Science.gov

Sample records for act toxic substances

  1. Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  2. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and Federal Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 provides EPA with authority to require reporting, record-keeping and testing requirements, and restrictions relating to chemical substances and/or mixtures.

  3. Toxic Substances Control Act Section 8(e): Frequent Questions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Section 8(e) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requires notification to EPA of information that reasonably supports the conclusion that their substances or mixtures presents a substantial risk of injury to health or the environment.

  4. 76 FR 38170 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... AGENCY Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces EPA's receipt of test data on 12 chemicals listed in the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) section 4 test rule titled ``Testing of...

  5. 76 FR 38169 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... AGENCY Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces EPA's receipt of test data on five chemicals listed in the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) section 4 test rule titled ``In Vitro...

  6. 40 CFR 2.306 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Toxic Substances Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Toxic Substances Control Act. 2.306 Section 2.306 Protection of Environment... Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Toxic Substances Control Act. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: (1) Act means the Toxic Substances Control Act, 15 U.S.C....

  7. 40 CFR 261.8 - PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false PCB wastes regulated under Toxic... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE General § 261.8 PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act. The disposal of PCB-containing dielectric fluid and...

  8. 40 CFR 261.8 - PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false PCB wastes regulated under Toxic... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE General § 261.8 PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act. The disposal of PCB-containing dielectric fluid and...

  9. 40 CFR 261.8 - PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false PCB wastes regulated under Toxic... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE General § 261.8 PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act. The disposal of PCB-containing dielectric fluid and...

  10. 40 CFR 261.8 - PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false PCB wastes regulated under Toxic... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE General § 261.8 PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act. The disposal of PCB-containing dielectric fluid and...

  11. Environmental Guidance Program reference book: Toxic substances control act. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  12. Toxic Substances Control Act. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  13. Higher hazard substances under The Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Act: lessons from the first four years.

    PubMed

    Massey, Rachel I; Tenney, Heather; Harriman, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA) has achieved significant reductions in toxic chemical use in Massachusetts, using a combination of regulatory and voluntary measures. Historically the program has regulated only users of relatively large quantities of toxic chemicals, with services provided to facilities of all sizes on a voluntary basis. Statutory amendments adopted in 2006 created an authority to designate Higher and Lower Hazard Substances (HHS and LHS). The HHS designation extends TURA program requirements to smaller quantity chemical users. This article reports on experiences from the first four years of implementing this new authority. A case study of trichloroethylene is provided as an example. The article also discusses steps taken to regulate n-propyl bromide, a drop-in substitute for TCE that is minimally regulated at the federal level. TURA program experiences may be of interest to other jurisdictions that are working to reach small-quantity chemical users, and to categorize and prioritize chemicals.

  14. Toxic substances Control Act inspection manual. Vol. 1 and Vol. 2. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Volume one: Toxic Substances Control Act base manual provides general information relating to the act. Inspector authorities and responsibilities are discussed along with the elements and scope of inspections. Procedures which are common to all inspections are outlined in detail: Pre-Inspection Preparation, Entry, Opening Conference, Records Inspection, Documentary Support, Sampling, Chain of Custody, Safety, Closing Conference, and Report Preparation. Special procedures are listed, and all TSCA forms are presented and explained. Information is also included on data systems, warrants, shipping samples, and testifying in court. Volume two: provides the specific information necessary for conducting a comprehensive inspection for PCBs. An Enforcement Strategy details EPA plans and provides an overview of the regulation. Inspecting, sampling, and reporting procedures for PCBs in specific industries are provided.

  15. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) TSCATS (test submissions database) comprehensive update (raw data file)

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-01

    TSCATS (Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions) is an online index to unpublished, nonconfidential studies covering chemical testing results and adverse effects of chemicals on health and ecological systems. The studies are submitted by US industry to EPA under several sections of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). There are four types of documents in the database: Section 4 chemical testing results, Section 8(d) health and safety studies, Section 8(e) substantial risk of injury to health or the environment notices, and voluntary documents submitted to EPA known as a For Your Information (FYI) notice. TSCATS contains information that is pertinent to the risk assessment and hazard evaluation processes. The information can be used in conjunction with published material and is a valuable source along with or in the absence of published data. The data are used by federal and state agencies, researchers, toxicologists, risk assessors, the regulated industry, attorneys, trade and professional associations. TSCATS was developed to make ongoing and completed chemical testing studies available to the public and includes chemical exposure studies, epidemiology, environmental fate, monitoring, episodic incidents, such as spills and case reports. There are 81,000 studies on 6,700 unique chemical substances contained in 23,000 documents. On average three or four individual studies are extracted from each document. Studies are indexed under three broad categories: health effects, ecological effects and environmental fate. Additional controlled vocabulary terms are assigned to describe the experimental protocol and test observations. A TSCATS record also includes: the chemical name, CAS (Chemical Abstracts Service) Registry Number, Section of TSCA, title, document number, microfiche number, submitting organization, and performing organization. A select number of studies also have abstracts. Microfiche copies of the full-text documents of the unpublished reports

  16. Toxic Substances List. 1972 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Herbert E., Ed.; And Others

    The second edition of the Toxic Substances List, containing some 13,000 entries, is prepared annually by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The purpose of the List is to identify all known toxic substances but not to quantitate the hazard. The List…

  17. Toxic Substances; Biphenyl; Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This rule promulgates EPA’s decision to require manufacturers and processors to test biphenyl (CAS No: 92—52—4) for environmental effects and chemical fate under section 4(a) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

  18. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Confidential Business Information Records Access System for the Toxic Control Substances Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This system collects submission data from the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and contact information for EPA contractors and employees who are CBI cleared. Learn how this data is collected, how it will be used, and the purpose of data collection.

  19. 48 CFR 1552.235-78 - Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Data Security for Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (DEC 1997). 1552.235-78 Section 1552.235-78 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts...

  20. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) TSCATS (test submissions database) comprehensive update, August 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-01

    TSCATS (Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions) is an online index to unpublished, nonconfidential studies covering chemical testing results and adverse effects of chemicals on health and ecological systems. There are four types of documents in the database: Section 4 chemical testing results, Section 8(d) health and safety studies, Section 8(e) substantial risk of injury to health or the environment notices, and voluntary documents submitted to EPA known as a For Your Information (FYI) notice. TSCATS contains information that is pertinent to the risk assessment and hazard evaluation processes. The information can be used in conjunction with published material and is a valuable source along with or in the absence of published data. The data are used by federal and state agencies, researchers, toxicologists, risk assessors, the regulated industry, attorneys, trade and professional associations. TSCATS was developed to make ongoing and completed chemical testing studies available to the public.There are 81,000 studies on 6,700 unique chemical substances are contained in 23,000 documents. Studies are indexed under three broad categories: health effects, ecological effects and environmental fate. Additional controlled vocabulary terms are assigned to describe the experimental protocol and test observations. A TSCATS record also includes: the chemical name, CAS (Chemical Abstracts Service) Registry Number, Section of TSCA, title, document number, microfiche number, submitting organization, and performing organization. A select number of studies also have abstracts. Microfiche copies of the full-text documents of the unpublished reports referenced by TSCATS are directly available from NTIS. The titles of these 23,000 unpublished reports can be searched directly on the NTIS web site at www.ntis.gov/yellowbk/1nty834.htm.

  1. Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator test bed for continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.V. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator, located on the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, continues to be the only operational incinerator in the country that can process hazardous and radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste. During 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems established a continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) test bed and began conducting evaluations of CEMS under development to measure contaminants from waste combustion and thermal treatment stacks. The program was envisioned to promote CEMS technologies meeting requirements of the recently issued Proposed Standards for Hazardous Waste Combustors as well as monitoring technologies that will allay public concerns about mixed waste thermal treatment and accelerate the development of innovative treatment technologies. Fully developed CEMS, as well as innovative continuous or semi-continuous sampling systems not yet interfaced with a pollutant analyzer, were considered as candidates for testing and evaluation. Complementary to other Environmental Protection Agency and DOE sponsored CEMS testing and within compliant operating conditions of the TSCA Incinerator, prioritization was given to multiple metals monitors also having potential to measure radionuclides associated with particulate emissions. In August 1996, developers of two multiple metals monitors participated in field activities at the incinerator and a commercially available radionuclide particulate monitor was acquired for modification and testing planned in 1997. This paper describes the CEMS test bed infrastructure and summarizes completed and planned activities.

  2. Toxic substances handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junod, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    Handbook, published in conjunction with Toxic Substances Alert Program at NASA Lewis Research Center, profiles 187 toxic chemicals in their relatively pure states and include 27 known or suspected carcinogens.

  3. In the arc of history: AIHA and the movement to reform the Toxic Substances Control Act.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Michael P. Wilson of UC Berkeley delivered his keynote address before the general assembly of the American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exhibition (AIHce) in Portland, Oregon, in May 2011. Here, Dr. Wilson again discusses the political and economic drivers of occupational disease in the United States and proposes a role for AIHA in helping to highlight and resolve them. He proposes that until these underlying drivers are acknowledged and ameliorated, the toll of occupational disease will persist, despite the hard work of industrial hygienists in the workplace. Among these drivers, Dr. Wilson points to the decline of labor rights and unionization; economic inequality; economic insecurity; political resistance to public health protections for workers, notably the OSHA and NIOSH programs; and weaknesses in the Federal Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 (TSCA). Of these, Dr. Wilson calls on the AIHA to participate in the historic effort to rewrite TSCA. He points to weaknesses in TSCA that have produced a chemicals market dominated by the function, price, and performance of chemicals, with little attention given to their health and environmental effects. Under these conditions, he argues, hazardous chemicals have remained economically competitive, and innovation in inherently safer chemicals-in green chemistry-has been held back by a lack of market transparency and public accountability in the industry. TSCA reform has the potential to shift the market toward green chemistry, with long-term implications for occupational disease prevention, industrial investment, and renewed energy in the industrial hygiene profession. Dr. Wilson proposes that, like previous legislative changes in the United States, TSCA reform is likely to occur in response to myriad social pressures, which include the emergence of the European Union's REACH regulation; recent chemicals policy actions in 18 U.S. states; growing support from downstream businesses; increasing public awareness

  4. Review of organic nitrile incineration at the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) operates the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly called the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, where uranium was enriched under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Currently, ETTP missions include environmental management, waste management (WM), and the development of new technologies. As part of its WM mission, ETTP operates the TSCA (Toxic Substances Control Act) Incinerator (TSCAI) for treatment of hazardous waste and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contaminated with low-level radioactivity. Beginning in the autumn of 1995, employees from diverse ETTP buildings and departments reported experiencing headaches, fatigue, depression, muscle aches, sleeplessness, and muscle tremors. These symptoms were judged by a physician in the ETTP Health Services Department to be consistent with chronic exposures to hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was called in to perform a health hazard evaluation to ascertain whether the employees` illnesses were in fact caused by occupational exposure to HCN. The NIOSH evaluation found no patterns for employees` reported symptoms with respect to work location or department. NIOSH also conducted a comprehensive air sampling study, which did not detect airborne cyanides at the ETTP. Employees, however, expressed concerns that the burning of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have produced HCN as a combustion product. Therefore, LMES and DOE established a multidisciplinary team (TSCAI Technical Review Team) to make a more detailed review of the possibility that combustion of nitrile-bearing wastes at the TSCAI might have either released nitriles or created HCN as a product of incomplete combustion (PIC).

  5. Toxic substances alert program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junod, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    A toxicity profile is provided, of 187 toxic substances procured by NASA Lewis Research Center during a 3 1/2 year period, including 27 known or suspected carcinogens. The goal of the program is to assure that the center's health and safety personnel are aware of the procurement and use of toxic substances and to alert and inform the users of these materials as to the toxic characteristics and the control measures needed to ensure their safe use. The program also provides a continuing record of the toxic substances procured, who procured them, what other toxic substances the user has obtained in the past, and where similar materials have been used elsewhere at the center.

  6. Dynamic computer model for heat transfer and incineration in the Oak Ridge TSCA (Toxic Substances Control Act) hazardous waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator was designed to burn toxic wastes such as PCBs. During the course of certification, concern was expressed by the Environmental Protection Agency that unburned PCBs might not continue to be destructed if the ''burning'' in the incinerator ceased. For example, it is possible that the flow of auxiliary fuel could be interrupted during the course of incinerator operation. The situation could occur at the time when a fresh batch of waste was introduced into the incinerator which would be the worst time for normal incinerator operation to cease. In response to the question concerning the destruction of PCBs during such an accidental cooling period, a dynamic model was constructed to approximate the situation, and thus obtain an estimate of the time period that the exit gas would remain above the necessary temperature required to detoxify the undesirable substance.

  7. The findings of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Medical Waste Tracking Act report.

    PubMed Central

    Lichtveld, M Y; Rodenbeck, S E; Lybarger, J A

    1992-01-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) report "The Public Health Implications of Medical Waste: A Report to Congress" has been finalized and submitted to Congress. The report is a comprehensive review of all available data and information on the subject. Based on the data developed in the report, ATSDR concludes that the general public is not likely to be adversely affected by medical waste generated in the traditional health setting. However, the increase of in-home health care and other sources of nonregulated medical waste (e.g., intravenous drug users) provides opportunities for the general public to contact medical waste. In addition, ATSDR concludes that public health concerns exist for selected occupations involved with medical waste. These populations include janitorial and laundry workers, nurses, emergency medical personnel, and refuse workers. The ATSDR report also defines what material should be managed as medical waste and identifies research needs related to medical waste. PMID:1486856

  8. Regulation of Chemicals under Section 6(a) of the Toxic Substances Control Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's existing chemicals programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and/or characterization, and risk management for chemicals substances in commercial use.

  9. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Operations, Level III

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    A Level III pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator to evaluate pollution prevention (P2) options for various waste streams: The main objective of this study was to identify and evaluate options to reduce the quantities of each waste stream generated by the TSCA Incinerator operations to realize significant environmental and/or economic benefits from P2. For each of the waste streams, P2 options were evaluated following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hierarchy to (1) reduce the quantity of waste generated, (2) recycle the waste, and/or (3) use alternate waste treatment or segregation methods. This report provides process descriptions, identification and evaluation of P2 options, and final recommendations.

  10. 40 CFR 261.8 - PCB wastes regulated under Toxic Substance Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE General § 261.8 PCB wastes... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PCB wastes regulated under Toxic... hazardous only because they fail the test for the Toxicity Characteristic (Hazardous Waste Codes...

  11. Toxic Substances; Mesityl Oxide; Final Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing a final test rule establishing testing requirements under section 4(a) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) for manufacturers and processors of mesityl oxide (MO; CAS No. 141-97-7).

  12. 40 CFR 2.306 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Toxic Substances Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... 2603) or for which notification is required under section 5 of the Act (15 U.S.C. 2604). (A) Any study... underlying data and epidemiological studies; studies of occupational exposure to a chemical substance or mixture; and toxicological, clinical, and ecological studies of a chemical substance or mixture; (B)...

  13. National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants compliance verification plan for the K-1435 Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, M.L.

    1986-07-28

    This documentation was prepared for submittal to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in order to meet the requirements of the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP). This document will emphasize the control of radioactive emissions from the K-1435 Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. The TSCA Incinerator is a dual purpose solid/liquid incinerator that is under construction at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant to destroy radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other hazardous organic wastes in compliance with the TSCA and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These wastes are generated at the facilities managed by the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO). Destruction of the PCBs and the hazardous organic wastes will be accomplished in a rotary kiln incinerator with an afterburner. The incinerator will thermally destroy the organic constituents of the liquids, solids, and sludges to produce an organically inert ash. In addition to the incinerator, an extensive off-gas treatment facility is being constructed to remove particulate and acidic gas air emissions.

  14. Toxic Substances in the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of toxic substances, examining pesticides and herbicides, heavy metals, industrial chemicals, and household substances. Includes a list of major toxic substances (indicating what they are, where they are found, and health concerns) and a student activity on how pesticides enter the food chain. (JN)

  15. Field testing of particulate matter continuous emission monitors at the DOE Oak Ridge TSCA incinerator. Toxic Substances Control Act.

    PubMed

    Dunn, James E; Davis, Wayne T; Calcagno, James A; Allen, Marshall W

    2002-01-01

    A field study to evaluate the performance of three commercially available particulate matter (PM) continuous emission monitors (CEMs) was conducted in 1999-2000 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. This study offers unique features that are believed to enhance the collective US experience with PM CEMs. The TSCA Incinerator is permitted to treat PCB-contaminated RCRA hazardous low-level radioactive wastes. The air pollution control system utilizes MACT control technology and is comprised of a rapid quench, venturi scrubber, packed bed scrubber, and two ionizing wet scrubbers in series, which create a saturated flue gas that must be conditioned by the CEMs prior to measurement. The incinerator routinely treats a wide variety of wastes including high and low BTU organic liquids, aqueous, and solid wastes. The various possible combinations for treating liquid and solid wastes may present a challenge in establishing a single, acceptable correlation relationship for individual CEMs. The effect of low-level radioactive material present in the waste is a unique site-specific factor not evaluated in previous tests. The three systems chosen for evaluation were two beta gauge devices and a light scattering device. The performance of the CEMs was evaluated using the requirements in draft Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 11 (PS11) and Procedure 2. The results of Reference Method 5i stack tests for establishing statistical correlations between the reference method data and the CEMs responses are discussed.

  16. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)/Radioactive Waste Annual Inventory for Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, Deborah L.

    2015-06-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act, 40 CFR 761.65(a)(1) provides an exemption from the one year storage time limit for PCB/radioactive waste. PCB/radioactive waste may exceed the one year time limit provided that the provisions at 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(ii) and 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(iii) are followed. These two subsections require, (ii) "A written record documenting all continuing attempts to secure disposal is maintained until the waste is disposed of" and (iii) "The written record required by subsection (ii) of this section is available for inspection or submission if requested by EPA." EPA Region 10 has requested the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit an inventory of radioactive-contaminated PCB waste in storage at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the previous calendar year. The annual inventory is separated into two parts, INL without Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) (this includes Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, and the Naval Reactors Facility), and AMWTP.

  17. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)/Radioactive Waste Annual Inventory for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect

    no author on report

    2014-06-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act, 40 CFR 761.65(a)(1) provides an exemption from the one year storage time limit for PCB/radioactive waste. PCB/radioactive waste may exceed the one year time limit provided that the provisions at 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(ii) and 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(iii) are followed. These two subsections require, (ii) "A written record documenting all continuing attempts to secure disposal is maintained until the waste is disposed of" and (iii) "The written record required by subsection (ii) of this section is available for inspection or submission if requested by EPA." EPA Region 10 has requested the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit an inventory of radioactive-contaminated PCB waste in storage at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the previous calendar year. The annual inventory is separated into two parts, INL without Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) (this includes Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, and the Naval Reactors Facility), and AMWTP.

  18. Impacts & Compliance Implementation Plans & Required Deviations for Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Regulation of Double Shell Tanks (DST)

    SciTech Connect

    MULKEY, C.H.

    2000-08-22

    In May 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held meetings regarding the management of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Hanford tank waste. It was decided that the radioactive waste currently stored in the double-shell tanks (DSTs) contain waste which will become subject to the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) (40 CFR 761). As a result, DOE-ORP directed the River Protection Project tank farm contractor (TFC) to prepare plans for managing the PCB inventory in the DSTs. Two components of the PCB management plans are this assessment of the operational impacts of TSCA regulation and the identifications of deviations from TSCA that are required to accommodate tank farm unique limitations. This plan provides ORP and CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) with an outline of TSCA PCB requirements and their applicability to tank farm activities, and recommends a compliance/implementation approach. Where strict compliance is not possible, the need for deviations from TSCA PCB requirements is identified. The purpose of assembling this information is to enhance the understanding of PCB management requirements, identify operational impacts and select impact mitigation strategies. This information should be useful in developing formal agreements with EPA where required.

  19. Toxic Substances Control Act oversight. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Toxic Substances and Environmental Oversight, United States Senate, Ninety-Eight Congress, first session, July 27, 29, and August 1, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Three days of testimony examined the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) to see if simple reauthorization would be appropriate or if substantive amendments are needed. At issue was whether the structural activity relationship (SAR) process is working in the new chemicals program and whether the triggers for Interagency Testing Committee (ITC) listing are working for existing chemicals. The witnesses included representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency, university laboratories, pesticide and chemical industries, health organizations, citizen groups, and others. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony off 18 witnesses and their associates.

  20. Consolidated list of chemicals subject to reporting under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act: SARA (Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986) Section 302 Extremely Hazardous Substances, CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) Hazardous Substances and SARA Section 313 Toxic Chemicals (Title III. List of Lists) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, H.

    1990-01-01

    The data file is the disk-based version of the Office of Toxic Substances' consolidated list of chemicals subject to reporting under Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and SARA Section 302 Extremely Hazardous Substances, as well as CERCLA Hazardous Substances. Title III is also known as the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act. The disks are designed to generate either a printout or a dBase III file from any IBM or IBM compatible system.

  1. Canadian Environmental Protection Act, strategic options for the management of toxic substances: Electric power generation (fossil fuel) sector, report of stakeholder consultations

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The Electric Power Generation Sector Issue Table was formed to assess the management of toxic substances released from that sector, and more specifically, to develop (where warranted) goals, targets, and effective and efficient options for managing toxic releases in order to reduce potential risks to human health and the environment. This strategic options report sets out the recommendations of Issue Table members for the management of toxic substances. The introduction includes an industry profile and a review of the provincial management of electric power sector strategic options priority (SOP) substances. Chapter 2 discusses what substances are toxic, estimates releases of SOP substances from the sector, and reviews Issue Table approaches to risk assessment. Chapter 3 outlines Issue Table activities. Chapter 4 screens toxic substance management options, with evaluation of options against 13 groups of criteria. Chapter 5 presents toxic substances management proposals made to the Issue Table by the electric power generation industry, environmental groups, and Environment Canada.

  2. History of EPI Suite™ and future perspectives on chemical property estimation in US Toxic Substances Control Act new chemical risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Card, Marcella L; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Lee, Wen-Hsiung; Lynch, David G; Orentas, Nerija S; Lee, Mari Titcombe; Wong, Edmund M; Boethling, Robert S

    2017-03-22

    Chemical property estimation is a key component in many industrial, academic, and regulatory activities, including in the risk assessment associated with the approximately 1000 new chemical pre-manufacture notices the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) receives annually. The US EPA evaluates fate, exposure and toxicity under the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act (amended by the 2016 Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21(st) Century Act), which does not require test data with new chemical applications. Though the submission of data is not required, the US EPA has, over the past 40 years, occasionally received chemical-specific data with pre-manufacture notices. The US EPA has been actively using this and publicly available data to develop and refine predictive computerized models, most of which are housed in EPI Suite™, to estimate chemical properties used in the risk assessment of new chemicals. The US EPA develops and uses models based on (quantitative) structure-activity relationships ([Q]SARs) to estimate critical parameters. As in any evolving field, (Q)SARs have experienced successes, suffered failures, and responded to emerging trends. Correlations of a chemical structure with its properties or biological activity were first demonstrated in the late 19(th) century and today have been encapsulated in a myriad of quantitative and qualitative SARs. The development and proliferation of the personal computer in the late 20(th) century gave rise to a quickly increasing number of property estimation models, and continually improved computing power and connectivity among researchers via the internet are enabling the development of increasingly complex models.

  3. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    SciTech Connect

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  4. K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Ch.A.; Tiepel, E.W.; Swientoniewski, M.D.; Crow, K.R.

    2008-07-01

    This paper will discuss the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. The incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (blow down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinerator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 7.95 to 17 cubic meters per hour (m3/hr) (35 to 75 gallons per minute; gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, micro-filtration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to

  5. K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect

    Swientoniewski M.D.

    2008-02-24

    This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other

  6. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c) (1)(ii)(C... with additional strips and should fit snugly around the trunk of the animal. The ends of the sleeve...

  7. [Acting out and psychoactive substances: alcohol, drugs, illicit substances].

    PubMed

    Gillet, C; Polard, E; Mauduit, N; Allain, H

    2001-01-01

    In humans, some psychotropic agents (alcohol, drugs, illicit substances) have been suggested to play a role in the occurrence of major behavioural disorders, mainly due to the suppression of psychomotor inhibition. Behavioural disinhibition is a physiological mechanism which allows humans to behave appropriately according to a given environmental situation. The behavioural disinhibition induced by either therapeutic dosage or misuse involves the loss of restraint over certain types of social behaviour and may increase the risk of auto or hetero-aggression and acting out. The increased use of psychotropic agents in recent years and the occurrence of unwanted effects are worrying and must be detected and evaluated. The objective of the present study was to establish a causal relationship between psychoactive substance use and occurrence of major behavioural disorders, such as paradoxical rage reactions and suicidal behaviour, based on a literature analysis. It consisted of reviewing reports of drug-induced violent reactions in healthy volunteers and demonstrating, where possible, a cause-effect relationship. Patients with schizophrenia and psychopathic personalities were not included in our study since psychiatric comorbidity could influence behavioural responses. Psychotropic agents included drugs, licit and illicit substances already associated with violence in the past. Many reports used the "Go/No Go test" to evaluate the disinhibiting effect of psychotropic substances; this allows the "cognitive mapping" of drugs. The results suggest that only alcohol, antidepressants, benzodiazepines and cocaïne are related to aggressive behaviour. The best known precipitant of behavioural disinhibition is alcohol, which induces aggressive behaviour. However, there are large differences between individuals, and attentional mechanisms are now recognised as being important in mediating the effects of alcohol. Suicidal tendency as an adverse antidepressant reaction is rare

  8. USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology Program, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Herbert T.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Toxic Substances Hydrology Program adapts research priorities to address the most important contamination issues facing the Nation and to identify new threats to environmental health. The Program investigates two major types of contamination problems: * Subsurface Point-Source Contamination, and * Watershed and Regional Contamination. Research objectives include developing remediation methods that use natural processes, characterizing and remediating contaminant plumes in fractured-rock aquifers, identifying new environmental contaminants, characterizing new and understudied pesticides in common pesticide-use settings, explaining mercury methylation and bioaccumulation, and developing approaches for remediating watersheds affected by active and historic mining.

  9. Persistent toxic substances: sources, fates and effects.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming H; Armour, Margaret-Ann; Naidu, Ravi; Man, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Persistent toxic substances (PTS) include the Stockholm persistent organic pollutants, like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxin/furan, etc., and organometallic compounds, like organomercury, organotin, and organolead, which all share the same characteristics of being persistent, toxic, bioaccumulative, and able to travel long distances through different media. The adverse health effects of some of the emerging chemicals like pentabromodiphenyl ether, bisphenol A, and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, which are widely used in daily appliances (e.g., TVs, computers, mobile phones, plastic baby bottles), have become a public health concern due to more evidence now available showing their adverse effects like disturbance of the endocrine system and cancer. This article is an attempt to review the current status of PTS in our environment, citing case studies in China and North America, and whether our existing drinking water treatment and wastewater treatment processes are adequate in removing them from water. Some management issues of these emerging chemicals of concern are also discussed.

  10. Management of toxic substances in our ecosystems: taming the Medusa

    SciTech Connect

    Cornaby, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    In addition to the opening and closing remarks, six papers were presented at the meeting. One paper was abstracted and indexed for EDB/ERA. The other five are entitled: Toxic Substances: Clear Science, Foggy Politics; Environmental Carcinogens: the Human Perspective; Paradigms in Multiple Toxicity; Development of New Bioassay Protocols; and, Toward Improved Control of Toxic Substances. Author and subject indexes are included. (JGB)

  11. Human health and the environment can't wait for reform: current opportunities for the federal government and states to address chemical risks under the Toxic Substances Control Act.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Expressing its concern about growing rates of cancer and other diseases, coupled with the lack of data about the effect of the thousands of chemicals used in U.S. society, in 1976 Congress enacted the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Congress intended for TSCA to shed new light on chemical risks and provide the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with a set of tools to address those risks and protect human health and the environment. In the years since TSCA's passage, the procedural hurdles and the difficult-to-meet legal standards built into the statute, along with a court decision rejecting EPA's use of its authority to ban dangerous chemicals, have impeded EPA's ability to regulate chemical use and manufacture. This Comment argues that both the EPA and state governments have the authority to act now to address the risks posed by dangerous chemicals. By utilizing certain sections of the statute in new and aggressive ways, EPA can effectively address chemical risks. Further, this Comment argues that TSCA's preemption provision affords states leeway to continue to regulate the use of chemicals within their borders. Though reform of TSCA is necessary, EPA and states can effectively protect against chemical risks in the near-term by using the full extent of their authority under the current law.

  12. PETROTOX: an aquatic toxicity model for petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Redman, Aaron D; Parkerton, Thomas F; McGrath, Joy A; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2012-11-01

    A spreadsheet model (PETROTOX) is described that predicts the aquatic toxicity of complex petroleum substances from petroleum substance composition. Substance composition is characterized by specifying mass fractions in constituent hydrocarbon blocks (HBs) based on available analytical information. The HBs are defined by their mass fractions within a defined carbon number range or boiling point interval. Physicochemical properties of the HBs are approximated by assigning representative hydrocarbons from a database of individual hydrocarbons with associated physicochemical properties. A three-phase fate model is used to simulate the distribution of each structure among the water-, air-, and oil-phase liquid in the laboratory test system. Toxicity is then computed based on the predicted aqueous concentrations and aquatic toxicity of each structure and the target lipid model. The toxicity of the complex substance is computed assuming additivity of the contribution of the individual assigned hydrocarbons. Model performance was evaluated by using direct comparisons with measured toxicity data for petroleum substances with sufficient analytical characterization to run the model. Indirect evaluations were made by comparing predicted toxicity distributions using analytical data on petroleum substances from different product categories with independent, empirical distributions of toxicity data available for the same categories. Predictions compared favorably with measured aquatic toxicity data across different petroleum substance categories. These findings demonstrate the utility of PETROTOX for assessing environmental hazards of petroleum substances given knowledge of substance composition.

  13. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... that does not require animals, are presented in the CPSC's animal testing policy set forth in 16 CFR... number of test animals. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c)(1)(ii)(C... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances....

  14. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... not require animals, are presented in the CPSC's animal testing policy set forth in 16 CFR 1500.232. A... test animals. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c)(1)(ii)(C) and (c)(2... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances....

  15. Toxic Substances Registry System Index of Material Safety Data Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The July 1997 revision of the Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored at KSC.

  16. Progress report and technology status development of an EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha/beta particulate monitor for use on the East Tennessee Technology Park Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, J.T.; Singh, S.P.N.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to modify and evaluate a commercially available EG and G Berthold LB-150 alpha-beta radionuclide particulate monitor for the high-temperature and moisture-saturation conditions of the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Site) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator stack. The monitor was originally outfitted for operation at gas temperatures of 150 F on the defunct Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) controlled air incinerator, and the objective was to widen its operating envelope. A laboratory apparatus was constructed that simulated the effects of water-saturated air at the TSCA Incinerator stack-gas temperatures, 183 F. An instrumented set of heat exchangers was constructed to then condition the gas so that the radionuclide monitor could be operated without condensation. Data were collected under the conditions of the elevated temperatures and humidities and are reported herein, and design considerations of the apparatus are provided. The heat exchangers and humidification equipment performed as designed, the Mylar film held, and the instrument suffered no ill effects. However, for reasons as yet undetermined, the sensitivity of the radionuclide detection diminishes as the gas temperature is elevated, whether the gas is humidified or not. The manufacturer has had no experience with (a) the operation of the monitor under these conditions and (b) any commercial market that might exist for an instrument that operates under these conditions. The monitor was not installed into the radiologically contaminated environment of the TSCA Incinerator stack pending resolution of this technical issue.

  17. Toxic Substances in the Environment. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Ronald J.

    Modern society is very dependent upon numerous chemical substances. Chemicals have a wide variety of uses, including drugs to prolong our lives and pesticides to control insect and weed pests. Life would be drastically different without the availability of these chemical substances but, while the benefits of chemicals should be appreciated, the…

  18. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity) is disclosed. Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. Mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics, are also disclosed.

  19. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Jan. 1993 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  20. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Oct. 1992 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  1. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Jul. 1992 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  2. S. 2637: A Bill to amend the Toxic Substances Control Act to reduce the levels of lead in the environment, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, May 16, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the Senate of the United States on May 16, 1990 to amend the Toxic Substances Control Act to reduce the levels of lead in the environment. Provisions are provided on the following: restrictions on continuing uses of certain lead-containing products; inventory of lead-containing products; product labeling; recycling of lead-acid batteries; prohibited acts; lead abatement and measurement; establishment of national centers for the prevention of lead poisoning; reporting of blood-lead levels and blood-lead laboratory reference project; update to 1988 report to Congress on childhood lead poisoning; conforming amendments; and authorization of appropriations.

  3. Analysis of the impact of the regulation of toxic substances on Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Pigg, J.

    1980-10-01

    In recent years, Congress has passed two regulatory acts, namely the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) and the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) which seek to control the manufacture, use, and disposal of hazardous chemical substances. These acts can have a significant impact on Sandia's missions and will particularly affect those organizations involved in materials development and selection. The primary purpose of this report is to describe in some detail the impact of these acts on Sandia's corporate goals and make recommendations on what our response should be. Also described in this report is the present position of Sandia with respect to these regulatory acts and the policies and actions that Sandia has taken to date in an effort to minimize their impact.

  4. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics.

  5. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  6. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) listed reflect product inventories and associated MSDSs which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry data base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of NASA Kennedy. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at NASA Kennedy. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  7. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) listed in this index reflect product inventories and associated MSDSs which have been submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry database maintained by the Base Operations Contractor at the Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this index is to provide a means to access information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  8. Toxic Substances Registry System. Index of Material Safety Data Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The October 1994 revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSD's) is presented. The listed MSD's which were submitted to the TSRS are maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  9. A Biological Model of the Effects of Toxic Substances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-29

    testing the system’s response to different classes of toxic chemicals. 14. SUBJECT TIRMS IS. NUMBER Of PAGES Bioassay, Environmental toxins , Detoxification...Painful. Irritant and Toxic Stimuli. Neurons were found to be reactive to bradykinin (Fig. 12), capsaicin (Fig. 13: a classical pain-producing substance...the same concentration of bradykinin. 41 49..9 -40.0 40. 9.9 ... ............... ......... -2.3 FIGURE 13. Stimulation with capsaicin . Stimulation is

  10. Mercury toxicity. Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Because mercury has several forms and because it produces subtle effects at chronic low-level exposures, mercury toxicity can be a difficult diagnosis to establish. Elemental mercury vapor accounts for most occupational and many accidental exposures. The main source of organic methyl mercury exposure in the general population is fish consumption. Children are at increased risk of exposure to elemental mercury vapor in the home because it tends to settle to the floor. The chemical and physical forms of mercury determine its absorption, metabolism, distribution and excretion pathways. The central nervous system and kidneys are key targets of mercury toxicity. Chelation therapy has been used successfully in treating patients who have ingested mercury salts or inhaled elemental mercury. There is no antidote for patients poisoned with organic mercury.7 references.

  11. Toxic substances from coal energy: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Shy, C M

    1979-01-01

    Environmental concerns over increased coal consumption are fully justified by the past history of coal use. Although improved technology has provided some safeguards, increased utilization will require mining practices, emission control technologies, and waste disposal procedures that are not yet fully integrated into the routine use of the coal energy system. The Committee on Health and Evnironmental Effects of Increased Coal Utilization identified six critical environmental issues which are of concern: coal mine worker health and safety, reclamation of arid lands from surface mining, the health effects of coal combustion products, toxic trace elements in coal combustion wastes, acid fallout, and global effects of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This presentation addresses the first four of these issues. PMID:540602

  12. Toxic substances from coal energy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Shy, C M

    1979-10-01

    Environmental concerns over increased coal consumption are fully justified by the past history of coal use. Although improved technology has provided some safeguards, increased utilization will require mining practices, emission control technologies, and waste disposal procedures that are not yet fully integrated into the routine use of the coal energy system. The Committee on Health and Evnironmental Effects of Increased Coal Utilization identified six critical environmental issues which are of concern: coal mine worker health and safety, reclamation of arid lands from surface mining, the health effects of coal combustion products, toxic trace elements in coal combustion wastes, acid fallout, and global effects of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This presentation addresses the first four of these issues.

  13. Toxic substances registry system. Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The January 1995 revision of the index of material safety data sheets is presented. The index of toxic substances is divided by maufacturer, tradename, stock number, and distributor. This index provides a means of accessing information including hazards, uses, and chemical composition of materials stored and used at KSC's Biomedical Operations and Research Office.

  14. Federal Register: Toxic Substances; 1,2- Dichloropropane; Testing Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA (also Agency) is issuing a final test rule under section 4(a) of the Toxic Substances (TSCA) that requires manufacturers and processors of 1,2-dichloropropane (DCP CAS Number 78-87—5) to test this chemical.

  15. Effects of toxic substances on zooplankton populations: a Great Lakes perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.S.; McNaught, D.

    1988-01-01

    The chapter discusses how toxic substances can affect zooplankton, both at the species and community level, modifying factors affecting toxicity, the effects of various environmental pertubations, including toxic substances, on Great Lakes zooplankton, and the role of zooplankton in the transport, persistence, and biomagnification of toxic substances.

  16. [The biomonitoring of toxic substances in biological samples of general population].

    PubMed

    Ibarluzea, Jesús; Aurrekoetxea, Juan José; Porta, Miquel; Sunyer, Jordi; Ballester, Ferran

    2016-11-01

    Many of the world's most developed countries have adopted biomonitoring of toxic substances in order to ascertain their levels in biological samples. These substances get into the body through different environmental exposures. Monitoring toxic substances in biological samples should allow us to ascertain their levels in vulnerable groups, assess their evolution over time, make comparisons with levels observed in other countries, identify groups at risk or with high toxic levels and promote research. The main objective of biomonitoring is to act as a policy design tool to facilitate the implementation of particular measures in various sectors: health, environmental, agricultural and livestock or food industry sectors. In Spain, information on levels of toxic substances of environmental origin is provided by specific studies on health effects from environmental sources, such as the INMA project (INfancia y Medio Ambiente [childhood and environment]). In addition, biomonitoring projects have been implemented in Catalonia and the Canary Islands, together with a national biomonitoring programme in the adult working population. However, further progress is needed to develop a system that covers the general population as well as subgroups at risk, which relies on the collaboration of the involved authorities and the participation of professionals from different sectors and citizen organisations interested in the relationship between health and the environment.

  17. [Application of toxic substances in ancient Chinese Army].

    PubMed

    Gong, C

    1995-01-01

    Application of toxic substances as a weapon began in the Spring-Autumn Period. In 677 B.C. the people of Sui dropped poisons into water to expel army from Qi State. During the period of cold weapon in addition to toxic fumigation, poisons were also spread on spears, swords and arrows. Recipes for anti-toxic arrows were recorded in Chen Yanzhi's Xiao-pin-fang of the Western Jin Dynasty, Liu Juan-zi's Gui-Yi-fang of the Liu-Song Dynasty, Jin-chuang-mi-chuan-jin-fang of the Yuan Dynasty. As a rule, toxication through natural sources were emphasized as described in Tai-bai-yin-jing of the Tang Dynasty, etc, including selection of camping sites, quality of water supply. It was also mentioned that the general of an army should despatch order for antitoxicity during travelling.

  18. Toxic-substance control for the Ohio River

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, P.; Vicory, A.; Norman, C. ); McConocha, P.

    1990-10-01

    Before the widespread application of pollution abatement technology, the Ohio River and its tributaries suffered severe water-quality degradation as a consequence of the basin's economic growth. In 1948, eight states in the Ohio Valley signed a compact pledging cooperation to restore and maintain the quality of the valley's waters. The authors outline the monitoring and control of toxic substances in the Ohio River.

  19. Development of a test system for screening toxic substances: a comparison using organic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a test system for screening toxic substances by predicting their aquatic ecosystem effects. The system studied was a static, one liter microcosm with a diverse species assemblage. The microcosm was composed of biotic inoculum, chemically defined medium and sediment. The biotic inoculum contained primary producers, grazers, carnivores and decomposers. Three different types of sediment were studied: sand, clay, and clay plus sand. Four organic chemicals: phenol, triethylene glycol (TEG), quinoline and naphthoquinone were evaluated with this test system. The toxicities of TEG, quinoline and naphthoquinone were compared for each sediment type. Toxicity was evaluated in terms of the chemical's effects on primary productivity and heterotrophic activity though other effects are also noted. Naphthoquinone concentration exhibited no correlation between ecosystem property values and therefore, could not be ranked. Phenol exhibited the greatest toxicity to net production immediately after the toxicant addition. Quinoline was most toxic to net production over the longer time scale. TEG exhibited the least toxicity to net production, however, TEG exhibited higher toxicity to heterotrophic activity than either quinoline or phenol. Although the type of sediment used in the microcosms did not change the relative toxicities of the chemicals, the microcosms with clay sediment always were observed to exhibit lower net production and higher variability.

  20. Rice seed toxicity tests for organic and inorganic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.

    1994-01-01

    Plant seed toxicity tests can be used to evaluate hazardous waste sites and to assess toxicity of complex effluents and industrial chemicals. Conventional plant seed toxicity tests are performed using culture dishes containing filter paper. Some reports indicate that filter papers might interfere with the toxicity of inorganic substances. In this study, a plastic seed tray was used. Rice was used as the test species. A comparison of results in the literature and this study revealed that variation of test species, methods, exposure duration, and other factors may affect the test results. The results of this study showed that the order of decreasing toxicity of metal ions was Cu>Ag>Ni>Cd>Cr(VI)>Pb>Zn>Mn>NaF for rice. The test results were similar to those reported in the literature for lettuce Ag>Ni>Cd,Cu>Cr (VI)>Zn>Mn, millet Cu,Ni>Cd>Cr(VI)>Zn>Mn, and ryegrass Cu>Ni>Mn>>Pb>Cd>Zn> Al>Hg>Cr>Fe. The order of decreasing toxicity of organic herbicides was paraquat, 2,4-D>>glyphosate>bromacil.

  1. Abuse deterrent formulations and the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Frank L

    2006-06-01

    The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) has reduced the diversion of controlled substances at the manufacturing and distribution levels. Recent increased diversion has occurred at the retail level. Levels of diversion and abuse of controlled substances with similar abuse potential and therapeutic indications often parallel availability for medical use, while rates of diversion and abuse may be influenced by factors related to specific products, including their formulations and risk management plans. Abuse deterrent formulations may reduce abuse and attendant adverse health consequences even if the products are diverted. Their development should consider how, to what extent and by whom products containing the targeted substance are abused. It should take into consideration all potential types of abuse including "as is", multiple doses, alternate routes of administration, physical or chemical separation of the active ingredient, compromised extended release mechanisms and abuse in combination with other substances. Industry incentives for developing abuse-resistant formulations include enhanced corporate image and potentially less restrictive scheduling or risk management plans. Scheduling is substance specific, but the CSA includes products/formulations that are differentially scheduled. Issues to be considered for differential scheduling under the CSA include: (1) whether there is legal authority to do so; (2) application of standard scheduling criteria to individual products; (3) product specific data for "eight factor analyses"; (4) development of predictive data and standards accepted by the scientific and regulatory communities; (5) use of predictive data or post marketing surveillance data; (6) international treaty obligations. These issues must be addressed before differential scheduling can be considered.

  2. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) listed in this index reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substances Registry database maintained by the Base Operations Contractor at the Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this index is to provide KSC government, contractor, and tenant organizations a means to access information on the hazards associated with these chemicals. The Toxic Substance Registry Service (TSRS) was established to manage information dealing with the storage and use of toxic and otherwise hazardous materials at KSC. As a part of this service, the BOC Environmental Health Services maintains a central repository of MSDS's which were provided to TSRS. The data on the TSRS are obtained from NASA, contractor, and tenant organizations who use or store hazardous materials at KSC. It is the responsibility of these organizations to conduct inventories, obtain MSDS's, distribute Hazard Communication information to their employees, and otherwise implement compliance with appropriate Federal, State, and NASA Hazard Communication and Worker Right-to-Know regulations and policies.

  3. [Hospital response and medical management in toxic chemical substance disasters].

    PubMed

    Yeh, I-Jeng; Lin, Tzeng-Jih

    2010-06-01

    A hazardous material is defined as any item or agent which has the potential to cause harm to humans, animals, or the environment, either by itself or through interaction with other factors. Toxic chemical substance events are increasingly common events in our modern world. The numerous variables and special equipment involved make effective response to toxic chemical events an especially critical test of hospital emergency response and patient rescue mechanisms. Inadequacies in management could result in disaster - even when only a simple event and minimal error are involved. This article introduces the general medical management algorithm for toxic chemical substance injury and the hospital incident command systems (HICS) developed and currently used by Taiwanese hospitals. Important steps and frequent mistakes made during medical management procedures are further described. The goal of medical care response and emergency units is to prevent catastrophic disasters in the emergency room and their subsequent results. This article further emphasizes correct patient management not only in terms of medical unit effort, but also in terms of cooperation between various relevant organizations including factory-based industrial health and safety systems, multi-factory union defense systems, coordination centers, fire protection and disaster rescue systems, the Environmental Protection Administration and national defense system in order to achieve the most appropriate management. Such coordination, in particular, requires reinforcement in order to ensure readiness for future response needs.

  4. Reducing groundwater pollution by toxic substances: Procedures and policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterstone, Marvin

    1987-11-01

    One major source of water-related health problems is the improper disposal of toxic substances in the environment. Toxic materials leaching from unregulated and unlined pits, ponds, lagoons, and landfills have created a widespread environmental nightmare in the United States and many other parts of the world. At present, there are two major and interrelated components of this problem in the United States. The first is the issue of cleaning up abandoned disposal sites that pose actual or potential threats to water supplies. The second aspect of the problem concerns the necessity of siting proper management, treatment, or disposal facilities in the future. Priorities must be set to allow efficient, effective, and equitable allocation of the scarce resources that are available for accomplishing these tasks. This article examines a number of the issues involved in setting these priorities, and presents the results obtained from a study of risk estimation and evaluation in the context of groundwater contamination by toxic substances. The article introduces a new concept of risk estimation, which is shown to produce more accurate and credible risk analyses. Finally, the relationships between risk credibility and public perceptions of procedural fairness and equity are examined as these factors bear on the institutional aspects of implementing policies for site cleanup and/or facility siting.

  5. Monitoring of toxic substances in the Hong Kong marine environment.

    PubMed

    Kueh, C S W; Lam, J Y C

    2008-01-01

    A long-term programme for monitoring toxic substances in the marine environment was established in Hong Kong in 2004, focusing on chemicals of potential ecological and health concern. The programme ran on 3-year cycles, with the first two years monitoring marine water, sediment, biota, and the third year monitoring pollution sources. Twenty-four priority chemicals were measured, including dioxins/furans, dioxin-like PCBs, total PCBs, PAHs, DDTs, HCHs, TBTs, phenol, nonylphenol (NP), NP ethoxylates, PBDEs and metals. Results from the first three years of monitoring indicate that toxic substances in the Hong Kong marine environment were within the range reported for the coastal waters in China and other regions, but generally lower than in the Pearl River Estuary. The levels met the standards for protecting aquatic life and human consumption. Sewage effluent, stormwater and river water were possible sources of phenolic compounds; whereas air deposition or regional pollution, rather than local discharges, may contribute to the dioxins/furans, PAHs and PCBs found in the marine environment.

  6. Sequential assessment via daphnia and zebrafish for systematic toxicity screening of heterogeneous substances.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gun Hyuk; Park, Chang-Beom; Kang, Benedict J; Kim, Young Jun; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2016-09-01

    Environment and organisms are persistently exposed by a mixture of various substances. However, the current evaluation method is mostly based on an individual substance's toxicity. A systematic toxicity evaluation of heterogeneous substances needs to be established. To demonstrate toxicity assessment of mixture, we chose a group of three typical ingredients in cosmetic sunscreen products that frequently enters ecosystems: benzophenone-3 (BP-3), ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC), and titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2 NP). We first determined a range of nominal toxic concentration of each ingredient or substance using Daphnia magna, and then for the subsequent organismal level phenotypic assessment, chose the wild-type zebrafish embryos. Any phenotype change, such as body deformation, led to further examinations on the specific organs of transgenic zebrafish embryos. Based on the systematic toxicity assessments of the heterogeneous substances, we offer a sequential environmental toxicity assessment protocol that starts off by utilizing Daphnia magna to determine a nominal concentration range of each substance and finishes by utilizing the zebrafish embryos to detect defects on the embryos caused by the heterogeneous substances. The protocol showed additive toxic effects of the mixtures. We propose a sequential environmental toxicity assessment protocol for the systematic toxicity screening of heterogeneous substances from Daphnia magna to zebrafish embryo in-vivo models.

  7. Toxic Substances Registry System: Index of Material Safety Data Sheets. Volume 1; Manufacturer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The April 1998 revision of the Index of Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored at KSC.

  8. Toxic Substances Registry System: Index of Material Safety Data Sheets. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The October 1997 revision of the Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on the hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored and used at KSC.

  9. Toxic Substances Registry System: Index of Material Safety Data Sheets. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The January 1998 revision of the Index of Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored at KSC.

  10. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Removal of [123I]Ioflupane From Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-11

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes [123I]ioflupane from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act. This action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act which requires that such actions be made on the record after an opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, [123I]ioflupane was, by definition, a schedule II controlled substance because it is derived from cocaine via ecgonine, both of which are schedule II controlled substances. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle [123I]ioflupane.

  11. Examining the effect of the Life Enhancement Treatment for Substance Use (LETS ACT) on residential substance abuse treatment retention.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Gorka, Stephanie M; MacPherson, Laura; Hopko, Derek R; Blanco, Carlos; Lejuez, C W; Daughters, Stacey B

    2011-06-01

    Effective, parsimonious behavioral interventions that target reinforcement are needed for substance users with depression to improve mood as well as treatment retention. The Life Enhancement Treatment for Substance Use (LETS ACT; Daughters et al., 2008) is a behavioral activation-based approach tailored to increase levels of positive reinforcement among depressed substance users while in substance abuse treatment. The current study tested the efficacy of LETS ACT compared to a contact-time matched control condition, supportive counseling (SC), examining effects on depressed mood, substance abuse treatment retention, and behavioral activation outcomes. Fifty-eight adult substance users in residential substance abuse treatment presenting with depressive symptoms (BDI≥12) were randomly assigned to LETS ACT or SC. Assessments were administered at pre- and post-treatment and included assessment of DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses, depression severity, treatment motivation, overall activation, environmental reward, and substance abuse treatment retention. Patients in LETS ACT had significantly higher rates of substance abuse treatment retention and significantly greater increases in activation on the Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) compared to those in SC. Both groups had decreased depression severity at post-treatment, although the group by time interaction was not significant. This study was the first to compare LETS ACT to a contact-time matched control treatment to evaluate effects on substance abuse treatment retention and two distinct measures of behavioral activation: overall activation and environmental reward. Findings suggest preliminary support for the feasibility, tolerability, and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation-based protocol that may be particularly useful to improve substance abuse treatment retention.

  12. 16 CFR 1500.129 - Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Poison Act. 1500.129 Section 1500.129 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.129 Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act. The Commission finds that for those substances covered by the Federal Caustic Poison Act (44 Stat. 1406), the requirements of section 2(p)(1)...

  13. 16 CFR 1500.129 - Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Poison Act. 1500.129 Section 1500.129 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.129 Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act. The Commission finds that for those substances covered by the Federal Caustic Poison Act (44 Stat. 1406), the requirements of section 2(p)(1)...

  14. 16 CFR 1500.129 - Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Poison Act. 1500.129 Section 1500.129 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.129 Substances named in the Federal Caustic Poison Act. The Commission finds that for those substances covered by the Federal Caustic Poison Act (44 Stat. 1406), the requirements of section 2(p)(1)...

  15. Toxic substances form coal combustion--a co prehemsice assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.

    1997-04-01

    The Clean Coal Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on emission of these pollutants from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling their formation and partition will be needed. A new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) has been developed by a broad consortium to be useful to regulators and utility planners. During the last quarter coal analysis was completed on the final program coal, from the Wyodak Seam of the Powder River Basin, Combustion testing continued, including data collected on the self-sustained combustor. Efforts were directed to identify the governing mechanisms for trace element vaporization from the program coals. Mercury speciation and measurements were continued. Review of the existing trace element and organics emission literature was completed. And, model development was begun.

  16. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION: A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Senior; T. Panagiotou; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; F.E. Huggins; G.P Huffman; N. Yap; M.R. Ames; I.Olmez; T. Zeng; A.F. Sarofim; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; J.J. Helble

    1998-07-16

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (W) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO{sub x} combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from the submission of the draft Phase 1 Final Report through the end of June, 1998. During this period two of the three Phase 2 coals were procured and pulverized samples were distributed to team members. Analysis of Phase 1 X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data, particularly of mercury in sorbent samples, continued. An improved method for identifying mercury compounds on sorbents was developed, leading to a clearer understanding of forms of mercury in char and sorbents exposed to flue gas. Additional analysis of Phase 1 large scale combustion data was performed to investigate mechanistic information related to the fate of the radionuclides Cs, Th, and Co. Modeling work for this period was focused on building and testing a sub-model for vaporization

  17. Evaluating the male and female reproductive toxicity of high-boiling petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Murray, F Jay; Gray, Thomas M; Roberts, Linda G; Roth, Randy N; Nicolich, Mark J; Simpson, Barry J

    2013-11-01

    To meet the EPA HPV Chemical Challenge Program requirement for reproductive toxicity data on sponsored high-boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), an analysis was conducted using the results of 39 repeat-dose and 59 developmental rat dermal toxicity studies on HBPS samples spanning the boiling range of the sponsored substances, and the results of three one-generation reproductive toxicity studies on two samples spanning the concentration range of polycyclic aromatic compounds of sponsored substances. The analysis found little evidence of male or female reproductive tract toxicity based on histopathology, reproductive organ weight, and sperm parameters, and no evidence of effects on fertility, while significant developmental toxicity and/or systemic repeat-dose toxicity were frequently observed. Among 14 samples of HBPS tested in both repeat-dose toxicity and developmental toxicity studies, there were no studies in which an adverse reproductive tract finding occurred at a dose lower than that producing developmental toxicity or other adverse effects in repeat-dose toxicity studies. The current analysis supports the hypothesis that effects in developmental and/or repeat-dose toxicity studies of HBPS occur at doses lower than those that might affect fertility in rat one-generation reproductive studies. When adequate developmental and repeat-dose toxicity studies are available, a reproductive toxicity study of HBPS appears unnecessary.

  18. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Senior, C.L.; Panagiotou, T.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Yap, N.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Seames, W.; Ames, M.R.; Sarofim, A.F.; Lighty, J.; Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.; Palmer, C.A.; Mroczkowsky, S.J.; Helble, J.J.; Mamani-Paco, R.

    1999-07-30

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the period from 1 April 1999 to 30 June 1999. During this quarter low temperature ashing and elemental analysis of the three Phase II coals were completed. Results from MIT and USGS are comparable. Plans were made for measurements of loss of trace elements during devolatilization and for single particle combustion studies at the University of Utah. The iodated charcoal trap was tested on coal combustion flue gas and was shown to collect both Hg and Se in from the vapor phase with 100% efficiency. Data from the University of Arizona self-sustained combustor were analyzed from the combustion of three coals: Ohio, Wyodak and Illinois No. 6. Ash size distributions and enrichment factors for selected trace elements were calculated. The correlation between the concentration of the more volatile trace elements in the ash and the

  19. Layman's guide to the Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    Contents include: introduction; scope of the law; testing of chemicals; premanufacture and significant new use notifications; control of hazardous chemicals; record keeping and reporting; relationship to other federal laws; research, monitoring, and data systems; exports and imports; disclosure of data; effect on state laws; state programs; judicial review; actions by citizens; employee protection; civil and criminal penalties; enforcement; TSCA assistance office; further information; and EPA regional offices.

  20. Toxic substances: Effects on fish. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed upon using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Senior; T. Panagiotou; F.E. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F Sarofim; J. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowsky; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco

    1999-11-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). This report covers the reporting period from 1 July 1999 to 30 September 1999. During this period the MIT INAA procedures were revised to improve the quality of the analytical results. Two steps have been taken to reduce the analytical errors. A new nitric acid leaching procedure, modified from ASTM procedure D2492, section 7.3.1 for determination of pyritic sulfur, was developed by USGS and validated. To date, analytical results have been returned for all but the last complete round of the four-step leaching procedure. USGS analysts in Denver have halted development of the cold vapor atomic fluorescence technique for mercury analysis procedure in favor of a new direct analyzer for Hg that the USGS is in the process of acquiring. Since early June, emphasis at USGS has been placed on microanalysis of clay minerals in project coals in preparation

  2. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION-A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Senior; F. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Shah; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F. Sarofim; S. Swenson; J.S. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowski; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco; R. Sterling; G. Dunham; S. Miller

    2001-06-30

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). The work discussed in this report covers the Phase II program. Five coals were studied (three in Phase I and two new ones in Phase II). In this work UK has used XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopies to characterize elements in project coals. For coals, the principal use was to supply direct information about certain hazardous and other key elements (iron) to complement the more complete indirect investigation of elemental modes of occurrence being carried out by colleagues at USGS. Iterative selective leaching using ammonium acetate, HCl, HF, and HNO3, used in conjunction with mineral identification/quantification, and microanalysis of individual mineral grains, has allowed USGS to delineate modes of occurrence for 44 elements. The Phase II coals show rank-dependent systematic differences in trace-element modes of occurrence. The work at UU

  3. Toxicity of binary mixtures of metals and pyrethroid insecticides to Daphnia magna Straus. Implications for multi-substance risks assessment.

    PubMed

    Barata, Carlos; Baird, D J; Nogueira, A J A; Soares, A M V M; Riva, M C

    2006-06-10

    Two different concepts, termed concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA), describe general relationships between the effects of single substances and their corresponding mixtures allowing calculation of an expected mixture toxicity on the basis of known toxicities of the mixture components. Both concepts are limited to cases in which all substances in a mixture influence the same experimental endpoint, and are usually tested against a "fixed ratio design" where the mixture ratio is kept constant throughout the studies and the overall concentration of the mixture is systematically varied. With this design, interaction among toxic components across different mixture ratios and endpoints (i.e. lethal versus sublethal) is not assessed. In this study lethal and sublethal (feeding) responses of Daphnia magna individuals to single and binary combinations of similarly and dissimilarly acting chemicals including the metals (cadmium, copper) and the pyrethroid insecticides (lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin) were assayed using a composite experimental design to test for interactions among toxic components across mixture effect levels, mixture ratios, lethal and sublethal toxic effects. To account for inter-experiment response variability, in each binary mixture toxicity assay the toxicity of the individual mixture constituents was also assessed. Model adequacy was then evaluated comparing the slopes and elevations of predicted versus observed mixture toxicity curves with those estimated for the individual components. Model predictive abilities changed across endpoints. The IA concept was able to predict accurately mixture toxicities of dissimilarly acting chemicals for lethal responses, whereas the CA concept did so in three out of four pairings for feeding response, irrespective of the chemical mode of action. Interaction effects across mixture effect levels, evidenced by crossing slopes, were only observed for the binary mixture Cd and Cu for lethal effects

  4. Identification of toxic substances in United Kingdom estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.V.; Thain, J.E.; Waldock, M.J.

    1999-03-01

    The organic load of bulk water samples, collected from five industrially impacted estuaries, was extracted using solid-phase extraction. Where toxicity was demonstrated using a Tisbe battagliai bioassay, a toxicity directed fractionation scheme was applied to isolate causal compounds. To reduce the complexity of the extracts toxicity profiles were obtained following solid-phase fractionation and reverse-phase HPLC. Candidate toxic contaminants were identified by GC-MS. All procedures were evaluated with a series of reference compounds of widely differing polarity. The method was successful in identifying a number of compounds, which traditionally have not been selected for inclusion in monitoring programs, as the probable cause of detrimental environmental effect. The results suggest that chlorinated phenols are a major contributor to poor water quality in the lower reaches of the river Tyne and alkylphenol surfactant metabolites in the river Tees. Other compounds, as yet unidentified, also contribute to poor water quality. It is suggested that the identified compounds should now be surveyed more widely and considered for inclusion in future monitoring programs.

  5. Characterization of Combinatorial Effects of Toxic Substances by Cell Cultivation in Micro Segmented Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Kürsten, D.; Funfak, A.; Schneider, S.; Köhler, J. M.

    This chapter reviews the application of micro segmented flow for the screening of toxic effects on bacteria, eukaryotic microorganisms, human cells and multicellular systems. Besides, the determination of complete dose/response functions of toxic substances with a minimum of cells and chemicals, it is reviewed how two- and multi-dimensional concentration spaces can be screened in order to evaluate combinatorial effects of chemicals on cells. The challenge for the development of new and miniaturized methods is derived from the increase of the number of different used substances in technique, agriculture and medicine, from the increasing release of new substances and nanomaterials into our environment and from the improvement of the insight of toxicity of natural substances and the interferences between different substances resulting in toxic effects on different organisms, cells and tissues. The application of two-dimensional toxicological screenings on selected examples of effector combinations is described. Examples for the detection of an independent, an additive and a synergistic interference between two substances are given. In addition, it is shown that the screening for toxicological effects in complete two-dimensional concentration spaces allows the detection of complex response behaviour—for example, the formation of tolerances and stimulation peaks—which thereby can be characterized. The characterization of interference of toxic organic substances with silver nanoparticles is reported as an example for the potential of micro segmented-flow technique for evaluating the toxicological impact of new materials. Finally, it is demonstrated that the technique can be applied for different organisms like simple bacteria, single cell alga such as Chlorella vulgaris and multicellular systems up to the development of complete organisms beginning from eggs.

  6. Toxic substances: Effects on fish. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed upon using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  7. The affordable care act and treatment for "substance use disorders:" implications of ending segregated behavioral healthcare.

    PubMed

    McLellan, A Thomas; Woodworth, Abigail Mason

    2014-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act (2010) and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (2008) are expected to transform substance abuse prevention and treatment in the United States. In this paper, we outline the potential disruption to the existing specialty care delivery system, and describe the opportunities for treatment providers and health services researchers.

  8. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    A KOLKER; AF SAROFIM; CA PALMER; FE HUGGINS; GP HUFFMAN; J LIGHTY; JJ HELBLE; JOL WENDT; MR AMES; N YAP; R FINKELMAN; R. MAMANI-PACO; SJ MROCZKOWSKY; T PANAGIOTOU; W SEAMES

    1999-01-28

    The technical objectives of this project are: (a) To identify the effect of the mode-of-occurrence of toxic elements in coal on the partitioning of these elements among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash during the combustion of pulverized coal, (b) To identify the mechanisms governing the post-vaporization interaction of toxic elements and major minerals or unburnt char, (c) To determine the effect of combustion environment (i.e., fuel rich or fuel lean) on the partitioning of trace elements among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash during the combustion of pulverized coal, (d) To model the partitioning of toxic elements among various chemical species in the vapor phase and between the vapor phase and complex aluminosilicate melts, (e) To develop the new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM), applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO{sub x} combustion systems, and new power generation plants. A description of the work plan for accomplishing these objectives is presented in Section 2.1 of this report. The work discussed in this report covers the reporting period from 1 October 1998 to 31 December 1998. During this quarter, basic coal testing at USGS was completed. Total sulfur contents range from 0.43 wt-% in the Wyodak to 2.68 wt-% in the Ohio sample. In the North Dakota and Ohio samples, about half of the total sulfur is pyritic and half is organic. The North Dakota sample also contains a minor amount of sulfate, consistent with the presence of barite in this sample. In the Wyodak sample, the majority of the sulfur is organic. Preliminary mineralogy of the three Phase II coals was determined by SEM/EDX. The Ohio coal contains all of the five most common major phases: quartz, illitic clay, kaolinitic clay, pyrite and calcite. Based on this preliminary work, the North Dakota sample appears to lack both kaolinite and calcite, and the Wyodak sample appears to lack calcite. Subsequent SEM work will attempt to reconfirm

  9. Boar spermatozoa as a biosensor for detecting toxic substances in indoor dust and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M A; Mikkola, R; Rasimus, S; Hoornstra, D; Salin, P; Rahkila, R; Heikkinen, M; Mattila, S; Peltola, J; Kalso, S; Salkinoja-Salonen, M

    2010-10-01

    The presence, quantity and origins of potentially toxic airborne substances were searched in moisture damaged indoor environments, where building related ill health symptoms were suspected and reference sites with no health complaints. Boar spermatozoa were used as the toxicity sensor. Indoor aerosols and dusts were collected from kindergartens, schools, offices and residences (n=25) by electrostatic filtering, vacuuming, wiping from elevated surfaces and from the interior of personal computers. Toxicity was measured from the ethanol or methanol extracts of the dusts and aerosols. EC(50) was expressed as the lowest concentration of the airborne substance that inhibited motility of >50% of the exposed sperm cells compared to vehicle control, within 30 min, 1 day or 3-4 days of exposure. Remarkably toxic aerosols (EC(50) Toxic microbial cultures were obtained from subsamples of the toxic aerosols/dusts. From these cereulide, amylosin, valinomycin and a novel indoor toxin, stephacidin B were identified and toxicities measured. Airborn dispersal of valinomycin from Streptomyces griseus cultures was evaluated using a flow-through chamber. Significant amounts of valinomycin (LC-MS assay) and toxicity (boar sperm motility assay) were carried by air and were after 14 days mainly recovered from the interior surfaces of the flow chamber.

  10. Physiological effects of toxic substances on wildlife species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haseltine, S.D.; Kacmar, Peter; Legath, J.

    1983-01-01

    Study of the physiological effects of contaminants on wildlife species has expanded as more sophisticated medical techniques are adapted to wildlife and as the mode of action of new classes of pesticides increase the number of organ systems which may be sublethally or lethally impacted. This paper summarizes some of the latest data published on toxicant affects on organ systems of warm-blooded vertebrates. Reporting on effects with enzyme systems concentrates on cholinesterase in blood and plasma after sublethal and lethal exposure to organophosphate end carbamate pesticides, but also covers, recent work with Na+, k+-ATPases, AST, AAT, and AL.AD. A discussion of recent work on hormones, biogenlc amines, and other compounds which indicate alteration of specific organ systems, is followed by examples of histopathological lesions associated both pathognomically and non-specifically with widely-used and/or severely toxic contaminants. All these specific effects and lesions are then discussed in terms of their potential for use diagnostically in field problems and their practical and possible impact on wildlife populations.

  11. 40 CFR 1.43 - Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Office of Prevention, Pesticides and... STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.43 Office of Prevention, Pesticides and... matters pertaining to assessment and regulation of pesticides and toxic substances and is responsible...

  12. 40 CFR 1.43 - Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Toxic Substances. 1.43 Section 1.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL... the development of strategic plans for the control of the national environmental pesticide situation... pesticides; special review of pesticides suspected of posing unreasonable risks to human health or...

  13. 40 CFR 1.43 - Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Toxic Substances. 1.43 Section 1.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL... the development of strategic plans for the control of the national environmental pesticide situation... pesticides; special review of pesticides suspected of posing unreasonable risks to human health or...

  14. Toxic metals in WEEE: characterization and substance flow analysis in waste treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Masahiro; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Terazono, Atsushi

    2013-10-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has received extensive attention as a secondary source of metals. Because WEEE also contains toxic substances such as heavy metals, appropriate management of these substances is important in the recycling and treatment of WEEE. As a basis for discussion toward better management of WEEE, this study characterizes various types of WEEE in terms of toxic metal contents. The fate of various metals contained in WEEE, including toxic metals, was also investigated in actual waste treatment processes. Cathode-ray tube televisions showed the highest concentration and the largest total amount of toxic metals such as Ba, Pb, and Sb, so appropriate recycling and disposal of these televisions would greatly contribute to better management of toxic metals in WEEE. A future challenge is the management of toxic metals in mid-sized items such as audio/visual and ICT equipment because even though the concentrations were not high in these items, the total amount of toxic metals contained in them is not negligible. In the case of Japan, such mid-sized WEEE items as well as small electronic items are subject to municipal solid waste treatment. A case study showed that a landfill was the main destination of toxic metals contained in those items in the current treatment systems. The case study also showed that changes in the flows of toxic metals will occur when treatment processes are modified to emphasize resource recovery. Because the flow changes might lead to an increase in the amount of toxic metals released to the environment, the flows of toxic metals and the materials targeted for resource recovery should be considered simultaneously.

  15. Reconnaissance of toxic substances in the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Kendall R.

    1984-01-01

    A reconnaissance of toxic substances in the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah, was made during July, 1980 to October, 1982 as part of a larger study of the river that included studies of sanitary quality, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity. Samples for toxic substances were collected at five sites on the Jordan River, at three major tributaries, and at six storm drains. The toxic substance that most frequently exceeded State standards was total mercury. About 78 percent of the 138 samples for total mercury exceeded the State standard of 0.05 microgram per liter. Other toxic substances that exceeded State standards were: Ammonia-18 percent of the samples analyzed, cadmium--9 percent, copper-9 percent, zinc--6 percent, and lead--2 percent. One sample for cyanide and one for iron also exceeded State standards. The diversity of toxic substances with concentrations large enough to cause them to be problems increased from the upstream sampling site at the Jordan Narrows to the next two downstream sites at 9000 South and 5800 South Streets. Concentrations of trace elements in stream-bottom materials also increased in a downstream direction. Substantial increases first were observed at 5800 South Street, and they were sustained throughout the downstream study area. Iron is transported in the greatest quantity of all the trace elements studied, with a mean load of 110 pounds per day. Notable loads of barium, boron, lead , and zinc also are transported by the river. DDD, DDE, DDT, dieldrin, heptachlor, methoxychlor, PCB, and 2,4-D were detected in bottom materials; and DDE, Silvex, and 2,4-D were detected in water samples. Of 112 organic compounds in the Environmental Protection Agency 's priority pollutant list, only chloroform was detected in the storm drains that empty into the Joran River. Several metals and phenol also were detected in the samples for priority pollutants. (USGS)

  16. Nanoscale Substances on the TSCA Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is to help the regulated community comply with the requirements of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Section 5 Premanufacturing Notice (PMN) Program for nanoscale chemical substances.

  17. Acute toxicity of selected crude and refined shale oil derived and petroleum-derived substances

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.H.; Haschek, W.M.; Witschi, H.

    1980-01-01

    General information was obtained on the toxicity of selected samples of crude Paraho shale oil and some of its derivatives, some crude petroleums, and 3 refined petroleum products. Five tests were used to determine the acute toxicity of these substances: acute lethality in mice following oral or intraperitoneal administration of a single dose; acute dermal toxicity of a single dose in rats; delayed-type allergic contact hypersensitivity in guinea pigs; primary eye irritation and primary skin irritation of a single dose in rabbits. Histopathologic changes induced in mice following intraperitoneal injection of a single large dose of crude shale oil and two of its hydrotreated derivatives were examined. Studies also have been initiated to examine the tumor inducing potential of selected samples. The test system used was the mouse lung adenoma bioassay. The present report describes our findings and shows that all compounds tested have very low or no acute toxic effects in laboratory animals.

  18. 76 FR 17867 - Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) publishes a list of... Disease Registry (ATSDR), Office of Noncommunicable Diseases, Injury, and Environmental Health...

  19. National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting Act (NASPER): balancing substance abuse and medical necessity.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Brown, Keith R; Singh, Vijay

    2002-07-01

    The National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting Act, or NASPER, is a bill proposed by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians to provide and improve patient access with quality care, and protect patients and physicians from deleterious effects of controlled substance misuse, abuse and trafficking. Controlled prescription drugs, including narcotic analgesics, anxiolytics, anti-depressants, stimulants, and sedative-hypnotics play a significant and legitimate role in interventional pain management practices in managing chronic pain and related disorders. Based on the 1997 household survey on drug abuse it is estimated that 76.9 million Americans had used an illicit drug at least once in their life. In 1997, 4.2 million people used analgesics, 2.1 million used tranquillizers, and an additional 2.3 million people used various other drugs, including sedatives, tranquillizers, etc. The non-medical use of prescription drugs exceeds that of all illicit substances except for marijuana and hashish. The report on epidemiology trends in drug abuse, based on community epidemiology work group analysis showed continued increase of abuse of prescription drugs in urban, suburban, and rural areas. The most commonly abused drugs include oxycodone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, morphine, codeine, clonazepam, alprazolam, lorazepam, diazepam and carisoprodol. The diversion of prescription controlled substances to illicit channels is a public health and safety issue. This review describes the role of controlled substances in chronic pain management, prevalence and economic impact of controlled substance abuse, prescription accountability, effectiveness of prescription monitoring programs, and rationale for national controlled substance electronic reporting system.

  20. Toxic Effect of a Marine Bacterium on Aquatic Organisms and Its Algicidal Substances against Phaeocystis globosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiuchan; Chen, Lina; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Ling; Yin, Pinghe; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms have caused enormous damage to the marine ecosystem and the coastal economy in China. In this paper, a bacterial strain B1, which had strong algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa, was isolated from the coastal waters of Zhuhai in China. The strain B1 was identified as Bacillus sp. on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequence and morphological characteristics. To evaluate the ecological safety of the algicidal substances produced by strain B1, their toxic effects on marine organisms were tested. Results showed that there were no adverse effects observed in the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, Chaetoceros muelleri, and Isochrystis galbana after exposure to the algicidal substances at a concentration of 1.0% (v/v) for 96 h. The 48h LC50 values for Brachionus plicatilis, Moina mongolica Daday and Paralichthys olivaceus were 5.7, 9.0 and 12.1% (v/v), respectively. Subsequently, the algicidal substances from strain B1 culture were isolated and purified by silica gel column, Sephadex G-15 column and high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and PeakView Software, the purified substances were identified as prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine. Algicidal mechanism indicated that prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine inhibited the growth of P. globosa by disrupting the antioxidant systems. In the acute toxicity assessment using M. mongolica, 24h LC50 values of prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine were 7.0 and 13.8 g/L, respectively. The active substances produced by strain B1 can be considered as ecologically and environmentally biological agents for controlling harmful algal blooms. PMID:25646807

  1. Multiple inorganic toxic substances contaminating the groundwater of Myingyan Township, Myanmar: arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, and uranium.

    PubMed

    Bacquart, Thomas; Frisbie, Seth; Mitchell, Erika; Grigg, Laurie; Cole, Christopher; Small, Colleen; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-06-01

    In South Asia, the technological and societal shift from drinking surface water to groundwater has resulted in a great reduction of acute diseases due to water borne pathogens. However, arsenic and other naturally occurring inorganic toxic substances present in groundwater in the region have been linked to a variety of chronic diseases, including cancers, heart disease, and neurological problems. Due to the highly specific symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning, arsenic was the first inorganic toxic substance to be noticed at unsafe levels in the groundwater of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. Subsequently, other inorganic toxic substances, including manganese, uranium, and fluoride have been found at unsafe levels in groundwater in South Asia. While numerous drinking water wells throughout Myanmar have been tested for arsenic, relatively little is known about the concentrations of other inorganic toxic substances in Myanmar groundwater. In this study, we analyzed samples from 18 drinking water wells (12 in Myingyan City and 6 in nearby Tha Pyay Thar Village) and 2 locations in the Ayeyarwaddy River for arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, selenium, thallium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc. Concentrations of arsenic, manganese, fluoride, iron, or uranium exceeded health-based reference values in most wells. In addition, any given well usually contained more than one toxic substance at unsafe concentrations. While water testing and well sharing could reduce health risks, none of the wells sampled provide water that is entirely safe with respect to inorganic toxic substances. It is imperative that users of these wells, and users of other wells that have not been tested for multiple inorganic toxic substances throughout the region, be informed of the need for drinking water testing and the health consequences of drinking water contaminated with inorganic toxic

  2. Research on the 2nd generation biofuel BIOXDIESEL in aspects of emission of toxic substances in exhaust gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struś, M. S.; Poprawski, W.; Rewolte, M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents results of research of Diesel engines emission of toxic substances in exhaust gases fuelled with a second generation biofuel BIOXDIESEL, which is a blend of Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters obtained from waste resources such waste vegetable and animal fats, bioethanol and standard Diesel fuel. Presented results are very promising, showing that the emission of toxic substances in exhaust gases are significantly reduced when fuelling with BIOXDIESEL fuel in comparison with standard Diesel fuel.

  3. Plan of study for selected toxic substances in the Calcasieu River, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Demcheck, D.K.; Demas, C.R.; Curwick, P.B.

    1990-01-01

    In 1984 the US Geological Survey established the Toxic Substances Hydrology, Surface-Water Contamination Program. As part of this program, an investigation of the lower Calcasieu River, Louisiana, began in 1985 to define the magnitude and distribution of selected toxic substances in the Calcasieu River and the physical and chemical processes that govern their fate. The major elements of the investigation are: (1) a compilation of previous studies of the Calcasieu River by various Federal, State, and local agencies; (2) reconnaissance surveys of chemical constituents in the water column and bottom material; (3) a remobilization study; (4) a study of microbial degradation; (5) studies of the presence of synthetic organic compounds in the tissues of fish, clams, and crabs; (6) volatilization studies of compounds such as bromoform and chloroform; (7) sediment-water interface studies; and (8) the development of a streamflow model to provide a hydrologic framework for water quality analysis. Preliminary results were used to select for intensive study of the following substances in water, bottom material, and biota: ammonia, nitrite plus nitrate, chromium, iron, mercury, bromoform, chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorobutadiene, naphthalene, octachloronaphthalene, benzopyrene, and benzoperylene. 11 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Do toxic substances pose a threat to rehabilitation of lake trout in the Great Lakes? A review of the literature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zint, Michaela T.; Taylor, William W.; Carl, Leon; Edsall, Carol C.; Heinrich, John; Sippel, Al; Lavis, Dennis; Schaner, Ted

    1995-01-01

    Toxic substances have been suspected of being one of the causes of Great Lakes lake trout reproductive failure. Because toxic substances are present in the Great Lakes basin, managers should be aware of the role of contaminants in preventing lake trout rehabilitation. This paper summarizes studies which have sought to establish a relation between toxic substances and lake trout mortality or morbidity, and offers recommendations for future research and management. The review suggests that exposure to toxic substances has the possibility of affecting the species' rehabilitation. A variety of toxic substances, specifically organochlorine compounds, concentrated in lake trout eggs, fry, and the environment, have affected the hatching success of lake trout in the laboratory, but the strength of the relation between toxic substances and lake trout mortality and morbidity in the field remains unclear. In order to clarify this relation, more information is needed on lake trout physiology, biochemistry, behavior, and genetics. An interdisciplinary workshop should be convened to evaluate existing evidence by epidemiological methods, to set priorities for further research, and to develop management strategies.

  5. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1005 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline toxics program? 80.1005 Section 80.1005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Toxics Violation Provisions § 80.1005 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline toxics program? No person shall:...

  10. Microbial toxicity and biodegradability of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and shorter chain perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs).

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Herrera, Valeria; Field, Jim A; Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-09-14

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and related perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are emerging contaminants that have been widely applied in consumer and industrial applications for decades. However, PFOS has raised public concern due to its high bioaccumulative character, environmental persistence, and toxicity. Shorter PFASs such as perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS) and polyfluoroalkyl compounds have been proposed as alternatives to PFOS but it is unclear whether these fluorinated substances pose a risk for public health and the environment. The objective of this research was to investigate the microbial toxicity and the susceptibility to microbial degradation of PFOS and several related fluorinated compounds, i.e., short-chain perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl sulfonic and carboxylic acids. None of the compounds tested were toxic to the methanogenic activity of anaerobic wastewater sludge even at very high concentrations (up to 500 mg L(-1)). All PFASs evaluated were highly resistant to microbial degradation. PFOS was not reductively dehalogenated by the anaerobic microbial consortium even after very long periods of incubation (3.4 years). Similarly, the tested short chain perfluoroalkyl substances (i.e., PFBS and trifluoroacetic acid) and a polyfluoroalkyl PFOS analogue, 6 : 2 fluorotelomer sulfonic acid (FTSA) were also resistant to anaerobic biodegradation. Likewise, no conclusive evidence of microbial degradation was observed under aerobic conditions for any of the short-chain perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids tested after 32 weeks of incubation. Collectively, these results indicate that PFOS and its alternatives such as short chain perfluoroalkyl sulfonates and carboxylates and their polyfluorinated homologues are highly resistant to microbial degradation.

  11. Gonzales versus Oregon:the Oregon Death with Dignity Act Meets the Controlled Substances Act.

    PubMed

    Rich, Ben A

    2007-01-01

    The decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Gonzales v. Oregon represents the most recent battle in a long war of attrition waged by the opponents of the practice of physician-assisted suicide in general and the Oregon Death with Dignity Act in particular. The history of the Oregon law and the many challenges to it provide pertinent background to understanding important elements of the majority and dissenting opinions in this case and suggest where this seemingly intractable societal debate may be headed.

  12. Predicting the formation and the dispersion of toxic combustion products from the fires of dangerous substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevrlý, V.; Bitala, P.; Danihelka, P.; Dobeš, P.; Dlabka, J.; Hejzlar, T.; Baudišová, B.; Míček, D.; Zelinger, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Natural events, such as wildfires, lightning or earthquakes represent a frequent trigger of industrial fires involving dangerous substances. Dispersion of smoke plume from such fires and the effects of toxic combustion products are one of the reference scenarios expected in the framework of major accident prevention. Nowadays, tools for impact assessment of these events are rather missing. Detailed knowledge of burning material composition, atmospheric conditions, and other factors are required in order to describe quantitatively the source term of toxic fire products and to evaluate the parameters of smoke plume. Nevertheless, an assessment of toxic emissions from large scale fires involves a high degree of uncertainty, because of the complex character of physical and chemical processes in the harsh environment of uncontrolled flame. Among the others, soot particle formation can be mentioned as still being one of the unresolved problems in combustion chemistry, as well as decomposition pathways of chemical substances. Therefore, simplified approach for estimating the emission factors from outdoor fires of dangerous chemicals, utilizable for major accident prevention and preparedness, was developed and the case study illustrating the application of the proposed method was performed. ALOFT-FT software tool based on large eddy simulation of buoyant fire plumes was employed for predicting the local toxic contamination in the down-wind vicinity of the fire. The database of model input parameters can be effectively modified enabling the simulation of the smoke plume from pool fires or jet fires of arbitrary flammable (or combustible) gas, liquid or solid. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic via the project LD11012 (in the frame of the COST CM0901 Action) and the Ministry of Environment of the Czech Republic (project no. SPII 1a10 45/70).

  13. ATSDR evaluation of health effects of chemicals. VI. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Fay, M; Donohue, J M; De Rosa, C

    1999-12-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (also known as DEHP, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, or BEHP; CAS Registry Number 117-81-7) is a widely-used plasticizer. It is found in numerous plastic articles, such as paints, inks, floor tiles, upholstery, shower curtains, footwear, plastic bags, food-packaging materials, toys, and medical tubing. Not surprisingly, DEHP appears at many waste sites. As part of its mandate, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) prepares toxicological profiles on hazardous chemicals that are of greatest public health concern at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priority List (NPL) sites. These profiles comprehensively summarize toxicological and environmental information. This article constitutes the release of the bulk of ATSDR's profile for DEHP (ATSDR, 1993) into the mainstream scientific literature. An extensive listing of human and animal health effects, organized by route, duration, and endpoint, is presented. Toxicological information on toxicokinetics, biomarkers, interactions, sensitive subpopulations, reducing toxicity after exposure, and relevance to public health is also included. Environmental information encompasses physical properties, production and use, environmental fate, levels seen in the environment, analytical methods, and a listing of regulations. ATSDR, at the behest of Congress and therefore the citizenry, prepares these profiles to inform the public about site contaminants.

  14. Did Mineral Surface Chemistry and Toxicity Contribute to Evolution of Microbial Extracellular Polymeric Substances?

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jay M.; Zhang, Nianli; Hickey, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Modern ecological niches are teeming with an astonishing diversity of microbial life in biofilms closely associated with mineral surfaces, which highlights the remarkable success of microorganisms in conquering the challenges and capitalizing on the benefits presented by the mineral–water interface. Biofilm formation capability likely evolved on early Earth because biofilms provide crucial cell survival functions. The potential toxicity of mineral surfaces toward cells and the complexities of the mineral–water–cell interface in determining the toxicity mechanisms, however, have not been fully appreciated. Here, we report a previously unrecognized role for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which form biofilms in shielding cells against the toxicity of mineral surfaces. Using colony plating and LIVE/DEAD staining methods in oxide suspensions versus oxide-free controls, we found greater viability of wild-type, EPS-producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 compared to their isogenic knockout mutant with defective biofilm-producing capacity. Oxide toxicity was specific to its surface charge and particle size. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and assays for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) on mineral surfaces suggested that EPS shield via both physical and chemical mechanisms. Intriguingly, qualitative as well as quantitative measures of EPS production showed that toxic minerals induced EPS production in bacteria. By determining the specific toxicity mechanisms, we provide insight into the potential impact of mineral surfaces in promoting increased complexity of cell surfaces, including EPS and biofilm formation, on early Earth. Key Words: Mineral toxicity—Bacteria—EPS evolution—Biofilms—Cytotoxicity—Silica—Anatase—Alumina. Astrobiology 12, 785–798. PMID:22934560

  15. Civil commitment for substance use disorder patients under the Florida Marchman Act: demographics and outcomes in the private clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Timothy J; Strolla, Michael P; Myers, David P

    2013-01-01

    The Florida Marchman Act, a statutory process for civil commitment of persons with substance use disorders. The paper describes the various methods by which the Act may be employed, and examines the demographics and outcomes of 100 patients admitted to a private treatment setting pursuant to Marchman Act authority.

  16. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Brownfields/ land-reuse site tool.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Gary D; Berman, Laurel; Leann, Kathryn; Bing, Lemley

    2012-12-01

    As part of our continuing effort to highlight innovative approaches to improving the health and environment of communities, the Journal is pleased to bring back the bimonthly column from the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The ATSDR, based in Atlanta, Georgia, is a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and shares a common office of the Director with the National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ATSDR serves the public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent harmful exposures and diseases related to toxic substances. The purpose of this column is to inform readers of ATSDR's activities and initiatives to better understand the relationship between exposure to hazardous substances in the environment and their impact on human health and how to protect public health. We believe that the column will provide a valuable resource to our readership by helping to make known the considerable resources and expertise that ATSDR has available to assist communities, states, and others to assure good environmental health practice for all is served. The conclusions of this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the views of ATSDR, CDC, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Gary D. Perlman is an environmental health scientist for ATSDR. He is a commissioned officer with the U.S. Public Health Service and has been deployed in support of numerous environmental disasters including hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Isabelle, and Irene, as well as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Laurel Berman is the national brownfields coordinator with ATSDR. She coordinates the ATSDR Brownfields/Land-Reuse Health Initiative. Kathryn Leann Lemley Bing is an environmental health scientist and an ATSDR regional representative in Atlanta. She has specialized

  17. Shared Responsibility: Massachusetts Legislators, Physicians, and An Act Relative to Substance Use Treatment, Education, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Rudder, Meghan; Tsao, Lulu; Jack, Helen E

    2016-09-01

    Recent passage of the Massachusetts law, An Act Relative to Substance Use, Treatment, Education, and Prevention, represents an admirable public health approach to substance use disorder (SUD), a stigmatized chronic disease that affects some of society's most vulnerable people. With its seven-day supply limit on first-time opioid prescriptions, this legislation takes an unusual approach to state government involvement in health care. By intervening in individual physicians' practices, state legislators have entered a space traditionally reserved for clinical teams. The seven-day supply limit and the process through which it was developed highlight competing priorities and dialogue between physicians and legislators, limits of physician self-regulation, and standards of evidence in policy making and health care. Addressing these issues requires both physicians and legislators to recognize and fulfill new responsibilities in order to better assist the populations they serve.

  18. Certain Chemical Substances Containing Varying Carbon Chain Lengths (Alkyl Ranges Using the Cx-y Notation) on the TSCA Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This paper explains the conventions that are applied to certain listings of chemical substances containing ranges of alkyl chain lengths (i.e., carbon chains of varying lengths) for chemical substances on the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)

  19. The role of exopolymeric substances in the bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag nanoparticles to algae

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kaijun; Hu, Yi; Zhang, Luqing; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2016-01-01

    Exopolymeric substances (EPS) have an important role in bioaccumulation and toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) to algae, which warrants specific studies. The interaction of EPS with citrate and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) coated AgNPs (C-AgNPs and P-AgNPs, respectively) and its roles in bioaccumulation and toxicity of the AgNPs to Chlorella pyrenoidosa were investigated. The amino and aromatic carboxylic groups in the EPS were involved in the EPS-AgNP interactions. Compared with Ag+, C-AgNPs had comparable total bioaccumulation but greater absorption by intact algae with EPS; P-AgNPs had the smallest total bioaccumulation and were mainly adsorbed on algal surfaces. With EPS removed, the total bioaccumulations and surface adsorptions for the three Ag species decreased but the cell internalizations increased; the 96 h half growth inhibition concentrations decreased, indicating EPS alleviated the algal toxicity of Ag. The cell-internalized but not the adsorbed AgNPs could contribute to the nanotoxicity. The EPS could bind both AgNPs and Ag+, and thus inhibited the cell internalization and the nanotoxicity. However, the EPS-bound Ag on the cell surfaces would migrate along with the algae and be biologically amplified in the aquatic food chains, presenting ecological risks. These results are helpful for understanding the fate and ecological effects of NPs. PMID:27615743

  20. The role of exopolymeric substances in the bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag nanoparticles to algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kaijun; Hu, Yi; Zhang, Luqing; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2016-09-01

    Exopolymeric substances (EPS) have an important role in bioaccumulation and toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) to algae, which warrants specific studies. The interaction of EPS with citrate and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) coated AgNPs (C-AgNPs and P-AgNPs, respectively) and its roles in bioaccumulation and toxicity of the AgNPs to Chlorella pyrenoidosa were investigated. The amino and aromatic carboxylic groups in the EPS were involved in the EPS-AgNP interactions. Compared with Ag+, C-AgNPs had comparable total bioaccumulation but greater absorption by intact algae with EPS; P-AgNPs had the smallest total bioaccumulation and were mainly adsorbed on algal surfaces. With EPS removed, the total bioaccumulations and surface adsorptions for the three Ag species decreased but the cell internalizations increased; the 96 h half growth inhibition concentrations decreased, indicating EPS alleviated the algal toxicity of Ag. The cell-internalized but not the adsorbed AgNPs could contribute to the nanotoxicity. The EPS could bind both AgNPs and Ag+, and thus inhibited the cell internalization and the nanotoxicity. However, the EPS-bound Ag on the cell surfaces would migrate along with the algae and be biologically amplified in the aquatic food chains, presenting ecological risks. These results are helpful for understanding the fate and ecological effects of NPs.

  1. The role of exopolymeric substances in the bioaccumulation and toxicity of Ag nanoparticles to algae.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kaijun; Hu, Yi; Zhang, Luqing; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2016-09-12

    Exopolymeric substances (EPS) have an important role in bioaccumulation and toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) to algae, which warrants specific studies. The interaction of EPS with citrate and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) coated AgNPs (C-AgNPs and P-AgNPs, respectively) and its roles in bioaccumulation and toxicity of the AgNPs to Chlorella pyrenoidosa were investigated. The amino and aromatic carboxylic groups in the EPS were involved in the EPS-AgNP interactions. Compared with Ag(+), C-AgNPs had comparable total bioaccumulation but greater absorption by intact algae with EPS; P-AgNPs had the smallest total bioaccumulation and were mainly adsorbed on algal surfaces. With EPS removed, the total bioaccumulations and surface adsorptions for the three Ag species decreased but the cell internalizations increased; the 96 h half growth inhibition concentrations decreased, indicating EPS alleviated the algal toxicity of Ag. The cell-internalized but not the adsorbed AgNPs could contribute to the nanotoxicity. The EPS could bind both AgNPs and Ag(+), and thus inhibited the cell internalization and the nanotoxicity. However, the EPS-bound Ag on the cell surfaces would migrate along with the algae and be biologically amplified in the aquatic food chains, presenting ecological risks. These results are helpful for understanding the fate and ecological effects of NPs.

  2. Was Mineral Surface Complexity and Toxicity an Impetus for Evolution of Microbial Extracellular Polymeric Substances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, N.; Xu, J.; Zhu, C.; Campbell, J.; Hickey, W.; Zhang, N.

    2011-12-01

    Modern ecological niches are teeming with an astonishing diversity of microbial life closely associated with mineral surfaces, highlighting the remarkable success of microorganisms in conquering the challenges and capitalizing on the benefits presented by the mineral-water interface. Such community-living is enabled by an extracellular, polymeric, biofilm matrix developed at cell surfaces. Despite the energetic penalties, biofilm formation capability likely evolved on early Earth because of crucial cell survival functions, of which recognized roles include facilitating cell-attachment at mineral surfaces, intercellular signaling and lateral gene transfer, protection from dessication in tidal pools, and screening toxic UV light and toxic soluble metals. Cell-attachment to mineral surfaces was likely critical for cell survival and function, but the potential toxicity of mineral surfaces towards cells and the complexities of the mineral-water-cell interface in promoting biofilm formation, have not been fully appreciated. We examined the effects of nanoparticulate oxides (amorphous SiO2, anatase β-TiO2, and γ-Al2O3) on EPS- and biofilm-producing wild-type strains and their isogenic knock-out mutants which are defective in EPS-producing ability. In detail, we used Gram-negative wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and its EPS knock-out mutant Δ-psl, and the Gram-positive wild-type Bacillus subtilis NCIB3610 and its EPS-knock-out mutant yhxBΔ. We conducted bacterial growth experiments in the presence of each oxide in order to determine the viability of each cell type relative to oxide-free controls. The amount of EPS generated in the presence of oxides was also quantified and qualitatively analyzed by fluorescent stains. The results indicated a previously unrecognized role for microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in shielding both Gram-negative and Gram-positive cells against the toxic effects of mineral surfaces. This role is distinct from the

  3. Decreasing toxic and mutagenic activity of soils through the application of humic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorova Alla, I.; Pavlichenko Artem, 2.; Klimkina Iryna, 3.

    2009-04-01

    Based on an example of conditions on mining industry land adjacent to the Dnepr River in the Dnepropetrovsk Region (Ukraine), the ecological quality of the soils was evaluated by cytogenetic methods and, in parallel, the efficiency of using humates obtained from brown coal of the Alexandria deposit was also researched. During an ecological monitoring programme from 1997 to 2007, the genetic characteristics of soils at 12 locations in Dnepropetrovsk, and at 33 locations in four other industrial mining areas in the region, was studied. A theoretical basis for the use of humic substances for blocking the migration paths of ecological toxic-matter within a soil-to-plant system was reasoned, namely that introducing natrium humate into the soil would promote a normalization of the cell division processes and a reduction in the chromosome aberration rate in the root meristem of the biological indicators. Laboratory tests involved growing seeds of an indicator plant (Pisum sativum L.) in the different soils, to some of which humic substances had been added. The data showed evidence that the soils of the region display a rather patchy picture in terms of toxic and mutagen features. This was obvious from the variety of levels on the mitotic index, as well as from the increase of 5 to 24 times the frequency of aberrant chromosomes. Introducing 0.01per cent of a Christecol water solution into a substratum for growing the indicator plant apparently reduced (P<0,01) the level of the chromosome aberrations in the meristem cells of the test material. The mutagenic rates of the soils during the test was reduced by 1.5 to 4 times and, at the same time, a reduction of the soil toxic rates was also observed. The reduction in chromosome aberration levels in the cells of the tested materials for the soils in the different city districts, varied from 2.9 to 12.4 times. Importantly, a reliable reduction in the genetic damage under the influence of humic substances was observed in all test

  4. EXTRAN: A computer code for estimating concentrations of toxic substances at control room air intakes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1991-03-01

    This report presents the NRC staff with a tool for assessing the potential effects of accidental releases of radioactive materials and toxic substances on habitability of nuclear facility control rooms. The tool is a computer code that estimates concentrations at nuclear facility control room air intakes given information about the release and the environmental conditions. The name of the computer code is EXTRAN. EXTRAN combines procedures for estimating the amount of airborne material, a Gaussian puff dispersion model, and the most recent algorithms for estimating diffusion coefficients in building wakes. It is a modular computer code, written in FORTRAN-77, that runs on personal computers. It uses a math coprocessor, if present, but does not require one. Code output may be directed to a printer or disk files. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Integration of site-specific health information: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry health assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.

    1990-12-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry is required to conduct a health assessment of any site that is listed on or proposed for the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List. Sixteen US Department of Energy (DOE) sites currently fall into this category. Health assessments contain a qualitative description of impacts to public health and the environment from hazardous waste sites, as well as recommendations for actions to mitigate or eliminate risk. Because these recommendations may have major impacts on compliance activities at DOE facilities, the health assessments are an important source of information for the monitoring activities of DOE's Office of Environmental Compliance (OEC). This report provides an overview of the activities involved in preparing the health assessment, its role in environmental management, and its key elements.

  6. Toxins Secreted by Bacillus Isolated from Lung Adenocarcinomas Favor the Penetration of Toxic Substances

    PubMed Central

    Merlos, Alexandra; Rodríguez, Pau; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Winterhalter, Mathias; Benz, Roland; Vinuesa, Teresa; Moya, Juan A.; Viñas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to explore the eventual role of bacteria in the induction of lung cancer by smoking habits. Viable bacteria closely related to the genus Bacillus were detected at high frequencies in lung-cancer biopsies. Similar, if not identical, microbes were isolated from cigarettes and in smog. Bacteria present in cigarettes could be transferred to a physiological solution via a “smoker” device that mimicked their potential transfer during smoking those bacteria produce exotoxins able to open transmembrane pores. These channels can be used as a way to penetrate cells of benzopyrenes and other toxic substances present in tobacco products. We hypothesize that Bacillaceae present in tobacco play a key role in the development of lung cancer. PMID:26635767

  7. Flow-through bioassay for measuring bioaccumulation of toxic substances from sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac, Michael J.; Edsall, Carol C.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Sayers, Richard E.

    1984-01-01

    Over 10 million cubic meters of sediment are dredged annually from Great Lakes waterways. Because much of this material is taken from harbors, connecting channels, and other nearshore areas that often are contaminated with toxic substances, the sediments proposed for dredging need to be evaluated for the presence of bioavailable contaminants and the potential for toxicity to the biota. Sound decisions on the appropriate disposal of the dredged material can be made only after such an evaluation. Presently, no standardized procedure exists for evaluating dredged material in freshwater systems although current criteria for discharge of dredged material into marine water have been developed (USEPA/CE 1977). In the ocean discharge guideline, it is recommended that bioassays be conducted on liquid, solid, and suspended particulate phases of dredged material. because it appears that the solid phase has the greatest potential for environmental damage and because measurement of bioaccumulation must be made to evaluate sediments for disposal (USEPA/CE 1977, Seeyle and Mac 1983), we developed a bioassay for testing the solid phase of dredged material that measures the survival of organisms and, perhaps more important, the bioaccumulation of toxic substances by aquatic organisms from naturally contaminated sediments (Peddicord et al. 1980; Rubinstein et al. 1980, 1983; Seeyle st al. 1982), several have used testing methods that result in unacceptable mortality to control organisms (Bahnick et al. 1981, Prater et al. 1983). Our bioassay is intended to estimate the potential for bioaccumlation of contaminants from sediments that are not acutely toxic to test organisms, but are suspected of containing persistent contaminants. By using test organisms that are not highly susceptible to toxic compounds, the bioaccumulation test allows estimation of the potential food-chain accumulation of contaminants that may occur in local biota from surficial sediments. In practice

  8. Toxic substances: Effects on fish. January 1978-July 1989 (Citations from Pollution Abstracts). Report for January 1978-July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed on using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (This updated bibliography contains 330 citations, 66 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  9. Toxic substances: Effects on fish. January 1978-July 1989 (A Bibliography from Pollution Abstracts). Report for January 1978-July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed on using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (This updated bibliography contains 356 citations, 26 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  10. Toxic substances: effects on fish. January 1970-July 1988 (Citations from Pollution Abstracts). Report for January 1970-July 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed on using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (This updated bibliography contains 264 citations, 24 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  11. Assessment of quantitative structure-activity relationship of toxicity prediction models for Korean chemical substance control legislation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Yon; Shin, Seong Eun; No, Kyoung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Objectives For successful adoption of legislation controlling registration and assessment of chemical substances, it is important to obtain sufficient toxicological experimental evidence and other related information. It is also essential to obtain a sufficient number of predicted risk and toxicity results. Particularly, methods used in predicting toxicities of chemical substances during acquisition of required data, ultimately become an economic method for future dealings with new substances. Although the need for such methods is gradually increasing, the-required information about reliability and applicability range has not been systematically provided. Methods There are various representative environmental and human toxicity models based on quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Here, we secured the 10 representative QSAR-based prediction models and its information that can make predictions about substances that are expected to be regulated. We used models that predict and confirm usability of the information expected to be collected and submitted according to the legislation. After collecting and evaluating each predictive model and relevant data, we prepared methods quantifying the scientific validity and reliability, which are essential conditions for using predictive models. Results We calculated predicted values for the models. Furthermore, we deduced and compared adequacies of the models using the Alternative non-testing method assessed for Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals Substances scoring system, and deduced the applicability domains for each model. Additionally, we calculated and compared inclusion rates of substances expected to be regulated, to confirm the applicability. Conclusions We evaluated and compared the data, adequacy, and applicability of our selected QSAR-based toxicity prediction models, and included them in a database. Based on this data, we aimed to construct a system that can be used

  12. Applying mixture toxicity modelling to predict bacterial bioluminescence inhibition by non-specifically acting pharmaceuticals and specifically acting antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Neale, Peta A; Leusch, Frederic D L; Escher, Beate I

    2017-04-01

    Pharmaceuticals and antibiotics co-occur in the aquatic environment but mixture studies to date have mainly focused on pharmaceuticals alone or antibiotics alone, although differences in mode of action may lead to different effects in mixtures. In this study we used the Bacterial Luminescence Toxicity Screen (BLT-Screen) after acute (0.5 h) and chronic (16 h) exposure to evaluate how non-specifically acting pharmaceuticals and specifically acting antibiotics act together in mixtures. Three models were applied to predict mixture toxicity including concentration addition, independent action and the two-step prediction (TSP) model, which groups similarly acting chemicals together using concentration addition, followed by independent action to combine the two groups. All non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals had similar EC50 values at both 0.5 and 16 h, indicating together with a QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) analysis that they act as baseline toxicants. In contrast, the antibiotics' EC50 values decreased by up to three orders of magnitude after 16 h, which can be explained by their specific effect on bacteria. Equipotent mixtures of non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals only, antibiotics only and both non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals and antibiotics were prepared based on the single chemical results. The mixture toxicity models were all in close agreement with the experimental results, with predicted EC50 values within a factor of two of the experimental results. This suggests that concentration addition can be applied to bacterial assays to model the mixture effects of environmental samples containing both specifically and non-specifically acting chemicals.

  13. Science First: Contributions of a University-Industry Toxic Substances Research and Teaching Program to Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Ted K.; Kennedy, Kevin M.; Davis, Paul R.; Lloyd, Larry L.; Gwebu, Nokuthula; Last, Jerold A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes how public policy establishing the University of California Toxic Substances Research and Teaching Program helped to establish the state's environmental technology industry. The multidisciplinary "science-push" program generated economic development benefits including leveraged research funding and at least 200 new private…

  14. 40 CFR 792.105 - Test, control, and reference substance characterization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or concomitantly according to written standard operating procedures, which provide for periodic...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and...

  15. 40 CFR 792.105 - Test, control, and reference substance characterization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or concomitantly according to written standard operating procedures, which provide for periodic...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and...

  16. 40 CFR 792.105 - Test, control, and reference substance characterization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or concomitantly according to written standard operating procedures, which provide for periodic...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and...

  17. 40 CFR 792.105 - Test, control, and reference substance characterization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or concomitantly according to written standard operating procedures, which provide for periodic...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Test, Control, and...

  18. Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion - Phase I Coal Selection and Chaacterization

    SciTech Connect

    A. Kolker; A. Sarofim; C.A. Palmer; C.L. Senior; F.E. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; I. Olmez; N. Shah; R. Finkelman; S. Crowley; T. Zeng

    1998-07-16

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. Over the past decade, a large database identifying the partitioning and emitted concentrations of several toxic metals on the list of HAPs has been developed. Laboratory data have also been generated to help define the general behavior of several elements in combustion systems. These data have been used to develop empirical and probabalistic models to predict emissions of trace metals from coal-fired power plants. While useful for providing average emissions of toxic species, these empirically based models fail when extrapolated beyond their supporting database. This represents a critical gap; over the coming decades, new fuels and combustion systems will play an increasing role in our nation's power generation system. For example, new fuels, such as coal blends or beneficiated fuels, new operating conditions, such as low-NO burners or staged combustion, or new power x systems, for example, those being developed under the DoE sponsored Combustion 2000 programs and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems, are all expected to play a role in power generation in the next century. The need for new predictive tools is not limited to new combustion systems, however. Existing combustion systems may have to employ controls for HAPs, should regulations be imposed. Testing of new control methods, at pilot and full scale, is expensive. A sound under-standing of the chemical transformations of both organic and inorganic HAPs will promote the development of new control methods in a cost-effective manner. To ensure that coal-fired power generation proceeds in an environmentally benign fashion, methods for the prediction and

  19. Urgent need to reevaluate the latest World Health Organization guidelines for toxic inorganic substances in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Frisbie, Seth H; Mitchell, Erika J; Sarkar, Bibudhendra

    2015-08-13

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has established guidelines for drinking-water quality that cover biological and chemical hazards from both natural and anthropogenic sources. In the most recent edition of Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality (2011), the WHO withdrew, suspended, did not establish, or raised guidelines for the inorganic toxic substances manganese, molybdenum, nitrite, aluminum, boron, nickel, uranium, mercury, and selenium. In this paper, we review these changes to the WHO drinking-water guidelines, examining in detail the material presented in the WHO background documents for each of these toxic substances. In some cases, these WHO background documents use literature reviews that do not take into account scientific research published within the last 10 or more years. In addition, there are instances in which standard WHO practices for deriving guidelines are not used; for example, rounding and other mathematical errors are made. According to published meeting reports from the WHO Chemical Aspects Working Group, the WHO has a timetable for revising some of its guidelines for drinking-water quality, but for many of these toxic substances the planned changes are minimal or will be delayed for as long as 5 years. Given the limited nature of the planned WHO revisions to the inorganic toxic substances and the extended timetable for these revisions, we suggest that governments, researchers, and other stakeholders might establish independent recommendations for inorganic toxic substances and possibly other chemicals to proactively protect public health, or at the very least, revert to previous editions of the Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, which were more protective of public health.

  20. Classification of two steroids, prostanozol and methasterone, as Schedule III anabolic steroids under the Controlled Substance Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-07-30

    With the issuance of this Final Rule, the Administrator of the DEA classifies the following two steroids as "anabolic steroids'' under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA): prostanozol (17[beta]-hydroxy-5[alpha]-androstano[3,2-c]pyrazole) and methasterone (2[alpha],17[alpha]-dimethyl-5[alpha]-androstan-17[beta]-ol-3-one). These steroids and their salts, esters, and ethers are Schedule III controlled substances subject to the regulatory control provisions of the CSA.

  1. Schedules of controlled substances: placement of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine into Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-12-20

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Deputy Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) places the substance 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT), including its salts, isomers and salts of isomers whenever the existence of such salts, isomers, and salts of isomers is possible, into schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). This action by the DEA Deputy Administrator is based on a scheduling recommendation from the Assistant Secretary for Health of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and a DEA review indicating that 5-MeO-DMT meets the criteria for placement in schedule I of the CSA. This final rule will impose the criminal sanctions and regulatory controls of schedule I substances under the CSA on the manufacture, distribution, dispensing, importation, exportation, and possession of 5-MeO-DMT.

  2. Ecological toxicity of reactive X-3B red dye and cadmium acting on wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yun; Zhou, Qi-xing

    2002-01-01

    Ecological toxicity of reactive X-3B red dye and cadmium in both their single form and their combined form on wheat was studied using the experimental method of seed and root exposure. The single-factor exposure indicated that the inhibitory rate of wheat root elongation was significantly increased with the increase in the concentration of the dye in the cultural solution, although seed germination of wheat was not sensitive to the dye. The toxicity of cadmium was greatly higher than that of the dye, but low concentration cadmium (< 40 mg/L) could promote the germination of wheat seed. Interactive effects of the dye and cadmium on wheat were complicated. There was no significant correlation between the inhibitory rate of seed germination and the concentrations of the dye and cadmium. Low concentration cadmium could strengthen the toxicity of the dye acting on root elongation. On the contrary, high concentration cadmium could weaken the toxicity of the dye acting on root elongation.

  3. Variation in sensitivity of aquatic species to toxicants: Practical consequences for effect assessment of chemical substances

    SciTech Connect

    Vaal, M.A.; Van Leeuwen, C.J.; Hoekstra, J.A.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    2000-04-01

    This study addresses the relation between the sensitivity of aquatic species and mode of action of different classes or organic chemicals. The authors analyzed large data sets of ecotoxicological information to reveal the interspecies variation in sensitivity, to relate this variation to the compounds' mode of action, and to explain the observed patterns using general biological information. Here the authors present a general framework and recommendations for risk assessment procedures. The authors recommend the use of toxicologically based classification schemes at an early stage of the risk assessment procedure. Screening programs are most efficiently run when only one species per compound is tested to prioritize substances. The toxicity of compounds belonging to the class of nonpolar narcotics is highly predictable and shows little interspecies variation. For these compounds quantitative structure-activity relationships (WSARs) can be used to estimate effect levels. Most effort should be put into testing reactive compounds and compounds with a specific mode of action as toxicity to some species can be 10{sup 5}--10{sup 6} times higher compared with less sensitive species. The use of assessment factors in effect assessment procedures may lead to an underestimation of effects on the more sensitive species. For many priority pollutants there is little information on their ecotoxicity. Predictive techniques are needed to compensate for this lack of data. Knowledge of the relation between modes of action of compounds and interspecies variation in sensitivity should be integrated in risk assessment procedures in order to make more efficient use of the limited financial resources available.

  4. Chitosan nanoparticles loaded the herbicide paraquat: the influence of the aquatic humic substances on the colloidal stability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Renato; Clemente, Zaira; de Oliveira, Jhones Luis; Campos, Estefânia Vangelie Ramos; Chalupe, Victor C; Jonsson, Claudio M; de Lima, Renata; Sanches, Gabriela; Nishisaka, Caroline S; Rosa, André H; Oehlke, Kathleen; Greiner, Ralf; Fraceto, Leonardo F

    2015-04-09

    Polymeric nanoparticles have been developed for several applications, among them as carrier system of pesticides. However, few studies have investigated the fate of these materials in the environment in relation to colloidal stability and toxicity. In nature, humic substances are the main agents responsible for complexation with metals and organic compounds, as well as responsible for the dynamics of these nanoparticles in aquatic and terrestrial environments. In this context, the evaluation of the influence of aquatic humic substances (AHS) on the colloidal stability and toxicity of polymeric nanoparticles of chitosan/tripolyphosphate with or without paraquat was performed. In this study, the nanoparticles were prepared by the ionic gelation method and characterized by size distribution measurements (DLS and NTA), zeta potential, infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Allium cepa genotoxicity studies and ecotoxicity assays with the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata were used to investigate the effect of aquatic humic substances (AHS) on the toxicity of this delivery system. No changes were observed in the physical-chemical stability of the nanoparticles due to the presence of AHS using DLS and NTA techniques. However some evidence of interaction between the nanoparticles and AHS was observed by infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies. The ecotoxicity and genotoxicity assays showed that humic substances can decrease the toxic effects of nanoparticles containing paraquat. These results are interesting because they are important for understanding the interaction of these nanostructured carrier systems with species present in aquatic ecosystems such as humic substances, and in this way, opening new perspectives for studies on the dynamics of these carrier systems in the ecosystem.

  5. Toxicity testing of NCSRP priority substances for the development of soil quality criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Cureton, P.M.; Balch, G.; Lintott, D.; Poirrier, K.; Goudey, S.

    1994-12-31

    The effects of 14 National Contaminated Sites Remediation Program (NCSRP) priority substances was measured on emergence and root elongation in lettuce (Lactuca saliva) and radish (Raphanus saliva) and on survival of the earthworm Eisenia foetida. The worm and seedling emergence tests were conducted in an artificial soil mixture composed of 10% peat moss, 20% kaolinite clay, and 70% silica sand (70 mesh) spiked with the contaminant. The root elongation tests were conducted on filter paper moistened with the contaminant solution. The following endpoints were derived on nominal and measured concentrations: NOEC, LOEC, the LC{sub 50} and LC{sub 25} for earthworm mortality and the EC{sub 50} and EC{sub 25} for emergence and root elongation. The contaminants tested included: arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, zinc, vanadium, benzo(a)pyrene, cyanide, naphthalene, ethylene glycol, pentachlorophenol, and phenol. Each test was repeated three times using different batches of freshly prepared soil, seed lots and worm cultures. The authors will present the findings and discuss the application of toxicity test results in developing generic soil quality criteria.

  6. California Dept. of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) Update of the Schools Naturally Occurring Asbestos Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, M.

    2012-12-01

    Prior to acquisition and/or construction of prospective school sites, the California Education Code mandates that school districts complete environmental assessments and cleanups for prospective new or expanding school sites in order to qualify for state funding. If prospective school sites are determined to have environmental contamination from hazardous materials, including naturally occurring hazardous materials such as naturally occurring asbestos (NOA), where there may be unacceptable potential health risks, the school sites must be properly mitigated prior to occupancy for protection of human health and the environment. NOA is of special concern for schools, because children who are exposed to asbestos may be at increased risk of developing asbestos-related diseases over time. In order to protect human health, the Department of Toxic Substances Control's (DTSC) goals at school sites are to: 1) identify the presence of NOA in school site soils using exposure-reducing soil thresholds; 2) manage potential NOA exposures using mitigation measures to reduce generation of airborne asbestos fibers from soils on school sites; and 3) ensure long-term monitoring and protection of mitigation measures via Operations & Maintenance activities. DTSC is currently in the process of revising its Interim Guidance Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) at School Sites - September 2004. The revisions include: 1) updating the guidance to consider incremental sampling for use at NOA sites in consultation with DTSC's project manager and technical staff, and 2) documenting a tiered approach to addressing high and low activity areas on a school.

  7. Changes in development and ultrastructure of Aspergillus niger mycelium, strain with increased tolerance to toxic substances from beet molasses.

    PubMed

    Zakowska, Z; Gabara, B

    1991-01-01

    Effects of a defoamer and toxic molasses compounds on development and ultrastructure of A. niger mycelium, strain Z, characterized by high tolerance to these substances and producing citric acid in surface fermentation on proper molasses media with 70% yield were presented. Spumol BJ in concentration of 5 microliters/100 cm3 as well as toxic molasses compounds stimulated the process of swelling and germinating of conidia. Moreover, giant conidia, unable to germinate, appeared. Developing mycelium with dispersed hyphae became mucilaginous after 17-20 h culture, which indicated the process of sinking but after 24 h some part of the mycelium developed normally. Electron microscopic observations of mycelium developing in the presence of the toxic substances showed along with electron-transparent cytoplasm in a consequence of decrease in ribosome number, changes in ultrastructure of mitochondria. It may be assumed that one of the reasons of the above described abnormalities in development and ultrastructure of mycelium was a disturbance of respiration processes. The appearance of deposits of electron-dense material in mitochondria suggested the existence of a defence mechanism, eliminating toxic substances.

  8. 40 CFR 710.45 - Chemical substances for which information must be reported.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL INVENTORY REGULATIONS Inventory Update Reporting for... substance which is in the Master Inventory File at the beginning of a submission period described in §...

  9. U. S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program; proceedings of the technical meeting, Charleston, South Carolina, March 8-12, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morganwalp, D. W.; Buxton, H.T.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains papers presented at the seventh Technical Meeting of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Toxic Substances Hydrology (Toxics) Program. The meeting was held March 8-12, 1999, in Charleston, South Carolina. Toxics Program Technical Meetings are held periodically to provide a forum for presentation and discussion of results of recent research activities.

  10. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bool, L.E. III; Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.

    1997-01-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UKy), the University of Connecticut, and Princeton University to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI`s existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). During the past quarter the final program coal, from the Wyodak seam in the Powder River Basin, was acquired and distributed. Extensive coal characterization and laboratory work is underway to develop and test new sub-models. Coal characterization in the past quarter included direct identification of the modes of occurrence of various trace inorganic species in coal and ash using unique analytical techniques such as XAFS analysis and selective leaching. Combustion testing of the bituminous coals continued and additional data were obtained on trace element vaporization in the combustion zone. Studies of post-combustion trace element transformations, such as mercury speciation in the flue gas, were also begun in the last quarter.

  11. Assessing the mammalian toxicity of high-boiling petroleum substances under the rubric of the HPV program.

    PubMed

    Gray, Thomas M; Simpson, Barry J; Nicolich, Mark J; Murray, F Jay; Verstuyft, Allen W; Roth, Randy N; McKee, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In 1998, the US EPA announced the HPV Challenge Program, a voluntary chemical data collection effort. The Petroleum HPV Testing Group (PHPVTG(1)) volunteered to provide data on approximately 110 high boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), i.e. substances with final boiling points ≥ approximately 650°F (343°C). These HBPS are substances of unknown and variable composition (UVCBs) that are composed of numerous individual constituents. Toxicity studies have shown that some HBPS can produce systemic (repeat-dose) and developmental effects, and some are mutagenic under in vitro conditions. The papers in this supplement show that these effects are related to the profiles of aromatic constituents in these substances. Further, it is shown that the effects on selected repeat-dose and developmental toxicity endpoints and mutagenic activity in bacterial assays can be predicted from compositional information using models based on the aromatic-ring class profile, "ARC profile" as defined by gas chromatographic separation of the DMSO-soluble fraction of the starting materials. This chromatographic method and the predictive models provide an efficient means of characterizing for screening purposes the potential for repeat-dose, developmental effects and bacterial mutagenicity of HBPS and can reduce the number of animal tests that would be required if these tests were conducted on all 110 HBPS.

  12. 75 FR 42130 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Resource...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...''); Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1311 to 1387 (``CWA''); Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (``RCRA''), 42... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; Safe Drinking Water Act; Toxic Substances Control Act; and the Reporting Requirements of...

  13. Assessment of the freshwater annual fish Cynopoecilus melanotaenia as a toxicity test organism using three reference substances.

    PubMed

    Arenzon, Alexandre; Pinto, Régis Fontana; Colombo, Patrick; Raya-Rodriguez, Maria Teresa

    2003-09-01

    This study presents a preliminary evaluation of the use of the Brazilian fish Cynopoecilus melanotaenia as a test organism in toxicity tests. The cryptobiotic stage presented by the eggs of fish C. melanotaenia can overcome the difficulty of continuously keeping cultures and recruiting healthy animals in sufficient numbers to be used in toxicity tests. In order to determine the applicability of this species as a test organism, three different reference substances were evaluated in 96-h acute toxicity tests: Copper sulfate (CuSO4 x 5H2O), sodium dodecil sulfate (C12H25NaO4S), and sodium chloride (NaCl). Sensitivity ranged as follows: copper sulfate (0.05-0.13 mg/L), sodium dodecil sulfate (10.7-19.0 mg/L), and sodium chloride (1.44-1.96 g/L). We conclude that C. melanotaenia shows potential as a test organism in toxicity tests; however, further research should be conducted with other substances and should be compared with the research on other species before we can reach more conclusive results.

  14. Humic substances alleviate the aquatic toxicity of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles to organisms of different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuang; Quik, Joris T K; Song, Lan; Van Den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; Wouterse, Marja; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-06-01

    The present study investigated how humic substances (HS) modify the aquatic toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as these particles agglomerate in water and interact with HS. An alga species (Raphidocelis subcapitata), a cladoceran species (Chydorus sphaericus), and a freshwater fish larva (Danio rerio), representing organisms of different trophic levels, were exposed to colloids of the polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated AgNPs in the presence and absence of HS. Results show that the presence of HS alleviated the aquatic toxicity of the AgNP colloids to all the organisms in a dose-dependent manner. The particle size distribution of the AgNPs' colloidal particles shifted to lower values due to the presence of HS, implying that the decrease in the toxicity of the AgNP colloids cannot be explained by the variation of agglomeration size. The surface charge of the AgNPs was found to be more negative in the presence of high concentrations of HS, suggesting an electrostatic barrier by which HS might limit interactions between particles and algae cells; indeed, this effect reduced the algae toxicity. Observations on silver ions (Ag(+)) release show that HS inhibit AgNP dissolution, depending on the concentrations of HS. When toxic effects were expressed as a function of each Ag-species, toxicity of the free Ag(+) was found to be much higher than that of the agglomerated particles.

  15. A novel two-dimensional liquid chromatographic system for the online toxicity prediction of pharmaceuticals and related substances.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Xu, Li; Shi, Zhi-guo; Hu, Min

    2015-08-15

    In this study, a novel two-dimensional liquid chromatographic (2D-LC) system was developed for simultaneous separation and toxicity prediction of pharmaceutical and its related substances. A conventional ODS column was used on the 1st-D to separate the sample; while, bio-partitioning micellar chromatography served as the 2nd-D to predict toxicity of the components. The established system was tested for the toxicity of ibuprofen and its impurities with known toxicity. With only one injection, ibuprofen and its impurities were separated on the 1st-D; and LC50 values of individual impurity were obtained based on the quantitative retention-activity relationships, which agreed well with the reported data. Furthermore, LC50 values of photolysis transformation products (TPs) of carprofen, ketoprofen and diclofenac acid (as unknown compounds) were screened in this 2D-LC system, which could be an indicator of the toxicity of these TPs and was meaningful for the environmental monitoring and drinking water treatment. The established 2D-LC system was cost-effective, time-saving and reliable, and was promising for fast online screening of toxicity of known and unknown analytes in the complex sample in a single step. It may find applications in environment, pharmaceutical and food, etc.

  16. Principles and Procedures for Evaluating the Toxicity of Household Substances. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Life Sciences.

    This report was prepared for use by the professional toxicologist. It contains chapters on ingestion exposure, dermal and dye toxicity tests, inhalation exposure, chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity tests, mutagenicity tests, reproduction and teratogenicity tests, and behavioral toxicity tests. In addition, regulations under the Federal Hazardous…

  17. Webinar Presentation: Center for Disease Control/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry’s Role in Children’s Environmental Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Center for Disease Control/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry’s Role in Children’s Environmental Health, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series.

  18. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Extension of Temporary Placement of THJ-2201, AB-PINACA and AB-CHMINACA in Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. Temporary order.

    PubMed

    2017-01-27

    The Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration is issuing this temporary order to extend the temporary schedule I status of three synthetic cannabinoids pursuant to the temporary scheduling provisions of the Controlled Substances Act. The substances are: [1-(5-Fluoropentyl)-1H-indazol-3-yl](naphthalen-1-yl)methanone (THJ-2201); N-1-Amino-3-methyl-1-oxo-2-butanyl]-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (AB-PINACA); N-[1-Amino-3-methyl-1-oxo-2-butanyl]-1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (AB-CHMINACA), including their optical, positional and geometric isomers, salts, and salts of isomers. The current final order temporarily placing THJ-2201, AB-PINACA and AB-CHMINACA into schedule I is in effect through January 29, 2017. This order will extend the temporary scheduling of THJ-2201, AB-PINACA and AB-CHMINACA for one year, or until the permanent scheduling action for these three substances is completed, whichever occurs first.

  19. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Extension of Temporary Placement of 10 Synthetic Cathinones in Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-03-04

    The Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration is issuing this final order to extend the temporary schedule I status of 10 synthetic cathinones pursuant to the temporary scheduling provisions of the Controlled Substances Act. The 10 substances are: 4-methyl-N-ethylcathinone (4-MEC); 4-methyl-alpha-pyrrolidinopropiophenone (4-MePPP); alpha-pyrrolidinopentiophenone ([alpha]-PVP); 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-(methylamino)butan-1-one (butylone); 2-(methylamino)-1-phenylpentan-1-one (pentedrone); 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-(methylamino)pentan-1-one (pentylone); 4-fluoro-N-methylcathinone (4-FMC); 3-fluoro-N-methylcathinone (3-FMC); 1-(naphthalen-2-yl)-2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)pentan-1-one (naphyrone); and alpha-pyrrolidinobutiophenone ([alpha]-PBP) [hereinafter 4-MEC, 4-MePPP, [alpha]-PVP, butylone, pentedrone, pentylone, 4-FMC, 3-FMC, naphyrone, and [alpha]-PBP, respectively], including their optical, positional, and geometric isomers, salts, and salts of isomers. The current final order temporarily placing 4-MEC, 4-MePPP, [alpha]-PVP, butylone, pentedrone, pentylone, 4-FMC, 3-FMC, naphyrone, and [alpha]-PBP into schedule I is in effect through March 6, 2016. This final order will extend the temporary scheduling of 4-MEC, 4-MePPP, [alpha]-PVP, butylone, pentedrone, pentylone, 4-FMC, 3-FMC, naphyrone, and [alpha]-PBP for one year, or until the permanent scheduling action for these 10 substances is completed, whichever occurs first.

  20. Optimizing electric utility air toxics compliance with other titles of the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, A.P.; South, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of regulatory issues under Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments that could affect electric utilities. Title III contains provisions relating to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and provides special treatment for electric utilities. Generally, this discussion documents that if utility toxic emissions are regulated, one of the chief difficulties confronting utilities will be the lack of coordination between Title III and other titles of the Act. The paper concludes that if the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determines that regulation of utility HAPs is warranted under Title III, savings can be realized from flexible compliance treatment.

  1. 77 FR 61117 - Significant New Use Rules on Certain Chemical Substances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ...EPA is promulgating significant new use rules (SNURs) under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) for 78 chemical substances which were the subject of premanufacture notices (PMNs). Seven of these chemical substances are subject to TSCA section 5(e) consent orders issued by EPA. This action requires persons who intend to manufacture, import, or process any of these 78 chemical substances for......

  2. In Vitro Toxicity Assessment Technique for Volatile Substances Using Flow-Through System

    EPA Science Inventory

    : The U.S. EPA is responsible for evaluating the effects of approximately 80,000 chemicals registered for use. The challenge is that limited toxicity data exists for many of these chemicals; traditional toxicity testing methods are slow, costly, involve animal studies, and canno...

  3. 78 FR 64210 - Extension of Review Periods Under the Toxic Substances Control Act; Certain Chemicals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Microorganisms; Premanufacture, Significant New Use, and Exemption Notices; Delay in Processing Due to Lack of... manufacture of new microorganisms is required under 40 CFR part 725, in the form of an MCAN. Under section 5... notice in the form of a SNUN. SNURs for microorganisms appear at 40 CFR part 725, subpart M. There are...

  4. 78 FR 69414 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ...- propanesulfonic acid, 2-hydroxy-3-(2-propen-1-yloxy)-, sodium salt (1:1). These data were submitted pursuant to a... for Biodegradation; Acute 0146 (2-propen-1-yloxy)-, sodium salt vinylic systems; antistatic...

  5. 76 FR 52692 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... August 15, 2011 a proposed Consent Decree in United States and the State of Michigan v. Hansons Window... District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. The consent decree settles claims against a window...''). For the State SEP, the Settling Defendant will provide $250,000 worth of windows to the State...

  6. 78 FR 72818 - Electronic Reporting Under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... and Safety Data Reporting Rules at 40 CFR part 716. EPA developed this action in accordance with its... enable more efficient data transmittal via the Central Data Exchange (CDX) and reduces errors with the... burden for submitters by reducing the cost and time required to review, edit, and transmit data to...

  7. 77 FR 22707 - Electronic Reporting Under the Toxic Substances Control Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 712, 716, 720, 721, 723, 725, 766, 790, and 799 RIN 2070-AJ75 Electronic Reporting... rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to require electronic reporting for information that must be submitted... 5 reporting regulations that would extend electronic reporting requirements to Notices...

  8. 77 FR 6801 - Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry; Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... housing, FEMA provided over 130,000 travel trailers, park homes, and mobile homes for persons displaced by... household members, demographics, and health status questions, focusing on respiratory outcomes and mental... the main questionnaire. There are no costs to the respondents other than their time. The...

  9. Predictive Models and Tools for Assessing Chemicals under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has developed databases and predictive models to help evaluate the hazard, exposure, and risk of chemicals released to the environment and how workers, the general public, and the environment may be exposed to and affected by them.

  10. 78 FR 66700 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ...-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene] methyl] catalyst in organic Coefficient. 0437, 0438 phenyl] amino]-(CAS No. 1324-76-1.... Esterification and Boiling Point; Vapor 0110 25321-41-9). acetylation catalyst; Pressure; n-Octanol/Water catalyst for coatings and Partition Coefficient. foundry resins; in the preparation of esters;...

  11. 77 FR 18248 - Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry; Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... (MSEL), Postpartum Surveys (12 month Postpartum survey includes Nutritional Assessment/Food Intake..... 500 1 15/60 Development Postpartum Survey (0 500 1 60/60 months). Post-partum Survey...... 500 3 15/60 (2,6,9 months) Postpartum Survey (12 500 1 15/60 months). Eligibility Form........ 550 1 5/60...

  12. Report: EPA Needs a Coordinated Plan to Oversee Its Toxic Substances Control Act Responsibilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #10-P-0066, February 17, 2010. EPA does not have integrated procedures and measures in place to ensure that new chemicals entering commerce do not pose an unreasonable risk to human health and the environment.

  13. 40 CFR 791.105 - Prohibited acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Prohibited acts. 791.105 Section 791.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Prohibited Acts § 791.105 Prohibited acts. Failure to provide...

  14. The role of perceived need and health insurance in substance use treatment: implications for the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mir M; Teich, Judith L; Mutter, Ryan

    2015-07-01

    The expansions in insurance coverage under the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act (ACA) that took full effect in 2014 have been projected to increase the number of users of behavioral health services. By analyzing data from the 2008-2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, this paper examines whether health insurance expansion may result in an increase in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment utilization. The study sample includes 18,600 adults with SUD but no diagnosable mental health condition. The analysis finds that over 80% of that population receives no treatment and 97% do not perceive a need for treatment. When they do receive treatment, they are more likely to receive mental health treatment. Using multinomial logistic regression, the study finds that having Medicaid or private insurance is associated with higher likelihood of receiving SUD treatment, but only when individuals perceive a need for it, compared to being uninsured and not perceiving a need for treatment (the reference category). These results indicate that increased service utilization is associated with perceiving a need for substance abuse treatment, implying that outreach initiatives to raise awareness about SUD and the effective role of substance use treatment are needed to enhance the impact of the structural changes to the substance abuse treatment system resulting from the ACA.

  15. Early Exposure to Toxic Substances Damages Brain Architecture. Working Paper #4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2006

    2006-01-01

    New science shows that exposure to toxins prenatally or early in life can have a devastating and lifelong effect on the developing architecture of the brain. Exposures to many chemicals have much more severe consequences for embryos, fetuses, and young children, whose brains are still developing, than for adults. Substances that can have a truly…

  16. 40 CFR 798.6560 - Subchronic delayed neuro-toxicity of organophosphorus substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... employed. (2) Number of animals. Ten hens should be used for each treatment and control group. (3) Control group—(i) General. A concurrent control group should be used. This group should be treated in a manner identical to the treated group, except that administration of the test substance is omitted. (ii)...

  17. Notification: Background Investigation Services EPA’s Efforts to Incorporate Environmental Justice Into Clean Air Act Inspections for Air Toxics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OPE-FY14-0017, March 7, 2014. The OIG plans to begin the preliminary research phase of an evaluation of the EPA's efforts to incorporate environmental justice into Clean Air Act (CAA) inspections for air toxics.

  18. Improving Access to Long-Acting Contraceptive Methods and Reducing Unplanned Pregnancy Among Women with Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Black, Kirsten I.; Day, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Much has been written about the consequences of substance use in pregnancy, but there has been far less focus on the prevention of unintended pregnancies in women with substance use disorders (SUDs). We examine the literature on pregnancy incidence for women with SUDs, the clinical and economic benefits of increasing access to long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods in this population, and the current hurdles to increased access and uptake. High rates of unintended pregnancies and poor physical and psychosocial outcomes among women with SUDs underscore the need for increased access to, and uptake of, LARC methods among these women. A small number of studies that focused on improving access to contraception, especially LARC, via integrated contraception services predominantly provided in drug treatment programs were identified. However, a number of barriers remain, highlighting that much more research is needed in this area. PMID:27199563

  19. 78 FR 4446 - Exempt Chemical Preparations Under the Controlled Substances Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... CSA certain compounds, mixtures, or preparations containing a controlled substance, if he finds that such compounds, mixtures, or preparations meet the requirements detailed in 21 U.S.C. 811(g)(3)(B).\\1... Assistant Administrator may exempt a chemical preparation or mixture from the application of...

  20. The psychological experience of nursing mothers upon learning of a toxic substance in their breast milk.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, S L

    1982-05-01

    This study explores the psychological reactions of a group of nursing mothers whose breast milk was inadvertently contaminated with a toxic fire-retardant chemical, polybrominated bihenyl. In particular, the extent to which the 97 mothers in the study denied the presence and possible effects of the chemical in their offspring is examined. Corresponding psychological defenses and reactions such as guilt or ambivalence in the nursing relationship and efforts at mastery of the situation are described with accompanying clinical illustrations. Insofar as the presence of a variety of toxic chemicals in the environment has been reported, the psychological reactions discussed here may have widespread application.

  1. Toxicogenomics in vitro as an alternative tool for safety evaluation of petroleum substances and PAHs with regard to prenatal developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tsitou, Polyxeni; Heneweer, Marjoke; Boogaard, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    The REACH legislation requires chemicals - including petroleum substances - that are put on the EU market in quantities greater than 1000 tonnes/year, to be tested for prenatal developmental toxicity. This will require large numbers of animals since prenatal development toxicity testing is animal-intensive. The application of toxicogenomic technologies might reduce the number of animals to study prenatal developmental toxicity of petroleum substances by allowing their grouping into categories with the same toxicological properties. This substance categorization may be supported by similarities in molecular fingerprints. The developmental toxicity effects observed in some oil products are most likely related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with high-molecular weight. However, the current review indicates that even though the available studies provide clues regarding the HOX, FOX, SHH and PAX family genes, which regulate functions in skeleton development, single individual genes cannot be used as biomarkers of PAHs exposure and subsequent prenatal developmental toxicity. Furthermore, it should be considered that toxicogenomic technologies applied to specific tissues/organs testing might lead to unreliable results regarding developmental toxicity due to induction of tissue-specific pathways. Thus, an approach which applies a battery of in vitro tests including the zebrafish embryo test, embryonic stem cells, and the whole embryo culture is suggested as it would be more relevant for studying developmental effects in the terms of substances categorization.

  2. QSAR screening of 70,983 REACH substances for genotoxic carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and developmental toxicity in the ChemScreen project.

    PubMed

    Wedebye, Eva B; Dybdahl, Marianne; Nikolov, Nikolai G; Jónsdóttir, Svava Ó; Niemelä, Jay R

    2015-08-01

    The ChemScreen project aimed to develop a screening system for reproductive toxicity based on alternative methods. QSARs can, if adequate, contribute to the evaluation of chemical substances under REACH and may in some cases be applied instead of experimental testing to fill data gaps for information requirements. As no testing for reproductive effects should be performed in REACH on known genotoxic carcinogens or germ cell mutagens with appropriate risk management measures implemented, a QSAR pre-screen for 70,983 REACH substances was performed. Sixteen models and three decision algorithms were used to reach overall predictions of substances with potential effects with the following result: 6.5% genotoxic carcinogens, 16.3% mutagens, 11.5% developmental toxicants. These results are similar to findings in earlier QSAR and experimental studies of chemical inventories, and illustrate how QSAR predictions may be used to identify potential genotoxic carcinogens, mutagens and developmental toxicants by high-throughput virtual screening.

  3. [A system for predicting the toxicity and hazard of chemical substances, based on the joint use of logistic and numerical methods].

    PubMed

    Kharchevnikova, N V

    2005-01-01

    A version of a logical combinatorial intellectual system (DMS system) has been developed to predict the toxicity and hazards of chemical substances. The system is based on the combined description of the substances, which includes both structural and numerical descriptors, particularly those characterizing the reactivity of compounds or their metabolites. The selection of numerical descriptors is based on the classification of processes of the interaction of the substance with the body in accordance with the key stage of the mechanism responsible for its toxic action. The new version of the DSM system takes into account the fact that the toxicity and hazard of chemicals are frequently determined by their bioactivation. Examples of how to apply the system to the prediction of carcinogenicity are given.

  4. Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

    1991-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA`s Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

  5. Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

    1991-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

  6. [Meconium as a new biological material for detecting intrauterine exposure to toxic substances].

    PubMed

    Lisowska-Myjak, Barbara

    2005-07-01

    The use of licit and illicit drugs and exposure to other xenobiotic agents during pregnancy is common. These substances are known to have adverse effects on the pregnancy and fetus; however information on fetal exposure is sparse due to the lack of an appropriate measure of exposure. Meconium analysis is a new method for identifying in utero exposure of infants to a number of illicit and legal drugs, alcohol, nicotine, heavy metals, pesticides, congenital infections. It's testing is non-invasive, highly accurate and able to detect prior exposure in utero during 12-40 weeks of gestation. This has implications for toxicology to develop improved methods to identify exposed infants.

  7. Biomarkers of Exposure to Toxic Substances. Volume 3: Proteomics, Biomarkers to Kidney and Organ Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    not reveal any interesting proteins (Data is not shown). All of the spots turned out to be keratins. 3.1.2.2 Conclusions on puromycin toxicity...hamster) Odorant-binding protein precursor - Rattus norvegicus (Rat) 0.543 2.105 Oleandomycin polyketide synthase , modules 5...Using Government drawings, specifications, or other data included in this document for any purpose other than Government procurement does not

  8. Use of environmental health-risk analysis for managing toxic substances

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.

    1985-03-01

    This paper presents a set of simple models used to assess health risks based on toxicity, environmental mobility and persistence. These models use a representative landscape in order to describe the steady-state distribution of arsenic, tritiated water, and TCDD as a result of continuous additions to soil. This information is used to assess potential exposures. Application of the screening model to three chemically different carcinogens reveals that the environmental health risk does not scale with direct measures of toxicity. As estimated here, the environmental health risk of TCDD relative to tritiated water and arsenic is roughly an order of magnitude less than its cancer potency relative to these compounds. The difference is attributable in large part to the immobility of TCDD relative to tritium and the lower persistence of TCDD compared to arsenic. The purpose is to present a simple procedure for using the relative behavior of toxic species under prototype conditions as a basis for risk management. 21 refs., 4 tabs. (ACR)

  9. Integrative rodent models for assessing male reproductive toxicity of environmental endocrine active substances

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Jacques; Eustache, Florence; Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie Chantal; Livera, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    In the present review, we first summarize the main benefits, limitations and pitfalls of conventional in vivo approaches to assessing male reproductive structures and functions in rodents in cases of endocrine active substance (EAS) exposure from the postulate that they may provide data that can be extrapolated to humans. Then, we briefly present some integrated approaches in rodents we have recently developed at the organism level. We particularly focus on the possible effects and modes of action (MOA) of these substances at low doses and in mixtures, real-life conditions and at the organ level, deciphering the precise effects and MOA on the fetal testis. It can be considered that the in vivo experimental EAS exposure of rodents remains the first choice for studies and is a necessary tool (together with the epidemiological approach) for understanding the reproductive effects and MOA of EASs, provided the pitfalls and limitations of the rodent models are known and considered. We also provide some evidence that classical rodent models may be refined for studying the multiple consequences of EAS exposure, not only on the reproductive axis but also on various hormonally regulated organs and tissues, among which several are implicated in the complex process of mammalian reproduction. Such models constitute an interesting way of approaching human exposure conditions. Finally, we show that organotypic culture models are powerful complementary tools, especially when focusing on the MOA. All these approaches have contributed in a combinatorial manner to a better understanding of the impact of EAS exposure on human reproduction. PMID:24369134

  10. Clearing of toxic substances: are there differences between the available liver support devices?

    PubMed

    Krisper, Peter; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Stauber, Rudolf E

    2011-09-01

    Toxins accumulating in liver failure split into water solved (e.g. ammonia) and albumin bound substances (e.g. bilirubin). Because the latter cannot be removed by conventional haemodialysis, special liver support systems have been developed. The majority of data concerning elimination efficiency exist for the cell-free devices Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) and Prometheus, as they have been commercially available in Europe since many years. Overall, Prometheus provides higher clearances for most liver toxins, especially if they are tightly albumin bound. However, for bile acids and cytokines no such differences could be found. Single pass albumin dialysis (SPAD) can be assumed to be equally effective as MARS. None of the bioartificial liver support systems being developed is on the market today and published clearance data are scarce. In general, clearance efficiency for albumin bound substances is relatively low in all systems currently available. Besides optimizing biocompatibility and selectivity, future technologies should also focus on improved detoxification efficiency of liver support devices.

  11. Assessment of the levels of potentially toxic substances around a transect of anthrosols in Aqaba shoreline, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahsha, Mohammad; Al-Rousan, Saber; Al-Jawasreh, Raid

    2016-04-01

    Soils are the major sink for potentially toxic substances (PTSs) such as heavy metals released into the environment by emissions from the quickly increasing of human impact including industrial mine tailings, disposal of high metal wastes, land misuse, wastewater irrigation, spillage of petrochemicals, and atmospheric deposition. The present study concerns the properties variability and soil biological health status in abandoned salt transportation port site in the Jordanian coast of the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. Seven sites were selected according to different morphological and pedological conditions, anthropogenic impact and the same climate conditions. Successively, all locations were sampled for topsoil in the period between spring-summer 2014. Field observations as well as laboratory analysis including heavy metal concentrations (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn); soil chemo-physical parameters (pH, soil dry mass, carbonate, water holding, organic carbon content, soil particle size distribution), and quality of soil's biological community were determined. The anthropogenic influence related to former port activity on soils of the studied area is evident. Soils in the studied area site are highly contaminated by PTSs, mainly Cu and Zn, by 648, 298.6 mgKg-1respectively. Former activities proved to affect the microarthropods community altering both quantity and quality of soil and the chemo-physical structure of the microhabitats. The evaluation of soil biological quality index (QBS-ar) of the surface horizons from the study area is demonstrated that the area is "sufferings" since it is affected by PTSs contamination resulting in a failure in the ecological success of secondary recolonization after abandonment. However, there is an increasing need for further research in the soils of Aqaba focusing on soil health management , combining QBS-ar index with soil chemo-physical properties. Key words: Potentially Toxic Substances, Heavy Metals, Soil Quality.

  12. ADVERSE EFFECTS OF ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDE AND TOXIC SUBSTANCES ON REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT IN THE MALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) or chemical mixtures alter androgen-response tissues via a variety of mechanisms including mimicking or blocking the action of the natural ligand to the androgen receptor (AR), inhibiting steroid hormone synthesis or by acting a...

  13. Bioaccumulation of toxic substances associated with dredging and dredged material disposal: a literature review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seelye, James G.; Mac, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    A literature review of sediment bioassessment was conducted as the first step in the development of a more standardized and ecologically sound test procedure for evaluating sediment quality. Based on the review, the authors concluded that 1) a standardized laboratory bioassessment test should consist of flowthrough exposure of at least 10 days duration using more than one aquatic organism including at least an infaunal benthic invertebrate and a fish species. 2) Before adoption of a laboratory sediment bioassessment procedure, the laboratory results should be evaluated by comparison with field conditions. 3) Most current sediment bioassessment regulatory tests measure acute toxicity or bioaccumulation. Development of tests to evaluate chronic, sublethal effects is needed.

  14. ABILITY OF ECOSAR, TOPKAT, NEURAL NETWORKS, AND ASTER TO PREDICT TOXICITY OF CHEMICALS TO AQUATIC BIOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) which provides the basis for assessing and managing toxic substances in Canada, is being revised. Several new mandates have been introduced in the Act...

  15. Peer consultation on relationship between PAC profile and toxicity of petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jacqueline; Maier, Andrew; Kohrman-Vincent, Melissa; Dourson, Michael L

    2013-11-01

    An expert peer consultation panel reviewed a report by the PAC Analysis Task Group, which hypothesized that systemic, developmental, and reproductive toxicity observed in repeated-dose dermal toxicity studies was related to polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) content. Peer consultations seek to solicit scientific and technical input from experts on the scientific basis and merits of the subject report. This peer consultation panel included nine scientists with expertise in petroleum chemistry, biostatistics, toxicology, risk assessment, structure activity, and reproductive and developmental toxicology. The panel evaluated the technical quality of the PAC report and provided recommendations for improving the statistical and biological approaches. The PAC report authors revised their methods and documentation, which are published elsewhere in this supplement. A review of the post peer consultation manuscripts confirmed that many of the key suggestions from expert panel members were considered and incorporated. In cases where the PAC report authors did not fully incorporate panel suggestions from the peer consultation, they have provided an explanation and support for their decision. This peer consultation demonstrates the value of formal engagement of peers in development of new scientific methods and approaches.

  16. Toxic Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Toxic hepatitis is an inflammation of your liver in reaction to certain substances to which you're exposed. Toxic hepatitis can be caused by alcohol, chemicals, drugs or ...

  17. Ameliorating effects of extracellular polymeric substances excreted by Thalassiosira pseudonana on algal toxicity of CdSe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Saijin; Jiang, Yuelu; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Creeley, Danielle; Schwehr, Kathleen A; Quigg, Antonietta; Chin, Wei-Chun; Santschi, Peter H

    2013-01-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered nanoparticles (ENs) that have found increasing applications and shown great potential in drug delivery, biological imaging and industrial products. Knowledge of their stability, fate and transport in the aquatic environment is still lacking, including details of how these nanomaterials interact with marine phytoplankton. Here, we examined the toxicity of functionalized CdSe/ZnS QDs (amine- and carboxyl-) by exposing them for five days to Thalassiosira pseudonana (marine diatom) grown under different nutrient-conditions (enriched versus nitrogen-limited media). The released polysaccharides and proteins, the major components of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured to assess their potential effects on the interactions between QDs and T. pseudonana. The partitioning of QDs was analyzed by monitoring the concentration of Cd in different size fractions of the cultures (i.e., filtrate, <0.22 μm and permeate, <3 kDa). We found that the Cd release of QDs in the T. pseudonana culture was dependent on the nutrient conditions and nature of QDs' surface coating. Both amine- and carboxyl-functionalized QDs exhibited higher rates of Cd release in N-limited cultures than in nutrient enriched cultures. The results also showed that amine-functionalized QDs aggregate with minimal Cd release, independent of nutrient conditions. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images confirmed that aggregates are composed of QDs and the culture matrix (EPS). In addition, both types of QDs showed limited toxicity to T. pseudonana. The increasing production of proteins induced by QDs suggests that extracellular proteins might be involved in the detoxification of QDs to T. pseudonana via the Cd release of QDs. Our results here demonstrated that EPS can play an ameliorating role in QD toxicity, fate and transport in the aquatic environment.

  18. Raising awareness of new psychoactive substances: chemical analysis and in vitro toxicity screening of 'legal high' packages containing synthetic cathinones.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ana Margarida; Valente, Maria João; Carvalho, Márcia; Dias da Silva, Diana; Gaspar, Helena; Carvalho, Félix; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Guedes de Pinho, Paula

    2015-05-01

    The world's status quo on recreational drugs has dramatically changed in recent years due to the rapid emergence of new psychoactive substances (NPS), represented by new narcotic or psychotropic drugs, in pure form or in preparation, which are not controlled by international conventions, but that may pose a public health threat comparable with that posed by substances listed in these conventions. These NPS, also known as 'legal highs' or 'smart drugs', are typically sold via Internet or 'smartshops' as legal alternatives to controlled substances, being announced as 'bath salts' and 'plant feeders' and is often sought after for consumption especially among young people. Although NPS have the biased reputation of being safe, the vast majority has hitherto not been tested and several fatal cases have been reported, namely for synthetic cathinones, with pathological patterns comparable with amphetamines. Additionally, the unprecedented speed of appearance and distribution of the NPS worldwide brings technical difficulties in the development of analytical procedures and risk assessment in real time. In this study, 27 products commercialized as 'plant feeders' were chemically characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was also evaluated, for the first time, the in vitro hepatotoxic effects of individual synthetic cathinones, namely methylone, pentedrone, 4-methylethcathinone (4-MEC) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). Two commercial mixtures ('Bloom' and 'Blow') containing mainly cathinone derivatives were also tested, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) was used as the reference drug. The study allowed the identification of 19 compounds, showing that synthetic cathinones are the main active compounds present in these products. Qualitative and quantitative variability was found in products sold with the same trade name in matching or different 'smartshops'. In the toxicity studies performed in

  19. Large Scale Numerical Modelling to Study the Dispersion of Persistent Toxic Substances Over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulinger, A.; Petersen, G.

    2003-12-01

    For the past two decades environmental research at the GKSS Research Centre has been concerned with airborne pollutants with adverse effects on human health. The research was mainly focused on investigating the dispersion and deposition of heavy metals like lead and mercury over Europe by means of numerical modelling frameworks. Lead, in particular, served as a model substance to study the relationship between emissions and human exposition. The major source of airborne lead in Germany was fuel combustion until the 1980ies when its use as gasoline additive declined due to political decisions. Since then, the concentration of lead in ambient air and the deposition rates decreased in the same way as the consumption of leaded fuel. These observations could further be related to the decrease of lead concentrations in human blood measured during medical studies in several German cities. Based on the experience with models for heavy metal transport and deposition we have now started to turn our research focus to organic substances, e.g. PAHs. PAHs have been recognized as significant air borne carcinogens for several decades. However, it is not yet possible to precisely quantify the risk of human exposure to those compounds. Physical and chemical data, known from literature, describing the partitioning of the compounds between particle and gas phase and their degradation in the gas phase are implemented in a tropospheric chemistry module. In this way, the fate of PAHs in the atmosphere due to different particle type and size and different meteorological conditions is tested before carrying out large-scale and long-time studies. First model runs have been carried out for Benzo(a)Pyrene as one of the principal carcinogenic PAHs. Up to now, nearly nothing is known about degradation reactions of particle bound BaP. Thus, they could not be taken into account in the model so far. On the other hand, the proportion of BaP in the gas phase has to be considered at higher ambient

  20. 40 CFR 716.120 - Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies. 716.120 Section 716.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING Specific Chemical Listings § 716.120 Substances and listed mixtures...

  1. 40 CFR 716.120 - Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substances and listed mixtures to which this subpart applies. 716.120 Section 716.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING Specific Chemical Listings § 716.120 Substances and listed mixtures...

  2. Urinary concentrations of toxic substances: an assessment of alternative approaches to adjusting for specific gravity.

    PubMed

    Sorahan, Tom; Pang, Dong; Esmen, Nurtan; Sadhra, Steven

    2008-11-01

    Alternative approaches of adjusting urinary concentration of cadmium for differences in specific gravity of biological samples were assessed. The main analysis used 2922 cadmium-in-urine samples collected in the period 1968-1989 from workers at a UK nickel-cadmium battery facility. Geometric means of cadmium-in-urine, adjusted and unadjusted for specific gravity, were obtained for 21 different values of specific gravity ranging from 1.010 to 1.030. There was a highly significant positive trend (P < 0.001) of unadjusted cadmium-in-urine with specific gravity. Conventional adjustment for specific gravity led to a highly significant negative trend (P < 0.001) of adjusted cadmium-in-urine with specific gravity, SG. An approach proposed by Vij and Howell, involving the introduction of a z coefficient, led to satisfactory adjustment. Conventional adjustment of specific gravity leads to overcompensation of the confounding effects of specific gravity. An alternative method is available and should probably be adopted when interpreting urine biological samples for all chemical substances.

  3. Complexing of toxic hydrolysable tannins of yellow-wood (Terminalia oblongata) and harendong (Clidemia hirta) with reactive substances: an approach to preventing toxicity.

    PubMed

    Murdiati, T B; McSweeney, C S; Lowry, J B

    1991-10-01

    Ruminants consuming either tannic acid or hydrolysable tannins from the Australian yellow-wood tree (Terminalia oblongata) and the Indonesian shrub Clidemia hirta are intoxicated by simple phenolics liberated in the gut. The affinity of these tannins and of the simple phenolic gallic acid for the two proteins casein and pepsin, polyvinylpyrolidone (PVP), activated charcoal and Ca(OH)2 was examined in vitro. The studies were undertaken to predict the effect of these phenolics on digestion and to identify substances that would act as antidotes by precipitating phenolics. Tannins but not gallic acid were precipitated as stable complexes with both pepsin and casein at pH 3-5. Optimal complexing of tannin with protein occurred at a weight ratio of 1:1. Ionic strength and temperature did not affect the amount of tannin precipitated from solution with protein. The precipitation of tannins with PVP and Ca(OH)2 was unaffected by pH within the range 2-8 while maximum binding with activated charcoal occurred between pH 3 and 7. In contrast to protein, the other substances complexed with gallic acid; only gallic acid-PVP complexes were affected by pH. Calcium hydroxide bound more tannin and gallic acid on a weight basis than PVP and charcoal. Both Ca(OH)2 and activated charcoal should complex with phenolics in the forestomach, abomasum and intestines. The reaction of hydrolysable tannins and proteins at the pH found in the abomasum suggests that hydrolysable tannins would interfere with enzyme function and protein digestion post-ruminally rather than in the forestomach.

  4. Persistent toxic substances released from uncontrolled e-waste recycling and actions for the future.

    PubMed

    Man, Ming; Naidu, Ravi; Wong, Ming H

    2013-10-01

    The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal was adopted on March 22, 1989 and enforced on May 5, 1992. Since then, the USA, one of the world's largest e-waste producers, has not ratified this Convention or the Basel Ban Amendment. Communities are still debating the legal loophole, which permits the export of whole products to other countries provided it is not for recycling. In January 2011, China's WEEE Directive was implemented, providing stricter control over e-waste imports to China, including Hong Kong, while emphasizing that e-waste recycling is the producers' responsibility. China is expected to supersede the USA as the principal e-waste producer, by 2020, according to the UNEP. Uncontrolled e-waste recycling activities generate and release heavy metals and POPs into the environment, which may be re-distributed, bioaccumulated and biomagnified, with potentially adverse human health effects. Greater efforts and scientific approaches are needed for future e-product designs of minimal toxic metal and compound use, reaping greater benefits than debating the definition and handling responsibilities of e-waste recycling.

  5. Dynamics of an electrochemical biosensor for the detection of toxic substances in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Laurent; Ospina, Juan

    2016-05-01

    A proposed analytical method focuses on electrolyte transport to the electrode of an electrochemical cell. The recombinant Escherichia coli whole-cell biosensor detects toxicity in water based on a set of biochemical reactors. Previous contributions elucidated the kinetics of product formation and validated a mathematical model for its diffusion in the chamber. This work introduces an approach to investigate the dynamics of the probe using Laplace transforms and an effective time constant. The transfer function between the electrolyte production and the total current revealed a faster response for larger electrode radii. Both the first-order and effective time constants increased with the chamber height and radius. Separation of variables yields closed-form solutions and helps estimate the kinetics of p-aminophenol generation. When the bacteria were exposed to phenol concentrations of 1.6, 8.3 and 16 ppm, the corresponding overall rate constants were 5.11x10-7, 1.13x10-6 and 1.99x10-6 (product concentration unit/s2), respectively. In addition to parameter estimation, the method can be applied to perform sensitivity analysis and aid manufacturers in meeting design specifications of biosensors.

  6. 3-Nitropropionate, the toxic substance of Indigofera, is a suicide inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Alston, T A; Mela, L; Bright, H J

    1977-09-01

    We have shown that 3-nitropropionate, an isoelectronic analogue of succinate, is a suicide inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase [succinate:(acceptor) oxidoreductase, EC 1.3.99.1] as follows. (i) When rat liver mitochondria oxidize succinate in the presence of 3-nitropropionate carbanion, the rate of O(2) consumption decreases exponentially to a zero value. This pattern is duplicated by subsequent additions of mitochondria. The dependence of the apparent first-order rate constant for enzyme inhibition, as well as the number of enzyme turnovers completed before inhibition, on the concentrations of 3-nitropropionate carbanion and succinate are those expected for an active site-directed and irreversible inhibitor. (ii) The inactivated enzyme is not resuscitated by centrifugation and washing of the mitochondria, in contrast to malonate-treated enzyme, and malonate protects against irreversible, inhibition. (iii) The inhibitor species is 3-nitropropionate carbanion and no external nucleophile is required for inhibition. (iv) The respiratory rates, respiratory control ratios, and ADP/O ratios obtained with NAD-linked substrates are unaffected by 3-nitropropionate carbanion. These results show that 3-nitropropionate carbanion is a highly specific, time-dependent, and irreversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase. By analogy with the reaction of nitroethane with D-amino acid oxidase, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that the carbanionic inhibitor forms a covalent N-5 adduct with the active site flavin. However, the precise mechanism of inactivation, as well as mechanistic extrapolations to the oxidation of succinate, must await the elucidation of the structure of the modified enzyme. We can now explain the toxicity of plants such as Indigofera endecaphylla for mammals and fowl as being due to the irreversible blockage of the Krebs cycle by 3-nitropropionate carbanion.

  7. 3-Nitropropionate, the toxic substance of Indigofera, is a suicide inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Alston, Theodore A.; Mela, Leena; Bright, Harold J.

    1977-01-01

    We have shown that 3-nitropropionate, an isoelectronic analogue of succinate, is a suicide inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase [succinate:(acceptor) oxidoreductase, EC 1.3.99.1] as follows. (i) When rat liver mitochondria oxidize succinate in the presence of 3-nitropropionate carbanion, the rate of O2 consumption decreases exponentially to a zero value. This pattern is duplicated by subsequent additions of mitochondria. The dependence of the apparent first-order rate constant for enzyme inhibition, as well as the number of enzyme turnovers completed before inhibition, on the concentrations of 3-nitropropionate carbanion and succinate are those expected for an active site-directed and irreversible inhibitor. (ii) The inactivated enzyme is not resuscitated by centrifugation and washing of the mitochondria, in contrast to malonate-treated enzyme, and malonate protects against irreversible, inhibition. (iii) The inhibitor species is 3-nitropropionate carbanion and no external nucleophile is required for inhibition. (iv) The respiratory rates, respiratory control ratios, and ADP/O ratios obtained with NAD-linked substrates are unaffected by 3-nitropropionate carbanion. These results show that 3-nitropropionate carbanion is a highly specific, time-dependent, and irreversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase. By analogy with the reaction of nitroethane with D-amino acid oxidase, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that the carbanionic inhibitor forms a covalent N-5 adduct with the active site flavin. However, the precise mechanism of inactivation, as well as mechanistic extrapolations to the oxidation of succinate, must await the elucidation of the structure of the modified enzyme. We can now explain the toxicity of plants such as Indigofera endecaphylla for mammals and fowl as being due to the irreversible blockage of the Krebs cycle by 3-nitropropionate carbanion. PMID:269430

  8. Lake Chapala (mexico) and its Geological Framework as a Possible Source of Potentially Toxic Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarate, P. F.; Camacho, J. B.; Salazar, S. G.; na

    2011-12-01

    Lake Chapala basin (LCH) is located in western Mexico in the neotectonic Rift Citala and its Geothermal system (GS) associated. LCH is matter of public health concern because Lake Chapala is a primary source of water to Guadalajara Metropolitan Zone (~4 M inhabitants). The major lithology of LCH is volcanic in origin and andesite-basalt in composition; the minor lithology is made of lacustrine sedimentary deposits. The GS at LCH is characterized by: sublacustrine and terrestrial hot springs; hydrothermal alteration halos; metallic prospects hosted in E-W structures; carbonate deposits (sinter); mud volcanoes and hydrothermal oil deposits. Most of the thermal springs (64-83° C) that flow at LCH have carbonated water ([HCO3]; 193-240 mg L-1) as in the sublacustrine spring "Los Gorgos"; exceptionally and near of the hydrothermal alteration halos the hydrothermal spring water of San Juan Cosala (SJC) is sulfated ([SO42-] 479 mg L-1). The hydrogeochemistry of SJC and of lake water is showed in Table 1. The lithogeochemistry of sediments and the clarke of basaltic rock (Krauskopf, 1967) are presented in Table 2. Oil is formed by the thermal transformation of sedimentary organic matter. At LCH the causative agent of thermal alteration of sedimentary organic matter and mass transfer was a fossil (>50,000 yr; 14C) hydrothermal system. The presence of metals in the LCH natural environment (sediments, rocks, hot springs, water, etc.) is apparent and this content is accordingly with the clarke in basaltic rocks. To conclude that the quantification of a potentially toxic metal (PTM; "heavy" metals) is harmful to aquatic organism in LCH this research has been complemented as follows: applying the sequential extraction technique (Tessier et al., 1979) to establish the geochemical fraction to which the PTM is bound: a) Interchangeable metals (F1); b) metals bound to carbonates (F2); c) metals bound to Fe and Mn oxides (F3); Metals bound to organic matter(F4) and, e) residual

  9. [Reduction of a risk of the deleterious effects of persistent toxic substances on the health of the far north population].

    PubMed

    Dudarev, A A; Mizerniuk, V N; Chupakhin, V S; Lebedev, G B; Chashchin, V P

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the general principles and procedure of the development and implementation of measures to decrease and prevent environmental pollution with persistent toxic substances (PTS) in the Russian Arctic and, accordingly, to reduce a risk of the deleterious effects of PTS on human health. Based on the results of a study of PTS in the Russian Arctic (from the Kola Peninsula to Chukotka), the authors first systematized the basic lines and actions and formulated specific measures to reduce the North population's exposure to PTSs, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, organic chlorine pesticides (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, hexachlorocyclohexane, hexachlorobenzene, etc.), and heavy metals (mercury, lead, cadmium). A package of measures is aimed at maximally reducing the presence of PTS-containing objects and materials in the north (via detection, collection, and extermination), at neutralizing the soils in settlement lands, at setting up safe water consumption systems, at organizing effective control over the safe use of chemicals and the levels of PTS in raw food materials and foodstuffs, and at working out recommendations on safe procedures for food purchase, storage, and cooking.

  10. Assessment of the predictive capacity of the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity test method to identify substances not classified for acute oral toxicity (LD50>2000 mg/kg): results of an ECVAM validation study.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pilar; Cole, Thomas; Curren, Rodger; Gibson, Rosemary M; Liebsch, Manfred; Raabe, Hans; Tuomainen, Anita M; Whelan, Maurice; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka

    2013-04-01

    Assessing chemicals for acute oral toxicity is a standard information requirement of regulatory testing. However, animal testing is now prohibited in the cosmetics sector in Europe, and strongly discouraged for industrial chemicals. Building on the results of a previous international validation study, a follow up study was organised to assess if the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity assay could identify substances not requiring classification as acute oral toxicants under the EU regulations. Fifty-six coded industrial chemicals were tested in three laboratories, each using one of the following protocols: the previously validated protocol, an abbreviated version of the protocol and the protocol adapted for an automation platform. Predictions were very similar among the three laboratories. The assay exhibited high sensitivity (92-96%) but relatively low specificity (40-44%). Three chemicals were under predicted. Assuming that most industrial chemicals are not likely to be acutely toxic, this test method could prove a valuable component of an integrated testing strategy, a read-across argument, or weight-of-evidence approach to identify non toxic chemicals (LD50>2000 mg/kg). However, it is likely to under predict chemicals acting via specific mechanisms of action not captured by the 3T3 test system, or which first require biotransformation in vivo.

  11. Polyglutamine length-dependent toxicity from α1ACT in Drosophila models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Wei-Ling; Qiblawi, Sultan H.; Hosking, Ryan R.; Gomez, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is a neurodegenerative disease that results from abnormal expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat. SCA6 is caused by CAG triplet repeat expansion in the gene CACNA1A, resulting in a polyQ tract of 19-33 in patients. CACNA1A, a bicistronic gene, encodes the α1A calcium channel subunit and the transcription factor, α1ACT. PolyQ expansion in α1ACT causes degeneration in mice. We recently described the first Drosophila models of SCA6 that express α1ACT with a normal (11Q) or hyper-expanded (70Q) polyQ. Here, we report additional α1ACT transgenic flies, which express full-length α1ACT with a 33Q repeat. We show that α1ACT33Q is toxic in Drosophila, but less so than the 70Q version. When expressed everywhere, α1ACT33Q-expressing adults die earlier than flies expressing the normal allele. α1ACT33Q causes retinal degeneration and leads to aggregated species in an age-dependent manner, but at a slower pace than the 70Q counterpart. According to western blots, α1ACT33Q localizes less readily in the nucleus than α1ACT70Q, providing clues into the importance of polyQ tract length on α1ACT localization and its site of toxicity. We expect that these new lines will be highly valuable for future work on SCA6. PMID:27979829

  12. Acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.; Haws, R.; Little, D.; Reese, D.; Peterson, C.; Moeller, G.

    1995-12-31

    This study develops data on the acute aquatic toxicity of selected biodiesel fuels which may become subject to environmental effects test regulations under the US Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The test substances are Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Methyl Soyate (MS), a biodiesel mixture of 20% REE and 80% Diesel, a biodiesel mixture of 50% REE and diesel, and a reference substance of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel. The test procedure follows the Daphnid Acute Toxicity Test outlined in 40 CFR {section} 797.1300 of the TSCA regulations. Daphnia Magna are exposed to the test substance in a flow-through system consisting of a mixing chamber, a proportional diluter, and duplicate test chambers. Novel system modifications are described that accommodate the testing of oil-based test substances with Daphnia. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an EC50, an effective concentration producing immobility in 50% of the test specimen.

  13. 40 CFR 710.25 - Chemical substances for which information must be reported.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL INVENTORY REGULATIONS 2002 Inventory Update Reporting... the Master Inventory File at the beginning of a reporting period described in § 710.33, unless...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting...

  19. An evaluation of fish early life stage tests for predicting reproductive and longer-term toxicity from plant protection product active substances.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, James R; Maynard, Samuel K; Crane, Mark

    2014-08-01

    The chronic toxicity of chemicals to fish is routinely assessed by using fish early life stage (ELS) test results. Fish full life cycle (FLC) tests are generally required only when toxicity, bioaccumulation, and persistence triggers are met or when there is a suspicion of potential endocrine-disrupting properties. This regulatory approach is based on a relationship between the results of fish ELS and FLC studies first established more than 35 yrs ago. Recently, this relationship has been challenged by some regulatory authorities, and it has been recommended that more substances should undergo FLC testing. In addition, a project proposal has been submitted to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to develop a fish partial life cycle (PLC) test including a reproductive assessment. Both FLC and PLC tests are animal- and resource-intensive and technically challenging and should therefore be undertaken only if there is clear evidence that they are necessary for coming to a regulatory decision. The present study reports on an analysis of a database of paired fish ELS and FLC endpoints for plant protection product active substances from European Union draft assessment reports and the US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs Pesticide Ecotoxicity Database. Analysis of this database shows a clear relationship between ELS and FLC responses, with similar median sensitivity across substances when no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) are compared. There was also no indication that classification of a substance as a mammalian reproductive toxicant leads to more sensitive effects in fish FLC tests than in ELS tests. Indeed, the response of the ELS tests was generally more sensitive than the most sensitive reproduction NOEC from a FLC test. This analysis indicates that current testing strategies and guidelines are fit for purpose and that there is no need for fish full or partial life cycle tests for most plant protection

  20. Threshold of toxicological concern for chemical substances present in the diet: a practical tool for assessing the need for toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Kroes, R; Galli, C; Munro, I; Schilter, B; Tran, L; Walker, R; Würtzen, G

    2000-01-01

    The de minimis concept acknowledges a human exposure threshold value for chemicals below which there is no significant risk to human health. It is the underlying principle for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation on substances used in food-contact articles. Further to this, the principle of Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) has been developed and is now used by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) in their evaluations. Establishing an accepted TTC would benefit consumers, industry and regulators, since it would preclude extensive toxicity evaluations when human intakes are below such threshold, and direct considerable time and cost resources towards testing substances with the highest potential risk to human health. It was questioned, however, whether specific endpoints that may potentially give rise to low-dose effects would be covered by such threshold. In this review, the possibility of defining a TTC for chemical substances present in the diet was examined for general toxicity endpoints (including carcinogenicity), as well as for specific endpoints, namely neurotoxicity and developmental neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity and developmental toxicity. For each of these endpoints, a database of specific no-observed-effect levels (NOELs) was compiled by screening oral toxicity studies. The substances recorded in each specific database were selected on the basis of their demonstrated adverse effects. For the neurotoxicity and developmental neurotoxicity databases, it was intended to cover all classes of compounds reported to have either a demonstrated neurotoxic or developmentally neurotoxic effect, or at least, on a biochemical or pharmacological basis were considered to have a potential for displaying such effects. For the immunotoxicity endpoint, it was ensured that only immunotoxicants were included in the database by selecting most of the substances from the Luster et al. database, provided that they satisfied the

  1. Toxic Substances from Coal Combustion: A Comprehensive Assessment: Quarterly report, 1 July 1996-30 September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bool, L.E.; Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Peterson, T.W.; Sarofim, A.F.; Olmez, I.; Zeng, T.; Crowley, S.; Finkelman, R.

    1996-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPS) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UKy), the University of Connecticut, and Princeton University to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO{sub x}, combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI`s existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). Extensive coal characterization and laboratory work has begun in order to develop and test new sub-models. Trace element concentrations in the Pittsburgh, Elkhorn/Hazard, and Illinois No. 6 coals, and in size/density fractions of these coals, were completed. Coal characterization in the past quarter also included direct identification of the modes of occurrence of various trace inorganic species in coal and ash using unique analytical techniques such as XAFS analysis and selective leaching. Combustion testing of these two coals was begun and preliminary data obtained on trace element 0301 vaporization in the combustion zone. Modeling efforts in the past quarter include the development on a preliminary model to assess mercury speciation in combustion systems.

  2. Toxic Substances Portal- Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some PDF files may be electronic conversions from paper copy or other electronic ASCII text files. This ... format errors. Users are referred to the original paper copy of the toxicological profile for the official ...

  3. ASSESSING CONTAMINANT SENSITIVITY OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES: TOXICANT CLASSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with determining if the manufacture, use, or disposal of a chemical will present an unreasonable risk ...

  4. 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  5. High concentrations of protein test substances may have non-toxic effects on Daphnia magna: implications for regulatory study designs and ecological risk assessments for GM crops.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Alan; Burns, Andrea; Hamer, Mick

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory testing for possible adverse effects of insecticidal proteins on non-target organisms (NTOs) is an important part of many ecological risk assessments for regulatory decision-making about the cultivation of insect-resistant genetically modified (IRGM) crops. To increase confidence in the risk assessments, regulatory guidelines for effects testing specify that representative surrogate species for NTOs are exposed to concentrations of insecticidal proteins that are in excess of worst-case predicted exposures in the field. High concentrations in effects tests are achieved by using protein test substances produced in microbes, such as Escherichia coli. In a study that exposed Daphnia magna to a single high concentration of a microbial test substance containing Vip3Aa20, the insecticidal protein in MIR162 maize, small reductions in growth were observed. These effects were surprising as many other studies strongly suggest that the activity of Vip3Aa20 is limited to Lepidoptera. A plausible explanation for the effect on growth is that high concentrations of test substance have a non-toxic effect on Daphnia, perhaps by reducing its feeding rate. A follow-up study tested that hypothesis by exposing D. magna to several concentrations of Vip3Aa20, and a high concentration of a non-toxic protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Vip3Aa20 and BSA had sporadic effects on the reproduction and growth of D. magna. The pattern of the effects suggests that they result from non-toxic effects of high concentrations of protein, and not from toxicity. The implications of these results for regulatory NTO effects testing and ERA of IRGM crops are discussed.

  6. High concentrations of protein test substances may have non-toxic effects on Daphnia magna: Implications for regulatory study designs and ecological risk assessments for GM crops

    PubMed Central

    Raybould, Alan; Burns, Andrea; Hamer, Mick

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory testing for possible adverse effects of insecticidal proteins on non-target organisms (NTOs) is an important part of many ecological risk assessments for regulatory decision-making about the cultivation of insect-resistant genetically modified (IRGM) crops. To increase confidence in the risk assessments, regulatory guidelines for effects testing specify that representative surrogate species for NTOs are exposed to concentrations of insecticidal proteins that are in excess of worst-case predicted exposures in the field. High concentrations in effects tests are achieved by using protein test substances produced in microbes, such as Escherichia coli. In a study that exposed Daphnia magna to a single high concentration of a microbial test substance containing Vip3Aa20, the insecticidal protein in MIR162 maize, small reductions in growth were observed. These effects were surprising as many other studies strongly suggest that the activity of Vip3Aa20 is limited to Lepidoptera. A plausible explanation for the effect on growth is that high concentrations of test substance have a non-toxic effect on Daphnia, perhaps by reducing its feeding rate. A follow-up study tested that hypothesis by exposing D. magna to several concentrations of Vip3Aa20, and a high concentration of a non-toxic protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Vip3Aa20 and BSA had sporadic effects on the reproduction and growth of D. magna. The pattern of the effects suggests that they result from non-toxic effects of high concentrations of protein, and not from toxicity. The implications of these results for regulatory NTO effects testing and ERA of IRGM crops are discussed. PMID:25523175

  7. ACT HEALTHY: A Combined Cognitive-Behavioral Depression and Medication Adherence Treatment for HIV-Infected Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daughters, Stacey B.; Magidson, Jessica F.; Schuster, Randi M.; Safren, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The two most common comorbid conditions with HIV are substance use disorders and depression, and individuals with comorbid HIV, depression, and substance dependence face a more chronic and treatment-resistant course. As an example of how to adapt evidence-based approaches to a complex comorbid population, the current case study examined the…

  8. 1997 toxic chemical release inventory -- Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Zaloudek, D.E.

    1998-06-30

    Two listed toxic chemicals were used at the Hanford Site above established activity thresholds: phosphoric acid and chlorine. Because total combined quantities of chlorine released, disposed, treated, recovered through recycle operations, co-combusted for energy recovery, and transferred to off-site locations for the purpose of recycle, energy recovery, treatment, and/or disposal, amounted to less than 500 pounds, the Hanford Site qualified for the alternate one million pound threshold for chlorine. Accordingly, this Toxic Chemical Release Inventory includes a Form A for chlorine, and a Form B for phosphoric acid.

  9. 1995 Toxic chemical release inventory: Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Mincey, S.L.

    1996-08-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act (EPCRA) requires the annual submittal of toxic chemical release information to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.Executive Order 12856, `Federal Compliance With Right-to-Know Laws and Pollution Prevention Requirements` extends the requirements of EPCRA to all Federal agencies. The following document is the August 1996 submittal of the Hanford Site Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report. Included is a Form R for ethylene glycol, the sole chemical used in excess of the established regulatory thresholds at the Hanford Site by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and its contractors during Calendar Year 1995.

  10. 40 CFR 710.25 - Chemical substances for which information must be reported.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chemical substances for which information must be reported. 710.25 Section 710.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL INVENTORY REGULATIONS 2002 Inventory Update...

  11. 40 CFR 710.45 - Chemical substances for which information must be reported.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chemical substances for which information must be reported. 710.45 Section 710.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL INVENTORY REGULATIONS Inventory Update Reporting...

  12. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strains isolated from moisture-damaged buildings produced surfactin and a substance toxic to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mikkola, Raimo; Andersson, Maria A; Grigoriev, Pavel; Teplova, Vera V; Saris, Nils-Erik L; Rainey, Frederick A; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S

    2004-04-01

    Fungicidic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strains isolated from the indoor environment of moisture-damaged buildings contained heat-stable, methanol-soluble substances that inhibited motility of boar spermatozoa within 15 min of exposure and killed feline lung cells in high dilution in 1 day. Boar sperm cells lost motility, cellular ATP, and NADH upon contact to the bacterial extract (0.2 microg dry wt/ml). Two bioactive substances were purified from biomass of the fungicidal isolates. One partially characterized substance, 1,197 Da, was moderately hydrophobic and contained leucine, proline, serine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and tyrosine, in addition to chromophore(s) absorbing at 365 nm. In boar sperm and human neural cells (Paju), the compound depolarized the transmembrane potentials of mitochondria (Delta Psi(m)) and the plasma membrane (Delta Psi(p)) after a 20-min exposure and formed cation-selective channels in lipid membranes, with a selectivity K(+):Na(+):Ca(2+) of 26:15:3.5. The other substance was identified as a plasma-membrane-damaging lipopeptide surfactin. Plate-grown biomass of indoor Bacillus amyloliquefaciens contained ca. 7% of dry weight of the two substances, 1,197 Da and surfactin, in a ratio of 1:6 (w:w). The in vitro observed simultaneous collapse of both cytosolic and mitochondrial ATP in the affected mammalian cell, induced by the 1,197-Da cation channel, suggests potential health risks for occupants of buildings contaminated with such toxins.

  13. A novel express bioassay for detecting toxic substances in water by recording rhodopsin-mediated photoelectric responses in Chlamydomonas cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, E G; Altschuler, I M; Häder, D P; Sineshchekov, O A

    2000-09-01

    The influence of Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Pb2+ and formaldehyde on rhodopsin-mediated photoelectric responses in the green flagellate Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was investigated using three modifications of a recently developed population method for electrical recording (in nonoriented, phototactically preoriented (PO) and gravitactically preoriented cell suspensions). The addition of the heavy metal ions at concentrations several times lower than those known to affect swimming velocity and other physiological parameters in photosynthetic flagellates led to a rapid (one to several minutes) inhibition of the responses. Formaldehyde induced a significant temporary increase in the gravi-orientation of the cells simultaneously with an inhibition of their photoelectric cascade, photo-orientation and motility. The signals recorded in PO suspensions were more sensitive to all tested toxic substances than those recorded from nonoriented cells and indicated a switch from negative to positive phototaxis in the presence of the toxic substances. Of the two major components of the photoelectric cascade, the regenerative response was more sensitive to the tested heavy metal ions, but not to formaldehyde, than the photoreceptor current. The results obtained show that measurement of the photoinduced electrical responses in Chlamydomonas cell suspensions is a powerful novel bioassay for testing environmental pollutants in water samples.

  14. Air and seawater pollution and air-sea gas exchange of persistent toxic substances in the Aegean Sea: spatial trends of PAHs, PCBs, OCPs and PBDEs.

    PubMed

    Lammel, Gerhard; Audy, Ondřej; Besis, Athanasios; Efstathiou, Christos; Eleftheriadis, Kostas; Kohoutek, Jiři; Kukučka, Petr; Mulder, Marie D; Přibylová, Petra; Prokeš, Roman; Rusina, Tatsiana P; Samara, Constantini; Sofuoglu, Aysun; Sofuoglu, Sait C; Taşdemir, Yücel; Vassilatou, Vassiliki; Voutsa, Dimitra; Vrana, Branislav

    2015-08-01

    Near-ground air (26 substances) and surface seawater (55 substances) concentrations of persistent toxic substances (PTS) were determined in July 2012 in a coordinated and coherent way around the Aegean Sea based on passive air (10 sites in 5 areas) and water (4 sites in 2 areas) sampling. The direction of air-sea exchange was determined for 18 PTS. Identical samplers were deployed at all sites and were analysed at one laboratory. hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) as well as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its degradation products are evenly distributed in the air of the whole region. Air concentrations of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and o,p'-DDT and seawater concentrations of p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD were elevated in Thermaikos Gulf, northwestern Aegean Sea. The polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener pattern in air is identical throughout the region, while polybrominated diphenylether (PBDE)patterns are obviously dissimilar between Greece and Turkey. Various pollutants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, DDE, and penta- and hexachlorobenzene are found close to phase equilibrium or net-volatilisational (upward flux), similarly at a remote site (on Crete) and in the more polluted Thermaikos Gulf. The results suggest that effective passive air sampling volumes may not be representative across sites when PAHs significantly partitioning to the particulate phase are included.

  15. [Responsibilities of enterprises introducing new dangerous chemical substances and preparations].

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Jacek; Majka, Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    also defines the terms "substance" and "chemical preparation" and sets the rules for classification and labelling of dangerous chemical substances and preparations (criteria for classification, rules for labelling, introduces the official classification and labelling of certain substances in the "list of dangerous substances"). The Act identifies methods to be used in the tests of physico-chemical properties, toxicity and ecotoxicity of chemical substances and preparations to meet the legal requirements and sets criteria to be followed by institutions involved in such testing.

  16. Prenatal Exposure to Substances of Abuse: An Evaluation of the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act Emergency Grants Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    A program was developed and implemented to train early childhood educators in two New York City school districts in how to identify and refer students who have been prenatally exposed to drugs or alcohol. Two substance abuse prevention and intervention specialists implemented the program, training 88 teachers in 4 schools. At the end of the…

  17. 40 CFR 2.306 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Toxic Substances Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... health and safety data are not eligible for confidential treatment. No information to which this section... entitled to confidential treatment under this subpart. However, any such disclosure shall be made in a... the fact that the information otherwise might be entitled to confidential treatment under this...

  18. 76 FR 30835 - Requests for Modification or Revocation of Toxic Substances Control Act Section 5 Significant New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... (202) 566-0280. Docket visitors are required to show photographic identification, pass through a metal... substitute for paper. 2. Use and acceptance of electronic signatures, when practicable. EPA's Cross-Media... manner set forth in 40 CFR 720.40(a)(2)(i), (ii), or (iii). Paper requests must be submitted either via...

  19. Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) can act as a penetration enhancer for topically applied substances

    PubMed Central

    Otberg, Nina; Grone, Diego; Meyer, Lars; Schanzer, Sabine; Hoffmann, Gerd; Ackermann, Hanns; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Background: Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) irradiation has been shown to enhance penetration of clinically used topically applied substances in humans through investigation of functional effects of penetrated substances like vasoconstriction by cortisone. Aim of the study: Investigation of the influence of wIRA irradiation on the dermatopharmacokinetics of topically applied substances by use of optical methods, especially to localize penetrating substances, in a prospective randomised controlled study in humans. Methods: The penetration profiles of the hydrophilic dye fluorescein and the lipophilic dye curcumin in separate standard water-in-oil emulsions were determined on the inner forearm of test persons by tape stripping in combination with spectroscopic measurements. Additionally, the penetration was investigated in vivo by laser scanning microscopy. Transepidermal water loss, hydration of the epidermis, and surface temperature were determined. Three different procedures (modes A, B, C) were used in a randomised order on three separate days of investigation in each of 12 test persons. In mode A, the two dyes were applied on different skin areas without water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) irradiation. In mode B, the skin surface was irradiated with wIRA over 30 min before application of the two dyes (Hydrosun® radiator type 501, 10 mm water cuvette, orange filter OG590, water-filtered spectrum: 590–1400 nm with dominant amount of wIRA). In mode C, the two dyes were applied and immediately afterwards the skin was irradiated with wIRA over 30 min. In all modes, tape stripping started 30 min after application of the formulations. Main variable of interest was the ratio of the amount of the dye in the deeper (second) 10% of the stratum corneum to the amount of the dye in the upper 10% of the stratum corneum. Results: The penetration profiles of the hydrophilic fluorescein showed in case of pretreatment or treatment with wIRA (modes B and C) an increased

  20. Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approach combining chemical manipulations and aquatic toxicity testing, generally with whole organisms, to systematically characterize, identify and confirm toxic substances causing toxicity in whole sediments and sediment interstitial waters. The approach is divided into thre...

  1. A comparison of fresh and used aircraft oil for the identification of toxic substances linked to aerotoxic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Megson, David; Ortiz, Xavier; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Mulder, Michel F A; Balouet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-09-01

    Fresh and used aircraft engine lubricants (Mobil Jet Oil II) were analysed using a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FTICRMS) and comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-HRTOFMS). The composition of the fresh oil was established, with special focus to its tricresyl phosphate (TCP) content as this has formed the focus for most investigations into aerotoxic syndrome. The results showed that only four TCP isomers were present at detectable levels in the fresh oil: mmm-TCP, mmp-TCP, ppm-TCP and ppp-TCP. The results indicate that the formulation of Mobile Jet Oil II does not contain the more toxic ortho substituted TCP isomers at concentrations above 0.0005%. The temperatures of jet engines during operation are greater than 200 °C which creates the potential to alter the composition of the original oil and create other toxic compounds. The results show there may be a significant risk from alkylated cresyl phosphates, which were identified in the used oils at concentrations calculated in the range of 0.13-0.69%. w/w. Several xylenyl and ethylphenyl phosphates have been shown to exhibit a similar toxicity to ortho substituted TCP isomers which makes there discovery in used oil significant. These compounds should be included in future aircraft air quality studies and when assessing the risks and causes of aerotoxic syndrome.

  2. Update to agency for toxic substances and disease registry 2012 report on assessment of biota exposure to mercury originating from Savannah River Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhne, W.

    2015-08-10

    The purpose of this report is to 1) update previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) assessment reports (Kvartek et al. 1994 and Halverson et al. 2008) on the fate of mercury in the Savannah River Site (SRS) environment and 2) address comments and recommendations from the review of SRS by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) concerning the evaluation of exposures to contaminants in biota originating from the SRS. The ATSDR reviewed and evaluated data from SRS, South Carolina Department of Health & Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR) concerning the non-radioactive contaminant mercury. This report will provide a response and update to conclusions and recommendations made by the ATSDR.

  3. 40 CFR 721.170 - Notification requirements for selected new chemical substances that have completed pre-manu...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... may result in significantly increased human exposure to or environmental release of the impurity or... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT...) Selection of substances. In accordance with the expedited process specified in this section, EPA may...

  4. 40 CFR 721.170 - Notification requirements for selected new chemical substances that have completed pre-manu...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... may result in significantly increased human exposure to or environmental release of the impurity or... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT...) Selection of substances. In accordance with the expedited process specified in this section, EPA may...

  5. 40 CFR 721.170 - Notification requirements for selected new chemical substances that have completed pre-manu...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... may result in significantly increased human exposure to or environmental release of the impurity or... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT...) Selection of substances. In accordance with the expedited process specified in this section, EPA may...

  6. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment. Quarterly report number 2, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bool, L.E. III; Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Wendt, J.; Sarofim, A.F.; Zeng, T.

    1996-04-01

    The technical objectives of this project are: to identify the effect of the mode-of-occurrence of toxic elements in coal on the partitioning of these elements among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash during the combustion of pulverized coal; to identify the mechanisms governing the post-vaporization interaction of toxic elements and major minerals or unburnt char; to determine the effect of combustion environment (i.e., fuel rich or fuel lean) on the partitioning of trace elements between vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash during the combustion of pulverized coal; to model the partitioning of toxic elements between various chemical species in the vapor phase and between the vapor phase and complex aluminosilicate melts; and to develop a frame work for incorporating the results of the program into the Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). A description of the work plan for accomplishing these objectives is presented in Section 2 of this report. In Section 3 of this report the authors define a detailed list of deliverables expected and consists of a group by group breakdown of the critical experiments to be performed, and a discussion of how that data fits into the overall program. In Section 4 the four coals selected for this program are reported. In Section 5 preliminary XAFs analysis by UKy personnel is discussed. Section 6 consists of a discussion of trace element analysis (INAA) of two size fractions of the Elkhorn-Hazard coal. A discussion of the modifications to the U.Arizona self-sustained combustor is presented in Section 7. Modifications included addition of a baghouse and improvements in the on-line safety and analytical systems. In Section 8 a detailed QA/QC protocol is presented.

  7. Adolescent Criminal Acts Committed and Substance Use with a Voluntary Sample Recruited from Post-Secondary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collette, Tessa; Pakzad, Sarah; Bergheul, Saïd

    2015-01-01

    The current study focuses on exploring the relationships between various patterns of criminal acts committed, drug use, alcohol consumption, and adult personality traits in a sample with a low probability of life course persistent criminal behaviors. A retrospective questionnaire and the NEO-FFI (Five Factor Inventory) were administered to a…

  8. Fast Screening Techniques for Neurotoxigenic Substances and Other Toxicants and Pollutants Based on Thermal Lensing and Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Franko, Mladen; Liu, Mingqiang; Boškin, Aleš; Delneri, Ambra; Proskurnin, Mikhail A

    2016-01-01

    Efficient environment protection and human safety require high-throughput analysis techniques for pollutants or toxicants for large sample sets. State-of-the-art HPLC and GC coupled to various detecting strategies offer excellent sensitivity and selectivity, though they are quite time-extensive (2 - 3 samples/h or less when sample preparation is involved). Efforts are made towards screening techniques with high sample throughputs simultaneously providing detection limits below the maximum contaminant levels for the analyte. However, such approaches frequently sacrifice the selectivity or sensitivity (or just give a yes/no response). In this review, we demonstrate thermal-lens spectrometry and microscopy as highly sensitive spectrometric techniques in combination with flow-injection analysis (FIA) and microfluidic FIA along with lab-on-a-chip chemistry for fast screening (several samples/h and up to 20 samples/min) exemplified by organophosphates and carbamates as neurotoxigenic compounds. Various approaches to determining other topical toxicants, like microcystin and cyanopigments as its indicators, allergens, and carcinogenic chromate, are also discussed.

  9. Induction by toxic-shock-syndrome toxin-1 of a circulating tumor necrosis factor-like substance in rabbits and of immunoreactive tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 from human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ikejima, T; Okusawa, S; van der Meer, J W; Dinarello, C A

    1988-11-01

    A shock-like syndrome was induced in rabbits by administering toxic-shock-syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1); tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like activity was detected in sera of rabbits 3.5 h after injection, as measured by cytotoxic effects on the tumorigenic L929 murine fibroblast cell line. Appearance of this activity in sera coincided with onset of significant shock-related hemodynamic changes. TSST-1 stimulated release of TNF-like material from rabbit mononuclear cells in culture. Human mononuclear cells also secreted a cytotoxic substance shown to be TNF by radioimmunoassay. Maximal TNF secretion was higher in human mononuclear cells stimulated with TSST-1 than in those stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Lipopolysaccharide, however, was a more potent inducer of interleukin-1 alpha and interleukin-1 beta from the same cells than was TSST-1. Because TNF and interleukin-1 act synergistically during induction of a shock-like state, these results suggest that part of the TSST-1-induced shock is due to production of interleukin-1 and TNF.

  10. Summary of Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Potential Impacts Related to Hanford Cleanup and the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA)

    SciTech Connect

    IWATATE, D.F.

    2000-07-14

    This white paper provides an initial assessment of the potential impacts of the Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) regulations (and proposed revisions) on the Hanford site cleanup and addresses concerns that MTCA might impose inappropriate or unachievable clean-up levels and drive clean-up costs higher. The white paper and supporting documentation (Appendices A and B) provide DOE with a concise and up-to-date review of potential MTCA impacts to cost and schedule for the Hanford site activities. MTCA, Chapter 70.105D RCW, is the State of Washington's risk based law governing clean-up of contaminated sites and is implemented by The Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) under the MTCA Clean-up Regulations, Chapter 173-340 WAC. Hanford cleanup is subject to the MTCA requirements as Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) for those areas of Hanford being managed under the authority of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the state Dangerous Waste Regulations. MTCA provides Ecology with authority to implement site clean-up actions under both the federal RCRA and CERCLA regulations as well as the state regulations. Most of the Hanford clean-up actions are being implemented under the CERCLA program, however, there is a trend is toward increased use of MTCA procedures and standards. The application of MTCA to the Hanford clean-up has been an evolving process with some of the Hanford clean-up actions considering MTCA standards as an ARAR and using MTCA procedures for remedy selection. The increased use and application of MTCA standards and procedures could potentially impact both cost and schedule for the Hanford cleanup.

  11. Pharmaceuticals, hormones, personal-care products, and other organic wastewater contaminants in water resources: Recent research activities of the U.S. Geological Survey's toxic substances hydrology program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Focazio, Michael J.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Buxton, Herbert T.

    2003-01-01

    Recent decades have brought increasing concerns for potential contamination of water resources that could inadvertently result during production, use, and disposal of the numerous chemicals offering improvements in industry, agriculture, medical treatment, and even common household products. Increasing knowledge of the environmental occurrence or toxicological behavior of these contaminants from various studies in Europe, United States, and elsewhere has resulted in increased concern for potential adverse environmental and human health effects (Daughton and Ternes, 1999). Ecologists and public health experts often have incomplete understandings of the toxicological significance of many of these contaminants, particularly long-term, low-level exposure and when they occur in mixtures with other contaminants (Daughton and Ternes, 1999; Kümmerer, 2001). In addition, these ‘emerging contaminants’ are not typically monitored or assessed in ambient water resources. The need to understand the processes controlling the transport and fate of these contaminants in the environment, and the lack of knowledge of the significance of long-term exposures have increased the need to study environmental occurrence down to trace (nanogram per liter) levels. Furthermore, the possibility that mixtures of environmental contaminants may interact synergistically or antagonistically has increased the need to characterize the types of mixtures that are found in our waters. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Toxic Substances Hydrology Program (Toxics Program) is developing information and tools on emerging water-quality issues that will be used to design and improve water-quality monitoring and assessment programs of the USGS and others, and for proactive decision-making by industry, regulators, the research community, and the public (http://toxics.usgs.gov/regional/emc.html). This research on emerging water-quality issues includes a combination of laboratory work to develop new analytical

  12. [Biochemical adaptation of the barley root cells to toxic substances. 1. Effect of aluminum on the phosphohydrolase activity].

    PubMed

    Tikhaia, N I; Fedorovskaia, M D

    2000-01-01

    Acid phosphatase (AP) and two nucleotidases with a top affinity to ATP and Ca (AN1) or AMP and Mg (AN2) were found among acid phosphohydrolases of the apoplast. After 15 min aluminum chloride at 100 microM induced activity of both membrane-bound and soluble phosphohydrolases. The highest induction of the enzymes by aluminum was observed at pH 4.5. A relatively high concentration of aluminum chloride (2 mM) stimulated AN2 and inhibited AN1, while AP activity remained unaltered. We propose that they activation of membrane-bound and soluble acid phosphohydrolases is one of the protective mechanisms of barley root apoplast against the toxic effect of aluminum chloride.

  13. Notification: Background Investigation Services New Assignment Notification: EPA’s Efforts to Incorporate Environmental Justice Into Clean Air Act Inspections for Air Toxics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this memorandum is to notify you that the EPA OIG plans to begin the preliminary research phase of an evaluation of the U.S. EPA's efforts to incorporate environmental justice into Clean Air Act inspections for air toxics.

  14. 1997 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Heather McBride

    1997-07-01

    The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (EPCIL4), Title III, Section 313 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA)], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires all federal facilities to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators of manufacturing, processing, or production facilities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), nitric acid was the only toxic chemical used in 1997 that met the reportable threshold limit of 10,000 lb. Form R is the only documentation required by the Environmental Protection Agency, and it is included in the appendix of this report. This report, as requested by DOE, is provided for documentation purposes. In addition, a detailed description of the evaluation and reporting process for chemicals and processes at LANL has been included.

  15. Toxic'' terminology

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of terms (e.g., toxic chemicals,'' toxic pollutants,'' toxic waste,'' and similar nomenclature) refer to substances that are subject to regulation under one or more federal environmental laws. State laws and regulations also provide additional, similar, or identical terminology that may be confused with the federally defined terms. Many of these terms appear synonymous, and it is easy to use them interchangeably. However, in a regulatory context, inappropriate use of narrowly defined terms can lead to confusion about the substances referred to, the statutory provisions that may apply, and the regulatory requirements for compliance under the applicable federal statues. This information Brief provides regulatory definitions, a brief discussion of compliance requirements, and reference for the precise terminology that should be used when referring to toxic'' substances regulated under federal environmental laws. A companion CERCLA Information Brief (EH-231-003/0191) addresses hazardous'' nomenclature.

  16. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION--A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT, PHASE II: ELEMENT MODES OF OCCURRENCE FOR THE OHIO 5/6/7, WYODAK AND NORTH DAKOTA COAL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Allan Kolker; Stanley J. Mroczkowski; Curtis A. Palmer; Kristen O. Dennen; Robert B. Finkelman; John H. Bullock Jr.

    2002-05-30

    This study reports on the second phase (Phase II) of USGS research activities in support of DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95101 ''Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion--A Comprehensive Assessment'', funded under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-95PC95145. The purpose of the study was to provide a quantitative and semi-quantitative characterization of the modes of occurrence of trace elements in coal samples investigated under Phase II, including (1) Ohio 5/6/7, an Ohio bituminous coal sample blended from the No.5, No.6, and No.7 beds; (2) North Dakota, a lignite sample from the Falkirk Mine, Underwood, ND, and (3) Wyodak, a sub-bituminous coal sample from the Cordero Mine, Gillette, WY. Samples from these coal beds were selected for their range in rank and commercial applicability. Results of this research provide basic information on the distribution of elements in Phase II coal samples, information needed for development of a commercial predictive model for trace-element behavior during coal combustion.

  17. 1998 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III

    SciTech Connect

    Marjorie B. Stockton

    1999-11-01

    The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) of 1986 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA), Title III], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires that all federal facilities evaluate the need to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report as prescribed in Title III, Section 313 of this Act. This annual report is due every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators who manufacture, process, or otherwise use certain toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), no EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 1998 above the reportable threshold limits of 10,000 lb or 25,000 lb. Therefore LANL was not required to submit any Toxic Chemical Release Inventory reports (Form Rs) for 1998. This document was prepared to provide a detailed description of the evaluation on chemical usage and EPCRA Section 313 threshold determinations for LANL for 1998.

  18. [Examination of analytical method for triphenyltin (TPT) and tributyltin (TBT) to revise the official methods based on "Act on the Control of Household Products Containing Harmful Substances"].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Isama, Kazuo; Nakashima, Harunobu; Yoshida, Jin; Ooshima, Tomoko; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Hitoshi; Shioda, Hiroko; Kikuchi, Yoko; Matsuoka, Atsuko; Nishimura, Tetsuji

    2012-01-01

    The use of triphenyltin (TPT) and tributyltin (TBT) in some household products is banned by "Act on the Control of Household Products Containing Harmful Substances" in Japan. To revise the official analytical method, the method for detecting these organotin compounds was examined in six laboratories using a textile product, water-based adhesive, oil-based paint, which contained known amounts of TPT and TBT (0.1, 1.0, 10 μg/g). TPT and TBT were measured by GC-MS after ethyl-derivation with sodium tetraethylborate. The TBT recoveries in the samples were 70-120%. The TPT recoveries in the water-based adhesive samples were 80-110%, while its concentrations in the textile product and oil-based paint samples decreased because of dephenylation during storage. However, the precision of the method examined was satisfactory because most coefficients of variation for TPT and TBT in the samples were less than 10%. Furthermore, the revised method was able to detect concentrations lower than the officially regulated value. However, the sample matrix and the condition of analytical instrument might affect the estimated TPT and TBT concentrations. Therefore, the revised method may not be suitable for quantitative tests; rather, it can be employed to judge the acceptable levels of these organotin compounds by comparing the values of control sample containing regulated amounts of TPT and TBT with those for an unknown sample, with deuterated TPT and TBT as surrogate substances. It is desirable that TPT in textile and oil-based paint samples are analyzed immediately after the samples obtained because of the decomposition of TPT.

  19. Formulation of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) with safe EPA-exempt substance significantly diminishes the Anopheles sergentii population in a desert oasis

    PubMed Central

    Revay, Edita E.; Schlein, Yosef; Tsabari, Onie; Kravchenko, Vasiliy; Qualls, Whitney; De-Xue, Rui; Beier, John C.; Traore, Sekou F.; Doumbia, Seydou; Hausmann, Axel; Müller, Günter C.

    2016-01-01

    Attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) is a highly effective method which targets mosquitoes based on their sugar foraging behavior, by presenting baits of attractive compounds in combination with sugar and oral toxin to local mosquito populations. Environmental concerns and insecticide selection-pressure have prompted investigations of novel, ecologically-harmless substances which can be used as insecticides. This study examined the efficacy of microencapsulated garlic-oil as the oral toxin component of ATSB for controlling Anopheles sergentii populations inhabiting desert-surrounded wetlands in Israel. ATSB solution containing 0.4% encapsulated garlic oil was applied to local vegetation around a streamlet located in the lower Jordan Valley. To determine the propensity of bait ingestion, and assess the potential ecological impact of the method, mosquito and non-target specimens were collected and tested for the presence of natural plant- or attractive sugar bait (ASB)-derived sugars. Over the experimental period, biting-pressure values in the ATSB treatment site decreased by 97.5%, while at the control site, treated with non-toxic ASB, no significant changes were observed. Approximately 70% of the mosquitoes collected before both treatments, as well as those captured following the application of ASB at the control site, were found to have ingested sugar prior to capture. Non-target insects were minimally affected by the treatment when ATSB was applied to foliage of non-flowering plants. Of the non-Diptera species, only 0.7% of the sampled non-target insects were found to have ingested ASB-solution which was applied to green vegetation, compared with 8.5% which have foraged on ASB-derived sugars applied to flowering plants. Conversely, a high proportion of the non-target species belonging to the order Diptera, especially non-biting midges, were found to have ingested foliage-applied ASB, with more than 36% of the specimens collected determined to have foraged on bait

  20. Formulation of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) with safe EPA-exempt substance significantly diminishes the Anopheles sergentii population in a desert oasis.

    PubMed

    Revay, Edita E; Schlein, Yosef; Tsabari, Onie; Kravchenko, Vasiliy; Qualls, Whitney; De-Xue, Rui; Beier, John C; Traore, Sekou F; Doumbia, Seydou; Hausmann, Axel; Müller, Günter C

    2015-10-01

    Attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) is a highly effective method which targets mosquitoes based on their sugar foraging behavior, by presenting baits of attractive compounds in combination with sugar and oral toxin to local mosquito populations. Environmental concerns and insecticide selection-pressure have prompted investigations of novel, ecologically-harmless substances which can be used as insecticides. This study examined the efficacy of microencapsulated garlic-oil as the oral toxin component of ATSB for controlling Anopheles sergentii populations inhabiting desert-surrounded wetlands in Israel. ATSB solution containing 0.4% encapsulated garlic oil was applied to local vegetation around a streamlet located in the lower Jordan Valley. To determine the propensity of bait ingestion, and assess the potential ecological impact of the method, mosquito and non-target specimens were collected and tested for the presence of natural plant- or attractive sugar bait (ASB)-derived sugars. Over the experimental period, biting-pressure values in the ATSB treatment site decreased by 97.5%, while at the control site, treated with non-toxic ASB, no significant changes were observed. Approximately 70% of the mosquitoes collected before both treatments, as well as those captured following the application of ASB at the control site, were found to have ingested sugar prior to capture. Non-target insects were minimally affected by the treatment when ATSB was applied to foliage of non-flowering plants. Of the non-Diptera species, only 0.7% of the sampled non-target insects were found to have ingested ASB-solution which was applied to green vegetation, compared with 8.5% which have foraged on ASB-derived sugars applied to flowering plants. Conversely, a high proportion of the non-target species belonging to the order Diptera, especially non-biting midges, were found to have ingested foliage-applied ASB, with more than 36% of the specimens collected determined to have foraged on bait

  1. Substance use - phencyclidine (PCP)

    MedlinePlus

    PCP; Substance abuse - phencyclidine; Drug abuse - phencyclidine; Drug use - phencyclidine ... PCP is a mind-altering drug. This means it acts on your brain (central nervous system) and changes your mood, behavior, and the way you relate to ...

  2. Toxicity of seven priority hazardous and noxious substances (HNSs) to marine organisms: Current status, knowledge gaps and recommendations for future research.

    PubMed

    Rocha, A Cristina S; Reis-Henriques, Maria Armanda; Galhano, Victor; Ferreira, Marta; Guimarães, Laura

    2016-01-15

    Shipping industry and seaborne trade have rapidly increased over the last fifty years, mainly due to the continuous increasing demand for chemicals and fuels. Consequently, despite current regulations, the occurrence of accidental spills poses an important risk. Hazardous and noxious substances (HNSs) have been raising major concern among environmental managers and scientific community for their heterogeneity, hazardous potential towards aquatic organisms and associated social-economic impacts. A literature review on ecotoxicological hazards to aquatic organisms was conducted for seven HNSs: acrylonitrile, n-butyl acrylate, cyclohexylbenzene, hexane, isononanol, trichloroethylene and xylene. Information on the mechanisms of action of the selected HNS was also reviewed. The main purpose was to identify: i) knowledge gaps in need of being addressed in future research; and ii) a set of possible biomarkers suitable for ecotoxicological assessment and monitoring in both estuarine and marine systems. Main gaps found concern the scarcity of information available on ecotoxicological effects of HNS towards marine species and their poorly understood mode of action in wildlife. Differences were found between the sensitivity of freshwater and seawater organisms, so endpoints produced in the former may not be straightforwardly employed in evaluations for the marine environment. The relationship between sub-individual effects and higher level detrimental alterations (e.g. behavioural, morphological, reproductive effects and mortality) are not fully understood. In this context, a set of biomarkers associated to neurotoxicity, detoxification and anti-oxidant defences is suggested as potential indicators of toxic exposure/effects of HNS in marine organisms. Overall, to support the development of contingency plans and the establishment of environmental safety thresholds, it will be necessary to undertake targeted research on HNS ecotoxicity in the marine environment. Research should

  3. Sources, fates, toxicity, and risks of trifluoroacetic acid and its salts: Relevance to substances regulated under the Montreal and Kyoto Protocols.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Keith R; Velders, Guus J M; Wilson, Stephen R; Madronich, Sasha; Longstreth, Janice; Aucamp, Pieter J; Bornman, Janet F

    2016-01-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is a breakdown product of several hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC), regulated under the Montreal Protocol (MP), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) used mainly as refrigerants. Trifluoroacetic acid is (1) produced naturally and synthetically, (2) used in the chemical industry, and (3) a potential environmental breakdown product of a large number (>1 million) chemicals, including pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and polymers. The contribution of these chemicals to global amounts of TFA is uncertain, in contrast to that from HCFC and HFC regulated under the MP. TFA salts are stable in the environment and accumulate in terminal sinks such as playas, salt lakes, and oceans, where the only process for loss of water is evaporation. Total contribution to existing amounts of TFA in the oceans as a result of the continued use of HCFCs, HFCs, and hydrofluoroolefines (HFOs) up to 2050 is estimated to be a small fraction (<7.5%) of the approximately 0.2 μg acid equivalents/L estimated to be present at the start of the millennium. As an acid or as a salt TFA is low to moderately toxic to a range of organisms. Based on current projections of future use of HCFCs and HFCs, the amount of TFA formed in the troposphere from substances regulated under the MP is too small to be a risk to the health of humans and environment. However, the formation of TFA derived from degradation of HCFC and HFC warrants continued attention, in part because of a long environmental lifetime and due many other potential but highly uncertain sources.

  4. Insurance Receipt and Readiness for Opportunities under the Affordable Care Act: A National Survey of Treatment Providers for Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Aletraris, Lydia; Edmond, Mary Bond; Roman, Paul M

    2017-04-13

    This study measures the readiness of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment to use opportunities under the Affordable Care Act by examining Medicaid and private insurance acceptance between 2011 and 2013, as well as center characteristics associated with acceptance. Data for this study were from a random sample of SUD treatment centers in the United States. Interviews were conducted on site and face to face, with administrative and clinical directors. We employed logistic regression analyses to examine Medicaid acceptance and private insurance acceptance. We found that 59% of centers accepted Medicaid and 55% accepted private insurance. Accredited centers were more likely to accept Medicaid. A 12-step orientation and greater reliance on female clients were negatively associated with Medicaid acceptance. Larger centers and centers with a greater percentage of counselors with advanced degrees had greater odds of accepting private insurance. Centers that offered residential treatment had lower odds of accepting either Medicaid or private insurance. For private insurance acceptance, having a specific track for homeless patients lowered the odds of acceptance, as did having a greater percentage of Hispanic clients. Newly insured individuals under the ACA may have difficulty finding a program that accepts insurance. Future research should examine effects of Medicaid expansion on SUD treatment delivery.

  5. Chronic toxicity of biphenyl to Daphnia magna Straus

    SciTech Connect

    Gersich, F.M.; Bartlett, E.A.; Murphy, P.G.; Milazzo, D.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a final test rule (1985) for biphenyl on the authority of Section 4(a) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Contained within this rule was the requirement for generating chronic daphnid toxicity data for biphenyl. Biphenyl is used primarily to produce dye carriers, heat-transfer fluids and alkylated biphenyls. The acute toxicity of biphenyl to Daphnia magna has been reported. The 48-hr LC50 values were 4.7 and 2.1 mg/L, respectively. To date, the chronic toxicity of biphenyl to fish and aquatic invertebrates has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the chronic toxicity of biphenyl to D. magna. The daphnid chronic toxicity test is designed to estimate the maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC). The MATC is defined as the concentration falling between the highest concentration showing no effect and the next higher concentration showing a toxic effect when compared to the controls.

  6. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS... mixtures. In order to minimize the need for animal testing, the Agency encourages the review of existing acute toxicity information on mixtures that are substantially similar to the mixture under...

  7. 40 CFR 798.4350 - Inhalation developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Specific Organ/Tissue... million (ppm). (6) “No-observed-effect level” is the maximum concentration in a test which produces no observed adverse effects. A no-observed-effect level is expressed in terms of weight or volume of...

  8. 40 CFR 798.4900 - Developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Specific Organ/Tissue Toxicity § 798.4900... weight of test substance (g, mg) per unit weight of a test animal (e.g., mg/kg). (3) No-observed-effect level is the maximum concentration in a test which produces no observed adverse effects. A...

  9. 40 CFR 798.4900 - Developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Specific Organ/Tissue Toxicity § 798.4900... weight of test substance (g, mg) per unit weight of a test animal (e.g., mg/kg). (3) No-observed-effect level is the maximum concentration in a test which produces no observed adverse effects. A...

  10. 34 CFR 84.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Controlled substance. 84.610 Section 84.610 Education... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further...

  11. 36 CFR 1212.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Controlled substance. 1212.610... Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by regulation at 21 CFR 1308.11...

  12. 43 CFR 43.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Controlled substance. 43.610 Section 43... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 43.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21...

  13. 49 CFR 32.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Controlled substance. 32.610 Section 32.610... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further...

  14. 28 CFR 83.610 - Controlled substance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Controlled substance. 83.610 Section 83...-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.610 Controlled substance. Controlled substance means a controlled substance in schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and...

  15. 78 FR 23767 - Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes a list of information... (ACHS-II)--New--Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Department of Health and...

  16. 78 FR 23766 - Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes a list of information... (ACHS-II)--New--Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Department of Health and...

  17. 75 FR 69086 - Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)--New--Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). Background and Brief Description On October 10, 2008, President Bush signed S. 1382: ALS Registry Act which... (ALS) Registry. The activities described are part of the effort to create the National ALS...

  18. Acute inhalation toxicity evaluation of a 93:7 mixture of perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane, a replacement candidate for ozone depleting substances. Interim report, July--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, M.L.; Leahy, H.F.; Vinegar, A.

    1997-10-01

    The DoD requires the development of toxicity profiles for chemical substitute candidates proposed to replace ozone depleting substances such as chloro- and fluorocarbons and halons. A 93:7 mixture of perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane was identified as a possible replacement candidate for ozone-depleting fire extinguishants. An acute inhalation toxicity test utilizing male and female Fischer 344 rats was performed on this test material. No deaths occurred in any of the rats exposed to 5.3 mg/L of the 93:7 perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane mixture. Body weights of male and female rats during the subsequent 14-day observation period were unaffected by treatment. The test material did not produce acute toxicity via the inhalation route.

  19. 40 CFR 712.5 - Method of identification of substances for reporting purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chemical have no reporting responsibilities under this Part. Note, however, that any method of extraction... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT CHEMICAL INFORMATION RULES General Provisions § 712.5 Method of... otherwise required, respondents must report only about quantities of a chemical that is defined as...

  20. 40 CFR 712.5 - Method of identification of substances for reporting purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chemical have no reporting responsibilities under this Part. Note, however, that any method of extraction... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT CHEMICAL INFORMATION RULES General Provisions § 712.5 Method of... otherwise required, respondents must report only about quantities of a chemical that is defined as...

  1. 40 CFR 712.5 - Method of identification of substances for reporting purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chemical have no reporting responsibilities under this Part. Note, however, that any method of extraction... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT CHEMICAL INFORMATION RULES General Provisions § 712.5 Method of... otherwise required, respondents must report only about quantities of a chemical that is defined as...

  2. COMPARISON OF EUROPEAN AND UNITED STATES APPROACHES TO NEW AND EXISTING SUBSTANCES REGULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical regulation in Europe and the U.S. share the goal of protection of human health and the environment, but regulatory requirements differ between the two jurisdictions. This presentation will review the approach taken in the U.S. under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSC...

  3. 40 CFR 68.130 - List of substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... methyl ether 107-30-2 5,000 b Crotonaldehyde 4170-30-3 20,000 b Crotonaldehyde, (E)- 123-73-9 20,000 b...,000 e 10025-87-3 Phosphorus oxychloride 5,000 b 10049-04-4 Chlorine dioxide 1,000 c 10102-43-9 Nitric... Act are the substances listed in Tables 1, 2, 3, and 4. Threshold quantities for listed toxic...

  4. 40 CFR 68.130 - List of substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... methyl ether 107-30-2 5,000 b Crotonaldehyde 4170-30-3 20,000 b Crotonaldehyde, (E)- 123-73-9 20,000 b...,000 e 10025-87-3 Phosphorus oxychloride 5,000 b 10049-04-4 Chlorine dioxide 1,000 c 10102-43-9 Nitric... Act are the substances listed in Tables 1, 2, 3, and 4. Threshold quantities for listed toxic...

  5. Who's protecting you from hazardous substances

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Employee accidents, life endangering spills of harmful chemicals, toxic materials leaching into drinking water, polluted air, crippling side effects of wonder metals and products, and human and animal deaths made it apparent that in order to protect and preserve the community and the environment, the community needed to be aware/knowledgeable of chemical uses and related possible dangers, i.e., it was time to establish rules and regulations for the use and disposal of hazardous substances and chemicals. This report details several organizations, acts, rules, and regulations created in the interest of hazardous materials safety.

  6. Toxic remediation

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  7. Toxicity and Intraocular Properties of a Novel Long-Acting Anti-Proliferative and Anti-Angiogenic Compound IMS2186

    PubMed Central

    Falkenstein, Iryna A.; Cheng, Lingyun; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Tammewar, Ajay M.; Barron, Erin C.; Silva, Gabriel A.; Li, Qi-Xiang; Yu, Dehua; Hysell, Michelle; Liu, Guohong; Ke, Ning; Macdonald, James E.; Freeman, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the intraocular properties and toxicity of IMS2186, a small molecule developed as an anti-choroidal neovascularization (anti-CNV) drug. Materials and Methods Cellular toxicity and mechanism of action was tested on cell lines in vitro. Intraocular studies used rabbits for drug dissolution as well as toxicity and rats for the treatment study as well as the toxicity confirmation study. Rabbits' eyes were injected with 2.5 mg of IMS2186 and observed for 36 weeks. Laser-induced CNV in rats was treated with IMS2186, Kenalog, or phosphate-buffered saline (pBS). Fluorescein angiography (FA) and immunohistochemical processing of the globes was performed. Results The anti-proliferative IC50 of IMS2186 for human fibroblast cells was 1.0–3.0 μM and 0.3–3.0 μM for human cancer cells; the IC50 of IMS2186 to inhibit endothelial tube formation was 0.1–0.3 μM. The IC50 of IMS2186 for inhibiting the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was 0.3–1 μM. The IC50 of IMS2186 for inhibiting macrophage migration was 1 μM. These biological properties were not species specific. IMS2186 can be formulated as a suspension for long-lasting release and when delivered intraocularly, no intraocular toxicity was observed by slit lamp exam, fundus exam, intraocular pressure measurements, or by electroretinography. FA showed a reduction in the leakage in eyes treated with IMS2186 and triamcinolone acetonide; DAPI staining also showed significantly less cellularity in IMS2186-treated lesions as compared to PBS (p = 0.0025). Conclusion IMS2186 may be a safe intraocular therapeutic agent for intraocular proliferation and angiogenesis. PMID:18600493

  8. 2006 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2007-12-12

    For reporting year 2006, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2006 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2006, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  9. 2002 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stockton

    2003-11-01

    For reporting year 2002, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds and mercury as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2002 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical usage and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2002 as well as provide background information about the data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999 EPA promulgated a final rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable under EPCRA Section 313. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  10. 2004 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stockton

    2006-01-15

    Section 313 of Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. For reporting year 2004, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds, nitric acid, and nitrate compounds as required under the EPCRA Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2004 above the reportable thresholds. This document provides a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2004, as well as background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  11. Framework for identifying chemicals with structural features associated with the potential to act as developmental or reproductive toxicants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shengde; Fisher, Joan; Naciff, Jorge; Laufersweiler, Michael; Lester, Cathy; Daston, George; Blackburn, Karen

    2013-12-16

    Developmental and reproductive toxicity (DART) end points are important hazard end points that need to be addressed in the risk assessment of chemicals to determine whether or not they are the critical effects in the overall risk assessment. These hazard end points are difficult to predict using current in silico tools because of the diversity of mechanisms of action that elicit DART effects and the potential for narrow windows of vulnerability. DART end points have been projected to consume the majority of animals used for compliance with REACH; thus, additional nonanimal predictive tools are urgently needed. This article presents an empirically based decision tree for determining whether or not a chemical has receptor-binding properties and structural features that are consistent with chemical structures known to have toxicity for DART end points. The decision tree is based on a detailed review of 716 chemicals (664 positive, 16 negative, and 36 with insufficient data) that have DART end-point data and are grouped into defined receptor binding and chemical domains. When tested against a group of chemicals not included in the training set, the decision tree is shown to identify a high percentage of chemicals with known DART effects. It is proposed that this decision tree could be used both as a component of a screening system to identify chemicals of potential concern and as a component of weight-of-evidence decisions based on structure-activity relationships (SAR) to fill data gaps without generating additional test data. In addition, the chemical groupings generated could be used as a starting point for the development of hypotheses for in vitro testing to elucidate mode of action and ultimately in the development of refined SAR principles for DART that incorporate mode of action (adverse outcome pathways).

  12. The Role of Substance Abuse in Psychotic versus Personality Disordered Offenders Detained under the Dutch Entrustment Act (TBS): An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goethals, Kris; Buitelaar, Jan; van Marle, Hjalmar

    2008-01-01

    Mentally disordered patients that abuse drugs or alcohol have a larger number of criminal convictions. Early starters who had their first conviction before the age of 18, especially, more often have a diagnosis of substance abuse and are more often intoxicated at the time of the offense compared to late starters. The present study involved four…

  13. Toxic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle tissue is highly sensitive to many substances. Early recognition of toxic myopathies is important, as they potentially are reversible on removal of the offending drug or toxin, with greater likelihood of complete resolution the sooner this is achieved. Clinical features range from mild muscle pain and cramps to severe weakness with rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and even death. The pathogenic bases can be multifactorial. This article reviews some of the common toxic myopathies and their clinical presentation, histopathologic features and possible underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:25037083

  14. Impact of the Clean Water Act on the levels of toxic metals in urban estuaries: The Hudson River estuary revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S.A.; Gill, G.A.

    1999-10-15

    To establish the impact of the Clean Water Act on the water quality of urban estuaries, dissolved trace metals and phosphate concentrations were determined in surface waters collected along the Hudson River estuary between 1995 and 1997 and compared with samples collected in the mid-1970s by Klinkhammer and Bender. The median concentrations along the estuary have apparently declined 36--56% for Cu, 55--89% for Cd, 53--85% for Ni, and 53--90% for Zn over a period of 23 years. These reductions appear to reflect improvements in controlling discharges from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants since the Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972. In contrast, levels of dissolved nutrients (PO{sub 4}) have remained relatively constant during the same period of time, suggesting that wastewater treatment plant improvements in the New York/New Jersey Metropolitan area have not been as effective at reducing nutrient levels within the estuary. While more advanced wastewater treatment could potentially reduce the levels of Ag and PO{sub 4} along the estuary, these improvements would have a more limited effect on the levels of other trace metals.

  15. 78 FR 43205 - Proposed Substances To Be Evaluated for Set 27 Toxicological Profiles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Proposed Substances To Be Evaluated for Set 27 Toxicological Profiles AGENCY: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR... evaluated for Set 27 toxicological profiles. SUMMARY: The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease...

  16. 40 CFR 700.17 - Addresses for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Addresses for the Office of Pollution... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT GENERAL Addresses § 700.17 Addresses for the Office of Pollution... non-docket materials—(1) United States Postal Service mailing address. Office of Pollution...

  17. SBAR Panel: Regulation of N-Methylpyrrolidone and Methylene Chloride in Paint and Coating Removal under Section 6(a) of the Toxic Substances Control Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SBAR panel related to a rule that proposes to determine whether the continued use of NMP and methylene chloride in commercial and consumer paint and coating removers poses an unreasonable risk to human health and the environment

  18. Substance use - LSD

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - LSD; Drug abuse - LSD; Drug use - LSD; Lysergic acid diethylamide; Hallucinogen - LSD ... LSD is a mind-altering drug. This means it acts on your brain (central nervous system) and changes your mood, behavior, and the way you relate to ...

  19. Management of Bottom Sediments Containing Toxic Substances. Proceedings of the U.S./Japan Experts Meeting (8th) Held at Tokyo, Japan on 8-10 November 1982

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    1973 and chemicals are regulated as follows. New chemicals having PCB-like properties are controlled in manufacture, use, disposal, etc., as a Special...year. It is impossible to examine all Existing Chemicals for biodegradability, bioaccumulability, and toxicity. Therefore, chemicals having properties ...which move in an estuary can form ag- gregates according to the hydraulic and water quallity conditions such as a Sparticle’s electrochemical properties

  20. Using S and Pb isotope ratios to trace leaching of toxic substances from an acid-impacted industrial-waste landfill (Pozdatky, Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Novak, Martin; Pacherova, Petra; Erbanova, Lucie; Veron, Alain J; Buzek, Frantisek; Jackova, Ivana; Paces, Tomas; Rukavickova, Lenka; Blaha, Vladimir; Holecek, Jan

    2012-10-15

    Slightly elevated concentrations of toxic species in waters sampled in the surroundings of a leaky landfill may be both a sign of an approaching contaminant plume, or a result of water-rock interaction. Isotopes can be instrumental in distinguishing between anthropogenic and geogenic species in groundwater. We studied sulfur and lead isotope ratios at an abandoned industrial-waste landfill, located in a densely populated part of Central Europe. Stable isotope variability in space and time was used to follow the movement of a groundwater plume, contaminated with toxic metals (Cd, Cr, Be), in fractured granitoids. Toxic metals had been mobilized from industrial waste by a strong pulse of sulfuric acid, also deposited in the landfill. Both tracers exhibited a wide range of values (δ(34)S between +2.6 and +18.9‰; (206)Pb/(207)Pb between 1.16 and 1.39), which facilitated identification of mixing end-members, and made it possible to assess the sources of the studied species. In situ fractionations did not hinder source apportionment. Influx of contaminated groundwater was observed neither in irrigation wells in a nearby village, nor at distances greater than 300 m from the landfill. Combination of stable isotope tracers can be used as part of an early-warning system in landscapes affected by landfills.

  1. Novel psychoactive substances (designer drugs): overview and pharmacology of modulators of monoamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Liechti, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Novel psychoactive substances are newly used designer drugs ("internet drugs", "research chemicals", "legal highs") potentially posing similar health risks to classic illicit substances. Chemically, many novel psychoactive substances can be classified as phenethylamines, amphetamines, synthetic cathinones, piperazines, pipradrols/piperidines, aminoindanes benzofurans, and tryptamines. Pharmacologically, these substances interact with various monoaminergic targets. Typically, stimulants inhibit the transport of dopamine and noradrenaline (pipradrols, pyrovalerone cathinones) or induce the release of these monoamines (amphetamines and methamphetamine-like cathinones), entactogens predominantly enhance serotonin release (phenylpiperazines, aminoindanes, para-substituted amphetamines, and MDMA-like cathinones) similar to MDMA (ecstasy), and hallucinogens (tryptamines, hallucinogenic phenethylamines) are direct agonists at serotonergic 5-HT2A receptors. Synthetic cannabinoids are another group of novel substances which all act as agonists at the cannabinoid CB1 receptor similar to THC but are chemically diverse. In particular, the relative serotonergic vs dopaminergic activity (determined by the dopamine/serotonin transporter inhibition ratio in vitro) can be helpful to predict the desired psychotropic but also the toxic effects of novel substances as well as their potential for addiction. Although the use of novel psychoactive substances mostly produces minor or moderate poisonings, serious complications occur. Serotonergic drugs (entactogens and hallucinogens) are associated with acute serotonin syndrome, hyperthermia, seizures, and hyponatremia. Dopaminergic drugs are highly addictive and acute toxicity includes prolonged stimulation, insomnia, agitation, and psychosis. Agitation, anxiety, paranoia, hypertension, and rarely myocardial infarction and renal failure are seen with synthetic cannabinoids. Treatment is supportive.

  2. Ground-water levels, water quality, and potential effects of toxic-substance spills or cessation of quarry dewatering near a municipal ground-water supply, southeastern Franklin County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedam, A.C.; Eberts, S.M.; Bair, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    A newly completed municipal ground-water supply that produces from a sand and gravel aquifer in southern Franklin County, Ohio, may be susceptible to potential sources of pollution. Among these are spills of toxic substances that could enter recharge areas of the aquifer or be carried by surface drainage and subsequently enter the aquifer by induced infiltration. Ground water of degraded quality also is present in the vicinity of several landfills located upstream from the municipal supply. Local dewatering by quarrying operations has created a ground-water divide which, at present, prevents direct movement of the degraded ground water to the municipal supply. In addition, the dewatering has held water levels at the largest landfills below the base of the landfill. Should the dewatering cease, concern would be raised regarding the rise of water levels at this landfills and transport of contaminants through the aquifer to the Scioto River and subsequently by the river to the well field. From June 1984 through July 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Columbus, Ohio, investigated the relations among the ground-water supply and potential sources of contamination by means of an observation-well network and a program of measuring water levels and sampling for water quality. Sample collections included those made to determine the baseline levels of organic chemicals and metals, as well as periodic sampling and analysis for common constituents to evaluate any changes taking place in the system. Finally, a steady-state, three-dimensional numerical model was used to determine ground-water flow directions and average ground-water velocities to asses potential effects of toxic-substance spills. The model also was used to simulate changes in the ground-water flow system that could result if part or all of the quarry dewatering ceased. Few of the organic-chemical and metal constituents analyzed for were present at detectable levels. With respect to

  3. A comparison between the multimedia fate and exposure models CalTOX and uniform system for evaluation of substances adapted for life-cycle assessment based on the population intake fraction of toxic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Huijbregts, Mark A J; Geelen, Loes M J; Hertwich, Edgar G; McKone, Thomas E; van de Meent, Dik

    2005-02-01

    In life-cycle assessment (LCA) and comparative risk assessment, potential human exposure to toxic pollutants can be expressed as the population intake fraction (iF), which represents the fraction of the quantity emitted that enters the human population. To assess the influence of model differences in the calculation of the population iF ingestion and inhalation iFs of 365 substances emitted to air, freshwater, and soil were calculated with two commonly applied multimedia fate and exposure models, CalTOX and the uniform system for evaluation of substances adapted for life-cycle assessment (USES-LCA). The model comparison showed that differences in the iFs due to model choices were the lowest after emission to air and the highest after emission to soil. Inhalation iFs were more sensitive to model differences compared to ingestion iFs. The choice for a continental seawater compartment, vertical stratification of the soil compartment, rain and no-rain scenarios, and drinking water purification mainly clarify the relevant model differences found in population iFs. Furthermore, pH correction of chemical properties and aerosol-associated deposition on plants appeared to be important for dissociative organics and metals emitted to air, respectively. Finally, it was found that quantitative structure-activity relationship estimates for superhydrophobics may introduce considerable uncertainty in the calculation of population intake fractions.

  4. Multicellular behaviour and production of a wide variety of toxic substances support usage of Bacillus subtilis as a powerful biocontrol agent.

    PubMed

    Nagórska, Krzysztofa; Bikowski, Mariusz; Obuchowski, Michał

    2007-01-01

    Intensive cultivation of plants in the monoculture field system in order to feed the continuously growing human population creates a need for their protection from the variety of natural competitors such as: bacteria, fungi, insects as well as other plants. The increase in the use of chemical substances in the 20th century has brought many effective solutions for the agriculture. However, it was extremely difficult to obtain a substance, which would be directed solely against a specific plant pathogen and would not be harmful for the environment. In the late 1900's scientists began trying to use natural antagonisms between resident soil organism to protect plants. This phenomenon was named biocontrol. Biological control of plants by microorganisms is a very promising alternative to an extended use of pesticides, which are often expensive and accumulate in plants or soil, having adverse effects on humans. Nonpathogenic soil bacteria living in association with roots of higher plants enhance their adaptive potential and, moreover, they can be beneficial for their growth. Here, we present the current status of the use of Bacillus subtilis in biocontrol. This prevalent inhabitant of soil is widely recognized as a powerful biocontrol agent. Naturally present in the immediate vicinity of plant roots, B. subtilis is able to maintain stable contact with higher plants and promote their growth. In addition, due to its broad host range, its ability to form endospores and produce different biologically active compounds with a broad spectrum of activity, B. subtilis as well as other Bacilli are potentially useful as biocontrol agents.

  5. Interaction effects on uptake and toxicity of perfluoroalkyl substances and cadmium in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rapeseed (Brassica campestris L.) from co-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuyan; Fan, Ziyan; Sun, Lihui; Zhou, Tao; Xing, Yuliang; Liu, Lifen

    2017-03-01

    A vegetation study was conducted to investigate the interactive effects of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and Cadmium (Cd) on soil enzyme activities, phytotoxicity and bioaccumulation of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rapeseed (Brassica campestris L.) from co-contaminated soil. Soil urease activities were inhibited significantly but catalase activities were promoted significantly by interaction of PFASs and Cd which had few effects on sucrase activities. Joint stress with PFASs and Cd decreased the biomass of plants and chlorophyll (Chl) content in both wheat and rapeseed, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities were increased in wheat but inhibited in rapeseed compared with single treatments. The bioconcentration abilities of PFASs in wheat and rapeseed were decreased, and the translocation factor of PFASs was decreased in wheat but increased in rapeseed with Cd addition. The bioaccumulation and translocation abilities of Cd were increased significantly in both wheat and rapeseed with PFASs addition. These findings suggested important evidence that the co-existence of PFASs and Cd reduced the bioavailability of PFASs while enhanced the bioavailability of Cd in soil, which increased the associated environmental risk for Cd but decreased for PFASs.

  6. Characterization and In Vitro Toxicity of Copper Nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) in Murine Neuroblastoma (N2A) Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    declared a work of the United States Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States...Toxic Substance Control Act (EPA) Environmental Protection Agency (NIOSH) National Institute for Occupational Safety and...oxide) Zn, ZnO Skin Protectant , Sunscreen conversion efficiencies. Another area of energy research is in the area of fuel cells, because they

  7. Who`s protecting you from hazardous substances?

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.S.

    1993-05-01

    Employee accidents, life endangering spills of harmful chemicals, toxic materials leaching into drinking water, polluted air, crippling side effects of wonder metals and products, and human and animal deaths made it apparent that in order to protect and preserve the community and the environment, the community needed to be aware/knowledgeable of chemical uses and related possible dangers, i.e., it was time to establish rules and regulations for the use and disposal of hazardous substances and chemicals. This report details several organizations, acts, rules, and regulations created in the interest of hazardous materials safety.

  8. TEAM (Total Exposure Assessment Methodology) Study: personal exposures to toxic substances in air, drinking water, and breath of 400 residents of New Jersey, North Carolina, and North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.A.; Pellizzari, E.D.; Hartwell, T.D.; Sparacino, C.; Whitmore, R.; Sheldon, L.; Zelon, H.; Perritt, R.

    1987-08-01

    EPA's TEAM Study has measured exposures to 20 volatile organic compounds in personal air, outdoor air, drinking water, and breath of approximately 400 residents of New Jersey, North Carolina, and North Dakota. All residents were selected by a probability sampling scheme to represent 128,000 inhabitants of Elizabeth and Bayonne, New Jersey, 131,000 residents of Greensboro, North Carolina, and 7000 residents of Devils Lake, North Dakota. Participants carried a personal monitor to collect two 12-hr air samples and gave a breath sample at the end of the day. Two consecutive 12-hr outdoor air samples were also collected on identical Tenax cartridges in the backyards of some of the participants. About 5000 samples were collected, of which 1500 were quality control samples. Ten compounds were often present in personal air and breath samples at all locations. Personal exposures were consistently higher than outdoor concentrations for these chemicals and were sometimes 10 times the outdoor concentrations. Indoor sources appeared to be responsible for much of the difference. Breath concentrations also often exceeded outdoor concentrations and correlated more strongly with personal exposures than with outdoor concentrations. Some activities (smoking, visiting dry cleaners or service stations) and occupations (chemical, paint, and plastics plants) were associated with significantly elevated exposures and breath levels for certain toxic chemicals. Homes with smokers had significantly increased benzene and styrene levels in indoor air. Residence near major point sources did not affect exposure.

  9. Biological model of the effects of toxic substances. Annual technical report No. 2. Final report, 1 November 1990-31 October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tuckett, R.P.

    1992-12-31

    Due to the basic nature of military operations, it is sometimes necessary for Air Force personnel to be exposed to toxic chemicals in their work environment, either as a protracted, low-level exposure or as an acute, high-level exposure. Hence, there is a need to establish quantitative tests for the biological effects of chemical exposure. The Draize rabbit eye test for acute irritancy has come under severe criticism by the animal rights movement and maybe banned in the near future. Therefore, it is important to replace the Draize test with procedures that are not performed on awake animals. Tissue culture has many advantages: it is commercially viable, well controlled, reproducible, and capable of studying the specific effects of chronic chemical exposure. Topical Testing has submitted a patent application on the concept of: (1) identifying cultured sensory neurons that respond to 'pain-related' chemicals, and (2) determining whether these neurons respond to a test chemical. (3) If so, it can be concluded that the test chemical has a potential for producing pain in humans.... Bioassay, Environmental toxins, Detoxification, Tissue culture.

  10. Psychoactive Substances Bill and Act of New Zealand: A Chance to Engage Undergraduate Scientists with Society using a Transfer Learning Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Gliddon, Catherine M.; Cridge, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to develop a teaching paradigm that connected undergraduate’s neuropharmacological/toxicological knowledge to that of government policy. One goal of undergraduate education should be to help develop scientists that can use their scientific knowledge to critique government policy. There is little research, however, on whether democratization of science occurs: nor how to achieve this. Our work focused on a semi-structured workshop designed around the Psychoactive Substances Bill (PSB). Third year science students were given a questionnaire that was designed to address whether participating in the workshop enhanced their understanding of the PSB and its relationship to their established knowledge (i.e., transfer learning). Furthermore, whether they felt that they had enough expertise to consider making a submission (i.e., societal engagement). Results showed that the students appreciated the opportunity to explore potential application of their knowledge and delve into a socio-scientific issue. However, our findings suggested they felt uncomfortable discussing their ideas outside the classroom: nor, did they identify themselves as having sufficient knowledge to contribute to a submission. In conclusion, this study highlights two points. First, that discussion based transfer learning can be used in the tertiary sector and students value the opportunity to apply their knowledge to socio-scientific issue. Second, if social participation and democratization of science is a goal, then more emphasis should be placed on how students can realistically and confidently apply their learning to change social policy. In order to achieve this, education programs need to focus on legitimate real-life processes such as the PSB for engagement. PMID:26557790

  11. S. 792: This Act may be cited as the Indoor Radon Abatement Reauthorization Act of 1991, introduced in the United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, April 9, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the Senate of the United States on April 9, 1991 to reauthorize the Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988. This legislation amends the Toxic Substances Control Act. The following sections are clarified and expanded: Priority radon areas; Citizens guide; Model construction standards; Technical assistance; Grant assistance; Radon in schools; Regional radon training centers; Federal buildings; Radon information; Mandatory radon proficiency program; Medical community outreach; Federal Housing; National radon educational efforts; Radon in work places; and Citizens suits.

  12. 40 CFR 766.25 - Chemical substances for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chemical substances for testing. 766... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.25 Chemical substances for testing. (a) Listing of chemical substances. Chemical...

  13. 40 CFR 766.25 - Chemical substances for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chemical substances for testing. 766... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.25 Chemical substances for testing. (a) Listing of chemical substances. Chemical...

  14. 40 CFR 766.25 - Chemical substances for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chemical substances for testing. 766... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.25 Chemical substances for testing. (a) Listing of chemical substances. Chemical...

  15. 40 CFR 766.25 - Chemical substances for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chemical substances for testing. 766... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.25 Chemical substances for testing. (a) Listing of chemical substances. Chemical...

  16. 40 CFR 766.25 - Chemical substances for testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chemical substances for testing. 766... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.25 Chemical substances for testing. (a) Listing of chemical substances. Chemical...

  17. Lead Exposure Reduction Act of 1992. Report together with Additional and Dissenting Views To Accompany 5730 (Including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office.) Part 1 [and] Part 2. House of Representatives, 102d Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    This two-part report deals with the Lead Exposure Reduction Act of 1992 (H.R. 5730), an amendment to the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The amendment is intended to lead to the reduction of levels of lead in the environment and to lower the degree of childhood exposure to lead. The bill provides for a…

  18. Protective mask for airborne toxic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, C.J.; Scavnicky, J.A.; Little, M.E.; Hagy, E.M.; Bloom, A.

    1983-10-21

    A protective mask is described which includes a one-piece face piece molded of a transparent elastomer. A visor in the face piece provides panoramic visibility and is resilient enough to deform under applied force to permit improved use of optical devices. Identical left and right cheek fittings permit installation of a canister on either side so that the same mask can be used by right-handed and left-handed wearers voice for use with a telephone and the like. Air deflectors inside the mask adjacent the left and right cheek fittings deflect de-foging air along the inside surface of the visor when either left or right or both cheek fittings are used for attachment of a canister. A sealing adapter permits sealing around earpiece shafts of eyeglasses.

  19. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... ATSDR) , based in Atlanta, Georgia, is a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and ... public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent ...

  20. Test Guidelines for Pesticides and Toxic Substances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Documents that specify methods EPA recommends to generate data submitted to EPA to support the registration of a pesticide, setting of a tolerance or tolerance exemption for pesticide residues, or the decision making process for an industrial chemical.

  1. Assessment of microplastic toxicity to embryonic development of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    PubMed

    Nobre, C R; Santana, M F M; Maluf, A; Cortez, F S; Cesar, A; Pereira, C D S; Turra, A

    2015-03-15

    Apart from the physiological impacts on marine organisms caused by ingesting microplastics, the toxicity caused by substances leaching from these particles into the environment requires investigation. To understand this potential risk, we evaluated the toxicity of virgin (raw) and beach-stranded plastic pellets to the development of embryos of Lytechinus variegatus, simulating transfers of chemical compounds to interstitial water and water column by assays of pellet-water interface and elutriate, respectively. Both assays showed that virgin pellets had toxic effects, increasing anomalous embryonic development by 58.1% and 66.5%, respectively. The toxicity of stranded pellets was lower than virgin pellets, and was observed only for pellet-water interface assay. These results show that (i) plastic pellets act as a vector of pollutants, especially for plastic additives found on virgin particles; and that (ii) the toxicity of leached chemicals from pellets depends on the exposure pathway and on the environmental compartment in which pellets accumulate.

  2. Welfare Reform and Substance Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Metsch, Lisa R; Pollack, Harold A

    2005-01-01

    The 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) changed the nature, purpose, and financing of public aid. Researchers, administrators, and policymakers expressed special concern about the act's impact on low-income mothers with substance use disorders. Before PRWORA's passage, however, little was known about the true prevalence of these disorders among welfare recipients or about the likely effectiveness of substance abuse treatment interventions for welfare recipients. Subsequent research documented that substance abuse disorders are less widespread among welfare recipients than was originally thought and are less common than other serious barriers to self-sufficiency. This research also showed significant administrative barriers to the screening, assessment, and referral of drug-dependent welfare recipients. This article summarizes current research findings and examines implications for welfare reform reauthorization. PMID:15787954

  3. 77 FR 58557 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR) In... Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: September 17, 2012. Elaine L. Baker, Director,...

  4. 77 FR 24720 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR) In... Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: April...

  5. 76 FR 24031 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR) In... and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: April 21, 2011. Elaine L....

  6. Toxic megacolon

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease - toxic megacolon; Crohn disease - toxic megacolon; Ulcerative colitis - toxic megacolon ... people with an inflamed colon due to: Ulcerative colitis , or Crohn disease that is not well controlled ...

  7. shRNA-Based Screen Identifies Endocytic Recycling Pathway Components That Act as Genetic Modifiers of Alpha-Synuclein Aggregation, Secretion and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Diana; Raquel, Helena; Simões, Pedro D.; Giorgini, Flaviano; Ramalho, José S.; Barral, Duarte C.; Ferreira Moita, Luís; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-Synuclein (aSyn) misfolding and aggregation is common in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, which are known as synucleinopathies. Accumulating evidence suggests that secretion and cell-to-cell trafficking of pathological forms of aSyn may explain the typical patterns of disease progression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling aSyn aggregation and spreading of pathology are still elusive. In order to obtain unbiased information about the molecular regulators of aSyn oligomerization, we performed a microscopy-based large-scale RNAi screen in living cells. Interestingly, we identified nine Rab GTPase and kinase genes that modulated aSyn aggregation, toxicity and levels. From those, Rab8b, Rab11a, Rab13 and Slp5 were able to promote the clearance of aSyn inclusions and rescue aSyn induced toxicity. Furthermore, we found that endocytic recycling and secretion of aSyn was enhanced upon Rab11a and Rab13 expression in cells accumulating aSyn inclusions. Overall, our study resulted in the identification of new molecular players involved in the aggregation, toxicity, and secretion of aSyn, opening novel avenues for our understanding of the molecular basis of synucleinopathies. PMID:27123591

  8. Toxic Synovitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Toxic Synovitis KidsHealth > For Parents > Toxic Synovitis A A A ... and causes no long-term problems. About Toxic Synovitis Toxic synovitis (also known as transient synovitis ) is ...

  9. 75 FR 43172 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR): Notice... October 6, 1972, that the Board of Scientific Counselors, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry... management activities, for both CDC and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: July...

  10. The complex interaction between marine debris and toxic chemicals in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Engler, Richard E

    2012-11-20

    Marine debris, especially plastic debris, is widely recognized as a global environmental problem. There has been substantial research on the impacts of plastic marine debris, such as entanglement and ingestion. These impacts are largely due to the physical presence of plastic debris. In recent years there has been an increasing focus on the impacts of toxic chemicals as they relate to plastic debris. Some plastic debris acts as a source of toxic chemicals: substances that were added to the plastic during manufacturing leach from plastic debris. Plastic debris also acts as a sink for toxic chemicals. Plastic sorbs persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic substances (PBTs), such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins, from the water or sediment. These PBTs may desorb when the plastic is ingested by any of a variety of marine species. This broad look at the current research suggests that while there is significant uncertainty and complexity in the kinetics and thermodynamics of the interaction, plastic debris appears to act as a vector transferring PBTs from the water to the food web, increasing risk throughout the marine food web, including humans. Because of the extremely long lifetime of plastic and PBTs in the ocean, prevention strategies are vital to minimizing these risks.

  11. 40 CFR 799.9110 - TSCA acute oral toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) harmonized test guideline 870.1100 (August... of test substance per unit weight of test animal (milligrams per kilogram). (d) Alternative.... EPA will accept three alternative Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)...

  12. 40 CFR 799.9110 - TSCA acute oral toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) harmonized test guideline 870.1100 (August... of test substance per unit weight of test animal (milligrams per kilogram). (d) Alternative.... EPA will accept three alternative Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)...

  13. 40 CFR 799.9110 - TSCA acute oral toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) harmonized test guideline 870.1100 (August... of test substance per unit weight of test animal (milligrams per kilogram). (d) Alternative.... EPA will accept three alternative Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)...

  14. 40 CFR 799.9110 - TSCA acute oral toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) harmonized test guideline 870.1100 (August... of test substance per unit weight of test animal (milligrams per kilogram). (d) Alternative.... EPA will accept three alternative Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)...

  15. 40 CFR 799.9110 - TSCA acute oral toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) harmonized test guideline 870.1100 (August... of test substance per unit weight of test animal (milligrams per kilogram). (d) Alternative.... EPA will accept three alternative Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)...

  16. 40 CFR 798.3260 - Chronic toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Chronic Exposure § 798.3260 Chronic toxicity. (a) Purpose. The objective of a chronic toxicity study is to determine the effects of a substance in a mammalian species following prolonged and repeated exposure. Under the conditions of the chronic toxicity test, effects...

  17. 40 CFR 798.3260 - Chronic toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Chronic Exposure § 798.3260 Chronic toxicity. (a) Purpose. The objective of a chronic toxicity study is to determine the effects of a substance in a mammalian species following prolonged and repeated exposure. Under the conditions of the chronic toxicity test, effects...

  18. 40 CFR 707.20 - Chemical substances import policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chemical substances import policy. 707... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT CHEMICAL IMPORTS AND EXPORTS General Import Requirements and Restrictions § 707.20 Chemical substances import policy. (a) Scope. (1) This statement addresses the policy of the...

  19. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)–flavin containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2) signaling acts in silver nanoparticles and silver ion toxicity in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Hyun-Jeong; Ahn, Jeong-Min; Kim, Younghun; Choi, Jinhee

    2013-07-15

    In the present study, nanotoxicity mechanism associated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) exposure was investigated on the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans focusing on the hypoxia response pathway. In order to test whether AgNPs-induced hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation was due to hypoxia or to oxidative stress, depletion of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the test media and a rescue effect using an antioxidant were investigated, respectively. The results suggested that oxidative stress was involved in activation of the HIF-1 pathway. We then investigated the toxicological implications of HIF-1 activation by examining the HIF-1 mediated transcriptional response. Of the genes tested, increased expression of the flavin containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2) gene was found to be the most significant as induced by AgNPs exposure. We found that AgNPs exposure induced FMO-2 activation in a HIF-1 and p38 MAPK PMK-1 dependent manner, and oxidative stress was involved in it. We conducted all experiments to include comparison of AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3} in order to evaluate whether any observed toxicity was due to dissolution or particle specific. The AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3} did not produce any qualitative differences in terms of exerting toxicity in the pathways observed in this study, however, considering equal amount of silver mass, in every endpoint tested the AgNPs were found to be more toxic than AgNO{sub 3}. These results suggest that Ag nanotoxicity is dependent not only on dissolution of Ag ion but also on particle specific effects and HIF-1–FMO-2 pathway seems to be involved in it. - Highlights: • HIF-1 signaling was investigated in C. elegans exposed to AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3}. • HIF-1 and PMK-1 were needed for AgNPs- and AgNO{sub 3}-induced fmo-2 gene expression. • PMK-1–HIF-1–FMO-2 pathway was dependent on oxidative stress. • AgNPs and AgNO{sub 3} did not produce any qualitative differences in HIF-1 signaling. • AgNPs were more toxic than an equal

  20. Comparing toxic air pollutant programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    This article compares state and federal toxic air pollutant programs. The Clean Air Act Ammendments created a program for the control of Hazardous Air Pollutants based on the establishment of control technology standards. State toxic programs can be classified into two categories: control technology-based and ambient concentration-based. Many states have opened to implement the MACT standards while enforcing their own state air toxics programs. Specific topics discussed include the following: the Federal air toxics program; existing state regulations; New Jersey Air Toxic Program; New York Toxics program.

  1. Tenellin acts as an iron chelator to prevent iron-generated reactive oxygen species toxicity in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Jirakkakul, Jiraporn; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Punya, Juntira; Chutrakul, Chanikul; Senachak, Jittisak; Buajarern, Taridaporn; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for life. However, the iron overload can be toxic. Here, we investigated the significant increase of tenellin and iron-tenellin complex production in ferricrocin-deficient mutants of Beauveria bassiana. Our chemical analysis indicated that the ferricrocin-deficient mutants T1, T3 and T5 nearly abolished ferricrocin production. In turn, these mutants had significant accumulation of iron-tenellin complex in their mycelia at 247-289 mg g(-1) cell dry weight under iron-replete condition. Both tenellin and iron-tenellin complex were not detected in the wild-type under such condition. Mass analysis of the mutants' crude extracts demonstrated that tenellin formed a 3:1 complex with iron in the absence of ferricrocin. The unexpected link between ferricrocin and tenellin biosynthesis in ferricrocin-deficient mutants could be a survival strategy during iron-mediated oxidative stress.

  2. 2009 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Environmental Stewardship Group

    2010-11-01

    For reporting year 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2009 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2009, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  3. SuperToxic: a comprehensive database of toxic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ulrike; Struck, Swantje; Gruening, Bjoern; Hossbach, Julia; Jaeger, Ines S.; Parol, Roza; Lindequist, Ulrike; Teuscher, Eberhard; Preissner, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Within our everyday life, we are confronted with a variety of toxic substances of natural or artificial origin. Toxins are already used, e.g. in medicine, but there is still an increasing number of toxic compounds, representing a tremendous potential to extract new substances. Since predictive toxicology gains in importance, the careful and extensive investigation of known toxins is the basis to assess the properties of unknown substances. In order to achieve this aim, we have collected toxic compounds from literature and web sources in the database SuperToxic. The current version of this database compiles about 60 000 compounds and their structures. These molecules are classified according to their toxicity, based on more than 2 million measurements. The SuperToxic database provides a variety of search options like name, CASRN, molecular weight and measured values of toxicity. With the aid of implemented similarity searches, information about possible biological interactions can be gained. Furthermore, connections to the Protein Data Bank, UniProt and the KEGG database are available, to allow the identification of targets and those pathways, the searched compounds are involved in. This database is available online at: http://bioinformatics.charite.de/supertoxic. PMID:19004875

  4. Protein corona acts as a protective shield against Fe3O4-PEG inflammation and ROS-induced toxicity in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Rivera, V; Uribe-Ramírez, M; González-Pozos, S; Lozano, O; Lucas, S; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, A

    2016-01-05

    Protein corona (PC) is the main biological entity of initial cell interaction and can define the toxicological response to Fe3O4 nanoparticles (IONP). Polymer coating to IONP, polyethilenglycol (PEG) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), is a widely accepted strategy to prevent toxicity and avoid excessive protein binding. The aim of this study was to assess the role of PC as a potential protector for ROS-induced cytotoxicity and pro-inflammatory response in THP-1 macrophages (exposed to three different IONP: bare, PVP or PEG coated). Cells were exposed to either IONP in RPMI-1640 media or IONP with a preformed human PC. All three IONP showed cytotoxic effects, which in the presence of PC was abolished. IONP-PEG exposure significantly increased ROS, mitochondrial dysfunction and pro-inflammatory cytokines release (IL-1β and TNF-α). PC presence on IONP-PEG promoted a decrease in ROS and prevented cytokine secretion. Also, presence of PC reduced cell uptake for IONP-bare, but had no influence on IONP-PVP or IONP-PEG. Hence, the reduction in IONP-PEG cytotoxicity can be attributed to PC shielding against ROS generation and pro-inflammatory response and not a differential uptake in THP-1 macrophages. The presence of the PC as a structural element of NP biological entity provides in vivo-relevant conditions for nanosafety testing.

  5. Cocaine Babies: Florida's Substance-Exposed Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpring, Jayme

    This report is designed to provide Florida's school personnel with assistance in working with students prenatally exposed to cocaine or other toxic substances. The report offers background data, practical strategies for teaching and learning, and resources for networking. The first chapter outlines statistics on the incidence of the problem of…

  6. 21 CFR 70.11 - Related substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... considered to have additive toxic effects. (b) Food additives may also cause pharmacological or biological... chemicals may also cause pharmacological or biological effects similar or related to such effects caused by... General Provisions § 70.11 Related substances. (a) Different color additives may cause similar or...

  7. Final Recommendations of the Air Toxics Work Group

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Air Toxics Workgroup was organized under the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee for the purpose of discussing and identifying recommendations related to Urban Air Toxics. The workgroup is part of the Permits, New Source Review and Toxics Subcommittee.

  8. 76 FR 27294 - Proposed Revocation of the Significant New Use Rule on a Certain Chemical Substance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... Chemical Substance AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is... Substances Control Act (TSCA) for a chemical substance identified generically as substituted ethoxyethylamine... new information and test data for the chemical substance and proposes to revoke the SNUR....

  9. Substance Use among Pregnant Women: The Report of the Task Force for the Prevention of Substance Use among Pregnant Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayye, Paul T.; Relos, Ruth

    This document contains a report from the North Carolina Task Force for the Prevention of Substance Use Among Pregnant Women, a task force established to develop a long-range plan to decrease infant death and disability due to exposure to toxic substances in utero. The executive summary identifies four major problem areas which negatively affect…

  10. Semiautomated Motility Assay For Determining Toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond

    1996-01-01

    Improved method of assessing toxicities of various substances based on observation of effects of those substances on motilities of manageably small number of cells of protozoan species Tetrahema pyriformis. Provides repeatable, standardized tests with minimal handling by technicians and with minimal exposure of technicians to chemicals. Rapid and economical alternative to Draize test.

  11. Substance use and multiculturalism.

    PubMed

    Adrian, M

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews intercultural variability of substance use behaviors, including availability of international statistics on consumption of alcohol and other drugs, as well as the use of drugs available locally only. Within a conceptual framework of intercultural relations, it considers the history of transcultural spread of substance use behaviors and possible reactions to the introduction of new drugs within a culture or jurisdiction, including illustrations of the "law of alien poisons." Although intercultural views of substance use have generally concentrated on majority groups' views of substance use in minority groups, minority and non-Western views of substance use need to be considered in the context of increasing international and intercultural communications that increase the rate at which substance use behaviors spread. Both Western and non-Western experiences with substance use and misuse must be taken into account so that better interventions can be developed to deal with addictions and other substance-related problems.

  12. Alternative acute oral toxicity assessment under REACH based on sub-acute toxicity values.

    PubMed

    Gissi, Andrea; Louekari, Kimmo; Hoffstadt, Laurence; Bornatowicz, Norbert; Aparicio, Alberto Martin

    2016-11-08

    The REACH Regulation requires information on acute oral toxicity for substances produced or imported in quantities greater than one tonne per year. When registering, animal testing should be used as last resort. The standard acute oral toxicity test requires use of animals. Therefore, the European Chemicals Agency examined whether alternative ways exist to generate information on acute oral toxicity. The starting hypothesis was that low acute oral toxicity can be predicted from the results of low toxicity in oral sub-acute toxicity studies. Proving this hypothesis would allow avoiding acute toxicity oral testing whenever a sub-acute oral toxicity study is required or available and indicates low toxicity. ECHA conducted an analysis of the REACH database and found suitable studies on both acute oral and sub-acute oral toxicities for 1,256 substances. 415 of these substances had low toxicity in the sub-acute toxicity study (i.e. NO(A)EL at or above the classification threshold of 1,000 mg/kg). For 98% of these substances, low acute oral toxicity was also reported (i.e. LD₅₀ above the classification threshold of 2,000 mg/kg). On the other hand, no correlation was found between lower NO(A)ELs and LD₅₀. According to the REACH regulation, this approach for predicting acute oral toxicity needs to be considered as part of a weight of evidence analysis. Therefore, additional sources of information to support this approach are presented. Ahead of the last REACH registration deadline in 2018, ECHA estimates that registrants of about 550 substances can omit the in vivo acute oral study by using this adaptation.

  13. Method of removing and detoxifying a phosphorus-based substance

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Steindler, M.J.

    1985-05-21

    A method of removing a phosphorus-based poisonous substance from water contaminated is presented. In addition, the toxicity of the phosphorus-based substance is also subsequently destroyed. A water-immiscible organic solvent is first immobilized on a supported liquid membrane before the contaminated water is contacted with one side of the supported liquid membrane to absorb the phosphorus-based substance in the organic solvent. The other side of the supported liquid membrane is contacted with a hydroxy-affording strong base to react with phosphorus-based solvated species to form a non-toxic product.

  14. Substance Abuse and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Shannon; Suárez, Liza

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong, bidirectional link between substance abuse and traumatic experiences. Teens with cooccurring substance use disorders (SUDs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have significant functional and psychosocial impairment. Common neurobiological foundations point to the reinforcing cycle of trauma symptoms, substance withdrawal, and substance use. Treatment of teens with these issues should include a systemic and integrated approach to both the SUD and the PTSD.

  15. POREWATER TOXICITY TESTING: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments act as sinks for contaminants, where they may build up to toxic levels. Sediments containing toxic levels of contaminants pose a risk to aquatic life, human health, and wildlife. There is an overwhelming amount of evidence that demonstrates chemicals in sediments are re...

  16. Toxic Remediation System And Method

    DOEpatents

    Matthews, Stephen M.; Schonberg, Russell G.; Fadness, David R.

    1996-07-23

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  17. Predicting fish acute toxicity using a fish gill cell line-based toxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Tanneberger, Katrin; Knöbel, Melanie; Busser, Frans J M; Sinnige, Theo L; Hermens, Joop L M; Schirmer, Kristin

    2013-01-15

    The OECD test guideline 203 for determination of fish acute toxicity requires substantial numbers of fish and uses death as an apical end point. One potential alternative are fish cell lines; however, several studies indicated that these appear up to several orders of magnitude less sensitive than fish. We developed a fish gill cell line-based (RTgill-W1) assay, using several measures to improve sensitivity. The optimized assay was applied to determine the toxicity of 35 organic chemicals, having a wide range of toxicity to fish, mode of action and physicochemical properties. We found a very good agreement between in vivo and in vitro effective concentrations. For up to 73% of the tested compounds, the difference between the two approaches was less than 5-fold, covering baseline toxicants but as well compounds with presumed specific modes of action, including reactivity, inhibition of acetylcholine esterase or uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Accounting for measured chemical concentrations eliminated two outliers, the hydrophobic 4-decylaniline and the volatile 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene, with an outlier being operationally defined as a substance showing a more than 10-fold difference between in vivo/in vitro effect concentrations. Few outliers remained. The most striking were allyl alcohol (2700-fold), which likely needs to be metabolically activated, and permethrin (190-fold) and lindane (63-fold), compounds acting, respectively, on sodium and chloride channels in the brain of fish. We discuss further developments of this assay and suggest its use beyond predicting acute toxicity to fish, for example, as part of adverse outcome pathways to replace, reduce, or refine chronic fish tests.

  18. Dermal uptake of petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Jakasa, Ivone; Kezic, Sanja; Boogaard, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Petroleum products are complex substances comprising varying amounts of linear and branched alkanes, alkenes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics which may penetrate the skin at different rates. For proper interpretation of toxic hazard data, understanding their percutaneous absorption is of paramount importance. The extent and significance of dermal absorption of eight petroleum substances, representing different classes of hydrocarbons, was evaluated. Literature data on the steady-state flux and permeability coefficient of these substances were evaluated and compared to those predicted by mathematical models. Reported results spanned over 5-6 orders of magnitude and were largely dependent on experimental conditions in particular on the type of the vehicle used. In general, aromatic hydrocarbons showed higher dermal absorption than more lipophilic aliphatics with similar molecular weight. The results showed high variation and were largely influenced by experimental conditions emphasizing the need of performing the experiments under "in use" scenario. The predictive models overestimated experimental absorption. The overall conclusion is that, based on the observed percutaneous penetration data, dermal exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons, even of aromatics with highest dermal absorption is limited and highly unlikely to be associated with health risks under real use scenarios.

  19. Method of removing and detoxifying a phosphorus-based substance

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, George F.; Steindler, Martin J.

    1989-01-01

    A method of removing organic phosphorus-based poisonous substances from water contaminated therewith and of subsequently destroying the toxicity of the substance is disclosed. Initially, a water-immiscible organic is immobilized on a supported liquid membrane. Thereafter, the contaminated water is contacted with one side of the supported liquid membrane to selectively dissolve the phosphorus-based substance in the organic extractant. At the same time, the other side of the supported liquid membrane is contacted with a hydroxy-affording strong base to react the phosphorus-based substance dissolved by the organic extractant with a hydroxy ion. This forms a non-toxic reaction product in the base. The organic extractant can be a water-insoluble trialkyl amine, such as trilauryl amine. The phosphorus-based substance can be phosphoryl or a thiophosphoryl.

  20. 40 CFR 716.45 - How to report on substances and mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mixtures. 716.45 Section 716.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... substances and mixtures. Section 716.120 lists substances and mixtures, in order by Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number and by alphabetical order. Studies of listed substances and listed mixtures shall...

  1. 40 CFR 716.45 - How to report on substances and mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... mixtures. 716.45 Section 716.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... substances and mixtures. Section 716.120 lists substances and mixtures, in order by Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number and by alphabetical order. Studies of listed substances and listed mixtures shall...

  2. 40 CFR 716.45 - How to report on substances and mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mixtures. 716.45 Section 716.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... substances and mixtures. Section 716.120 lists substances and mixtures, in order by Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number and by alphabetical order. Studies of listed substances and listed mixtures shall...

  3. 40 CFR 716.45 - How to report on substances and mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mixtures. 716.45 Section 716.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... substances and mixtures. Section 716.120 lists substances and mixtures, in order by Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number and by alphabetical order. Studies of listed substances and listed mixtures shall...

  4. 40 CFR 716.45 - How to report on substances and mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mixtures. 716.45 Section 716.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... substances and mixtures. Section 716.120 lists substances and mixtures, in order by Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number and by alphabetical order. Studies of listed substances and listed mixtures shall...

  5. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  6. A TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION OF SILTY MARINE HARBOR SEDIMENTS TO CHARACTERIZE PERSISTENT AND NON-PERSISTENT CONSTITUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment toxicity in silty marine harbor sediments is frequently dominated by ammonia or sulfide, leaving the adverse effects of persistent toxic substances unnoticed. To investigate the latter, we subjected interstitial water from three contaminated silty sediments to toxicity i...

  7. [Plants as a source of natural harmful substances].

    PubMed

    Czerwiecki, Ludwik

    2005-01-01

    In this review the several data concerning phytotoxins as natural harmful substances of plants and phycotoxins--toxicants of algae were described. For example plants are source of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, glycoalkaloids, glucosinolates as well as glycosides, saponine and psolarens. Possible adverse effects of phytoestrogens as endocrine disruptors versus beneficial influence these substances on human organism were mentioned. About lectins as possible factors of some diseases was reported, as well as some proteins as allergens of soy and peanuts was mentioned. Accumulated by shellfish and fish the most important phycotoxins such as saxitoxin, okadaic acid, brevetoxins and ciguatoxins were described. Phycotoxins produced several poisoning symptoms. Microcystins and nodularin--cyanobacterial phycotoxins of freshwater, was mentioned. In conclusion, the need of limitation of permissible levels of some plant toxicants, development of analytical methods as well as knowledge of influence of some technological processes on toxic plant substances was highlighted. The importance of balanced diet as a tool of defense against plant toxicants was concluded.

  8. Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... to: What is Elder Abuse? Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse Substance abuse has been identified as the most frequently cited ... victim and/or the perpetrator who has the substance abuse problem. Substance abuse is believed to be a ...

  9. [Comprehensive Toxicity Evaluation and Toxicity Identification Used in Tannery and Textile Wastewaters].

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Chen, Wen-yan; Wan, Yu-shan; Zheng, Guo-juan; Zhao, Yuan; Cai, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    To better evaluate the toxicity of tannery and textile effluents from various emission stages, the research attempted battery of toxicological bioassays and toxicological indices. The bioassays employed Microtox test, zebra fish embryo-larval test and algae (Chlorella vulgaris) test. Meanwhile, toxicological indices including Toxicity Unit (TU), Average Toxicity (AvTx), Toxic Print (TxPr), Most Sensitive Test (MST) and Potential Ecotoxic Effects Probe (PEEP) were applied. The results illustrated that PEEP was the most comprehensive index to take account of the emissions and toxic potential of effluents. PEEP values showed that the reduction rates of toxicity in tannery and textile effluents were 36. 8% and 23. 2%, respectively. Finally, based on the Microtox toxicity test, toxicants in textile effluent were identified through the toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) studies. The results indicated that the main toxicant of textile effluent was non-polar organic pollutants, followed by filterable compounds, heavy metals, oxidizing substances and volatile components.

  10. Investigations in Fish Control: 92. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of Rotenone to Daphnia magna, 93. Toxicity of Rotenone to Developing Rainbow Trout, 94. Oral Toxicity of Rotenone to Mammals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    completed as part of the EPA requirements. One of the studies required consisted of acute and chronic toxicity tests on Daphnia magna , the organism chosen because it is sensitive to toxic substances.

  11. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements... molecular structure is conducive to HDD/HDF formation under favorable reaction conditions when they are...

  12. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements... molecular structure is conducive to HDD/HDF formation under favorable reaction conditions when they are...

  13. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  14. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  15. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  16. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  17. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  18. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  19. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  20. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  1. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  2. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical...

  3. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical...

  4. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical...

  5. Air toxics issues in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book on air toxic issues is organized under the following headings: initiatives by state and local regulatory agencies; industry's role in meeting air toxics goals of the reauthorized Clean Air Act; implementation of strategies and public health impacts; regulatory, permitting, and enforcement strategies; air toxics control; emission estimation, impact analysis and monitoring.

  6. Water quality objectives for mixtures of toxic chemicals: problems and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vighi, M; Altenburger, R; Arrhenius, A; Backhaus, T; Bödeker, W; Blanck, H; Consolaro, F; Faust, M; Finizio, A; Froehner, K; Gramatica, P; Grimme, L H; Grönvall, F; Hamer, V; Scholze, M; Walter, H

    2003-02-01

    The need to develop water quality objectives not only for single substances but also for mixtures of chemicals seems evident. For that purpose, the conceptual basis could be the use of the two existing biometric models: concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA), which is also called response addition. Both may allow calculation of the toxicity of mixtures of chemicals with similar modes of action (CA) or dissimilar modes of action (IA), respectively. The joint research project Prediction and Assessment of the Aquatic Toxicity of Mixtures of Chemicals (PREDICT) within the framework of the IVth Environment and Climate Programme of the European Commission, provided the opportunity to address (a) chemometric and QSAR criteria to classify substances as supposedly similarly or dissimilarly acting; (b) the predictive values of both models for the toxicity of mixtures at low, statistically nonsignificant effect concentrations of the individual components; and (c) the predictability of mixture toxicity at higher levels of biological complexity. In this article, the general outline, methodological approach, and some preliminary findings of PREDICT are presented. A procedure for classifying chemicals in relation to their structural and toxicological similarities has been developed. The predictive capabilities of CA and IA models have been demonstrated for single species and, to some extent, for multispecies testing. The role of very low effect concentrations in multiple mixtures has been evaluated. Problems and perspectives concerning the development of water quality objectives for mixtures are discussed.

  7. Privacy Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the Privacy Act of 1974, the Electronic Government Act of 2002, the Federal Information Security Management Act, and other information about the Environmental Protection Agency maintains its records.

  8. Substance use - inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - inhalants; Drug abuse - inhalants; Drug use - inhalants; Glue - inhalants ... symptoms and may include: Strong cravings for the drug Having mood swings from feeling depressed to agitated ...

  9. Substance use - amphetamines

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - amphetamines; Drug abuse - amphetamines; Drug use - amphetamines ... Amphetamine: goey, louee, speed, uppers, whiz Dextroamphetamine (ADHD medicine used illegally): dexies, kiddie-speed, pep pills, uppers; ...

  10. GENE INDUCTION STUDIES AND TOXICITY OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its mixtures program the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) supports in vitro and limited in vivo toxicity testing to further our understanding of the toxicity and health effects of chemical mixtures. There are increasing concerns that environment...

  11. Toxic compensation bills

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.C.

    1985-10-01

    Congress has demonstrated interest in toxic compensation legislation, but not enough agreement to make significant progress. Advocates of reform claim that the legal system is heavily weighed against victims who seek compensation through the courts. Proposed reforms include a compensation fund and a cause of action in federal court. Critics have questioned whether these changes in the law would represent an improvement. Existing income replacement, medical cost reimbursement, and survivor insurance programs largely cover the losses of individuals with chronic disease. Thus, the need for an additional compensation is not clear. Furthermore, experience with compensation funds such as the Black Lung Fund suggests that political rather than scientific criteria may be used to determine eligibility. Finally, under the proposed financing mechanisms the compensation funds that are being debated would not increase incentives for care in the handling of hazardous wastes or toxic substances.

  12. Toxic compensation bills.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R C

    1985-01-01

    Congress has demonstrated interest in toxic compensation legislation, but not enough agreement to make significant progress. Advocates of reform claim that the legal system is heavily weighed against victims who seek compensation through the courts. Proposed reforms include a compensation fund and a cause of action in federal court. Critics have questioned whether these changes in the law would represent an improvement. Existing income replacement, medical cost reimbursement, and survivor insurance programs largely cover the losses of individuals with chronic disease. Thus, the need for an additional compensation is not clear. Furthermore, experience with compensation funds such as the Black Lung Fund suggests that political rather than scientific criteria may be used to determine eligibility. Finally, under the proposed financing mechanisms the compensation funds that are being debated would not increase incentives for care in the handling of hazardous wastes or toxic substances. PMID:4085440

  13. Genetic and perinatal effects of abused substances

    SciTech Connect

    Brande, M.C.; Zimmerman, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the effects of several abused drugs, including opiates, cannabinoids, alcohol, nicotine, and cocaine, with special emphasis on the actions of these substances at the molecular and cellular levels. The first half deals with genetic effects, including molecular genetics, biochemical genetics, pharmacogenetics, cytogenetics, and genetic toxicity. The second half focuses on perinatal effects and covers: drug abuse during pregnancy; biochemical aspects of marihuana on male reproduction; and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of perinatal alcohol exposure.

  14. Sustainability, substance flow management and time. Part I Temporal analysis of substance flows.

    PubMed

    Kümmerer, Klaus; Hofmeister, Sabine

    2008-09-01

    Flows of chemical substances need to be managed in a sustainable way. Sustainable development as a whole and the sustainable management of substance flows in particular are both time issues. These include the importance of the dynamics of substance flows and the way these interconnect with the use of resources, the avoidance of environmental pollution, and their effects on health and food production. Another prerequisite for the proper management of substance flows is justice within and between generations. This requires a systematic approach and a systematic analysis of the issues as well as of the actions to be taken. One tool for such a systematic approach is temporal analysis. It brings the temporal aspects of the substances themselves and of their intended use, as well as factors affecting the stakeholders, such as decision makers, producers and consumers, into focus. In the past, timing factors were rarely taken into account. Knowledge of the temporal dynamics of substance flows and their resultant outcomes, as well as of their interaction with ecological, economic and social systems, is a basic requirement for successful substance flow management. The need to include temporal aspects into substance flow management and how to do so is outlined here. Included are not only politicians but also practitioners and scientists who must explicitly take into account adequate time scales, points in time, breaks and other forms of time in planning and acting.

  15. Lichen substances prevent lichens from nutrient deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus; Willenbruch, Karen; Leuschner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    The dibenzofuran usnic acid, a widespread cortical secondary metabolite produced by lichen-forming fungi, was shown to promote the intracellular uptake of Cu(2+) in two epiphytic lichens, Evernia mesomorpha and Ramalina menziesii, from acidic, nutrient-poor bark. Higher Cu(2+) uptake in the former, which produces the depside divaricatic acid in addition to usnic acid, suggests that this depside promotes Cu(2+) uptake. Since Cu(2+) is one of the rarest micronutrients, promotion of Cu(2+) uptake by lichen substances may be crucial for the studied lichens to survive in their nutrient-poor habitats. In contrast, study of the uptake of other metals in E. mesomorpha revealed that the intracellular uptake of Mn(2+), which regularly exceeds potentially toxic concentrations in leachates of acidic tree bark, was partially inhibited by the lichen substances produced by this species. Inhibition of Mn(2+) uptake by lichen substances previously has been demonstrated in lichens. The uptake of Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+), which fail to reach toxic concentrations in acidic bark at unpolluted sites, although they are more common than Cu(2+), was not affected by lichen substances of E. mesomorpha.

  16. Aminophylline toxicity.

    PubMed

    Albert, S

    1987-02-01

    Aminophylline therapy has undergone change in the past decade. With the changes in usage and dosage forms, the frequency of toxicity in the pediatric population, especially in adolescents, has increased dramatically. Two distinct patterns, chronic and acute, have been recognized and treatment methods for both are changing. Table 4 summarizes the emerging state-of-the-art therapy for aminophylline toxicity. Judging from the activity seen in the literature, investigation into aminophylline toxicity will continue to be a priority. We will see a greater understanding of the disease process and a refining of the therapeutic process. The ultimate goal is the elimination of mortality and the minimization of morbidity from aminophylline toxicity.

  17. Lidocaine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mehra, P; Caiazzo, A; Maloney, P

    1998-01-01

    Local anesthetics are the most commonly used drugs in dentistry. The number of adverse reactions reported, particularly toxic reactions, are extraordinarily negligible. This article reports a case of lidocaine toxicity with its typical manifestation in a 37-yr-old healthy male. The toxic reaction followed transoral/transpharyngeal topical spraying of lidocaine preoperatively during preparation for general anesthesia. A review of dosages of the most commonly used local anesthetic drugs in dentistry and the management of a toxic reaction is presented. Clinicians need to be in a position to recognize and successfully manage this potential adverse reaction.

  18. Substance Abuse Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzolino, Robert

    This brochure outlines the substance abuse policy for students at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM/Pennsylvania). Noted are the dangers of substance abuse during the stressful time of medical training and later for the doctor and clients during professional practice. The policy's five goals are briefly stated. Described next…

  19. Substance Abuse. Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This paper presents the policy statement on substance abuse from the National Collaboration for Youth (NCY). The policy statement section lists programs and activities supported by the NCY. A section on background includes a statement of the issue of substance abuse. Areas examined in this section include alcohol abuse and drunk driving among…

  20. Isolation and identification of an allelopathic substance from Hibiscus sabdariffa.

    PubMed

    Suwitchayanon, Prapaipit; Pukclai, Piyatida; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake; Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2015-05-01

    In this study, an allelopathic substance was isolated from an aqueous methanol extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. by column chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. The chemical structure of the substance was determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as trimethyl allo-hydroxycitrate. Trimethyl allo-hydroxycitrate inhibited the growth of cress hypocotyls and roots at concentrations greater than 10 mM. The concentrations required for 50% growth inhibition of the hypocotyls and roots of cress were 20.3 and 14.4 mM, respectively. The inhibitory activity of trimethyl allo-hydroxycitrate suggests that the substance may act as an allelopathic substance of H. sabdariffa.

  1. Effect of sunlight exposure on the release of intentionally and/or non-intentionally added substances from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water: chemical analysis and in vitro toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bach, Cristina; Dauchy, Xavier; Severin, Isabelle; Munoz, Jean-François; Etienne, Serge; Chagnon, Marie-Christine

    2014-11-01

    The effect of sunlight exposure on chemical migration into PET-bottled waters was investigated. Bottled waters were exposed to natural sunlight for 2, 6 and 10 days. Migration was dependent on the type of water. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and Sb migration increased with sunlight exposure in ultrapure water. In carbonated waters, carbon dioxide promoted migration and only formaldehyde increased slightly due to sunlight. Since no aldehydes were detected in non-carbonated waters, we conclude that sunlight exposure has no effect. Concerning Sb, its migration levels were higher in carbonated waters. No unpredictable NIAS were identified in PET-bottled water extracts. Cyto-genotoxicity (Ames and micronucleus assays) and potential endocrine disruption effects (transcriptional-reporter gene assays) were checked in bottled water extracts using bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium) and human cell lines (HepG2 and MDA-MB453-kb2). PET-bottled water extracts did not induce any toxic effects (cyto-genotoxicity, estrogenic or anti-androgenic activity) in vitro at relevant consumer-exposure levels.

  2. The TEAM (Total Exposure Assessment Methodology) Study: personal exposures to toxic substances in air, drinking water, and breath of 400 residents of New Jersey, North Carolina, and North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L A; Pellizzari, E D; Hartwell, T D; Sparacino, C; Whitmore, R; Sheldon, L; Zelon, H; Perritt, R

    1987-08-01

    EPA's TEAM Study has measured exposures to 20 volatile organic compounds in personal air, outdoor air, drinking water, and breath of approximately 400 residents of New Jersey, North Carolina, and North Dakota. All residents were selected by a probability sampling scheme to represent 128,000 inhabitants of Elizabeth and Bayonne, New Jersey, 131,000 residents of Greensboro, North Carolina, and 7000 residents of Devils Lake, North Dakota. Participants carried a personal monitor to collect two 12-hr air samples and gave a breath sample at the end of the day. Two consecutive 12-hr outdoor air samples were also collected on identical Tenax cartridges in the backyards of some of the participants. About 5000 samples were collected, of which 1500 were quality control samples. Ten compounds were often present in personal air and breath samples at all locations. Personal exposures were consistently higher than outdoor concentrations for these chemicals and were sometimes 10 times the outdoor concentrations. Indoor sources appeared to be responsible for much of the difference. Breath concentrations also often exceeded outdoor concentrations and correlated more strongly with personal exposures than with outdoor concentrations. Some activities (smoking, visiting dry cleaners or service stations) and occupations (chemical, paint, and plastics plants) were associated with significantly elevated exposures and breath levels for certain toxic chemicals. Homes with smokers had significantly increased benzene and styrene levels in indoor air. Residence near major point sources did not affect exposure.

  3. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  4. Tungsten toxicity.

    PubMed

    Witten, Mark L; Sheppard, Paul R; Witten, Brandon L

    2012-04-05

    There is emerging evidence that tungsten has toxic health effects. We summarize the recent tungsten toxicity research in this short review. Tungsten is widely used in many commercial and military applications because it has the second highest melting temperature of any element. Consequently, it is important to elucidate the potential health effects of tungsten.

  5. 21 CFR 1305.04 - Persons entitled to order Schedule I and II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to order Schedule I and II controlled substances. (a) Only persons who are registered with DEA under... are registered with DEA under section 1008 of the Act (21 U.S.C. 958) to export these substances may obtain and use DEA Form 222 (order forms) or issue electronic orders for these substances. Persons...

  6. 21 CFR 1305.04 - Persons entitled to order Schedule I and II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to order Schedule I and II controlled substances. (a) Only persons who are registered with DEA under... are registered with DEA under section 1008 of the Act (21 U.S.C. 958) to export these substances may obtain and use DEA Form 222 (order forms) or issue electronic orders for these substances. Persons...

  7. 21 CFR 1305.04 - Persons entitled to order Schedule I and II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to order Schedule I and II controlled substances. (a) Only persons who are registered with DEA under... are registered with DEA under section 1008 of the Act (21 U.S.C. 958) to export these substances may obtain and use DEA Form 222 (order forms) or issue electronic orders for these substances. Persons...

  8. 21 CFR 1305.04 - Persons entitled to order Schedule I and II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to order Schedule I and II controlled substances. (a) Only persons who are registered with DEA under... are registered with DEA under section 1008 of the Act (21 U.S.C. 958) to export these substances may obtain and use DEA Form 222 (order forms) or issue electronic orders for these substances. Persons...

  9. 21 CFR 1305.04 - Persons entitled to order Schedule I and II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to order Schedule I and II controlled substances. (a) Only persons who are registered with DEA under... are registered with DEA under section 1008 of the Act (21 U.S.C. 958) to export these substances may obtain and use DEA Form 222 (order forms) or issue electronic orders for these substances. Persons...

  10. [Extrapyramidal syndrome induced by chemical substances].

    PubMed

    Inoue, N

    1993-11-01

    Extrapyramidal signs are frequently observed in toxic diseases due to environmental and industrial chemical substances. The predominant manifestations are Parkinsonism and less frequently tremor. Parkinsonism has been described among the toxic diseases due to carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, and hydrogen cyanide. In these diseases, Parkinsonism used to appear in the recovery stage from coma in the severe cases. This was also true in methyl alcohol poisoning. The extrapyramidal signs are usually symmetrical. Akinesia and rigidity are main features. Tremor is absent or mild. Levodopa and the other antiparkinsonian drugs are not so effective. Brain CT studies have revealed symmetrical low density areas in the globus pallidus and putamen. On the other hand, postural tremor is main neurological findings in the poisonings by inorganic mercury and tetraethyl lead. In general, tremor in the toxic disease is reported to be self-limited.

  11. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To amend the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 to require the Federal Government, before termination of Federal activities on any real property owned by the Government, to identify real property where no hazardous substance was stored, released, or disposed of.

  12. TOXIC POLLUTANTS IN URBAN WET-WEATHER FLOWS: AN OVERVIEW OF THE MULTI-MEDIA TRANSPORT, IMPACTS, AND CONTROL MEASURES (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an oveview of the transport of toxic pollutants through multiple media in the urban environment. Discussions include the sources of particulate-associated toxic substances and the relationship of these toxics to atmospheric deposition, overland accumulation an...

  13. 78 FR 41768 - Chemical Substances and Mixtures Used in Oil and Gas Exploration or Production; TSCA Section 21...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... processors of E&P chemical substances and mixtures to develop test data sufficient to evaluate the toxicity... and processors of E&P [chemical substances and mixtures] to develop test data to evaluate the toxicity...(a) to require manufacturers and processors of oil and gas exploration and production (E&P)...

  14. Novel psychoactive substances of interest for psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Schifano, Fabrizio; Orsolini, Laura; Duccio Papanti, G; Corkery, John M

    2015-01-01

    Novel psychoactive substances include synthetic cannabinoids, cathinone derivatives, psychedelic phenethylamines, novel stimulants, synthetic opioids, tryptamine derivatives, phencyclidine-like dissociatives, piperazines, GABA-A/B receptor agonists, a range of prescribed medications, psychoactive plants/herbs, and a large series of performance and image enhancing drugs. Users are typically attracted by these substances due to their intense psychoactive effects and likely lack of detection in routine drug screenings. This paper aims at providing psychiatrists with updated knowledge of the clinical pharmacology and psychopathological consequences of the use of these substances. Indeed, these drugs act on a range of neurotransmitter pathways/receptors whose imbalance has been associated with psychopathological conditions, including dopamine, cannabinoid CB1, GABA-A/B, 5-HT2A, glutamate, and k opioid receptors. An overall approach in terms of clinical management is briefly discussed. PMID:25655145

  15. Substance use - marijuana

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - marijuana; Drug abuse - marijuana; Drug use - marijuana; Cannabis; Grass; Hashish; Mary Jane; Pot; Weed ... several minutes. If you eat foods containing the drug as an ingredient, such as brownies, you may ...

  16. Substance use during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Forray, Ariadna

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal substance use is a critical public health concern that is linked with several harmful maternal and fetal consequences. The most frequently used substance in pregnancy is tobacco, followed by alcohol, cannabis and other illicit substances. Unfortunately, polysubstance use in pregnancy is common, as well as psychiatric comorbidity, environmental stressors, and limited and disrupted parental care, all of which can compound deleterious maternal and fetal outcomes. There are few existing treatments for prenatal substance use and these mainly comprise behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Contingency management has been shown to be the most efficacious of these. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the prenatal use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids, including the effects of these on maternal and fetal health and the current therapeutic options. PMID:27239283

  17. Supervision: Substance and Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellerman, Saul W.

    1976-01-01

    Argues that managerial style and substance are inextricably intertwined, illustrating the discussion with excerpts from an extensive study and job analysis of first-line supervisors in a food packaging plant. (JG)

  18. Organic substances in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeson, Phillip E.

    1981-01-01

    This is the third of several compilations of briefing papers on water quality by the U.S. Geological Survey. Each briefing paper is prepared in a simple, nontechnical, easy-to-understand manner. This U.S. Geological Survey Circular contains papers on selected organic substances in water. Briefing papers are included on ' Why study organic substances in water. ', ' Taste and odor in water ', and ' Classification and fractionation of organic solutes in natural waters'. (USGS)

  19. PTSD and Substance Abuse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Substance use disorders (SUD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are...Appendix……………………………………………………………………………. 10-end INTRODUCTION Substance use disorders (SUD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD...International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies “Resilience After Trauma: From Surviving to Thriving” Annual Meeting 7-9 November 2013. Currently

  20. 16 CFR 1500.135 - Summary of guidelines for determining chronic toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... though they may provide only limited evidence of developmental toxicity. (3) Male Reproductive Toxicants. Male reproductive toxicants can be grouped into the following different categories based on evidence obtained from human or animal studies. (i) Known Human Male Reproductive Toxicant. A substance...

  1. 16 CFR 1500.135 - Summary of guidelines for determining chronic toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... though they may provide only limited evidence of developmental toxicity. (3) Male Reproductive Toxicants. Male reproductive toxicants can be grouped into the following different categories based on evidence obtained from human or animal studies. (i) Known Human Male Reproductive Toxicant. A substance...

  2. 16 CFR 1500.135 - Summary of guidelines for determining chronic toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... though they may provide only limited evidence of developmental toxicity. (3) Male Reproductive Toxicants. Male reproductive toxicants can be grouped into the following different categories based on evidence obtained from human or animal studies. (i) Known Human Male Reproductive Toxicant. A substance...

  3. Assessment of toxicity of dissolved and microencapsulated biocides for control of the Golden Mussel Limnoperna fortunei.

    PubMed

    Calazans, Sávio Henrique C; Americo, Juliana Alves; da Costa Fernandes, Flavio; Aldridge, David C; de Freitas Rebelo, Mauro

    2013-10-01

    Biological invasions currently pose major threats to ecosystems worldwide. Invasive bivalves such as the Golden Mussel Limnoperna fortunei can act as 'environmental engineers', altering biogeochemistry, reducing biodiversity, and literally changing the landscape of aquatic environments. The risk that this mussel will invade the Amazon basin is a great concern for environmental authorities, especially because no efficient control methods presently exist. In this study, we tested new microencapsulated chemicals, along with the traditional dissolved chlorine and KCl, as alternatives to control L. fortunei infestation in industrial and water supply plants along rivers. Because these bivalves can close their valves when they sense toxic substances in the water, microencapsulation has improved the effectiveness of the chemicals in controlling L. fortunei, reducing variation in the application and increasing toxicity compared to dissolved chemicals. Microencapsulation should be seriously considered as an alternative to replace hazardous chlorine.

  4. Digitalis toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be rapid, or slow and irregular. An ECG is done to check for irregular heartbeats. Blood ... A. Digitalis toxicity. In: Goldberger AL, ed. Clinical Electrocardiography : A Simplified Approach, 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  5. Beryllium Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Beryllium Toxicity Patient Education Care Instruction Sheet Course : WB 1095 CE Original ... of Contents Introduction Printer-Friendly version of the Patient Education Sheet [PDF - 48 KB] What Is Beryllium? Beryllium ...

  6. Antimony Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients) and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically. PMID:21318007

  7. Levels and fate of perfluoroalkyl substances in beached plastic pellets and sediments collected from Greece.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Marta; Farré, Marinella; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Barceló, Damià

    2014-10-15

    Plastic debris damages marine wildlife and ecosystems becoming an important source of marine pollution. In addition, they can sorb, concentrate and stabilise contaminants acting as toxic carriers to the marine food web. In this context, the presence of 18 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in plastic pellets (n=5) and beach sediment (n=9) samples widely distributed around Greek coastal areas was assessed. The results, mainly, showed the sorption of PFASs onto pellet surface from surrounding water with concentrations from method limit of quantification to 115 ng/kg for C5, C7, C8 and C10 carboxylic acids and C8 sulfonate acid. A similar pattern was found by comparing plastic pellets and sediment for the same sampling locations that could indicate a common origin of contamination in both types of samples. However, since the number of analysed samples is limited, a more comprehensive study with a higher number of samples should be performed in future research.

  8. SEDIMENT TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION (TIE) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sediment contamination in the United States has been amply documented and, in order to comply with the 1972 Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency must address the issue of toxic sediments. Contaminated sediments from a number of freshwater and marine sites have demonstrated acute and/or chronic toxicity to a variety of test species, as well as adverse ecological effects such as population declines and changes in community structure. However, simply knowing that a sediment is toxic has limited use. This document provides guidance on the performance of sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE). TIE methods allow for the identification of toxic chemicals or chemical classes causing observed toxicity. The identification of pollutants responsible for toxicity of contaminated sediments has broad application in a number of EPA programs as the methods can be used within the total maximum daily load (TMDL) framework, to link sediment toxicity to specific dischargers, to design cost-effective remediation programs, and to identify environmentally protective options for dredged material disposal. In addition, the identification of specific problem contaminants in sediments could prove to be very useful to EPA programs involved in the development of water or sediment quality guidelines, and the registration of new products such as pesticides. Finally, knowledge of the causes of toxicity that influence ecological changes such as community struc

  9. New DEA rules expand options for controlled substance disposal.

    PubMed

    Peterson, David M

    2015-03-01

    Prescription drug abuse and overdose are rapidly growing problems in the United States. The United States federal Disposal of Controlled Substances Rule became effective 9 October 2014, implementing the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010 (Disposal Act). These regulations target escalating prescription drug misuse by reducing accumulation of unused controlled substances that may be abused, diverted or accidentally ingested. Clinical areas that can now participate in collecting unused controlled substances include retail pharmacies, hospitals or clinics with an onsite pharmacy, and narcotic treatment programs. Collection methods include placing a controlled substance collection receptacle or instituting a mail-back program. Because prompt onsite destruction of collected items is required of mail-back programs, collection receptacles are more likely to be used in clinical areas. Retail pharmacies and hospitals or clinics with an onsite pharmacy may also place and maintain collection receptacles at long-term care facilities. The Act and Rule are intended to increase controlled substance disposal methods and expand local involvement in collection of unused controlled substances. Potential barriers to participating in controlled substance collection include acquisition of suitable collection receptacles and liners, lack of available space meeting the necessary criteria, lack of employee time for verification and inventory requirements, and program costs.

  10. Fish acute toxicity syndromes and their use in the QSAR approach to hazard assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McKim, J.M.; Bradbury, S.P.; Niemi, G.J.

    1987-04-01

    Implementation of the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1977 creates the need to reliably establish testing priorities because laboratory resources are limited and the number of industrial chemicals requiring evaluation is overwhelming. The use of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models as rapid and predictive screening tools to select more potentially hazardous chemicals for in-depth laboratory evaluation has been proposed. Further implementation and refinement of quantitative structure-toxicity relationships in aqueous toxicology and hazard assessment requires the development of a mode-of-action database. With such a database, a qualitative structure-activity relationship can be formulated to assign the proper mode of action, and respective QSAR, to a given chemical structure. In this review, the development of fish acute toxicity syndromes (FATS), which are toxic-response sets based on various behavioral and physiological-biochemical measurements, and their projected use in the mode-of-action database are outlined. Using behavioral parameters monitored in the fathead minnow during acute toxicity testing, FATS associated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors and narcotics could be reliably predicted. However, compounds classified as oxidative phosphorylation uncouplers or stimulants could not be resolved. Refinement of this approach by using respiratory-cardiovascular responses in the rainbow trout, enabled FATS associated with AChE inhibitors, convulsants, narcotics, respiratory blockers, respiratory membrane irritants, and uncouplers to be correctly predicted.

  11. Fish acute toxicity syndromes and their use in the QSAR approach to hazard assessment.

    PubMed Central

    McKim, J M; Bradbury, S P; Niemi, G J

    1987-01-01

    Implementation of the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1977 creates the need to reliably establish testing priorities because laboratory resources are limited and the number of industrial chemicals requiring evaluation is overwhelming. The use of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models as rapid and predictive screening tools to select more potentially hazardous chemicals for in-depth laboratory evaluation has been proposed. Further implementation and refinement of quantitative structure-toxicity relationships in aquatic toxicology and hazard assessment requires the development of a "mode-of-action" database. With such a database, a qualitative structure-activity relationship can be formulated to assign the proper mode of action, and respective QSAR, to a given chemical structure. In this review, the development of fish acute toxicity syndromes (FATS), which are toxic-response sets based on various behavioral and physiological-biochemical measurements, and their projected use in the mode-of-action database are outlined. Using behavioral parameters monitored in the fathead minnow during acute toxicity testing, FATS associated with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors and narcotics could be reliably predicted. However, compounds classified as oxidative phosphorylation uncouplers or stimulants could not be resolved. Refinement of this approach by using respiratory-cardiovascular responses in the rainbow trout, enabled FATS associated with AChE inhibitors, convulsants, narcotics, respiratory blockers, respiratory membrane irritants, and uncouplers to be correctly predicted. PMID:3297660

  12. The new Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabha, A.P. ); Olem, H. )

    1991-05-01

    This article is a title by title review of the new Clean Air Act and how it affects water quality and wastewater treatment. The bill provides for restoring and protecting lakes and rivers by reducing acid-rain-causing emissions and toxics from nonpoint-source runoff. Topics covered include urban smog, mobile sources, air toxics, acid rain, permits, ozone-depleting chemicals, enforcement, and the law's socio-economic impacts.

  13. A 90-Day Oral Toxicity Study and a 5-Day Metabolism Study of Diisopropyl Methylphosphonate (DIMP) in Mink.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    Eighty 12-13 month-old brown "Ranch Wild " mink of each sex were randomized by body weight into eight dose groups of ten animals per sex. The animals...Laboratory Practice Standard (Toxic Substances Control Act) was followed. 90-DAY STUDY One hundred sixty 12-13 month-old brown "Ranch Wild " mink (80...3.2 x 10ŚM sec-’ * Hydrolysis Half- life : 687 years * Decomposition Products: (in microwave plasma discharge): methylphosphonic acid, isopropyl

  14. Potential community exposure to toxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    LaGrone, F.S. )

    1991-03-01

    There is increasing public concern over potential exposure to airborne chemical substances from all sources. Industries in Houston have cooperated to implement a comprehensive regional monitoring program to address the issue of long-term community exposure to toxic airborne chemicals. The initial results from the HRM Volatile Organic Indicator Compound Study have been used effectively to address public concerns regarding the air quality impact of airborne toxic emissions reported under Section 313 of SARA Title III.

  15. 40 CFR 798.4350 - Inhalation developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to ensure that conditions throughout the exposure chamber are essentially the same. Test material... of the toxic characteristics of an inhalable material such as a gas, volatile substance, or aerosol... particles of the test substance. It is used to compare particles of different sizes, shapes, and...

  16. 40 CFR 798.4350 - Inhalation developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to ensure that conditions throughout the exposure chamber are essentially the same. Test material... of the toxic characteristics of an inhalable material such as a gas, volatile substance, or aerosol... particles of the test substance. It is used to compare particles of different sizes, shapes, and...

  17. 40 CFR 798.4350 - Inhalation developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to ensure that conditions throughout the exposure chamber are essentially the same. Test material... of the toxic characteristics of an inhalable material such as a gas, volatile substance, or aerosol... particles of the test substance. It is used to compare particles of different sizes, shapes, and...

  18. Acute toxicity of pinnatoxins E, F and G to mice.

    PubMed

    Munday, Rex; Selwood, Andrew I; Rhodes, Lesley

    2012-11-01

    The acute toxicities to mice of pinnatoxins E, F and G, members of the cyclic imine group of phycotoxins, by intraperitoneal injection and/or oral administration, have been determined. These substances were all very toxic by intraperitoneal injection, with LD(50) values between 12.7 and 57 μg/kg. Pinnatoxin E was much less toxic by oral administration than by intraperitoneal injection, but this was not the case for pinnatoxin F. The median lethal doses of the latter substance by gavage and by voluntary intake were only 2 and 4 times higher than that by injection. The high oral toxicity of pinnatoxin F raises concerns as to the possibility of adverse effects of this substance in shellfish consumers, although it should be noted that no toxic effects in humans have been recorded with pinnatoxins or with any other compound of the cyclic imine group.

  19. 78 FR 61991 - Schedules of Controlled Substances: Temporary Placement of Three Synthetic Phenethylamines Into...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-10

    ... toxicology for cases of acute toxicity. Since abusers obtain these drugs through unknown sources, the...; ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration 21 CFR Part 1308 Schedules of Controlled Substances: Temporary Placement of Three Synthetic Phenethylamines Into Schedule I AGENCY: Drug...

  20. Cadmium as a respiratory toxicant

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, E.C.; Graham, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Cadmium is a major respiratory toxicant as evidenced by numerous human and animal studies. Controlled animal inhalation studies provide supporting evidence to the associations observed in epidemiological studies that Cd has the potential to cause lung fibrosis, emphysema, cancer, and kidney disease after prolonged exposure. Shorter-term exposure studies indicate that mechanisms thought to be involved in several of these chronic disease states (especially fibrosis and emphysema) are acutely activated. The evidence of toxicity is sufficiently clear that a TLV has been set and the International Agency for Research on Cancer has named Cd as a Group B1 substance (probable human carcinogen). The risk to Cd exposure is enhanced by its chemical and physical properties that result in bioaccumulation. Thus, even a low-level exposure over long periods of time would be expected to reach doses that could be toxic.

  1. Approaching Suspicious Substances Safely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A mineral identification tool that was developed for NASA's Mars Rover Technology Development program is now serving as a powerful tool for U.S. law enforcement agencies and military personnel to identify suspicious liquid and solid substances. The tool can measure unknown substances through glass and plastic packaging materials with the RamanProbe(TradeMark) focused fiber-optic probe. The probe length can be extended up to 200 meters to enable users to analyze potentially dangerous substances at a safe distance. In many cases, the spectrometer and personnel are kept in a safe zone while the probe is positioned next to the sample being analyzed. Being able to identify chemicals in remote locations also saves users time and labor, since otherwise the samples would need to be collected, transported, and prepared prior to measurement in the laboratory.

  2. Health and Ecological Hazards Caused by Hazardous Substances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In some cases, hazardous substances may irritate the skin or eyes, make it difficult to breathe, cause headaches and nausea, result in other types of illness, or far more severe health effects. Toxic effects on the environment can be just as devastating.

  3. Cancer therapy using nanoformulated substances: scientific, regulatory and financial aspects.

    PubMed

    Alphandéry, Edouard; Grand-Dewyse, Pierre; Lefèvre, Raphael; Mandawala, Chalani; Durand-Dubief, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    Several nanoformulated anti-cancer substances are currently commercialized or under development. Pre-clinical and clinical results have revealed better properties, that is, larger efficacy and lower toxicity for these substances than for conventional anti-cancer treatments. Here, we review the development of several of these substances such as Marqibo, Myocet, Doxil, DaunoXome, MM398, MM302, Mepact, Versamune, Thermodox, Depocyt, Livatag, Abraxane, Eligard, Opaxio, Zinostatin Stimalamer (SMANCS), Pegasys and PegIntron, BIND-014, CRLX-101, Oncaspar, Neulasta, Aurimmune, Auroshell, AuNPs, Nanotherm, NanoXray, Magnetosome chains, Kadcyla (T-DM1), Ontak (DAB/IL2), Gendicine and Curcumin. We describe their specific properties, such as their stability, solubility, mean of administration or targeting, distribution, metabolism and toxicity. We discuss their categorization as medical devices or drugs, their fabrication process within a regulatory environment as well as intellectual property and financial aspects that are all essential to enable their industrial development.

  4. 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment Summary

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In 1989, President George W. Bush proposed revisions to the Clean Air Act designed to curb acid rain, urban air pollution, and toxic air emissions. The proposal also called for establishing a national permits program.

  5. Draft Test Guideline: Gammarid Acute Toxicity Test

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  6. Draft Test Guideline: Penaeid Acute Toxicity Test

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  7. In Vitro Models of Human Toxicity Pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    For toxicity testing and assessment programs to address the large numbers of substances of potential concern, a paradigm shift in the assessment of chemical hazard and risk is needed that takes advantage of advances in molecular toxicology, computational sciences, and information...

  8. Draft Test Guideline: Fish Life Cycle Toxicity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  9. Draft Test Guideline: Daphnid Chronic Toxicity Test

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  10. Draft Test Guideline: Chironomid Sediment Toxicity Test

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  11. Draft Test Guideline: Mysid Chronic Toxicity Test

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  12. Draft Test Guideline: Mysid Acute Toxicity Test

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  13. Drug and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Drug and Substance Abuse Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  14. Substance Abuse and Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Amos, Ed.

    This book focuses on the identification of practical knowledge and skills needed for counseling individuals with substance abuse problems. It is a resource for practitioners, students, and faculty in school counseling, rehabilitation counseling, mental health counseling, school psychology, or social work in recognizing, preventing, and treating…

  15. Risks and Chemical Substances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Avrom A.

    1994-01-01

    Examines exposure to chemicals within the home and three important ways in which hazardous substances can be identified and evaluated. Suggests a rational picture of human health risks and contains an introductory discussion of reasons for exposure, epidemiology, cancer causes and patterns, animal testing, toxins, and risk. (LZ)

  16. Substance Use Prevention Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Judy

    This report outlines the Hillsborough County, Florida, Head Start Program's project to field test with young children and their families curricula that were designed to prevent alcohol and other drug problems. A national search conducted by means of computers, individual contacts, and other methods yielded information on 22 substance abuse…

  17. Adolescent Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Craig R.; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1985-01-01

    Cummings (1979), citing evidence from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, reports that one of every eleven adult Americans suffers from a severe addictive problem. Drug addiction is epidemic among teenagers; one of every six teenagers suffers from a severe addictive problem. This paper focuses on adolescent drug/substance abuse. (Author)

  18. Ranking chemicals based on chronic toxicity data.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, C T; Stara, J F; Durkin, P R

    1985-12-01

    During the past 3 years, EPA's ECAO/Cincinnati has developed a method to rank chemicals based on chronic toxicity data. This ranking system reflects two primary attributes of every chemical: the minimum effective dose and the type of effect elicited at that dose. The purpose for developing this chronic toxicity ranking system was to provide the EPA with the technical background required to adjust the RQs of hazardous substances designated in Section 101(14) of CERCLA or "Superfund." This approach may have applications to other areas of interest to the EPA and other regulatory agencies where ranking of chemicals based on chronic toxicity is desired.

  19. 40 CFR 799.9410 - TSCA chronic toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... clinical abnormalities), gross lesions, identified target organs, body weight changes, effects on mortality... Health Effects Test Guidelines § 799.9410 TSCA chronic toxicity. (a) Scope—(1) Applicability. This... objective of a chronic toxicity study is to determine the effects of a substance in a mammalian...

  20. 40 CFR 799.9410 - TSCA chronic toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... clinical abnormalities), gross lesions, identified target organs, body weight changes, effects on mortality... Health Effects Test Guidelines § 799.9410 TSCA chronic toxicity. (a) Scope—(1) Applicability. This... objective of a chronic toxicity study is to determine the effects of a substance in a mammalian...

  1. Developmental Toxicity Potential of Hydroxyuera, a Positive Control, in Rabbits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    developmental toxicity testing procedure for New Zealand White rabbits is a valid model for testing substances for developmental toxicity. Coppes et al...10. Wilson JG. Methods for acministering igents anci detecting malformations in experimental animls . Tn: 0>. JG, Warkany J, eds. Teratoloqy: Principles

  2. EMISSIONS OF ORGANIC AIR TOXICS FROM OPEN BURNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed literature search was performed to collect and collate available data reporting emissions of toxic organic substances into the air from open burning sources. Availability of data varied according to the source and the class of air toxics of interest. Volatile organic c...

  3. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... agent is held in contact with the skin by means of a sleeve for periods varying up to 24 hours. The... adhere readily to the skin, mesh wire screen may be employed instead of the sleeve. The screen is padded and raised approximately 2 centimeters from the exposed skin. In the case of dry powder...

  4. Toxic substances and human risk: principles of data interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Tardiff, R.G.; Rodricks, J.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the relationship between toxicology and risk assessment and identifying the principles that should be used to evaluate toxicological data for human risk assessment. The book opens by distinguishing between the practice of toxicology as a science (observational and data-gathering activities) and its practice as an art (predictive or risk-estimating activities). This dichotomous nature produces the two elemental problems with which users of toxicological data must grapple. First, how relevant are data provided by the science of toxicology to assessment of human health risks. Second, what methods of data interpretation should be used to formulate hypotheses or predictions regarding human health risk.

  5. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shan, N.; Yap, N.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Seames, W.; Ames, M.R.; Sarofim, A.F.; Swenson, S.; Lighty, J.; Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.; Palmer, C.; Mroczkowski, S.; Helble, J.; Mamani-Paco, R.; Sterling, R.; Dunham, G.; Miller, S.

    2000-08-17

    The final program review meeting of Phase II was held on June 22 in Salt Lake City. The goals of the meeting were to present work in progress and to identify the remaining critical experiments or analyses, particularly those involving collaboration among various groups. The information presented at the meeting is summarized in this report. Remaining fixed bed, bench-scale experiments at EERC were discussed. There are more ash samples which can be run. Of particular interest are high carbon ash samples to be generated by the University of Arizona this summer and some ash-derived sorbents that EERC has evaluated on a different program. The use of separation techniques (electrostatic or magnetic) was also discussed as a way to understand the active components in the ash with respect to mercury. XAFS analysis of leached and unleached ash samples from the University of Arizona was given a high priority. In order to better understand the fixed bed test results, CCSEM and Moessbauer analyses of those ash samples need to be completed. Utah plans to analyze the ash from the single particle combustion experiments for those major elements not measured by INAA. USGS must still complete mercury analyses on the whole coals and leaching residues. Priorities for further work at the SHRIMP-RG facility include arsenic on ash surfaces and mercury in sulfide minerals. Moessbauer analyses of coal samples from the University of Utah were completed; samples from the top and bottom layers of containers of five different coals showed little oxidation of pyrite in the top relative to the bottom except for Wyodak.

  6. USGS TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION -- FORMS OF OCCURRENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Allan Kolker; Stanley J. Mroczkowski; Curtis A. Palmer; Robert B. Finkelman

    1999-10-01

    Leaching procedures have been completed for the three Phase 2 coals. Chemical analyses have been returned for the whole coals, allowing leaching results to be determined as data on the leachates and solid residues become available. Problems with the nitric acid leaching step twice necessitated repeating the entire procedure for the Ohio and North Dakota samples. Similarly, leaching of the Wyodak sample was repeated once. Analytical results have been returned for all but the last complete round of leaching, which was conducted after modification of the procedure for the nitric acid step. Re-leaching of solid residues prepared under the old procedure confirms that pyrite recovery using the new method is complete. Development of an improved analytical method for Hg continues, but emphasis has shifted from the atomic fluorescence method to an automated direct analysis method that offers similar or better sensitivity. The cold vapor atomic absorption (CVAA) method has been used in the interim for whole coals. During the reporting period Dr. Kolker traveled to Stanford University to evaluate the Stanford/USGS SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe for project purposes and generate trace-element results for illite/smectite in project coals. Initial SHRIMP results for Cr in these samples confirm the Phase 1 conclusion that its concentration in clays is just below the detection limit ({approximately} 100--200 ppm) for electron microprobe analysis. The SHRIMP-RG offers promise for other project priorities, including determination of Hg in sulfides and of As in fly-ash. Use of the SEM and electron microprobe continued during the last half-year, and has been especially useful in support of the ion probe effort. Among other procedures conducted, low temperature ashing has been completed and XRD determinations are underway. Splits of leached residues have been taken for XAFS analysis. The authors expect the first of these to be determined shortly by their Univ. of Kentucky colleagues. These results will be very useful in integrating the leaching and XAFS results and in resolving possible discrepancies.

  7. Flavored E-Cig Liquids May Contain Toxic Substances

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) -- Some of the liquid flavorings heated in e-cigarettes appear to break down into potentially dangerous compounds, ... health of electronic cigarette users. Whatever the case, e-cigarettes are popular. A 2015 federal survey suggested that ...

  8. Controlling toxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Postel, S.

    1988-01-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture and the disposal of industrial chemical wastes constitute two major pathways by which people are inadvertently exposed to toxics. These practices release hundreds of millions of tons of potentially hazardous substances into the environment each year. In many ways the situation with industrial chemical waste parallels the predicament with pesticides: Not only are current practices contaminating the environment and creating health risks, but they are unsustainable over the long term. Strategies that reduce pesticide use in agriculture and minimize waste generation in industry offer cost-effective approaches to decreasing risks from toxics. Such strategies differ fundamentally from current practice and require new ways of thinking. The quick fixes of pesticide spraying and end-of-pipe pollution control are replaced with new production systems aimed at reconciling economic profits with environmental protection. Current efforts in integrated pest management and industrial waste reduction, although clearly promising, only hint at their long-term potential for detoxifying the environment.

  9. [Toxic complex from parrotfish].

    PubMed

    Chungue, E; Bagnis, R; Fusetani, N; Yasumoto, T

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiological observations suggested that a complex toxic molecule is involved in the parrotfish flesh (Scarus gibbus) poisoning from Gambier Islands. The fat soluble extract obtained from the muscles upon ciguatoxin preparation showed two toxic substances after fractionation by DEAE cellulose column chromatography. The major toxin is different from ciguatoxin judging by its chromatographic behaviour. The other is closely similar to (or identical with) ciguatoxin from the moray eel Gymnothorax javanicus. They were named SG1 for the new toxin and SG2 for the ciguatoxin like compound. Successive filtrations on Sephadex LH-20 of SG1 and SG2 gave respectively a lethality to mice of 0.03 microgram/g and 0.06 microgram/g. SG1, specifically occurs in the muscles of the parrotfish family (scaritoxin) while it is absent from other ciguateric fishes. According to that specificity and the lack of SG1 in S. gibbus liver and gut contents, the origin of scaritoxin is briefly discussed.

  10. Cadmium toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lichuan; Zhang, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium is a well-known environmental pollutant with distinctly toxic effects on plants. It can displace certain essential metals from a wealth of metalloproteins, and thus disturb many normal physiological processes and cause severe developmental aberrant. The harmful effects of cadmium stress include, but are not limited to: reactive oxygen species overproduction, higher lipid hydroperoxide contents, and chloroplast structure change, which may lead to cell death. Plants have developed diverse mechanisms to alleviate environmental cadmium stress, e.g., cadmium pump and transporting cadmium into the leaf vacuoles. This mini-review focuses on the current research into understanding the cellular mechanisms of cadmium toxicity on cytoskeleton, vesicular trafficking and cell wall formation in plants. PMID:22499203

  11. Toxic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the widespread use of gases and some volatile solvents in modern society is given. The usual circumstances in which undue exposure may occur are described. The most prominent symptoms and general principles of diagnosis and treatment are given and are followed by more specific information on the commoner, more toxic materials. While acute poisonings constitute the greater part of the paper, some indication of chronic disorders arising from repeated or prolonged exposure is also given. PMID:2687827

  12. [Source identification of toxic wastewaters in a petrochemical industrial park].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Yu, Yin; Zhou, Yue-Xi; Chen, Xue-Min; Fu, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Miao

    2014-12-01

    Petrochemical wastewaters have toxic impacts on the microorganisms in biotreatment processes, which are prone to cause deterioration of effluent quality of the wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the inhibition effects of activated sludge's oxygen consumption were tested to evaluate the toxicity of production wastewaters in a petrochemical industrial park. The evaluation covered the wastewaters from not only different production units in the park, but also different production nodes in each unit. No direct correlation was observed between the toxicity effects and the organic contents, suggesting that the toxic properties of the effluents could not be predicted by the organic contents. In view of the variation of activated sludge sensitivity among different tests, the toxicity data were standardized according to the concentration-effect relationships of the standard toxic substance 3, 5-dichlorophenol on each day, in order to improve the comparability among the toxicity data. Furthermore, the Quality Emission Load (QEL) of corresponding standard toxic substance was calculated by multiplying the corresponding 3, 5-dichlorophenol concentration and the wastewater flow quantity, to indicate the toxicity emission contribution of each wastewater to the wastewater treatment plant. According to the rank list of the toxicity contribution of wastewater from different units and nodes, the sources of toxic wastewater in the petrochemical industrial park were clearly identified. This study provides effective guidance for source control of wastewater toxicity in the large industrial park.

  13. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  14. Studying toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elkus, A.; LeBlanc, L.; Kim, C.; Van Beneden, R.; Mayer, G.

    2006-01-01

    With funding from the George Mitchell Center for the Environment at the University of Maine, a team of scientists used a simple laboratory-based sediment resuspension design, and two well-established aquatic toxicology models, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), to evaluate if resuspension of Penobscot river sediment significantly elevates the toxicity of river water and to provide preliminary information on the types of chemicals likely to desorb during resuspension. The group collected sediments from two sites with known chemical contamination downstream of the Great Works and Veazie dams. The sediments were examined to determine the dynamics of PAH desorption and degradation under different resuspension frequencies. The scientists used clarified water from resuspension experiments for toxicity tests with the water-flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and other aquatic test organisms to infer toxicity from sediments from northern California rivers. Data from the study will help ascertain whether metals and/or xenoestrogens are present in the desorption water and give insight into possible avenues of sediment remediation.

  15. Modern toxic antipersonnel projectiles.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Yvan; Regenstreif, Philippe; Fanton, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    In the spring of 1944, Kurt von Gottberg, the SS police chief in Minsk, was shot and injured by 2 Soviet agents. Although he was only slightly injured, he died 6 hours later. The bullets were hollow and contained a crystalline white powder. They were 4-g bullets, semi-jacketed in cupronickel, containing 28 mg of aconitine. They were later known as akonitinnitratgeschosse. The Sipo (the Nazi security police) then ordered a trial with a 9-mm Parabellum cartridge containing Ditran, an anticholinergic drug with hallucinogenic properties causing intense mental confusion. In later years, QNB was used and given the NATO code BZ (3-quinuclidinyl-benzylate). It was proven that Saddam Hussein had this weapon (agent 15) manufactured and used it against the Kurds. Serbian forces used the same type of weapon in the Bosnian conflict, particularly in Srebrenica.The authors go on to list the Cold War toxic weapons developed by the KGB and the Warsaw pact countries for the discreet elimination of dissidents and proindependence leaders who had taken refuge in the West. These weapons include PSZh-13 launchers, the Troika electronic sequential pistol, and the ingenious 4-S110T captive piston system designed by the engineer Stechkin. Disguised as a cigarette case, it could fire a silent charge of potassium cyanide. This rogues gallery also includes the umbrella rigged to inject a pellet of ricin (or another phytalbumin of similar toxicity, such as abrin or crotin) that was used to assassinate the Bulgarian writer and journalist Georgi Markov on September 7, 1978, in London.During the autopsy, the discovery of a bullet burst into 4 or 5 parts has to make at once suspecting the use of a toxic substance. Toxicological analysis has to look for first and foremost aconitine, cyanide, suxamethonium, Ditran, BZ, or one of the toxic phytalbumins. The use of such complex weapons has to make suspect a powerful organization: army, secret service, terrorism. The existence of the Russian UDAR spray

  16. The subacute inhalation toxicity of 109 industrial chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Gage, J. C.

    1970-01-01

    Gage, J. C. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 1-18. The subacute inhalation toxicity of 109 industrial chemicals. The inhalation toxicity of 109 substances has been studied by exposing experimental animals to known concentrations in air for periods of about three weeks. The toxic properties of these substances are reviewed in relation to the effects of similar compounds on animals and on man. Provisional operational limits are suggested to assist in the design of new plant and in the establishment of codes for safe manufacturing practice. PMID:5418916

  17. Substance use disorders and employability among welfare recipients.

    PubMed

    Wetzler, Scott; Schwartz, Bruce; Swanson, Arthur; Cahill, Rachel

    2010-11-01

    The 2006 welfare reform legislation (Deficit Reduction Act of 2005) imposed more stringent work requirements and defined the amount of time cash assistance recipients are allowed to be exempted from the work requirement because of substance use treatment. As there is little empirical literature on the employability of substance users, it is difficult to know whether it is realistic to expect individuals with substance use disorders to meet the increased work requirement. Based on a comprehensive evaluation of nearly 9,000 substance-misusing welfare recipients from 2001 to 2007, University Behavioral Associates (UBA) Comprehensive Services Model program in Bronx, New York, found that 60% of recipients were not exempted from the work requirement owing to substance misuse at the outset, and an additional 24% were found nonexempt after 3 months of intensive outpatient treatment coupled with case management, resulting in a total of 84% of the UBA clients not being exempted from the work requirement because of substance misuse by Day 90. UBA also found that 25% of substance-misusing clients were able to obtain employment, and most successfully retained those jobs over the course of 6 months. These findings are discussed in relation to the new law's work requirements and the issue of the employability of substance misusers. Finally, the value of case management in serving this hard-to-engage population is discussed.

  18. 77 FR 76897 - Significant New Use Rule on Certain Chemical Substances; Removal of Significant New Use Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 9 and 721 RIN 2070-AB27 Significant New Use Rule on Certain Chemical Substances... Act (TSCA) for four chemical substances which were the subject of premanufacture notices (PMNs). EPA... chemical substances under separate notice and comment procedures. DATES: This final rule is...

  19. [Antihypoxic properties of opiates and substance P].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, I G; Torshin, V I

    2001-01-01

    Using survival slices of the rat cerebellum, we studied the influence of opiates (alpha- and beta-endorphines, met-enkephalines) as well as substance P (SP) on the impulse activity (IA) of neurons. Low doses of the studied substances (10(-8)-10(-10) M) for the most part increased the IA of the neurons, while high doses (10(6)-10(-5) M) produced biphasic reaction (inhibition-excitation). It is supposed that opiates and SP act as transmitters in the cerebellum. Under increasing hypoxia, opiates and SP manifested antixypoxic properties both in low O22 concentration and under reoxygenation. Opiates and SP proved to be natural antihypoxants involved not only in nociception mechanisms but also in brain adaptation to oxygen deficiency.

  20. Disposal of controlled substances. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-09-09

    This rule governs the secure disposal of controlled substances by registrants and ultimate users. These regulations will implement the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010 by expanding the options available to collect controlled substances from ultimate users for the purpose of disposal, including: Take-back events, mail-back programs, and collection receptacle locations. These regulations contain specific language allowing law enforcement to voluntarily continue to conduct take-back events, administer mail-back programs, and maintain collection receptacles. These regulations will allow authorized manufacturers, distributors, reverse distributors, narcotic treatment programs (NTPs), hospitals/clinics with an on-site pharmacy, and retail pharmacies to voluntarily administer mail-back programs and maintain collection receptacles. In addition, this rule expands the authority of authorized hospitals/clinics and retail pharmacies to voluntarily maintain collection receptacles at long-term care facilities. This rule also reorganizes and consolidates previously existing regulations on disposal, including the role of reverse distributors.