (estuarine and oceanic) pollution effects. The design of acute, early life-stage, life-cycle, and community toxicity tests is discussed. Uses of tes...

  9. AIR LAND WATER ANALYSIS SYSTEM (ALEAS): A MULTI-MEDIA MODEL FOR TOXIC SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air Land Water Analysis System (ALWAS) is a multi-media environmental model for describing the atmospheric dispersion of toxicants, the surface runoff of deposited toxicants, and the subsequent fate of these materials in surface water bodies. ALWAS dipicts the spatial and tem...

  10. HIGH SENSITIVITY FOURIER TRANSFORM NMR. INTERMOLECULAR INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project explored the feasibility of developing new techniques for evaluation of the effects of environmental toxic materials on complex biopolymer systems using high sensitivity Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectroscopy. Commercial instrumentation avail...

  11. 77 FR 6801 - Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry; Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... housing, FEMA provided over 130,000 travel trailers, park homes, and mobile homes for persons displaced by... the main questionnaire. There are no costs to the respondents other than their time. The total... household members, demographics, and health status questions, focusing on respiratory outcomes and...

  12. 76 FR 52692 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... August 15, 2011 a proposed Consent Decree in United States and the State of Michigan v. Hansons Window... District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. The consent decree settles claims against a window...''). For the State SEP, the Settling Defendant will provide $250,000 worth of windows to the State...

  13. 78 FR 66700 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... (Pseudokirchneriella of rare earth elements subcapitata); In Vitro from ore; bleaching Mammalian Chromosome leather and... FR 13708) (FRL-7335-2) (docket identification (ID) number EPA-HQ-OPPT-2005-0033). EPA received data... (76 FR 1067) (FRL-8846-9) (docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPPT-2007-0531). EPA received data on 5...

  14. PROTOCOL FOR MEASURING THE RELATIVE TOXICITY OF SUBSTANCES ON PLANT FOLIAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing numbers of synthetic chemicals and naturally occurring substances are being utilized in many newly developed processes and in so doing become part of our environment. To find out how these compounds may be affecting vegetation, a standard test was needed for comparativ...

  15. Early Exposure to Toxic Substances Damages Brain Architecture. Working Paper #4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2006

    2006-01-01

    New science shows that exposure to toxins prenatally or early in life can have a devastating and lifelong effect on the developing architecture of the brain. Exposures to many chemicals have much more severe consequences for embryos, fetuses, and young children, whose brains are still developing, than for adults. Substances that can have a truly…

  16. Development of a Tier-1 assay for assessing the toxicity of insecticidal substances against Coleomegilla maculata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Tier-1 laboratory testing system was developed to assess the potential dietary effects of insecticidal substances on the predacious ladybird beetle, Coleomegilla maculata. Artificial diets utilizing shrimp eggs were developed, and a Tier-1 bioassay examining C. maculata development and survival wa...

  17. 40 CFR 798.2450 - Inhalation toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inhalation toxicity. 798.2450 Section 798.2450 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2450 Inhalation toxicity. (a) Purpose. In the assessment...

  18. 40 CFR 798.2650 - Oral toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oral toxicity. 798.2650 Section 798.2650 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2650 Oral toxicity. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of...

  19. 40 CFR 798.2250 - Dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dermal toxicity. 798.2250 Section 798.2250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2250 Dermal toxicity. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of...

  20. 40 CFR 798.3260 - Chronic toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chronic toxicity. 798.3260 Section 798.3260 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Chronic Exposure § 798.3260 Chronic toxicity. (a) Purpose. The objective of a chronic...

  1. Toxicogenomics in vitro as an alternative tool for safety evaluation of petroleum substances and PAHs with regard to prenatal developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tsitou, Polyxeni; Heneweer, Marjoke; Boogaard, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    The REACH legislation requires chemicals - including petroleum substances - that are put on the EU market in quantities greater than 1000 tonnes/year, to be tested for prenatal developmental toxicity. This will require large numbers of animals since prenatal development toxicity testing is animal-intensive. The application of toxicogenomic technologies might reduce the number of animals to study prenatal developmental toxicity of petroleum substances by allowing their grouping into categories with the same toxicological properties. This substance categorization may be supported by similarities in molecular fingerprints. The developmental toxicity effects observed in some oil products are most likely related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with high-molecular weight. However, the current review indicates that even though the available studies provide clues regarding the HOX, FOX, SHH and PAX family genes, which regulate functions in skeleton development, single individual genes cannot be used as biomarkers of PAHs exposure and subsequent prenatal developmental toxicity. Furthermore, it should be considered that toxicogenomic technologies applied to specific tissues/organs testing might lead to unreliable results regarding developmental toxicity due to induction of tissue-specific pathways. Thus, an approach which applies a battery of in vitro tests including the zebrafish embryo test, embryonic stem cells, and the whole embryo culture is suggested as it would be more relevant for studying developmental effects in the terms of substances categorization. PMID:25481525

  2. Improving Access to Long-Acting Contraceptive Methods and Reducing Unplanned Pregnancy Among Women with Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Black, Kirsten I.; Day, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Much has been written about the consequences of substance use in pregnancy, but there has been far less focus on the prevention of unintended pregnancies in women with substance use disorders (SUDs). We examine the literature on pregnancy incidence for women with SUDs, the clinical and economic benefits of increasing access to long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods in this population, and the current hurdles to increased access and uptake. High rates of unintended pregnancies and poor physical and psychosocial outcomes among women with SUDs underscore the need for increased access to, and uptake of, LARC methods among these women. A small number of studies that focused on improving access to contraception, especially LARC, via integrated contraception services predominantly provided in drug treatment programs were identified. However, a number of barriers remain, highlighting that much more research is needed in this area. PMID:27199563

  3. IN-VITRO METHODS FOR EVALUATING SIDE EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES AND TOXIC SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several skeletal muscle and smooth muscle preparations have been examined for their usefulness in evaluating the toxic effects of a variety of insecticides. The following preparations were found satisfactory for such test: guinea pig ileum for muscarinic receptors, guinea pig hea...

  4. QSAR screening of 70,983 REACH substances for genotoxic carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and developmental toxicity in the ChemScreen project.

    PubMed

    Wedebye, Eva B; Dybdahl, Marianne; Nikolov, Nikolai G; Jónsdóttir, Svava Ó; Niemelä, Jay R

    2015-08-01

    The ChemScreen project aimed to develop a screening system for reproductive toxicity based on alternative methods. QSARs can, if adequate, contribute to the evaluation of chemical substances under REACH and may in some cases be applied instead of experimental testing to fill data gaps for information requirements. As no testing for reproductive effects should be performed in REACH on known genotoxic carcinogens or germ cell mutagens with appropriate risk management measures implemented, a QSAR pre-screen for 70,983 REACH substances was performed. Sixteen models and three decision algorithms were used to reach overall predictions of substances with potential effects with the following result: 6.5% genotoxic carcinogens, 16.3% mutagens, 11.5% developmental toxicants. These results are similar to findings in earlier QSAR and experimental studies of chemical inventories, and illustrate how QSAR predictions may be used to identify potential genotoxic carcinogens, mutagens and developmental toxicants by high-throughput virtual screening. PMID:25797653

  5. A retrospective analysis of data from toxic substance-related cases in Northeast China (Heilongjiang) between 2000 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dalei; Zhang, Jilin; Zuo, Zhong; Liao, Linchuan

    2013-09-10

    The aim of this study was to analyze data from toxic substance-related cases in Northeast China (Heilongjiang Province) reported between 2000 and 2010, and to investigate the associations among the classes of toxic substances detected with gender, age, season, district of occurrence, and type of case. Pesticides, drugs, and alcohol were detected using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry or flame ionization detection. Carbon monoxide levels were measured using ultraviolet spectrometry, and levels of cyanides, nitrites, and acid were monitored using the chemical colorimetry method. Among a total of 565 cases, 208 (36.8%) were related to accidental injury/death, 175 (31.0%) to suicide, 80 (14.2%) to homicide, 43 (7.6%) to robbery, 29 (5.1%) to fire or arson, 20 (3.5%) to intentional injury/death, 7 (1.2%) to rape, and 3 (0.5%) to kidnapping. Men constituted 65.3% of the total 565 victims, most of who were between the ages of 31 and 50 years, with the average age being 44 years. The highest number of cases (126) was reported from Harbin, the capital of Heilongjiang Province. Pesticide-related cases accounted for 37.9% of the cases, with more cases occurring between April and August. Methomyl (48 cases) and fluoroacetamide (38 cases) were the most common pesticides involved in these cases. Drug-related cases accounted for 19.5% of the total poisoning cases, with benzodiazepines being the most commonly detected drugs (45 cases). More than 70% of alcohol-related cases involved the use of alcohol in crime (or affair) execution, with the blood alcohol concentration being less than 350 mg/100mL in these cases. Carbon monoxide was detected in 16.1% of the cases, with a higher yearly incidence noted in winter. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide an overall analysis of toxic substance-related cases in Northeast China. Similar to the findings observed in Central China (Hubei), our findings indicated that pesticides were the major cause of poisoning in the

  6. Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

    1991-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA`s Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

  7. Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

    1991-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

  8. Speed of efficacy and delayed toxicity characteristics of fast-acting fire ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) baits.

    PubMed

    Oi, David H; Oi, Faith M

    2006-10-01

    Efficacy and speed of action of fire ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) baits that claim fast control of colonies were compared with a standard bait. More than 85% of red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, laboratory colonies provided bait containing the active ingredient indoxacarb died within 3 d, and all colonies were dead in 6 d. Standard bait containing hydramethylnon resulted in death of 60% of the colonies in 9 d. Bait containing spinosad did not cause colony death. Under field conditions, one-half of the areas treated with the indoxacarb bait did not have any active fire ant nests within 3 d, whereas 11 d was needed to reach the same level of control with the hydramethylnon bait. Spinosad had a maximum of 17% of the treated areas without nests after 3 d. The delay in death of S. invicta adults treated in the laboratory with the indoxacarb and spinosad baits was shorter than the standard hydramethylnon bait, which had mortality similar to the traditional delayed toxicity criterion of < 15% mortality after 24 h and > 89% mortality over the test period. Indoxacarb caused mortality of 57% at 24 h and 100% at 48 h; however, visual symptoms of toxicity were not readily observed for at least 8 h before the abrupt increase in death. Spinosad caused 96% mortality by 24 h, and initial mortality became apparent at 4 h. Time required for death of 15% of a treated population (LT15) of spinosad, indoxacarb, and hydramethylnon was 3, 9, and 16 h, respectively. Delayed toxicity characteristics of the fast-acting indoxacarb bait may be useful for the development of other fast-acting ant baits. PMID:17066807

  9. [Meconium as a new biological material for detecting intrauterine exposure to toxic substances].

    PubMed

    Lisowska-Myjak, Barbara

    2005-07-01

    The use of licit and illicit drugs and exposure to other xenobiotic agents during pregnancy is common. These substances are known to have adverse effects on the pregnancy and fetus; however information on fetal exposure is sparse due to the lack of an appropriate measure of exposure. Meconium analysis is a new method for identifying in utero exposure of infants to a number of illicit and legal drugs, alcohol, nicotine, heavy metals, pesticides, congenital infections. It's testing is non-invasive, highly accurate and able to detect prior exposure in utero during 12-40 weeks of gestation. This has implications for toxicology to develop improved methods to identify exposed infants. PMID:16363385

  10. Integrative rodent models for assessing male reproductive toxicity of environmental endocrine active substances

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Jacques; Eustache, Florence; Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie Chantal; Livera, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    In the present review, we first summarize the main benefits, limitations and pitfalls of conventional in vivo approaches to assessing male reproductive structures and functions in rodents in cases of endocrine active substance (EAS) exposure from the postulate that they may provide data that can be extrapolated to humans. Then, we briefly present some integrated approaches in rodents we have recently developed at the organism level. We particularly focus on the possible effects and modes of action (MOA) of these substances at low doses and in mixtures, real-life conditions and at the organ level, deciphering the precise effects and MOA on the fetal testis. It can be considered that the in vivo experimental EAS exposure of rodents remains the first choice for studies and is a necessary tool (together with the epidemiological approach) for understanding the reproductive effects and MOA of EASs, provided the pitfalls and limitations of the rodent models are known and considered. We also provide some evidence that classical rodent models may be refined for studying the multiple consequences of EAS exposure, not only on the reproductive axis but also on various hormonally regulated organs and tissues, among which several are implicated in the complex process of mammalian reproduction. Such models constitute an interesting way of approaching human exposure conditions. Finally, we show that organotypic culture models are powerful complementary tools, especially when focusing on the MOA. All these approaches have contributed in a combinatorial manner to a better understanding of the impact of EAS exposure on human reproduction. PMID:24369134

  11. Assessment of the levels of potentially toxic substances around a transect of anthrosols in Aqaba shoreline, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahsha, Mohammad; Al-Rousan, Saber; Al-Jawasreh, Raid

    2016-04-01

    Soils are the major sink for potentially toxic substances (PTSs) such as heavy metals released into the environment by emissions from the quickly increasing of human impact including industrial mine tailings, disposal of high metal wastes, land misuse, wastewater irrigation, spillage of petrochemicals, and atmospheric deposition. The present study concerns the properties variability and soil biological health status in abandoned salt transportation port site in the Jordanian coast of the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. Seven sites were selected according to different morphological and pedological conditions, anthropogenic impact and the same climate conditions. Successively, all locations were sampled for topsoil in the period between spring-summer 2014. Field observations as well as laboratory analysis including heavy metal concentrations (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn); soil chemo-physical parameters (pH, soil dry mass, carbonate, water holding, organic carbon content, soil particle size distribution), and quality of soil's biological community were determined. The anthropogenic influence related to former port activity on soils of the studied area is evident. Soils in the studied area site are highly contaminated by PTSs, mainly Cu and Zn, by 648, 298.6 mgKg‑1respectively. Former activities proved to affect the microarthropods community altering both quantity and quality of soil and the chemo-physical structure of the microhabitats. The evaluation of soil biological quality index (QBS-ar) of the surface horizons from the study area is demonstrated that the area is "sufferings" since it is affected by PTSs contamination resulting in a failure in the ecological success of secondary recolonization after abandonment. However, there is an increasing need for further research in the soils of Aqaba focusing on soil health management , combining QBS-ar index with soil chemo-physical properties. Key words: Potentially Toxic Substances, Heavy Metals, Soil Quality.

  12. 40 CFR 799.9346 - TSCA 90-day inhalation toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TSCA 90-day inhalation toxicity. 799.9346 Section 799.9346 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Health Effects Test Guidelines...

  13. Analysis of 32 toxic natural substances in herbal products by liquid chromatography quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yun; Quek, Yi-Ling; Kee, Chee-Leong; Low, Min-Yong; Bloodworth, Bosco C; Ge, Xiaowei

    2015-11-10

    In this study, an LC-MS/MS EPI method was developed for simultaneous determination of 32 toxic natural substances in herbal products. The analytes include aconite alkaloids, lobelia alkaloids, solanaceous alkaloids, digitalis steroid glycosides, strychnine, tetrahydropalmatine etc. They werecommonly used in herbal products. The target analytes were extracted from the samples using theQuEChERS method and analysed using AB SCIEX QTRAP 5500 coupled with Agilent HPLC 1260. Thecolumn used was biphenyl reversed phase analytical column. Mobile phase A and B were deionizedwater and methanol respectively, both containing 5mM ammonium formate and 0.1% formic acid. TheMRM-IDA-EPI method enabled quantification and confirmation of the analytes in a single run. The EPIwas used for the qualitative analysis while the MRM was used for the quantitative analysis. Limits ofdetection were determined to be below 10μg/kg for the majority of the analytes. The recoveries forthose commonly detected natural substances were in the acceptable range of 70-120%. PMID:26210743

  14. Almost strict liability: Wind River Petroleum and the Utah Hazardous Substance Mitigation Act

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    In Wind River, the Utah Supreme Court developed a two-step liability standard. The court ruled that under the act, statutorily responsible parties are strictly liable for any release of hazardous material from their facility. Among responsible parties, liability is to be apportioned on an equitable contribution standard. However, the Utah Legislature has subsequently amended the Mitigation Act to prohibit the application of unapportioned strict liability. Therefore, Wind River can no longer be relied upon as the law regarding liability under the Mitigation Act.

  15. ADVERSE EFFECTS OF ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDE AND TOXIC SUBSTANCES ON REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT IN THE MALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) or chemical mixtures alter androgen-response tissues via a variety of mechanisms including mimicking or blocking the action of the natural ligand to the androgen receptor (AR), inhibiting steroid hormone synthesis or by acting a...

  16. Bioaccumulation of toxic substances associated with dredging and dredged material disposal: a literature review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seelye, James G.; Mac, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    A literature review of sediment bioassessment was conducted as the first step in the development of a more standardized and ecologically sound test procedure for evaluating sediment quality. Based on the review, the authors concluded that 1) a standardized laboratory bioassessment test should consist of flowthrough exposure of at least 10 days duration using more than one aquatic organism including at least an infaunal benthic invertebrate and a fish species. 2) Before adoption of a laboratory sediment bioassessment procedure, the laboratory results should be evaluated by comparison with field conditions. 3) Most current sediment bioassessment regulatory tests measure acute toxicity or bioaccumulation. Development of tests to evaluate chronic, sublethal effects is needed.

  17. Raising awareness of new psychoactive substances: chemical analysis and in vitro toxicity screening of 'legal high' packages containing synthetic cathinones.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ana Margarida; Valente, Maria João; Carvalho, Márcia; Dias da Silva, Diana; Gaspar, Helena; Carvalho, Félix; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Guedes de Pinho, Paula

    2015-05-01

    The world's status quo on recreational drugs has dramatically changed in recent years due to the rapid emergence of new psychoactive substances (NPS), represented by new narcotic or psychotropic drugs, in pure form or in preparation, which are not controlled by international conventions, but that may pose a public health threat comparable with that posed by substances listed in these conventions. These NPS, also known as 'legal highs' or 'smart drugs', are typically sold via Internet or 'smartshops' as legal alternatives to controlled substances, being announced as 'bath salts' and 'plant feeders' and is often sought after for consumption especially among young people. Although NPS have the biased reputation of being safe, the vast majority has hitherto not been tested and several fatal cases have been reported, namely for synthetic cathinones, with pathological patterns comparable with amphetamines. Additionally, the unprecedented speed of appearance and distribution of the NPS worldwide brings technical difficulties in the development of analytical procedures and risk assessment in real time. In this study, 27 products commercialized as 'plant feeders' were chemically characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was also evaluated, for the first time, the in vitro hepatotoxic effects of individual synthetic cathinones, namely methylone, pentedrone, 4-methylethcathinone (4-MEC) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). Two commercial mixtures ('Bloom' and 'Blow') containing mainly cathinone derivatives were also tested, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) was used as the reference drug. The study allowed the identification of 19 compounds, showing that synthetic cathinones are the main active compounds present in these products. Qualitative and quantitative variability was found in products sold with the same trade name in matching or different 'smartshops'. In the toxicity studies performed in

  18. ABILITY OF ECOSAR, TOPKAT, NEURAL NETWORKS, AND ASTER TO PREDICT TOXICITY OF CHEMICALS TO AQUATIC BIOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) which provides the basis for assessing and managing toxic substances in Canada, is being revised. Several new mandates have been introduced in the Act...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990... 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990... 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990... 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION...

  2. Large Scale Numerical Modelling to Study the Dispersion of Persistent Toxic Substances Over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulinger, A.; Petersen, G.

    2003-12-01

    For the past two decades environmental research at the GKSS Research Centre has been concerned with airborne pollutants with adverse effects on human health. The research was mainly focused on investigating the dispersion and deposition of heavy metals like lead and mercury over Europe by means of numerical modelling frameworks. Lead, in particular, served as a model substance to study the relationship between emissions and human exposition. The major source of airborne lead in Germany was fuel combustion until the 1980ies when its use as gasoline additive declined due to political decisions. Since then, the concentration of lead in ambient air and the deposition rates decreased in the same way as the consumption of leaded fuel. These observations could further be related to the decrease of lead concentrations in human blood measured during medical studies in several German cities. Based on the experience with models for heavy metal transport and deposition we have now started to turn our research focus to organic substances, e.g. PAHs. PAHs have been recognized as significant air borne carcinogens for several decades. However, it is not yet possible to precisely quantify the risk of human exposure to those compounds. Physical and chemical data, known from literature, describing the partitioning of the compounds between particle and gas phase and their degradation in the gas phase are implemented in a tropospheric chemistry module. In this way, the fate of PAHs in the atmosphere due to different particle type and size and different meteorological conditions is tested before carrying out large-scale and long-time studies. First model runs have been carried out for Benzo(a)Pyrene as one of the principal carcinogenic PAHs. Up to now, nearly nothing is known about degradation reactions of particle bound BaP. Thus, they could not be taken into account in the model so far. On the other hand, the proportion of BaP in the gas phase has to be considered at higher ambient

  3. An analytical approach to toxic substance replacement in support of pollution prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, I.B.

    1997-12-31

    In support of pollution prevention and in accordance with Executive Order 12856 concerning pollution prevention, all federal agencies must comply with the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) chemical release reduction and pollution prevention planning. The inventory lists hundreds of chemicals and choosing those to replace and finding actual replacement chemicals or procedures is not always clear. This study focuses on an analytical approach to this problem by understanding the application of ethanol. Ethanol is a volatile organic compound (VOC) used as a solvent in ammunition manufacturing. Ethanol`s use as the solvent for shellac in a primer lacquer is characterized in the laboratory. Due to interest in substituting acetone for ethanol, an acetone-based primer lacquer is fabricated and tested in comparison to its ethanol counterpart. The results form the basis for broader application and chemical change.

  4. Arbutin and decrease of potentially toxic substances generated in human blood neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Pečivová, Jana; Nosál', Radomír; Sviteková, Klára

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils, highly motile phagocytic cells, constitute the first line of host defense and simultaneously they are considered to be central cells of chronic inflammation. In combination with standard therapeutic procedures, natural substances are gaining interest as an option for enhancing the effectiveness of treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effect of arbutin and carvedilol and of their combination on 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate- stimulated functions of human isolated neutrophils. Cells were preincubated with the drugs tested and subsequently stimulated. Superoxide (with or without blood platelets, in the rate close to physiological conditions [1:50]) and HOCl generation, elastase and myeloperoxidase release were determined spectrophotometrically and phospholipase D activation spectrofluorometrically. The combined effect of arbutin and carvedilol was found to be more effective than the effect of each compound alone. Our study provided evidence supporting the potential beneficial effect of arbutin alone or in combination with carvedilol in diminishing tissue damage by decreasing phospholipase D, myeloperoxidase and elastase activity and by attenuating the generation of superoxide and the subsequently derived reactive oxygen species. The presented data indicate the ability of arbutin to suppress the onset and progression of inflammation. PMID:26109900

  5. Arbutin and decrease of potentially toxic substances generated in human blood neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Pečivová, Jana; Nosál', Radomír; Sviteková, Klára; Mačičková, Tatiana

    2014-12-01

    Neutrophils, highly motile phagocytic cells, constitute the first line of host defense and simultaneously they are considered to be central cells of chronic inflammation. In combination with standard therapeutic procedures, natural substances are gaining interest as an option for enhancing the effectiveness of treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effect of arbutin and carvedilol and of their combination on 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate- stimulated functions of human isolated neutrophils. Cells were preincubated with the drugs tested and subsequently stimulated. Superoxide (with or without blood platelets, in the rate close to physiological conditions [1:50]) and HOCl generation, elastase and myeloperoxidase release were determined spectrophotometrically and phospholipase D activation spectrofluorometrically. The combined effect of arbutin and carvedilol was found to be more effective than the effect of each compound alone. Our study provided evidence supporting the potential beneficial effect of arbutin alone or in combination with carvedilol in diminishing tissue damage by decreasing phospholipase D, myeloperoxidase and elastase activity and by attenuating the generation of superoxide and the subsequently derived reactive oxygen species. The presented data indicate the ability of arbutin to suppress the onset and progression of inflammation. PMID:26109900

  6. 40 CFR 716.120 - Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies. 716.120 Section 716.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING Specific Chemical Listings § 716.120 Substances and listed mixtures...

  7. 40 CFR 716.105 - Additions of substances and mixtures to which this subpart applies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additions of substances and mixtures to which this subpart applies. 716.105 Section 716.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING Specific Chemical Listings § 716.105 Additions of substances...

  8. 40 CFR 716.45 - How to report on substances and mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How to report on substances and mixtures. 716.45 Section 716.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.45 How to report on substances and mixtures. Section 716.120...

  9. 40 CFR 712.5 - Method of identification of substances for reporting purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Method of identification of substances for reporting purposes. 712.5 Section 712.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT CHEMICAL INFORMATION RULES General Provisions § 712.5 Method of identification of substances for...

  10. 40 CFR 716.120 - Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies. 716.120 Section 716.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING Specific Chemical Listings § 716.120 Substances and listed mixtures...

  11. 40 CFR 716.120 - Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies. 716.120 Section 716.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING Specific Chemical Listings § 716.120 Substances and listed mixtures...

  12. 40 CFR 716.120 - Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies. 716.120 Section 716.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING Specific Chemical Listings § 716.120 Substances and listed mixtures...

  13. 40 CFR 792.105 - Test, control, and reference substance characterization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test, control, and reference substance characterization. 792.105 Section 792.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and Reference Substances § 792.105...

  14. 78 FR 27048 - Significant New Use Rules on Certain Chemical Substances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ...EPA is promulgating significant new use rules (SNURs) under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) for 15 chemical substances which were the subject of premanufacture notices (PMNs). This action requires persons who intend to manufacture, import, or process any of these 15 chemical substances for an activity that is designated as a significant new use by this rule to notify EPA at least 90......

  15. Effects of a Television Drama about Environmental Exposure to Toxic Substances

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, May G.; Eustis Turf, Elizabeth; Wilson-Genderson, Maureen; Wells, Kristen; Huang, Grace C.; Beck, Vicki

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This study assessed short-term outcomes of viewing an episode of a prime-time television drama in which a child developed cancer after environmental exposure to an illegal pesticide. The study explored the effects among viewers of feeling transported into a narrative world. Methods. Respondents (n=2,139) to a post-episode Internet panel survey were asked if they had seen the show and asked questions about their demographic information, their frequency of viewing the television show, the degree to which they had felt transported into a narrative world created by the drama, and their knowledge and beliefs about the health effects of environmental exposure. Conversations with key informants from federal agencies and advocacy groups were also held. Results. Episode viewing and narrative transportation were positively associated with knowledge of toxic exposure effects, and transported viewers reported being more likely to report an unusually high number of cancer cases to authorities. The show also appeared to have prompted a clarification of federal pesticide-testing policy. Conclusions. Entertainment Education is a promising strategy for disseminating key points of information about environmental health. PMID:21563723

  16. Persistent toxic substances released from uncontrolled e-waste recycling and actions for the future.

    PubMed

    Man, Ming; Naidu, Ravi; Wong, Ming H

    2013-10-01

    The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal was adopted on March 22, 1989 and enforced on May 5, 1992. Since then, the USA, one of the world's largest e-waste producers, has not ratified this Convention or the Basel Ban Amendment. Communities are still debating the legal loophole, which permits the export of whole products to other countries provided it is not for recycling. In January 2011, China's WEEE Directive was implemented, providing stricter control over e-waste imports to China, including Hong Kong, while emphasizing that e-waste recycling is the producers' responsibility. China is expected to supersede the USA as the principal e-waste producer, by 2020, according to the UNEP. Uncontrolled e-waste recycling activities generate and release heavy metals and POPs into the environment, which may be re-distributed, bioaccumulated and biomagnified, with potentially adverse human health effects. Greater efforts and scientific approaches are needed for future e-product designs of minimal toxic metal and compound use, reaping greater benefits than debating the definition and handling responsibilities of e-waste recycling. PMID:22840636

  17. Analytical solution using computer algebra of a biosensor for detecting toxic substances in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rúa Taborda, María. Isabel

    2014-05-01

    In a relatively recent paper an electrochemical biosensor for water toxicity detection based on a bio-chip as a whole cell was proposed and numerically solved and analyzed. In such paper the kinetic processes in a miniaturized electrochemical biosensor system was described using the equations for specific enzymatic reaction and the diffusion equation. The numerical solution shown excellent agreement with the measured data but such numerical solution is not enough to design efficiently the corresponding bio-chip. For this reason an analytical solution is demanded. The object of the present work is to provide such analytical solution and then to give algebraic guides to design the bio-sensor. The analytical solution is obtained using computer algebra software, specifically Maple. The method of solution is the Laplace transform, with Bromwich integral and residue theorem. The final solution is given as a series of Bessel functions and the effective time for the bio-sensor is computed. It is claimed that the analytical solutions that were obtained will be very useful to predict further current variations in similar systems with different geometries, materials and biological components. Beside of this the analytical solution that we provide is very useful to investigate the relationship between different chamber parameters such as cell radius and height; and electrode radius.

  18. Protecting Baltimore`s waters from toxic substances in urban storm drains

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, W.; Belt, K.; Murphy, D.

    1995-12-31

    The City of Baltimore received a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) municipal storm water permit in January 1994. A major effort under the permit was to develop a program to identify and eliminate illicit entries into the municipal storm water system. Approximately one third of the storm drain outfalls have been targeted under this program. The outfalls correspond to sections of the storm drain system inspected for the development of a storm drain infra-structure data base. During the infra-structure inspections, samples were collected and flow measurements were taken at storm water outfalls. Any suspended illicit discharges were sent to the laboratory where they were analyzed for a suite of toxicants and other pollutants include: surfactants, phenols, ammonia, copper, lead, zinc, residual chlorine and total petroleum hydrocarbons. The laboratory data provided the basis for ranking the subwatersheds from least to most polluted. These rankings were then used to design a dry weather sampling program so that the most polluted watersheds are sampled more frequently (e.g., monthly) than the least polluted (annually). Repeated high pollution levels initiate an investigation at sequential sampling points upstream until the pipe segment receiving the discharge is identified. A geographical information system is used to assist in identifying potential sources of contamination (e.g., industries) in the suspected drain segment.

  19. Dynamics of an electrochemical biosensor for the detection of toxic substances in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Laurent; Ospina, Juan

    2016-05-01

    A proposed analytical method focuses on electrolyte transport to the electrode of an electrochemical cell. The recombinant Escherichia coli whole-cell biosensor detects toxicity in water based on a set of biochemical reactors. Previous contributions elucidated the kinetics of product formation and validated a mathematical model for its diffusion in the chamber. This work introduces an approach to investigate the dynamics of the probe using Laplace transforms and an effective time constant. The transfer function between the electrolyte production and the total current revealed a faster response for larger electrode radii. Both the first-order and effective time constants increased with the chamber height and radius. Separation of variables yields closed-form solutions and helps estimate the kinetics of p-aminophenol generation. When the bacteria were exposed to phenol concentrations of 1.6, 8.3 and 16 ppm, the corresponding overall rate constants were 5.11x10-7, 1.13x10-6 and 1.99x10-6 (product concentration unit/s2), respectively. In addition to parameter estimation, the method can be applied to perform sensitivity analysis and aid manufacturers in meeting design specifications of biosensors.

  20. Lake Chapala (mexico) and its Geological Framework as a Possible Source of Potentially Toxic Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarate, P. F.; Camacho, J. B.; Salazar, S. G.; na

    2011-12-01

    Lake Chapala basin (LCH) is located in western Mexico in the neotectonic Rift Citala and its Geothermal system (GS) associated. LCH is matter of public health concern because Lake Chapala is a primary source of water to Guadalajara Metropolitan Zone (~4 M inhabitants). The major lithology of LCH is volcanic in origin and andesite-basalt in composition; the minor lithology is made of lacustrine sedimentary deposits. The GS at LCH is characterized by: sublacustrine and terrestrial hot springs; hydrothermal alteration halos; metallic prospects hosted in E-W structures; carbonate deposits (sinter); mud volcanoes and hydrothermal oil deposits. Most of the thermal springs (64-83° C) that flow at LCH have carbonated water ([HCO3]; 193-240 mg L-1) as in the sublacustrine spring "Los Gorgos"; exceptionally and near of the hydrothermal alteration halos the hydrothermal spring water of San Juan Cosala (SJC) is sulfated ([SO42-] 479 mg L-1). The hydrogeochemistry of SJC and of lake water is showed in Table 1. The lithogeochemistry of sediments and the clarke of basaltic rock (Krauskopf, 1967) are presented in Table 2. Oil is formed by the thermal transformation of sedimentary organic matter. At LCH the causative agent of thermal alteration of sedimentary organic matter and mass transfer was a fossil (>50,000 yr; 14C) hydrothermal system. The presence of metals in the LCH natural environment (sediments, rocks, hot springs, water, etc.) is apparent and this content is accordingly with the clarke in basaltic rocks. To conclude that the quantification of a potentially toxic metal (PTM; "heavy" metals) is harmful to aquatic organism in LCH this research has been complemented as follows: applying the sequential extraction technique (Tessier et al., 1979) to establish the geochemical fraction to which the PTM is bound: a) Interchangeable metals (F1); b) metals bound to carbonates (F2); c) metals bound to Fe and Mn oxides (F3); Metals bound to organic matter(F4) and, e) residual

  1. [Reduction of a risk of the deleterious effects of persistent toxic substances on the health of the far north population].

    PubMed

    Dudarev, A A; Mizerniuk, V N; Chupakhin, V S; Lebedev, G B; Chashchin, V P

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the general principles and procedure of the development and implementation of measures to decrease and prevent environmental pollution with persistent toxic substances (PTS) in the Russian Arctic and, accordingly, to reduce a risk of the deleterious effects of PTS on human health. Based on the results of a study of PTS in the Russian Arctic (from the Kola Peninsula to Chukotka), the authors first systematized the basic lines and actions and formulated specific measures to reduce the North population's exposure to PTSs, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, organic chlorine pesticides (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, hexachlorocyclohexane, hexachlorobenzene, etc.), and heavy metals (mercury, lead, cadmium). A package of measures is aimed at maximally reducing the presence of PTS-containing objects and materials in the north (via detection, collection, and extermination), at neutralizing the soils in settlement lands, at setting up safe water consumption systems, at organizing effective control over the safe use of chemicals and the levels of PTS in raw food materials and foodstuffs, and at working out recommendations on safe procedures for food purchase, storage, and cooking. PMID:20491265

  2. A toxic substance from the sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus induces histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Takei, M; Nakagawa, H; Kimura, A; Endo, K

    1991-03-01

    A toxic substance (P-II fraction), fractionated from the pedicellariae of the sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus, dose-dependently caused the histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. The histamine release induced by P-II fraction increased with time, while compound 48/80 caused a more rapid histamine release. The dose-response curve for P-II fraction was studied with concentration 0.03-2.0 mg/ml. This reaction was dependent on Ca2+ and temperature. When glucose (5.5 mM) was omitted during the incubation step, the histamine release induced by P-II fraction was significantly reduced as compared to that of compound 48/80. Pyruvate reversed this reduction. On the other hand, the histamine release induced by P-II fraction was effectively potentiated by the addition of glucose (11.0 mM), but not that by compound 48/80. These results suggest that P-II fraction-induced histamine release differs from that of compound 48/80 disregards to the effects of glucose, because this histamine release appears to be more sensitive to the glycolytic pathway than compound 48/80-induced histamine release. PMID:1713736

  3. Toxic substances from coal combustion - forms of occurrence analyses. Semi-annual report, April 30, 1996--November 1, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, S.S.; Palmer, C.A.; Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.B.; Kolb, K.C.

    1996-12-01

    The overall objective of this project is to provide analytical support for the Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI) effort being performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-95101 and entitled `` Toxic Substances from Coal Combustion - A Comprehensive Assessment``. The Pittsburgh Elkhorn/Hazard, and Illinois No. 6 program coals have been examined to determine the mode of occurrence of selected trace elements using scanning electron microscopy, microprobe analysis, and experimental leaching procedures. Preliminary microprobe data indicates that the arsenic content of pyrite grains in the Illinois No. 6 (0.0-0.027 ppm As) and Pittsburgh (0.0-0.080 ppm As) coals is similar. Pyrite grains observed in the Elkhorn/Hazard coal generally have arsenic concentrations (0.0-0.272 wt. %As) that are slightly higher than those of the Pittsburgh or Illinois No. 6 coals. One pyrite grain observed in the Elkhorn/Hazard coal contained much higher levels of arsenic (approximately 2 wt. % As). Preliminary microprobe analyses and data from leaching experiments indicate the association of arsenic with pyrite in the Pittsburgh and Illinois No. 6 coals. Leaching data for arsenic in the Elkhorn/Hazard coal, in contrast, is inconclusive and additional data are needed before a definite determination can be made.

  4. A multispecies approach for monitoring persistent toxic substances in the Gulf of Gdańsk (Baltic sea).

    PubMed

    Galassi, S; Bettinetti, R; Neri, M C; Jeannot, R; Dagnac, T; Bristeau, S; Sakkas, V; Albanis, T; Boti, V; Valsamaki, T; Falandysz, J; Schulte-Oehlmann, U

    2008-01-01

    Bivalve mussels are usually used for biomonitoring persistent toxic substances (PTS) in coastal ecosystems. Nevertheless, these organisms, which live attached on hard substrates, can be found along the sandy coasts only on human manufactured products. In this work different species collected in the Gulf of Gdańsk were compared to evaluate their suitability for monitoring PTS pollution at a local scale. The clam Mya arenaria seems to represent an excellent indicator of sediment pollution, mainly for organotin compounds which are selectively bioaccumulated. Organochlorine compounds are bioaccumulated in the different species mainly in function of their lipid body burden. Habitat conditions (salinity, substrate, pollution), however, strongly limited the occurrence of different species in the sampling sites; the most ubiquitous species, the common shrimp Crangon crangon, resulted therefore the most suitable to be used for the comparison of PTS pollution in this aquatic environment. Although the blue mussel (Mytilus trossulus) was confirmed to be a very useful sentinel species to compare pollution level inside and outside the Gulf of Gdańsk, we recommend the use of other species to give a more detailed picture of the pollution situation in coastal areas. PMID:17291585

  5. Assessment of the predictive capacity of the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity test method to identify substances not classified for acute oral toxicity (LD50>2000 mg/kg): results of an ECVAM validation study.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pilar; Cole, Thomas; Curren, Rodger; Gibson, Rosemary M; Liebsch, Manfred; Raabe, Hans; Tuomainen, Anita M; Whelan, Maurice; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka

    2013-04-01

    Assessing chemicals for acute oral toxicity is a standard information requirement of regulatory testing. However, animal testing is now prohibited in the cosmetics sector in Europe, and strongly discouraged for industrial chemicals. Building on the results of a previous international validation study, a follow up study was organised to assess if the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity assay could identify substances not requiring classification as acute oral toxicants under the EU regulations. Fifty-six coded industrial chemicals were tested in three laboratories, each using one of the following protocols: the previously validated protocol, an abbreviated version of the protocol and the protocol adapted for an automation platform. Predictions were very similar among the three laboratories. The assay exhibited high sensitivity (92-96%) but relatively low specificity (40-44%). Three chemicals were under predicted. Assuming that most industrial chemicals are not likely to be acutely toxic, this test method could prove a valuable component of an integrated testing strategy, a read-across argument, or weight-of-evidence approach to identify non toxic chemicals (LD50>2000 mg/kg). However, it is likely to under predict chemicals acting via specific mechanisms of action not captured by the 3T3 test system, or which first require biotransformation in vivo. PMID:23246604

  6. 40 CFR 798.3320 - Combined chronic toxicity/oncogenicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Combined chronic toxicity/oncogenicity. 798.3320 Section 798.3320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Chronic Exposure § 798.3320 Combined chronic toxicity/oncogenicity....

  7. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fish acute toxicity test. 797.1400 Section 797.1400 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1400 Fish acute toxicity test. (a) Purpose. This...

  8. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Daphnid acute toxicity test. 797.1300 Section 797.1300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1300 Daphnid acute toxicity test. (a) Purpose....

  9. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gammarid acute toxicity test. 795.120 Section 795.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) PROVISIONAL TEST GUIDELINES Provisional Environmental Effects Guidelines § 795.120 Gammarid acute toxicity test....

  10. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test. 797.1930 Section 797.1930 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1930 Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test. (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 797.1330 - Daphnid chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Daphnid chronic toxicity test. 797.1330 Section 797.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1330 Daphnid chronic toxicity test. (a) Purpose....

  12. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Algal acute toxicity test. 797.1050 Section 797.1050 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1050 Algal acute toxicity test. (a) Purpose. The...

  13. Acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.; Haws, R.; Little, D.; Reese, D.; Peterson, C.; Moeller, G.

    1995-12-31

    This study develops data on the acute aquatic toxicity of selected biodiesel fuels which may become subject to environmental effects test regulations under the US Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The test substances are Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Methyl Soyate (MS), a biodiesel mixture of 20% REE and 80% Diesel, a biodiesel mixture of 50% REE and diesel, and a reference substance of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel. The test procedure follows the Daphnid Acute Toxicity Test outlined in 40 CFR {section} 797.1300 of the TSCA regulations. Daphnia Magna are exposed to the test substance in a flow-through system consisting of a mixing chamber, a proportional diluter, and duplicate test chambers. Novel system modifications are described that accommodate the testing of oil-based test substances with Daphnia. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an EC50, an effective concentration producing immobility in 50% of the test specimen.

  14. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening test. 799.9365 Section 799.9365 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL...

  15. 75 FR 69086 - Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)--New--Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). Background... amended the Public Health Service Act to provide for the establishment of an Amyotrophic Lateral...

  16. Persistent toxic substances in soils and waters along an altitudinal gradient in the Laja River Basin, Central Southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Barra, Ricardo; Popp, Peter; Quiroz, Roberto; Bauer, Coretta; Cid, Hernan; von Tümpling, Wolf

    2005-02-01

    In this study the levels and distribution of some persistent toxic substances (PTS) were investigated in soils, superficial water, and snow along an altitudinal gradient in the Laja River Basin (South Central Chile). The principal objective was to establish the basin's contamination status. The working hypothesis was that PTS levels and distribution in the basin are dependent on the degree of anthropogenic intervention. Fifteen PAHs, seven PCBs congeners, and three organochlorine pesticides were studied in superficial soil and water samples obtained along the altitudinal gradient and from a coastal reference station (Lleu-Lleu River). Soil samples were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction with acetone/cyclohexane (1:1) for PAHs and organochlorine compounds. Contaminants were extracted from water and snow samples by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). PAH and organochlorine compound quantification was carried out by HPLC with fluorescence detection and GC-MS, respectively. PCBs in soils presented four different profiles in the altitudinal gradient, mainly determined by their chlorination degree; these profiles were not observed for the chlorinated pesticides. In general, the detected levels for the analyzed compounds were low for soils when compared with soil data from other remote areas of the world. Higher summation operator PAHs levels in soils were found in the station located at 227 masl (4243 ng g-1 TOC), in a forestry area and near a timber industry, where detected levels were up to eight times higher than the other sampling sites. In general, PAH levels and distribution seems to be dependent on local conditions. No pesticides were detected in surface waters. However, congeners of PCBs were detected in almost all sampling stations with the highest levels being found in Laja Lake waters, where 1.1 ng/l were observed. This concentration is two times higher than values reported for polluted lakes in the Northern Hemisphere. The presence of organochlorine

  17. An evaluation of fish early life stage tests for predicting reproductive and longer-term toxicity from plant protection product active substances.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, James R; Maynard, Samuel K; Crane, Mark

    2014-08-01

    The chronic toxicity of chemicals to fish is routinely assessed by using fish early life stage (ELS) test results. Fish full life cycle (FLC) tests are generally required only when toxicity, bioaccumulation, and persistence triggers are met or when there is a suspicion of potential endocrine-disrupting properties. This regulatory approach is based on a relationship between the results of fish ELS and FLC studies first established more than 35 yrs ago. Recently, this relationship has been challenged by some regulatory authorities, and it has been recommended that more substances should undergo FLC testing. In addition, a project proposal has been submitted to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to develop a fish partial life cycle (PLC) test including a reproductive assessment. Both FLC and PLC tests are animal- and resource-intensive and technically challenging and should therefore be undertaken only if there is clear evidence that they are necessary for coming to a regulatory decision. The present study reports on an analysis of a database of paired fish ELS and FLC endpoints for plant protection product active substances from European Union draft assessment reports and the US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs Pesticide Ecotoxicity Database. Analysis of this database shows a clear relationship between ELS and FLC responses, with similar median sensitivity across substances when no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) are compared. There was also no indication that classification of a substance as a mammalian reproductive toxicant leads to more sensitive effects in fish FLC tests than in ELS tests. Indeed, the response of the ELS tests was generally more sensitive than the most sensitive reproduction NOEC from a FLC test. This analysis indicates that current testing strategies and guidelines are fit for purpose and that there is no need for fish full or partial life cycle tests for most plant protection

  18. Impact of certain household micropollutants on bacterial behavior. Toxicity tests/study of extracellular polymeric substances in sludge.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Laure; Merlin, Christophe; Hassenboehler, Lucille; Munoz, Jean-François; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Görner, Tatiana

    2013-10-01

    The impact of eight household micropollutants (erythromycin, ofloxacin, ibuprofen, 4-nonylphenol, triclosan, sucralose, PFOA and PFOS (PFAAs)) on the laboratory bacterial strain Escherichia coli MG1655 and on activated sludge from an urban wastewater treatment plant was studied. Growth-based toxicity tests on E. coli were performed for each micropollutants. The effect of micropollutants on activated sludge (at concentrations usually measured in wastewater up to concentrations disturbing the bacterial growth of E. coli) was examined in batch reactors and by comparison to a control reactor (without micropollutants). The bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) secreted by the sludge were measured by size exclusion chromatography and their overexpression was considered as an indicator of bacteria sensitivity to environmental changes. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the ammonium concentration were monitored to evaluate the biomass ability to remove the macropollution. Some micropollutants induced an increase of bound EPS in activated sludge flocs at concentrations depending on the micropollutant: erythromycin from 100 μg/L, ofloxacin from 10 μg/L, triclosan from 0.5 μg/L, 4-nonylphenol from 5000 μg/L and PFAAs from 0.1 μg/L. This suggests that the biomass had to cope with new conditions. Moreover, at high concentrations of erythromycin (10 mg/L) and ibuprofen (5 mg/L) bacterial populations were no longer able to carry out the removal of macropollution. Ibuprofen induced a decrease of bound EPS at all the studied concentrations, probably reflecting a decrease of general bacterial activity. The biomass was not sensitive to sucralose in terms of EPS production, however at very high concentration (1 g/L) it inhibited the COD decrease. Micropollution removal was also assessed. Ibuprofen, erythromycin, ofloxacin, 4-nonylphenol and triclosan were removed from wastewater, mainly by biodegradation. Sucralose and PFOA were not removed from wastewater at all, and

  19. Toxic Substances from Coal Combustion: A Comprehensive Assessment: Quarterly report, 1 July 1996-30 September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bool, L.E.; Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Peterson, T.W.; Sarofim, A.F.; Olmez, I.; Zeng, T.; Crowley, S.; Finkelman, R.

    1996-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPS) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UKy), the University of Connecticut, and Princeton University to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO{sub x}, combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI`s existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). Extensive coal characterization and laboratory work has begun in order to develop and test new sub-models. Trace element concentrations in the Pittsburgh, Elkhorn/Hazard, and Illinois No. 6 coals, and in size/density fractions of these coals, were completed. Coal characterization in the past quarter also included direct identification of the modes of occurrence of various trace inorganic species in coal and ash using unique analytical techniques such as XAFS analysis and selective leaching. Combustion testing of these two coals was begun and preliminary data obtained on trace element 0301 vaporization in the combustion zone. Modeling efforts in the past quarter include the development on a preliminary model to assess mercury speciation in combustion systems.

  20. 1992 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory: Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know-Act of 1986 Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA) requires the annual submittal of toxic chemical release information to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The following document is the July 1993 submittal of the EPCRA Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R). Included is a Form R for chlorine and for lead, the two chemicals used in excess of the established regulatory thresholds at the Hanford Site by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and its contractors during calendar year 1992.

  1. The Collision of the Adoption and Safe Families Act and Substance Abuse: Research-Based Education and Training Priorities for Child Welfare Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Julie; Lemieux, Catherine; Pogue, Rene

    2008-01-01

    A large body of descriptive literature demonstrates the problem of substance abuse in child welfare. The 1997 Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) established time frames that make children's need for permanency the overriding priority in families involved with the child welfare system. Child welfare workers often lack proper knowledge and skill…

  2. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of...

  4. Toxic Substances Portal- Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    ... industrial applications. Organic arsenic compounds are used as pesticides, primarily on cotton fields and orchards. top What ... as copper or lead smelting, wood treating, or pesticide application. top How can arsenic affect my health? ...

  5. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents. 799.9305 Section 799.9305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Health...

  6. 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  7. ASSESSING CONTAMINANT SENSITIVITY OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES: TOXICANT CLASSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with determining if the manufacture, use, or disposal of a chemical will present an unreasonable risk ...

  8. 76 FR 49500 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security United States Coast Guard-020 Substance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... authorities to report, under State law, incidents of suspected child abuse or neglect to the extent described... Guard--020 Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Program System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office...--020 Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Program System of Records.'' This system of...

  9. ACT HEALTHY: A Combined Cognitive-Behavioral Depression and Medication Adherence Treatment for HIV-Infected Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daughters, Stacey B.; Magidson, Jessica F.; Schuster, Randi M.; Safren, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The two most common comorbid conditions with HIV are substance use disorders and depression, and individuals with comorbid HIV, depression, and substance dependence face a more chronic and treatment-resistant course. As an example of how to adapt evidence-based approaches to a complex comorbid population, the current case study examined the…

  10. Applications To Become Registered Under the Controlled Substances Act To Manufacture Marijuana To Supply Researchers in the United States. Policy statement.

    PubMed

    2016-08-12

    To facilitate research involving marijuana and its chemical constituents, DEA is adopting a new policy that is designed to increase the number of entities registered under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) to grow (manufacture) marijuana to supply legitimate researchers in the United States. This policy statement explains how DEA will evaluate applications for such registration consistent with the CSA and the obligations of the United States under the applicable international drug control treaty. PMID:27529905

  11. 1997 toxic chemical release inventory -- Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Zaloudek, D.E.

    1998-06-30

    Two listed toxic chemicals were used at the Hanford Site above established activity thresholds: phosphoric acid and chlorine. Because total combined quantities of chlorine released, disposed, treated, recovered through recycle operations, co-combusted for energy recovery, and transferred to off-site locations for the purpose of recycle, energy recovery, treatment, and/or disposal, amounted to less than 500 pounds, the Hanford Site qualified for the alternate one million pound threshold for chlorine. Accordingly, this Toxic Chemical Release Inventory includes a Form A for chlorine, and a Form B for phosphoric acid.

  12. Toxic chemical release inventory: Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act, Title 3, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Toxic chemical release information contained in this document was derived using process flow diagrams and material balances, process chemistry and emissions treatment technology, hazardous materials inventories, environmental permits, hazardous materials release reports, hazardous waste shipment papers, and sample analysis or monitoring data where available.

  13. 40 CFR 797.1600 - Fish early life stage toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fish early life stage toxicity test. 797.1600 Section 797.1600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1600 Fish early life stage toxicity test....

  14. 40 CFR 720.87 - Categories or proposed categories of uses of a new chemical substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Categories or proposed categories of uses of a new chemical substance. 720.87 Section 720.87 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT PREMANUFACTURE NOTIFICATION Confidentiality and Public Access to Information § 720.87...

  15. 1993 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory: Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know-Act of 1986 (EPCRA) requires the annual submittal of toxic chemical release information to the US Environmental Protection Agency. The following document is the July 1994 submittal of the Hanford site EPCRA Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) Report. Included is a Form R for chlorine, the sole chemical used in excess of the established regulatory thresholds at the Hanford Site by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and its contractors during Calendar Year 1993. Only those facilities that fall within the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) code range of 20 through 39 are subject to mandatory reporting under EPCRA, Section 313. However, on August 3, 1993, Executive Order 12856 was signed, requiring all federal agencies and facilities to comply with pollution prevention and emergency planning and community right-to-know provisions established by Section 313 of EPCRA and Section 6607 of the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990, without restriction to the specified SIC Codes. The report format requires identification of the facility SIC Code in the TRI Report. Application of definitions and requirements provided in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations Part 372.22 has led to the adoption of SIC Code 9999, Nonclassifiable Establishments, as the primary Hanford Site SIC Code for EPCRA regulatory assessments. The SIC Code 9999 determination is based on a broad analysis of the current mission of the Hanford Site which includes environmental and waste management, demonstration and application of advanced remediation technologies, and environmental restoration.

  16. 76 FR 30835 - Requests for Modification or Revocation of Toxic Substances Control Act Section 5 Significant New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... detector, and sign the EPA visitor log. All visitor bags are processed through an X-ray machine and subject... January 6, 2010 (75 FR 773) (FRL-8794-5), EPA had intended to include these modification requests. In the... issue of December 22, 2008 (73 FR 78261) (FRL-8395-8), EPA included regulatory text to...

  17. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Extension of Temporary Placement of PB-22, 5F-PB-22, AB-FUBINACA and ADB-PINACA in Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    The Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration is issuing this final order to extend the temporary schedule I status of four synthetic cannabinoids pursuant to the temporary scheduling provisions of the Controlled Substances Act. The substances are: quinolin-8-yl 1-pentyl-1H-indole-3-carboxylate (PB-22; QUPIC); quinolin-8-yl 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indole-3-carboxylate (5-fluoro-PB-22; 5F-PB-22); N-(1-amino-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (AB-FUBINACA); and N-(1-amino-3,3-dimethyl-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (ADB-PINACA), including their optical, positional and geometric isomers, salts, and salts of isomers. The current final order temporarily placing PB-22, 5F-PB-22, AB-FUBINACA, and ADB-PINACA into schedule I is in effect through February 9, 2016. This final order will extend the temporary scheduling of PB-22, 5F-PB-22, AB-FUBINACA, and ADB-PINACA for one year, or until the permanent scheduling action for these four substances is completed, whichever occurs first. PMID:26859904

  18. Superfund guide: Clean Air Act hazardous air pollutants added to the list of CERCLA hazardous substances. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The fact sheet identifies the 52 CAA hazardous air pollutants that have been added to the list of CERCLA hazardous substances and that are now subject to CERCLA requirements; describes the reporting requirements and exemptions under CERCLA; and examines reporting exemptions in relation to releases of ethylene glycol.

  19. 77 FR 18752 - Benzidine-Based Chemical Substances; Di-n

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ...Under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), EPA is proposing: To add nine benzidine-based chemical substances to the Significant New Use Rule (SNUR) on benzidine-based chemical substances; a SNUR for di-n-pentyl phthalate (DnPP) (1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 1,2-dipentyl ester) (CAS No. 131-18-0); and a SNUR for alkanes, C12-13, chloro (CAS No. 71011-12-6). In the case of the......

  20. Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approach combining chemical manipulations and aquatic toxicity testing, generally with whole organisms, to systematically characterize, identify and confirm toxic substances causing toxicity in whole sediments and sediment interstitial waters. The approach is divided into thre...

  1. FISH ACUTE TOXICITY SYNDROMES AND THEIR USE IN THE QSAR (QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP) APPROACH TO HAZARD ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Implementation of the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1977 creates the need to reliably establish testing priorities because laboratory resources are limited and the number of industrial chemicals requiring evaluation is overwhelming. The use of quantitative structure activity re...

  2. Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) can act as a penetration enhancer for topically applied substances

    PubMed Central

    Otberg, Nina; Grone, Diego; Meyer, Lars; Schanzer, Sabine; Hoffmann, Gerd; Ackermann, Hanns; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Background: Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) irradiation has been shown to enhance penetration of clinically used topically applied substances in humans through investigation of functional effects of penetrated substances like vasoconstriction by cortisone. Aim of the study: Investigation of the influence of wIRA irradiation on the dermatopharmacokinetics of topically applied substances by use of optical methods, especially to localize penetrating substances, in a prospective randomised controlled study in humans. Methods: The penetration profiles of the hydrophilic dye fluorescein and the lipophilic dye curcumin in separate standard water-in-oil emulsions were determined on the inner forearm of test persons by tape stripping in combination with spectroscopic measurements. Additionally, the penetration was investigated in vivo by laser scanning microscopy. Transepidermal water loss, hydration of the epidermis, and surface temperature were determined. Three different procedures (modes A, B, C) were used in a randomised order on three separate days of investigation in each of 12 test persons. In mode A, the two dyes were applied on different skin areas without water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) irradiation. In mode B, the skin surface was irradiated with wIRA over 30 min before application of the two dyes (Hydrosun® radiator type 501, 10 mm water cuvette, orange filter OG590, water-filtered spectrum: 590–1400 nm with dominant amount of wIRA). In mode C, the two dyes were applied and immediately afterwards the skin was irradiated with wIRA over 30 min. In all modes, tape stripping started 30 min after application of the formulations. Main variable of interest was the ratio of the amount of the dye in the deeper (second) 10% of the stratum corneum to the amount of the dye in the upper 10% of the stratum corneum. Results: The penetration profiles of the hydrophilic fluorescein showed in case of pretreatment or treatment with wIRA (modes B and C) an increased

  3. A comparison of fresh and used aircraft oil for the identification of toxic substances linked to aerotoxic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Megson, David; Ortiz, Xavier; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Mulder, Michel F A; Balouet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-09-01

    Fresh and used aircraft engine lubricants (Mobil Jet Oil II) were analysed using a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FTICRMS) and comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-HRTOFMS). The composition of the fresh oil was established, with special focus to its tricresyl phosphate (TCP) content as this has formed the focus for most investigations into aerotoxic syndrome. The results showed that only four TCP isomers were present at detectable levels in the fresh oil: mmm-TCP, mmp-TCP, ppm-TCP and ppp-TCP. The results indicate that the formulation of Mobile Jet Oil II does not contain the more toxic ortho substituted TCP isomers at concentrations above 0.0005%. The temperatures of jet engines during operation are greater than 200 °C which creates the potential to alter the composition of the original oil and create other toxic compounds. The results show there may be a significant risk from alkylated cresyl phosphates, which were identified in the used oils at concentrations calculated in the range of 0.13-0.69%. w/w. Several xylenyl and ethylphenyl phosphates have been shown to exhibit a similar toxicity to ortho substituted TCP isomers which makes there discovery in used oil significant. These compounds should be included in future aircraft air quality studies and when assessing the risks and causes of aerotoxic syndrome. PMID:27258902

  4. Biological model of the effects of toxic substances. Annual technical report No. 1, 1 Nov 90-31 Oct 91

    SciTech Connect

    Tuckett, R.P.

    1991-11-29

    Due to the basic nature of military operations, it is sometimes necessary for Air Force personnel to be exposed to toxic chemicals in their work environment, either as a protracted low-level exposure or as a high-level, acute exposure. The Draize rabbit eye test for acute irritancy has come under severe criticism by the animal rights movement and has undergone legislative restrictions. Therefore, the tissue culture test being developed is likely to be of commercial as well as scientific benefit. Progress by Topical Testing during the past year has been on a number of technical fronts including the development of data collection software and a method for delivery of microquantities of toxic chemicals to individual nerve cells in tissue culture. The neuronal cultures are now viable and reproducible, and their response to a variety of chemical stimuli has been recorded. Corneal epithelial cultures have been viable for a number of months. A number of strategies have been explored to expand the corneal epithelial culture and thus make it a viable commercial system. In summary, Topical Testing has made substantial gains in the development of a commercial assay system, and next year will focus on testing the system's response to different classes of toxic chemicals.

  5. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- a comprehensive assessment. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April 1996--30 June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bool, L.E. III; Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.

    1996-07-01

    Before electric utilities can plan or implement emissions minimization strategies for hazardous pollutants, they must have an accurate and site-specific means of predicting emissions in all effluent streams for the broad range of fuels and operating conditions commonly utilized. Development of a broadly applicable emissions model useful to utility planners first requires a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion (specifically in Phase I, As, Se, Cr, and possibly Hg). PSI Technologies (PSIT) and its team members will achieve this objective through the development of an {open_quotes}Engineering Model{close_quotes} that accurately predicts the formation and partitioning of toxic species as a result of coal combustion. The {open_quotes}Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model{close_quotes} (ToPEM) will be applicable to all conditions including new fuels or blends, low-NO{sub x} combustion systems, and new power systems being advanced by DOE in the Combustion 2000 program. This report describes the mineralogy and chemical analysis of bituminous coal samples.

  6. A normal and biotransforming model of the human bronchial epithelium for the toxicity testing of aerosols and solubilised substances.

    PubMed

    Prytherch, Zoë C; BéruBé, Kelly A

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of the experimental workflow by the Lung and Particle Research Group at Cardiff University, that led to the development of the two in vitro lung models - the normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) model and the lung-liver model, Metabo-Lung™. This work was jointly awarded the 2013 Lush Science Prize. The NHBE model is a three-dimensional, in vitro, human tissue-based model of the normal human bronchial epithelium, and Metabo-Lung involves the co-culture of the NHBE model with primary human hepatocytes, thus permitting the biotransformation of inhaled toxicants in an in vivo-like manner. Both models can be used as alternative test systems that could replace the use of animals in research and development for safety and toxicity testing in a variety of industries (e.g. the pharmaceutical, environmental, cosmetics, and food industries). Metabo-Lung itself is a unique tool for the in vitro detection of toxins produced by reactive metabolites. This 21st century animal replacement model could yield representative in vitro predictions for in vivo toxicity. This advancement in in vitro toxicology relies on filter-well technology that will enable a wide-spectrum of researchers to create viable and economic alternatives for respiratory safety assessment and disease-focused research. PMID:25635646

  7. Update to agency for toxic substances and disease registry 2012 report on assessment of biota exposure to mercury originating from Savannah River Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhne, W.

    2015-08-10

    The purpose of this report is to 1) update previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) assessment reports (Kvartek et al. 1994 and Halverson et al. 2008) on the fate of mercury in the Savannah River Site (SRS) environment and 2) address comments and recommendations from the review of SRS by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) concerning the evaluation of exposures to contaminants in biota originating from the SRS. The ATSDR reviewed and evaluated data from SRS, South Carolina Department of Health & Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR) concerning the non-radioactive contaminant mercury. This report will provide a response and update to conclusions and recommendations made by the ATSDR.

  8. The antidepressant venlafaxine may act as a neurodevelopmental toxicant in cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis).

    PubMed

    Bidel, Flavie; Di Poi, Carole; Budzinski, Hélène; Pardon, Patrick; Callewaert, William; Arini, Adeline; Basu, Niladri; Dickel, Ludovic; Bellanger, Cécile; Jozet-Alves, Christelle

    2016-07-01

    The Serotonin/Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor (SNRI) antidepressant venlafaxine (VEN, Effexor(®)) has become one of the most common antidepressants detected in North American and European streams. Mammalian research has established that VEN exposure is associated with a range of structural, neurochemical, and functional alterations of the brain in adults and newborns. However, the neurodevelopmental effects of VEN on non-target organisms have never been investigated. The aim of our research was to decrease this gap in knowledge by characterizing the effects of VEN exposure on a cephalopod mollusk, the common cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. This species inhabits VEN-contaminated waters and possesses an unusually sophisticated brain. These characteristics render it a unique invertebrate species for studying the neurodevelopmental effects of VEN. Cuttlefish were exposed to environmentally-relevant concentrations of VEN (Measured concentrations ≈5 and 100ngL(-)(1)) or to filtered natural seawater (control) in a closed-loop system with regular water changes during the first 20days after hatching. We evaluated brain maturation as well as neurochemical changes and behavioral performances during this critical period of development. Our results show that both VEN-exposed groups exhibited a decrease in norepinephrine levels, along with a reduction in the relative number of glutamate NMDA-like receptors binding sites in the group exposed to 5ngL(-1) of VEN after 20days of exposure. Brain regional changes in cellular proliferation were observed in VEN-exposed groups in the vertical lobe (i.e. a key structure involved in cognitive processes) and in the optic lobes (i.e. main visual processing centers) in the absence of significant change in their volume. Along with these neurodevelopmental changes, 20days of exposure to 100ngL(-1) of VEN was associated with a decrease in camouflage ability. Overall, our study suggests that VEN is a neurodevelopmental toxicant in non

  9. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment. Quarterly report number 2, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bool, L.E. III; Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Wendt, J.; Sarofim, A.F.; Zeng, T.

    1996-04-01

    The technical objectives of this project are: to identify the effect of the mode-of-occurrence of toxic elements in coal on the partitioning of these elements among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash during the combustion of pulverized coal; to identify the mechanisms governing the post-vaporization interaction of toxic elements and major minerals or unburnt char; to determine the effect of combustion environment (i.e., fuel rich or fuel lean) on the partitioning of trace elements between vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash during the combustion of pulverized coal; to model the partitioning of toxic elements between various chemical species in the vapor phase and between the vapor phase and complex aluminosilicate melts; and to develop a frame work for incorporating the results of the program into the Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). A description of the work plan for accomplishing these objectives is presented in Section 2 of this report. In Section 3 of this report the authors define a detailed list of deliverables expected and consists of a group by group breakdown of the critical experiments to be performed, and a discussion of how that data fits into the overall program. In Section 4 the four coals selected for this program are reported. In Section 5 preliminary XAFs analysis by UKy personnel is discussed. Section 6 consists of a discussion of trace element analysis (INAA) of two size fractions of the Elkhorn-Hazard coal. A discussion of the modifications to the U.Arizona self-sustained combustor is presented in Section 7. Modifications included addition of a baghouse and improvements in the on-line safety and analytical systems. In Section 8 a detailed QA/QC protocol is presented.

  10. Stability of air toxic gases listed in Title III Clean Air Act Amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Jayanty, R.K.M.; Jaffe, L.B.; Albritton, J.R.; Jackson, M.D.; Midgett, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    A repository of 59 organic compounds has been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use as gas standards in performance audits during field validation of emission concentrations from stationary sources. These compounds are listed in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment. The compounds are prepared in compressed gas cylinders and recyclable aluminum containers. Three concentration ranges were selected: low (20 to 200 ppb), mid-level (0.5 to 5 ppm), and high (5 to 50 ppm). The recyclable aluminum containers were only prepared in the low range, and pressures were generally below 400 psig. The compressed gas cylinders contained pressures up to 2000 psig. In this program to ensure that the concentration of each gas standard had not changed, each standard was analyzed periodically for stability. The gas mixtures were analyzed by the manufacturer before shipment. They were then analyzed upon receipt, and reanalyzed periodically to determine any change in concentration. The stability data obtained to date indicates that many compounds are stable in the compressed gas cylinders; however, some of the compounds in the recyclable containers are not stable.

  11. Fast Screening Techniques for Neurotoxigenic Substances and Other Toxicants and Pollutants Based on Thermal Lensing and Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Franko, Mladen; Liu, Mingqiang; Boškin, Aleš; Delneri, Ambra; Proskurnin, Mikhail A

    2016-01-01

    Efficient environment protection and human safety require high-throughput analysis techniques for pollutants or toxicants for large sample sets. State-of-the-art HPLC and GC coupled to various detecting strategies offer excellent sensitivity and selectivity, though they are quite time-extensive (2 - 3 samples/h or less when sample preparation is involved). Efforts are made towards screening techniques with high sample throughputs simultaneously providing detection limits below the maximum contaminant levels for the analyte. However, such approaches frequently sacrifice the selectivity or sensitivity (or just give a yes/no response). In this review, we demonstrate thermal-lens spectrometry and microscopy as highly sensitive spectrometric techniques in combination with flow-injection analysis (FIA) and microfluidic FIA along with lab-on-a-chip chemistry for fast screening (several samples/h and up to 20 samples/min) exemplified by organophosphates and carbamates as neurotoxigenic compounds. Various approaches to determining other topical toxicants, like microcystin and cyanopigments as its indicators, allergens, and carcinogenic chromate, are also discussed. PMID:26753701

  12. Summary of Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Potential Impacts Related to Hanford Cleanup and the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA)

    SciTech Connect

    IWATATE, D.F.

    2000-07-14

    This white paper provides an initial assessment of the potential impacts of the Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) regulations (and proposed revisions) on the Hanford site cleanup and addresses concerns that MTCA might impose inappropriate or unachievable clean-up levels and drive clean-up costs higher. The white paper and supporting documentation (Appendices A and B) provide DOE with a concise and up-to-date review of potential MTCA impacts to cost and schedule for the Hanford site activities. MTCA, Chapter 70.105D RCW, is the State of Washington's risk based law governing clean-up of contaminated sites and is implemented by The Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) under the MTCA Clean-up Regulations, Chapter 173-340 WAC. Hanford cleanup is subject to the MTCA requirements as Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) for those areas of Hanford being managed under the authority of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the state Dangerous Waste Regulations. MTCA provides Ecology with authority to implement site clean-up actions under both the federal RCRA and CERCLA regulations as well as the state regulations. Most of the Hanford clean-up actions are being implemented under the CERCLA program, however, there is a trend is toward increased use of MTCA procedures and standards. The application of MTCA to the Hanford clean-up has been an evolving process with some of the Hanford clean-up actions considering MTCA standards as an ARAR and using MTCA procedures for remedy selection. The increased use and application of MTCA standards and procedures could potentially impact both cost and schedule for the Hanford cleanup.

  13. Pharmaceuticals, hormones, personal-care products, and other organic wastewater contaminants in water resources: Recent research activities of the U.S. Geological Survey's toxic substances hydrology program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Focazio, Michael J.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Buxton, Herbert T.

    2003-01-01

    Recent decades have brought increasing concerns for potential contamination of water resources that could inadvertently result during production, use, and disposal of the numerous chemicals offering improvements in industry, agriculture, medical treatment, and even common household products. Increasing knowledge of the environmental occurrence or toxicological behavior of these contaminants from various studies in Europe, United States, and elsewhere has resulted in increased concern for potential adverse environmental and human health effects (Daughton and Ternes, 1999). Ecologists and public health experts often have incomplete understandings of the toxicological significance of many of these contaminants, particularly long-term, low-level exposure and when they occur in mixtures with other contaminants (Daughton and Ternes, 1999; Kümmerer, 2001). In addition, these ‘emerging contaminants’ are not typically monitored or assessed in ambient water resources. The need to understand the processes controlling the transport and fate of these contaminants in the environment, and the lack of knowledge of the significance of long-term exposures have increased the need to study environmental occurrence down to trace (nanogram per liter) levels. Furthermore, the possibility that mixtures of environmental contaminants may interact synergistically or antagonistically has increased the need to characterize the types of mixtures that are found in our waters. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Toxic Substances Hydrology Program (Toxics Program) is developing information and tools on emerging water-quality issues that will be used to design and improve water-quality monitoring and assessment programs of the USGS and others, and for proactive decision-making by industry, regulators, the research community, and the public (http://toxics.usgs.gov/regional/emc.html). This research on emerging water-quality issues includes a combination of laboratory work to develop new analytical

  14. Effects of toxic substances on natural bacterial assemblages determined by means of ( sup 3 H)thymidine incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Riemann, B., Lindgaard-Jorgensen, P. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of 3,5-dichlorophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and potassium dichromate on natural bacterial assemblages were examined by means of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material. Results from a large number of coastal marine and freshwater samples suggest the following. (i) The effects of the three toxicants included reductions in the bacterial cell number as well as changes in rates of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation and in ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation per cell. The concentrations that inhibited ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation by 50% ranged from 3 to 11 mg liter{sup {minus}1} for 3,5-dichlorophenol, 5 to 10 mg liter{sup {minus}1} for 2,4-dinitrophenol, and 21 to 123 mg liter{sup {minus}1} for potassium dichromate, with a tendency to higher values in bacterial assemblages from more eutrophic environments. (ii) The effects of 3,5-dichlorophenol and potassium dichromate determined by ({sup 3}H) leucine incorporation into bacterial protein were similar or larger than those obtained from ({sup 3}H) thymidine incorporation. (III) Two to four hours of exposure to the toxicants was necessary before stable maximum effects were found in ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation. (IV) Storage of natural environmental samples should be avoided, since tests with water stored for 1 to 3 days sometimes produced results different from results obtained from in situ tests. (V) The effects of 3,5-dichlorophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and potassium dichromate on natural bacterial assemblages were relatively constant during periods with different growth rates in the assemblages, during various periods of the year, and between samples from freshwater and marine localities.

  15. An adherent cell perifusion technique to study the overall and sequential response of rat alveolar macrophages to toxic substances.

    PubMed Central

    Forget, G; Lacroix, M J; Cadieux, A; Calvert, R; Grose, J H; Sirois, P

    1983-01-01

    Essentially pure (97%) alveolar macrophages were isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage of rats with warm (37 degrees C) PBS solution. These cells were allowed to adhere to the inside walls of open-ended glass cylinders which were closed off at each end by three-way stopcocks. The adhering cells were perifused with RPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum for 18 hr at the rate of 1 mL/hr, and the effluent medium was collected automatically in 2-mL aliquots. Cell recoveries and viabilities did not differ from those found for Petri cultures treated similarly, indicating that the perifusion method under study offered an adequate milieu for short-term primary cultures. The alveolar macrophages in culture were subjected to the presence of particulate (chrysotile asbestos) and soluble (phorbol myristate) toxicants, and their response was monitored in the effluent medium by measuring the release of prostaglandins (PGE) by radioimmunoassay. A significant increase in the sequential release of PGE was observed in the presence of asbestos (100 micrograms/mL) or phorbol myristate (200 ng/mL). Treatment of the cells with indomethacin (20 microM) completely abolished the release of PGE stimulated with phorbol myristate. A cumulative response to the toxicants was also observed when cells were harvested manually from the chambers: asbestos caused a 2-fold increase in cell mortality relative to control, while phorbol myristate brought about a 3-fold increase in the number of dead cells. This effect was not prevented by the presence of indomethacin. Cell aggregation was also observed when cells were perifused in the presence of phorbol myristate, whether indomethacin was present or absent. Our results indicate that the cell perifusion system combines the advantages of conventional adherent cell cultures (viability, aggregation) with those of perifusion techniques (sequential metabolism studies). Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 6. PMID:6641651

  16. 16 CFR 1500.135 - Summary of guidelines for determining chronic toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Summary of guidelines for determining chronic toxicity. 1500.135 Section 1500.135 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.135 Summary of...

  17. Adolescent Criminal Acts Committed and Substance Use with a Voluntary Sample Recruited from Post-Secondary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collette, Tessa; Pakzad, Sarah; Bergheul, Saïd

    2015-01-01

    The current study focuses on exploring the relationships between various patterns of criminal acts committed, drug use, alcohol consumption, and adult personality traits in a sample with a low probability of life course persistent criminal behaviors. A retrospective questionnaire and the NEO-FFI (Five Factor Inventory) were administered to a…

  18. 40 CFR 131.36 - Toxics criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(c)(2)(B).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Toxics criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(c)(2)(B). 131.36 Section 131.36 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.36...

  19. 40 CFR 131.36 - Toxics criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(c)(2)(B).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Toxics criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(c)(2)(B). 131.36 Section 131.36 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.36...

  20. 40 CFR 131.36 - Toxics criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(c)(2)(B).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toxics criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(c)(2)(B). 131.36 Section 131.36 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.36...

  1. 40 CFR 131.36 - Toxics criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(c)(2)(B).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Toxics criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(c)(2)(B). 131.36 Section 131.36 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.36...

  2. 1997 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Heather McBride

    1997-07-01

    The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (EPCIL4), Title III, Section 313 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA)], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires all federal facilities to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators of manufacturing, processing, or production facilities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), nitric acid was the only toxic chemical used in 1997 that met the reportable threshold limit of 10,000 lb. Form R is the only documentation required by the Environmental Protection Agency, and it is included in the appendix of this report. This report, as requested by DOE, is provided for documentation purposes. In addition, a detailed description of the evaluation and reporting process for chemicals and processes at LANL has been included.

  3. Pupil function as an indicator of being under the influence of central nervous system-acting substances from a traffic-medicine perspective - Part II.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, Fabio; Preiss, Ulrich; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Keller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate driving abilities of each traffic participant, standardised and objective measurement methods are needed. The applicability and value of infrared pupillography as an objective measurement method to indicate possible influence of central nervous acting substances has been demonstrated in former publications. Healthy test subjects (n = 41), as well as persons who were under the influence of drugs and/or medication (n = 105), were exposed to different light stimuli using infrared technology in order to demonstrate the relevance of specific parameters of the pupillary light reflex (PLR) in the field of traffic medicine. Based on former reported results, the statistical examination was extended to further parameters of the PLR, which again confirmed the high value of infrared pupillography as a reliable indicator of previous consumption of drugs and/or medication. PMID:25899463

  4. Toxic action/toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hathway, D E

    2000-02-01

    ,Z-muconaldehyde forms cyclic products containing a pyrrole residue linked to purine. Increased HbCO concentrations reduce the O2-carrying capacity of the blood, and the changed shape of the O2-Hb dissociation curve parallels disturbance in O2 unloading. CN- acts on electron transport and paralyses respiration. In telodrin poisoning, preconvulsive glutamine formation abstracts tricarboxylic acid intermediates incommensurately with normal cerebral respiration. Antigen-antibody complexing depletes the antibody titre, available against infection. At high doses of Cd, Cd-thionein filtered through the kidneys is reabsorbed and tubular lesions produced. Some organophosphate insecticides promote irreversible acetylcholinesterase phosphorylation and blockade nerve function, and others react with neurotoxic esterase to cause delayed neuropathy. The evidence for Paraquat pulmonary poisoning suggests a radical mechanism involving three interrelated cyclic reaction stages. The action of N- and O8 (O substituent in 6-position of the purine) demethylases explains deletion mechanisms for DNA-alkyl adducts. DNA-directed synthesis in the presence of ultimate carcinogens provides for an estimation of misincorporations, which implicate the same transversions as those found by direct mutagenicity testing. Chemical carcinogens recognize tissue-sensitive cells and modify their heritable genetic complement. Oncoproteins encoded by activated oncogenes signal the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. The importance of the H-ras oncogene and p53 tumour-suppressor gene is stressed. Antidotal action is analysed; for example, parenteral glutamine administration to telodrin-intoxicated rats restores the depleted cerebral glutamate level and prevents seizures. Glutamate acts as anticonvulsant in petit mal epilepsy. In general, therefore, the reaction of the toxicant-related substance with the relevant target-tissue macromolecule accounts for the biochemical/biological events at a cellular level a PMID

  5. Use of sodium dodecyl sulfate and zinc sulfate as reference substances for toxicity tests with the mussel Perna perna (Linnaeus, 1758) (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Jorge, R A D L V C; Moreira, G S

    2005-06-01

    Effects of anthropogenic pollution have been observed at different trophic levels in the oceans, and toxicity tests constitute one way of monitoring these alterations. The present assay proposes the use of two reference substances, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and zinc sulfate, for Perna perna larvae. This common mussel on the Brazilian coast is used as a bioindicator and is of economic interest. The chronic static embryo-larval test of short duration (48 h) was employed to determine the NOEC, LOEC, and IC50 for SDS and zinc sulfate, as well as the coefficient of variation. Salinity, pH and un-ionized ammonia (NH3) and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations were measured to monitor water quality. The results demonstrated that the main alterations in veliger larvae are the development of only one shell, protruded mantle, malformed shell, formation of only part of a valve, clipped edges, uneven sizes and presence of a concave or convex hinge. NOEC values were lower than 0.25 mg L(-1) for zinc sulfate and 0.68 mg L(-1) for SDS. The coefficient of variation was 17.63% and 2.50% for zinc sulfate and SDS, respectively. PMID:15883100

  6. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION--A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT, PHASE II: ELEMENT MODES OF OCCURRENCE FOR THE OHIO 5/6/7, WYODAK AND NORTH DAKOTA COAL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Allan Kolker; Stanley J. Mroczkowski; Curtis A. Palmer; Kristen O. Dennen; Robert B. Finkelman; John H. Bullock Jr.

    2002-05-30

    This study reports on the second phase (Phase II) of USGS research activities in support of DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95101 ''Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion--A Comprehensive Assessment'', funded under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-95PC95145. The purpose of the study was to provide a quantitative and semi-quantitative characterization of the modes of occurrence of trace elements in coal samples investigated under Phase II, including (1) Ohio 5/6/7, an Ohio bituminous coal sample blended from the No.5, No.6, and No.7 beds; (2) North Dakota, a lignite sample from the Falkirk Mine, Underwood, ND, and (3) Wyodak, a sub-bituminous coal sample from the Cordero Mine, Gillette, WY. Samples from these coal beds were selected for their range in rank and commercial applicability. Results of this research provide basic information on the distribution of elements in Phase II coal samples, information needed for development of a commercial predictive model for trace-element behavior during coal combustion.

  7. 1998 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III

    SciTech Connect

    Marjorie B. Stockton

    1999-11-01

    The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) of 1986 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA), Title III], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires that all federal facilities evaluate the need to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report as prescribed in Title III, Section 313 of this Act. This annual report is due every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators who manufacture, process, or otherwise use certain toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), no EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 1998 above the reportable threshold limits of 10,000 lb or 25,000 lb. Therefore LANL was not required to submit any Toxic Chemical Release Inventory reports (Form Rs) for 1998. This document was prepared to provide a detailed description of the evaluation on chemical usage and EPCRA Section 313 threshold determinations for LANL for 1998.

  8. Feasibility of using GEMS (Graphical Exposure Modeling System) to perform risk assessments using SARA (Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act of 1986), toxic release inventory information. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckels, J.H.

    1989-04-13

    Under Title III, Section 313 of the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) companies which release toxic chemicals into the environment are required to report annually the amount of these toxic releases. Because the chemical toxic-release reports are public information, EPA Region V is concerned that the raw data published in the toxic-chemical-release reports will be misinterpreted and will in turn generate unfounded public concern. The study examines the possibility of using the Graphical Exposure Modeling System (GEMS), a computer program, to transform incoming raw data into better qualified, user ready, public information. Specifically, the report analyzes the compatibility between the raw data reported in the toxic chemical release reports and the input requirements of the GEMS exposure model. An industrial site in East St. Louis, Illinois is used as a test site for the development of the exposure assessment. The study discusses the research and the methods used to perform the exposure assessment. The report also reviews the legislation which requires companies to report toxic-release data, the basics of exposure assessment and the GEMS model, the research methods used, and the findings of the study.

  9. Roadmaps to sources of information on chemicals listed in the Emergency Planning Community and Community Right-To-Know Act also known as SARA (Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act) Title III, Section 313. Toxic Release Inventory (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzke, J.; Edelstein, M.

    1989-07-14

    EPA has developed a database of sources of information on the chemicals listed in Section 313 of the Emergency Preparedness Community Right-To-Know Act, Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act. The database is intended to assist users of Section 313 Toxic Release Inventory data to perform exposure and risk assessments of these chemicals. The Roadmaps system displays and/or prints out information for the Section 313 chemicals on health and environmental effects, Federal Regulation, and state air and water regulations, monitoring data, and state contacts.

  10. Formulation of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) with safe EPA-exempt substance significantly diminishes the Anopheles sergentii population in a desert oasis

    PubMed Central

    Revay, Edita E.; Schlein, Yosef; Tsabari, Onie; Kravchenko, Vasiliy; Qualls, Whitney; De-Xue, Rui; Beier, John C.; Traore, Sekou F.; Doumbia, Seydou; Hausmann, Axel; Müller, Günter C.

    2016-01-01

    Attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) is a highly effective method which targets mosquitoes based on their sugar foraging behavior, by presenting baits of attractive compounds in combination with sugar and oral toxin to local mosquito populations. Environmental concerns and insecticide selection-pressure have prompted investigations of novel, ecologically-harmless substances which can be used as insecticides. This study examined the efficacy of microencapsulated garlic-oil as the oral toxin component of ATSB for controlling Anopheles sergentii populations inhabiting desert-surrounded wetlands in Israel. ATSB solution containing 0.4% encapsulated garlic oil was applied to local vegetation around a streamlet located in the lower Jordan Valley. To determine the propensity of bait ingestion, and assess the potential ecological impact of the method, mosquito and non-target specimens were collected and tested for the presence of natural plant- or attractive sugar bait (ASB)-derived sugars. Over the experimental period, biting-pressure values in the ATSB treatment site decreased by 97.5%, while at the control site, treated with non-toxic ASB, no significant changes were observed. Approximately 70% of the mosquitoes collected before both treatments, as well as those captured following the application of ASB at the control site, were found to have ingested sugar prior to capture. Non-target insects were minimally affected by the treatment when ATSB was applied to foliage of non-flowering plants. Of the non-Diptera species, only 0.7% of the sampled non-target insects were found to have ingested ASB-solution which was applied to green vegetation, compared with 8.5% which have foraged on ASB-derived sugars applied to flowering plants. Conversely, a high proportion of the non-target species belonging to the order Diptera, especially non-biting midges, were found to have ingested foliage-applied ASB, with more than 36% of the specimens collected determined to have foraged on bait

  11. Formulation of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) with safe EPA-exempt substance significantly diminishes the Anopheles sergentii population in a desert oasis.

    PubMed

    Revay, Edita E; Schlein, Yosef; Tsabari, Onie; Kravchenko, Vasiliy; Qualls, Whitney; De-Xue, Rui; Beier, John C; Traore, Sekou F; Doumbia, Seydou; Hausmann, Axel; Müller, Günter C

    2015-10-01

    Attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) is a highly effective method which targets mosquitoes based on their sugar foraging behavior, by presenting baits of attractive compounds in combination with sugar and oral toxin to local mosquito populations. Environmental concerns and insecticide selection-pressure have prompted investigations of novel, ecologically-harmless substances which can be used as insecticides. This study examined the efficacy of microencapsulated garlic-oil as the oral toxin component of ATSB for controlling Anopheles sergentii populations inhabiting desert-surrounded wetlands in Israel. ATSB solution containing 0.4% encapsulated garlic oil was applied to local vegetation around a streamlet located in the lower Jordan Valley. To determine the propensity of bait ingestion, and assess the potential ecological impact of the method, mosquito and non-target specimens were collected and tested for the presence of natural plant- or attractive sugar bait (ASB)-derived sugars. Over the experimental period, biting-pressure values in the ATSB treatment site decreased by 97.5%, while at the control site, treated with non-toxic ASB, no significant changes were observed. Approximately 70% of the mosquitoes collected before both treatments, as well as those captured following the application of ASB at the control site, were found to have ingested sugar prior to capture. Non-target insects were minimally affected by the treatment when ATSB was applied to foliage of non-flowering plants. Of the non-Diptera species, only 0.7% of the sampled non-target insects were found to have ingested ASB-solution which was applied to green vegetation, compared with 8.5% which have foraged on ASB-derived sugars applied to flowering plants. Conversely, a high proportion of the non-target species belonging to the order Diptera, especially non-biting midges, were found to have ingested foliage-applied ASB, with more than 36% of the specimens collected determined to have foraged on bait

  12. Further classification of skin alkaloids from neotropical poison frogs (Dendrobatidae), with a general survey of toxic/noxious substances in the amphibia.

    PubMed

    Daly, J W; Myers, C W; Whittaker, N

    1987-01-01

    Cutaneous granular glands are a shared character of adult amphibians, including caecilians, and are thought to be the source of most biologically active compounds in amphibian skin. Data are available from one or more species in over 100 of nearly 400 genera comprising the three living orders of Amphibia. Many species contain unidentified substances judged to be noxious based on predator aversion or human taste. Additionally, there is a great diversity of known compounds, some highly toxic as well as noxious, which can be tabulated under four broad categories: biogenic amines, peptides, bufodienolides (bufogenins) and alkaloids. The last category includes alkaloids derived from biogenic amines, water-soluble alkaloids (tetrodotoxins) and lipophilic alkaloids. Most compounds are known only from skin of adult amphibians, but the toxic and noxious properties of eggs and larvae of certain salamanders and toads can be attributed to tetrodotoxins and bufodienolides, which occur also in adult tissues other than skin. Predator aversion and various antipredator behaviors and aposematic colorations clearly prove the defensive value of these diverse metabolites, whether or not they are elaborated primarily (e.g. alkaloids) or secondarily (e.g. some peptides and biogenic amines) for this function. Lipophilic alkaloids include the samandarine alkaloids, known definitely only from an Old World genus of salamanders, and the more than 200 dendrobatid alkaloids. Nearly all the latter are unique to neotropical poison frogs of the genera Dendrobates and Phyllobates (Dendrobatidae), except for seemingly homoplastic occurrences of a few such alkaloids in small brightly colored anurans of several other families. Owing to recent discoveries and new structural information, the dendrobatid alkaloids are here partitioned among the following major and minor classes: batrachotoxins, histrionicotoxins, indolizidines, pumiliotoxin-A class and its allopumiliotoxin and homopumiliotoxin subclasses

  13. Chronic toxicity of biphenyl to Daphnia magna Straus

    SciTech Connect

    Gersich, F.M.; Bartlett, E.A.; Murphy, P.G.; Milazzo, D.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a final test rule (1985) for biphenyl on the authority of Section 4(a) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Contained within this rule was the requirement for generating chronic daphnid toxicity data for biphenyl. Biphenyl is used primarily to produce dye carriers, heat-transfer fluids and alkylated biphenyls. The acute toxicity of biphenyl to Daphnia magna has been reported. The 48-hr LC50 values were 4.7 and 2.1 mg/L, respectively. To date, the chronic toxicity of biphenyl to fish and aquatic invertebrates has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the chronic toxicity of biphenyl to D. magna. The daphnid chronic toxicity test is designed to estimate the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC). The MATC is defined as the concentration falling between the highest concentration showing no effect and the next higher concentration showing a toxic effect when compared to the controls.

  14. Toxicity of seven priority hazardous and noxious substances (HNSs) to marine organisms: Current status, knowledge gaps and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Rocha, A Cristina S; Reis-Henriques, Maria Armanda; Galhano, Victor; Ferreira, Marta; Guimarães, Laura

    2016-01-15

    Shipping industry and seaborne trade have rapidly increased over the last fifty years, mainly due to the continuous increasing demand for chemicals and fuels. Consequently, despite current regulations, the occurrence of accidental spills poses an important risk. Hazardous and noxious substances (HNSs) have been raising major concern among environmental managers and scientific community for their heterogeneity, hazardous potential towards aquatic organisms and associated social-economic impacts. A literature review on ecotoxicological hazards to aquatic organisms was conducted for seven HNSs: acrylonitrile, n-butyl acrylate, cyclohexylbenzene, hexane, isononanol, trichloroethylene and xylene. Information on the mechanisms of action of the selected HNS was also reviewed. The main purpose was to identify: i) knowledge gaps in need of being addressed in future research; and ii) a set of possible biomarkers suitable for ecotoxicological assessment and monitoring in both estuarine and marine systems. Main gaps found concern the scarcity of information available on ecotoxicological effects of HNS towards marine species and their poorly understood mode of action in wildlife. Differences were found between the sensitivity of freshwater and seawater organisms, so endpoints produced in the former may not be straightforwardly employed in evaluations for the marine environment. The relationship between sub-individual effects and higher level detrimental alterations (e.g. behavioural, morphological, reproductive effects and mortality) are not fully understood. In this context, a set of biomarkers associated to neurotoxicity, detoxification and anti-oxidant defences is suggested as potential indicators of toxic exposure/effects of HNS in marine organisms. Overall, to support the development of contingency plans and the establishment of environmental safety thresholds, it will be necessary to undertake targeted research on HNS ecotoxicity in the marine environment. Research should

  15. PEER REVIEW OF THE PERSISTENT, BIOACCUMULATIVE, AND TOXIC (PBT) PROFILER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA is required, under Sections 4, 5, and 6 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), to screen chemicals for potential risk to humans and the environment. OPPT has developed computerized methods designed to support screening-level assessment of chemicals in the absen...

  16. Substance use - LSD

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - LSD; Drug abuse - LSD; Drug use - LSD ... LSD is a mind-altering drug. This means it acts on your brain (central nervous system) and changes your mood, behavior, and the way you relate to ...

  17. H. R. 3026: This Act may be cited as the Toxic Cleanup Equity and Acceleration Act of 1991, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 24, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    H.R. 3026 describes the proposed amendment, including its purpose and the legislative background, reviews the hearings and committee findings, and summarizes potential economic impacts and effects on the budget. This bill amends the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 to protect citizens, municipalities, and other generators and transporters of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge from lawsuits equating these substances with industrial hazardous wastes. Separate sections address the following: third-party suits for municipal solid waste or sewage sludge; settlements; preliminary allocation of responsibility; and retroactivity.

  18. Acute inhalation toxicity evaluation of a 93:7 mixture of perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane, a replacement candidate for ozone depleting substances. Interim report, July--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, M.L.; Leahy, H.F.; Vinegar, A.

    1997-10-01

    The DoD requires the development of toxicity profiles for chemical substitute candidates proposed to replace ozone depleting substances such as chloro- and fluorocarbons and halons. A 93:7 mixture of perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane was identified as a possible replacement candidate for ozone-depleting fire extinguishants. An acute inhalation toxicity test utilizing male and female Fischer 344 rats was performed on this test material. No deaths occurred in any of the rats exposed to 5.3 mg/L of the 93:7 perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane mixture. Body weights of male and female rats during the subsequent 14-day observation period were unaffected by treatment. The test material did not produce acute toxicity via the inhalation route.

  19. COMPARISON OF EUROPEAN AND UNITED STATES APPROACHES TO NEW AND EXISTING SUBSTANCES REGULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical regulation in Europe and the U.S. share the goal of protection of human health and the environment, but regulatory requirements differ between the two jurisdictions. This presentation will review the approach taken in the U.S. under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSC...

  20. 40 CFR 712.5 - Method of identification of substances for reporting purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... chemical have no reporting responsibilities under this Part. Note, however, that any method of extraction... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT CHEMICAL INFORMATION RULES General Provisions § 712.5 Method of... otherwise required, respondents must report only about quantities of a chemical that is defined as...

  1. 40 CFR 712.5 - Method of identification of substances for reporting purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... chemical have no reporting responsibilities under this Part. Note, however, that any method of extraction... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT CHEMICAL INFORMATION RULES General Provisions § 712.5 Method of... otherwise required, respondents must report only about quantities of a chemical that is defined as...

  2. Toxic remediation

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  3. Multidisciplinary Studies of the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in Ground Water at the U.S. Geological Survey Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Program Research Site, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, D. R.; Smith, R. L.; Kent, D. B.; Barber, L. B.; Harvey, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducts multidisciplinary research on the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes affecting ground-water contaminants of global concern at its Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Program site in Massachusetts, USA. The work centers on a 6-kilometer-long plume of treated wastewater in a glacial sand and gravel aquifer. The plume is characterized by distinct geochemical zones caused by the biodegradation of organic materials in treated wastewater that was disposed to the aquifer by rapid infiltration during the period 1936-95. A core group of hydrogeologists, geochemists, microbiologists, and geophysicists has been involved in the research effort for more than two decades. The effort has been enhanced by stable funding, a readily accessible site, a relatively simple hydrologic setting, and logistical support from an adjacent military base. The research team uses a three-part approach to plan and conduct research at the site. First, detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of the plume since the late 1970s provides field evidence of important contaminant-transport processes and provides the basis for multidisciplinary, process-oriented studies. Second, ground-water tracer experiments are conducted in various geochemical zones in the plume to study factors that control the rate and extent of contaminant transport. Several arrays of multilevel sampling devices, including an array with more than 15,000 individual sampling points, are used to conduct these experiments. Plume-scale (kilometers) and tracer-test-scale (1- 100 meters) studies are complemented by laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling of flow and reactive transport. Third, results are applied to the treated-wastewater plume, other contaminant plumes at the military base, and other sites nationally to evaluate the applicability of the findings and to point toward further research. Examples of findings to date include that (1) macrodispersivity can be related to

  4. [Toxic polyneuropathies].

    PubMed

    Neundörfer, B

    1992-08-01

    Toxic factors may have damaging effects on the peripheral nerves at different sites: on the axon, on the myelin sheath, on the cell bodies and on the vasa nervorum. The toxic neuropathies can be divided up into polyneuropathies induced by drugs, by industrial, environmental and stimulant poisons. Mostly symmetrical sensory symptoms and signs are the first disturbances, often followed by symmetrical motor pareses. Some polyneuropathies induced by amiodarone, benzene, lead, cimetidine, chloroquine, dapsone, gentamycin, gold, imipramine, hexacarbons, nialamide, penicillin, triorthocresylphosphate and vincristine are primarily dominated by motory losses. Polyneuropathies induced by amitriptyline, ethylene, oxide, lead, chlorprothixene, heroin, hydralazine, methaqualone, nialamide and penicillin show an asymmetrical distribution pattern of the neural losses. In some types of toxic polyneuropathies the cranial nerves and the autonomic nerves are particularly involved. The clinical symptomatology of the most important types of toxic neuropathies are described shortly. The best therapy is, of course, termination of exposure to the toxic substance concerned. PMID:1509644

  5. Who's protecting you from hazardous substances

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Employee accidents, life endangering spills of harmful chemicals, toxic materials leaching into drinking water, polluted air, crippling side effects of wonder metals and products, and human and animal deaths made it apparent that in order to protect and preserve the community and the environment, the community needed to be aware/knowledgeable of chemical uses and related possible dangers, i.e., it was time to establish rules and regulations for the use and disposal of hazardous substances and chemicals. This report details several organizations, acts, rules, and regulations created in the interest of hazardous materials safety.

  6. 2002 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stockton

    2003-11-01

    For reporting year 2002, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds and mercury as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2002 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical usage and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2002 as well as provide background information about the data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999 EPA promulgated a final rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable under EPCRA Section 313. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  7. 2006 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2007-12-12

    For reporting year 2006, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2006 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2006, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  8. 2004 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stockton

    2006-01-15

    Section 313 of Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. For reporting year 2004, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds, nitric acid, and nitrate compounds as required under the EPCRA Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2004 above the reportable thresholds. This document provides a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2004, as well as background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  9. Coal mining facilities: Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. Toxic chemical release inventory

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended to assist establishments and facilities designated by the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) code 12 (except 1241) in making compliance determinations under the EPCRA Section 313 reporting requirements and preparing Form R(s) or the Form A certification statement(s) as required. The EPCRA Section 313 program is commonly referred to as the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) program. This document is organized to provide a step-by-step guide to compliance with EPCRA Section 313, starting with how you determine if your facility must report through completion of the Form R or Form A.

  10. Chemical distribution facilities: Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. Toxic chemical release inventory

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended to assist establishments and facilities designated by the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) code 5169 (chemical and allied products wholesale) in making compliance determinations under the EPCRA Section 313 reporting requirements and preparing Form R(s) or the Form A certification statement(s) as required. The EPCRA Section 313 program is commonly referred to as the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) program. This document is organized to provide a step-by-step guide to compliance with EPCRA Section 313, starting with how you determine if your facility must report through completion of the Form R or Form A.

  11. Toxic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle tissue is highly sensitive to many substances. Early recognition of toxic myopathies is important, as they potentially are reversible on removal of the offending drug or toxin, with greater likelihood of complete resolution the sooner this is achieved. Clinical features range from mild muscle pain and cramps to severe weakness with rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and even death. The pathogenic bases can be multifactorial. This article reviews some of the common toxic myopathies and their clinical presentation, histopathologic features and possible underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:25037083

  12. Neurotranmission systems as targets for toxicants: a review.

    PubMed

    Marrs, Timothy C; Maynard, R L

    2013-12-01

    Neurotransmitters are chemicals that transmit impulses from one nerve to another or from nerves to effector organs. Numerous neurotransmitters have been described in mammals, amongst them acetylcholine, amino acids, amines, peptides and gases. Toxicants may interact with various parts of neurotransmission systems, including synthetic and degradative enzymes, presynaptic vesicles and the specialized receptors that characterize neurotransmission systems. Important toxicants acting on the cholinergic system include the anticholinesterases (organophosphates and carbamates) and substances that act on receptors such as nicotine and the neonicotinoid insecticides, including imidacloprid. An important substance acting on the glutamatergic system is domoic acid, responsible for amnesic shellfish poisoning. 4-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine are inhibitory neurotransmitters and their antagonists, fipronil (an insecticide) and strychnine respectively, are excitatory. Abnormalities of dopamine neurotransmission occur in Parkinson's disease, and a number of substances that interfere with this system produce Parkinsonian symptoms and clinical signs, including notably 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, which is the precursor of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium. Fewer substances are known that interfere with adrenergic, histaminergic or seroninergic neurotransmission, but there are some examples. Among peptide neurotransmission systems, agonists of opioids are the only well-known toxic compounds. PMID:24036955

  13. Impact of the Clean Water Act on the levels of toxic metals in urban estuaries: The Hudson River estuary revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S.A.; Gill, G.A.

    1999-10-15

    To establish the impact of the Clean Water Act on the water quality of urban estuaries, dissolved trace metals and phosphate concentrations were determined in surface waters collected along the Hudson River estuary between 1995 and 1997 and compared with samples collected in the mid-1970s by Klinkhammer and Bender. The median concentrations along the estuary have apparently declined 36--56% for Cu, 55--89% for Cd, 53--85% for Ni, and 53--90% for Zn over a period of 23 years. These reductions appear to reflect improvements in controlling discharges from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants since the Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972. In contrast, levels of dissolved nutrients (PO{sub 4}) have remained relatively constant during the same period of time, suggesting that wastewater treatment plant improvements in the New York/New Jersey Metropolitan area have not been as effective at reducing nutrient levels within the estuary. While more advanced wastewater treatment could potentially reduce the levels of Ag and PO{sub 4} along the estuary, these improvements would have a more limited effect on the levels of other trace metals.

  14. The Role of Substance Abuse in Psychotic versus Personality Disordered Offenders Detained under the Dutch Entrustment Act (TBS): An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goethals, Kris; Buitelaar, Jan; van Marle, Hjalmar

    2008-01-01

    Mentally disordered patients that abuse drugs or alcohol have a larger number of criminal convictions. Early starters who had their first conviction before the age of 18, especially, more often have a diagnosis of substance abuse and are more often intoxicated at the time of the offense compared to late starters. The present study involved four…

  15. Paraquat Toxicity Induced by Voltage-dependent Anion Channel 1 Acts as an NADH-dependent Oxidoreductase*

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Hiroki; Hirai, Kei-Ichi; Simamura, Eriko; Hatta, Toshihisa; Iwakiri, Hiroki; Mizuki, Keiji; Hatta, Taizo; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Satoko; Endo, Yaeta; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2009-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ), a herbicide used worldwide, causes fatal injury to organs upon high dose ingestion. Treatments for PQ poisoning are unreliable, and numerous deaths have been attributed inappropriate usage of the agent. It is generally speculated that a microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme system is responsible for PQ toxicity. However, recent studies have demonstrated cytotoxicity via mitochondria, and therefore, the cytotoxic mechanism remains controversial. Here, we demonstrated that mitochondrial NADH-dependent PQ reductase containing a voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) is responsible for PQ cytotoxicity. When mitochondria were incubated with NADH and PQ, superoxide anion (O2˙̄) was produced, and the mitochondria ruptured. Outer membrane extract oxidized NADH in a PQ dose-dependent manner, and oxidation was suppressed by VDAC inhibitors. Zymographic analysis revealed the presence of VDAC1 protein in the oxidoreductase, and the direct binding of PQ to VDAC1 was demonstrated using biotinylated PQ. VDAC1-overexpressing cells showed increased O2˙̄ production and cytotoxicity, both of which were suppressed in VDAC1 knockdown cells. These results indicated that a VDAC1-containing mitochondrial system is involved in PQ poisoning. These insights into the mechanism of PQ poisoning not only demonstrated novel physiological functions of VDAC protein, but they may facilitate the development of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:19717555

  16. 40 CFR 700.17 - Addresses for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Addresses for the Office of Pollution... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Addresses § 700.17 Addresses for the Office of Pollution... non-docket materials—(1) United States Postal Service mailing address. Office of Pollution...

  17. 40 CFR 700.17 - Addresses for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Addresses for the Office of Pollution... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Addresses § 700.17 Addresses for the Office of Pollution... non-docket materials—(1) United States Postal Service mailing address. Office of Pollution...

  18. Lipid Peroxidation-Antioxidant Defense System during Toxic Liver Damage and Its Correction with a Nanocomposite [corrected] Substance Containing Selenium and Arabinogalactan.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikova, L I; Karpova, E A; Vlasov, B Ya; Sukhov, B G; Mov, B A Trofi

    2015-06-01

    Experiments on rat model of toxic liver damage (CCl4, subcutaneously) have demonstrated that selenium nanopreparation on arabinogalactan matrix and partially arabinogalactan alone prevented the development of oxidative stress assessed by the balance of LPO and antioxidant defense processes. PMID:26087750

  19. Substance p.

    PubMed

    Harrison, S; Geppetti, P

    2001-06-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the history of substance P from its discovery in the 1930s to the present day. The development of substance P receptor agonists and antagonists, and more recently the employment of transgenic mice, provide a framework to explore the functional role of substance P. Chronic inflammation and pain are associated with a number of diseases, and it has been proposed that substance P, released from primary afferent nerve endings play a role in these conditions. Recent developments with substance P antagonists have demonstrated the importance of substance P in several models of disease that span from asthma to chronic bronchitis; from cystitis, inflammatory bowel disease to migraine; emesis, depression, pain and seizures. Advancements in the knowledge of the role of substance P, its agonists and antagonists could provide clinical solutions for a variety of chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:11378438

  20. EVALUATION OF SUBMISSIONS UNDER CLEAN AIR ACT, TITLE VI SECTION 612

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under Section 612 of the Clean Air Act, the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program is authorized to evaluate alternatives to ozone-depleting substances based on the risk posed to human health and the environment. Based on the scientific evaluation of toxicity, flama...

  1. Ground-water levels, water quality, and potential effects of toxic-substance spills or cessation of quarry dewatering near a municipal ground-water supply, southeastern Franklin County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedam, A.C.; Eberts, S.M.; Bair, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    A newly completed municipal ground-water supply that produces from a sand and gravel aquifer in southern Franklin County, Ohio, may be susceptible to potential sources of pollution. Among these are spills of toxic substances that could enter recharge areas of the aquifer or be carried by surface drainage and subsequently enter the aquifer by induced infiltration. Ground water of degraded quality also is present in the vicinity of several landfills located upstream from the municipal supply. Local dewatering by quarrying operations has created a ground-water divide which, at present, prevents direct movement of the degraded ground water to the municipal supply. In addition, the dewatering has held water levels at the largest landfills below the base of the landfill. Should the dewatering cease, concern would be raised regarding the rise of water levels at this landfills and transport of contaminants through the aquifer to the Scioto River and subsequently by the river to the well field. From June 1984 through July 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Columbus, Ohio, investigated the relations among the ground-water supply and potential sources of contamination by means of an observation-well network and a program of measuring water levels and sampling for water quality. Sample collections included those made to determine the baseline levels of organic chemicals and metals, as well as periodic sampling and analysis for common constituents to evaluate any changes taking place in the system. Finally, a steady-state, three-dimensional numerical model was used to determine ground-water flow directions and average ground-water velocities to asses potential effects of toxic-substance spills. The model also was used to simulate changes in the ground-water flow system that could result if part or all of the quarry dewatering ceased. Few of the organic-chemical and metal constituents analyzed for were present at detectable levels. With respect to

  2. A comparison between the multimedia fate and exposure models CalTOX and uniform system for evaluation of substances adapted for life-cycle assessment based on the population intake fraction of toxic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Huijbregts, Mark A J; Geelen, Loes M J; Hertwich, Edgar G; McKone, Thomas E; van de Meent, Dik

    2005-02-01

    In life-cycle assessment (LCA) and comparative risk assessment, potential human exposure to toxic pollutants can be expressed as the population intake fraction (iF), which represents the fraction of the quantity emitted that enters the human population. To assess the influence of model differences in the calculation of the population iF ingestion and inhalation iFs of 365 substances emitted to air, freshwater, and soil were calculated with two commonly applied multimedia fate and exposure models, CalTOX and the uniform system for evaluation of substances adapted for life-cycle assessment (USES-LCA). The model comparison showed that differences in the iFs due to model choices were the lowest after emission to air and the highest after emission to soil. Inhalation iFs were more sensitive to model differences compared to ingestion iFs. The choice for a continental seawater compartment, vertical stratification of the soil compartment, rain and no-rain scenarios, and drinking water purification mainly clarify the relevant model differences found in population iFs. Furthermore, pH correction of chemical properties and aerosol-associated deposition on plants appeared to be important for dissociative organics and metals emitted to air, respectively. Finally, it was found that quantitative structure-activity relationship estimates for superhydrophobics may introduce considerable uncertainty in the calculation of population intake fractions. PMID:15720012

  3. Guanidines from 'toxic substances' to compounds with multiple biological applications--detailed outlook on synthetic procedures employed for the synthesis of guanidines.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Shaista; Badshah, Amin; Hussain, Raja Azadar

    2015-04-01

    Guanidines to begin with, were thought of being harmful substances associated with medical ailment. With the advent of World War I and the impact it left on the populations at large research focus was shifted, towards polymer synthesis and that too on plastics and rubbers which were mostly employed in various artillery equipments. In the surge, to get plastics and rubbers with enhanced mechanical properties, many variedly substituted guanidines used as accelerators in vulcanization of polymers were synthesized using different procedures. Continuous research on guanidines, led scientists to develop different protocols and routes for the synthesis of these compounds, later these were tested for their possible use in various areas and now these are sought for their enhanced biomedical and catalytic applications. This review article presents thirty six different synthetic procedures employed for the synthesis of guanidines over the years including seventy schemes and a brief account on the reported wide ranging applications of some novel guanidines. PMID:25681571

  4. 40 CFR 792.113 - Mixtures of substances with carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., control or reference substance in the mixture before the experimental start date or concomitantly... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and Reference Substances § 792.113 Mixtures of substances with carriers. (a) For each test, control, or reference substance...

  5. 40 CFR 792.113 - Mixtures of substances with carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., control or reference substance in the mixture before the experimental start date or concomitantly... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and Reference Substances § 792.113 Mixtures of substances with carriers. (a) For each test, control, or reference substance...

  6. 40 CFR 792.113 - Mixtures of substances with carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., control or reference substance in the mixture before the experimental start date or concomitantly... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and Reference Substances § 792.113 Mixtures of substances with carriers. (a) For each test, control, or reference substance...

  7. 40 CFR 792.113 - Mixtures of substances with carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., control or reference substance in the mixture before the experimental start date or concomitantly... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and Reference Substances § 792.113 Mixtures of substances with carriers. (a) For each test, control, or reference substance...

  8. [Toxicology of chemical substances (metals and organic solvents): management as an occupational physician].

    PubMed

    Ueno, Susumu

    2013-10-01

    Even in Japan, there was a time when cases of occupational poisoning had frequently occurred, which led to the enactment of the Industrial Safety and Health Act in 1972. Currently, the use of only a part of chemical substances utilized in the workplace is regulated according to their designated hazardous level, but there are many other substances whose toxicities have not been elucidated. Risk assessment is now required of entrepreneurs in all categories of industry by the recently-revised Industrial Safety and Health Act. This article will focus on the toxicology of metals and organic solvents, and it will discuss how occupational physicians should manage chemicals, including the ones whose toxicities have not been clarified. PMID:24107340

  9. Respirometric biomonitor for the control of industrial effluent toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Campanella, L.; Favero, G.; Mastrofini, D.; Tomassetti, M.

    1995-12-31

    A yeast cell biosystem has been recently developed for the total toxicity testing of a sample that may contain a number of different polluting species. The method uses an amperometric gas diffusion oxygen sensor as indicating electrode and is based on the perturbation of the respiratory activity of the immobilized yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae; glucose acts as substrate. Several toxic substances were tested: metal ions (Cd{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}), phenol and cationic, anionic or nonionic surfactants. Some results of a monitoring program of an industrial wastewater are also reported and discussed.

  10. Biological model of the effects of toxic substances. Annual technical report No. 2. Final report, 1 November 1990-31 October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tuckett, R.P.

    1992-12-31

    Due to the basic nature of military operations, it is sometimes necessary for Air Force personnel to be exposed to toxic chemicals in their work environment, either as a protracted, low-level exposure or as an acute, high-level exposure. Hence, there is a need to establish quantitative tests for the biological effects of chemical exposure. The Draize rabbit eye test for acute irritancy has come under severe criticism by the animal rights movement and maybe banned in the near future. Therefore, it is important to replace the Draize test with procedures that are not performed on awake animals. Tissue culture has many advantages: it is commercially viable, well controlled, reproducible, and capable of studying the specific effects of chronic chemical exposure. Topical Testing has submitted a patent application on the concept of: (1) identifying cultured sensory neurons that respond to 'pain-related' chemicals, and (2) determining whether these neurons respond to a test chemical. (3) If so, it can be concluded that the test chemical has a potential for producing pain in humans.... Bioassay, Environmental toxins, Detoxification, Tissue culture.

  11. Decline in sediment contamination by persistent toxic substances from the outfall of wastewater treatment plant: Effectiveness of legislative actions in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangzi; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Badejo, Abimbola C; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Shen, Aihua; Lee, Sunggyu; Jeong, Yunsun; Choi, Minkyu; Moon, Hyo-Bang

    2016-06-01

    Legacy and new persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in sediments near a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) outfall in a semi-enclosed bay, to investigate the current contamination and temporal changes in these contaminants associated with regulation activities in Korea. The concentrations of most of the POPs showed clear decreasing trends with an increase in the distance from the WWTP outfall, indicating that the WWTP discharges greatly contributed to the sediment contamination by POPs. Highly significant correlations were found for most of the POPs, indicating a common source for sediment contamination. Significant declines were found in the concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and PAHs in the sediments collected between 2005 and 2013. This result suggested that legislative actions (regulation of the PCDD/Fs in flue gas, total pollution load management, and whole effluent toxicity for WWTP discharges) and change of fuels, were likely to be effective at reducing the POP and PAH levels in sediments during the past several years. The different compositional profiles of the PCDD/Fs and PAHs between 2005 and 2013 implied changes in and/or additional sources of these contaminants. Despite a decline in the PCDD/Fs over time, the present levels of PCDD/Fs in the sediment exceeded some of the sediment quality guidelines suggested by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. PMID:27031806

  12. Who`s protecting you from hazardous substances?

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.S.

    1993-05-01

    Employee accidents, life endangering spills of harmful chemicals, toxic materials leaching into drinking water, polluted air, crippling side effects of wonder metals and products, and human and animal deaths made it apparent that in order to protect and preserve the community and the environment, the community needed to be aware/knowledgeable of chemical uses and related possible dangers, i.e., it was time to establish rules and regulations for the use and disposal of hazardous substances and chemicals. This report details several organizations, acts, rules, and regulations created in the interest of hazardous materials safety.

  13. Pheromone-Regulated Expression of Sex Pheromone Plasmid pAD1-Encoded Aggregation Substance Depends on at Least Six Upstream Genes and a cis-Acting, Orientation-Dependent Factor

    PubMed Central

    Muscholl-Silberhorn, Albrecht B.

    2000-01-01

    Conjugative transfer of Enterococcus faecalis-specific sex pheromone plasmids relies on an adhesin, called aggregation substance, to confer a tight cell-to-cell contact between the mating partners. To analyze the dependence of pAD1-encoded aggregation substance, Asa1, on pheromone induction, a variety of upstream fragments were fused to an α-amylase reporter gene, amyL, by use of a novel promoter probe vector, pAMY-em1. For pheromone-regulated α-amylase activity, a total of at least six genes, traB, traC, traA, traE1, orfY, and orf1, are required: TraB efficiently represses asa1 (by a mechanism unrelated to its presumptive function in pheromone shutdown, since a complete shutdown is observed exclusively in the presence of traC); only traC can relieve traB-mediated repression in a pheromone-dependent manner. In addition to traB, traA is required but not sufficient for negative control. Mutational inactivation of traE1, orfY, or orf1, respectively, results in a total loss of α-amylase activity for constructs normally mediating constitutive expression. Inversion of a fragment covering traA, P0, and traE1 without disrupting any gene or control element switches off amyL or asa1 expression, indicating the involvement of a cis-acting, orientation-dependent factor (as had been shown for plasmid pCF10). Unexpectedly, pAD1 represses all pAMY-em1 derivatives in trans, while its own pheromone-dependent functions are unaffected. The discrepancy between the new data and those of former studies defining TraE1 as a trans-acting positive regulator is discussed. PMID:10850999

  14. Psychoactive Substances Bill and Act of New Zealand: A Chance to Engage Undergraduate Scientists with Society using a Transfer Learning Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Gliddon, Catherine M.; Cridge, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to develop a teaching paradigm that connected undergraduate’s neuropharmacological/toxicological knowledge to that of government policy. One goal of undergraduate education should be to help develop scientists that can use their scientific knowledge to critique government policy. There is little research, however, on whether democratization of science occurs: nor how to achieve this. Our work focused on a semi-structured workshop designed around the Psychoactive Substances Bill (PSB). Third year science students were given a questionnaire that was designed to address whether participating in the workshop enhanced their understanding of the PSB and its relationship to their established knowledge (i.e., transfer learning). Furthermore, whether they felt that they had enough expertise to consider making a submission (i.e., societal engagement). Results showed that the students appreciated the opportunity to explore potential application of their knowledge and delve into a socio-scientific issue. However, our findings suggested they felt uncomfortable discussing their ideas outside the classroom: nor, did they identify themselves as having sufficient knowledge to contribute to a submission. In conclusion, this study highlights two points. First, that discussion based transfer learning can be used in the tertiary sector and students value the opportunity to apply their knowledge to socio-scientific issue. Second, if social participation and democratization of science is a goal, then more emphasis should be placed on how students can realistically and confidently apply their learning to change social policy. In order to achieve this, education programs need to focus on legitimate real-life processes such as the PSB for engagement. PMID:26557790

  15. Psychoactive Substances Bill and Act of New Zealand: A Chance to Engage Undergraduate Scientists with Society using a Transfer Learning Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Gliddon, Catherine M; Cridge, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to develop a teaching paradigm that connected undergraduate's neuropharmacological/toxicological knowledge to that of government policy. One goal of undergraduate education should be to help develop scientists that can use their scientific knowledge to critique government policy. There is little research, however, on whether democratization of science occurs: nor how to achieve this. Our work focused on a semi-structured workshop designed around the Psychoactive Substances Bill (PSB). Third year science students were given a questionnaire that was designed to address whether participating in the workshop enhanced their understanding of the PSB and its relationship to their established knowledge (i.e., transfer learning). Furthermore, whether they felt that they had enough expertise to consider making a submission (i.e., societal engagement). Results showed that the students appreciated the opportunity to explore potential application of their knowledge and delve into a socio-scientific issue. However, our findings suggested they felt uncomfortable discussing their ideas outside the classroom: nor, did they identify themselves as having sufficient knowledge to contribute to a submission. In conclusion, this study highlights two points. First, that discussion based transfer learning can be used in the tertiary sector and students value the opportunity to apply their knowledge to socio-scientific issue. Second, if social participation and democratization of science is a goal, then more emphasis should be placed on how students can realistically and confidently apply their learning to change social policy. In order to achieve this, education programs need to focus on legitimate real-life processes such as the PSB for engagement. PMID:26557790

  16. Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, section 313 toxic chemical release inventory reporting forms for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    This document contains the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Forms and the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Certification Statement Form A(s) for chlorine for 1996 for the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The reporting forms contain information on the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Y-12 Plant and Johnson Controls Water Treatment Plant operational releases for specific toxic chemicals to the air, water, and land in addition to transfers to off-site disposal locations in CY 1996. Personnel from U.S. West reported no usage of the specified toxic chemicals in CY 1996; therefore, no Form R or Form A reporting data are included for U.S. West.

  17. Roadmaps to sources of information on chemicals listed in the Emergency Planning Community and Community Right-To-Know Act (also known as SARA Title 3), Section 313. Toxic release inventory (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    EPA has developed a database of sources of information on the chemicals listed in section 313 of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). The datbase is intended to assist users of section 313 Toxic Release Inventory data to perform exposure and risk assessments of these chemicals. The Roadmaps system displays and/or prints information for the SARA section 313 chemicals on health and environmental effects, Federal regulations, and state air and water regulations, monitoring data, and state contacts.

  18. 16 CFR 1500.127 - Substances with multiple hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Substances with multiple hazards. 1500.127 Section 1500.127 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.127 Substances with multiple hazards. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 766.25 - Chemical substances for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chemical substances for testing. 766... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.25 Chemical substances for testing. (a) Listing of chemical substances. Chemical...

  20. 40 CFR 766.25 - Chemical substances for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chemical substances for testing. 766... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.25 Chemical substances for testing. (a) Listing of chemical substances. Chemical...

  1. 40 CFR 766.25 - Chemical substances for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chemical substances for testing. 766... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.25 Chemical substances for testing. (a) Listing of chemical substances. Chemical...

  2. 40 CFR 766.25 - Chemical substances for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chemical substances for testing. 766... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.25 Chemical substances for testing. (a) Listing of chemical substances. Chemical...

  3. 40 CFR 766.25 - Chemical substances for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chemical substances for testing. 766... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.25 Chemical substances for testing. (a) Listing of chemical substances. Chemical...

  4. Lead Exposure Reduction Act of 1992. Report together with Additional and Dissenting Views To Accompany 5730 (Including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office.) Part 1 [and] Part 2. House of Representatives, 102d Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    This two-part report deals with the Lead Exposure Reduction Act of 1992 (H.R. 5730), an amendment to the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The amendment is intended to lead to the reduction of levels of lead in the environment and to lower the degree of childhood exposure to lead. The bill provides for a…

  5. MANAGEMENT OF BOTTOM SEDIMENTS CONTAINING TOXIC SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States-Japan Ministerial Agreement of May 1974 provided for the exchange of environmental information in several areas of mutual concern. This report is the compilation of papers presented at the Second U.S.-Japan Experts' Meeting on the Management of Bottom Sediments ...

  6. Beyond toxicity

    PubMed Central

    García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2014-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic plants, cyanide is a co-product of ethylene and camalexin biosynthesis. To maintain cyanide at non-toxic levels, Arabidopsis plants express the mitochondrial β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1. CYS-C1 knockout leads to an increased level of cyanide in the roots and leaves and a severe defect in root hair morphogenesis, suggesting that cyanide acts as a signaling factor in root development. During compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions, cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated. Moreover, CYS-C1 mutation increases both plant tolerance to biotrophic pathogens and their susceptibility to necrotrophic fungi, indicating that cyanide could stimulate the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. We hypothesize that CYS-C1 is essential for maintaining non-toxic concentrations of cyanide in the mitochondria to facilitate cyanide’s role in signaling. PMID:24398435

  7. Cadmium is more toxic to LLC-PK1 cells than to MDCK cells acting on the cadherin-catenin complex.

    PubMed

    Zimmerhackl, L B; Momm, F; Wiegele, G; Brandis, M

    1998-07-01

    Cadmium toxicity to renal cells was investigated in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and LLC-PK1 cells as models of the distal tubule/collecting duct and proximal tubule, respectively. Cells were grown on two-compartment filters and exposed to 0.1-50 microM Cd2+. In MDCK cells, Cd2+ was more toxic from the basolateral than from the apical side and dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration. Toxicity was evident within 24 h, as shown by a decrease in transepithelial resistance (TER), reduced proliferation (bromodeoxyuridine incorporation), reduction in ATP concentration, and morphological changes. On confocal microscopy, E-cadherin and alpha-catenin staining patterns indicated interference with the cadherin-catenin complex. LLC-PK1 cells showed a similar toxicity pattern, which was evident at lower Cd2+ concentrations. An increase of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin molecules in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction was detectable at high Cd2+ concentrations in LLC-PK1 cells but not in MDCK cells. Lactate dehydrogenase release indicated membrane leakage in LLC-PK1 cells. Rhodamine-phalloidin staining, a probe for F-actin filaments, demonstrated alterations of the actin cytoskeleton in both cell lines. In conclusion, cadmium caused ATP depletion and interfered with the cadherin-catenin complex and probably the tight junctions changing renal cell morphology and function. PMID:9689016

  8. Federal facilities report toxics use under EPCRA

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    President Clinton's Aug. 3, 1993, executive order requires federal agencies to disclose toxic chemical use and release data under Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and to develop pollution prevention strategies to achieve targeted chemical reduction goals. Section 313 of EPCRA requires manufacturers in Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes 20--39 with more than 10 employees to report annually by July 1, 1994, release of listed toxic substances to all environmental media during the previous year. GOCOs that meet these requirements already report Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data. But non-manufacturing GOCOs and federal facilities not included in SIC codes 20--39 had been exempt from the reporting requirement. The August 3 order does not come as a complete surprise. Last April, President Clinton made several revealing announcements during his Earth Day Address. Perhaps his most salient announcement was his decision to issue an executive order requiring the federal government to become the leader in applying pollution prevention to its daily operations, purchasing decisions and policies, and in reducing toxic releases.

  9. 22 CFR 312.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Controlled substance. 312.610 Section 312.610 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE... through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21...

  10. 22 CFR 312.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Controlled substance. 312.610 Section 312.610 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE... through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21...

  11. 22 CFR 312.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Controlled substance. 312.610 Section 312.610 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE... through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21...

  12. 22 CFR 312.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Controlled substance. 312.610 Section 312.610 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE... through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21...

  13. 22 CFR 312.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Controlled substance. 312.610 Section 312.610 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE... through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21...

  14. 21 CFR 1405.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE... controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15....

  15. 21 CFR 1405.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE... controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15....

  16. 21 CFR 1405.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE... controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15....

  17. 21 CFR 1405.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE... controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15....

  18. 21 CFR 1405.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE... controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15....

  19. 45 CFR 630.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15. ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Controlled substance. 630.610 Section 630.610 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE...

  20. 45 CFR 630.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15. ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Controlled substance. 630.610 Section 630.610 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE...

  1. 45 CFR 630.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15. ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Controlled substance. 630.610 Section 630.610 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE...

  2. Examining the Role of Topological Factors in Controlling the Hydraulic Conductivity of Granular Deposits Through the Analysis of Geophysical Well Logs: Results From the USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, R. H.; Leblanc, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Long-term spatial and temporal monitoring of a treated-wastewater plume moving through a sand-and-gravel aquifer has been ongoing at the USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology research site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for three decades. The site offers access to numerous wells that penetrate the glacial outwash-plain deposits, and a variety of field experiments has been designed and implemented to investigate aquifer heterogeneity and transport processes. As part of this effort, geophysical logging programs have delineated the spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity, K, by means of a comprehensive series of flowmeter/pumping tests, and correlations among K and other log-derived properties such as porosity, electrical conductivity, and natural gamma activity have been examined statistically to extract information regarding the nature of fluid flow through these materials. Results revealed only a weak or inconclusive dependence of K on porosity from which was inferred that hydraulic conductivity may be influenced more by the topology, or geometric configuration, of the granular mixtures than by the volume of the fluid phase. To investigate the role of pore geometry further, a field experiment was recently conducted in which a sequence of electromagnetic induction logs was recorded in a well to monitor changes in the electrical properties of the surrounding sediments during injection of a saline tracer. The changes resulted from marked contrasts in the specific conductance between the ambient and injected fluids. Analytical mixing models, as well as empirical relations such as Archie's law, have been developed to characterize the electrical properties of saturated rocks and sediments. By applying these relations to the electrical conductivity data combined with the porosity log, topological measures of phase connectivity and surface area along grain boundaries can be derived from downhole measurements. Petrophysical parameters such as formation factor, F, and

  3. shRNA-Based Screen Identifies Endocytic Recycling Pathway Components That Act as Genetic Modifiers of Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation, Secretion and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Diana; Raquel, Helena; Simões, Pedro D.; Giorgini, Flaviano; Ramalho, José S.; Barral, Duarte C.; Ferreira Moita, Luís; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-Synuclein (aSyn) misfolding and aggregation is common in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, which are known as synucleinopathies. Accumulating evidence suggests that secretion and cell-to-cell trafficking of pathological forms of aSyn may explain the typical patterns of disease progression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling aSyn aggregation and spreading of pathology are still elusive. In order to obtain unbiased information about the molecular regulators of aSyn oligomerization, we performed a microscopy-based large-scale RNAi screen in living cells. Interestingly, we identified nine Rab GTPase and kinase genes that modulated aSyn aggregation, toxicity and levels. From those, Rab8b, Rab11a, Rab13 and Slp5 were able to promote the clearance of aSyn inclusions and rescue aSyn induced toxicity. Furthermore, we found that endocytic recycling and secretion of aSyn was enhanced upon Rab11a and Rab13 expression in cells accumulating aSyn inclusions. Overall, our study resulted in the identification of new molecular players involved in the aggregation, toxicity, and secretion of aSyn, opening novel avenues for our understanding of the molecular basis of synucleinopathies. PMID:27123591

  4. 21 CFR 1301.34 - Application for importation of Schedule I and II substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... technical advances in the art of manufacturing these substances and the development of new substances; (4... controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II, under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act (21... registered as an importer of a Schedule I or II controlled substance, which substance shall be identified....

  5. Toxic chemical release inventory magnetic media submission instructions. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act (revised 1990 version)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The document provides basic specifications for the use of magnetic media to submit EPA Form R reports required by section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986), Public Law 99-499. The use of magnetic media can be a convenient and timesaving way to submit required information. The specifications and requirements presented in the document supplement the reporting requirements presented in the section 313 final rule (40 CFR Part 372). Submission of magnetic media reports does not relieve the submitter from any of the regulatory requirements of the section 313 final rule.

  6. Toxic chemical release inventory magnetic media submission instructions. Section 313 of the emergency planning and community right-to-know act (revision)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This document provides basic specifications for the use of magnetic media to submit EPA Form R reports required by Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986), Public Law 99-499. The specifications and requirements presented in the document supplement to the reporting requirements presented in the Section 313 final rule (40 CFR Part 372). Submission of magnetic-media reports does not relieve the submitter from any of the regulatory requirements of the Section 313 final rule.

  7. Toxic chemicals and toxic laws

    SciTech Connect

    Koshland, D.E. Jr.

    1991-08-30

    Recently there was consternation when it was discovered that a program intended to help minorities and the underprivileged in Detroit might have to be canceled. The reason was that some of the land on which new buildings were built was thought to contain toxic chemicals and therefore fell under the provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (or Superfund). This collision of two valuable programs illustrates how a program originally heralded to carry out a worthwhile goal can become flawed. Since 1980, when the Superfund Act was passed by an overwhelming majority in Congress, only 34 of 1,245 identified priority sites have been cleaned up while approximately 40% of the money has been spent in trial litigation and administrative oversight. Critics, many of them within the EPA, point out that if the chemical danger level had been scientifically determined, approximately 90% of the truly important sites could have been cleaned up by now and the money wisely spent. However, the program was designed so that Congress initially did not have to raise much money or raise taxes and instead could argue that the program would not cost the taxpayer anything because it soaked the corporations. What needs to be done First, priority decisions should be taken out of the hands of nonscientists and lawyers and placed in those of scientists who are knowledgeable about toxic agents, who can identify effective targets objectively and who can establish workable priorities for removal of toxic waste. Second, a significant fraction of the money should be dedicated to research and to new programs that are more cost-effective. The purpose is to get chemical manufacturers thinking about reducing pollutants and the cost of cleanup when they plan to manufacture a chemical.

  8. Psychoactive substances: Position statement on harm reduction.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan Joseph; Manyedi For The Executive Committee Of The Central Drug Authority, Eva

    2016-09-01

    Psychoactive substances are subject to several international and national conventions and laws that have emphasised the importance of the 'war on drugs' and supply reduction. At the same time, it is increasingly clear that evidence-based, balanced policies are needed, which address the important differences between alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and other psychoactive substances or drugs. The Prevention of and Treatment for Substance Abuse Act 70 of 2008 speaks to the National Drug Master Plan, which emphasises a range of strategies for addressing the excessive use of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and other psychoactive substances. PMID:27601125

  9. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)–flavin containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2) signaling acts in silver nanoparticles and silver ion toxicity in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Hyun-Jeong; Ahn, Jeong-Min; Kim, Younghun; Choi, Jinhee

    2013-07-15

    In the present study, nanotoxicity mechanism associated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) exposure was investigated on the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans focusing on the hypoxia response pathway. In order to test whether AgNPs-induced hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation was due to hypoxia or to oxidative stress, depletion of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the test media and a rescue effect using an antioxidant were investigated, respectively. The results suggested that oxidative stress was involved in activation of the HIF-1 pathway. We then investigated the toxicological implications of HIF-1 activation by examining the HIF-1 mediated transcriptional response. Of the genes tested, increased expression of the flavin containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2) gene was found to be the most significant as induced by AgNPs exposure. We found that AgNPs exposure induced FMO-2 activation in a HIF-1 and p38 MAPK PMK-1 dependent manner, and oxidative stress was involved in it. We conducted all experiments to include comparison of AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3} in order to evaluate whether any observed toxicity was due to dissolution or particle specific. The AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3} did not produce any qualitative differences in terms of exerting toxicity in the pathways observed in this study, however, considering equal amount of silver mass, in every endpoint tested the AgNPs were found to be more toxic than AgNO{sub 3}. These results suggest that Ag nanotoxicity is dependent not only on dissolution of Ag ion but also on particle specific effects and HIF-1–FMO-2 pathway seems to be involved in it. - Highlights: • HIF-1 signaling was investigated in C. elegans exposed to AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3}. • HIF-1 and PMK-1 were needed for AgNPs- and AgNO{sub 3}-induced fmo-2 gene expression. • PMK-1–HIF-1–FMO-2 pathway was dependent on oxidative stress. • AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3} did not produce any qualitative differences in HIF-1 signaling. • AgNPs were more toxic than an equal

  10. 77 FR 20022 - Substances To Be Evaluated for Set 26 Toxicological Profiles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... Federal Register on November 3rd, 2011 (76 FR 68193). For prior versions of the list of substances, see Federal Register notices dated December 7, 2005 (70 FR 70284); and March 6, 2008 (73 FR 12178). Substances... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Substances To Be Evaluated for Set...

  11. Evaluation of metabolic responses of Artemia salina to oil and oil dispersant as a potential indicator of toxicant stress

    SciTech Connect

    Verriopoulos, G.; Moraitou-Apostolopoulou, M.; Xatzispirou, A.

    1986-03-01

    Oil represents an obvious hazard for the coastal environment and studies on its impact on marine organisms are necessary. Solvent based oil dispersants constitute one of the most important means for removing oil from shores. Although recently new dispersants have been developed, which are much less toxic than the first ones, dispersants still remain toxic substances. Since in the case of oil pollution treatment, oils and detergents are acting in combination, a realistic approach of laboratory studies must also include the combined action of these substances on marine organisms. Although acute toxicity studies are very useful for the determination of the range of animal tolerance, other effects causing physiological alterations may be detrimental to a population's survival. This paper concerns research on the effects of an oil, an oil dispersant and of the mixture of oil and dispersant on a physiological process, the respiration of the brine shrimp Artemia salina.

  12. Comparing toxic air pollutant programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    This article compares state and federal toxic air pollutant programs. The Clean Air Act Ammendments created a program for the control of Hazardous Air Pollutants based on the establishment of control technology standards. State toxic programs can be classified into two categories: control technology-based and ambient concentration-based. Many states have opened to implement the MACT standards while enforcing their own state air toxics programs. Specific topics discussed include the following: the Federal air toxics program; existing state regulations; New Jersey Air Toxic Program; New York Toxics program.

  13. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... poisonous or deleterious substance, other than a pesticide chemical, that is also a food additive will be... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious substance... added poisonous or deleterious substance that is also a pesticide chemical will ordinarily be...

  14. Substance Abuse and Child Welfare: Clear Linkages and Promising Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semidei, Joseph; Radel, Laura Feig; Nolan, Catherine

    2001-01-01

    Examines the prevalence of substance abuse among families involved with the child welfare system and the impact of substance abuse on child welfare practice. Discusses how both the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 and welfare reform legislation intensify the need to address parental substance abuse effectively. Considers strategies for…

  15. Tenellin acts as an iron chelator to prevent iron-generated reactive oxygen species toxicity in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Jirakkakul, Jiraporn; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Punya, Juntira; Chutrakul, Chanikul; Senachak, Jittisak; Buajarern, Taridaporn; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for life. However, the iron overload can be toxic. Here, we investigated the significant increase of tenellin and iron-tenellin complex production in ferricrocin-deficient mutants of Beauveria bassiana. Our chemical analysis indicated that the ferricrocin-deficient mutants T1, T3 and T5 nearly abolished ferricrocin production. In turn, these mutants had significant accumulation of iron-tenellin complex in their mycelia at 247-289 mg g(-1) cell dry weight under iron-replete condition. Both tenellin and iron-tenellin complex were not detected in the wild-type under such condition. Mass analysis of the mutants' crude extracts demonstrated that tenellin formed a 3:1 complex with iron in the absence of ferricrocin. The unexpected link between ferricrocin and tenellin biosynthesis in ferricrocin-deficient mutants could be a survival strategy during iron-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:25670702

  16. AQUATIC FATE AND TRANSPORT MODELING TECHNIQUES FOR PREDICTING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE TO ORGANIC PESTICIDES AND OTHER TOXICANTS - A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure assessment enhanced by mathematical modeling has become an accepted technique for evaluating the environmental risk associated with the release of toxic substances into various environmental media. Mathematical models for analyzing the behavior of toxic substances in riv...

  17. 2009 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Environmental Stewardship Group

    2010-11-01

    For reporting year 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2009 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2009, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  18. 40 CFR 302.4 - Designation of hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 102(a) of the Act. (b) Unlisted hazardous substances. A solid waste, as defined in 40 CFR 261.2, which is not excluded from regulation as a hazardous waste under 40 CFR 261.4(b), is a hazardous substance under section 101(14) of the Act if it exhibits any of the characteristics identified in 40 CFR...

  19. 40 CFR 302.4 - Designation of hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 102(a) of the Act. (b) Unlisted hazardous substances. A solid waste, as defined in 40 CFR 261.2, which is not excluded from regulation as a hazardous waste under 40 CFR 261.4(b), is a hazardous substance under section 101(14) of the Act if it exhibits any of the characteristics identified in 40 CFR...

  20. 40 CFR 302.4 - Designation of hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 102(a) of the Act. (b) Unlisted hazardous substances. A solid waste, as defined in 40 CFR 261.2, which is not excluded from regulation as a hazardous waste under 40 CFR 261.4(b), is a hazardous substance under section 101(14) of the Act if it exhibits any of the characteristics identified in 40 CFR...

  1. 40 CFR 302.4 - Designation of hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 102(a) of the Act. (b) Unlisted hazardous substances. A solid waste, as defined in 40 CFR 261.2, which is not excluded from regulation as a hazardous waste under 40 CFR 261.4(b), is a hazardous substance under section 101(14) of the Act if it exhibits any of the characteristics identified in 40 CFR...

  2. 40 CFR 302.4 - Designation of hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 102(a) of the Act. (b) Unlisted hazardous substances. A solid waste, as defined in 40 CFR 261.2, which is not excluded from regulation as a hazardous waste under 40 CFR 261.4(b), is a hazardous substance under section 101(14) of the Act if it exhibits any of the characteristics identified in 40 CFR...

  3. Toxicity-indicating structural patterns.

    PubMed

    von Korff, Modest; Sander, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    We describe a toxicity alerting system for uncharacterized compounds, which is based upon comprehensive tables of substructure fragments that are indicative of toxicity risk. These tables were derived computationally by analyzing the RTECS database and the World Drug Index. We provide, free of charge, a Java applet for structure drawing and toxicity risk assessment. In an independent investigation, we compared the toxicity classification performance of naive Bayesian clustering, k next neighbor classification, and support vector machines. To visualize the chemical space of both toxic and druglike molecules, we trained a large self-organizing map (SOM) with all compounds from the RTECS database and the IDDB. In summary, we found that a support vector machine performed best at classifying compounds of defined toxicity into appropriate toxicity classes. Also, SOMs performed excellently in separating toxic from nontoxic substances. Although these two methods are limited to compounds that are structurally similar to known toxic substances, our fragment-based approach extends predictions to compounds that are structurally dissimilar to compounds used in the training set. PMID:16562981

  4. Emerging endocrine disrupters: perfluoroalkylated substances.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Allan Astrup; Leffers, Henrik

    2008-04-01

    In recent years, polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) have increasingly been used as surfactants in various industry- and consumer products, because of their unique properties as repellents of dirt, water and oils. The most well-known PFCs are perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and their derivatives belonging to the group of perfluoroalkylated substances. The PFCs are very persistent in the environment, and some of them have been discovered as global pollutants of air, water, soil and wildlife and even found in remote polar areas. Bioaccumulation occurs also in humans, and everybody in our society has traces of these PFCs in their blood and internal organs such as the liver, kidneys, spleen, gall bladder and testes. In the blood, PFOS and PFOA are bound to serum proteins. The acute toxicity of the polyfluorinated substances is moderate but some substances can induce peroxisome proliferation in rat livers and may change the fluidity of cell membranes. Some of these PFCs, such as PFOS and PFOA, are potential developmental toxicants and are suspected endocrine disruptors with effects on sex hormone levels resulting in lower testosterone levels and higher oestradiol level. Other PFCs have oestrogenic effects in cell cultures. The industrial production of PFOS and its derivatives stopped in 2000, and the European Union has banned most uses from the summer of 2008. However, hundreds of related chemicals: homologues with shorter or longer alkyl chain, PFOA and telomers, which potentially may degrade to perfluoroalkanoic (carboxylic) acids, are not regulated. PMID:18315716

  5. Protein corona acts as a protective shield against Fe3O4-PEG inflammation and ROS-induced toxicity in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Rivera, V; Uribe-Ramírez, M; González-Pozos, S; Lozano, O; Lucas, S; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, A

    2016-01-01

    Protein corona (PC) is the main biological entity of initial cell interaction and can define the toxicological response to Fe3O4 nanoparticles (IONP). Polymer coating to IONP, polyethilenglycol (PEG) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), is a widely accepted strategy to prevent toxicity and avoid excessive protein binding. The aim of this study was to assess the role of PC as a potential protector for ROS-induced cytotoxicity and pro-inflammatory response in THP-1 macrophages (exposed to three different IONP: bare, PVP or PEG coated). Cells were exposed to either IONP in RPMI-1640 media or IONP with a preformed human PC. All three IONP showed cytotoxic effects, which in the presence of PC was abolished. IONP-PEG exposure significantly increased ROS, mitochondrial dysfunction and pro-inflammatory cytokines release (IL-1β and TNF-α). PC presence on IONP-PEG promoted a decrease in ROS and prevented cytokine secretion. Also, presence of PC reduced cell uptake for IONP-bare, but had no influence on IONP-PVP or IONP-PEG. Hence, the reduction in IONP-PEG cytotoxicity can be attributed to PC shielding against ROS generation and pro-inflammatory response and not a differential uptake in THP-1 macrophages. The presence of the PC as a structural element of NP biological entity provides in vivo-relevant conditions for nanosafety testing. PMID:26518974

  6. RCRA Subtitle C TSD facilities and solvent recovery facilities: Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. Toxic chemical release inventory; Industry guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this guidance document is to assist facilities in SIC code 4953 that are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle C and facilities in SIC code 7389 that are primarily engaged in solvent recovery services on a contract or fee basis. This document explains the EPCRA Section 313 and PPA Section 6607 reporting requirements (collectively referred to as the EPCRA Section 313) reporting requirements, and discusses specific release and other waste management activities encountered at many facilities in these industries. The objectives of this manual are to: clarify EPCRA Section 313 requirements for industry; increase the accuracy and completeness of the data being reported by RCRA Subtitle C TSD and solvent recovery facilities; and reduce the level of effort expended by those facilities that prepare an EPCRA Section 313 report.

  7. The Efficacy of Assertive Community Treatment to Treat Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Fries, Heather P.; Rosen, Marc I.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) has been studied extensively in people with severe mental illness, but there have only been a few clinical trials in which substance use was one of the measured outcomes. OBJECTIVE The goal of this article was to describe the efficacy of ACT in treating co-occurring substance use disorders and suggest approaches to make it more efficacious. DESIGN A literature review was conducted and randomized clinical trials describing ACT’s impact on substance use were reviewed. RESULTS Four randomized clinical trials of ACT that measured substance abuse adequately were identified, all of which showed small to no effect on substance abuse compared with control conditions. Methodological issues might account for the small effects. ACT might further reduce substance use by being paired with evidenced-based substance abuse treatment, helping clients become housed or helping them manage their money better. CONCLUSION Integrated ACT, in which the ACT team provides substance abuse counseling, has the potential to reduce substance use by several mechanisms, but this has been difficult to demonstrate in clinical trials when participants in control groups receive similar interventions. PMID:21532920

  8. Cocaine Babies: Florida's Substance-Exposed Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpring, Jayme

    This report is designed to provide Florida's school personnel with assistance in working with students prenatally exposed to cocaine or other toxic substances. The report offers background data, practical strategies for teaching and learning, and resources for networking. The first chapter outlines statistics on the incidence of the problem of…

  9. Metal mining facilities. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, toxic chemical release inventory: Industry guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended to assist establishments and facilities designated by the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Major Group 10 (except SIC codes 1011, 1081, and 1094) in making compliance determinations under the EPCRA Section 313 reporting requirements and preparing Form R(s) or the Form A certification statement(s) as required. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction to TRI reporting and provides a brief background on the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act and information on where to obtain additional compliance assistance. Chapter 2 begins with how to determine if a facility must report. Chapter 2 concludes with a discussion on how to address trade secrets in reporting and the kinds of records that should be kept to support reporting. Chapter 3 discusses how to calculate the activity thresholds (manufacture, process, and otherwise use) for the EPCRA Section 313 chemicals. Chapter 3 concludes with a discussion of how to determine whether EPCRA Section 313 chemicals exceed a reporting threshold, including focused discussions on issues specific to metal mining facilities. Chapter 4 discusses how to calculate the release and other waste management amounts for those EPCRA Section 313 chemicals for which a report must be prepared. This chapter provides a step-by-step approach designed to minimize the risk of overlooking an activity involving an EPCRA Section 313 chemical and any potential sources or types of releases and other waste management activities that a facility may conduct.

  10. Semiautomated Motility Assay For Determining Toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond

    1996-01-01

    Improved method of assessing toxicities of various substances based on observation of effects of those substances on motilities of manageably small number of cells of protozoan species Tetrahema pyriformis. Provides repeatable, standardized tests with minimal handling by technicians and with minimal exposure of technicians to chemicals. Rapid and economical alternative to Draize test.

  11. Electricity generating facilities. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, toxic chemical release inventory: Industry guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended to assist establishments and facilities designated by the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes 4911 (limited to facilities that combust coal and/or oil for the purpose of generating electricity for distribution in commerce), 4931 (limited to facilities that combust coal and/or oil for the purpose of generating electricity for distribution in commerce), and 4939 (limited to facilities that combust coal and/or oil for the purpose of generating electricity for distribution in commerce) in making compliance determinations under the EPCRA Section 313 reporting requirements and preparing Form R(s) or the Form A certification statement(s) as required. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction to TRI reporting and provides a brief background on the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act and information on where to obtain additional compliance assistance. Chapter 2 begins with how to determine if a facility must report. Chapter 2 concludes with a discussion on how to address trade secrets in reporting and the kinds of records that should be kept to support reporting. Chapter 3 discusses how to calculate the activity thresholds (manufacture, process, and otherwise use) for the EPCRA Section 313 chemicals. Chapter 3 concludes with a discussion of how to determine whether EPCRA Section 313 chemicals exceed a reporting threshold, including focused discussions on issues specific to electricity generating facilities. Chapter 4 discusses how to calculate the release and other waste management amounts for those EPCRA Section 313 chemicals for which a report must be prepared. This chapter provides a step-by-step approach designed to minimize the risk of overlooking an activity involving an EPCRA Section 313 chemical and any potential sources or types of releases and other waste management activities that a facility may conduct.

  12. 21 CFR 1301.34 - Application for importation of Schedule I and II substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II, under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act (21... registered as an importer of a Schedule I or II controlled substance, which substance shall be identified. A... that controlled substance and to any other applicant therefor. Any such person may, within 30 days...

  13. 21 CFR 1301.34 - Application for importation of Schedule I and II substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II, under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act (21... registered as an importer of a Schedule I or II controlled substance, which substance shall be identified. A... that controlled substance and to any other applicant therefor. Any such person may, within 30 days...

  14. 21 CFR 1301.34 - Application for importation of Schedule I and II substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II, under the authority of section 1002(a)(2)(B) of the Act (21... registered as an importer of a Schedule I or II controlled substance, which substance shall be identified. A... that controlled substance and to any other applicant therefor. Any such person may, within 30 days...

  15. NEW HAVEN TOXICS INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA will be working with the New Haven Department of Health to collect data and create an inventory of toxic air pollutants in the New Haven area. Under section 112 of the Clean Air Act, EPA and cities and states are required to reduce cancer and non-cancer health risks in urb...

  16. Toxic Remediation System And Method

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1996-07-23

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  17. POREWATER TOXICITY TESTING: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments act as sinks for contaminants, where they may build up to toxic levels. Sediments containing toxic levels of contaminants pose a risk to aquatic life, human health, and wildlife. There is an overwhelming amount of evidence that demonstrates chemicals in sediments are re...

  18. 77 FR 70780 - Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork... the Collection of Qualitative Feedback on Agency Service Delivery-NEW-Agency for Toxic Substances and... feedback from the public on service delivery, the ATSDR has submitted a Generic Information...

  19. Method of removing and detoxifying a phosphorus-based substance

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Steindler, M.J.

    1985-05-21

    A method of removing a phosphorus-based poisonous substance from water contaminated is presented. In addition, the toxicity of the phosphorus-based substance is also subsequently destroyed. A water-immiscible organic solvent is first immobilized on a supported liquid membrane before the contaminated water is contacted with one side of the supported liquid membrane to absorb the phosphorus-based substance in the organic solvent. The other side of the supported liquid membrane is contacted with a hydroxy-affording strong base to react with phosphorus-based solvated species to form a non-toxic product.

  20. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  1. Reduce toxic hazards using passive mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Flamberg, S.A.; Torti, K.S.; Myers, P.M.

    1998-07-01

    The primary goal of the Risk Management Program Rule promulgated under Section 112(r) of the 1990 US Clean Air Act Amendments is to prevent the accidental release of those chemicals that pose the greatest threat to the public and the environment, and to encourage emergency preparedness to mitigate the severity of such releases. The Rule requires facility owners to identify, evaluate, and communicate to the public any potential worst-case scenarios that could involve accidental releases of toxic and flammable substances. A worst-case scenario is defined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA; Washington, DC) as: {hor_ellipsis}the release of the largest quantity of a regulated substance from a vessel or process line failure that results in the greatest distance to an endpoint. When designing systems to store or process hazardous materials, passive-mitigation methods--those that function without human, mechanical, or energy input--should be considered. Such systems contain or limit a potential release of hazardous materials. And, because they have no mechanical requirements, passive-mitigation techniques are considered more reliable than active methods, such as emergency-shutdown and water-spray systems. Passive mitigation should also be considered when defining potential release scenarios and modeling hazard zones.

  2. Toxic inhalational exposures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tze-Ming Benson; Malli, Harjoth; Maslove, David M; Wang, Helena; Kuschner, Ware G

    2013-01-01

    Respirable toxicants are a spectrum of irritant and nonirritant gases, vapors, fumes, and airborne particles that can be entrained into the body through the respiratory tract, resulting in exposures that cause pulmonary injury and/or systemic disease. Sources of respirable toxicants include structural fires, industrial accidents, domestic mishaps, and intentional releases of injurious agents on the battleground (warfare) or in civilian settings (acts of terrorism). Acute toxic inhalational exposures may result in respiratory failure, multisystem organ dysfunction, and death. Management of victims includes assessment and protection of the airway, monitoring and treatment of systemic toxicity, and delivery of exposure-specific and nonspecific therapies that improve outcomes. Treatments may include antidotes, hyperbaric oxygen, and other nonspecific life-supporting interventions. PMID:22232204

  3. Substance Abuse and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Shannon; Suárez, Liza

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong, bidirectional link between substance abuse and traumatic experiences. Teens with cooccurring substance use disorders (SUDs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have significant functional and psychosocial impairment. Common neurobiological foundations point to the reinforcing cycle of trauma symptoms, substance withdrawal, and substance use. Treatment of teens with these issues should include a systemic and integrated approach to both the SUD and the PTSD. PMID:27613348

  4. Toxicity Studies.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity studies in the animal models are done to determine the dose level recommended for the treatment of disease as drug. This guideline enables the characterization of adverse effects following repeated daily inhalation exposure to a test. This chapter includes oral and dermal toxicity studies which are discussed as per OECD guidelines. Both acute and subacute toxicity studies are given special emphasis. PMID:26939270

  5. A TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION OF SILTY MARINE HARBOR SEDIMENTS TO CHARACTERIZE PERSISTENT AND NON-PERSISTENT CONSTITUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment toxicity in silty marine harbor sediments is frequently dominated by ammonia or sulfide, leaving the adverse effects of persistent toxic substances unnoticed. To investigate the latter, we subjected interstitial water from three contaminated silty sediments to toxicity i...

  6. [Comprehensive Toxicity Evaluation and Toxicity Identification Used in Tannery and Textile Wastewaters].

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Chen, Wen-yan; Wan, Yu-shan; Zheng, Guo-juan; Zhao, Yuan; Cai, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    To better evaluate the toxicity of tannery and textile effluents from various emission stages, the research attempted battery of toxicological bioassays and toxicological indices. The bioassays employed Microtox test, zebra fish embryo-larval test and algae (Chlorella vulgaris) test. Meanwhile, toxicological indices including Toxicity Unit (TU), Average Toxicity (AvTx), Toxic Print (TxPr), Most Sensitive Test (MST) and Potential Ecotoxic Effects Probe (PEEP) were applied. The results illustrated that PEEP was the most comprehensive index to take account of the emissions and toxic potential of effluents. PEEP values showed that the reduction rates of toxicity in tannery and textile effluents were 36. 8% and 23. 2%, respectively. Finally, based on the Microtox toxicity test, toxicants in textile effluent were identified through the toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) studies. The results indicated that the main toxicant of textile effluent was non-polar organic pollutants, followed by filterable compounds, heavy metals, oxidizing substances and volatile components. PMID:26489331

  7. 21 CFR 189.1 - Substances prohibited from use in human food.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adulterated in violation of the act. (b) This section includes only a partial list of substances prohibited from use in human food, for easy reference purposes, and is not a complete list of substances that...

  8. Method of removing and detoxifying a phosphorus-based substance

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, George F.; Steindler, Martin J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of removing organic phosphorus-based poisonous substances from water contaminated therewith and of subsequently destroying the toxicity of the substance is disclosed. Initially, a water-immiscible organic is immobilized on a supported liquid membrane. Thereafter, the contaminated water is contacted with one side of the supported liquid membrane to selectively dissolve the phosphorus-based substance in the organic extractant. At the same time, the other side of the supported liquid membrane is contacted with a hydroxy-affording strong base to react the phosphorus-based substance dissolved by the organic extractant with a hydroxy ion. This forms a non-toxic reaction product in the base. The organic extractant can be a water-insoluble trialkyl amine, such as trilauryl amine. The phosphorus-based substance can be phosphoryl or a thiophosphoryl.

  9. Method of removing and detoxifying a phosphorus-based substance

    SciTech Connect

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Steindler, M.J.

    1989-07-25

    A method of removing organic phosphorus-based poisonous substances from water contaminated therewith and of subsequently destroying the toxicity of the substances is disclosed. Initially, a water-immiscible organic is immobilized on a supported liquid membrane. Thereafter, the contaminated water is contacted with one side of the supported liquid membrane to selectively dissolve the phosphorus-based substance in the organic extractant. At the same time, the other side of the supported liquid membrane is contacted with a hydroxy-affording strong base to react the phosphorus-based substance dissolved by the organic extractant with a hydroxy ion. This forms a non-toxic reaction product in the base. The organic extractant can be a water-insoluble trialkyl amine, such as trilauryl amine. The phosphorus-based substance can be phosphoryl or a thiophosphoryl.

  10. Designer Drug (DD) abuse in Poland; a review of the psychoactive and toxic properties of substances found from seizures of illegal drug products and the legal consequences thereof. Part 1--cannabinoids and cathinones.

    PubMed

    Biliński, Przemysław; Hołownia, Piotr; Kapka-Skrzypczak, Lucyna; Wojtyła, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Faced with the rapidly growing increase of designer drug abuse, particularly amongst the younger generation, various legislative strategies are currently employed world-wide for tackling this problem - however with mixed results. The key issue is that the producers of DDs are able to either exploit existing legal substances intended for other uses, but which have been found to possess psychoactive properties, or to synthesise new psychoactive substances by introducing chemical modifications, often very minor ones, thereby avoiding the prohibited use of chemicals included on any banned lists. Some countries opt to ban new drugs as and when shown or considered to be harmful, while others introduce sweeping bans based on chemical structure. Nevertheless, an ever increasing diversity of new DDs are constantly appearing on domestic and Internet markets. Poland, together with the UK and Eire, has placed temporary bans on all DDs whenever they have been identified, thus enabling sufficient time for assessing their potential hazards to health. Part of this 'holding' strategy entails a thorough review of the scientific literature, including expert opinion when direct evidence is lacking, as well as information received from EU support organisations Europol and the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA). This paper, in two parts, therefore aims to provide an up-to-date summary review of available scientific evidence on the harm caused by the six main chemical groupings of DDs found in drug seizures of illegal products recently made in Poland. The first part is devoted to Cannabinoids and Cathinones derivatives. Ensuing legislation can therefore be rapidly formulated to make the bans permanent as appropriate. PMID:23311820

  11. GENE INDUCTION STUDIES AND TOXICITY OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its mixtures program the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) supports in vitro and limited in vivo toxicity testing to further our understanding of the toxicity and health effects of chemical mixtures. There are increasing concerns that environment...

  12. Toxic compensation bills.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R C

    1985-01-01

    Congress has demonstrated interest in toxic compensation legislation, but not enough agreement to make significant progress. Advocates of reform claim that the legal system is heavily weighed against victims who seek compensation through the courts. Proposed reforms include a compensation fund and a cause of action in federal court. Critics have questioned whether these changes in the law would represent an improvement. Existing income replacement, medical cost reimbursement, and survivor insurance programs largely cover the losses of individuals with chronic disease. Thus, the need for an additional compensation is not clear. Furthermore, experience with compensation funds such as the Black Lung Fund suggests that political rather than scientific criteria may be used to determine eligibility. Finally, under the proposed financing mechanisms the compensation funds that are being debated would not increase incentives for care in the handling of hazardous wastes or toxic substances. PMID:4085440

  13. 2 CFR 182.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11 through 1308.15. ... MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS NATIONAL POLICY REQUIREMENTS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 182.610...

  14. 16 CFR 1500.4 - Human experience with hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human experience with hazardous substances... § 1500.4 Human experience with hazardous substances. (a) Reliable data on human experience with any... the meaning of the act. When such data give reliable results different from results with animal...

  15. 16 CFR 1500.4 - Human experience with hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Human experience with hazardous substances... § 1500.4 Human experience with hazardous substances. (a) Reliable data on human experience with any... the meaning of the act. When such data give reliable results different from results with animal...

  16. 16 CFR 1500.4 - Human experience with hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Human experience with hazardous substances... § 1500.4 Human experience with hazardous substances. (a) Reliable data on human experience with any... the meaning of the act. When such data give reliable results different from results with animal...

  17. 16 CFR 1500.4 - Human experience with hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Human experience with hazardous substances... § 1500.4 Human experience with hazardous substances. (a) Reliable data on human experience with any... the meaning of the act. When such data give reliable results different from results with animal...

  18. 16 CFR 1500.4 - Human experience with hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Human experience with hazardous substances... § 1500.4 Human experience with hazardous substances. (a) Reliable data on human experience with any... the meaning of the act. When such data give reliable results different from results with animal...

  19. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical...

  20. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical...

  1. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical...

  2. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical...

  3. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical...

  4. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  5. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  6. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  7. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  8. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  9. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  10. EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES FOR CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE RELEASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information is provided for selecting the best spill stabilization controls for hazardous substances regulated by the Comprehensive Enviromental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Information is also provided on the onsite assessment of spill severity, app...

  11. Genetic and perinatal effects of abused substances

    SciTech Connect

    Brande, M.C.; Zimmerman, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the effects of several abused drugs, including opiates, cannabinoids, alcohol, nicotine, and cocaine, with special emphasis on the actions of these substances at the molecular and cellular levels. The first half deals with genetic effects, including molecular genetics, biochemical genetics, pharmacogenetics, cytogenetics, and genetic toxicity. The second half focuses on perinatal effects and covers: drug abuse during pregnancy; biochemical aspects of marihuana on male reproduction; and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of perinatal alcohol exposure.

  12. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  13. Effect of sunlight exposure on the release of intentionally and/or non-intentionally added substances from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water: chemical analysis and in vitro toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bach, Cristina; Dauchy, Xavier; Severin, Isabelle; Munoz, Jean-François; Etienne, Serge; Chagnon, Marie-Christine

    2014-11-01

    The effect of sunlight exposure on chemical migration into PET-bottled waters was investigated. Bottled waters were exposed to natural sunlight for 2, 6 and 10 days. Migration was dependent on the type of water. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and Sb migration increased with sunlight exposure in ultrapure water. In carbonated waters, carbon dioxide promoted migration and only formaldehyde increased slightly due to sunlight. Since no aldehydes were detected in non-carbonated waters, we conclude that sunlight exposure has no effect. Concerning Sb, its migration levels were higher in carbonated waters. No unpredictable NIAS were identified in PET-bottled water extracts. Cyto-genotoxicity (Ames and micronucleus assays) and potential endocrine disruption effects (transcriptional-reporter gene assays) were checked in bottled water extracts using bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium) and human cell lines (HepG2 and MDA-MB453-kb2). PET-bottled water extracts did not induce any toxic effects (cyto-genotoxicity, estrogenic or anti-androgenic activity) in vitro at relevant consumer-exposure levels. PMID:24874358

  14. Special Issue: Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuhrmann, Barbara S., Ed.; Washington, Craig S., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Presents ten articles about substance abuse: its effects, consequences, and strategies for intervention. Describes specific group therapy techniques and presents both a court service designed for assisting juveniles with drug/alcohol offenses, and a school-based substance abuse prevention program. Looks at strategies for counseling special…

  15. Substance Abuse. Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This paper presents the policy statement on substance abuse from the National Collaboration for Youth (NCY). The policy statement section lists programs and activities supported by the NCY. A section on background includes a statement of the issue of substance abuse. Areas examined in this section include alcohol abuse and drunk driving among…

  16. Substance Abuse and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Amos

    A review of the literature provides the conclusion that individuals with a disability versus those without a disability are more likely to have a substance abuse problem and less likely to get effective treatment. Data suggest 10-40% of all individuals in treatment for substance abuse have a coexisting physical or mental disability. Alcohol rates…

  17. TOXIC POLLUTANTS IN URBAN WET-WEATHER FLOWS: AN OVERVIEW OF THE MULTI-MEDIA TRANSPORT, IMPACTS, AND CONTROL MEASURES (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an oveview of the transport of toxic pollutants through multiple media in the urban environment. Discussions include the sources of particulate-associated toxic substances and the relationship of these toxics to atmospheric deposition, overland accumulation an...

  18. Toxic trauma.

    PubMed

    Moles, T M; Baker, D J

    2001-01-01

    Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) carry many inherent dangers. Such materials are distributed widely in industrial and military sites. Toxic trauma (TT) denotes the complex of systemic and organ injury caused by toxic agents. Often, TT is associated with other injuries that also require the application of life-support techniques. Rapid onset of acute respiratory failure and consequent cardiovascular failure are of primary concern. Management of TT casualties is dependent upon the characteristics of the toxic agents involved and on the demographics surrounding the HAZMAT incident. Agents that can produce TT possess two pairs of salient characteristics: (1) causality (toxicity and latency), and (2) EMS system (persistency and transmissibility). Two characteristics of presentations are important: (1) incident presentation, and (2) casualty presentation. In addition, many of these agents complicate the processes associated with anaesthesia and must be dealt with. Failure of recognition of these factors may result in the development of respiratory distress syndromes and multiorgan system failure, or even death. PMID:11513285

  19. Digitalis toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    These are symptoms of digitalis toxicity: Confusion Irregular pulse Loss of appetite Nausea , vomiting , diarrhea Fast heartbeat Vision changes (unusual), including blind spots, blurred vision, changes in how colors look, or ...

  20. Antimony Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients) and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically. PMID:21318007

  1. 16 CFR 1500.41 - Method of testing primary irritant substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of testing primary irritant substances. 1500.41 Section 1500.41 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.41 Method of testing primary...

  2. 16 CFR 1500.85 - Exemptions from classification as banned hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exemptions from classification as banned hazardous substances. 1500.85 Section 1500.85 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.85 Exemptions...

  3. 16 CFR 1500.85 - Exemptions from classification as banned hazardous substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exemptions from classification as banned hazardous substances. 1500.85 Section 1500.85 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.85 Exemptions...

  4. Fish acute toxicity syndromes and their use in the QSAR approach to hazard assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McKim, J.M.; Bradbury, S.P.; Niemi, G.J.

    1987-04-01

    Implementation of the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1977 creates the need to reliably establish testing priorities because laboratory resources are limited and the number of industrial chemicals requiring evaluation is overwhelming. The use of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models as rapid and predictive screening tools to select more potentially hazardous chemicals for in-depth laboratory evaluation has been proposed. Further implementation and refinement of quantitative structure-toxicity relationships in aqueous toxicology and hazard assessment requires the development of a mode-of-action database. With such a database, a qualitative structure-activity relationship can be formulated to assign the proper mode of action, and respective QSAR, to a given chemical structure. In this review, the development of fish acute toxicity syndromes (FATS), which are toxic-response sets based on various behavioral and physiological-biochemical measurements, and their projected use in the mode-of-action database are outlined. Using behavioral parameters monitored in the fathead minnow during acute toxicity testing, FATS associated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors and narcotics could be reliably predicted. However, compounds classified as oxidative phosphorylation uncouplers or stimulants could not be resolved. Refinement of this approach by using respiratory-cardiovascular responses in the rainbow trout, enabled FATS associated with AChE inhibitors, convulsants, narcotics, respiratory blockers, respiratory membrane irritants, and uncouplers to be correctly predicted.

  5. Substance use disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse; Chemical use; Chemical abuse; Drug addiction; Addiction - drug; Dependence on drugs ... known. A person's genes, the action of the drug, peer pressure, emotional distress, anxiety , depression , and environmental ...

  6. Substance use - phencyclidine (PCP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs called hallucinogens. These are substances that cause hallucinations . These are things that you see, hear, or ... up, excited, tense, confused, or irritable ( agitation ), having hallucinations Physical reactions may include muscle breakdown or twitching, ...

  7. Supervision: Substance and Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellerman, Saul W.

    1976-01-01

    Argues that managerial style and substance are inextricably intertwined, illustrating the discussion with excerpts from an extensive study and job analysis of first-line supervisors in a food packaging plant. (JG)

  8. Substance use - marijuana

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - marijuana; Drug abuse - marijuana; Drug use - marijuana; Cannabis; Grass; Hashish; Mary Jane; Pot; Weed ... several minutes. If you eat foods containing the drug as an ingredient, such as brownies, you may ...

  9. Substance Abuse/Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video Games Video Sharing Sites Webcasts/ Webinars Widgets Wikis Follow Us on New Media Virtual Office Hours ... users when they are included as part of medical and substance abuse treatment and prevention services. Syringe ...

  10. Substance use - marijuana

    MedlinePlus

    ... substance taken from the tops of female marijuana plants. It contains the highest amount of THC. Marijuana is called many other names, including cannabis, grass, hashish, joint, Mary Jane, pot, reefer, weed.

  11. Substance use during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Forray, Ariadna

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal substance use is a critical public health concern that is linked with several harmful maternal and fetal consequences. The most frequently used substance in pregnancy is tobacco, followed by alcohol, cannabis and other illicit substances. Unfortunately, polysubstance use in pregnancy is common, as well as psychiatric comorbidity, environmental stressors, and limited and disrupted parental care, all of which can compound deleterious maternal and fetal outcomes. There are few existing treatments for prenatal substance use and these mainly comprise behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Contingency management has been shown to be the most efficacious of these. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the prenatal use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids, including the effects of these on maternal and fetal health and the current therapeutic options. PMID:27239283

  12. Substance use during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Forray, Ariadna

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal substance use is a critical public health concern that is linked with several harmful maternal and fetal consequences. The most frequently used substance in pregnancy is tobacco, followed by alcohol, cannabis and other illicit substances. Unfortunately, polysubstance use in pregnancy is common, as well as psychiatric comorbidity, environmental stressors, and limited and disrupted parental care, all of which can compound deleterious maternal and fetal outcomes. There are few existing treatments for prenatal substance use and these mainly comprise behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Contingency management has been shown to be the most efficacious of these. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the prenatal use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids, including the effects of these on maternal and fetal health and the current therapeutic options. PMID:27239283

  13. Substance use -- cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000793.htm Substance use - cocaine To use the sharing features on this page, ... Charlie, coca, coke, flake, rock, snow, speedball, toot. Cocaine's Effects on Your Brain Cocaine is a strong ...

  14. Novel psychoactive substances of interest for psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Schifano, Fabrizio; Orsolini, Laura; Duccio Papanti, G; Corkery, John M

    2015-01-01

    Novel psychoactive substances include synthetic cannabinoids, cathinone derivatives, psychedelic phenethylamines, novel stimulants, synthetic opioids, tryptamine derivatives, phencyclidine-like dissociatives, piperazines, GABA-A/B receptor agonists, a range of prescribed medications, psychoactive plants/herbs, and a large series of performance and image enhancing drugs. Users are typically attracted by these substances due to their intense psychoactive effects and likely lack of detection in routine drug screenings. This paper aims at providing psychiatrists with updated knowledge of the clinical pharmacology and psychopathological consequences of the use of these substances. Indeed, these drugs act on a range of neurotransmitter pathways/receptors whose imbalance has been associated with psychopathological conditions, including dopamine, cannabinoid CB1, GABA-A/B, 5-HT2A, glutamate, and k opioid receptors. An overall approach in terms of clinical management is briefly discussed. PMID:25655145

  15. Novel psychoactive substances of interest for psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Schifano, Fabrizio; Orsolini, Laura; Duccio Papanti, G; Corkery, John M

    2015-02-01

    Novel psychoactive substances include synthetic cannabinoids, cathinone derivatives, psychedelic phenethylamines, novel stimulants, synthetic opioids, tryptamine derivatives, phencyclidine-like dissociatives, piperazines, GABA-A/B receptor agonists, a range of prescribed medications, psychoactive plants/herbs, and a large series of performance and image enhancing drugs. Users are typically attracted by these substances due to their intense psychoactive effects and likely lack of detection in routine drug screenings. This paper aims at providing psychiatrists with updated knowledge of the clinical pharmacology and psychopathological consequences of the use of these substances. Indeed, these drugs act on a range of neurotransmitter pathways/receptors whose imbalance has been associated with psychopathological conditions, including dopamine, cannabinoid CB1, GABA-A/B, 5-HT2A, glutamate, and k opioid receptors. An overall approach in terms of clinical management is briefly discussed. PMID:25655145

  16. Acute toxicity of pinnatoxins E, F and G to mice.

    PubMed

    Munday, Rex; Selwood, Andrew I; Rhodes, Lesley

    2012-11-01

    The acute toxicities to mice of pinnatoxins E, F and G, members of the cyclic imine group of phycotoxins, by intraperitoneal injection and/or oral administration, have been determined. These substances were all very toxic by intraperitoneal injection, with LD(50) values between 12.7 and 57 μg/kg. Pinnatoxin E was much less toxic by oral administration than by intraperitoneal injection, but this was not the case for pinnatoxin F. The median lethal doses of the latter substance by gavage and by voluntary intake were only 2 and 4 times higher than that by injection. The high oral toxicity of pinnatoxin F raises concerns as to the possibility of adverse effects of this substance in shellfish consumers, although it should be noted that no toxic effects in humans have been recorded with pinnatoxins or with any other compound of the cyclic imine group. PMID:22813782

  17. Cadmium as a respiratory toxicant

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, E.C.; Graham, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Cadmium is a major respiratory toxicant as evidenced by numerous human and animal studies. Controlled animal inhalation studies provide supporting evidence to the associations observed in epidemiological studies that Cd has the potential to cause lung fibrosis, emphysema, cancer, and kidney disease after prolonged exposure. Shorter-term exposure studies indicate that mechanisms thought to be involved in several of these chronic disease states (especially fibrosis and emphysema) are acutely activated. The evidence of toxicity is sufficiently clear that a TLV has been set and the International Agency for Research on Cancer has named Cd as a Group B1 substance (probable human carcinogen). The risk to Cd exposure is enhanced by its chemical and physical properties that result in bioaccumulation. Thus, even a low-level exposure over long periods of time would be expected to reach doses that could be toxic.

  18. 76 FR 55393 - Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Storms (CHATS)--New--National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) and Agency for Toxic Substances and... Health Study''); however, the goals remain the same. The Children's Health Study After the Storms...

  19. The new Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabha, A.P. ); Olem, H. )

    1991-05-01

    This article is a title by title review of the new Clean Air Act and how it affects water quality and wastewater treatment. The bill provides for restoring and protecting lakes and rivers by reducing acid-rain-causing emissions and toxics from nonpoint-source runoff. Topics covered include urban smog, mobile sources, air toxics, acid rain, permits, ozone-depleting chemicals, enforcement, and the law's socio-economic impacts.

  20. 77 FR 37678 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry: Notice of Charter... Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and...

  1. 75 FR 43172 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR): Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under...

  2. [Toxic anterior segment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS) is a general term used to describe acute, sterile postoperative inflammation due to a non-infectious substance that accidentally enters the anterior segment at the time of surgery and mimics infectious endophthalmitis. TASS most commonly occurs acutely following anterior segment surgery, typically 12-72h after cataract extraction. Anterior segment inflammation is usually quite severe with hypopyon. Endothelial cell damage is common, resulting in diffuse corneal edema. No bacterium is isolated from ocular samples. The causes of TASS are numerous and difficult to isolate. Any device or substance used during the surgery or in the immediate postoperative period may be implicated. The major known causes include: preservatives in ophthalmic solutions, denatured ophthalmic viscosurgical devices, bacterial endotoxin, and intraocular lens-induced inflammation. Clinical features of infectious and non-infectious inflammation are initially indistinguishable and TASS is usually diagnosed and treated as acute endophthalmitis. It usually improves with local steroid treatment but may result in chronic elevation of intraocular pressure or irreversible corneal edema due to permanent damage of trabecular meshwork or endothelial cells. PMID:21176994

  3. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement of Brivaracetam Into Schedule V. Interim final rule, with request for comments.

    PubMed

    2016-05-12

    The Drug Enforcement Administration is placing the substance brivaracetam ((2S)-2-[(4R)-2-oxo-4-propylpyrrolidin-1-yl] butanamide) (also referred to as BRV; UCB-34714; Briviact) (including its salts) into schedule V of the Controlled Substances Act. This scheduling action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act, as revised by the Improving Regulatory Transparency for New Medical Therapies Act which was signed into law on November 25, 2015. PMID:27192732

  4. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement of Thiafentanil Into Schedule II. Interim final rule with request for comments.

    PubMed

    2016-08-26

    The Drug Enforcement Administration is placing the substance thiafentanil (4-(methoxycarbonyl)-4-(N-phenmethoxyacetamido)-1-[2-(thienyl)ethyl]piperidine), including its isomers, esters, ethers, salts and salts of isomers, esters and ethers as possible, into schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act. This scheduling action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act, as revised by the Improving Regulatory Transparency for New Medical Therapies Act which was signed into law on November 25, 2015. PMID:27568479

  5. In Vitro Models of Human Toxicity Pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    For toxicity testing and assessment programs to address the large numbers of substances of potential concern, a paradigm shift in the assessment of chemical hazard and risk is needed that takes advantage of advances in molecular toxicology, computational sciences, and information...

  6. Ranking chemicals based on chronic toxicity data.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, C T; Stara, J F; Durkin, P R

    1985-12-01

    During the past 3 years, EPA's ECAO/Cincinnati has developed a method to rank chemicals based on chronic toxicity data. This ranking system reflects two primary attributes of every chemical: the minimum effective dose and the type of effect elicited at that dose. The purpose for developing this chronic toxicity ranking system was to provide the EPA with the technical background required to adjust the RQs of hazardous substances designated in Section 101(14) of CERCLA or "Superfund." This approach may have applications to other areas of interest to the EPA and other regulatory agencies where ranking of chemicals based on chronic toxicity is desired. PMID:3843499

  7. Approaching Suspicious Substances Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A mineral identification tool that was developed for NASA's Mars Rover Technology Development program is now serving as a powerful tool for U.S. law enforcement agencies and military personnel to identify suspicious liquid and solid substances. The tool can measure unknown substances through glass and plastic packaging materials with the RamanProbe(TradeMark) focused fiber-optic probe. The probe length can be extended up to 200 meters to enable users to analyze potentially dangerous substances at a safe distance. In many cases, the spectrometer and personnel are kept in a safe zone while the probe is positioned next to the sample being analyzed. Being able to identify chemicals in remote locations also saves users time and labor, since otherwise the samples would need to be collected, transported, and prepared prior to measurement in the laboratory.

  8. AQUIRE--AQUATIC TOXICITY INFORMATION RETRIEVAL DATA BASE (MAGNETIC TAPE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The AQUlRE -- Aquatic Toxicity Information Retrieval -- data base was established in 1981 by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances. AQUlRE continues to be updated and maintained atthe U.S. EPA Environmental Researc...

  9. EMISSIONS OF ORGANIC AIR TOXICS FROM OPEN BURNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed literature search was performed to collect and collate available data reporting emissions of toxic organic substances into the air from open burning sources. Availability of data varied according to the source and the class of air toxics of interest. Volatile organic c...

  10. Cancer therapy using nanoformulated substances: scientific, regulatory and financial aspects.

    PubMed

    Alphandéry, Edouard; Grand-Dewyse, Pierre; Lefèvre, Raphael; Mandawala, Chalani; Durand-Dubief, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    Several nanoformulated anti-cancer substances are currently commercialized or under development. Pre-clinical and clinical results have revealed better properties, that is, larger efficacy and lower toxicity for these substances than for conventional anti-cancer treatments. Here, we review the development of several of these substances such as Marqibo, Myocet, Doxil, DaunoXome, MM398, MM302, Mepact, Versamune, Thermodox, Depocyt, Livatag, Abraxane, Eligard, Opaxio, Zinostatin Stimalamer (SMANCS), Pegasys and PegIntron, BIND-014, CRLX-101, Oncaspar, Neulasta, Aurimmune, Auroshell, AuNPs, Nanotherm, NanoXray, Magnetosome chains, Kadcyla (T-DM1), Ontak (DAB/IL2), Gendicine and Curcumin. We describe their specific properties, such as their stability, solubility, mean of administration or targeting, distribution, metabolism and toxicity. We discuss their categorization as medical devices or drugs, their fabrication process within a regulatory environment as well as intellectual property and financial aspects that are all essential to enable their industrial development. PMID:26402250

  11. Deaths from abuse of volatile substances: a national epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H R; Macnair, R S; Ramsey, J D

    1985-01-26

    A survey of the United Kingdom detected 282 deaths from abuse of volatile substances during 1971-83. Deaths appeared to have increased in the most recent years, reaching 80 in 1983. Age at death ranged from 11 to 76 years but most deaths (72%) occurred under 20 years. Ninety five per cent of the subjects were male, and in 1983 deaths from volatile substance abuse accounted for 2% of all deaths in males aged 10-19. All areas of the United Kingdom were affected, the rates being highest in Scotland and urban areas. All social classes were affected, though rates were highest in social class V and the armed forces. The volatile substances abused were gas fuels (24%), mainly butane; aerosol sprays (17%); solvents in glues (27%); and other volatile substances, such as cleaning agents (31%). In 51% of cases death was attributed to the direct toxic effects of the substance abused, in 21% to plastic bag asphyxia, in 18% to inhalation of stomach contents, and in 11% to trauma. Deaths associated with the abuse of glues were more likely to be traumatic, but all substances appeared capable of killing directly by their toxic effects, probably by a cardiac mechanism. Only a small proportion of deaths (6%) were due to the abuse of glues among children under 16; hence current attempts to limit access of children to glues will probably have little impact on overall mortality. PMID:3917795

  12. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  13. The price function of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Mark D; Dranitsaris, George

    2009-03-01

    The high and accelerating price of new anticancer drugs is giving rise to increased concern. However, monetary price is not the only way to value chemotherapy. Toxic effects can also be seen as a form of payment in which "units" of wellbeing are exchanged for "units" of efficacy. Although this trading analogy is not perfect, a proposal can be made that toxicity is a type of price, and that one of its functions is to signal valuation, similar to the crucial signalling function of monetary price in the real economy. This price function of toxicity, to the extent where there is transparency about the real amounts of toxicity, can have two important and helpful consequences: acting as a brake on the increasing monetary price of new drugs, via a damping effect on demand; and assisting individual patients in the informed contemplation of chemotherapy decisions. However, there are two problems that currently impede the effective dissemination of this highly desirable toxicity information. First, a prediction of toxicity in individual patients is difficult. Second, the vast database of real toxic effects in community practice is rarely made available for public scrutiny. Both of these problems, which together constitute a form of hidden cost, are potentially resolvable at least to some extent. In the absence of accurate information on toxic effects, it is easy for monetary price to progressively diverge from true value. We believe that improved transparency with respect to toxic effects, and better toxicity prediction, offer a better and more genuinely market-orientated solution to the issue of price distortions than the bureaucratic imposition of price controls. PMID:19261259

  14. Synergetic toxic effect of an explosive material mixture in soil.

    PubMed

    Panz, Katarzyna; Miksch, Korneliusz; Sójka, Tadeusz

    2013-11-01

    Explosives materials are stable in soil and recalcitrant to biodegradation. Different authors report that TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) and HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) are toxic, but most investigations have been performed in artificial soil with individual substances. The aim of the presented research was to assess the toxicity of forest soil contaminated with these substances both individually as well in combinations of these substances. TNT was the most toxic substance. Although RDX and HMX did not have adverse effects on plants, these compounds did cause earthworm mortality, which has not been reported in earlier research. Synergistic effects of explosives mixture were observed. PMID:24005241

  15. [Source identification of toxic wastewaters in a petrochemical industrial park].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Yu, Yin; Zhou, Yue-Xi; Chen, Xue-Min; Fu, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Miao

    2014-12-01

    Petrochemical wastewaters have toxic impacts on the microorganisms in biotreatment processes, which are prone to cause deterioration of effluent quality of the wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the inhibition effects of activated sludge's oxygen consumption were tested to evaluate the toxicity of production wastewaters in a petrochemical industrial park. The evaluation covered the wastewaters from not only different production units in the park, but also different production nodes in each unit. No direct correlation was observed between the toxicity effects and the organic contents, suggesting that the toxic properties of the effluents could not be predicted by the organic contents. In view of the variation of activated sludge sensitivity among different tests, the toxicity data were standardized according to the concentration-effect relationships of the standard toxic substance 3, 5-dichlorophenol on each day, in order to improve the comparability among the toxicity data. Furthermore, the Quality Emission Load (QEL) of corresponding standard toxic substance was calculated by multiplying the corresponding 3, 5-dichlorophenol concentration and the wastewater flow quantity, to indicate the toxicity emission contribution of each wastewater to the wastewater treatment plant. According to the rank list of the toxicity contribution of wastewater from different units and nodes, the sources of toxic wastewater in the petrochemical industrial park were clearly identified. This study provides effective guidance for source control of wastewater toxicity in the large industrial park. PMID:25826928

  16. Modern toxic antipersonnel projectiles.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Yvan; Regenstreif, Philippe; Fanton, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    In the spring of 1944, Kurt von Gottberg, the SS police chief in Minsk, was shot and injured by 2 Soviet agents. Although he was only slightly injured, he died 6 hours later. The bullets were hollow and contained a crystalline white powder. They were 4-g bullets, semi-jacketed in cupronickel, containing 28 mg of aconitine. They were later known as akonitinnitratgeschosse. The Sipo (the Nazi security police) then ordered a trial with a 9-mm Parabellum cartridge containing Ditran, an anticholinergic drug with hallucinogenic properties causing intense mental confusion. In later years, QNB was used and given the NATO code BZ (3-quinuclidinyl-benzylate). It was proven that Saddam Hussein had this weapon (agent 15) manufactured and used it against the Kurds. Serbian forces used the same type of weapon in the Bosnian conflict, particularly in Srebrenica.The authors go on to list the Cold War toxic weapons developed by the KGB and the Warsaw pact countries for the discreet elimination of dissidents and proindependence leaders who had taken refuge in the West. These weapons include PSZh-13 launchers, the Troika electronic sequential pistol, and the ingenious 4-S110T captive piston system designed by the engineer Stechkin. Disguised as a cigarette case, it could fire a silent charge of potassium cyanide. This rogues gallery also includes the umbrella rigged to inject a pellet of ricin (or another phytalbumin of similar toxicity, such as abrin or crotin) that was used to assassinate the Bulgarian writer and journalist Georgi Markov on September 7, 1978, in London.During the autopsy, the discovery of a bullet burst into 4 or 5 parts has to make at once suspecting the use of a toxic substance. Toxicological analysis has to look for first and foremost aconitine, cyanide, suxamethonium, Ditran, BZ, or one of the toxic phytalbumins. The use of such complex weapons has to make suspect a powerful organization: army, secret service, terrorism. The existence of the Russian UDAR spray

  17. Toxic substances and human risk: principles of data interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Tardiff, R.G.; Rodricks, J.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the relationship between toxicology and risk assessment and identifying the principles that should be used to evaluate toxicological data for human risk assessment. The book opens by distinguishing between the practice of toxicology as a science (observational and data-gathering activities) and its practice as an art (predictive or risk-estimating activities). This dichotomous nature produces the two elemental problems with which users of toxicological data must grapple. First, how relevant are data provided by the science of toxicology to assessment of human health risks. Second, what methods of data interpretation should be used to formulate hypotheses or predictions regarding human health risk.

  18. LANDSCAPE INDICATORS FOR STREAM VULNERABILITY TO PESTICIDES AND TOXIC SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating environmental conditions at community, watershed, regional, and national scales is a growing interest among Federal agencies, states, and the public. At the same time, the relatively high cost of collecting environmental data has limited the implementation of regional...

  19. USGS TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION -- FORMS OF OCCURRENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Allan Kolker; Stanley J. Mroczkowski; Curtis A. Palmer; Robert B. Finkelman

    1999-10-01

    Leaching procedures have been completed for the three Phase 2 coals. Chemical analyses have been returned for the whole coals, allowing leaching results to be determined as data on the leachates and solid residues become available. Problems with the nitric acid leaching step twice necessitated repeating the entire procedure for the Ohio and North Dakota samples. Similarly, leaching of the Wyodak sample was repeated once. Analytical results have been returned for all but the last complete round of leaching, which was conducted after modification of the procedure for the nitric acid step. Re-leaching of solid residues prepared under the old procedure confirms that pyrite recovery using the new method is complete. Development of an improved analytical method for Hg continues, but emphasis has shifted from the atomic fluorescence method to an automated direct analysis method that offers similar or better sensitivity. The cold vapor atomic absorption (CVAA) method has been used in the interim for whole coals. During the reporting period Dr. Kolker traveled to Stanford University to evaluate the Stanford/USGS SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe for project purposes and generate trace-element results for illite/smectite in project coals. Initial SHRIMP results for Cr in these samples confirm the Phase 1 conclusion that its concentration in clays is just below the detection limit ({approximately} 100--200 ppm) for electron microprobe analysis. The SHRIMP-RG offers promise for other project priorities, including determination of Hg in sulfides and of As in fly-ash. Use of the SEM and electron microprobe continued during the last half-year, and has been especially useful in support of the ion probe effort. Among other procedures conducted, low temperature ashing has been completed and XRD determinations are underway. Splits of leached residues have been taken for XAFS analysis. The authors expect the first of these to be determined shortly by their Univ. of Kentucky colleagues. These results will be very useful in integrating the leaching and XAFS results and in resolving possible discrepancies.

  20. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shan, N.; Yap, N.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Seames, W.; Ames, M.R.; Sarofim, A.F.; Swenson, S.; Lighty, J.; Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.; Palmer, C.; Mroczkowski, S.; Helble, J.; Mamani-Paco, R.; Sterling, R.; Dunham, G.; Miller, S.

    2000-08-17

    The final program review meeting of Phase II was held on June 22 in Salt Lake City. The goals of the meeting were to present work in progress and to identify the remaining critical experiments or analyses, particularly those involving collaboration among various groups. The information presented at the meeting is summarized in this report. Remaining fixed bed, bench-scale experiments at EERC were discussed. There are more ash samples which can be run. Of particular interest are high carbon ash samples to be generated by the University of Arizona this summer and some ash-derived sorbents that EERC has evaluated on a different program. The use of separation techniques (electrostatic or magnetic) was also discussed as a way to understand the active components in the ash with respect to mercury. XAFS analysis of leached and unleached ash samples from the University of Arizona was given a high priority. In order to better understand the fixed bed test results, CCSEM and Moessbauer analyses of those ash samples need to be completed. Utah plans to analyze the ash from the single particle combustion experiments for those major elements not measured by INAA. USGS must still complete mercury analyses on the whole coals and leaching residues. Priorities for further work at the SHRIMP-RG facility include arsenic on ash surfaces and mercury in sulfide minerals. Moessbauer analyses of coal samples from the University of Utah were completed; samples from the top and bottom layers of containers of five different coals showed little oxidation of pyrite in the top relative to the bottom except for Wyodak.