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Sample records for actin binding domain

  1. Tailor-Made Ezrin Actin Binding Domain to Probe Its Interaction with Actin In-Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Rohini; Köster, Darius; Kalme, Sheetal; Mayor, Satyajit; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin, a member of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) protein family, is an Actin-plasma membrane linker protein mediating cellular integrity and function. In-vivo study of such interactions is a complex task due to the presence of a large number of endogenous binding partners for both Ezrin and Actin. Further, C-terminal actin binding capacity of the full length Ezrin is naturally shielded by its N-terminal, and only rendered active in the presence of Phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) or phosphorylation at the C-terminal threonine. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for the design, expression and purification of constructs, combining the Ezrin C-terminal actin binding domain, with functional elements such as fusion tags and fluorescence tags to facilitate purification and fluorescence microscopy based studies. For the first time, internal His tag was employed for purification of Ezrin actin binding domain based on in-silico modeling. The functionality (Ezrin-actin interaction) of these constructs was successfully demonstrated by using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy. This design can be extended to other members of the ERM family as well. PMID:25860910

  2. Verprolin function in endocytosis and actin organization. Roles of the Las17p (yeast WASP)-binding domain and a novel C-terminal actin-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Rajmohan, Rajamuthiah; Meng, Lei; Ren, Gang; Vajjhala, Parimala R; Munn, Alan L

    2007-08-01

    Vrp1p (verprolin, End5p) is the yeast ortholog of human Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP)-interacting protein (WIP). Vrp1p localizes to the cortical actin cytoskeleton, is necessary for its polarization to sites of growth and is also essential for endocytosis. At elevated temperature, Vrp1p becomes essential for growth. A C-terminal Vrp1p fragment (C-Vrp1p) retains the ability to localize to the cortical actin cytoskeleton and function in actin-cytoskeleton polarization, endocytosis and growth. Here, we demonstrate that two submodules in C-Vrp1p are required for actin-cytoskeleton polarization: a novel C-terminal actin-binding submodule (CABS) that contains a novel G-actin-binding domain, which we call a verprolin homology 2 C-terminal (VH2-C) domain; and a second submodule comprising the Las17p-binding domain (LBD) that binds Las17p (yeast WASP). The LBD localizes C-Vrp1p to membranes and the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Intriguingly, the LBD is sufficient to restore endocytosis and growth at elevated temperature to Vrp1p-deficient cells. The CABS also restores these functions, but only if modified by a lipid anchor to provide membrane association. Our findings highlight the role of Las17p binding for Vrp1p membrane association, suggest general membrane association may be more important than specific targeting to the cortical actin cytoskeleton for Vrp1p function in endocytosis and cell growth, and suggest that Vrp1p binding to individual effectors may alter their physiological activity. PMID:17635585

  3. Functional characterization of spectrin-actin-binding domains in 4.1 family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Gimm, J Aura; An, Xiuli; Nunomura, Wataru; Mohandas, Narla

    2002-06-11

    Protein 4.1R is the prototypical member of a protein family that includes 4.1G, 4.1B, and 4.1N. 4.1R plays a crucial role in maintaining membrane mechanical integrity by binding cooperatively to spectrin and actin through its spectrin-actin-binding (SAB) domain. While the binary interaction between 4.1R and spectrin has been well characterized, the actin binding site in 4.1R remains unidentified. Moreover, little is known about the interaction of 4.1R homologues with spectrin and actin. In the present study, we showed that the 8 aa motif (LKKNFMES) within the 10 kDa spectrin-actin-binding domain of 4.1R plays a critical role in binding of 4.1R to actin. Recombinant 4.1R SAB domain peptides with mutations in this motif showed a marked decrease in their ability to form ternary complexes with spectrin and actin. Binary protein-protein interaction studies revealed that this decrease resulted from the inability of mutant SAB peptides to bind to actin filaments while affinity for spectrin was unchanged. We also documented that the 14 C-terminal residues of the 21 amino acid cassette encoded by exon 16 in conjunction with residues 27-43 encoded by exon 17 constituted a fully functional minimal spectrin-binding motif. Finally, we showed that 4.1N SAB domain was unable to form a ternary complex with spectrin and actin, while 4.1G and 4.1B SAB domains were able to form such a complex but less efficiently than 4.1R SAB. This was due to a decrease in the ability of 4.1G and 4.1B SAB domain to interact with actin but not with spectrin. These data enabled us to propose a model for the 4.1R-spectrin-actin ternary complex which may serve as a general paradigm for regulation of spectrin-based cytoskeleton interaction in various cell types. PMID:12044158

  4. Structure of the ERM protein moesin reveals the FERM domain fold masked by an extended actin binding tail domain.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M A; Reczek, D; Bretscher, A; Karplus, P A

    2000-04-28

    The ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) protein family link actin filaments of cell surface structures to the plasma membrane, using a C-terminal F-actin binding segment and an N-terminal FERM domain, a common membrane binding module. ERM proteins are regulated by an intramolecular association of the FERM and C-terminal tail domains that masks their binding sites. The crystal structure of a dormant moesin FERM/tail complex reveals that the FERM domain has three compact lobes including an integrated PTB/PH/ EVH1 fold, with the C-terminal segment bound as an extended peptide masking a large surface of the FERM domain. This extended binding mode suggests a novel mechanism for how different signals could produce varying levels of activation. Sequence conservation suggests a similar regulation of the tumor suppressor merlin. PMID:10847681

  5. Structural and Functional Dissection of the Abp1 ADFH Actin-binding Domain Reveals Versatile In Vivo Adapter Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Quintero-Monzon,O.; Rodal, A.; Strokopytov, B.; Almo, S.; Goode, B.

    2005-01-01

    Abp1 is a multidomain protein that regulates the Arp2/3 complex and links proteins involved in endocytosis to the actin cytoskeleton. All of the proposed cellular functions of Abp1 involve actin filament binding, yet the actin binding site(s) on Abp1 have not been identified, nor has the importance of actin binding for Abp1 localization and function in vivo been tested. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Abp1 actin-binding actin depolymerizing factor homology (ADFH) domain and dissect its activities by mutagenesis. Abp1-ADFH domain and ADF/cofilin structures are similar, and they use conserved surfaces to bind actin; however, there are also key differences that help explain their differential effects on actin dynamics. Using point mutations, we demonstrate that actin binding is required for localization of Abp1 in vivo, the lethality caused by Abp1 overexpression, and the ability of Abp1 to activate Arp2/3 complex. Furthermore, we genetically uncouple ABP1 functions that overlap with SAC6, SLA1, and SLA2, showing they require distinct combinations of activities and interactions. Together, our data provide the first structural and functional view of the Abp1-actin interaction and show that Abp1 has distinct cellular roles as an adapter, linking different sets of ligands for each function.

  6. The carboxyterminal EF domain of erythroid α-spectrin is necessary for optimal spectrin-actin binding

    PubMed Central

    Korsgren, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Spectrin and protein 4.1R crosslink F-actin, forming the membrane skeleton. Actin and 4.1R bind to one end of β-spectrin. The adjacent end of α-spectrin, called the EF domain, is calmodulin-like, with calcium-dependent and calcium-independent EF hands. The severely anemic sph1J/sph1J mouse has very fragile red cells and lacks the last 13 amino acids in the EF domain, implying that the domain is critical for skeletal integrity. To test this, we constructed a minispectrin heterodimer from the actin-binding domain, the EF domain, and 4 adjacent spectrin repeats in each chain. The minispectrin bound to F-actin in the presence of native human protein 4.1R. Formation of the spectrin-actin-4.1R complex was markedly attenuated when the minispectrin contained the shortened sph1J α-spectrin. The α-spectrin deletion did not interfere with spectrin heterodimer assembly or 4.1R binding but abolished the binary interaction between spectrin and F-actin. The data show that the α-spectrin EF domain greatly amplifies the function of the β-spectrin actin-binding domain (ABD) in forming the spectrin-actin-4.1R complex. A model, based on the structure of α-actinin, suggests that the EF domain modulates the function of the ABD and that the C-terminal EF hands (EF34) may bind to the linker that connects the ABD to the first spectrin repeat. PMID:20585040

  7. Direct binding of F actin to the cytoplasmic domain of the alpha 2 integrin chain in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, J. D.; Plopper, G.; Ingber, D. E.; Hartwig, J. H.; Kupper, T. S.

    1995-01-01

    The transmembrane integrins have been shown to interact with the cytoskeleton via noncovalent binding between cytoplasmic domains (CDs) of integrin beta chains and various actin binding proteins within the focal adhesion complex. Direct or indirect integrin alpha chain CD binding to the actin cytoskeleton has not been reported. We show here that actin, as an abundant constituent of focal adhesion complex proteins isolated from fibroblasts, binds strongly and specifically to alpha 2 CD, but not to alpha 1 CD peptide. Similar specific binding to alpha 2 CD peptide was seen for highly purified F actin, free of putative actin-binding proteins. The bound complex of actin and peptide was visualized directly by coprecipitation, and actin binding was abrogated by removal of a five amino acid sequence from the alpha 2 CD peptide. Our findings may explain the earlier observation that, while integrins alpha 2 beta 1 and alpha 1 beta 1 both bind to collagen, only alpha 2 beta 1 can mediate contraction of extracellular collagen matrices.

  8. A single charge in the actin binding domain of fascin can independently tune the linear and non-linear response of an actin bundle network.

    PubMed

    Maier, M; Müller, K W; Heussinger, C; Köhler, S; Wall, W A; Bausch, A R; Lieleg, O

    2015-05-01

    Actin binding proteins (ABPs) not only set the structure of actin filament assemblies but also mediate the frequency-dependent viscoelastic moduli of cross-linked and bundled actin networks. Point mutations in the actin binding domain of those ABPs can tune the association and dissociation dynamics of the actin/ABP bond and thus modulate the network mechanics both in the linear and non-linear response regime. We here demonstrate how the exchange of a single charged amino acid in the actin binding domain of the ABP fascin triggers such a modulation of the network rheology. Whereas the overall structure of the bundle networks is conserved, the transition point from strain-hardening to strain-weakening sensitively depends on the cross-linker off-rate and the applied shear rate. Our experimental results are consistent both with numerical simulations of a cross-linked bundle network and a theoretical description of the bundle network mechanics which is based on non-affine bending deformations and force-dependent cross-link dynamics. PMID:26004635

  9. The Actin-binding Domain of Cortactin is Dynamic and Unstructured and Affects Lateral and Longitudinal Contacts in F-actin

    PubMed Central

    Shvetsov, Alexander; Berkane, Emir; Chereau, David; Dominguez, Roberto; Reisler, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Cortactin is an F-actin- and Arp2/3 complex-binding protein, implicated in the regulation of cytoskeleton dynamics and cortical actin-assembly. The actin-binding domain of cortactin consists of a 6.5 tandem repeat of a 37-amino acid sequence known as the cortactin repeat (residues 80-325). Using a combination of structure prediction, circular dichroism and cysteine crosslinking, we tested a recently published three-dimensional model of the cortactin molecule in which the cortactin repeat is folded as a globular helical domain (Zhang et al., 2007). We show that the cortactin repeat is unstructured in solution. Thus, wild type and mutant constructs of the cortactin repeat, containing pairs of cysteines at positions 112 and 246, 83 and 112, 83 and 246, and 83 and 306, could be readily crosslinked with reagents of varying lengths (0–9.6 Å). Using yeast actin cysteine mutants, we also show that cortactin inhibits disulfide and dibromobimane crosslinking across the lateral and longitudinal interfaces of actin subunits in the filament, suggesting a weakening of inter-subunits contacts. Our results are in disagreement with the proposed model of the cortactin molecule and have important implications for our understanding of cortactin regulation of cytoskeleton dynamics. PMID:19089942

  10. The actin-binding domain of cortactin is dynamic and unstructured and affects lateral and longitudinal contacts in F-actin.

    PubMed

    Shvetsov, Alexander; Berkane, Emir; Chereau, David; Dominguez, Roberto; Reisler, Emil

    2009-02-01

    Cortactin is an F-actin- and Arp2/3 complex-binding protein, implicated in the regulation of cytoskeleton dynamics and cortical actin-assembly. The actin-binding domain of cortactin consists of a 6.5 tandem repeat of a 37-amino acid sequence known as the cortactin repeat (residues 80-325). Using a combination of structure prediction, circular dichroism, and cysteine crosslinking, we tested a recently published three-dimensional model of the cortactin molecule in which the cortactin repeat is folded as a globular helical domain [Zhang et al., 2007, Mol Cell 27:197-213]. We show that the cortactin repeat is unstructured in solution. Thus, wild type and mutant constructs of the cortactin repeat, containing pairs of cysteines at positions 112 and 246, 83 and 112, 83 and 246, and 83 and 306, could be readily crosslinked with reagents of varying lengths (0-9.6 A). Using yeast actin cysteine mutants, we also show that cortactin inhibits disulfide and dibromobimane crosslinking across the lateral and longitudinal interfaces of actin subunits in the filament, suggesting a weakening of intersubunits contacts. Our results are in disagreement with the proposed model of the cortactin molecule and have important implications for our understanding of cortactin regulation of cytoskeleton dynamics. PMID:19089942

  11. The Actin Binding Domain of βI-Spectrin Regulates the Morphological and Functional Dynamics of Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Michael W.; Cai, Xiang; Stone, Michele R.; Bloch, Robert J.; Thompson, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Actin microfilaments regulate the size, shape and mobility of dendritic spines and are in turn regulated by actin binding proteins and small GTPases. The βI isoform of spectrin, a protein that links the actin cytoskeleton to membrane proteins, is present in spines. To understand its function, we expressed its actin-binding domain (ABD) in CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slice cultures. The ABD of βI-spectrin bundled actin in principal dendrites and was concentrated in dendritic spines, where it significantly increased the size of the spine head. These effects were not observed after expression of homologous ABDs of utrophin, dystrophin, and α-actinin. Treatment of slice cultures with latrunculin-B significantly decreased spine head size and decreased actin-GFP fluorescence in cells expressing the ABD of α-actinin, but not the ABD of βI-spectrin, suggesting that its presence inhibits actin depolymerization. We also observed an increase in the area of GFP-tagged PSD-95 in the spine head and an increase in the amplitude of mEPSCs at spines expressing the ABD of βI-spectrin. The effects of the βI-spectrin ABD on spine size and mEPSC amplitude were mimicked by expressing wild-type Rac3, a small GTPase that co-immunoprecipitates specifically with βI-spectrin in extracts of cultured cortical neurons. Spine size was normal in cells co-expressing a dominant negative Rac3 construct with the βI-spectrin ABD. We suggest that βI-spectrin is a synaptic protein that can modulate both the morphological and functional dynamics of dendritic spines, perhaps via interaction with actin and Rac3. PMID:21297961

  12. Ezrin self-association involves binding of an N-terminal domain to a normally masked C-terminal domain that includes the F-actin binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Gary, R; Bretscher, A

    1995-01-01

    Ezrin is a membrane-cytoskeletal linking protein that is concentrated in actin-rich surface structures. It is closely related to the microvillar proteins radixin and moesin and to the tumor suppressor merlin/schwannomin. Cell extracts contain ezrin dimers and ezrin-moesin heterodimers in addition to monomers. Truncated ezrin fusion proteins were assayed by blot overlay to determine which regions mediate self-association. Here we report that ezrin self-association occurs by head-to-tail joining of distinct N-terminal and C-terminal domains. It is likely that these domains, termed N- and C-ERMADs (ezrin-radixin-moesin association domain), are responsible for homotypic and heterotypic associations among ERM family members. The N-ERMAD of ezrin resided within amino acids 1-296; deletion of 10 additional residues resulted in loss of activity. The C-ERMAD was mapped to the last 107 amino acids of ezrin, residues 479-585. The two residues at the C-terminus were required for activity, and the region from 530-585 was insufficient. The C-ERMAD was masked in the native monomer. Exposure of this domain required unfolding ezrin with sodium dodecyl sulfate or expressing the domain as part of a truncated protein. Intermolecular association could not occur unless the C-ERMAD had been made accessible to its N-terminal partner. It can be inferred that dimerization in vivo requires an activation step that exposes this masked domain. The conformationally inaccessible C-terminal region included the F-actin binding site, suggesting that this activity is likewise regulated by masking. Images PMID:7579708

  13. Mutations in the N-terminal actin-binding domain of filamin C cause a distal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Duff, Rachael M; Tay, Valerie; Hackman, Peter; Ravenscroft, Gianina; McLean, Catriona; Kennedy, Paul; Steinbach, Alina; Schöffler, Wiebke; van der Ven, Peter F M; Fürst, Dieter O; Song, Jaeguen; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Penttilä, Sini; Raheem, Olayinka; Reardon, Katrina; Malandrini, Alessandro; Gambelli, Simona; Villanova, Marcello; Nowak, Kristen J; Williams, David R; Landers, John E; Brown, Robert H; Udd, Bjarne; Laing, Nigel G

    2011-06-10

    Linkage analysis of the dominant distal myopathy we previously identified in a large Australian family demonstrated one significant linkage region located on chromosome 7 and encompassing 18.6 Mbp and 151 genes. The strongest candidate gene was FLNC because filamin C, the encoded protein, is muscle-specific and associated with myofibrillar myopathy. Sequencing of FLNC cDNA identified a c.752T>C (p.Met251Thr) mutation in the N-terminal actin-binding domain (ABD); this mutation segregated with the disease and was absent in 200 controls. We identified an Italian family with the same phenotype and found a c.577G>A (p.Ala193Thr) filamin C ABD mutation that segregated with the disease. Filamin C ABD mutations have not been described, although filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations cause multiple musculoskeletal disorders. The distal myopathy phenotype and muscle pathology in the two families differ from myofibrillar myopathies caused by filamin C rod and dimerization domain mutations because of the distinct involvement of hand muscles and lack of pathological protein aggregation. Thus, like the position of FLNA and B mutations, the position of the FLNC mutation determines disease phenotype. The two filamin C ABD mutations increase actin-binding affinity in a manner similar to filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. Cell-culture expression of the c.752T>C (p.Met251)Thr mutant filamin C ABD demonstrated reduced nuclear localization as did mutant filamin A and filamin B ABDs. Expression of both filamin C ABD mutants as full-length proteins induced increased aggregation of filamin. We conclude filamin C ABD mutations cause a recognizable distal myopathy, most likely through increased actin affinity, similar to the pathological mechanism of filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. PMID:21620354

  14. Mutations in the N-terminal Actin-Binding Domain of Filamin C Cause a Distal Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Rachael M.; Tay, Valerie; Hackman, Peter; Ravenscroft, Gianina; McLean, Catriona; Kennedy, Paul; Steinbach, Alina; Schöffler, Wiebke; van der Ven, Peter F.M.; Fürst, Dieter O.; Song, Jaeguen; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Penttilä, Sini; Raheem, Olayinka; Reardon, Katrina; Malandrini, Alessandro; Gambelli, Simona; Villanova, Marcello; Nowak, Kristen J.; Williams, David R.; Landers, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Udd, Bjarne; Laing, Nigel G.

    2011-01-01

    Linkage analysis of the dominant distal myopathy we previously identified in a large Australian family demonstrated one significant linkage region located on chromosome 7 and encompassing 18.6 Mbp and 151 genes. The strongest candidate gene was FLNC because filamin C, the encoded protein, is muscle-specific and associated with myofibrillar myopathy. Sequencing of FLNC cDNA identified a c.752T>C (p.Met251Thr) mutation in the N-terminal actin-binding domain (ABD); this mutation segregated with the disease and was absent in 200 controls. We identified an Italian family with the same phenotype and found a c.577G>A (p.Ala193Thr) filamin C ABD mutation that segregated with the disease. Filamin C ABD mutations have not been described, although filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations cause multiple musculoskeletal disorders. The distal myopathy phenotype and muscle pathology in the two families differ from myofibrillar myopathies caused by filamin C rod and dimerization domain mutations because of the distinct involvement of hand muscles and lack of pathological protein aggregation. Thus, like the position of FLNA and B mutations, the position of the FLNC mutation determines disease phenotype. The two filamin C ABD mutations increase actin-binding affinity in a manner similar to filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. Cell-culture expression of the c.752T>C (p.Met251)Thr mutant filamin C ABD demonstrated reduced nuclear localization as did mutant filamin A and filamin B ABDs. Expression of both filamin C ABD mutants as full-length proteins induced increased aggregation of filamin. We conclude filamin C ABD mutations cause a recognizable distal myopathy, most likely through increased actin affinity, similar to the pathological mechanism of filamin A and filamin B ABD mutations. PMID:21620354

  15. Vinculin Interacts with the Chlamydia Effector TarP Via a Tripartite Vinculin Binding Domain to Mediate Actin Recruitment and Assembly at the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, Tristan R.; Pedrosa, Antonio T.; Peacock, Thomas P.; Carabeo, Rey A.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian protein vinculin is often a target of bacterial pathogens to subvert locally host cell actin dynamics. In Chlamydia infection, vinculin has been implicated in RNA interference screens, but the molecular basis for vinculin requirement has not been characterized. In this report, we show that vinculin was involved in the actin recruitment and F-actin assembly at the plasma membrane to facilitate invasion. Vinculin was recruited to the plasma membrane via its interaction with a specific tripartite motif within TarP that resembles the vinculin-binding domain (VBD) found in the Shigella invasion factor IpaA. The TarP-mediated plasma membrane recruitment of vinculin resulted in the localized recruitment of actin. In vitro pulldown assays for protein-protein interaction and imaging-based evaluation of recruitment to the plasma membrane demonstrated the essential role of the vinculin-binding site 1 (VBS1), and the dispensability of VBS2 and VBS3. As further support for the functionality of VBD-vinculin interaction, VBD-mediated actin recruitment required vinculin. Interestingly, while both vinculin and the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) colocalized at the sites of adhesion, the recruitment of one was independent of the other; and the actin recruitment function of the VBD/vinculin signaling axis was independent of the LD/FAK pathway. PMID:26649283

  16. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations in the calponin-homology domain of ACTN2 affect actin binding and cardiomyocyte Z-disc incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Natalie J.; Wolny, Marcin; Rogers, Brendan; Trinh, Chi H.; Shuping, Yu; Edwards, Thomas A.; Peckham, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    α-Actinin-2 (ACTN2) is the only muscle isoform of α-actinin expressed in cardiac muscle. Mutations in this protein have been implicated in mild to moderate forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We have investigated the effects of two mutations identified from HCM patients, A119T and G111V, on the secondary and tertiary structure of a purified actin binding domain (ABD) of ACTN2 by circular dichroism and X-ray crystallography, and show small but distinct changes for both mutations. We also find that both mutants have reduced F-actin binding affinity, although the differences are not significant. The full length mEos2 tagged protein expressed in adult cardiomyocytes shows that both mutations additionally affect Z-disc localization and dynamic behaviour. Overall, these two mutations have small effects on structure, function and behaviour, which may contribute to a mild phenotype for this disease. PMID:27287556

  17. Filament assembly by Spire: key residues and concerted actin binding.

    PubMed

    Rasson, Amy S; Bois, Justin S; Pham, Duy Stephen L; Yoo, Haneul; Quinlan, Margot E

    2015-02-27

    The most recently identified class of actin nucleators, WASp homology domain 2 (WH2) nucleators, use tandem repeats of monomeric actin-binding WH2 domains to facilitate actin nucleation. WH2 domains are involved in a wide variety of actin regulatory activities. Structurally, they are expected to clash with interprotomer contacts within the actin filament. Thus, the discovery of their role in nucleation was surprising. Here we use Drosophila Spire (Spir) as a model system to investigate both how tandem WH2 domains can nucleate actin and what differentiates nucleating WH2-containing proteins from their non-nucleating counterparts. We found that the third WH2 domain in Spir (Spir-C or SC) plays a unique role. In the context of a short nucleation construct (containing only two WH2 domains), placement of SC in the N-terminal position was required for the most potent nucleation. We found that the native organization of the WH2 domains with respect to each other is necessary for binding to actin with positive cooperativity. We identified two residues within SC that are critical for its activity. Using this information, we were able to convert a weak synthetic nucleator into one with activity equal to a native Spir construct. Lastly, we found evidence that SC binds actin filaments, in addition to monomers. PMID:25234086

  18. Filament Assembly by Spire: Key Residues and Concerted Actin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Rasson, Amy S.; Bois, Justin S.; Pham, Duy Stephen L.; Yoo, Haneul; Quinlan, Margot E.

    2014-01-01

    The most recently identified class of actin nucleators, WASp Homology domain 2 (WH2) – nucleators, use tandem repeats of monomeric actin-binding WH2 domains to facilitate actin nucleation. WH2 domains are involved in a wide variety of actin regulatory activities. Structurally, they are expected to clash with interprotomer contacts within the actin filament. Thus, the discovery of their role in nucleation was surprising. Here we use Drosophila Spire (Spir) as a model system to investigate both how tandem WH2 domains can nucleate actin and what differentiates nucleating WH2-containing proteins from their non-nucleating counterparts. We found that the third WH2 domain in Spir (Spir-C or Sc), plays a unique role. In the context of a short nucleation construct (containing only two WH2 domains), placement of Sc in the N-terminal position was required for the most potent nucleation. We found that the native organization of the WH2 domains with respect to each other is necessary for binding to actin with positive cooperativity. We identified two residues within Sc that are critical for its activity. Using this information we were able to convert a weak synthetic nucleator into one with activity equal to a native Spir construct. Lastly, we found evidence that Sc binds actin filaments, in addition to monomers. PMID:25234086

  19. Gcn1 and Actin Binding to Yih1

    PubMed Central

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Barbosa, João A. R. G.; Moraes, Maria Carolina S.; Martins, Rafael M.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Castilho, Beatriz A.

    2011-01-01

    Yeast Yih1 protein and its mammalian ortholog IMPACT, abundant in neurons, are inhibitors of Gcn2, a kinase involved in amino acid homeostasis, stress response, and memory formation. Like Gcn2, Yih1/IMPACT harbors an N-terminal RWD domain that mediates binding to the Gcn2 activator Gcn1. Yih1 competes with Gcn2 for Gcn1 binding, thus inhibiting Gcn2. Yih1 also binds G-actin. Here, we show that Yih1-actin interaction is independent of Gcn1 and that Yih1-Gcn1 binding does not require actin. The Yih1 RWD (residues 1–132) was sufficient for Gcn2 inhibition and Gcn1 binding, but not for actin binding, showing that actin binding is dispensable for inhibiting Gcn2. Actin binding required Yih1 residues 68–258, encompassing part of the RWD and the C-terminal “ancient domain”; however, residues Asp-102 and Glu-106 in helix3 of the RWD were essential for Gcn1 binding and Gcn2 inhibition but dispensable for actin binding. Thus, the Gcn1- and actin-binding sites overlap in the RWD but have distinct binding determinants. Unexpectedly, Yih1 segment 68–258 was defective for inhibiting Gcn2 even though it binds Gcn1 at higher levels than does full-length Yih1. This and other results suggest that Yih1 binds with different requirements to distinct populations of Gcn1 molecules, and its ability to disrupt Gcn1-Gcn2 complexes is dependent on a complete RWD and hindered by actin binding. Modeling of the ancient domain on the bacterial protein YigZ showed peculiarities to the eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages, suggesting binding sites for conserved cellular components. Our results support a role for Yih1 in a cross-talk between the cytoskeleton and translation. PMID:21239490

  20. Binding of WIP to Actin Is Essential for T Cell Actin Cytoskeleton Integrity and Tissue Homing

    PubMed Central

    Massaad, Michel J.; Oyoshi, Michiko K.; Kane, Jennifer; Koduru, Suresh; Alcaide, Pilar; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Luscinskas, Francis W.; Hartwig, John

    2014-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) is important for actin polymerization in T cells and for their migration. WASp-interacting protein (WIP) binds to and stabilizes WASp and also interacts with actin. Cytoskeletal and functional defects are more severe in WIP−/− T cells, which lack WASp, than in WASp−/− T cells, suggesting that WIP interaction with actin may be important for T cell cytoskeletal integrity and function. We constructed mice that lack the actin-binding domain of WIP (WIPΔABD mice). WIPΔABD associated normally with WASp but not F-actin. T cells from WIPΔABD mice had normal WASp levels but decreased cellular F-actin content, a disorganized actin cytoskeleton, impaired chemotaxis, and defective homing to lymph nodes. WIPΔABD mice exhibited a T cell intrinsic defect in contact hypersensitivity and impaired responses to cutaneous challenge with protein antigen. Adoptively transferred antigen-specific CD4+ T cells from WIPΔABD mice had decreased homing to antigen-challenged skin of wild-type recipients. These findings show that WIP binding to actin, independently of its binding to WASp, is critical for the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton in T cells and for their migration into tissues. Disruption of WIP binding to actin could be of therapeutic value in T cell-driven inflammatory diseases. PMID:25246631

  1. Binding of actin to lens alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Actin has been coupled to a cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B column, then tested for binding to alpha, beta, and gamma crystallin preparations from the bovine lens. Alpha, but not beta or gamma, crystallins bound to the actin affinity column in a time dependent and saturable manner. Subfractionation of the alpha crystallin preparation into the alpha-A and alpha-B species, followed by incubation with the affinity column, demonstrated that both species bound approximately the same. Together, these studies demonstrate a specific and saturable binding of lens alpha-A and alpha-B with actin.

  2. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1–actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1–actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson–Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  3. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1-actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1-actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  4. Arrangement of the COOH-terminal and NH2-terminal domains of caldesmon bound to actin.

    PubMed

    Graceffa, P

    1997-04-01

    Smooth muscle caldesmon is a single polypeptide chain with its NH2- and COOH-terminal domains separated by a long alpha-helix. Caldesmon was labeled at either Cys-153 in the NH2 domain or Cys-580 in the COOH domain with a variety of fluorescence probes. Fluorescence intensity, peak position, and polarization of probes on Cys-580 were very sensitive to the binding to actin (with or without tropomyosin), whereas for probes on Cys-153, there was a lack of response, in reconstituted or native actin thin filaments. From fluorescence resonance energy transfer from donor labels on either caldesmon cysteine to acceptor labels on Cys-374 of actin, the distance between the donor and acceptor was estimated to be 27 A for the donor at Cys-580 and 65-80 A for the donor at Cys-153. These findings were the same for caldesmon prepared with or without heat treatment and with striated or smooth muscle actin. These results, together with previous knowledge that COOH-terminal fragments of caldesmon bind to actin whereas NH2-terminal fragments do not, indicate that, while the COOH domain of caldesmon is bound to actin, the NH2 domain is largely dissociated. Fluorescence quenching studies showed that actin binding to caldesmon greatly decreased the accessibility of probes at caldesmon Cys-580 to the quencher, whereas for probes at Cys-153, actin afforded much less, but significant, protection from quenching. Consequently, it appears that, although the NH2 domain is mostly dissociated, it spends some time in the vicinity of actin, through either a weak interaction with actin or collisions with actin and/or because of restricted flexibility which constrains the NH2 domain to be close to the actin filament. Since the NH2 domain of caldesmon binds to the neck region of myosin, a dissociated NH2 domain may account for caldesmon's ability to link myosin and actin filaments. PMID:9092808

  5. Identification and characterization of the actin-binding motif of phostensin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Fan; Lai, Ning-Sheng; Huang, Kuang-Yung; Huang, Hsien-Lu; Lu, Ming-Chi; Lin, Yu-Shan; Chen, Chun-Yu; Liu, Su-Qin; Lin, Ta-Hsien; Huang, Hsien-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Phostensin, a protein phosphatase 1 F-actin cytoskeleton-targeting subunit encoded by KIAA1949, consists of 165 amino acids and caps the pointed ends of actin filaments. Sequence alignment analyses suggest that the C-terminal region of phostensin, spanning residues 129 to 155, contains a consensus actin-binding motif. Here, we have verified the existence of an actin-binding motif in the C-terminal domain of phostensin using colocalization, F-actin co-sedimentation and single filament binding assays. Our data indicate that the N-terminal region of phostensin (1-129) cannot bind to actin filaments and cannot retard the pointed end elongation of gelsolin-actin seeds. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of phostensin (125-165) multiply bind to the sides of actin filaments and lacks the ability to block the pointed end elongation, suggesting that the actin-binding motif is located in the C-terminal region of the phostensin. Further analyses indicate that phostensin binding to the pointed end of actin filament requires N-terminal residues 35 to 51. These results suggest that phostensin might fold into a rigid structure, allowing the N-terminus to sterically hinder the binding of C-terminus to the sides of actin filament, thus rendering phostensin binding to the pointed ends of actin filaments. PMID:23443105

  6. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  7. The Association of Myosin IB with Actin Waves in Dictyostelium Requires Both the Plasma Membrane-Binding Site and Actin-Binding Region in the Myosin Tail

    PubMed Central

    Brzeska, Hanna; Pridham, Kevin; Chery, Godefroy; Titus, Margaret A.; Korn, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    F-actin structures and their distribution are important determinants of the dynamic shapes and functions of eukaryotic cells. Actin waves are F-actin formations that move along the ventral cell membrane driven by actin polymerization. Dictyostelium myosin IB is associated with actin waves but its role in the wave is unknown. Myosin IB is a monomeric, non-filamentous myosin with a globular head that binds to F-actin and has motor activity, and a non-helical tail comprising a basic region, a glycine-proline-glutamine-rich region and an SH3-domain. The basic region binds to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane through a short basic-hydrophobic site and the Gly-Pro-Gln region binds F-actin. In the current work we found that both the basic-hydrophobic site in the basic region and the Gly-Pro-Gln region of the tail are required for the association of myosin IB with actin waves. This is the first evidence that the Gly-Pro-Gln region is required for localization of myosin IB to a specific actin structure in situ. The head is not required for myosin IB association with actin waves but binding of the head to F-actin strengthens the association of myosin IB with waves and stabilizes waves. Neither the SH3-domain nor motor activity is required for association of myosin IB with actin waves. We conclude that myosin IB contributes to anchoring actin waves to the plasma membranes by binding of the basic-hydrophobic site to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane and binding of the Gly-Pro-Gln region to F-actin in the wave. PMID:24747353

  8. Regulation of water flow by actin-binding protein-induced actin gelatin.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, T; Suzuki, A; Stossel, T P

    1992-01-01

    Actin filaments inhibit osmotically driven water flow (Ito, T., K.S. Zaner, and T.P. Stossel. 1987. Biophys. J. 51: 745-753). Here we show that the actin gelation protein, actin-binding protein (ABP), impedes both osmotic shrinkage and swelling of an actin filament solution and reduces markedly the concentration of actin filaments required for this inhibition. These effects depend on actin filament immobilization, because the ABP concentration that causes initial impairment of water flow by actin filaments corresponds to the gel point measured viscometrically and because gelsolin, which noncovalently severs actin filaments, solates actin gels and restores water flow in a solution of actin cross-linked by ABP. Since ABP gels actin filaments in the periphery of many eukaryotic cells, such actin networks may contribute to physiological cell volume regulation. PMID:1318095

  9. Actin-binding protein G (AbpG) participates in modulating the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Chi; Wang, Liang-Chen; Pang, Te-Ling; Chen, Mei-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is involved in various physiological and pathogenic events, and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The simple eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum displays chemotactic locomotion in stages of its life cycle. By characterizing a Dictyostelium mutant defective in chemotactic responses, we identified a novel actin-binding protein serving to modulate cell migration and named it actin-binding protein G (AbpG); this 971–amino acid (aa) protein contains an N-terminal type 2 calponin homology (CH2) domain followed by two large coiled-coil regions. In chemoattractant gradients, abpG− cells display normal directional persistence but migrate significantly more slowly than wild-type cells; expressing Flag-AbpG in mutant cells eliminates the motility defect. AbpG is enriched in cortical/lamellipodial regions and colocalizes well with F-actin; aa 401–600 and aa 501–550 fragments of AbpG show the same distribution as full-length AbpG. The aa 501–550 region of AbpG, which is essential for AbpG to localize to lamellipodia and to rescue the phenotype of abpG− cells, is sufficient for binding to F-actin and represents a novel actin-binding protein domain. Compared with wild-type cells, abpG− cells have significantly higher F-actin levels. Collectively our results suggest that AbpG may participate in modulating actin dynamics to optimize cell locomotion. PMID:25609090

  10. Actin-binding protein G (AbpG) participates in modulating the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Chi; Wang, Liang-Chen; Pang, Te-Ling; Chen, Mei-Yu

    2015-03-15

    Cell migration is involved in various physiological and pathogenic events, and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The simple eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum displays chemotactic locomotion in stages of its life cycle. By characterizing a Dictyostelium mutant defective in chemotactic responses, we identified a novel actin-binding protein serving to modulate cell migration and named it actin-binding protein G (AbpG); this 971-amino acid (aa) protein contains an N-terminal type 2 calponin homology (CH2) domain followed by two large coiled-coil regions. In chemoattractant gradients, abpG(-) cells display normal directional persistence but migrate significantly more slowly than wild-type cells; expressing Flag-AbpG in mutant cells eliminates the motility defect. AbpG is enriched in cortical/lamellipodial regions and colocalizes well with F-actin; aa 401-600 and aa 501-550 fragments of AbpG show the same distribution as full-length AbpG. The aa 501-550 region of AbpG, which is essential for AbpG to localize to lamellipodia and to rescue the phenotype of abpG(-) cells, is sufficient for binding to F-actin and represents a novel actin-binding protein domain. Compared with wild-type cells, abpG(-) cells have significantly higher F-actin levels. Collectively our results suggest that AbpG may participate in modulating actin dynamics to optimize cell locomotion. PMID:25609090

  11. Mechanosensitive kinetic preference of actin-binding protein to actin filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-04-01

    The kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments is altered by external forces on the filament. Such an altered kinetic preference is largely responsible for remodeling the actin cytoskeletal structure in response to intracellular forces. During remodeling, actin-binding proteins and actin filaments interact under isothermal conditions, because the cells are homeostatic. In such a temperature homeostatic state, we can rigorously and thermodynamically link the chemical potential of actin-binding proteins to stresses on the actin filaments. From this relationship, we can construct a physical model that explains the force-dependent kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments. To confirm the model, we have analyzed the mechanosensitive alternation of the kinetic preference of Arp2/3 and cofilin to actin filaments. We show that this model captures the qualitative responses of these actin-binding proteins to the forces, as observed experimentally. Moreover, our theoretical results demonstrate that, depending on the structural parameters of the binding region, actin-binding proteins can show different kinetic responses even to the same mechanical signal tension, in which the double-helix nature of the actin filament also plays a critical role in a stretch-twist coupling of the filament.

  12. The actin binding protein adseverin regulates osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Siavash; Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W P; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL) stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW) macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion. PMID:25275604

  13. The Actin Binding Protein Adseverin Regulates Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W. P.; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL) stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW) macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion. PMID:25275604

  14. Structural Basis of Actin Filament Nucleation by Tandem W Domains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaorui; Ni, Fengyun; Tian, Xia; Kondrashkina, Elena; Wang, Qinghua; Ma, Jianpeng

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Spontaneous nucleation of actin is very inefficient in cells. To overcome this barrier, cells have evolved a set of actin filament nucleators to promote rapid nucleation and polymerization in response to specific stimuli. However, the molecular mechanism of actin nucleation remains poorly understood. This is hindered largely by the fact that actin nucleus, once formed, rapidly polymerizes into filament, thus making it impossible to capture stable multisubunit actin nucleus. Here, we report an effective double-mutant strategy to stabilize actin nucleus by preventing further polymerization. Employing this strategy, we solved the crystal structure of AMPPNP-actin in complex with the first two tandem W domains of Cordon-bleu (Cobl), a potent actin filament nucleator. Further sequence comparison and functional studies suggest that the nucleation mechanism of Cobl is probably shared by the p53 cofactor JMY, but not Spire. Moreover, the double-mutant strategy opens the way for atomic mechanistic study of actin nucleation and polymerization. PMID:23727244

  15. Modulation of actin structure and function by phosphorylation of Tyr-53 and profilin binding

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Kyuwon; Liu, Xiong; Ferron, Francois; Shu, Shi; Korn, Edward D.; Dominguez, Roberto

    2008-08-27

    On starvation, Dictyostelium cells aggregate to form multicellular fruiting bodies containing spores that germinate when transferred to nutrient-rich medium. This developmental cycle correlates with the extent of actin phosphorylation at Tyr-53 (pY53-actin), which is low in vegetative cells but high in viable mature spores. Here we describe high-resolution crystal structures of pY53-actin and unphosphorylated actin in complexes with gelsolin segment 1 and profilin. In the structure of pY53-actin, the phosphate group on Tyr-53 makes hydrogen-bonding interactions with residues of the DNase I-binding loop (D-loop) of actin, resulting in a more stable conformation of the D-loop than in the unphosphorylated structures. A more rigidly folded D-loop may explain some of the previously described properties of pY53-actin, including its increased critical concentration for polymerization, reduced rates of nucleation and pointed end elongation, and weak affinity for DNase I. We show here that phosphorylation of Tyr-53 inhibits subtilisin cleavage of the D-loop and reduces the rate of nucleotide exchange on actin. The structure of profilin-Dictyostelium-actin is strikingly similar to previously determined structures of profilin-{beta}-actin and profilin-{alpha}-actin. By comparing this representative set of profilin-actin structures with other structures of actin, we highlight the effects of profilin on the actin conformation. In the profilin-actin complexes, subdomains 1 and 3 of actin close around profilin, producing a 4.7 deg. rotation of the two major domains of actin relative to each other. As a result, the nucleotide cleft becomes moderately more open in the profilin-actin complex, probably explaining the stimulation of nucleotide exchange on actin by profilin.

  16. An actin cytoskeleton with evolutionarily conserved functions in the absence of canonical actin-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Paredez, Alexander R.; Assaf, Zoe June; Sept, David; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Dawson, Scott C.; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Cande, W. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia intestinalis, a human intestinal parasite and member of what is perhaps the earliest-diverging eukaryotic lineage, contains the most divergent eukaryotic actin identified to date and is the first eukaryote known to lack all canonical actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We sought to investigate the properties and functions of the actin cytoskeleton in Giardia to determine whether Giardia actin (giActin) has reduced or conserved roles in core cellular processes. In vitro polymerization of giActin produced filaments, indicating that this divergent actin is a true filament-forming actin. We generated an anti-giActin antibody to localize giActin throughout the cell cycle. GiActin localized to the cortex, nuclei, internal axonemes, and formed C-shaped filaments along the anterior of the cell and a flagella-bundling helix. These structures were regulated with the cell cycle and in encysting cells giActin was recruited to the Golgi-like cyst wall processing vesicles. Knockdown of giActin demonstrated that giActin functions in cell morphogenesis, membrane trafficking, and cytokinesis. Additionally, Giardia contains a single G protein, giRac, which affects the Giardia actin cytoskeleton independently of known target ABPs. These results imply that there exist ancestral and perhaps conserved roles for actin in core cellular processes that are independent of canonical ABPs. Of medical significance, the divergent giActin cytoskeleton is essential and commonly used actin-disrupting drugs do not depolymerize giActin structures. Therefore, the giActin cytoskeleton is a promising drug target for treating giardiasis, as we predict drugs that interfere with the Giardia actin cytoskeleton will not affect the mammalian host. PMID:21444821

  17. Structure of a Longitudinal Actin Dimer Assembled by Tandem W Domains: Implications for Actin Filament Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C.; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-11-20

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  18. Actin-binding proteins: the long road to understanding the dynamic landscape of cellular actin networks.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Pekka

    2016-08-15

    The actin cytoskeleton supports a vast number of cellular processes in nonmuscle cells. It is well established that the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are controlled by a large array of actin-binding proteins. However, it was only 40 years ago that the first nonmuscle actin-binding protein, filamin, was identified and characterized. Filamin was shown to bind and cross-link actin filaments into higher-order structures and contribute to phagocytosis in macrophages. Subsequently many other nonmuscle actin-binding proteins were identified and characterized. These proteins regulate almost all steps of the actin filament assembly and disassembly cycles, as well as the arrangement of actin filaments into diverse three-dimensional structures. Although the individual biochemical activities of most actin-regulatory proteins are relatively well understood, knowledge of how these proteins function together in a common cytoplasm to control actin dynamics and architecture is only beginning to emerge. Furthermore, understanding how signaling pathways and mechanical cues control the activities of various actin-binding proteins in different cellular, developmental, and pathological processes will keep researchers busy for decades. PMID:27528696

  19. An antifungal protein from Ginkgo biloba binds actin and can trigger cell death.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ningning; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Mühlhäuser, Philipp; Liu, Qiong; Riemann, Michael; Ulrich, Anne S; Nick, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Ginkbilobin is a short antifungal protein that had been purified and cloned from the seeds of the living fossil Ginkgo biloba. Homologues of this protein can be detected in all seed plants and the heterosporic fern Selaginella and are conserved with respect to domain structures, peptide motifs, and specific cysteine signatures. To get insight into the cellular functions of these conserved motifs, we expressed green fluorescent protein fusions of full-length and truncated ginkbilobin in tobacco BY-2 cells. We show that the signal peptide confers efficient secretion of ginkbilobin. When this signal peptide is either cleaved or masked, ginkbilobin binds and visualizes the actin cytoskeleton. This actin-binding activity of ginkbilobin is mediated by a specific subdomain just downstream of the signal peptide, and this subdomain can also coassemble with actin in vitro. Upon stable overexpression of this domain, we observe a specific delay in premitotic nuclear positioning indicative of a reduced dynamicity of actin. To elucidate the cellular response to the binding of this subdomain to actin, we use chemical engineering based on synthetic peptides comprising different parts of the actin-binding subdomain conjugated with the cell-penetrating peptide BP100 and with rhodamine B as a fluorescent reporter. Binding of this synthetic construct to actin efficiently induces programmed cell death. We discuss these findings in terms of a working model, where ginkbilobin can activate actin-dependent cell death. PMID:26315821

  20. Rho, nuclear actin, and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of Rho GTPases, which act as molecular switches on many signaling pathways. During the past decade, actin has emerged as an important regulator of gene expression. Nuclear actin plays a key role in transcription, chromatin remodeling, and pre-mRNA processing. In addition, the “status” of the actin cytoskeleton is used as a signaling intermediate by at least the MKL1-SRF and Hippo-pathways, which culminate in the transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal and growth-promoting genes, respectively. Rho GTPases may therefore regulate gene expression by controlling either cytoplasmic or nuclear actin dynamics. Although the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization is still poorly understood, many actin-binding proteins, which are downstream effectors of Rho, are found in the nuclear compartment. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms and key proteins that may mediate the transcriptional regulation by Rho GTPases through actin. PMID:24603113

  1. Rho, nuclear actin, and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of Rho GTPases, which act as molecular switches on many signaling pathways. During the past decade, actin has emerged as an important regulator of gene expression. Nuclear actin plays a key role in transcription, chromatin remodeling, and pre-mRNA processing. In addition, the "status" of the actin cytoskeleton is used as a signaling intermediate by at least the MKL1-SRF and Hippo-pathways, which culminate in the transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal and growth-promoting genes, respectively. Rho GTPases may therefore regulate gene expression by controlling either cytoplasmic or nuclear actin dynamics. Although the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization is still poorly understood, many actin-binding proteins, which are downstream effectors of Rho, are found in the nuclear compartment. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms and key proteins that may mediate the transcriptional regulation by Rho GTPases through actin. PMID:24603113

  2. Stretching Actin Filaments within Cells Enhances their Affinity for the Myosin II Motor Domain

    PubMed Central

    Uyeda, Taro Q. P.; Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Nagasaki, Akira; Yumura, Shigehiko

    2011-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the myosin II motor domain (S1) preferentially binds to specific subsets of actin filaments in vivo, we expressed GFP-fused S1 with mutations that enhanced its affinity for actin in Dictyostelium cells. Consistent with the hypothesis, the GFP-S1 mutants were localized along specific portions of the cell cortex. Comparison with rhodamine-phalloidin staining in fixed cells demonstrated that the GFP-S1 probes preferentially bound to actin filaments in the rear cortex and cleavage furrows, where actin filaments are stretched by interaction with endogenous myosin II filaments. The GFP-S1 probes were similarly enriched in the cortex stretched passively by traction forces in the absence of myosin II or by external forces using a microcapillary. The preferential binding of GFP-S1 mutants to stretched actin filaments did not depend on cortexillin I or PTEN, two proteins previously implicated in the recruitment of myosin II filaments to stretched cortex. These results suggested that it is the stretching of the actin filaments itself that increases their affinity for the myosin II motor domain. In contrast, the GFP-fused myosin I motor domain did not localize to stretched actin filaments, which suggests different preferences of the motor domains for different structures of actin filaments play a role in distinct intracellular localizations of myosin I and II. We propose a scheme in which the stretching of actin filaments, the preferential binding of myosin II filaments to stretched actin filaments, and myosin II-dependent contraction form a positive feedback loop that contributes to the stabilization of cell polarity and to the responsiveness of the cells to external mechanical stimuli. PMID:22022566

  3. Electrostatic Interactions Between the Bni1p Formin FH2 Domain and Actin Influence Actin Filament Nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Joseph L.; Courtemanche, Naomi; Parton, Daniel L.; McCullagh, Martin; Pollard, Thomas D.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Formins catalyze nucleation and growth of actin filaments. Here we study the structure and interactions of actin with the FH2 domain of budding yeast formin Bni1p. We built an all-atom model of the formin dimer on an Oda actin filament 7-mer and studied structural relaxation and inter-protein interactions by molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations produced a refined model for the FH2 dimer associated with the barbed end of the filament and revealed electrostatic interactions between the formin knob and actin target-binding cleft. Mutations of two formin residues contributing to these interactions (R1423N, K1467L or both) reduced the interaction energies between the proteins, and in coarse-grained simulations the formin lost more inter-protein contacts with an actin dimer than with an actin 7-mer. Biochemical experiments confirmed a strong influence of these mutations on Bni1p-mediated actin filament nucleation, but not elongation, suggesting that different interactions contribute to these two functions of formins. PMID:25482541

  4. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  5. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation*

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M.; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby entering the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come. PMID:24735648

  6. CryoEM reveals different coronin binding modes for ADP- and ADP-BeFx- actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Peng; Oztug Durer, Zeynep A.; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Zhou, Z. Hong; Reisler, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Essential cellular processes involving the actin cytoskeleton are regulated by auxiliary proteins which can sense the nucleotide state of actin. Here we report cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) structures at 8.6 Å resolution for ADP- and ADP-BeFx- (mimicking ADP-Pi) bound actin filaments in complex with the β-propeller domain (residues 1–600) of yeast coronin 1 (crn1). Our structures identify the main differences in the interaction of coronin with the two nucleotide states of F-actin. We derived pseudo-atomic models by fitting the atomic structures of actin and coronin into these structures. The identified binding interfaces on actin were confirmed by chemical crosslinking, fluorescence spectroscopy and actin mutagenesis. Importantly, the structures of actin and coronin mapped in this study offer a structural explanation for the nucleotide-dependent effects of coronin on cofilin-assisted remodeling of F-actin. PMID:25362487

  7. Gcn1 and actin binding to Yih1: implications for activation of the eIF2 kinase GCN2.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Barbosa, João A R G; Moraes, Maria Carolina S; Martins, Rafael M; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Castilho, Beatriz A

    2011-03-25

    Yeast Yih1 protein and its mammalian ortholog IMPACT, abundant in neurons, are inhibitors of Gcn2, a kinase involved in amino acid homeostasis, stress response, and memory formation. Like Gcn2, Yih1/IMPACT harbors an N-terminal RWD domain that mediates binding to the Gcn2 activator Gcn1. Yih1 competes with Gcn2 for Gcn1 binding, thus inhibiting Gcn2. Yih1 also binds G-actin. Here, we show that Yih1-actin interaction is independent of Gcn1 and that Yih1-Gcn1 binding does not require actin. The Yih1 RWD (residues 1-132) was sufficient for Gcn2 inhibition and Gcn1 binding, but not for actin binding, showing that actin binding is dispensable for inhibiting Gcn2. Actin binding required Yih1 residues 68-258, encompassing part of the RWD and the C-terminal "ancient domain"; however, residues Asp-102 and Glu-106 in helix3 of the RWD were essential for Gcn1 binding and Gcn2 inhibition but dispensable for actin binding. Thus, the Gcn1- and actin-binding sites overlap in the RWD but have distinct binding determinants. Unexpectedly, Yih1 segment 68-258 was defective for inhibiting Gcn2 even though it binds Gcn1 at higher levels than does full-length Yih1. This and other results suggest that Yih1 binds with different requirements to distinct populations of Gcn1 molecules, and its ability to disrupt Gcn1-Gcn2 complexes is dependent on a complete RWD and hindered by actin binding. Modeling of the ancient domain on the bacterial protein YigZ showed peculiarities to the eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages, suggesting binding sites for conserved cellular components. Our results support a role for Yih1 in a cross-talk between the cytoskeleton and translation. PMID:21239490

  8. Kindlin-2 directly binds actin and regulates integrin outside-in signaling.

    PubMed

    Bledzka, Kamila; Bialkowska, Katarzyna; Sossey-Alaoui, Khalid; Vaynberg, Julia; Pluskota, Elzbieta; Qin, Jun; Plow, Edward F

    2016-04-11

    Reduced levels of kindlin-2 (K2) in endothelial cells derived from K2(+/-)mice or C2C12 myoblastoid cells treated with K2 siRNA showed disorganization of their actin cytoskeleton and decreased spreading. These marked changes led us to examine direct binding between K2 and actin. Purified K2 interacts with F-actin in cosedimentation and surface plasmon resonance analyses and induces actin aggregation. We further find that the F0 domain of K2 binds actin. A mutation, LK(47)/AA, within a predicted actin binding site (ABS) of F0 diminishes its interaction with actin by approximately fivefold. Wild-type K2 and K2 bearing the LK(47)/AA mutation were equivalent in their ability to coactivate integrin αIIbβ3 in a CHO cell system when coexpressed with talin. However, K2-LK(47)/AA exhibited a diminished ability to support cell spreading and actin organization compared with wild-type K2. The presence of an ABS in F0 of K2 that influences outside-in signaling across integrins establishes a new foundation for considering how kindlins might regulate cellular responses. PMID:27044892

  9. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  10. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  11. Actin nucleation by WH2 domains at the autophagosome.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Amanda S; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process whereby cytosolic components and organelles are degraded to recycle key cellular materials. It is a constitutive process required for proper tissue homoeostasis but can be rapidly regulated by a variety of stimuli (for example, nutrient starvation and chemotherapeutic agents). JMY is a DNA damage-responsive p53 cofactor and actin nucleator important for cell survival and motility. Here we show that JMY regulates autophagy through its actin nucleation activity. JMY contains an LC3-interacting region, which is necessary to target JMY to the autophagosome where it enhances the autophagy maturation process. In autophagosomes, the integrity of the WH2 domains allows JMY to promote actin nucleation, which is required for efficient autophagosome formation. Thus our results establish a direct role for actin nucleation mediated by WH2 domain proteins that reside at the autophagosome. PMID:26223951

  12. Actin nucleation by WH2 domains at the autophagosome

    PubMed Central

    Coutts, Amanda S.; La Thangue, Nicholas B.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process whereby cytosolic components and organelles are degraded to recycle key cellular materials. It is a constitutive process required for proper tissue homoeostasis but can be rapidly regulated by a variety of stimuli (for example, nutrient starvation and chemotherapeutic agents). JMY is a DNA damage-responsive p53 cofactor and actin nucleator important for cell survival and motility. Here we show that JMY regulates autophagy through its actin nucleation activity. JMY contains an LC3-interacting region, which is necessary to target JMY to the autophagosome where it enhances the autophagy maturation process. In autophagosomes, the integrity of the WH2 domains allows JMY to promote actin nucleation, which is required for efficient autophagosome formation. Thus our results establish a direct role for actin nucleation mediated by WH2 domain proteins that reside at the autophagosome. PMID:26223951

  13. Glutamyl Phosphate Is an Activated Intermediate in Actin Crosslinking by Actin Crosslinking Domain (ACD) Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashova, Elena; Kalda, Caitlin; Kudryashov, Dmitri S.

    2012-01-01

    Actin Crosslinking Domain (ACD) is produced by several life-threatening Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria as part of larger toxins and delivered into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic host cells via Type I or Type VI secretion systems. Upon delivery, ACD disrupts the actin cytoskeleton by catalyzing intermolecular amide bond formation between E270 and K50 residues of actin, leading to the formation of polymerization-deficient actin oligomers. Ultimately, accumulation of the crosslinked oligomers results in structural and functional failure of the actin cytoskeleton in affected cells. In the present work, we advanced in our understanding of the ACD catalytic mechanism by discovering that the enzyme transfers the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP to the E270 actin residue, resulting in the formation of an activated acyl phosphate intermediate. This intermediate is further hydrolyzed and the energy of hydrolysis is utilized for the formation of the amide bond between actin subunits. We also determined the pH optimum for the reaction and the kinetic parameters of ACD catalysis for its substrates, ATP and actin. ACD showed sigmoidal, non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics for actin (K0.5 = 30 µM) reflecting involvement of two actin molecules in a single crosslinking event. We established that ACD can also utilize Mg2+-GTP to support crosslinking, but the kinetic parameters (KM = 8 µM and 50 µM for ATP and GTP, respectively) suggest that ATP is the primary substrate of ACD in vivo. The optimal pH for ACD activity was in the range of 7.0–9.0. The elucidated kinetic mechanism of ACD toxicity adds to understanding of complex network of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23029200

  14. In vivo dynamics of the F-actin-binding protein neurabin-II.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, D J; Banting, G

    2000-01-01

    Neurabin-II (spinophilin) is a ubiquitously expressed F-actin-binding protein containing an N-terminal actin-binding domain, a PDZ (PSD95/discs large/ZO-1) domain and a C-terminal domain predicted to form a coiled-coil structure. We have stably expressed a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged version of neurabin-II in PC12 cells, and characterized the in vivo dynamics of this actin-binding protein using confocal fluorescence microscopy. We show that GFP-neurabin-II localizes to actin filaments, especially at cortical sites and areas underlying sites of active membrane remodelling. GFP-neurabin-II labels only a subset of F-actin within these cells, as indicated by rhodamine-phalloidin staining. Both actin filaments and small, highly motile structures within the cell body are seen. Photobleaching experiments show that GFP-neurabin-II also exhibits highly dynamic behaviour when bound to actin filaments. Latrunculin B treatment results in rapid relocalization of GFP-neurabin-II to the cytosol, whereas cytochalasin D treatment causes the collapse of GFP-neurabin-II fluorescence to intensely fluorescent foci of F-actin within the cell body. This collapse is reversed on cytochalasin D removal, recovery from which is greatly accelerated by stimulation of cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF). Furthermore, we show that this EGF-induced relocalization of GFP-neurabin-II is dependent on the activity of the small GTPase Rac1 but not the activity of ADP-ribosylation factor 6. PMID:10620493

  15. Concentration profiles of actin-binding molecules in lamellipodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcke, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Motile cells form lamellipodia in the direction of motion, which are flat membrane protrusions containing an actin filament network. The network flows rearward relative to the leading edge of the lamellipodium due to actin polymerization at the front. Thus, actin binding molecules are subject to transport towards the rear of the cell in the bound state and diffuse freely in the unbound state. We analyze this reaction-diffusion-advection process with respect to the concentration profiles of these species and provide an analytic approximation for them. Network flow may cause a depletion zone of actin binding molecules close to the leading edge. The existence of such zone depends on the free molecule concentration in the cell body, on the ratio of the diffusion length to the distance bound molecules travel rearward with the flow before dissociating, and the ratio of the diffusion length to the width of the region with network flow and actin binding. Our calculations suggest the existence of depletion zones for the F-actin cross-linkers filamin and α-actinin in fish keratocytes (and other cell types), which is in line with the small elastic moduli of the F-actin network close to the leading edge found in measurements of the force motile cells are able to exert.

  16. Distinct Actin and Lipid Binding Sites in Ysc84 Are Required during Early Stages of Yeast Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Agnieszka N.; Allwood, Ellen G.; Smith, Adam P.; Booth, Wesley I.; Ayscough, Kathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    During endocytosis in S. cerevisiae, actin polymerization is proposed to provide the driving force for invagination against the effects of turgor pressure. In previous studies, Ysc84 was demonstrated to bind actin through a conserved N-terminal domain. However, full length Ysc84 could only bind actin when its C-terminal SH3 domain also bound to the yeast WASP homologue Las17. Live cell-imaging has revealed that Ysc84 localizes to endocytic sites after Las17/WASP but before other known actin binding proteins, suggesting it is likely to function at an early stage of membrane invagination. While there are homologues of Ysc84 in other organisms, including its human homologue SH3yl-1, little is known of its mode of interaction with actin or how this interaction affects actin filament dynamics. Here we identify key residues involved both in Ysc84 actin and lipid binding, and demonstrate that its actin binding activity is negatively regulated by PI(4,5)P2. Ysc84 mutants defective in their lipid or actin-binding interaction were characterized in vivo. The abilities of Ysc84 to bind Las17 through its C-terminal SH3 domain, or to actin and lipid through the N-terminal domain were all shown to be essential in order to rescue temperature sensitive growth in a strain requiring YSC84 expression. Live cell imaging in strains with fluorescently tagged endocytic reporter proteins revealed distinct phenotypes for the mutants indicating the importance of these interactions for regulating key stages of endocytosis. PMID:26312755

  17. How a single residue in individual β-thymosin/WH2 domains controls their functions in actin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Didry, Dominique; Cantrelle, Francois-Xavier; Husson, Clotilde; Roblin, Pierre; Moorthy, Anna M Eswara; Perez, Javier; Le Clainche, Christophe; Hertzog, Maud; Guittet, Eric; Carlier, Marie-France; van Heijenoort, Carine; Renault, Louis

    2012-01-01

    β-Thymosin (βT) and WH2 domains are widespread, intrinsically disordered actin-binding peptides that display significant sequence variability and different regulations of actin self-assembly in motile and morphogenetic processes. Here, we reveal the structural mechanisms by which, in their 1:1 stoichiometric complexes with actin, they either inhibit assembly by sequestering actin monomers like Thymosin-β4, or enhance motility by directing polarized filament assembly like Ciboulot βT. We combined mutational, functional or structural analysis by X-ray crystallography, SAXS (small angle X-ray scattering) and NMR on Thymosin-β4, Ciboulot, TetraThymosinβ and the long WH2 domain of WASP-interacting protein. The latter sequesters G-actin with the same molecular mechanisms as Thymosin-β4. Functionally different βT/WH2 domains differ by distinct dynamics of their C-terminal half interactions with G-actin pointed face. These C-terminal interaction dynamics are controlled by the strength of electrostatic interactions with G-actin. At physiological ionic strength, a single salt bridge with actin located next to their central LKKT/V motif induces G-actin sequestration in both isolated long βT and WH2 domains. The results open perspectives for elucidating the functions of βT/WH2 domains in other modular proteins. PMID:22193718

  18. A LIM domain protein from tobacco involved in actin-bundling and histone gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Moes, Danièle; Gatti, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Céline; Dieterle, Monika; Moreau, Flora; Neumann, Katrin; Schumacher, Marc; Diederich, Marc; Grill, Erwin; Shen, Wen-Hui; Steinmetz, André; Thomas, Clément

    2013-03-01

    The two LIM domain-containing proteins from plants (LIMs) typically exhibit a dual cytoplasmic-nuclear distribution, suggesting that, in addition to their previously described roles in actin cytoskeleton organization, they participate in nuclear processes. Using a south-western blot-based screen aimed at identifying factors that bind to plant histone gene promoters, we isolated a positive clone containing the tobacco LIM protein WLIM2 (NtWLIM2) cDNA. Using both green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion- and immunology-based strategies, we provide clear evidence that NtWLIM2 localizes to the actin cytoskeleton, the nucleus, and the nucleolus. Interestingly, the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton by latrunculin B significantly increases NtWLIM2 nuclear fraction, pinpointing a possible novel cytoskeletal-nuclear crosstalk. Biochemical and electron microscopy experiments reveal the ability of NtWLIM2 to directly bind to actin filaments and to crosslink the latter into thick actin bundles. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays show that NtWLIM2 specifically binds to the conserved octameric cis-elements (Oct) of the Arabidopsis histone H4A748 gene promoter and that this binding largely relies on both LIM domains. Importantly, reporter-based experiments conducted in Arabidopsis and tobacco protoplasts confirm the ability of NtWLIM2 to bind to and activate the H4A748 gene promoter in live cells. Expression studies indicate the constitutive presence of NtWLIM2 mRNA and NtWLIM2 protein during tobacco BY-2 cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, suggesting a role of NtWLIM2 in the activation of basal histone gene expression. Interestingly, both live cell and in vitro data support NtWLIM2 di/oligomerization. We propose that NtWLIM2 functions as an actin-stabilizing protein, which, upon cytoskeleton remodeling, shuttles to the nucleus in order to modify gene expression. PMID:22930731

  19. An immunodominant membrane protein (Imp) of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali' binds to plant actin.

    PubMed

    Boonrod, K; Munteanu, B; Jarausch, B; Jarausch, W; Krczal, G

    2012-07-01

    The phytopathogenic, cell-wall-less phytoplasmas exhibit a dual life cycle: they multiply in the phloem of their host plant and in the body of their insect vector. Their membrane proteins are in direct contact with both hosts and are supposed to play a crucial role in the phytoplasma spread within the plant as well as by the insect vector. Three types of nonhomologous but highly abundant and immunodominant membrane proteins (IDP) have been identified within the phytoplasmas: Amp, IdpA, and Imp. Although recent results indicate that Amp is involved in vector specificity interacting with insect proteins such as actin, little is known about the interaction of IDP with the plant. We could demonstrate that transiently expressed Imp of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali' as well as the Imp without transmembrane domain (Imp▴Tm) bind with plant actins in vivo. Moreover, in vitro co-sediment and binding assays showed that Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant Imp▴Tm-His binds to both G- and F-actins isolated from rabbit muscle. Transgenic plants expressing Imp- or Imp▴Tm-green fluorescent protein did not exhibit any remarkable change of phenotype compared with the wild-type plant. These results indicate that Imp specifically binds to plant actin and a role of Imp-actin binding in phytoplasma motility is hypothesized. PMID:22432876

  20. Solution structure of villin 14T, a domain conserved among actin-severing proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Markus, M. A.; Nakayama, T.; Matsudaira, P.; Wagner, G.

    1994-01-01

    The solution structure of the N-terminal domain of the actin-severing protein villin has been determined by multidimensional heteronuclear resonance spectroscopy. Villin is a member of a family of actin-severing proteins that regulate the organization of actin in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Members of this family are built from 3 or 6 homologous repeats of a structural domain of approximately 130 amino acids that is unrelated to any previously known structure. The N-terminal domain of villin (14T) contains a central beta-sheet with 4 antiparallel strands and a fifth parallel strand at one edge. This sheet is sandwiched between 2 helices on one side and a 2-stranded parallel beta-sheet with another helix on the other side. The strongly conserved sequence characteristic of the protein family corresponds to internal hydrophobic residues. Calcium titration experiments suggest that there are 2 binding sites for Ca2+, a stronger site near the N-terminal end of the longest helix, with a Kd of 1.8 +/- 0.4 mM, and a weaker site near the C-terminal end of the same helix, with a Kd of 11 +/- 2 mM. Mutational and biochemical studies of this domain in several members of the family suggest that the actin monomer binding site is near the parallel strand at the edge of the central beta-sheet. PMID:8142900

  1. A domain of synapsin I involved with actin bundling shares immunologic cross-reactivity with villin.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, T C; Mooseker, M S; Morrow, J S

    1988-01-01

    Synapsin I is a neuronal phosphoprotein that can bundle actin filaments in vitro. This activity is under phosphorylation control, and may be related to its putative in vivo role of regulating the clustering and release of small synaptic vesicles. We have compared human and bovine synapsin I by peptide mapping, and have used NTCB (2-nitro-5-thiocyano benzoic acid) cleavage to generate a series of peptide fragments from bovine synapsin I. After chymotryptic digestion, 88% of the tyrosine-containing fragments appear to be structurally identical in human and bovine synapsin I, as judged by their positions on high-resolution two-dimensional peptide maps. The alignment of the NTCB peptides within the parent protein have been determined by peptide mapping, and the ability of these fragments to precipitate with actin bundles has been measured. Only peptides that are derived from regions near the ends of the protein are active. One such 25-kDa peptide which sediments with actin also cross-reacts with antibodies to chicken villin, an actin binding and bundling protein derived from the intestinal microvillus. Since in other respects villin appears to be an unrelated protein, these results suggest the possibility that certain actin binding proteins may show immunologic cross-reactivity due to convergent evolution within the acting binding domain. PMID:3125185

  2. Plasmodium falciparum aldolase and the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of certain apical organellar proteins promote actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Suraya A; Martin, Stephen R; Grainger, Munira; Howell, Steven A; Green, Judith L; Holder, Anthony A

    2014-10-01

    The current model of Apicomplexan motility and host cell invasion is that both processes are driven by an actomyosin motor located beneath the plasma membrane, with the force transduced to the outside of the cell via coupling through aldolase and the cytoplasmic tail domains (CTDs) of certain type 1 membrane proteins. In Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), aldolase is thought to bind to the CTD of members of the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) family, which are micronemal proteins and represented by MTRAP in merozoites. Other type 1 membrane proteins including members of the erythrocyte binding antigen (EBA) and reticulocyte binding protein homologue (RH) protein families, which are also apical organellar proteins, have also been implicated in host cell binding in erythrocyte invasion. However, recent studies with Toxoplasma gondii have questioned the importance of aldolase in these processes. Using biolayer interferometry we show that Pf aldolase binds with high affinity to both rabbit and Pf actin, with a similar affinity for filamentous (F-) actin and globular (G-) actin. The interaction between Pf aldolase and merozoite actin was confirmed by co-sedimentation assays. Aldolase binding was shown to promote rabbit actin polymerization indicating that the interaction is more complicated than binding alone. The CTDs of some but not all type 1 membrane proteins also promoted actin polymerization in the absence of aldolase; MTRAP and RH1 CTDs promoted actin polymerization but EBA175 CTD did not. Direct actin polymerization mediated by membrane protein CTDs may contribute to actin recruitment, filament formation and stability during motor assembly, and actin-mediated movement, independent of aldolase. PMID:25261592

  3. Characterization of F-Actin Tryptophan Phosphorescence in the Presence and Absence of Tryptophan-Free Myosin Motor Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bódis, Emöke; Strambini, Giovanni B.; Gonnelli, Margherita; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Somogyi, Béla

    2004-01-01

    The effect of binding the Trp-free motor domain mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum, rabbit skeletal muscle myosin S1, and tropomyosin on the dynamics and conformation of actin filaments was characterized by an analysis of steady-state tryptophan phosphorescence spectra and phosphorescence decay kinetics over a temperature range of 140–293 K. The binding of the Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum to actin caused red shifts in the phosphorescence spectrum of two internal Trp residues of actin and affected the intrinsic lifetime of each emitter, decreasing by roughly twofold the short phosphorescence lifetime components (τ1 and τ2) and increasing by ∼20% the longest component (τ3). The alteration of actin phosphorescence by the motor protein suggests that i), structural changes occur deep down in the core of actin and that ii), subtle changes in conformation appear also on the surface but in regions distant from the motor domain binding site. When actin formed complexes with skeletal S1, an extra phosphorescence lifetime component appeared (τ4, twice as long as τ3) in the phosphorescence decay that is absent in the isolated proteins. The lack of this extra component in the analogous actin-Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum complex suggests that it should be assigned to Trps in S1 that in the complex attain a more compact local structure. Our data indicated that the binding of tropomyosin to actin filaments had no effect on the structure or flexibility of actin observable by this technique. PMID:15298917

  4. Modification of Cys-837 identifies an actin-binding site in the beta-propeller protein scruin.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, S; Footer, M; Matsudaira, P

    1997-01-01

    In the acrosomal process of Limulus sperm, the beta-propeller protein scruin cross-links actin into a crystalline bundle. To confirm that scruin has the topology of a beta-propeller protein and to understand how scruin binds actin, we compared the solvent accessibility of cysteine residues in scruin and the acrosomal process by chemical modification with (1,5-IAEDANS). In soluble scruin, the two most reactive cysteines of soluble scruin are C837 and C900, whereas C146, C333, and C683 are moderately reactive. This pattern of reactivity is consistent with the topology of a typical beta-propeller protein; all of the reactive cysteines map to putative loops and turns whereas the unreactive cysteines lie within the predicted interior of the protein. The chemical reactivities of cysteine in the acrosomal process implicate C837 at an actin-binding site. In contrast to soluble scruin, in the acrosomal process, C837 is completely unreactive while the other cysteines become less reactive. Binding studies of chemically modified scruin correlate the extent of modification at C837 with the extent of inhibition of actin binding. Furthermore, peptides corresponding to residues flanking C837 bind actin and narrow a possible actin-binding region to a KQK sequence. On the basis of these studies, our results suggest that an actin-binding site lies in the C-terminal domain of scruin and involves a putative loop defined by C837. Images PMID:9188095

  5. The Plant-Specific Actin Binding Protein SCAB1 Stabilizes Actin Filaments and Regulates Stomatal Movement in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Shuangshuang; Mao, Tonglin; Qu, Xiaolu; Cao, Wanhong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Wei; He, Liu; Li, Sidi; Ren, Sulin; Zhao, Jinfeng; Zhu, Guoli; Huang, Shanjin; Ye, Keqiong; Yuan, Ming; Guo, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Microfilament dynamics play a critical role in regulating stomatal movement; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is not well understood. We report here the identification and characterization of STOMATAL CLOSURE-RELATED ACTIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (SCAB1), an Arabidopsis thaliana actin binding protein. Plants lacking SCAB1 were hypersensitive to drought stress and exhibited reduced abscisic acid-, H2O2-, and CaCl2-regulated stomatal movement. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that SCAB1 binds, stabilizes, and bundles actin filaments. SCAB1 shares sequence similarity only with plant proteins and contains a previously undiscovered actin binding domain. During stomatal closure, actin filaments switched from a radial orientation in open stomata to a longitudinal orientation in closed stomata. This switch took longer in scab1 plants than in wild-type plants and was correlated with the delay in stomatal closure seen in scab1 mutants in response to drought stress. Our results suggest that SCAB1 is required for the precise regulation of actin filament reorganization during stomatal closure. PMID:21719691

  6. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is functionally affected by mutations on actin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Tang, Wei-Ping; Liu, Jia-Yao

    2013-03-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin, and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments. To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L. AtADF1, we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G- and F-actin binding. The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A, R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding. Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L. plants overexpressing these mutants, we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth. Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional, unless the affinity for actin monomers is also affected. The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding, depolymerization of actin polymers, and therefore in the control of actin organization. PMID:23190411

  7. Human endothelial actin-binding protein (ABP-280, nonmuscle filamin): a molecular leaf spring

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Actin-binding protein (ABP-280, nonmuscle filamin) is a ubiquitous dimeric actin cross-linking phosphoprotein of peripheral cytoplasm, where it promotes orthogonal branching of actin filaments and links actin filaments to membrane glycoproteins. The complete nucleotide sequence of human endothelial cell ABP cDNA predicts a polypeptide subunit chain of 2,647 amino acids, corresponding to 280 kD, also the mass derived from physical measurements of the native protein. The actin-binding domain is near the amino-terminus of the subunit where the amino acid sequence is similar to other actin filament binding proteins, including alpha-actinin, beta-spectrin, dystrophin, and Dictyostelium abp-120. The remaining 90% of the sequence comprises 24 repeats, each approximately 96 residues long, predicted to have stretches of beta-sheet secondary structure interspersed with turns. The first 15 repeats may have substantial intrachain hydrophobic interactions and overlap in a staggered fashion to yield a backbone with mechanical resilience. Sequence insertions immediately before repeats 16 and 24 predict two hinges in the molecule near points where rotary-shadowed molecules appear to swivel in electron micrographs. Both putative hinge regions are susceptible to cleavage by proteases and the second also contains the site that binds the platelet glycoprotein Ib/IX complex. Phosphorylation consensus sequences are also located in the hinges or near them. Degeneracy within every even- numbered repeat between 16 and 24 and the insertion before repeat 24 may convert interactions within chains to interactions between chains to account for dimer formation within a domain of 7 kD at the carboxy- terminus. The structure of ABP dimers resembles a leaf spring. Interchain interactions hold the leaves firmly together at one end, whereas intrachain hydrophobic bonds reinforce the arms of the spring where the leaves diverge, making it sufficiently stiff to promote high- angle branching of actin

  8. Human endothelial actin-binding protein (ABP-280, nonmuscle filamin): a molecular leaf spring.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, J B; Yamin, R; Egan, S; Stewart, M; Stossel, T P; Kwiatkowski, D J; Hartwig, J H

    1990-09-01

    Actin-binding protein (ABP-280, nonmuscle filamin) is a ubiquitous dimeric actin cross-linking phosphoprotein of peripheral cytoplasm, where it promotes orthogonal branching of actin filaments and links actin filaments to membrane glycoproteins. The complete nucleotide sequence of human endothelial cell ABP cDNA predicts a polypeptide subunit chain of 2,647 amino acids, corresponding to 280 kD, also the mass derived from physical measurements of the native protein. The actin-binding domain is near the amino-terminus of the subunit where the amino acid sequence is similar to other actin filament binding proteins, including alpha-actinin, beta-spectrin, dystrophin, and Dictyostelium abp-120. The remaining 90% of the sequence comprises 24 repeats, each approximately 96 residues long, predicted to have stretches of beta-sheet secondary structure interspersed with turns. The first 15 repeats may have substantial intrachain hydrophobic interactions and overlap in a staggered fashion to yield a backbone with mechanical resilience. Sequence insertions immediately before repeats 16 and 24 predict two hinges in the molecule near points where rotary-shadowed molecules appear to swivel in electron micrographs. Both putative hinge regions are susceptible to cleavage by proteases and the second also contains the site that binds the platelet glycoprotein Ib/IX complex. Phosphorylation consensus sequences are also located in the hinges or near them. Degeneracy within every even-numbered repeat between 16 and 24 and the insertion before repeat 24 may convert interactions within chains to interactions between chains to account for dimer formation within a domain of 7 kD at the carboxy-terminus. The structure of ABP dimers resembles a leaf spring. Interchain interactions hold the leaves firmly together at one end, whereas intrachain hydrophobic bonds reinforce the arms of the spring where the leaves diverge, making it sufficiently stiff to promote high-angle branching of actin

  9. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Villin Headpiece nad Mutants with Reduced F-Actin Binding Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meng,J.; Vardar, D.; Wang, Y.; Guo, H.; Head, J.; McKnight, C.

    2005-01-01

    Villin-type headpiece domains are approximately 70 amino acid modular motifs found at the C terminus of a variety of actin cytoskeleton-associated proteins. The headpiece domain of villin, a protein found in the actin bundles of the brush border epithelium, is of interest both as a compact F-actin binding domain and as a model folded protein. We have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of chicken villin headpiece (HP67) at 1.4 Angstrom resolution as well as two mutants, R37A and W64Y, at 1.45 and 1.5 Angstrom resolution, respectively. Replacement of R37 causes a 5-fold reduction in F-actin binding affinity in sedimentation assays. Replacement of W64 results in a much more drastic reduction in F-actin binding affinity without significant changes in headpiece structure or stability. The detailed comparison of these crystal structures with each other and to our previously determined NMR structures of HP67 and the 35-residue autonomously folding subdomain in villin headpiece, HP35, provides the details of the headpiece fold and further defines the F-actin binding site of villin-type headpiece domains.

  10. Wnt Signalling Promotes Actin Dynamics during Axon Remodelling through the Actin-Binding Protein Eps8

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    Upon arrival at their synaptic targets, axons slow down their growth and extensively remodel before the assembly of presynaptic boutons. Wnt proteins are target-derived secreted factors that promote axonal remodelling and synaptic assembly. In the developing spinal cord, Wnts secreted by motor neurons promote axonal remodelling of NT-3 responsive dorsal root ganglia neurons. Axon remodelling induced by Wnts is characterised by growth cone pausing and enlargement, processes that depend on the re-organisation of microtubules. However, the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that Wnt3a regulates the actin cytoskeleton by rapidly inducing F-actin accumulation in growth cones from rodent DRG neurons through the scaffold protein Dishevelled-1 (Dvl1) and the serine-threonine kinase Gsk3β. Importantly, these changes in actin cytoskeleton occurs before enlargement of the growth cones is evident. Time-lapse imaging shows that Wnt3a increases lamellar protrusion and filopodia velocity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of actin assembly demonstrates that Wnt3a increases actin dynamics. Through a yeast-two hybrid screen, we identified the actin-binding protein Eps8 as a direct interactor of Dvl1, a scaffold protein crucial for the Wnt signalling pathway. Gain of function of Eps8 mimics Wnt-mediated axon remodelling, whereas Eps8 silencing blocks the axon remodelling activity of Wnt3a. Importantly, blockade of the Dvl1-Eps8 interaction completely abolishes Wnt3a-mediated axonal remodelling. These findings demonstrate a novel role for Wnt-Dvl1 signalling through Eps8 in the regulation of axonal remodeling. PMID:26252776

  11. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin

    SciTech Connect

    Bekyarova, T.I.; Reedy, M.C.; Baumann, B.A.J.; Tregear, R.T.; Ward, A.; Krzic, U.; Prince, K.M.; Perz-Edwards, R.J.; Reconditi, M.; Gore, D.; Irving, T.C.; Reedy, M.K.

    2008-09-03

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the 'steric blocking' mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca{sup 2+} with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at high [Ca{sup 2+}], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca{sup 2+}], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored 'actin target zones.' Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca{sup 2+}] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca{sup 2+}], Vi-'paralyzed' fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa {approx} 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding 'brakes' by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions.

  12. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin.

    PubMed

    Bekyarova, T I; Reedy, M C; Baumann, B A J; Tregear, R T; Ward, A; Krzic, U; Prince, K M; Perz-Edwards, R J; Reconditi, M; Gore, D; Irving, T C; Reedy, M K

    2008-07-29

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the "steric blocking" mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca(2+) with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at high [Ca(2+)], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca(2+)], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored "actin target zones." Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca(2+)] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca(2+)], Vi-"paralyzed" fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa approximately 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding "brakes" by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions. PMID:18658238

  13. Arabidopsis CROLIN1, a Novel Plant Actin-binding Protein, Functions in Cross-linking and Stabilizing Actin Filaments*

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Honglei; Li, Jisheng; Zhu, Jingen; Fan, Tingting; Qian, Dong; Zhou, Yuelong; Wang, Jiaojiao; Ren, Haiyun; Xiang, Yun; An, Lizhe

    2013-01-01

    Higher order actin filament structures are necessary for cytoplasmic streaming, organelle movement, and other physiological processes. However, the mechanism by which the higher order cytoskeleton is formed in plants remains unknown. In this study, we identified a novel actin-cross-linking protein family (named CROLIN) that is well conserved only in the plant kingdom. There are six isovariants of CROLIN in the Arabidopsis genome, with CROLIN1 specifically expressed in pollen. In vitro biochemical analyses showed that CROLIN1 is a novel actin-cross-linking protein with binding and stabilizing activities. Remarkably, CROLIN1 can cross-link actin bundles into actin networks. CROLIN1 loss of function induces pollen germination and pollen tube growth hypersensitive to latrunculin B. All of these results demonstrate that CROLIN1 may play an important role in stabilizing and remodeling actin filaments by binding to and cross-linking actin filaments. PMID:24072702

  14. Scapinin, the Protein Phosphatase 1 Binding Protein, Enhances Cell Spreading and Motility by Interacting with the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sagara, Junji; Arata, Toshiaki; Taniguchi, Shunichiro

    2009-01-01

    Scapinin, also named phactr3, is an actin and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) binding protein, which is expressed in the adult brain and some tumor cells. At present, the role(s) of scapinin in the brain and tumors are poorly understood. We show that the RPEL-repeat domain of scapinin, which is responsible for its direct interaction with actin, inhibits actin polymerization in vitro. Next, we established a Hela cell line, where scapinin expression was induced by tetracycline. In these cells, expression of scapinin stimulated cell spreading and motility. Scapinin was colocalized with actin at the edge of spreading cells. To explore the roles of the RPEL-repeat and PP1-binding domains, we expressed wild-type and mutant scapinins as fusion proteins with green fluorescence protein (GFP) in Cos7 cells. Expression of GFP-scapinin (wild type) also stimulated cell spreading, but mutation in the RPEL-repeat domain abolished both the actin binding and the cell spreading activity. PP1-binding deficient mutants strongly induced cell retraction. Long and branched cytoplasmic processes were developed during the cell retraction. These results suggest that scapinin enhances cell spreading and motility through direct interaction with actin and that PP1 plays a regulatory role in scapinin-induced morphological changes. PMID:19158953

  15. The catalytic domain of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase-a contributes to ITPKA-induced modulation of F-actin.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Dina Julia; Pelka, Benjamin; Jaaks, Patricia; Wundenberg, Torsten; Blechner, Christine; Zobiak, Bernd; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Windhorst, Sabine

    2015-02-01

    Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-3-kinase-A (ITPKA) has been considered as an actin bundling protein because its N-terminal actin binding domain (ABD) induces formation of linear actin bundles. Since in many cancer cell lines ITPKA is essential for formation of lamellipodia, which consist of cross-linked actin filaments, here we analyzed if full length-ITPKA may induce formation of more complex actin structures. Indeed, we found that incubation of F-actin with ITPKA resulted in formation of dense, branched actin networks. Based on our result that ITPKA does not exhibit an additional C-terminal ABD, we exclude that ITPKA cross-links actin filaments by simultaneous F-actin binding with two different ABDs. Instead, stimulated-emission-depletion-microscopy and measurement of InsP3 Kinase activity give evidence that that N-terminal ABD-homodimers of ITPKA bind to F-actin while the monomeric C-termini insert between adjacent actin filaments. Thereby, they prevent formation of thick actin bundles but induce formation of thin branched actin structures. Interestingly, when embedded in this dense actin network, InsP3 Kinase activity is doubled and the product of InsP3 Kinase activity, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 , inhibits spontaneous actin polymerization which may reflect a local negative feedback regulation of InsP3 Kinase activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate that not only the ABD of ITPKA modulates actin dynamics but reveal that the InsP3 Kinase domain substantially contributes to this process. PMID:25620569

  16. A Mechanism for Actin Filament Severing by Malaria Parasite Actin Depolymerizing Factor 1 via a Low Affinity Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wilson; Webb, Andrew I.; Olshina, Maya A.; Infusini, Giuseppe; Tan, Yan Hong; Hanssen, Eric; Catimel, Bruno; Suarez, Cristian; Condron, Melanie; Angrisano, Fiona; NebI, Thomas; Kovar, David R.; Baum, Jake

    2014-01-01

    Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilins are essential regulators of actin turnover in eukaryotic cells. These multifunctional proteins facilitate both stabilization and severing of filamentous (F)-actin in a concentration-dependent manner. At high concentrations ADF/cofilins bind stably to F-actin longitudinally between two adjacent actin protomers forming what is called a decorative interaction. Low densities of ADF/cofilins, in contrast, result in the optimal severing of the filament. To date, how these two contrasting modalities are achieved by the same protein remains uncertain. Here, we define the proximate amino acids between the actin filament and the malaria parasite ADF/cofilin, PfADF1 from Plasmodium falciparum. PfADF1 is unique among ADF/cofilins in being able to sever F-actin but do so without stable filament binding. Using chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (XL-MS) combined with structure reconstruction we describe a previously overlooked binding interface on the actin filament targeted by PfADF1. This site is distinct from the known binding site that defines decoration. Furthermore, total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging of single actin filaments confirms that this novel low affinity site is required for F-actin severing. Exploring beyond malaria parasites, selective blocking of the decoration site with human cofilin (HsCOF1) using cytochalasin D increases its severing rate. HsCOF1 may therefore also use a decoration-independent site for filament severing. Thus our data suggest that a second, low affinity actin-binding site may be universally used by ADF/cofilins for actin filament severing. PMID:24371134

  17. Identification of Actin-Binding Proteins from Maize Pollen

    SciTech Connect

    Staiger, C.J.

    2004-01-13

    Specific Aims--The goal of this project was to gain an understanding of how actin filament organization and dynamics are controlled in flowering plants. Specifically, we proposed to identify unique proteins with novel functions by investigating biochemical strategies for the isolation and characterization of actin-binding proteins (ABPs). In particular, our hunt was designed to identify capping proteins and nucleation factors. The specific aims included: (1) to use F-actin affinity chromatography (FAAC) as a general strategy to isolate pollen ABPs (2) to produce polyclonal antisera and perform subcellular localization in pollen tubes (3) to isolate cDNA clones for the most promising ABPs (4) to further purify and characterize ABP interactions with actin in vitro. Summary of Progress By employing affinity chromatography on F-actin or DNase I columns, we have identified at least two novel ABPs from pollen, PrABP80 (gelsolin-like) and ZmABP30, We have also cloned and expressed recombinant protein, as well as generated polyclonal antisera, for 6 interesting ABPs from Arabidopsis (fimbrin AtFIM1, capping protein a/b (AtCP), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (AtCAP), AtCapG & AtVLN1). We performed quantitative analyses of the biochemical properties for two of these previously uncharacterized ABPs (fimbrin and capping protein). Our studies provide the first evidence for fimbrin activity in plants, demonstrate the existence of barbed-end capping factors and a gelsolin-like severing activity, and provide the quantitative data necessary to establish and test models of F-actin organization and dynamics in plant cells.

  18. Docking, molecular dynamics and QM/MM studies to delineate the mode of binding of CucurbitacinE to F-actin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Pravin; Roopa, L; Nongthomba, Upendra; Sudheer Mohammed, M M; Kulkarni, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    CucurbitacinE (CurE) has been known to bind covalently to F-actin and inhibit depolymerization. However, the mode of binding of CurE to F-actin and the consequent changes in the F-actin dynamics have not been studied. Through quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) and density function theory (DFT) simulations after the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the docked complex of F-actin and CurE, a detailed transition state (TS) model for the Michael reaction is proposed. The TS model shows nucleophilic attack of the sulphur of Cys257 at the β-carbon of Michael Acceptor of CurE producing an enol intermediate that forms a covalent bond with CurE. The MD results show a clear difference between the structure of the F-actin in free form and F-actin complexed with CurE. CurE affects the conformation of the nucleotide binding pocket increasing the binding affinity between F-actin and ADP, which in turn could affect the nucleotide exchange. CurE binding also limits the correlated displacement of the relatively flexible domain 1 of F-actin causing the protein to retain a flat structure and to transform into a stable "tense" state. This structural transition could inhibit depolymerization of F-actin. In conclusion, CurE allosterically modulates ADP and stabilizes F-actin structure, thereby affecting nucleotide exchange and depolymerization of F-actin. PMID:26615469

  19. A human β-III-spectrin spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 mutation causes high-affinity F-actin binding

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Adam W.; Crain, Jonathan; Thomas, David D.; Hays, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) is a human neurodegenerative disease that stems from mutations in the SPTBN2 gene encoding the protein β-III-spectrin. Here we investigated the molecular consequence of a SCA5 missense mutation that results in a L253P substitution in the actin-binding domain (ABD) of β-III-spectrin. We report that the L253P substitution in the isolated β-III-spectrin ABD causes strikingly high F-actin binding affinity (Kd = 75.5 nM) compared to the weak F-actin binding affinity of the wild-type ABD (Kd = 75.8 μM). The mutation also causes decreased thermal stability (Tm = 44.6 °C vs 59.5 °C). Structural analyses indicate that leucine 253 is in a loop at the interface of the tandem calponin homology (CH) domains comprising the ABD. Leucine 253 is predicted to form hydrophobic contacts that bridge the CH domains. The decreased stability of the mutant indicates that these bridging interactions are probably disrupted, suggesting that the high F-actin binding affinity of the mutant is due to opening of the CH domain interface. These results support a fundamental role for leucine 253 in regulating opening of the CH domain interface and binding of the ABD to F-actin. This study indicates that high-affinity actin binding of L253P β-III-spectrin is a likely driver of neurodegeneration. PMID:26883385

  20. A human β-III-spectrin spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 mutation causes high-affinity F-actin binding.

    PubMed

    Avery, Adam W; Crain, Jonathan; Thomas, David D; Hays, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) is a human neurodegenerative disease that stems from mutations in the SPTBN2 gene encoding the protein β-III-spectrin. Here we investigated the molecular consequence of a SCA5 missense mutation that results in a L253P substitution in the actin-binding domain (ABD) of β-III-spectrin. We report that the L253P substitution in the isolated β-III-spectrin ABD causes strikingly high F-actin binding affinity (Kd = 75.5 nM) compared to the weak F-actin binding affinity of the wild-type ABD (Kd = 75.8 μM). The mutation also causes decreased thermal stability (Tm = 44.6 °C vs 59.5 °C). Structural analyses indicate that leucine 253 is in a loop at the interface of the tandem calponin homology (CH) domains comprising the ABD. Leucine 253 is predicted to form hydrophobic contacts that bridge the CH domains. The decreased stability of the mutant indicates that these bridging interactions are probably disrupted, suggesting that the high F-actin binding affinity of the mutant is due to opening of the CH domain interface. These results support a fundamental role for leucine 253 in regulating opening of the CH domain interface and binding of the ABD to F-actin. This study indicates that high-affinity actin binding of L253P β-III-spectrin is a likely driver of neurodegeneration. PMID:26883385

  1. Stability domains of actin genes and genomic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlon, E.; Dkhissi, A.; Malki, M. Lejard; Blossey, R.

    2007-11-01

    In eukaryotic genes, the protein coding sequence is split into several fragments, the exons, separated by noncoding DNA stretches, the introns. Prokaryotes do not have introns in their genomes. We report calculations of the stability domains of actin genes for various organisms in the animal, plant, and fungi kingdoms. Actin genes have been chosen because they have been highly conserved during evolution. In these genes, all introns were removed so as to mimic ancient genes at the time of the early eukaryotic development, i.e., before intron insertion. Common stability boundaries are found in evolutionarily distant organisms, which implies that these boundaries date from the early origin of eukaryotes. In general, the boundaries correspond with intron positions in the actins of vertebrates and other animals, but not much for plants and fungi. The sharpest boundary is found in a locus where fungi, algae, and animals have introns in positions separated by one nucleotide only, which identifies a hot spot for insertion. These results suggest that some introns may have been incorporated into the genomes through a thermodynamically driven mechanism, in agreement with previous observations on human genes. They also suggest a different mechanism for intron insertion in plants and animals.

  2. MARCKS is a natively unfolded protein with an inaccessible actin-binding site: evidence for long-range intramolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Tapp, Hazel; Al-Naggar, Iman M; Yarmola, Elena G; Harrison, Alexis; Shaw, Gerry; Edison, Arthur S; Bubb, Michael R

    2005-03-18

    Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) is an unfolded protein that contains well characterized actin-binding sites within the phosphorylation site domain (PSD), yet paradoxically, we now find that intact MARCKS does not bind to actin. Intact MARCKS also does not bind as well to calmodulin as does the PSD alone. Myristoylation at the N terminus alters how calmodulin binds to MARCKS, implying that, despite its unfolded state, the distant N terminus influences binding events at the PSD. We show that the free PSD binds with site specificity to MARCKS, suggesting that long-range intramolecular interactions within MARCKS are also possible. Because of the unusual primary sequence of MARCKS with an overall isoelectric point of 4.2 yet a very basic PSD (overall charge of +13), we speculated that ionic interactions between oppositely charged domains of MARCKS were responsible for long-range interactions within MARCKS that sterically influence binding events at the PSD and that explain the observed differences between properties of the PSD and MARCKS. Consistent with this hypothesis, chemical modifications of MARCKS that neutralize negatively charged residues outside of the PSD allow the PSD to bind to actin and increase the affinity of MARCKS for calmodulin. Similarly, both myristoylation of MARCKS and cleavage of MARCKS by calpain are shown to increase the availability of the PSD so as to activate its actin-binding activity. Because abundant evidence supports the conclusion that MARCKS is an important protein in regulating actin dynamics, our data imply that post-translational modifications of MARCKS are necessary and sufficient to regulate actin-binding activity. PMID:15640140

  3. Moesin, ezrin, and p205 are actin-binding proteins associated with neutrophil plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Pestonjamasp, K; Amieva, M R; Strassel, C P; Nauseef, W M; Furthmayr, H; Luna, E J

    1995-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins in bovine neutrophil plasma membranes were identified using blot overlays with 125I-labeled F-actin. Along with surface-biotinylated proteins, membranes were enriched in major actin-binding polypeptides of 78, 81, and 205 kDa. Binding was specific for F-actin because G-actin did not bind. Further, unlabeled F-actin blocked the binding of 125I-labeled F-actin whereas other acidic biopolymers were relatively ineffective. Binding also was specifically inhibited by myosin subfragment 1, but not by CapZ or plasma gelsolin, suggesting that the membrane proteins, like myosin, bind along the sides of the actin filaments. The 78- and 81-kDa polypeptides were identified as moesin and ezrin, respectively, by co-migration on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation with antibodies specific for moesin and ezrin. Although not present in detectable amounts in bovine neutrophils, radixin (a third and closely related member of this gene family) also bound 125I-labeled F-actin on blot overlays. Experiments with full-length and truncated bacterial fusion proteins localized the actin-binding site in moesin to the extreme carboxy terminus, a highly conserved sequence. Immunofluorescence micrographs of permeabilized cells and cell "footprints" showed moesin co-localization with actin at the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane, consistent with a role as a membrane-actin-linking protein. Images PMID:7612961

  4. Cloning and sequencing of a gene coding for an actin binding protein of Saccharomyces exiguus.

    PubMed

    Lange, U; Steiner, S; Grolig, F; Wagner, G; Philippsen, P

    1994-03-01

    The actin binding protein Abp1p of the yeast Saccharomyces cervisiae is thought to be involved in the spatial organisation of cell surface growth. It contains a potential actin binding domain and an SH-3 region, a common motif of many signal transduction proteins [1]. We have cloned and sequenced an ABP1 homologous gene of Saccharomyces exiguus, a yeast which is only distantly related to S. cerevisiae. The protein encoded by this gene is slightly larger than the respective S. cerevisiae protein (617 versus 592 amino acids). The two genes are 67.4% identical and the deduced amino acid sequences share an overall identity of 59.8%. The most conserved regions are the 148 N-terminal amino acids containing the potential actin binding site and the 58 C-terminal amino acids including the SH3 domain. In addition, both proteins contain a repeated motif of unknown function which is rich in glutamic acids with the sequence EEEEEEEAPAPSLPSR in the S. exiguus Abp1p. PMID:8110838

  5. Structure of Actin-related protein 8 and its contribution to nucleosome binding

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Christian B.; Winkler, Duane D.; Lakomek, Kristina; Seifert, Florian U.; Fenn, Sebastian; Kessler, Brigitte; Witte, Gregor; Luger, Karolin; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear actin-related proteins (Arps) are subunits of several chromatin remodelers, but their molecular functions within these complexes are unclear. We report the crystal structure of the INO80 complex subunit Arp8 in its ATP-bound form. Human Arp8 has several insertions in the conserved actin fold that explain its inability to polymerize. Most remarkably, one insertion wraps over the active site cleft and appears to rigidify the domain architecture, while active site features shared with actin suggest an allosterically controlled ATPase activity. Quantitative binding studies with nucleosomes and histone complexes reveal that Arp8 and the Arp8–Arp4–actin-HSA sub-complex of INO80 strongly prefer nucleosomes and H3–H4 tetramers over H2A–H2B dimers, suggesting that Arp8 functions as a nucleosome recognition module. In contrast, Arp4 prefers free (H3–H4)2 over nucleosomes and may serve remodelers through binding to (dis)assembly intermediates in the remodeling reaction. PMID:22977180

  6. Subcellular localisation of the p40phox component of NADPH oxidase involves direct interactions between the Phox homology domain and F-actin

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Dongmin; Segal, Anthony W.; Dekker, Lodewijk V.

    2010-01-01

    Cytosolic components of the NADPH oxidase interact with the actin cytoskeleton. These interactions are thought to be important for the activation of this enzyme system but they are poorly characterised at the molecular level. Here we have explored the interaction between the actin cytoskeleton and p40phox, one of the cytosolic components of NADPH oxidase. Full length p40phox expressed in COS cells co-localised with F-actin in a peripheral lamellar compartment. The co-localisation was lost after deletion of the Phox homology (PX) domain and the PX domain in isolation (p40PX) showed the same F-actin co-localisation as the full length protein. PX domains are known lipid-binding modules however, a mutant p40PX which did not bind lipids still co-localised with F-actin suggesting that lipid-independent interactions underlie the localisation. Affinity chromatography identified actin as a binding partner for p40PX in neutrophil extracts. Pure actin interacted with both p40phox and with p40PX suggesting it is a direct interaction. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D resulted in actin rearrangement and concomitantly the localisation of full length p40phox proteins and that of p40PX changed. Thus p40PX is a dual F-actin/lipid-binding module and F-actin interactions with the PX domain dictate at least in part the intracellular localisation of the cytosolic p40phox subunit of the NADPH oxidase. PMID:20637895

  7. The evolution of the actin binding NET superfamily.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Timothy J; Deeks, Michael J; Wang, Pengwei; Hussey, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Networked (NET) superfamily are plant-specific actin binding proteins which specifically label different membrane compartments and identify specialized sites of interaction between actin and membranes unique to plants. There are 13 members of the superfamily in Arabidopsis, which group into four distinct clades or families. NET homologs are absent from the genomes of metazoa and fungi; furthermore, in plantae, NET sequences are also absent from the genome of mosses and more ancient extant plant clades. A single family of the NET proteins is found encoded in the club moss genome, an extant species of the earliest vascular plants. Gymnosperms have examples from families 4 and 3, with a hybrid form of NET1 and 2 which shows characteristics of both NET1 and NET2. In addition to NET3 and 4 families, the NET1 and pollen-expressed NET2 families are found only as independent sequences in Angiosperms. This is consistent with the divergence of reproductive actin. The four families are conserved across Monocots and Eudicots, with the numbers of members of each clade expanding at this point, due, in part, to regions of genome duplication. Since the emergence of the NET superfamily at the dawn of vascular plants, they have continued to develop and diversify in a manner which has mirrored the divergence and increasing complexity of land-plant species. PMID:24926301

  8. The evolution of the actin binding NET superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Timothy J.; Deeks, Michael J.; Wang, Pengwei; Hussey, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Networked (NET) superfamily are plant-specific actin binding proteins which specifically label different membrane compartments and identify specialized sites of interaction between actin and membranes unique to plants. There are 13 members of the superfamily in Arabidopsis, which group into four distinct clades or families. NET homologs are absent from the genomes of metazoa and fungi; furthermore, in plantae, NET sequences are also absent from the genome of mosses and more ancient extant plant clades. A single family of the NET proteins is found encoded in the club moss genome, an extant species of the earliest vascular plants. Gymnosperms have examples from families 4 and 3, with a hybrid form of NET1 and 2 which shows characteristics of both NET1 and NET2. In addition to NET3 and 4 families, the NET1 and pollen-expressed NET2 families are found only as independent sequences in Angiosperms. This is consistent with the divergence of reproductive actin. The four families are conserved across Monocots and Eudicots, with the numbers of members of each clade expanding at this point, due, in part, to regions of genome duplication. Since the emergence of the NET superfamily at the dawn of vascular plants, they have continued to develop and diversify in a manner which has mirrored the divergence and increasing complexity of land-plant species. PMID:24926301

  9. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  10. Probing the Flexibility of Tropomyosin and Its Binding to Filamentous Actin Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wenjun; Barua, Bipasha; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is a coiled-coil protein that binds to filamentous actin (F-actin) and regulates its interactions with actin-binding proteins like myosin by moving between three positions on F-actin (the blocked, closed, and open positions). To elucidate the molecular details of Tm flexibility in relation to its binding to F-actin, we conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations for both Tm alone and Tm-F-actin complex in the presence of explicit solvent (total simulation time >400 ns). Based on the simulations, we systematically analyzed the local flexibility of the Tm coiled coil using multiple parameters. We found a good correlation between the regions with high local flexibility and a number of destabilizing regions in Tm, including six clusters of core alanines. Despite the stabilization by F-actin binding, the distribution of local flexibility in Tm is largely unchanged in the absence and presence of F-actin. Our simulations showed variable fluctuations of individual Tm periods from the closed position toward the open position. In addition, we performed Tm-F-actin binding calculations based on the simulation trajectories, which support the importance of Tm flexibility to Tm-F-actin binding. We identified key residues of Tm involved in its dynamic interactions with F-actin, many of which have been found in recent mutational studies to be functionally important, and the rest of which will make promising targets for future mutational experiments. PMID:24138864

  11. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  12. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  13. Direct dynamin–actin interactions regulate the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Changkyu; Yaddanapudi, Suma; Weins, Astrid; Osborn, Teresia; Reiser, Jochen; Pollak, Martin; Hartwig, John; Sever, Sanja

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin assembles into higher order structures that are thought to promote endocytosis. Dynamin also regulates the actin cytoskeleton through an unknown, GTPase-dependent mechanism. Here, we identify a highly conserved site in dynamin that binds directly to actin filaments and aligns them into bundles. Point mutations in the actin-binding domain cause aberrant membrane ruffling and defective actin stress fibre formation in cells. Short actin filaments promote dynamin assembly into higher order structures, which in turn efficiently release the actin-capping protein (CP) gelsolin from barbed actin ends in vitro, allowing for elongation of actin filaments. Together, our results support a model in which assembled dynamin, generated through interactions with short actin filaments, promotes actin polymerization via displacement of actin-CPs. PMID:20935625

  14. Kinetic studies of the cooperative binding of subfragment 1 to regulated actin.

    PubMed Central

    Trybus, K M; Taylor, E W

    1980-01-01

    The transient-state kinetics of binding of myosin subfragment 1 (SF-1) to regulated actin in the presence and absence of Ca2+ were investigated. The binding of SF-1 to pure actin, to actin-tropomyosin (actin-TM), or to actin-tropomyosin-troponin (actin-TM-TN) in the presence of Ca2+ was kinetically the same. In each case, the light-scattering transients were biphasic, suggesting a two-step binding of SF-1 to actin. Binding of SF-1 to regulated actin in the absence of Ca2+ was different from binding in its presence and also varied depending on whether SF-1 or regulated actin was in excess. The kinetic results in the absence of CA2+ are explained by a cooperative binding model, in which the initial binding of SF-1 molecules to open (active) actin sites increases the number of open sites. TN-I labeled with the fluorophore 4-(N-iodoacetoxyethyl-N-methyl)-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3 diazole (TN*) was used to probe the state of the actin-TM-TN complex. Binding of SF-1 or CA2+ to regulated actin (in the absence of Ca2+) decreased the fluorescence of actin-TM-TN* by 30%, suggesting that binding of SF-1 or CA2+ induces a similar change in state. The change in fluorescence of TN* was also used to measure the rate of the transition from the active to the relaxed state in the absence of CA2+, which was 430 sec-1 at 4 degrees C in 0.1 M KCl. The lag prior to association of SF-1 with regulated actin (in the absence of Ca2+) was abolished when three SF-1 molecules were prebound per seven G-actin monomers. Similarly, a titration of actin-TM-TN* (in the absence of Ca2+) with SF-1 or SF-1-ADP showed that most actin sites are open, as measured by the fluorescence change, when the occupancy of actin-TM-TN* by SF-1-ADP or SF-1 is approximately 50%. The evidence shows that partial occupancy of a block of G-actin sites (possibly seven) by SF-1 or SF-1-ADP stabilizes the open (active) conformation. PMID:6938966

  15. Ha-VP39 binding to actin and the influence of F-actin on assembly of progeny virions.

    PubMed

    Lu, S; Ge, G; Qi, Y

    2004-11-01

    We present evidence that actin is necessary for the successful assembly of HaNPV virions. Purified nucleocapsid protein Ha-VP39 of Heliothis armigera nuclear polyhedrosis virus (HaNPV) was found to be able to bind to actin in vitro without assistance, as demonstrated by Western blot and isothermal titration calorimeter. DeltaH and binding constants (K) detected by isothermal titration calorimeter strongly suggested that Ha-VP39 first binds actin to seed the formation of hexamer complex of actin, and the hexamers then link to each other to form filaments, and the filaments finally twist into cable structures. The proliferation of HaNPV was completely inhibited in Hz-AM1 cells cultivated in the medium containing 0.5 microg/ml cytochalasin D (CD) to prevent polymerization of actin, while its yield was reduced to 10(-4) in the presence of 0.1 microg/ml CD. Actin concentration and the viral DNA synthesis were not significantly affected by CD even though the progeny virions assembled in the CD treated cells were morphologically different from normal ones and resulted in fewer plaques in plaque assay. PMID:15503206

  16. A complex of ZO-1 and the BAR-domain protein TOCA-1 regulates actin assembly at the tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Tietgens, Amber Jean; Krystofiak, Evan; Kachar, Bechara; Anderson, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and sealing of the tight junction barrier are critically dependent on the perijunctional actin cytoskeleton, yet little is known about physical and functional links between barrier-forming proteins and actin. Here we identify a novel functional complex of the junction scaffolding protein ZO-1 and the F-BAR–domain protein TOCA-1. Using MDCK epithelial cells, we show that an alternative splice of TOCA-1 adds a PDZ-binding motif, which binds ZO-1, targeting TOCA-1 to barrier contacts. This isoform of TOCA-1 recruits the actin nucleation–promoting factor N-WASP to tight junctions. CRISPR-Cas9–mediated knockout of TOCA-1 results in increased paracellular flux and delayed recovery in a calcium switch assay. Knockout of TOCA-1 does not alter FRAP kinetics of GFP ZO-1 or occludin, but longer term (12 h) time-lapse microscopy reveals strikingly decreased tight junction membrane contact dynamics in knockout cells compared with controls. Reexpression of TOCA-1 with, but not without, the PDZ-binding motif rescues both altered flux and membrane contact dynamics. Ultrastructural analysis shows actin accumulation at the adherens junction in TOCA-1–knockout cells but unaltered freeze-fracture fibril morphology. Identification of the ZO-1/TOCA-1 complex provides novel insights into the underappreciated dependence of the barrier on the dynamic nature of cell-to-cell contacts and perijunctional actin. PMID:26063734

  17. Coactosin-like protein, a human F-actin-binding protein: critical role of lysine-75.

    PubMed Central

    Provost, P; Doucet, J; Stock, A; Gerisch, G; Samuelsson, B; Rådmark, O

    2001-01-01

    Coactosin-like protein (CLP) was recently identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen using 5-lipoxygenase as bait. In the present study, we report the functional characterization of CLP as a human filamentous actin (F-actin)-binding protein. CLP mRNA shows a wide tissue distribution and is predominantly expressed in placenta, lung, kidney and peripheral-blood leucocytes. Endogenous CLP is localized in the cytosol of myeloid cells. Using a two-hybrid approach, actin was identified as a CLP-interacting protein. Binding experiments indicated that CLP associates with F-actin, but does not form a stable complex with globular actin. In transfected mammalian cells, CLP co-localized with actin stress fibres. CLP bound to actin filaments with a stoichiometry of 1:2 (CLP: actin subunits), but could be cross-linked to only one subunit of actin. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed the involvement of Lys(75) of CLP in actin binding, a residue highly conserved in related proteins and supposed to be exposed on the surface of the CLP protein. Our results identify CLP as a new human protein that binds F-actin in vitro and in vivo, and indicate that Lys(75) is essential for this interaction. PMID:11583571

  18. The Actin-Binding Protein α-Adducin Is Required for Maintaining Axon Diameter.

    PubMed

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sampaio, Paula; Sousa, Vera Filipe; Nogueira-Rodrigues, Joana; Pinto-Costa, Rita; Peters, Luanne Laurel; Brites, Pedro; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-04-19

    The actin-binding protein adducin was recently identified as a component of the neuronal subcortical cytoskeleton. Here, we analyzed mice lacking adducin to uncover the function of this protein in actin rings. α-adducin knockout mice presented progressive axon enlargement in the spinal cord and optic and sciatic nerves, followed by axon degeneration and loss. Using stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy, we show that a periodic subcortical actin cytoskeleton is assembled in every neuron type inspected including retinal ganglion cells and dorsal root ganglia neurons. In neurons devoid of adducin, the actin ring diameter increased, although the inter-ring periodicity was maintained. In vitro, the actin ring diameter adjusted as axons grew, suggesting the lattice is dynamic. Our data support a model in which adducin activity is not essential for actin ring assembly and periodicity but is necessary to control the diameter of both actin rings and axons and actin filament growth within rings. PMID:27068466

  19. Functional characterization of protein 4.1 homolog in amphioxus: defining a cryptic spectrin-actin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixia; Wang, Yuan; Li, Zhaohe; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate 4.1 proteins have a spectrin-actin-binding (SAB) domain, which is lacking in all the invertebrate 4.1 proteins indentified so far, and it was therefore proposed that the SAB domain emerged with the advent of vertebrates during evolution. Here we demonstrated for the first time that amphioxus (an invertebrate chordate) protein 4.1, though lacking a recognizable SAB, was able to bind both spectrin and actin, with a binding capacity comparable to that of human protein 4.1. Detailed structure-activity analyses revealed that the unique domain U2/3 was a newly identified SAB-like domain capable of interacting with spectrin and actin, suggesting the presence of a "cryptic" SAB domain in amphioxus 4.1 protein. We also showed that amphioxus 4.1 protein gene was the common ancestor of vertebrate 4.1 protein genes, from which 4.1R, 4.1N, 4.1G, and 4.1B genes originated. This work will encourage further study on the structure-activity of invertebrate 4.1 protein and its interacting proteins. PMID:24096627

  20. Functional characterization of protein 4.1 homolog in amphioxus: Defining a cryptic spectrin-actin-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lixia; Wang, Yuan; Li, Zhaohe; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate 4.1 proteins have a spectrin-actin-binding (SAB) domain, which is lacking in all the invertebrate 4.1 proteins indentified so far, and it was therefore proposed that the SAB domain emerged with the advent of vertebrates during evolution. Here we demonstrated for the first time that amphioxus (an invertebrate chordate) protein 4.1, though lacking a recognizable SAB, was able to bind both spectrin and actin, with a binding capacity comparable to that of human protein 4.1. Detailed structure-activity analyses revealed that the unique domain U2/3 was a newly identified SAB-like domain capable of interacting with spectrin and actin, suggesting the presence of a “cryptic” SAB domain in amphioxus 4.1 protein. We also showed that amphioxus 4.1 protein gene was the common ancestor of vertebrate 4.1 protein genes, from which 4.1R, 4.1N, 4.1G, and 4.1B genes originated. This work will encourage further study on the structure-activity of invertebrate 4.1 protein and its interacting proteins. PMID:24096627

  1. Actin Polymerization is Stimulated by Actin Crosslinking Protein Palladin

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H.; Beck, Moriah R.

    2016-01-01

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the coordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. Here we show that the actin binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro crosslinking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of G-actin, akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  2. Anti-peptide monoclonal antibody imaging of a common binding domain involved in muscle regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Van Eyk, J. E.; Caday-Malcolm, R. A.; Yu, L.; Irvin, R. T.; Hodges, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Multiple-component regulatory protein systems function through a generalized mechanism where a single regulatory protein or ligand binds to a variety of receptors to modulate specific functions in a physiologically sensitive context. Muscle contraction is regulated by the interaction of actin with troponin I (TnI) or myosin in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner. Actin utilizes a single binding domain (residues 1-28) to bind to residues 104-115 of TnI (Van Eyk JE, Sönnichsen FD, Sykes BD, Hodges RS, 1991, In: Rüegg JC, ed, Peptides as probes in muscle research, Heidelberg, Germany: Springer-Verlag, pp 15-31) and to myosin subfragment 1 (S1, an enzymatic fragment of myosin containing both the actin and ATP binding sites) (Van Eyk JE, Hodges RS, 1991, Biochemistry 30:11676-11682) in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner. We have utilized an anti-TnI peptide (104-115) monoclonal antibody, Mab B4, that binds specifically to TnI, to image the common binding domain of actin and thus mimic the activity of actin including activation of the S1 ATPase activity and TnI-mediated regulation of the S1 ATPase. Mab B4 has also been utilized to identify a receptor binding domain on myosin (residues 633-644) that is recognized by actin. Interestingly, Mab B4 binds to the native protein receptors TnI and S1 with relative affinities of 100- and 25,000-fold higher than the binding affinity to the 12-residue peptide immunogen. Thus, anti-peptide monoclonal antibodies prepared against a receptor binding domain can mimic the ligand binding domain and be utilized as a powerful tool for the detailed analysis of complex multiple-component regulatory systems. PMID:7613476

  3. Actin binding and proline rich motifs of CR16 play redundant role in growth of vrp1Delta cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lei; Rajmohan, Rajamuthiah; Yu, Shangjuan; Thanabalu, Thirumaran

    2007-05-25

    CR16, (Glucocorticoid-regulated) belongs to the verprolin family of proteins which are characterized by the presence of a V domain (verprolin) at the N-terminal. Expression of CR16 suppressed the growth and endocytosis defect of vrp1Delta strain without correcting the actin patch polarization defect. The V domain of CR16 is critical for suppression of the growth defect of vrp1Delta strain but not for localisation to cortical actin patches. Mutations in the actin binding motif alone did not abolish the activity of CR16 but the mutations in combination with deletion of N-terminal proline rich motif abolished the ability of CR16 to suppress the growth defect. This suggests that the V domain of CR16 has two functionally redundant motifs and either one of these motifs is sufficient for suppressing the growth defect of vrp1Delta strain. This is in contrast to the observation that both WIP and WIRE require the actin binding motif for their activity. PMID:17418095

  4. 25 Years of Tension over Actin Binding to the Cadherin Cell Adhesion Complex: The Devil is in the Details.

    PubMed

    Nelson, W James; Weis, William I

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 25 years, there has been a conceptual (re)evolution in understanding how the cadherin cell adhesion complex, which contains F-actin-binding proteins, binds to the actin cytoskeleton. There is now good synergy between structural, biochemical, and cell biological results that the cadherin-catenin complex binds to F-actin under force. PMID:27166091

  5. Bulkiness or aromatic nature of tyrosine-143 of actin is important for the weak binding between F-actin and myosin-ADP-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Gomibuchi, Yuki; Uyeda, Taro Q.P.; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The effect of mutation of Tyr143 that becomes more exposed on assembly was examined. •Mutation of tyrosine-143 of Dictyostelium actin changed actin polymerizability. •The bulkiness or aromatic nature of Tyr143 is important for the weak binding. •The weak interaction between myosin and actin strengthened by Tyr143Trp mutation. -- Abstract: Actin filaments (F-actin) interact with myosin and activate its ATPase to support force generation. By comparing crystal structures of G-actin and the quasi-atomic model of F-actin based on high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, the tyrosine-143 was found to be exposed more than 60 Å{sup 2} to the solvent in F-actin. Because tyrosine-143 flanks the hydrophobic cleft near the hydrophobic helix that binds to myosin, the mutant actins, of which the tyrosine-143 was replaced with tryptophan, phenylalanine, or isoleucine, were generated using the Dictyostelium expression system. It polymerized significantly poorly when induced by NaCl, but almost normally by KCl. In the presence of phalloidin and KCl, the extents of the polymerization of all the mutant actins were comparable to that of the wild-type actin so that the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity could be reliably compared. The affinity of skeletal heavy meromyosin to F-actin and the maximum ATPase activity (V{sub max}) were estimated by a double reciprocal plot. The Tyr143Trp-actin showed the higher affinity (smaller K{sub app}) than that of the wild-type actin, with the V{sub max} being almost unchanged. The K{sub app} and V{sub max} of the Tyr143Phe-actin were similar to those of the wild-type actin. However, the activation by Tyr143Ile-actin was much smaller than the wild-type actin and the accurate determination of K{sub app} was difficult. Comparison of the myosin ATPase activated by the various mutant actins at the same concentration of F-actin showed that the extent of activation correlates well with the solvent-accessible surface areas (ASA

  6. Kinetics and thermodynamics of phalloidin binding to actin filaments from three divergent species.

    PubMed

    De La Cruz, E M; Pollard, T D

    1996-11-12

    We compared the kinetics and thermodynamics of rhodamine phalloidin binding to actin purified from rabbit skeletal muscle, Acanthamoeba castellanii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in 50 mM KCl, 1 mM MgCl2, and pH 7.0 buffer at 22 degrees C. Filaments of S. cerevisiae actin bind rhodamine phalloidin more weakly than Acanthamoeba and rabbit skeletal muscle actin filaments due to a more rapid dissociation rate in spite of a significantly faster association rate constant. The higher dissociation rate constant and lower binding affinity of rhodamine phalloidin for S. cerevisiae actin filaments provide a quantitative explanation for the inefficient staining of yeast actin filaments, compared with that of rabbit skeletal muscle actin filaments [Kron et al. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 89, 4466-4470]. The temperature dependence of the rate constants was interpreted according to transition state theory. There is a small enthalpic difference (delta H++) between the ground states and the transition state. Consequently, the free energy of activation (delta G++) for association and dissociation of rhodamine phalloidin is dominated by entropic changes (delta S++). At equilibrium, rhodamine phalloidin binding generates a positive entropy change (delta S0). The rates of rhodamine phalloidin binding are independent of the pH, ionic strength, and filament length. Rhodamine covalently bound decreases the association rate and affinity of phalloidin for actin. The association rate constant is low for both phalloidin and rhodamine phalloidin because the filaments must undergo conformational changes (i.e. "breathe") to expose the phalloidin binding site [De La Cruz, E. M., & Pollard, T. D. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 14387-14392]. Raising the solvent microviscosity, but not the macroviscosity, dampens these conformational fluctuations, and phalloidin binding kinetics are inhibited. Yeast actin filaments bind rhodamine phalloidin more rapidly, suggesting that perhaps they are more

  7. Importance of internal regions and the overall length of tropomyosin for actin binding and regulatory function.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock-DeGregori, S E; Song, Y; Moraczewska, J

    2001-02-20

    Tropomyosin (Tm) binds along actin filaments, one molecule spanning four to seven actin monomers, depending on the isoform. Periodic repeats in the sequence have been proposed to correspond to actin binding sites. To learn the functional importance of length and the internal periods we made a series of progressively shorter Tms, deleting from two up to six of the internal periods from rat striated alpha-TM (dAc2--3, dAc2--4, dAc3--5, dAc2--5, dAc2--6, dAc1.5--6.5). Recombinant Tms (unacetylated) were expressed in Escherichia coli. Tropomyosins that are four or more periods long (dAc2--3, dAc2--4, and dAc3--5) bound well to F-actin with troponin (Tn). dAc2--5 bound weakly (with EGTA) and binding of shorter mutants was undetectable in any condition. Myosin S1-induced binding of Tm to actin in the tight Tm-binding "open" state did not correlate with actin binding. dAc3--5 and dAc2--5 did not bind to actin even when the filament was saturated with S1. In contrast, dAc2--3 and dAc2--4 did, like wild-type-Tm, requiring about 3 mol of S1/mol of Tm for half-maximal binding. The results show the critical importance of period 5 (residues 166--207) for myosin S1-induced binding. The Tms that bound to actin (dAc2--3, dAc2--4, and dAc3--5) all fully inhibited the actomyosin ATPase (+Tn) in EGTA. In the presence of Ca(2+), relief of inhibition by these Tms was incomplete. We conclude (1) four or more actin periods are required for Tm to bind to actin with reasonable affinity and (2) that the structural requirements of Tm for the transition of the regulated filament from the blocked-to-closed/open (relief of inhibition by Ca(2+)) and the closed-to-open states (strong Tm binding to actin-S1) are different. PMID:11329279

  8. Direct Microtubule-Binding by Myosin-10 Orients Centrosomes toward Retraction Fibers and Subcortical Actin Clouds.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Mijung; Bagonis, Maria; Danuser, Gaudenz; Pellman, David

    2015-08-10

    Positioning of centrosomes is vital for cell division and development. In metazoan cells, spindle positioning is controlled by a dynamic pool of subcortical actin that organizes in response to the position of retraction fibers. These actin "clouds" are proposed to generate pulling forces on centrosomes and mediate spindle orientation. However, the motors that pull astral microtubules toward these actin structures are not known. Here, we report that the unconventional myosin, Myo10, couples actin-dependent forces from retraction fibers and subcortical actin clouds to centrosomes. Myo10-mediated centrosome positioning requires its direct microtubule binding. Computational image analysis of large microtubule populations reveals a direct effect of Myo10 on microtubule dynamics and microtubule-cortex interactions. Myo10's role in centrosome positioning is distinct from, but overlaps with, that of dynein. Thus, Myo10 plays a key role in integrating the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to position centrosomes and mitotic spindles. PMID:26235048

  9. Polycystin-2 (TRPP2) Regulation by Ca2+ Is Effected and Diversified by Actin-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cantero, María del Rocío; Cantiello, Horacio F.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium regulation of Ca2+-permeable ion channels is an important mechanism in the control of cell function. Polycystin-2 (PC2, TRPP2), a member of the transient receptor potential superfamily, is a nonselective cation channel with Ca2+ permeability. The molecular mechanisms associated with PC2 regulation by Ca2+ remain ill-defined. We recently demonstrated that PC2 from human syncytiotrophoblast (PC2hst) but not the in vitro translated protein (PC2iv), functionally responds to changes in intracellular (cis) Ca2+. In this study we determined the regulatory effect(s) of Ca2+-sensitive and -insensitive actin-binding proteins (ABPs) on PC2iv channel function in a lipid bilayer system. The actin-bundling protein α-actinin increased PC2iv channel function in the presence of cis Ca2+, although instead was inhibitory in its absence. Conversely, filamin that shares actin-binding domains with α-actinin had a strong inhibitory effect on PC2iv channel function in the presence, but no effect in the absence of cis Ca2+. Gelsolin stimulated PC2iv channel function in the presence, but not the absence of cis Ca2+. In contrast, profilin that shares actin-binding domains with gelsolin, significantly increased PC2iv channel function both in the presence and absence of Ca2+. The distinct effect(s) of the ABPs on PC2iv channel function demonstrate that Ca2+ regulation of PC2 is actually mediated by direct interaction(s) with structural elements of the actin cytoskeleton. These data indicate that specific ABP-PC2 complexes would confer distinct Ca2+-sensitive properties to the channel providing functional diversity to the cytoskeletal control of transient receptor potential channel regulation. PMID:25954877

  10. Kv3.3 Channels Bind Hax-1 and Arp2/3 to Assemble a Stable Local Actin Network that Regulates Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalan; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Fleming, Matthew R; Amiri, Anahita; El-Hassar, Lynda; Surguchev, Alexei A; Hyland, Callen; Jenkins, David P; Desai, Rooma; Brown, Maile R; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Waters, Michael F; Large, Charles H; Horvath, Tamas L; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar; Vaccarino, Flora M; Forscher, Paul; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in the Kv3.3 potassium channel (KCNC3) cause cerebellar neurodegeneration and impair auditory processing. The cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 contains a proline-rich domain conserved in proteins that activate actin nucleation through Arp2/3. We found that Kv3.3 recruits Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in formation of a relatively stable cortical actin filament network resistant to cytochalasin D that inhibits fast barbed end actin assembly. These Kv3.3-associated actin structures are required to prevent very rapid N-type channel inactivation during short depolarizations of the plasma membrane. The effects of Kv3.3 on the actin cytoskeleton are mediated by the binding of the cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 to Hax-1, an anti-apoptotic protein that regulates actin nucleation through Arp2/3. A human Kv3.3 mutation within a conserved proline-rich domain produces channels that bind Hax-1 but are impaired in recruiting Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in growth cones with deficient actin veils in stem cell-derived neurons. PMID:26997484

  11. Actin Filaments Are Involved in the Coupling of V0-V1 Domains of Vacuolar H+-ATPase at the Golgi Complex.

    PubMed

    Serra-Peinado, Carla; Sicart, Adrià; Llopis, Juan; Egea, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that actin-depolymerizing agents promote the alkalization of the Golgi stack and thetrans-Golgi network. The main determinant of acidic pH at the Golgi is the vacuolar-type H(+)-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase), whose V1domain subunitsBandCbind actin. We have generated a GFP-tagged subunitB2construct (GFP-B2) that is incorporated into the V1domain, which in turn is coupled to the V0sector. GFP-B2 subunit is enriched at distal Golgi compartments in HeLa cells. Subcellular fractionation, immunoprecipitation, and inversal FRAP experiments show that the actin depolymerization promotes the dissociation of V1-V0domains, which entails subunitB2translocation from Golgi membranes to the cytosol. Moreover, molecular interaction between subunitsB2andC1and actin were detected. In addition, Golgi membrane lipid order disruption byd-ceramide-C6 causes Golgi pH alkalization. We conclude that actin regulates the Golgi pH homeostasis maintaining the coupling of V1-V0domains of V-ATPase through the binding of microfilaments to subunitsBandCand preserving the integrity of detergent-resistant membrane organization. These results establish the Golgi-associated V-ATPase activity as the molecular link between actin and the Golgi pH. PMID:26872971

  12. Actin-Based Transport Adapts Polarity Domain Size to Local Cellular Curvature.

    PubMed

    Bonazzi, Daria; Haupt, Armin; Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Delacour, Delphine; Salort, Delphine; Minc, Nicolas

    2015-10-19

    Intracellular structures and organelles such as the nucleus, the centrosome, or the mitotic spindle typically scale their size to cell size [1]. Similarly, cortical polarity domains built around the active form of conserved Rho-GTPases, such as Cdc42p, exhibit widths that may range over two orders of magnitudes in cells with different sizes and shapes [2-6]. The establishment of such domains typically involves positive feedback loops based on reaction-diffusion and/or actin-mediated vesicle transport [3, 7, 8]. How these elements may adapt polarity domain size to cellular geometry is not known. Here, by tracking the width of successive oscillating Cdc42-GTP domains in fission yeast spores [9], we find that domain width scales with local cell-surface radii of curvature over an 8-fold range, independently of absolute cell volume, surface, or Cdc42-GTP concentration. This local scaling requires formin-nucleated cortical actin cables and the fusion of secretory vesicles transported along these cables with the membrane. These data suggest that reaction-diffusion may set a minimal domain size and that secretory vesicle transport along actin cables may dilute and extend polarity domains to adapt their size to local cell-surface curvature. This work reveals that actin networks may act as micrometric curvature sensors and uncovers a generic morphogenetic principle for how polarity domains define their size according to cell morphologies. PMID:26441355

  13. N-terminus-mediated dimerization of ROCK-I is required for RhoE binding and actin reorganization.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ritu; Riento, Kirsi; Keep, Nicholas; Morris, Jonathan D H; Ridley, Anne J

    2008-04-15

    ROCK-I (Rho-associated kinase 1) is a serine/threonine kinase that can be activated by RhoA and inhibited by RhoE. ROCK-I has an N-terminal kinase domain, a central coiled-coil region and a RhoA-binding domain near the C-terminus. We have previously shown that RhoE binds to the N-terminal 420 amino acids of ROCK-I, which includes the kinase domain as well as N-terminal and C-terminal extensions. In the present study, we show that N-terminus-mediated dimerization of ROCK-I is required for RhoE binding. The central coiled-coil domain can also dimerize ROCK-I in cells, but this is insufficient in the absence of the N-terminus to allow RhoE binding. The kinase activity of ROCK-I(1-420) is required for dimerization and RhoE binding; however, inclusion of part of the coiled-coil domain compensates for lack of kinase activity, allowing RhoE to bind. N-terminus-mediated dimerization is also required for ROCK-I to induce the formation of stellate actin stress fibres in cells. These results indicate that dimerization via the N-terminus is critical for ROCK-I function in cells and for its regulation by RhoE. PMID:18215121

  14. Systematic mutational analysis of the amino-terminal domain of the Listeria monocytogenes ActA protein reveals novel functions in actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Lauer, P; Theriot, J A; Skoble, J; Welch, M D; Portnoy, D A

    2001-12-01

    The Listeria monocytogenes ActA protein acts as a scaffold to assemble and activate host cell actin cytoskeletal factors at the bacterial surface, resulting in directional actin polymerization and propulsion of the bacterium through the cytoplasm. We have constructed 20 clustered charged-to-alanine mutations in the NH2-terminal domain of ActA and replaced the endogenous actA gene with these molecular variants. These 20 clones were evaluated in several biological assays for phenotypes associated with particular amino acid changes. Additionally, each protein variant was purified and tested for stimulation of the Arp2/3 complex, and a subset was tested for actin monomer binding. These specific mutations refined the two regions involved in Arp2/3 activation and suggest that the actin-binding sequence of ActA spans 40 amino acids. We also identified a 'motility rate and cloud-to-tail transition' region in which nine contiguous mutations spanning amino acids 165-260 caused motility rate defects and changed the ratio of intracellular bacteria associated with actin clouds and comet tails without affecting Arp2/3 activation. Several unusual motility phenotypes were associated with amino acid changes in this region, including altered paths through the cytoplasm, discontinuous actin tails in host cells and the tendency to 'skid' or dramatically change direction while moving. These unusual phenotypes illustrate the complexity of ActA functions that control the actin-based motility of L. monocytogenes. PMID:11886549

  15. Specific Conserved C-terminal Amino Acids of Caenorhabditis elegans HMP-1/α-Catenin Modulate F-actin Binding Independently of Vinculin*

    PubMed Central

    Maiden, Stephanie L.; Harrison, Neale; Keegan, Jack; Cain, Brian; Lynch, Allison M.; Pettitt, Jonathan; Hardin, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Stable intercellular adhesions formed through the cadherin-catenin complex are important determinants of proper tissue architecture and help maintain tissue integrity during morphogenetic movements in developing embryos. A key regulator of this stability is α-catenin, which connects the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Although the C-terminal F-actin-binding domain of α-catenin has been shown to be crucial for its function, a more detailed in vivo analysis of discrete regions and residues required for actin binding has not been performed. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system, we have characterized mutations in hmp-1/α-catenin that identify HMP-1 residues 687–742 and 826–927, as well as amino acid 802, as critical to the localization of junctional proximal actin during epidermal morphogenesis. We also find that the S823F transition in a hypomorphic allele, hmp-1(fe4), decreases actin binding in vitro. Using hmp-1(fe4) animals in a mutagenesis screen, we were then able to identify 11 intragenic suppressors of hmp-1(fe4) that revert actin binding to wild-type levels. Using homology modeling, we show that these amino acids are positioned at key conserved sites within predicted α-helices in the C terminus. Through the use of transgenic animals, we also demonstrate that HMP-1 residues 315–494, which correspond to a putative mechanotransduction domain that binds vinculin in vertebrate αE-catenin, are not required during epidermal morphogenesis but may aid efficient recruitment of HMP-1 to the junction. Our studies are the first to identify key conserved amino acids in the C terminus of α-catenin that modulate F-actin binding in living embryos of a simple metazoan. PMID:23271732

  16. WAVE binds Ena/VASP for enhanced Arp2/3 complex–based actin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Noguera, Philippe; Abou-Ghali, Majdouline; Manzi, John; Faqir, Fahima; Lamora, Audrey; Guérin, Christophe; Blanchoin, Laurent; Plastino, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The WAVE complex is the main activator of the Arp2/3 complex for actin filament nucleation and assembly in the lamellipodia of moving cells. Other important players in lamellipodial protrusion are Ena/VASP proteins, which enhance actin filament elongation. Here we examine the molecular coordination between the nucleating activity of the Arp2/3 complex and the elongating activity of Ena/VASP proteins for the formation of actin networks. Using an in vitro bead motility assay, we show that WAVE directly binds VASP, resulting in an increase in Arp2/3 complex–based actin assembly. We show that this interaction is important in vivo as well, for the formation of lamellipodia during the ventral enclosure event of Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. Ena/VASP's ability to bind F-actin and profilin-complexed G-actin are important for its effect, whereas Ena/VASP tetramerization is not necessary. Our data are consistent with the idea that binding of Ena/VASP to WAVE potentiates Arp2/3 complex activity and lamellipodial actin assembly. PMID:25355952

  17. The actin binding site of thymosin beta 4 mapped by mutational analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Troys, M; Dewitte, D; Goethals, M; Carlier, M F; Vandekerckhove, J; Ampe, C

    1996-01-01

    We characterized in detail the actin binding site of the small actin-sequestering protein thymosin beta 4 (T beta 4) using chemically synthesized full-length T beta 4 variants. The N-terminal part (residues 1-16) and a hexapeptide motif (residues 17-22) form separate structural entities. In both, we identified charged and hydrophobic residues that participate in the actin interaction using chemical cross-linking, complex formation in native gels and actin-sequestering experiments. Quantitative data on the activity of the variants and circular dichroism experiments allow to present a model in which the N-terminal part needs to adopt an alpha-helix for actin binding and interacts through a patch of hydrophobic residues (6M-I-F12) on one side of this helix. Also, electrostatic contacts between actin and lysine residues 18, in the motif, and 14, in the N-terminal alpha-helix, appear important for binding. The residues critical for contacting actin are conserved throughout the beta-thymosin family and in addition to this we identify a similar pattern in the C-terminal headpiece of villin and dematin. Images PMID:8617195

  18. Head-neck domain of Arabidopsis myosin XI, MYA2, fused with GFP produces F-actin patterns that coincide with fast organelle streaming in different plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Nadine; Holweg, Carola L

    2008-01-01

    Background The cytoskeletal mechanisms that underlie organelle transport in plants are intimately linked to acto-myosin function. This function is mediated by the attachment of myosin heads to F-actin and the binding of cargo to the tails. Acto-myosin also powers vigorous cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. Class XI myosins exhibit strikingly fast velocities and may have extraordinary roles in cellular motility. Studies of the structural basis of organelle transport have focused on the cargo-binding tails of myosin XI, revealing a close relationship with the transport of peroxisomes, mitochondria, and Golgi-vesicles. Links between myosin heads and F-actin-based motility have been less investigated. To address this function, we performed localization studies using the head-neck domain of AtMYA2, a myosin XI from Arabidopsis. Results We expressed the GFP-fused head-neck domain of MYA2 in epidermal cells of various plant species and found that it associated with F-actin. By comparison to other markers such as fimbrin and talin, we revealed that the myosin-labeled F-actin was of a lower quality and absent from the fine microfilament arrays at the cell cortex. However, it colocalized with cytoplasmic (transvacuolar) F-actin in areas coinciding with the tracks of fast organelles. This observation correlates well with the proposed function of myosin XI in organelle trafficking. The fact that organelle streaming was reduced in cells expressing the GFP-MYA2-head6IQ indicated that the functionless motor protein inhibits endogenous myosins. Furthermore, co-expression of the GFP-MYA2-head6IQ with other F-actin markers disrupted its attachment to F-actin. In nuclei, the GFP-myosin associated with short bundles of F-actin. Conclusion The localization of the head of MYA2 in living plant cells, as investigated here for the first time, suggests a close linkage between this myosin XI and cytoplasmic microfilaments that support the rapid streaming of organelles such as peroxisomes

  19. Yeast mitochondria contain ATP-sensitive, reversible actin-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarino, D A; Boldogh, I; Smith, M G; Rosand, J; Pon, L A

    1994-01-01

    Sedimentation assays were used to demonstrate and characterize binding of isolated yeast mitochondria to phalloidin-stabilized yeast F-actin. These actin-mitochondrial interactions are ATP sensitive, saturable, reversible, and do not depend upon mitochondrial membrane potential. Protease digestion of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins or saturation of myosin-binding sites on F-actin with the S1 subfragment of skeletal myosin block binding. These observations indicate that a protein (or proteins) on the mitochondrial surface mediates ATP-sensitive, reversible binding of mitochondria to the lateral surface of microfilaments. Actin copurifies with mitochondria during subcellular fractionation and is released from the organelle upon treatment with ATP. Thus, actin-mitochondrial interactions resembling those observed in vitro may also exist in intact yeast cells. Finally, a yeast mutant bearing a temperature-sensitive mutation in the actin-encoding ACT1 gene (act1-3) displays temperature-dependent defects in transfer of mitochondria from mother cells to newly developed buds during yeast cell mitosis. Images PMID:7812049

  20. αT-Catenin Is a Constitutive Actin-binding α-Catenin That Directly Couples the Cadherin·Catenin Complex to Actin Filaments*

    PubMed Central

    Wickline, Emily D.; Dale, Ian W.; Merkel, Chelsea D.; Heier, Jonathon A.; Stolz, Donna B.

    2016-01-01

    α-Catenin is the primary link between the cadherin·catenin complex and the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian αE-catenin is allosterically regulated: the monomer binds the β-catenin·cadherin complex, whereas the homodimer does not bind β-catenin but interacts with F-actin. As part of the cadherin·catenin complex, αE-catenin requires force to bind F-actin strongly. It is not known whether these properties are conserved across the mammalian α-catenin family. Here we show that αT (testes)-catenin, a protein unique to amniotes that is expressed predominantly in the heart, is a constitutive actin-binding α-catenin. We demonstrate that αT-catenin is primarily a monomer in solution and that αT-catenin monomer binds F-actin in cosedimentation assays as strongly as αE-catenin homodimer. The β-catenin·αT-catenin heterocomplex also binds F-actin with high affinity unlike the β-catenin·αE-catenin complex, indicating that αT-catenin can directly link the cadherin·catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Finally, we show that a mutation in αT-catenin linked to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, V94D, promotes homodimerization, blocks β-catenin binding, and in cardiomyocytes disrupts localization at cell-cell contacts. Together, our data demonstrate that αT-catenin is a constitutively active actin-binding protein that can physically couple the cadherin·catenin complex to F-actin in the absence of tension. We speculate that these properties are optimized to meet the demands of cardiomyocyte adhesion. PMID:27231342

  1. 65-kilodalton protein phosphorylated by interleukin 2 stimulation bears two putative actin-binding sites and two calcium-binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zu, Youli; Shigesada, Katsuya; Hanaoka, Masao; Namba, Yuziro ); Nishida, Eisuke ); Kubota, Ichiro ); Kohno, Michiaki )

    1990-09-11

    The authors have previously characterized a 65-kilodalton protein (p65) as an interleukin 2 stimulated phosphoprotein in human T cells and showed that three endopeptide sequences of p65 are present in the sequence of l-plastin. In this paper, they present the complete primary structure of p65 based on the cDNA isolated from a human T lymphocyte (KUT-2) cDNA library. Analysis of p65 sequences and the amino acid composition of cleaved p65 N-terminal peptide indicated that the deduced p65 amino acid sequence exactly coincides with that of l-plastin over the C-terminal 580 residues and has a 57-residue extension at the N-terminus to l-plastin. Computer-assisted structural analysis revealed that p65 is a multidomain molecule involving at least three intriguing functional domains: two putative calcium-binding sites along the N-terminal 80 amino acid residues; a putative calmodulin-binding site following the calcium-binding region; and two tandem repeats of putative actin-binding domains in its middle and C-terminal parts, each containing approximately 240 amino acid residues. These results suggest that p65 belongs to actin-binding proteins.

  2. Actin polymerization is stimulated by actin cross-linking protein palladin.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H; Beck, Moriah R

    2016-02-15

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the co-ordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. In the present study, we show that the actin-binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro cross-linking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of globular or monomeric actin (G-actin), akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or through conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  3. Statistical Thermodynamics for Actin-Myosin Binding: The Crucial Importance of Hydration Effects.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hiraku; Hayashi, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    Actomyosin is an important molecular motor, and the binding of actin and myosin is an essential research target in biophysics. Nevertheless, the physical factors driving or opposing the binding are still unclear. Here, we investigate the role of water in actin-myosin binding using the most reliable statistical-mechanical method currently available for assessing biomolecules immersed in water. This method is characterized as follows: water is treated not as a dielectric continuum but as an ensemble of molecules; the polyatomic structures of proteins are taken into consideration; and the binding free energy is decomposed into physically insightful entropic and energetic components by accounting for the hydration effect to its full extent. We find that the actin-myosin binding brings large gains of electrostatic and Lennard-Jones attractive interactions. However, these gains are accompanied by even larger losses of actin-water and myosin-water electrostatic and LJ attractive interactions. Although roughly half of the energy increase due to the losses is cancelled out by the energy decrease arising from structural reorganization of the water released upon binding, the remaining energy increase is still larger than the energy decrease brought by the gains mentioned above. Hence, the net change in system energy is positive, which opposes binding. Importantly, the binding is driven by a large gain of configurational entropy of water, which surpasses the positive change in system energy and the conformational entropy loss occurring for actin and myosin. The principal physical origin of the large water-entropy gain is as follows: the actin-myosin interface is closely packed with the achievement of high shape complementarity on the atomic level, leading to a large increase in the total volume available to the translational displacement of water molecules in the system and a resultant reduction of water crowding (i.e., entropic correlations among water molecules). PMID

  4. Regulation of the human. beta. -actin promoter by upstream and intron domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sunyu )); Gunning, P.; Kedes, L. ); Liu, Shuhui National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu ); Leavitt, J. )

    1989-01-25

    The authors have identified three regulatory domains of the complex human {beta}-actin gene promoter. They span a region of about 3,000 bases, from not more than {minus}2,011 bases upstream of the mRNA cap site to within the 5{prime} intron (832 bases long). A distal upstream domain contains at least one enhancer-like element. A proximal upstream domain, with a CArG (for CC(A+T rich){sub 6}GG) motif found in all known mammalian actin genes, seems to confer serum, but not growth factor, inducibility. The third domain is within the evolutionarily conserved 3{prime} region of the first intron and contains a 13 base-pair sequence, identical to the upstream sequence with the CArG motif. This domain also contains sequences that are both serum and fibroblast growth inducible.

  5. Multiple CaMKII Binding Modes to the Actin Cytoskeleton Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahid; Conte, Ianina; Carter, Tom; Bayer, K Ulrich; Molloy, Justin E

    2016-07-26

    Localization of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) to dendritic spine synapses is determined in part by the actin cytoskeleton. We determined binding of GFP-tagged CaMKII to tag-RFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton within live cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking. Stepwise photobleaching showed that CaMKII formed oligomeric complexes. Photoactivation experiments demonstrated that diffusion out of the evanescent field determined the track lifetimes. Latrunculin treatment triggered a coupled loss of actin stress fibers and the colocalized, long-lived CaMKII tracks. The CaMKIIα (α) isoform, which was previously thought to lack F-actin interactions, also showed binding, but this was threefold weaker than that observed for CaMKIIβ (β). The βE' splice variant bound more weakly than α, showing that binding by β depends critically on the interdomain linker. The mutations βT287D and αT286D, which mimic autophosphorylation states, also abolished F-actin binding. Autophosphorylation triggers autonomous CaMKII activity, but does not impair GluN2B binding, another important synaptic protein interaction of CaMKII. The CaMKII inhibitor tatCN21 or CaMKII mutations that inhibit GluN2B association by blocking binding of ATP (βK43R and αK42M) or Ca(2+)/calmodulin (βA303R) had no effect on the interaction with F-actin. These results provide the first rationale for the reduced synaptic spine localization of the αT286D mutant, indicating that transient F-actin binding contributes to the synaptic localization of the CaMKIIα isoform. The track lifetime distributions had a stretched exponential form consistent with a heterogeneously diffusing population. This heterogeneity suggests that CaMKII adopts different F-actin binding modes, which is most easily rationalized by multiple subunit contacts between the CaMKII dodecamer and the F-actin cytoskeleton that stabilize the initial weak (micromolar

  6. Demonstration in vivo of the role of Arabidopsis PLIM2 actin-binding proteins during pollination.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Keisuke; Park, Jong-In; Sakazono, Satomi; Masuko-Suzuki, Hiromi; Osaka, Masaaki; Kawagishi, Mizuho; Fujita, Kotomi; Maruoka, Mayumi; Nanjo, Hikaru; Suzuki, Go; Suwabe, Keita; Watanabe, Masao

    2013-01-01

    In plant reproduction, pollination is the initial key process in bringing together the male and female gametophytes. When a pollen grain lands on the surface of the stigma, information is exchanged between the pollen and stigmatic cell to determine whether the pollen grain will be accepted or rejected. If it is accepted, the stigmatic papilla cell supplies water and other resources to the pollen for germination and pollen tube elongation. Cellular processes involving actin are essential for pollen germination and tube growth, and actin-binding proteins regulate these processes by interacting with actin filaments to assemble cytoskeletal structures and actin networks. LIM proteins, which belong to a subfamily of cysteine-rich proteins, are a family of actin-binding proteins in plants, and are considered to be important for formation of the actin cytoskeleton and maintenance of its dynamics. Although the physiological and biochemical characteristics of LIMs have been elucidated in vitro in a variety of cell types, their exact role in pollen germination and pollen tube growth during pollination remained unclear. In this manuscript, we focus on the pollen-specific LIM proteins, AtPLIM2a and AtPLIM2c, and define their biological function during pollination in Arabidopsis thaliana. The atplim2a/atplim2c double knockdown RNAi plants showed a reduced pollen germination, approximately one-fifth of wild type, and slower pollen tube growth in the pistil, that is 80.4 μm/hr compared to 140.8 μm/hr in wild type. These defects led to an occasional unfertilized ovule at the bottom of the silique in RNAi plants. Our data provide direct evidence of the biological function of LIM proteins during pollination as actin-binding proteins, modulating cytoskeletal structures and actin networks, and their consequent importance in seed production. PMID:24694391

  7. Binding of actin to thioglycolic acid modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles for antibody conjugation.

    PubMed

    Maltas, Esra; Ertekin, Betul

    2015-01-01

    Thioglycolic acid modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TG-APTS-SPION) were synthesized by using (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) and thioglycolic acid (TG). Actin was immobilized on the nanoparticle surfaces. Binding amount of the actin (Act) on TG-APTS-SPIONs was determined by using a calibration curve equation that was drawn using fluorescence spectra at 280 and 342 nm of excitation and emission wavelengths. Anti-Actin (anti-Act) was interacted with the actin immobilized TG-APTS-SPIONs as primary antibody. Horse radish peroxidase (HRP) was also interacted with antibody conjugated nanoparticles as secondary antibody. The binding capacity of primary and secondary antibodies was also estimated by fluorescence spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis were also clarified binding of the protein and antibodies to the nanoparticles' surfaces. Western blot analysis was also done for actin conjunction with anti Act antibody to confirm binding of the antibody to the protein. PMID:25451750

  8. Myosin Va bound to phagosomes binds to F-actin and delays microtubule-dependent motility.

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, A; Shonn, M A; Redlich, B; Blocker, A; Burkhardt, J K; Yu, H; Hammer, J A; Weiss, D G; Steffen, W; Griffiths, G; Kuznetsov, S A

    2001-09-01

    We established a light microscopy-based assay that reconstitutes the binding of phagosomes purified from mouse macrophages to preassembled F-actin in vitro. Both endogenous myosin Va from mouse macrophages and exogenous myosin Va from chicken brain stimulated the phagosome-F-actin interaction. Myosin Va association with phagosomes correlated with their ability to bind F-actin in an ATP-regulated manner and antibodies to myosin Va specifically blocked the ATP-sensitive phagosome binding to F-actin. The uptake and retrograde transport of phagosomes from the periphery to the center of cells in bone marrow macrophages was observed in both normal mice and mice homozygous for the dilute-lethal spontaneous mutation (myosin Va null). However, in dilute-lethal macrophages the accumulation of phagosomes in the perinuclear region occurred twofold faster than in normal macrophages. Motion analysis revealed saltatory phagosome movement with temporarily reversed direction in normal macrophages, whereas almost no reversals in direction were observed in dilute-lethal macrophages. These observations demonstrate that myosin Va mediates phagosome binding to F-actin, resulting in a delay in microtubule-dependent retrograde phagosome movement toward the cell center. We propose an "antagonistic/cooperative mechanism" to explain the saltatory phagosome movement toward the cell center in normal macrophages. PMID:11553713

  9. In vitro and in vivo evidence for actin association of the naphthylphthalamic acid-binding protein from zucchini hypocotyls.

    PubMed

    Butler, J H; Hu, S; Brady, S R; Dixon, M W; Muday, G K

    1998-02-01

    The N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA)-binding protein is part of the auxin efflux carrier, the protein complex that controls polar auxin transport in plant tissues. This study tested the hypothesis that the NPA-binding protein (NBP) is associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vitro and that an intact actin cytoskeleton is required for polar auxin transport in vivo. Cytoskeletal polymerization was altered in extracts of zucchini hypocotyls with reagents that stabilized either the polymeric or monomeric forms of actin or tubulin. Phalloidin treatment altered actin polymerization, as demonstrated by immunoblot analyses following native and denaturing electrophoresis. Phalloidin increased both filamentous actin (F-actin) and NPA-binding activity, while cytochalasin D and Tris decreased both F-actin and NPA-binding activity in cytoskeletal pellets. The microtubule stabilizing drug taxol increased pelletable tubulin, but did not alter either the amount of pelletable actin or NPA-binding activity. Treatment of etiolated zucchini hypocotyls with cytochalasin D decreased the amount of auxin transport and its regulation by NPA. These experimental results are consistent with an in vitro actin cytoskeletal association of the NPA-binding protein and with the requirement of an intact actin cytoskeleton for maximal polar auxin transport in vivo. PMID:11536873

  10. In vitro and in vivo evidence for actin association of the naphthylphthalamic acid-binding protein from zucchini hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. H.; Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Dixon, M. W.; Muday, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA)-binding protein is part of the auxin efflux carrier, the protein complex that controls polar auxin transport in plant tissues. This study tested the hypothesis that the NPA-binding protein (NBP) is associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vitro and that an intact actin cytoskeleton is required for polar auxin transport in vivo. Cytoskeletal polymerization was altered in extracts of zucchini hypocotyls with reagents that stabilized either the polymeric or monomeric forms of actin or tubulin. Phalloidin treatment altered actin polymerization, as demonstrated by immunoblot analyses following native and denaturing electrophoresis. Phalloidin increased both filamentous actin (F-actin) and NPA-binding activity, while cytochalasin D and Tris decreased both F-actin and NPA-binding activity in cytoskeletal pellets. The microtubule stabilizing drug taxol increased pelletable tubulin, but did not alter either the amount of pelletable actin or NPA-binding activity. Treatment of etiolated zucchini hypocotyls with cytochalasin D decreased the amount of auxin transport and its regulation by NPA. These experimental results are consistent with an in vitro actin cytoskeletal association of the NPA-binding protein and with the requirement of an intact actin cytoskeleton for maximal polar auxin transport in vivo.

  11. The Actin Filament-Binding Protein Coronin Regulates Motility in Plasmodium Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Bane, Kartik S.; Singer, Mirko; Reinig, Miriam; Klug, Dennis; Heiss, Kirsten; Baum, Jake; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Parasites causing malaria need to migrate in order to penetrate tissue barriers and enter host cells. Here we show that the actin filament-binding protein coronin regulates gliding motility in Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, the highly motile forms of a rodent malaria-causing parasite transmitted by mosquitoes. Parasites lacking coronin show motility defects that impair colonization of the mosquito salivary glands but not migration in the skin, yet result in decreased transmission efficiency. In non-motile sporozoites low calcium concentrations mediate actin-independent coronin localization to the periphery. Engagement of extracellular ligands triggers an intracellular calcium release followed by the actin-dependent relocalization of coronin to the rear and initiation of motility. Mutational analysis and imaging suggest that coronin organizes actin filaments for productive motility. Using coronin-mCherry as a marker for the presence of actin filaments we found that protein kinase A contributes to actin filament disassembly. We finally speculate that calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling regulate a switch from rapid parasite motility to host cell invasion by differentially influencing actin dynamics. PMID:27409081

  12. Identification of a Novel Inhibitory Actin-capping Protein Binding Motif in CD2-associated Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, Serawit; Huber, Tobias B.; Ingham, Robert J.; Kim, Kyoungtae; Niederstrasser, Hanspeter; Allen, Paul M.; Pawson, Tony; Cooper, John A.; Shaw, Andrey S.

    2008-01-01

    CD2-associated protein (CD2AP) is a scaffold molecule that plays a critical role in the maintenance of the kidney filtration barrier. Little, however, is understood about its mechanism of function. We used mass spectrometry to identify CD2AP-interacting proteins. Many of the proteins that we identified suggest a role for CD2AP in endocytosis and actin regulation. To address the role of CD2AP in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, we focused on characterizing the interaction of CD2AP with actin-capping protein CP. We identified a novel binding motif LXHXTXXRPK(X)6P present in CD2AP that is also found in its homolog Cin85 and other capping protein-associated proteins such as CARMIL and CKIP-1. CD2AP inhibits the function of capping protein in vitro. Therefore, our results support a role of CD2AP in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:16707503

  13. In vitro anti-cancer effects of the actin-binding natural compound rhizopodin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Menche, D; Zahler, S; Vollmar, A M; Liebl, J; Förster, F

    2015-09-01

    Several natural compound interfere with microtubules or the actin cytoskeleton. Compounds interfering with the microtubules like Vinca-alkaloids or taxanes, are extensively used for cancer therapy. In contrast, knowledge about pharmacological properties of actin binding drugs is poor and drugs interfering with actin are far from clinical use. Rhizopodin is a natural compound that strongly affects the actin cytoskeleton at nanomolar concentrations. Initial work revealed interesting anti-bacterial and cytotoxic effects, but the cellular effects and pharmacological properties of rhizopodin have not been characterized. We hypothesized that rhizopodin might exert anti-cancer activity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize the cellular and pharmacological effects of rhizopodin in cancer. Effects of rhizopodin demonstrated prominent effects on the actin cytoskeleton as shown in the actin-pyrene assay and by immunostaining of cancer cells. To investigate cellular effects of rhizopodin, we analyzed cell proliferation, cell death induction by propidium iodide exclusion and western blot, as well as migration by impedance measurement using the xCELLligence device in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and T24 bladder cancer cell lines. Rhizopodin inhibited proliferation and induced cell death of MDA-MB-231 and T24 cells at nanomolar concentrations. PARP cleavage by rhizopodin suggests caspase-dependent cell death induction. Importantly, rhizopodin potently inhibited MDA-MB-231 and T24 cancer cell migration at subtoxic doses where no actin aggregation was observed, indicating a specific underlying signaling of rhizopodin. In summary, our study elucidates rhizopodin as actin-binding natural compound that exerts potent anti-cancer effects. Therefore, our work provides the basis for further in depth characterization of rhizopodin as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26492647

  14. Human RNASET2 derivatives as potential anti-angiogenic agents: actin binding sequence identification and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Nesiel-Nuttman, Liron; Doron, Shani; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Human RNASET2 (hRNASET2) has been demonstrated to exert antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic effects independent of its ribonuclease capacity. We suggested that RNASET2 exerts its antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic activities via binding to actin and consequently inhibits cell motility. We focused herein on the identification of the actin binding site of hRNASET2 using defined sequences encountered within the whole hRNASET2 protein. For that purpose we designed 29 different hRNASET2-derived peptides. The 29 peptides were examined for their ability to bind immobilized actin. Two selected peptides-A103-Q159 consisting of 57 amino acids and peptide K108-K133 consisting of 26 amino acids were demonstrated to have the highest actin binding ability and concomitantly the most potent anti-angiogenic activity. Further analyses on the putative mechanisms associated with angiogenesis inhibition exerted by peptide K108-K133 involved its location during treatment within the HUVE cells. Peptide K108-K133 readily penetrates the cell membrane within 10 min of incubation. In addition, supplementation with angiogenin delays the entrance of peptide K108-K133 to the cell suggesting competition on the same cell internalization route. The peptide was demonstrated to co-localize with angiogenin, suggesting that both molecules bind analogous cellular epitopes, similar to our previously reported data for ACTIBIND and trT2-50. PMID:25815360

  15. Human RNASET2 derivatives as potential anti-angiogenic agents: actin binding sequence identification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Nesiel-Nuttman, Liron; Doron, Shani; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Human RNASET2 (hRNASET2) has been demonstrated to exert antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic effects independent of its ribonuclease capacity. We suggested that RNASET2 exerts its antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic activities via binding to actin and consequently inhibits cell motility. We focused herein on the identification of the actin binding site of hRNASET2 using defined sequences encountered within the whole hRNASET2 protein. For that purpose we designed 29 different hRNASET2-derived peptides. The 29 peptides were examined for their ability to bind immobilized actin. Two selected peptides-A103-Q159 consisting of 57 amino acids and peptide K108-K133 consisting of 26 amino acids were demonstrated to have the highest actin binding ability and concomitantly the most potent anti-angiogenic activity. Further analyses on the putative mechanisms associated with angiogenesis inhibition exerted by peptide K108-K133 involved its location during treatment within the HUVE cells. Peptide K108-K133 readily penetrates the cell membrane within 10 min of incubation. In addition, supplementation with angiogenin delays the entrance of peptide K108-K133 to the cell suggesting competition on the same cell internalization route. The peptide was demonstrated to co-localize with angiogenin, suggesting that both molecules bind analogous cellular epitopes, similar to our previously reported data for ACTIBIND and trT2-50. PMID:25815360

  16. Unphosphorylated calponin enhances the binding force of unphosphorylated myosin to actin

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Horia Nicolae; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Kachmar, Linda; Ijpma, Gijs; Hilbert, Lennart; Matusovskiy, Oleg; Benedetti, Andrea; Sobieszek, Apolinary; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background Smooth muscle has the distinctive ability to maintain force for long periods of time and at low energy costs. While it is generally agreed that this property, called the latch-state, is due to the dephosphorylation of myosin while attached to actin, dephosphorylated-detached myosin can also attach to actin and may contribute to force maintenance. Thus, we investigated the role of calponin in regulating and enhancing the binding force of unphosphorylated tonic muscle myosin to actin. Methods To measure the effect of calponin on the binding of unphosphorylated myosin to actin, we used the laser trap assay to quantify the average force of unbinding (Funb) in the absence and presence of calponin or phosphorylated calponin. Results Funb from F-actin alone (0.12±0.01pN; mean±SE) was significantly increased in the presence of calponin (0.20±0.02pN). This enhancement was lost when calponin was phosphorylated (0.12±0.01pN). To further verify that this enhancement of Funb was due to cross-linking of actin to myosin by calponin, we repeated the measurements at high ionic strength. Indeed, the Funb obtained at a [KCl] of 25mM (0.21±0.02pN; mean±SE) was significantly decreased at a [KCl] of 150mM, (0.13±0.01pN). Conclusions This study provides direct molecular level-evidence that calponin enhances the binding force of unphosphorylated myosin to actin by cross-linking them and that this is reversed upon calponin phosphorylation. Thus, calponin might play an important role in the latch-state. General Significance This study suggests a new mechanism that likely contributes to the latch-state, a fundamental and important property of smooth muscle that remains unresolved. PMID:23747303

  17. Investigation of the Interaction between Cdc42 and Its Effector TOCA1: HANDOVER OF Cdc42 TO THE ACTIN REGULATOR N-WASP IS FACILITATED BY DIFFERENTIAL BINDING AFFINITIES.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joanna R; Fox, Helen M; Nietlispach, Daniel; Gallop, Jennifer L; Owen, Darerca; Mott, Helen R

    2016-06-24

    Transducer of Cdc42-dependent actin assembly protein 1 (TOCA1) is an effector of the Rho family small G protein Cdc42. It contains a membrane-deforming F-BAR domain as well as a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain and a G protein-binding homology region 1 (HR1) domain. TOCA1 binding to Cdc42 leads to actin rearrangements, which are thought to be involved in processes such as endocytosis, filopodia formation, and cell migration. We have solved the structure of the HR1 domain of TOCA1, providing the first structural data for this protein. We have found that the TOCA1 HR1, like the closely related CIP4 HR1, has interesting structural features that are not observed in other HR1 domains. We have also investigated the binding of the TOCA HR1 domain to Cdc42 and the potential ternary complex between Cdc42 and the G protein-binding regions of TOCA1 and a member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family, N-WASP. TOCA1 binds Cdc42 with micromolar affinity, in contrast to the nanomolar affinity of the N-WASP G protein-binding region for Cdc42. NMR experiments show that the Cdc42-binding domain from N-WASP is able to displace TOCA1 HR1 from Cdc42, whereas the N-WASP domain but not the TOCA1 HR1 domain inhibits actin polymerization. This suggests that TOCA1 binding to Cdc42 is an early step in the Cdc42-dependent pathways that govern actin dynamics, and the differential binding affinities of the effectors facilitate a handover from TOCA1 to N-WASP, which can then drive recruitment of the actin-modifying machinery. PMID:27129201

  18. The interaction of vinculin with actin.

    PubMed

    Golji, Javad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2013-04-01

    Vinculin can interact with F-actin both in recruitment of actin filaments to the growing focal adhesions and also in capping of actin filaments to regulate actin dynamics. Using molecular dynamics, both interactions are simulated using different vinculin conformations. Vinculin is simulated either with only its vinculin tail domain (Vt), with all residues in its closed conformation, with all residues in an open I conformation, and with all residues in an open II conformation. The open I conformation results from movement of domain 1 away from Vt; the open II conformation results from complete dissociation of Vt from the vinculin head domains. Simulation of vinculin binding along the actin filament showed that Vt alone can bind along the actin filaments, that vinculin in its closed conformation cannot bind along the actin filaments, and that vinculin in its open I conformation can bind along the actin filaments. The simulations confirm that movement of domain 1 away from Vt in formation of vinculin 1 is sufficient for allowing Vt to bind along the actin filament. Simulation of Vt capping actin filaments probe six possible bound structures and suggest that vinculin would cap actin filaments by interacting with both S1 and S3 of the barbed-end, using the surface of Vt normally occluded by D4 and nearby vinculin head domain residues. Simulation of D4 separation from Vt after D1 separation formed the open II conformation. Binding of open II vinculin to the barbed-end suggests this conformation allows for vinculin capping. Three binding sites on F-actin are suggested as regions that could link to vinculin. Vinculin is suggested to function as a variable switch at the focal adhesions. The conformation of vinculin and the precise F-actin binding conformation is dependent on the level of mechanical load on the focal adhesion. PMID:23633939

  19. Binding of Cryptococcus neoformans by human cultured macrophages. Requirements for multiple complement receptors and actin.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; Tabuni, A

    1991-01-01

    We studied the receptors on human cultured macrophages (MO-M phi) responsible for binding encapsulated and isogenic mutant acapsular strains of Cryptococcus neoformans, and whether such binding leads to a phagocytic event. Both strains required opsonization with complement components in normal human serum in order for binding to occur. Binding of the acapsular, but not the encapsulated, strain led to phagocytosis. MAb directed against any of the three defined complement receptors (CR) on MO-M phi (CR1, CR3, and CR4) profoundly inhibited binding of serum-opsonized encapsulated (and to a lesser extent acapsular) organisms to MO-M phi. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated migration of CR to the area of the cryptococcal binding site. Trypsin and elastase inhibited binding of encapsulated and, to a lesser extent, acapsular yeasts to MO-M phi. Binding of encapsulated C. neoformans was profoundly inhibited by incubation in the cold or by inhibitors of receptor capping and actin microfilaments. Thus, multiple CR appear to contribute to binding of serum-opsonized encapsulated C. neoformans by MO-M phi. Binding is an energy-dependent process that requires conformational changes in actin yet does not lead to phagocytosis of the organism. In contrast, energy is not required for binding of acapsular yeasts by MO-M phi and binding triggers phagocytosis. Images PMID:1991837

  20. A polar-localized iron-binding protein determines the polar targeting of Burkholderia BimA autotransporter and actin tail formation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuhe; Xu, Yue; Yao, Qing; Niu, Miao; Shao, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens including Shigella, Listeria, Mycobacteria, Rickettsia and Burkholderia spp. deploy a specialized surface protein onto one pole of the bacteria to induce filamentous actin tail formation for directional movement within host cytosol. The mechanism underlying polar targeting of the actin tail proteins is unknown. Here we perform a transposon screen in Burkholderia thailandensis and identify a conserved bimC that is required for actin tail formation mediated by BimA from B. thailandensis and its closely related pathogenic species B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. bimC is located upstream of bimA in the same operon. Loss of bimC results in even distribution of BimA on the outer membrane surface, where actin polymerization still occurs. BimC is targeted to the same bacterial pole independently of BimA. BimC confers polar targeting of BimA prior to BimA translocation across bacterial inner membrane. BimC is an iron-binding protein, requiring a four-cysteine cluster at the carboxyl terminus. Mutation of the cysteine cluster disrupts BimC polar localization. Truncation analyses identify the transmembrane domain in BimA being responsible for its polar targeting. Consistently, BimC can interact with BimA transmembrane domain in an iron binding-dependent manner. Our study uncovers a new mechanism that determines the polar distribution of bacteria-induced actin tail in infected host cells. PMID:25293534

  1. The prototypical 4.1R-10-kDa domain and the 4.1g-10-kDa paralog mediate fodrin-actin complex formation.

    PubMed

    Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, A; Frye, C S; Benz, E J; Huang, S C

    2001-06-01

    A complex family of 4.1R isoforms has been identified in non-erythroid tissues. In this study we characterized the exonic composition of brain 4.1R-10-kDa or spectrin/actin binding (SAB) domain and identified the minimal sequences required to stimulate fodrin/F-actin association. Adult rat brain expresses predominantly 4.1R mRNAs that carry an extended SAB, consisting of the alternative exons 14/15/16 and part of the constitutive exon 17. Exon 16 along with sequences carried by exon 17 is necessary and sufficient to induce formation of fodrin-actin-4.1R ternary complexes. The ability of the respective SAB domains of 4.1 homologs to sediment fodrin/actin was also investigated. 4.1G-SAB stimulates association of fodrin/actin, although with an approximately 2-fold reduced efficiency compared with 4.1R-10-kDa, whereas 4.1N and 4.1B do not. Sequencing of the corresponding domains revealed that 4.1G-SAB carries a cassette that shares significant homology with 4.1R exon 16, whereas the respective sequence is divergent in 4.1N and absent from brain 4.1B. An approximately 150-kDa 4.1R and an approximately 160-kDa 4.1G isoforms are present in PC12 lysates that occur in vivo in a supramolecular complex with fodrin and F-actin. Moreover, proteins 4.1R and 4.1G are distributed underneath the plasma membrane in PC12 cells. Collectively, these observations suggest that brain 4.1R and 4.1G may modulate the membrane mechanical properties of neuronal cells by promoting fodrin/actin association. PMID:11274145

  2. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor complexes by actin corrals and lipid raft domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-12-01

    We developed an energetic model by integrating the generalized Langevin equation with the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of a living cell. Simulation results are presented to elaborate the confinement effects from actin corrals and protein-induced lipid domains. Single-molecule tracking data of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) acquired on live HeLa cells agree with the simulation results and the mechanism that controls the diffusion of single-molecule receptors is clarified. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method successfully captures dynamic interactions of receptors at the single-molecule level and provides insight into the functional architecture of both the diffusing EGFR molecules and their local cellular environment.

  3. Cross-talk among structural domains of human DBP upon binding 25-hydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arjun; Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    Serum vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is structurally very similar to serum albumin (ALB); both have three distinct structural domains and high cysteine-content. Yet, functionally they are very different. DBP possesses high affinity for vitamin D metabolites and G-actin, but ALB does not. It has been suggested that there may be cross-talk among the domains so that binding of one ligand may influence the binding of others. In this study we have employed 2-p-toluidinyl-6-sulphonate (TNS), a reporter molecule that fluoresces upon binding to hydrophobic pockets of DBP. We observed that recombinant domain III possesses strong binding for TNS, which is not influenced by 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D3), yet TNS-fluorescence of the whole protein is quenched by 25-OH-D3. These results provide a direct evidence of cross-talk among the structural domains of DBP. PMID:18035050

  4. Effect of ADP on binding of skeletal S1 to F-actin.

    PubMed

    Andreev, O A; Ushakov, D S; Borejdo, J

    1998-12-22

    The proximity of skeletal myosin subfragment-1 (S1) to actin, and its orientation with respect to thin filaments of single muscle fibers, were compared in the presence and in the absence of ADP. The proximity was assessed by the efficiency of carbodiimide-induced cross-linking and the orientation by polarization of fluorescence of probes attached to the essential light chains. ADP made no difference in proximity or orientation when the molar ratio of S1 to actin was low or high. However, at the intermediate ratios, ADP made a significant difference. Strong dissociating agents, AMP-PNP and PPi, made significant differences at all ratios. To explain this behavior, it is unnecessary to invoke the ADP-induced "swinging" of the tail of S1. Rather, it is simply explained by the "two-state" model which we proposed earlier, in which S1 binds to one or to two actin protomers, depending on the saturation of the filaments with S1s. The dissociation induced by the ADP shifts the equilibrium between the two bound states. At high and low degrees of saturation, ADP is unable to significantly decrease the amount of S1 bound to F-actin. However, at intermediate saturation levels, ADP causes significantly more S1s to bind to two actins. These results suggest that the ADP-induced changes seen at the intermediate molar ratios are due to the dissociation-induced reorientation of S1. PMID:9922150

  5. Study of the influence of actin-binding proteins using linear analyses of cell deformability.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Gustavo R; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Mirzaei, Zahra; Simmons, Craig A

    2015-07-21

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in the deformability of the cell and in mechanosensing. Here we analyze the contributions of three major actin cross-linking proteins, myosin II, α-actinin and filamin, to cell deformability, by using micropipette aspiration of Dictyostelium cells. We examine the applicability of three simple mechanical models: for small deformation, linear viscoelasticity and drop of liquid with a tense cortex; and for large deformation, a Newtonian viscous fluid. For these models, we have derived linearized equations and we provide a novel, straightforward methodology to analyze the experiments. This methodology allowed us to differentiate the effects of the cross-linking proteins in the different regimes of deformation. Our results confirm some previous observations and suggest important relations between the molecular characteristics of the actin-binding proteins and the cell behavior: the effect of myosin is explained in terms of the relation between the lifetime of the bond to actin and the resistive force; the presence of α-actinin obstructs the deformation of the cytoskeleton, presumably mainly due to the higher molecular stiffness and to the lower dissociation rate constants; and filamin contributes critically to the global connectivity of the network, possibly by rapidly turning over cross-links during the remodeling of the cytoskeletal network, thanks to the higher rate constants, flexibility and larger size. The results suggest a sophisticated relationship between the expression levels of actin-binding proteins, deformability and mechanosensing. PMID:26059185

  6. Closed membrane shapes with attached BAR domains subject to external force of actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Mesarec, Luka; Góźdź, Wojciech; Iglič, Veronika Kralj; Kralj, Samo; Iglič, Aleš

    2016-05-01

    Membrane deformations induced by attached BAR superfamily domains could trigger or facilitate the growth of plasma membrane protrusions. The BAR domain family consists of BAR, F-BAR and I-BAR domains, each enforcing a different local curvature when attached to the membrane surface. Our theoretical study mainly focuses on the role of I-BAR in the membrane tubular deformations generated or stabilised by actin filaments. The influence of the area density of membrane attached BAR domains and their intrinsic curvature on the closed membrane shapes (vesicles) was investigated numerically. We derived an analytical approximative expression for the critical relative area density of BARs at which the membrane tubular protrusions on vesicles are most prominent. We have shown that the BARs with a higher intrinsic curvature induce thinner and longer cylindrical protrusions. The average orientation of the membrane attached BARs is altered when the vesicle shape is subjected to external force of growing actin rod-like structure inside a vesicle. The average orientation angle of membrane attached BARs may indicate whether the actin filaments are just stabilising the protrusion or generating it by stretching the vesicle. PMID:26854580

  7. Tumor Suppressor Activity of Profilin Requires a Functional Actin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Wittenmayer, Nina; Jandrig, Burkhard; Rothkegel, Martin; Schlüter, Kathrin; Arnold, Wolfgang; Haensch, Wolfgang; Scherneck, Siegfried; Jockusch, Brigitte M.

    2004-01-01

    Profilin 1 (PFN1) is a regulator of the microfilament system and is involved in various signaling pathways. It interacts with many cytoplasmic and nuclear ligands. The importance of PFN1 for human tissue differentiation has been demonstrated by the findings that human cancer cells, expressing conspicuously low PFN1 levels, adopt a nontumorigenic phenotype upon raising their PFN1 level. In the present study, we characterize the ligand binding site crucial for profilin's tumor suppressor activity. Starting with CAL51, a human breast cancer cell line highly tumorigenic in nude mice, we established stable clones that express PFN1 mutants differentially defective in ligand binding. Clones expressing PFN1 mutants with reduced binding to either poly-proline-stretch ligands or phosphatidyl-inositol-4,5-bisphosphate, but with a functional actin binding site, were normal in growth, adhesion, and anchorage dependence, with only a weak tendency to elicit tumors in nude mice, similar to controls expressing wild-type PFN1. In contrast, clones expressing a mutant with severely reduced capacity to bind actin still behaved like the parental CAL51 and were highly tumorigenic. We conclude that the actin binding site on profilin is instrumental for normal differentiation of human epithelia and the tumor suppressor function of PFN1. PMID:14767055

  8. Activation of F-Actin Binding Capacity of Ezrin: Synergism of PIP2 Interaction and Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Bosk, Sabine; Braunger, Julia A.; Gerke, Volker; Steinem, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Ezrin is a membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein that can bind F-actin in its active conformation. Several means of regulation of ezrin's activity have been described including phosphorylation of Thr-567 and binding of L-α-phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). However, the relative contributions of these events toward activation of the protein and their potential interdependence are not known. We developed an assay based on solid-supported membranes, to which different ezrin mutants (ezrin T567A (inactive mutant), wild-type, and T567D (active pseudophosphorylated mutant)) were bound, that enabled us to analyze the influence of phosphorylation and PIP2 binding on ezrin's activation state in vitro. The lipid bilayers employed contained either DOGS-NTA-Ni to bind the proteins via an N-terminal His-tag, or PIP2, to which ezrin binds via specific binding sites located in the N-terminal region of the protein. Quantitative analysis of the binding behavior of all three proteins to the two different receptor lipids revealed that all three bind with high affinity and specificity to the two receptor lipids. Fluorescence microscopy on ezrin-decorated solid-supported membranes showed that, dependent on the mode of binding and the phosphorylation state, ezrin is capable of binding actin filaments. A clear synergism between phosphorylation and the receptor lipid PIP2 was observed, suggesting a conformational switch from the dormant to the active, F-actin binding state by recognition of PIP2, which is enhanced by the phosphorylation. PMID:21463584

  9. The monocyte binding domain(s) on human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Nik Jaafar, M I; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1984-06-01

    Monocyte binding has previously been assigned to the C gamma 3 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) largely on the ability of the pFc' fragment to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. This ability is markedly reduced compared to the intact parent IgG. We find this result with a conventional pFc' preparation but this preparation is found to contain trace contamination of parent IgG as demonstrated by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies directed against C gamma 2 domain and light-chain epitopes of human IgG. Extensive immunoaffinity purification of the pFc' preparation removes its inhibitory ability indicating that this originates in the trace contamination of parent IgG (or Fc). Neither of the human IgG1 paraproteins TIM, lacking the C gamma 2 domain, or SIZ, lacking the C gamma 3 domain, are found to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. The hinge-deleted IgG1 Dob protein shows little or no inhibitory ability. Indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain in monocyte binding is considered. We suggest finally that the site of interaction is found either on the C gamma 2 domain alone or between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains. PMID:6235444

  10. DNA bending and binding factors of the human. beta. -actin promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Takeshi; Makino, Kozo; Orita, Satoshi; Nakata, Atsuo; Kakunaga, Takeo )

    1989-01-25

    Transcription of the {beta}-actin gene is rapidly inducible in response to serum stimulation. To determine the regions responsible for serum inducible and basal level expression, the human {beta}-actin promoter was subjected to mutational analysis. Two distinct elements, the CCAAT homology and the {beta}-actin specific conserved sequences, were found by a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression assay and sequence comparisons, and then analyzed for possible functions. Using a DNA bend assay, it was shown that the conserved sequences included the core of a sequence-directed bend of DNA. Gel mobility shift and DNase I protection assays revealed that the conserved sequences and the CCAAT homology were recognized by binding factors in HeLa cell extracts.

  11. The 43-K protein, v1, associated with acetylcholine receptor containing membrane fragments is an actin-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J H; Boustead, C M; Witzemann, V

    1984-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptor enriched membrane fragments were obtained from the electric organs of Torpedo marmorata. The purified membrane fragments contained several proteins in addition to the acetylcholine receptor subunits. One of these was shown to be actin by means of immune blotting with a monoclonal antibody. Brief treatment of the membranes with pH 11.0 buffer removed actin and the other non-receptor proteins including the receptor-associated 43 000 mol. wt. polypeptide. This polypeptide was shown to bind actin after transferring the proteins from one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels to nitrocellulose paper and incubating the nitrocellulose blots with actin. Specifically bound actin was demonstrated using the monoclonal antibodies to actin. No calcium or calmodulin dependency of binding was observed. The findings suggest that the 43 000 mol. wt. polypeptide is a link between the membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor and the cytoskeleton. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6389118

  12. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N; Bayer, K Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira

    2012-10-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding-deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells. PMID:22918957

  13. Structure of a Bud6/Actin Complex Reveals a Novel WH2-like Actin Monomer Recruitment Motif.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunyoung; Graziano, Brian R; Zheng, Wei; Garabedian, Mikael; Goode, Bruce L; Eck, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    In budding yeast, the actin-binding protein Bud6 cooperates with formins Bni1 and Bnr1 to catalyze the assembly of actin filaments. The nucleation-enhancing activity of Bud6 requires both a "core" domain that binds to the formin and a "flank" domain that binds monomeric actin. Here, we describe the structure of the Bud6 flank domain in complex with actin. Two helices in Bud6(flank) interact with actin; one binds in a groove at the barbed end of the actin monomer in a manner closely resembling the helix of WH2 domains, a motif found in many actin nucleation factors. The second helix rises along the face of actin. Mutational analysis verifies the importance of these Bud6-actin contacts for nucleation-enhancing activity. The Bud6 binding site on actin overlaps with that of the formin FH2 domain and is also incompatible with inter-subunit contacts in F-actin, suggesting that Bud6 interacts only transiently with actin monomers during filament nucleation. PMID:26118535

  14. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  15. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  16. Saturable binding of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein (EMAP) on microtubules, but not filamentous actin or vimentin filaments.

    PubMed

    Eichenmüller, B; Ahrens, D P; Li, Q; Suprenant, K A

    2001-11-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein (EMAP) is a 75-kDa, WD-repeat protein associated with the mitotic spindle apparatus. To understand EMAP's biological role, it is important to determine its affinity for microtubules (MTs) and other cytoskeletal components. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a low-cost, bubble-column bioreactor to express EMAP as a hexahistidine fusion (6his) protein in baculovirus-infected insect cells. After optimizing cell growth conditions, up to 30 mg of EMAP was obtained in the soluble cell lysate from a 1-liter culture. EMAP was purified to homogeneity in a two-step process that included immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC) and anion-exchange chromatography. In vitro binding studies on cytoskeletal components were performed with the 6his-EMAP. EMAP bound to MTs, but not actin or vimentin filaments, with an intrinsic dissociation constant of 0.18 microM and binding stoichiometry of 0.7 mol EMAP per mol tubulin heterodimer. In addition, we show that a strong MT binding domain resides in the 137 amino acid, NH(2)-terminus of EMAP and a weaker binding site in the WD-domain. Previous work has shown that the EMAP concentration in the sea urchin egg is over 4 microM. Together, these results show that there is sufficient EMAP in the egg to regulate the assembly of a large pool of maternally stored tubulin. PMID:11807937

  17. Structural Characterization of the Binding of Myosin*ADP*Pi to Actin in Permeabilized Rabbit Psoas Muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,S.; Gu, J.; Belknap, B.; White, H.; Yu, L.

    2006-01-01

    the absence of PEG. When the binding between actin and myosin was increased, both the myosin layer lines and the actin layer lines increased in intensity, but the intensity profiles did not change. The configuration (mode) of attachment in the A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} state is thus unique among the intermediate attached states of the cross-bridge ATP hydrolysis cycle. One of the simplest explanations is that both myosin filaments and actin filaments are stabilized (e.g., undergo reduced spatial fluctuations) by the attachment. The alignment of the myosin heads in the thick filaments and the alignment of the actin monomers in the thin filaments are improved as a result. The compact atomic structure of M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} with strongly coupled domains may contribute to the unique attachment configuration: the 'primed' myosin heads may function as 'transient struts' when attached to the thin filaments.

  18. CsmA, a Class V Chitin Synthase with a Myosin Motor-like Domain, Is Localized through Direct Interaction with the Actin Cytoskeleton in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Norio; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    One of the essential features of fungal morphogenesis is the polarized synthesis of cell wall components such as chitin. The actin cytoskeleton provides the structural basis for cell polarity in Aspergillus nidulans, as well as in most other eukaryotes. A class V chitin synthase, CsmA, which contains a myosin motor-like domain (MMD), is conserved among most filamentous fungi. The ΔcsmA null mutant showed remarkable abnormalities with respect to cell wall integrity and the establishment of polarity. In this study, we demonstrated that CsmA tagged with 9× HA epitopes localized near actin structures at the hyphal tips and septation sites and that its MMD was able to bind to actin. Characterization of mutants bearing a point mutation or deletion in the MMD suggests that the interaction between the MMD and actin is not only necessary for the proper localization of CsmA, but also for CsmA function. Thus, the finding of a direct interaction between the chitin synthase and the actin cytoskeleton provides new insight into the mechanisms of polarized cell wall synthesis and fungal morphogenesis. PMID:15703213

  19. Electrostatic interaction map reveals a new binding position for tropomyosin on F-actin.

    PubMed

    Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Schott, Veronika; Orzechowski, Marek; Lehman, William; Fischer, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Azimuthal movement of tropomyosin around the F-actin thin filament is responsible for muscle activation and relaxation. Recently a model of αα-tropomyosin, derived from molecular-mechanics and electron microscopy of different contractile states, showed that tropomyosin is rather stiff and pre-bent to present one specific face to F-actin during azimuthal transitions. However, a new model based on cryo-EM of troponin- and myosin-free filaments proposes that the interacting-face of tropomyosin can differ significantly from that in the original model. Because resolution was insufficient to assign tropomyosin side-chains, the interacting-face could not be unambiguously determined. Here, we use structural analysis and energy landscapes to further examine the proposed models. The observed bend in seven crystal structures of tropomyosin is much closer in direction and extent to the original model than to the new model. Additionally, we computed the interaction map for repositioning tropomyosin over the F-actin surface, but now extended over a much larger surface than previously (using the original interacting-face). This map shows two energy minima-one corresponding to the "blocked-state" as in the original model, and the other related by a simple 24 Å translation of tropomyosin parallel to the F-actin axis. The tropomyosin-actin complex defined by the second minimum fits perfectly into the recent cryo-EM density, without requiring any change in the interacting-face. Together, these data suggest that movement of tropomyosin between regulatory states does not require interacting-face rotation. Further, they imply that thin filament assembly may involve an interplay between initially seeded tropomyosin molecules growing from distinct binding-site regions on actin. PMID:26286845

  20. Transgenic Expression of the Formin Protein Fhod3 Selectively in the Embryonic Heart: Role of Actin-Binding Activity of Fhod3 and Its Sarcomeric Localization during Myofibrillogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Noriko; Kan-o, Meikun; Ushijima, Tomoki; Kage, Yohko; Tominaga, Ryuji; Sumimoto, Hideki; Takeya, Ryu

    2016-01-01

    Fhod3 is a cardiac member of the formin family proteins that play pivotal roles in actin filament assembly in various cellular contexts. The targeted deletion of mouse Fhod3 gene leads to defects in cardiogenesis, particularly during myofibrillogenesis, followed by lethality at embryonic day (E) 11.5. However, it remains largely unknown how Fhod3 functions during myofibrillogenesis. In this study, to assess the mechanism whereby Fhod3 regulates myofibrillogenesis during embryonic cardiogenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing Fhod3 selectively in embryonic cardiomyocytes under the control of the β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) promoter. Mice expressing wild-type Fhod3 in embryonic cardiomyocytes survive to adulthood and are fertile, whereas those expressing Fhod3 (I1127A) defective in binding to actin die by E11.5 with cardiac defects. This cardiac phenotype of the Fhod3 mutant embryos is almost identical to that observed in Fhod3 null embryos, suggesting that the actin-binding activity of Fhod3 is crucial for embryonic cardiogenesis. On the other hand, the β-MHC promoter-driven expression of wild-type Fhod3 sufficiently rescues cardiac defects of Fhod3-null embryos, indicating that the Fhod3 protein expressed in a transgenic manner can function properly to achieve myofibril maturation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. Using the transgenic mice, we further examined detailed localization of Fhod3 during myofibrillogenesis in situ and found that Fhod3 localizes to the specific central region of nascent sarcomeres prior to massive rearrangement of actin filaments and remains there throughout myofibrillogenesis. Taken together, the present findings suggest that, during embryonic cardiogenesis, Fhod3 functions as the essential reorganizer of actin filaments at the central region of maturating sarcomeres via the actin-binding activity of the FH2 domain. PMID:26848968

  1. Actin-binding proteins coronin-1a and IBA-1 are effective microglial markers for immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zeshan; Shaw, Gerry; Sharma, Ved P; Yang, Cui; McGowan, Eileen; Dickson, Dennis W

    2007-07-01

    This study identifies the actin-binding protein, coronin-1a, as a novel and effective immunohistochemical marker for microglia in both cell cultures and in formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Antibodies to coronin-1a effectively immunostained microglia in human, monkey, horse, rat, and mouse tissues, even in tissues stored for long periods of time. The identity of coronin-1a-immunoreactive cells as microglia was confirmed using double immunolabeling with cell type-specific markers as well as by morphological features and the distribution of immunoreactive cells. These properties are shared by another actin-binding protein, IBA-1. Unlike IBA-1, coronin-1a immunoreactivity was also detected in lymphocytes and certain other hematopoietic cells. The results indicate that both coronin-1a and IBA-1 are robust markers for microglia that can be used in routinely processed tissue of humans and animals. Because both coronin-1a and IBA-1 are actin-binding proteins that play a role in rearrangement of the membrane cytoskeleton, it suggests that these proteins are critical to dynamic properties of microglia. PMID:17341475

  2. Structure and calcium-binding studies of calmodulin-like domain of human non-muscle α-actinin-1

    PubMed Central

    Drmota Prebil, Sara; Slapšak, Urška; Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Puž, Vid; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Anrather, Dorothea; Hartl, Markus; Backman, Lars; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The activity of several cytosolic proteins critically depends on the concentration of calcium ions. One important intracellular calcium-sensing protein is α-actinin-1, the major actin crosslinking protein in focal adhesions and stress fibers. The actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 has been proposed to be negatively regulated by calcium, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, we determined the first high-resolution NMR structure of its functional calmodulin-like domain (CaMD) in calcium-bound and calcium-free form. These structures reveal that in the absence of calcium, CaMD displays a conformationally flexible ensemble that undergoes a structural change upon calcium binding, leading to limited rotation of the N- and C-terminal lobes around the connecting linker and consequent stabilization of the calcium-loaded structure. Mutagenesis experiments, coupled with mass-spectrometry and isothermal calorimetry data designed to validate the calcium binding stoichiometry and binding site, showed that human non-muscle α-actinin-1 binds a single calcium ion within the N-terminal lobe. Finally, based on our structural data and analogy with other α-actinins, we provide a structural model of regulation of the actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 where calcium induced structural stabilisation causes fastening of the juxtaposed actin binding domain, leading to impaired capacity to crosslink actin. PMID:27272015

  3. Structure and calcium-binding studies of calmodulin-like domain of human non-muscle α-actinin-1.

    PubMed

    Drmota Prebil, Sara; Slapšak, Urška; Pavšič, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Puž, Vid; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Anrather, Dorothea; Hartl, Markus; Backman, Lars; Plavec, Janez; Lenarčič, Brigita; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The activity of several cytosolic proteins critically depends on the concentration of calcium ions. One important intracellular calcium-sensing protein is α-actinin-1, the major actin crosslinking protein in focal adhesions and stress fibers. The actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 has been proposed to be negatively regulated by calcium, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, we determined the first high-resolution NMR structure of its functional calmodulin-like domain (CaMD) in calcium-bound and calcium-free form. These structures reveal that in the absence of calcium, CaMD displays a conformationally flexible ensemble that undergoes a structural change upon calcium binding, leading to limited rotation of the N- and C-terminal lobes around the connecting linker and consequent stabilization of the calcium-loaded structure. Mutagenesis experiments, coupled with mass-spectrometry and isothermal calorimetry data designed to validate the calcium binding stoichiometry and binding site, showed that human non-muscle α-actinin-1 binds a single calcium ion within the N-terminal lobe. Finally, based on our structural data and analogy with other α-actinins, we provide a structural model of regulation of the actin crosslinking activity of α-actinin-1 where calcium induced structural stabilisation causes fastening of the juxtaposed actin binding domain, leading to impaired capacity to crosslink actin. PMID:27272015

  4. Crystal structure of a nuclear actin ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tingting; Sun, Lingfei; Jiang, Yuxiang; Huang, Shanjin; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Zhucheng

    2016-08-01

    Actin polymerizes and forms filamentous structures (F-actin) in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. It also exists in the nucleus and regulates various nucleic acid transactions, particularly through its incorporation into multiple chromatin-remodeling complexes. However, the specific structure of actin and the mechanisms that regulate its polymeric nature inside the nucleus remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of nuclear actin (N-actin) complexed with actin-related protein 4 (Arp4) and the helicase-SANT-associated (HSA) domain of the chromatin remodeler Swr1. The inner face and barbed end of N-actin are sequestered by interactions with Arp4 and the HSA domain, respectively, which prevents N-actin from polymerization and binding to many actin regulators. The two major domains of N-actin are more twisted than those of globular actin (G-actin), and its nucleotide-binding pocket is occluded, freeing N-actin from binding to and regulation by ATP. These findings revealed the salient structural features of N-actin that distinguish it from its cytoplasmic counterpart and provide a rational basis for its functions and regulation inside the nucleus. PMID:27457955

  5. The Cytoplasmic Domain of Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1 Affects Binding of the Protective Antigen▿

    PubMed Central

    Go, Mandy Y.; Chow, Edith M. C.; Mogridge, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin binds the I domain of the receptor ANTXR1. Integrin I domains convert between open and closed conformations that bind ligand with high and low affinities, respectively; this process is regulated by signaling from the cytoplasmic domains. To assess whether intracellular signals might influence the interaction between ANTXR1 and PA, we compared two splice variants of ANTXR1 that differ only in their cytoplasmic domains. We found that cells expressing ANTXR1 splice variant 1 (ANTXR1-sv1) bound markedly less PA than did cells expressing a similar level of the shorter splice variant ANTXR1-sv2. ANTXR1-sv1 but not ANTXR1-sv2 associated with the actin cytoskeleton, although disruption of the cytoskeleton did not affect binding of ANTXR-sv1 to PA. Introduction of a cytoplasmic domain missense mutation found in the related receptor ANTXR2 in a patient with juvenile hyaline fibromatosis impaired actin association and increased binding of PA to ANTXR1-sv1. These results suggest that ANTXR1 has two affinity states that may be modulated by cytoplasmic signals. PMID:18936178

  6. Microtubule-Actin Cross-Linking Factor 1: Domains, Interaction Partners, and Tissue-Specific Functions.

    PubMed

    Goryunov, Dmitry; Liem, Ronald K H

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of most eukaryotic cells is composed of three principal filamentous components: actin filaments, microtubules (MTs), and intermediate filaments. It is a highly dynamic system that plays crucial roles in a wide range of cellular processes, including migration, adhesion, cytokinesis, morphogenesis, intracellular traffic and signaling, and structural flexibility. Among the large number of cytoskeleton-associated proteins characterized to date, microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1 (MACF1) is arguably the most versatile integrator and modulator of cytoskeleton-related processes. MACF1 belongs to the plakin family of proteins, and within it, to the spectraplakin subfamily. These proteins are characterized by the ability to bridge MT and actin cytoskeletal networks in a dynamic fashion, which underlies their involvement in the regulation of cell migration, axonal extension, and vesicular traffic. Studying MACF1 functions has provided insights not only into the regulation of the cytoskeleton but also into molecular mechanisms of both normal cellular physiology and cellular pathology. Multiple MACF1 isoforms exist, composed of a large variety of alternatively spliced domains. Each of these domains mediates a specific set of interactions and functions. These functions are manifested in tissue and cell-specific phenotypes observed in conditional MACF1 knockout mice. The conditional models described to date reveal critical roles of MACF1 in mammalian skin, nervous system, heart muscle, and intestinal epithelia. Complete elimination of MACF1 is early embryonic lethal, indicating an essential role for MACF1 in early development. Further studies of MACF1 domains and their interactions will likely reveal multiple new roles of this protein in various tissues. PMID:26778566

  7. Profilin Binding to Poly-l-Proline and Actin Monomers along with Ability to Catalyze Actin Nucleotide Exchange Is Required for Viability of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the ability of 87 profilin point mutations to complement temperature-sensitive and null mutations of the single profilin gene of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We compared the biochemical properties of 13 stable noncomplementing profilins with an equal number of complementing profilin mutants. A large quantitative database revealed the following: 1) in a profilin null background fission yeast grow normally with profilin mutations having >10% of wild-type affinity for actin or poly-l-proline, but lower affinity for either ligand is incompatible with life; 2) in the cdc3-124 profilin ts background, fission yeast function with profilin having only 2–5% wild-type affinity for actin or poly-l-proline; and 3) special mutations show that the ability of profilin to catalyze nucleotide exchange by actin is an essential function. Thus, poly-l-proline binding, actin binding, and actin nucleotide exchange are each independent requirements for profilin function in fission yeast. PMID:11294914

  8. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C.; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H+-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation. PMID:26272553

  9. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-10-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H(+)-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation. PMID:26272553

  10. Self-Organized Gels in DNA/F-Actin Mixtures without Crosslinkers: Networks of Induced Nematic Domains with Tunable Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ghee Hwee; Butler, John C.; Zribi, Olena V.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Purdy, Kirstin R.; Golestanian, Ramin; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2008-11-01

    We examine mixtures of DNA and filamentous actin (F-actin) as a model system of like-charged rigid rods and flexible chains. Confocal microscopy reveals the formation of elongated nematic F-actin domains reticulated via defect-free vertices into a network embedded in a mesh of random DNA. Synchrotron x-ray scattering results indicate that the DNA mesh squeezes the F-actin domains into a nematic state with an interactin spacing that decreases with increasing DNA concentration as dactin∝ρDNA-1/2. Interestingly, the system changes from a counterion-controlled regime to a depletion-controlled regime with added salt, with drastic consequences for the osmotic pressure induced phase behavior.

  11. Metabolic and evolutionary origin of actin-binding polyketides from diverse organisms.

    PubMed

    Ueoka, Reiko; Uria, Agustinus R; Reiter, Silke; Mori, Tetsushi; Karbaum, Petra; Peters, Eike E; Helfrich, Eric J N; Morinaka, Brandon I; Gugger, Muriel; Takeyama, Haruko; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Piel, Jörn

    2015-09-01

    Actin-targeting macrolides comprise a large, structurally diverse group of cytotoxins isolated from remarkably dissimilar micro- and macroorganisms. In spite of their disparate origins and structures, many of these compounds bind actin at the same site and exhibit structural relationships reminiscent of modular, combinatorial drug libraries. Here we investigate biosynthesis and evolution of three compound groups: misakinolides, scytophycin-type compounds and luminaolides. For misakinolides from the sponge Theonella swinhoei WA, our data suggest production by an uncultivated 'Entotheonella' symbiont, further supporting the relevance of these bacteria as sources of bioactive polyketides and peptides in sponges. Insights into misakinolide biosynthesis permitted targeted genome mining for other members, providing a cyanobacterial luminaolide producer as the first cultivated source for this dimeric compound family. The data indicate that this polyketide family is bacteria-derived and that the unusual macrolide diversity is the result of combinatorial pathway modularity for some compounds and of convergent evolution for others. PMID:26236936

  12. The N-terminal tropomyosin- and actin-binding sites are important for leiomodin 2's function.

    PubMed

    Ly, Thu; Moroz, Natalia; Pappas, Christopher T; Novak, Stefanie M; Tolkatchev, Dmitri; Wooldridge, Dayton; Mayfield, Rachel M; Helms, Gregory; Gregorio, Carol C; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2016-08-15

    Leiomodin is a potent actin nucleator related to tropomodulin, a capping protein localized at the pointed end of the thin filaments. Mutations in leiomodin-3 are associated with lethal nemaline myopathy in humans, and leiomodin-2-knockout mice present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The arrangement of the N-terminal actin- and tropomyosin-binding sites in leiomodin is contradictory and functionally not well understood. Using one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and the pointed-end actin polymerization assay, we find that leiomodin-2, a major cardiac isoform, has an N-terminal actin-binding site located within residues 43-90. Moreover, for the first time, we obtain evidence that there are additional interactions with actin within residues 124-201. Here we establish that leiomodin interacts with only one tropomyosin molecule, and this is the only site of interaction between leiomodin and tropomyosin. Introduction of mutations in both actin- and tropomyosin-binding sites of leiomodin affected its localization at the pointed ends of the thin filaments in cardiomyocytes. On the basis of our new findings, we propose a model in which leiomodin regulates actin poly-merization dynamics in myocytes by acting as a leaky cap at thin filament pointed ends. PMID:27307584

  13. Activation of the cAMP Pathway Induces RACK1-Dependent Binding of β-Actin to BDNF Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Neasta, Jeremie; Fiorenza, Anna; He, Dao-Yao; Phamluong, Khanhky; Kiely, Patrick A.; Ron, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    RACK1 is a scaffolding protein that contributes to the specificity and propagation of several signaling cascades including the cAMP pathway. As such, RACK1 participates in numerous cellular functions ranging from cell migration and morphology to gene transcription. To obtain further insights on the mechanisms whereby RACK1 regulates cAMP-dependent processes, we set out to identify new binding partners of RACK1 during activation of the cAMP signaling using a proteomics strategy. We identified β-actin as a direct RACK1 binding partner and found that the association between β-actin and RACK1 is increased in response to the activation of the cAMP pathway. Furthermore, we show that cAMP-dependent increase in BDNF expression requires filamentous actin. We further report that β-actin associates with the BDNF promoter IV upon the activation of the cAMP pathway and present data to suggest that the association of β-actin with BDNF promoter IV is RACK1-dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that β-actin is a new RACK1 binding partner and that the RACK1 and β-actin association participate in the cAMP-dependent regulation of BDNF transcription. PMID:27505161

  14. Interaptin, an Actin-binding Protein of the α-Actinin Superfamily in Dictyostelium discoideum, Is Developmentally and cAMP-regulated and Associates with Intracellular Membrane Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Francisco; Kuspa, Adam; Brokamp, Regine; Matzner, Monika; Noegel, Angelika A.

    1998-01-01

    In a search for novel members of the α-actinin superfamily, a Dictyostelium discoideum genomic library in yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC) was screened under low stringency conditions using the acting-binding domain of the gelation factor as probe. A new locus was identified and 8.6 kb of genomic DNA were sequenced that encompassed the whole abpD gene. The DNA sequence predicts a protein, interaptin, with a calculated molecular mass of 204,300 D that is constituted by an actin-binding domain, a central coiled-coil rod domain and a membrane-associated domain. In Northern blot analyses a cAMP-stimulated transcript of 5.8 kb is expressed at the stage when cell differentiation occurs. Monoclonal antibodies raised against bacterially expressed interaptin polypeptides recognized a 200-kD developmentally and cAMP-regulated protein and a 160-kD constitutively expressed protein in Western blots. In multicellular structures, interaptin appears to be enriched in anterior-like cells which sort to the upper and lower cups during culmination. The protein is located at the nuclear envelope and ER. In mutants deficient in interaptin development is delayed, but the morphology of the mature fruiting bodies appears normal. When starved in suspension abpD− cells form EDTA-stable aggregates, which, in contrast to wild type, dissociate. Based on its domains and location, interaptin constitutes a potential link between intracellular membrane compartments and the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:9700162

  15. Cellulose-binding domains: biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ilan; Shoseyov, Oded

    2002-11-01

    Many researchers have acknowledged the fact that there exists an immense potential for the application of the cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) in the field of biotechnology. This becomes apparent when the phrase "cellulose-binding domain" is used as the key word for a computerized patent search; more then 150 hits are retrieved. Cellulose is an ideal matrix for large-scale affinity purification procedures. This chemically inert matrix has excellent physical properties as well as low affinity for nonspecific protein binding. It is available in a diverse range of forms and sizes, is pharmaceutically safe, and relatively inexpensive. Present studies into the application of CBDs in industry have established that they can be applied in the modification of physical and chemical properties of composite materials and the development of modified materials with improved properties. In agro-biotechnology, CBDs can be used to modify polysaccharide materials both in vivo and in vitro. The CBDs exert nonhydrolytic fiber disruption on cellulose-containing materials. The potential applications of "CBD technology" range from modulating the architecture of individual cells to the modification of an entire organism. Expressing these genes under specific promoters and using appropriate trafficking signals, can be used to alter the nutritional value and texture of agricultural crops and their final products. PMID:14550028

  16. Regulation of blood-testis barrier by actin binding proteins and protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Tang, Elizabeth I; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-03-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is an important ultrastructure in the testis, since the onset of meiosis and spermiogenesis coincides with the establishment of a functional barrier in rodents and humans. It is also noted that a delay in the assembly of a functional BTB following treatment of neonatal rats with drugs such as diethylstilbestrol or adjudin also delays the first wave of spermiation. While the BTB is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers, it undergoes extensive remodeling, in particular, at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones across the immunological barrier. Without this timely transport of preleptotene spermatocytes derived from type B spermatogonia, meiosis will be arrested, causing aspermatogenesis. Yet the biology and regulation of the BTB remains largely unexplored since the morphological studies in the 1970s. Recent studies, however, have shed new light on the biology of the BTB. Herein, we critically evaluate some of these findings, illustrating that the Sertoli cell BTB is regulated by actin-binding proteins (ABPs), likely supported by non-receptor protein kinases, to modulate the organization of actin microfilament bundles at the site. Furthermore, microtubule-based cytoskeleton is also working in concert with the actin-based cytoskeleton to confer BTB dynamics. This timely review provides an update on the unique biology and regulation of the BTB based on the latest findings in the field, focusing on the role of ABPs and non-receptor protein kinases. PMID:26628556

  17. Concomitant binding of Afadin to LGN and F-actin directs planar spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Carminati, Manuel; Gallini, Sara; Pirovano, Laura; Alfieri, Andrea; Bisi, Sara; Mapelli, Marina

    2016-02-01

    Polarized epithelia form by oriented cell divisions in which the mitotic spindle aligns parallel to the epithelial plane. To orient the mitotic spindle, cortical cues trigger the recruitment of NuMA-dynein-based motors, which pull on astral microtubules via the protein LGN. We demonstrate that the junctional protein Afadin is required for spindle orientation and correct epithelial morphogenesis of Caco-2 cysts. Molecularly, Afadin binds directly and concomitantly to F-actin and to LGN. We determined the crystallographic structure of human Afadin in complex with LGN and show that it resembles the LGN-NuMA complex. In mitosis, Afadin is necessary for cortical accumulation of LGN and NuMA above the spindle poles, in an F-actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our results depict Afadin as a molecular hub governing the enrichment of LGN and NuMA at the cortex. To our knowledge, Afadin is the first-described mechanical anchor between dynein and cortical F-actin. PMID:26751642

  18. Regulation of blood-testis barrier by actin binding proteins and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is an important ultrastructure in the testis since the onset of spermatogenesis coincides with the establishment of a functional barrier in rodents and humans. It is also noted that a delay in the assembly of a functional BTB following treatment of neonatal rats with drugs such as diethylstilbestrol or adjudin also delays the first wave of spermiation. While the BTB is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers, it undergoes extensive remodeling, in particular at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones across the immunological barrier. Without this timely transport of preleptotene spermatocytes derived from type B spermatogonia, meiosis will be arrested, causing aspermatogenesis. Yet the biology and regulation of the BTB remains largely unexplored since the morphological studies in the 1970s. Recent studies, however, have shed new light on the biology of the BTB. Herein, we critically evaluate some of these findings, illustrating that the Sertoli cell BTB is regulated by actin binding proteins (ABPs), likely supported by non-receptor protein kinases, to modulate the organization of actin microfilament bundles at the site. Furthermore, microtubule (MT)-based cytoskeleton is also working in concert with the actin-based cytoskeleton to confer BTB dynamics. This timely review provides an update on the unique biology and regulation of the BTB based on the latest findings in the field, focusing on the role of ABPs and non-receptor protein kinases. PMID:26628556

  19. Xenopus cytoskeletal actin and human c-fos gene promoters share a conserved protein-binding site.

    PubMed

    Mohun, T; Garrett, N; Treisman, R

    1987-03-01

    Xenopus laevis cytoskeletal actin gene promoters contain a 20-bp sequence homologous to the serum response element (SRE) required for transient human c-fos gene transcription in response to serum factors. Both sequences bind the same factor in HeLa cell extracts, as shown by binding competition, DNase I and dimethylsulphate (DMS) protection and DMS interference assays. A similar protein is present in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Sequences containing the SRE homology are essential for constitutive activity of the actin promoter in both Xenopus and mouse cells, and a synthetic SRE functions as a promoter element in these cells. In mouse cells, transcription of both transfected Xenopus actin and actin/c-fos fusion genes is activated following serum stimulation. These data suggest that the SRE and its cognate protein form part of a regulatory pathway that has been highly conserved during evolution. PMID:3582369

  20. Xenopus cytoskeletal actin and human c-fos gene promoters share a conserved protein-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Mohun, T; Garrett, N; Treisman, R

    1987-01-01

    Xenopus laevis cytoskeletal actin gene promoters contain a 20-bp sequence homologous to the serum response element (SRE) required for transient human c-fos gene transcription in response to serum factors. Both sequences bind the same factor in HeLa cell extracts, as shown by binding competition, DNase I and dimethylsulphate (DMS) protection and DMS interference assays. A similar protein is present in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Sequences containing the SRE homology are essential for constitutive activity of the actin promoter in both Xenopus and mouse cells, and a synthetic SRE functions as a promoter element in these cells. In mouse cells, transcription of both transfected Xenopus actin and actin/c-fos fusion genes is activated following serum stimulation. These data suggest that the SRE and its cognate protein form part of a regulatory pathway that has been highly conserved during evolution. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3582369

  1. The Role of Caldesmon and its Phosphorylation by ERK on the Binding Force of Unphosphorylated Myosin to Actin

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Horia Nicolae; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Kachmar, Linda; Benedetti, Andrea; Sobieszek, Apolinary; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies conducted at the whole muscle level have shown that smooth muscle can maintain tension with low ATP consumption. Whereas it is generally accepted that this property (latch-state) is a consequence of the dephosphorylation of myosin during its attachment to actin, free dephosphorylated myosin can also bind to actin and contribute to force maintenance. We investigated the role of caldesmon (CaD) in regulating the binding force of unphosphorylated tonic smooth muscle myosin to actin. Methods To measure the effect of CaD on the binding of unphosphorylated myosin to actin (in the presence of ATP), we used a single beam laser trap assay to quantify the average unbinding force (Funb) in the absence or presence of caldesmon, ERK-phosphorylated CaD, or CaD plus tropomyosin. Results Funb from unregulated actin (0.10 ± 0.01 pN) was significantly increased in the presence of CaD (0.17 ± 0.02 pN), tropomyosin (0.17 ± 0.02 pN) or both regulatory proteins (0.18 ± 0.02 pN). ERK phosphorylation of CaD significantly reduced the Funb (0.06 ± 0.01 pN). Inspection of the traces of the Funb as a function of time suggests that ERK phosphorylation of CaD decreases the binding force of myosin to actin or accelerates its detachment. Conclusions CaD enhances the binding force of unphosphorylated myosin to actin potentially contributing to the latch-state. ERK phosphorylation of CaD decreases this binding force to very low levels. General Significance This study suggests a mechanism that likely contributes to the latch-state and that explains the muscle relaxation from the latch-state. PMID:25108062

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Associated Protein (PI3KAP)/XB130 Crosslinks Actin Filaments through Its Actin Binding and Multimerization Properties In Vitro and Enhances Endocytosis in HEK293 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Daisuke; Akama, Takeshi; Chida, Kazuhiro; Minami, Shiro; Ito, Koichi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Actin-crosslinking proteins control actin filament networks and bundles and contribute to various cellular functions including regulation of cell migration, cell morphology, and endocytosis. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-associated protein (PI3KAP)/XB130 has been reported to be localized to actin filaments (F-actin) and required for cell migration in thyroid carcinoma cells. Here, we show a role for PI3KAP/XB130 as an actin-crosslinking protein. First, we found that the carboxyl terminal region of PI3KAP/XB130 containing amino acid residues 830-840 was required and sufficient for localization to F-actin in NIH3T3 cells, and this region is directly bound to F-actin in vitro. Moreover, actin-crosslinking assay revealed that recombinant PI3KAP/XB130 crosslinked F-actin. In general, actin-crosslinking proteins often multimerize to assemble multiple actin-binding sites. We then investigated whether PI3KAP/XB130 could form a multimer. Blue native-PAGE analysis showed that recombinant PI3KAP/XB130 was detected at 250-1200 kDa although the molecular mass was approximately 125 kDa, suggesting that PI3KAP/XB130 formed multimers. Furthermore, we found that the amino terminal 40 amino acids were required for this multimerization by co-immunoprecipitation assay in HEK293T cells. Deletion mutants of PI3KAP/XB130 lacking the actin-binding region or the multimerizing region did not crosslink actin filaments, indicating that actin binding and multimerization of PI3KAP/XB130 were necessary to crosslink F-actin. Finally, we examined roles of PI3KAP/XB130 on endocytosis, an actin-related biological process. Overexpression of PI3KAP/XB130 enhanced dextran uptake in HEK 293 cells. However, most of the cells transfected with the deletion mutant lacking the actin-binding region incorporated dextran to a similar extent as control cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PI3KAP/XB130 crosslinks F-actin through both its actin-binding region and multimerizing region and plays

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Associated Protein (PI3KAP)/XB130 Crosslinks Actin Filaments through Its Actin Binding and Multimerization Properties In Vitro and Enhances Endocytosis in HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Daisuke; Akama, Takeshi; Chida, Kazuhiro; Minami, Shiro; Ito, Koichi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Actin-crosslinking proteins control actin filament networks and bundles and contribute to various cellular functions including regulation of cell migration, cell morphology, and endocytosis. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-associated protein (PI3KAP)/XB130 has been reported to be localized to actin filaments (F-actin) and required for cell migration in thyroid carcinoma cells. Here, we show a role for PI3KAP/XB130 as an actin-crosslinking protein. First, we found that the carboxyl terminal region of PI3KAP/XB130 containing amino acid residues 830–840 was required and sufficient for localization to F-actin in NIH3T3 cells, and this region is directly bound to F-actin in vitro. Moreover, actin-crosslinking assay revealed that recombinant PI3KAP/XB130 crosslinked F-actin. In general, actin-crosslinking proteins often multimerize to assemble multiple actin-binding sites. We then investigated whether PI3KAP/XB130 could form a multimer. Blue native-PAGE analysis showed that recombinant PI3KAP/XB130 was detected at 250–1200 kDa although the molecular mass was approximately 125 kDa, suggesting that PI3KAP/XB130 formed multimers. Furthermore, we found that the amino terminal 40 amino acids were required for this multimerization by co-immunoprecipitation assay in HEK293T cells. Deletion mutants of PI3KAP/XB130 lacking the actin-binding region or the multimerizing region did not crosslink actin filaments, indicating that actin binding and multimerization of PI3KAP/XB130 were necessary to crosslink F-actin. Finally, we examined roles of PI3KAP/XB130 on endocytosis, an actin-related biological process. Overexpression of PI3KAP/XB130 enhanced dextran uptake in HEK 293 cells. However, most of the cells transfected with the deletion mutant lacking the actin-binding region incorporated dextran to a similar extent as control cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PI3KAP/XB130 crosslinks F-actin through both its actin-binding region and multimerizing region and

  4. Mutations in the Gene That Encodes the F-Actin Binding Protein Anillin Cause FSGS

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Gentzon; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Hanke, Nils; Tossidou, Irini; Burchette, James; Wu, Guanghong; Homstad, Alison; Sparks, Matthew A.; Gomez, Jose; Jiang, Ruiji; Alonso, Andrea; Lavin, Peter; Conlon, Peter; Korstanje, Ron; Stander, M. Christine; Shamsan, Ghaidan; Barua, Moumita; Spurney, Robert; Singhal, Pravin C.; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Haller, Hermann; Howell, David; Pollak, Martin R.; Shaw, Andrey S.; Schiffer, Mario; Winn, Michelle P.

    2014-01-01

    FSGS is characterized by segmental scarring of the glomerulus and is a leading cause of kidney failure. Identification of genes causing FSGS has improved our understanding of disease mechanisms and points to defects in the glomerular epithelial cell, the podocyte, as a major factor in disease pathogenesis. Using a combination of genome-wide linkage studies and whole-exome sequencing in a kindred with familial FSGS, we identified a missense mutation R431C in anillin (ANLN), an F-actin binding cell cycle gene, as a cause of FSGS. We screened 250 additional families with FSGS and found another variant, G618C, that segregates with disease in a second family with FSGS. We demonstrate upregulation of anillin in podocytes in kidney biopsy specimens from individuals with FSGS and kidney samples from a murine model of HIV-1–associated nephropathy. Overexpression of R431C mutant ANLN in immortalized human podocytes results in enhanced podocyte motility. The mutant anillin displays reduced binding to the slit diaphragm–associated scaffold protein CD2AP. Knockdown of the ANLN gene in zebrafish morphants caused a loss of glomerular filtration barrier integrity, podocyte foot process effacement, and an edematous phenotype. Collectively, these findings suggest that anillin is important in maintaining the integrity of the podocyte actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24676636

  5. Identification and characterization of espin, an actin-binding protein localized to the F-actin-rich junctional plaques of Sertoli cell ectoplasmic specializations.

    PubMed

    Bartles, J R; Wierda, A; Zheng, L

    1996-06-01

    Ectoplasmic specializations are membrane-cytoskeletal assemblages found in Sertoli cells at sites of attachment to elongate spermatids or neighboring Sertoli cells. They are characterized in part by the presence of a unique junctional plaque which contains a narrow layer of parallel actin bundles sandwiched between the Sertoli cell plasma membrane and an affiliated cistern of endoplasmic reticulum. Using a monoclonal antibody, we have identified 'espin,' a novel actin-binding protein localized to ectoplasmic specializations. By immunogold electron microscopy, espin was localized to the parallel actin bundles of ectoplasmic specializations at sites where Sertoli cells contacted the heads of elongate spermatids. The protein was also detected at the sites of ectoplasmic specializations between neighboring Sertoli cells. Espin exhibits an apparent molecular mass of approximately 110 kDa in SDS gels. It is encoded by an approximately 2.9 kb mRNA, which was found to be specific to testis among the 11 rat organs and tissues examined. On the basis of cDNA sequence, espin is predicted to be an 836 amino acid protein which contains 8 ankyrin-like repeats in its N-terminal third, a potential P-loop, two proline-rich peptides and two peptides which contain clusters of multiple glutamates bracketed by arginines, lysines and glutamines in a pattern reminiscent of the repetitive motif found in the protein trichohyalin. The ankyrin-like repeats and a 66 amino acid peptide in the C terminus show significant sequence similarity to proteins encoded by the forked gene of Drosophila. A fusion protein containing the C-terminal 378 amino acids of espin was found to bind with high affinity (Kd = approximately 10 nM) to F-actin in vitro with a stoichiometry of approximately 1 espin per 6 actin monomers. When expressed by transfected NRK fibroblasts, the same C-terminal fragment of espin was observed to decorate actin fibers or cables. On the basis of its structure, localization and

  6. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  7. DNA-binding site for two skeletal actin promoter factors is important for expression in muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, K.; Schimmel, P.

    1988-04-01

    Two nuclear factors bind to the same site in the chicken skeletal actin promoter. Mutations in the footprint sequence which eliminate detectable binding decrease expression in transfected skeletal muscle cells by a factor of 25 to 50 and do not elevate the flow expression in nonmuscle cells. These results show that the factor-binding site contributes to the activation of expression in muscle cells and that it alone does not contribute significantly to repress expression in nonmuscle cells.

  8. The actin-binding ERM protein Moesin directly regulates spindle assembly and function during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Vilmos, Péter; Kristó, Ildikó; Szikora, Szilárd; Jankovics, Ferenc; Lukácsovich, Tamás; Kari, Beáta; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2016-06-01

    Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin proteins are highly conserved, actin-binding cytoskeletal proteins that play an essential role in microvilli formation, T-cell activation, and tumor metastasis by linking actin filaments to the plasma membrane. Recent studies demonstrated that the only Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin protein of Drosophila melanogaster, Moesin, is involved in mitotic spindle function through stabilizing cell shape and microtubules at the cell cortex. We previously observed that Moesin localizes to the mitotic spindle; hence, we tested for the biological significance of this surprising localization and investigated whether it plays a direct role in spindle function. To separate the cortical and spindle functions of Moesin during mitosis we combined cell biological and genetic methods. We used early Drosophila embryos, in which mitosis occurs in the absence of a cell cortex, and found in vivo evidence for the direct requirement of Moesin in mitotic spindle assembly and function. We also found that the accumulation of Moesin precedes the construction of the microtubule spindle, and the fusiform structure formed by Moesin persists even after the microtubules have disassembled. PMID:27006187

  9. Transient Anomalous Subdiffusion: Effects of Specific and Non-specific Probe Binding with Actin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Sanabria, Hugo; Waxham, M. Neal

    2010-01-01

    When signaling molecules diffuse through the cytosol they encounter a wide variety of obstacles that hinder their mobility in space and time. Some of those factors include, but are not limited to, interactions with mobile and immobile targets or obstacles. Besides finding a crowded environment inside the cell, macromolecules assemble into molecular complexes that drive specific biological functions adding additional complexity to their diffusion. Thus, simple models of diffusion often fail to explain mobility through the cell interior and new approaches are needed. Here we used fluorescent correlation spectroscopy to measure diffusion of three molecules of similar size with different surface properties diffusing in actin gels. The fluorescent probes were a) quantum dots, b) yellow-green fluorescent spheres and c) the β isoform of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II tagged with green fluorescent protein. We compared various models for fitting the autocorrelation function (ACF) including single component, two-component, and anomalous diffusion. The two-component and anomalous diffusion models were superior and were largely indistinguishable based on a goodness of fit criteria. To better resolve differences between these two models, we modified the ACF to observe temporal variations in diffusion. We found in both simulated and experimental data, a transient anomalous subdiffusion between two freely diffusing regimes produced by binding interactions of the diffusive tracers with actin gels. PMID:20038146

  10. The Structural Basis of Actin Organization by Vinculin and Metavinculin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Laura Y; Thompson, Peter M; Lee, Hyunna T; Pershad, Mihir; Campbell, Sharon L; Alushin, Gregory M

    2016-01-16

    Vinculin is an essential adhesion protein that links membrane-bound integrin and cadherin receptors through their intracellular binding partners to filamentous actin, facilitating mechanotransduction. Here we present an 8.5-Å-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction and pseudo-atomic model of the vinculin tail (Vt) domain bound to F-actin. Upon actin engagement, the N-terminal "strap" and helix 1 are displaced from the Vt helical bundle to mediate actin bundling. We find that an analogous conformational change also occurs in the H1' helix of the tail domain of metavinculin (MVt) upon actin binding, a muscle-specific splice isoform that suppresses actin bundling by Vt. These data support a model in which metavinculin tunes the actin bundling activity of vinculin in a tissue-specific manner, providing a mechanistic framework for understanding metavinculin mutations associated with hereditary cardiomyopathies. PMID:26493222

  11. F-actin binds to the cytoplasmic surface of ponticulin, a 17-kD integral glycoprotein from Dictyostelium discoideum plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    F-actin affinity chromatography and immunological techniques are used to identify actin-binding proteins in purified Dictyostelium discoideum plasma membranes. A 17-kD integral glycoprotein (gp17) consistently elutes from F-actin columns as the major actin-binding protein under a variety of experimental conditions. The actin-binding activity of gp17 is identical to that of intact plasma membranes: it resists extraction with 0.1 N NaOH, 1 mM dithiothreitol (DTT); it is sensitive to ionic conditions; it is stable over a wide range of pH; and it is eliminated by proteolysis, denaturation with heat, or treatment with DTT and N- ethylmaleimide. gp17 may be responsible for much of the actin-binding activity of plasma membranes since monovalent antibody fragments (Fab) directed primarily against gp17 inhibit actin-membrane binding by 96% in sedimentation assays. In contrast, Fab directed against cell surface determinants inhibit binding by only 0-10%. The actin-binding site of gp17 appears to be located on the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane since Fab against this protein continue to inhibit 96% of actin- membrane binding even after extensive adsorption against cell surfaces. gp17 is abundant in the plasma membrane, constituting 0.4-1.0% of the total membrane protein. A transmembrane orientation of gp17 is suggested since, in addition to the cytoplasmic localization of the actin-binding site, extracellular determinants of gp17 are identified. gp17 is surface-labeled by sulfo-N-hydroxy-succinimido-biotin, a reagent that cannot penetrate the cell membrane. Also, gp17 is glycosylated since it is specifically bound by the lectin, concanavalin A. We propose that gp17 is a major actin-binding protein that is important for connecting the plasma membrane to the underlying microfilament network. Therefore, we have named this protein "ponticulin" from the Latin word, ponticulus, which means small bridge. PMID:3312238

  12. Ultra-fast optical manipulation of single proteins binding to the actin cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Marco; Gardini, Lucia; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-02-01

    In the last decade, forces and mechanical stresses acting on biological systems are emerging as regulatory factors essential for cell life. Emerging evidences indicate that factors such as applied forces or the rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) determine the shape and function of cells and organisms1. Classically, the regulation of biological systems is described through a series of biochemical signals and enzymatic reactions, which direct the processes and cell fate. However, mechanotransduction, i.e. the conversion of mechanical forces into biochemical and biomolecular signals, is at the basis of many biological processes fundamental for the development and differentiation of cells, for their correct function and for the development of pathologies. We recently developed an in vitro system that allows the investigation of force-dependence of the interaction of proteins binding the actin cytoskeleton, at the single molecule level. Our system displays a delay of only ~10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. Our assay allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds and conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  13. Heterodimeric Capping Protein from Arabidopsis Is a Membrane-Associated, Actin-Binding Protein1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C.; Wang, Xia; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Huang, Shanjin; Szymanski, Daniel B.; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a major regulator of cell morphogenesis and responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. The organization and activities of the cytoskeleton are choreographed by hundreds of accessory proteins. Many actin-binding proteins are thought to be stimulus-response regulators that bind to signaling phospholipids and change their activity upon lipid binding. Whether these proteins associate with and/or are regulated by signaling lipids in plant cells remains poorly understood. Heterodimeric capping protein (CP) is a conserved and ubiquitous regulator of actin dynamics. It binds to the barbed end of filaments with high affinity and modulates filament assembly and disassembly reactions in vitro. Direct interaction of CP with phospholipids, including phosphatidic acid, results in uncapping of filament ends in vitro. Live-cell imaging and reverse-genetic analyses of cp mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) recently provided compelling support for a model in which CP activity is negatively regulated by phosphatidic acid in vivo. Here, we used complementary biochemical, subcellular fractionation, and immunofluorescence microscopy approaches to elucidate CP-membrane association. We found that CP is moderately abundant in Arabidopsis tissues and present in a microsomal membrane fraction. Sucrose density gradient separation and immunoblotting with known compartment markers were used to demonstrate that CP is enriched on membrane-bound organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. This association could facilitate cross talk between the actin cytoskeleton and a wide spectrum of essential cellular functions such as organelle motility and signal transduction. PMID:25201878

  14. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  15. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  16. Purification and characterization of caldesmon77: a calmodulin-binding protein that interacts with actin filaments from bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed Central

    Sobue, K; Tanaka, T; Kanda, K; Ashino, N; Kakiuchi, S

    1985-01-01

    Caldesmon150, a protein composed of the Mr 150,000/147,000 doublet, alternately binds to calmodulin and actin filaments in a Ca2+-dependent "flip-flop" fashion. In all fibroblast cell lines examined, we also found a Mr 77,000 protein that crossreacts with anti-caldesmon150 antibody by using an immunoprecipitation technique [Owada, M.K., Hakura, A., Iida, K., Yahara, I., Sobue, K. & Kakiuchi, S. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 3133-3137]. In this report, we examine the tissue distribution of caldesmon by the method of immunoblotting, using caldesmon-specific antibody. Both caldesmon150 and caldesmon77 show widespread distribution in the tissues examined. Caldesmon77 is more widely distributed than caldesmon150, and we have purified caldesmon77 from bovine adrenal medulla. Its molecular weight estimated by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was 77,000, and a tetramer of this polypeptide may constitute the native molecule (Mr, 300,000). Caldesmon77 possesses a number of features in common with caldesmon150, including flip-flop binding to calmodulin and actin filaments depending on the concentration of Ca2+ and crossreactivity with caldesmon150-specific antibody. Analysis of caldesmon77-F actin interaction by sedimentation and electrophoresis revealed that 0.5 mg of caldesmon77 bound to 1 mg of F actin. This indicated that the molar ratio between caldesmon77 (tetramer) and actin monomer was calculated to be 1:12-14. In addition, caldesmon77 regulated the actin-myosin interaction in Ca2+-sensitive actomyosin obtained from adrenal medulla. These results suggest that caldesmon77 might be a ubiquitous actin-linked regulator of nonmuscle contractile processes, including those in adrenal medulla. Images PMID:2991905

  17. Structure of the 34 kDa F-actin-bundling protein ABP34 from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Ji-Sun; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2015-09-01

    The crystal structure of the 34 kDa F-actin-bundling protein ABP34 from Dictyostelium discoideum was solved by Ca(2+)/S-SAD phasing and refined at 1.89 Å resolution. ABP34 is a calcium-regulated actin-binding protein that cross-links actin filaments into bundles. Its in vitro F-actin-binding and F-actin-bundling activities were confirmed by a co-sedimentation assay and transmission electron microscopy. The co-localization of ABP34 with actin in cells was also verified. ABP34 adopts a two-domain structure with an EF-hand-containing N-domain and an actin-binding C-domain, but has no reported overall structural homologues. The EF-hand is occupied by a calcium ion with a pentagonal bipyramidal coordination as in the canonical EF-hand. The C-domain structure resembles a three-helical bundle and superposes well onto the rod-shaped helical structures of some cytoskeletal proteins. Residues 216-244 in the C-domain form part of the strongest actin-binding sites (193-254) and exhibit a conserved sequence with the actin-binding region of α-actinin and ABP120. Furthermore, the second helical region of the C-domain is kinked by a proline break, offering a convex surface towards the solvent area which is implicated in actin binding. The F-actin-binding model suggests that ABP34 binds to the side of the actin filament and residues 216-244 fit into a pocket between actin subdomains -1 and -2 through hydrophobic interactions. These studies provide insights into the calcium coordination in the EF-hand and F-actin-binding site in the C-domain of ABP34, which are associated through interdomain interactions. PMID:26327373

  18. Structural and evolutionary division of phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Temple, Brenda; Bencharit, Sompop; Kimple, Adam J; Siderovski, David P; Johnson, Gary L

    2005-01-01

    Proteins encoding phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains function as adaptors or scaffolds to organize the signaling complexes involved in wide-ranging physiological processes including neural development, immunity, tissue homeostasis and cell growth. There are more than 200 proteins in eukaryotes and nearly 60 human proteins having PTB domains. Six PTB domain encoded proteins have been found to have mutations that contribute to inherited human diseases including familial stroke, hypercholesteremia, coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, demonstrating the importance of PTB scaffold proteins in organizing critical signaling complexes. PTB domains bind both peptides and headgroups of phosphatidylinositides, utilizing two distinct binding motifs to mediate spatial organization and localization within cells. The structure of PTB domains confers specificity for binding peptides having a NPXY motif with differing requirements for phosphorylation of the tyrosine within this recognition sequence. In this review, we use structural, evolutionary and functional analysis to divide PTB domains into three groups represented by phosphotyrosine-dependent Shc-like, phosphotyrosine-dependent IRS-like and phosphotyrosine-independent Dab-like PTBs, with the Dab-like PTB domains representing nearly 75% of proteins encoding PTB domains. In addition, we further define the binding characteristics of the cognate ligands for each group of PTB domains. The signaling complexes organized by PTB domain encoded proteins are largely unknown and represents an important challenge in systems biology for the future. PMID:15567406

  19. Circulating Complexes of the Vitamin D Binding Protein with G-Actin Induce Lung Inflammation by Targeting Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lingyin; Trujillo, Glenda; Miller, Edmund J.; Kew, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the actin scavenger function of the vitamin D binding protein (DBP) in vivo using DBP null (−/−) mice. Intravenous injection of G-actin into wild-type (DBP+/+) and DBP−/− mice showed that contrary to expectations, DBP+/+ mice developed more severe acute lung inflammation. Inflammation was restricted to the lung and pathological changes were clearly evident at 1.5 and 4 hours post-injection but were largely resolved by 24 hours. Histology of DBP+/+ lungs revealed noticeably more vascular leakage, hemorrhage and thickening of the alveolar wall. Flow cytometry analysis of whole lung homogenates showed significantly increased neutrophil infiltration into DBP+/+ mouse lungs at 1.5 and 4 hours. Increased amounts of protein and leukocytes were also noted in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from DBP+/+ mice 4 hours after actin injection. In vitro, purified DBP-actin complexes did not activate complement or neutrophils but induced injury and death of cultured human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Cells treated with DBP-actin showed a significant reduction in viability at 4 hours, this effect was reversible if cells were cultured in fresh media for another 24 hours. However, a 24-hour treatment with DBP-actin complexes showed a significant increase in cell death (95% for HLMVEC, 45% for HUVEC). The mechanism of endothelial cell death was via both caspase-3 dependent (HUVEC) and independent (HLMVEC) pathways. These results demonstrate that elevated levels and/or prolonged exposure to DBP-actin complexes may induce endothelial cell injury and death, particularly in the lung microvasculature. PMID:24268110

  20. The Disruption of the Cytoskeleton during Semaphorin 3A induced Growth Cone Collapse Correlates with Differences in Actin Organization and Associated Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A; Bridgman, Paul C

    2010-01-01

    Repulsive guidance cues induce growth cone collapse or collapse and retraction. Collapse results from disruption and loss of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin rich regions of growth cones contain binding proteins that influence filament organization, such as Arp2/3, cortactin, and fascin, but little is known about the role that these proteins play in collapse. Here we show that Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A), which is repulsive to mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, has unequal effects on actin binding proteins and their associated filaments. The immunofluorescence staining intensity of Arp-2 and cortactin decreases relative to total protein, while in unextracted growth cones fascin increases. Fascin and myosin IIB staining redistribute and show increased overlap. The degree of actin filament loss during collapse correlates with filament superstructures detected by rotary shadow electron microscopy. Collapse results in the loss of branched f-actin meshworks, while actin bundles are partially retained to varying degrees. Taken together with the known affects of Sema 3A on actin, this suggests a model for collapse that follows a sequence; depolymerization of actin meshworks followed by partial depolymerization of fascin associated actin bundles and their movement to the neurite to complete collapse. The relocated fascin associated actin bundles may provide the substrate for actomyosin contractions that produce retraction. PMID:19513995

  1. Nuclear DNA helicase II (RNA helicase A) binds to an F-actin containing shell that surrounds the nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suisheng; Köhler, Carsten; Hemmerich, Peter; Grosse, Frank

    2004-02-15

    Nuclear DNA helicase II (NDH II), alternatively named RNA helicase A (RHA), is an F-actin binding protein that is particularly enriched in the nucleolus of mouse cells. Here, we show that the nucleolar localization of NDH II of murine 3T3 cells depended on an ongoing rRNA synthesis. NDH II migrated out of the nucleolus after administration of 0.05 microg/ml actinomycin D, while nucleolin and the upstream binding factor (UBF) remained there. In S phase-arrested mouse cells, NDH II was frequently found at the nucleolar periphery, where it was accompanied by newly synthesized nucleolar RNA. Human NDH II was mainly distributed through the whole nucleoplasm and not enriched in the nucleoli. However, in the human breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7, NDH II was also found at the nucleolar periphery, together with the tumor suppressor protein p53. Both NDH II and p53 were apparently attached to the F-actin-based filamentous network that surrounded the nucleoli. Accordingly, this subnuclear structure was sensitive to F-actin depolymerizing agents. Depolymerization with gelsolin led to a striking accumulation of NDH II in the nucleoli of MCF-7 cells. This effect was abolished by RNase, which extensively released nucleolus-bound NDH II when added together with gelsolin. Taken together, these results support the idea that an actin-based filamentous network may anchor NDH II at the nucleolar periphery for pre-ribosomal RNA processing, ribosome assembly, and/or transport. PMID:14729462

  2. Functional Characterization of an Extended Binding Component of the Actin-ADP-Ribosylating C2 Toxin Detected in Clostridium botulinum Strain (C) 2300 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sterthoff, Charlott; Lang, Alexander E.; Schwan, Carsten; Tauch, Andreas; Aktories, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin consists of the binding component C2II and the enzyme component C2I, which ADP-ribosylates G-actin of eukaryotic cells. Trypsin-activated C2II (C2IIa) forms heptamers that mediate cell binding and translocation of C2I from acidic endosomes into the cytosol of target cells. By genome sequencing of C. botulinum strain (C) 2300, we found that C2II from this strain carries a C-terminal extension of 129 amino acids, unlike its homologous counterparts from strains (C) 203U28, (C) 468, and (D) 1873. This extension shows a high similarity to the C-terminal receptor-binding domain of C2II and is presumably the result of a duplication of this domain. The C2II extension facilitates the binding to cell surface receptors, which leads to an increased intoxication efficiency compared to that of C2II proteins from other C. botulinum strains. PMID:20145093

  3. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26900020

  4. Sensing actin dynamics: Structural basis for G-actin-sensitive nuclear import of MAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} MAL has a bipartite NLS that binds to Imp{alpha} in an extended conformation. {yields} Mutational analyses verified the functional significance of MAL-Imp{alpha} interactions. {yields} Induced folding and NLS-masking by G-actins inhibit nuclear import of MAL. -- Abstract: The coordination of cytoskeletal actin dynamics with gene expression reprogramming is emerging as a crucial mechanism to control diverse cellular processes, including cell migration, differentiation and neuronal circuit assembly. The actin-binding transcriptional coactivator MAL (also known as MRTF-A/MKL1/BSAC) senses G-actin concentration and transduces Rho GTPase signals to serum response factor (SRF). MAL rapidly shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in unstimulated cells but Rho-induced depletion of G-actin leads to MAL nuclear accumulation and activation of transcription of SRF:MAL-target genes. Although the molecular and structural basis of actin-regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of MAL is not understood fully, it is proposed that nuclear import of MAL is mediated by importin {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer, and that G-actin competes with importin {alpha}/{beta} for the binding to MAL. Here we present structural, biochemical and cell biological evidence that MAL has a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal 'RPEL' domain containing Arg-Pro-X-X-X-Glu-Leu (RPEL) motifs. The NLS residues of MAL adopt an extended conformation and bind along the surface groove of importin-{alpha}, interacting with the major- and minor-NLS binding sites. We also present a crystal structure of wild-type MAL RPEL domain in complex with five G-actins. Comparison of the importin-{alpha}- and actin-complexes revealed that the binding of G-actins to MAL is associated with folding of NLS residues into a helical conformation that is inappropriate for importin-{alpha} recognition.

  5. 2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase binds to actin-based cytoskeletal elements in an isoprenylation-independent manner.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, D A; Braun, P E

    1996-09-01

    2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) is an isoprenylated protein enriched in myelin and oligodendrocytes but also present in several other tissues at low levels. CNP binds avidly to membranes and in addition possesses several characteristics of cytoskeletal proteins. The role of isoprenylation in the association of CNP with the cytoskeleton was analyzed by ectopic expression in L cells of epitope-tagged CNP1 and a non-isoprenylated mutant CNP1. Using nonionic detergent extraction, drug-mediated cytoskeletal disruption, and coimmunoprecipitation with an anti-actin antibody, we show that CNP1 is associated with actin-based cytoskeletal elements independently of its isoprenylation status. A control protein, p21c-H-ras, which is also modified by isoprenylation at its carboxyl-terminus, does not bind to cytoskeletal structures as judged by the same criteria. We present a model that accounts for the association of CNP1 with membranes and the cytoskeleton. PMID:8752099

  6. Structural Dynamics of the Cereblon Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Marcus D.; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution. PMID:26024445

  7. The Intimin periplasmic domain mediates dimerisation and binding to peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Leo, Jack C; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Chaubey, Manish; Schütz, Monika; Kühner, Daniel; Bertsche, Ute; Schwarz, Heinz; Götz, Friedrich; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Coles, Murray; Linke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Intimin and Invasin are prototypical inverse (Type Ve) autotransporters and important virulence factors of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Yersinia spp. respectively. In addition to a C-terminal extracellular domain and a β-barrel transmembrane domain, both proteins also contain a short N-terminal periplasmic domain that, in Intimin, includes a lysin motif (LysM), which is thought to mediate binding to peptidoglycan. We show that the periplasmic domain of Intimin does bind to peptidoglycan both in vitro and in vivo, but only under acidic conditions. We were able to determine a dissociation constant of 0.8 μM for this interaction, whereas the Invasin periplasmic domain, which lacks a LysM, bound only weakly in vitro and failed to bind peptidoglycan in vivo. We present the solution structure of the Intimin LysM, which has an additional α-helix conserved within inverse autotransporter LysMs but lacking in others. In contrast to previous reports, we demonstrate that the periplasmic domain of Intimin mediates dimerisation. We further show that dimerisation and peptidoglycan binding are general features of LysM-containing inverse autotransporters. Peptidoglycan binding by the periplasmic domain in the infection process may aid in resisting mechanical and chemical stress during transit through the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25353290

  8. Alpha-amylase starch binding domains: cooperative effects of binding to starch granules of multiple tandemly arranged domains.

    PubMed

    Guillén, D; Santiago, M; Linares, L; Pérez, R; Morlon, J; Ruiz, B; Sánchez, S; Rodríguez-Sanoja, R

    2007-06-01

    The Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase starch binding domain (SBD) is a functional domain responsible for binding to insoluble starch. Structurally, this domain is dissimilar from other reported SBDs because it is composed of five identical tandem modules of 91 amino acids each. To understand adsorption phenomena specific to this SBD, the importance of their modular arrangement in relationship to binding ability was investigated. Peptides corresponding to one, two, three, four, or five modules were expressed as His-tagged proteins. Protein binding assays showed an increased capacity of adsorption as a function of the number of modules, suggesting that each unit of the SBD may act in an additive or synergic way to optimize binding to raw starch. PMID:17468268

  9. Fused protein domains inhibit DNA binding by LexA.

    PubMed Central

    Golemis, E A; Brent, R

    1992-01-01

    Many studies of transcription activation employ fusions of activation domains to DNA binding domains derived from the bacterial repressor LexA and the yeast activator GAL4. Such studies often implicitly assume that DNA binding by the chimeric proteins is equivalent to that of the protein donating the DNA binding moiety. To directly investigate this issue, we compared operator binding by a series of LexA-derivative proteins to operator binding by native LexA, by using both in vivo and in vitro assays. We show that operator binding by many proteins such as LexA-Myc, LexA-Fos, and LexA-Bicoid is severely impaired, while binding of other LexA-derivative proteins, such as those that carry bacterially encoded acidic sequences ("acid blobs"), is not. Our results also show that DNA binding by LexA derivatives that contain the LexA carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (amino acids 88 to 202) is considerably stronger than binding by fusions that lack it and that heterologous dimerization motifs cannot substitute for the LexA88-202 function. These results suggest the need to reevaluate some previous studies of activation that employed LexA derivatives and modifications to recent experimental approaches that use LexA and GAL4 derivatives to detect and study protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:1620111

  10. Computational Analysis of the Binding Specificities of PH Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi; Liang, Zhongjie; Shen, Bairong; Hu, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains share low sequence identities but extremely conserved structures. They have been found in many proteins for cellular signal-dependent membrane targeting by binding inositol phosphates to perform different physiological functions. In order to understand the sequence-structure relationship and binding specificities of PH domains, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and sequence-based combined with structure-based binding analysis were employed in our research. In the structural aspect, the binding specificities were shown to correlate with the hydropathy characteristics of PH domains and electrostatic properties of the bound inositol phosphates. By comparing these structure properties with sequence-based profiles of physicochemical properties, PH domains can be classified into four functional subgroups according to their binding specificities and affinities to inositol phosphates. The method not only provides a simple and practical paradigm to predict binding specificities for functional genomic research but also gives new insight into the understanding of the basis of diseases with respect to PH domain structures. PMID:26881206

  11. F-actin binds to the cytoplasmic surface of ponticulin, a 17-kD integral glycoprotein from Dictyostelium discoideum plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Wuestehube, L J; Luna, E J

    1987-10-01

    F-actin affinity chromatography and immunological techniques are used to identify actin-binding proteins in purified Dictyostelium discoideum plasma membranes. A 17-kD integral glycoprotein (gp17) consistently elutes from F-actin columns as the major actin-binding protein under a variety of experimental conditions. The actin-binding activity of gp17 is identical to that of intact plasma membranes: it resists extraction with 0.1 N NaOH, 1 mM dithiothreitol (DTT); it is sensitive to ionic conditions; it is stable over a wide range of pH; and it is eliminated by proteolysis, denaturation with heat, or treatment with DTT and N-ethylmaleimide. gp17 may be responsible for much of the actin-binding activity of plasma membranes since monovalent antibody fragments (Fab) directed primarily against gp17 inhibit actin-membrane binding by 96% in sedimentation assays. In contrast, Fab directed against cell surface determinants inhibit binding by only 0-10%. The actin-binding site of gp17 appears to be located on the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane since Fab against this protein continue to inhibit 96% of actin-membrane binding even after extensive adsorption against cell surfaces. gp17 is abundant in the plasma membrane, constituting 0.4-1.0% of the total membrane protein. A transmembrane orientation of gp17 is suggested since, in addition to the cytoplasmic localization of the actin-binding site, extracellular determinants of gp17 are identified. gp17 is surface-labeled by sulfo-N-hydroxy-succinimido-biotin, a reagent that cannot penetrate the cell membrane. Also, gp17 is glycosylated since it is specifically bound by the lectin, concanavalin A. We propose that gp17 is a major actin-binding protein that is important for connecting the plasma membrane to the underlying microfilament network. Therefore, we have named this protein "ponticulin" from the Latin word, ponticulus, which means small bridge. PMID:3312238

  12. Simiate is an Actin binding protein involved in filopodia dynamics and arborization of neurons

    PubMed Central

    Derlig, Kristin; Ehrhardt, Toni; Gießl, Andreas; Brandstätter, Johann H.; Enz, Ralf; Dahlhaus, Regina

    2014-01-01

    The Actin cytoskeleton constitutes the functional base for a multitude of cellular processes extending from motility and migration to cell mechanics and morphogenesis. The latter is particularly important to neuronal cells since the accurate functioning of the brain crucially depends on the correct arborization of neurons, a process that requires the formation of several dozens to hundreds of dendritic branches. Recently, a model was proposed where different transcription factors are detailed to distinct facets and phases of dendritogenesis and exert their function by acting on the Actin cytoskeleton, however, the proteins involved as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Simiate, a protein previously indicated to activate transcription, directly associates with both, G- and F-Actin and in doing so, affects Actin polymerization and Actin turnover in living cells. Imaging studies illustrate that Simiate particularly influences filopodia dynamics and specifically increases the branching of proximal, but not distal dendrites of developing neurons. The data suggests that Simiate functions as a direct molecular link between transcription regulation on one side, and dendritogenesis on the other, wherein Simiate serves to coordinate the development of proximal and distal dendrites by acting on the Actin cytoskeleton of filopodia and on transcription regulation, hence supporting the novel model. PMID:24782708

  13. F-actin binding regions on the androgen receptor and huntingtin increase aggregation and alter aggregate characteristics.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Suzanne; Shao, Jieya; Diamond, Marc I

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is associated with neurodegeneration. Polyglutamine expansion diseases such as spinobulbar muscular atrophy and Huntington disease feature proteins that are destabilized by an expanded polyglutamine tract in their N-termini. It has previously been reported that intracellular aggregation of these target proteins, the androgen receptor (AR) and huntingtin (Htt), is modulated by actin-regulatory pathways. Sequences that flank the polyglutamine tract of AR and Htt might influence protein aggregation and toxicity through protein-protein interactions, but this has not been studied in detail. Here we have evaluated an N-terminal 127 amino acid fragment of AR and Htt exon 1. The first 50 amino acids of ARN127 and the first 14 amino acids of Htt exon 1 mediate binding to filamentous actin in vitro. Deletion of these actin-binding regions renders the polyglutamine-expanded forms of ARN127 and Htt exon 1 less aggregation-prone, and increases the SDS-solubility of aggregates that do form. These regions thus appear to alter the aggregation frequency and type of polyglutamine-induced aggregation. These findings highlight the importance of flanking sequences in determining the propensity of unstable proteins to misfold. PMID:20140226

  14. Actin-binding protein alpha-actinin 4 (ACTN4) is a transcriptional co-activator of RelA/p65 sub-unit of NF-kB

    PubMed Central

    Aksenova, Vasilisa; Turoverova, Lidia; Khotin, Mikhail; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Tulchinsky, Eugene; Melino, Gerry; Pinaev, George P.; Barlev, Nickolai; Tentler, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    ACTN4 is an actin-binding protein that participates in cytoskeleton organisation. It resides both in the cytoplasm and nucleus and physically associates with various transcription factors. Here, we describe an effect of ACTN4 expression on transcriptional activity of the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-kB. We demonstrate that ACTN4 enhances RelA/p65-dependant expression of c-fos, MMP-3 and MMP-1 genes, but it does not affect TNC, ICAM1 and FN1 expression. Importantly, actin-binding domains of ACTN4 are not critical for the nuclear translocation and co-activation of RelA/p65-dependent transcription. Collectively, our data suggest that in the nucleus, ACTN4 functions as a selective transcriptional co-activator of RelA/p65. PMID:23482348

  15. Comprehensive Identification of RNA-Binding Domains in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Castello, Alfredo; Fischer, Bernd; Frese, Christian K; Horos, Rastislav; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Foehr, Sophia; Curk, Tomaz; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Hentze, Matthias W

    2016-08-18

    Mammalian cells harbor more than a thousand RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), with half of these employing unknown modes of RNA binding. We developed RBDmap to determine the RNA-binding sites of native RBPs on a proteome-wide scale. We identified 1,174 binding sites within 529 HeLa cell RBPs, discovering numerous RNA-binding domains (RBDs). Catalytic centers or protein-protein interaction domains are in close relationship with RNA-binding sites, invoking possible effector roles of RNA in the control of protein function. Nearly half of the RNA-binding sites map to intrinsically disordered regions, uncovering unstructured domains as prevalent partners in protein-RNA interactions. RNA-binding sites represent hot spots for defined posttranslational modifications such as lysine acetylation and tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting metabolic and signal-dependent regulation of RBP function. RBDs display a high degree of evolutionary conservation and incidence of Mendelian mutations, suggestive of important functional roles. RBDmap thus yields profound insights into native protein-RNA interactions in living cells. PMID:27453046

  16. Function and Regulation Domains of a Newly Isolated Putative β-Actin Promoter from Pacific White Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jianhai; Lu, Yuanan

    2015-01-01

    Current development of transgenic shrimp research has been hampered due to the lack of the suitable promoters and efficient transfection methods for crustaceans. A 1642 bp sequence, containing 5’-upstream sequence, exon 1, intron 1 and partial exon 2, which is responsible for transcriptional initiation of the newly reported shrimp β-actin (actinT1), has been isolated from the Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) and named as SbaP. To determine its function and potential application in marine biotechnology, the sequence and functional domains were examined by constitutive expression of the luciferase reporter gene. We have identified 5’ regions that play a central role in the expression of the β-actin gene. The proximal promoter (-1642/-1325) contains two highly conserved transcriptional sites, CCAAT box and CArG motif. Two negative (-1140/-924, -222/-21) and one positive (-810/-425) regulatory elements have been identified in intron1. Transient transfection assay with a construct containing proximal promoter and enhancer (SbaPΔ-222/+1Δ-1325/-924) regions of the shrimp β-actin coupled with luciferase and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) showed that the promoter was not only functional in sf21 cells, but promoter activity was more than 8-fold higher than a viral-origin promoter (ie1, white spot syndrome virus immediate early gene promoter). Furthermore, SbaPΔ-222/+1Δ-1325/-924 drove a successful expression of luciferase injection assay in vivo injection and also showed higher promoter activity than the ie1 promoter, suggesting that the expression vectors constructed with SbaPΔ-222/+1Δ-1325/-924 have important potential in gene transfer studies for shrimp and other crustacean species. PMID:25835297

  17. Reconstitution of Actin-based Motility by Vasodilator-stimulated Phosphoprotein (VASP) Depends on the Recruitment of F-actin Seeds from the Solution Produced by Cofilin*

    PubMed Central

    Siton, Orit; Bernheim-Groswasser, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is active in many filopodium-based and cytoskeleton reorganization processes. It is not fully understood how VASP directly functions in actin-based motility and how regulatory proteins affect its function. Here, we combine bead motility assay and single filament experiments. In the presence of a bundling component, actin bundles that grow from the surface of WT-VASP-coated beads induced movement of the beads. VASP promotes actin-based movement alone, in the absence of other actin nucleators. We propose that at physiological salt conditions VASP nucleation activity is too weak to promote motility and bundle formation. Rather, VASP recruits F-actin seeds from the solution and promotes their elongation. Cofilin has a crucial role in the nucleation of these F-actin seeds, notably under conditions of unfavorable spontaneous actin nucleation. We explored the role of multiple VASP variants. We found that the VASP-F-actin binding domain is required for the recruitment of F-actin seeds from the solution. We also found that the interaction of profilin-actin complexes with the VASP-proline-rich domain and the binding of the VASP-F-actin binding domain to the side of growing filaments is critical for transforming actin polymerization into motion. At the single filament level, profilin mediates both filament elongation rate and VASP anti-capping activity. Binding of profilin-actin complexes increases the polymerization efficiency by VASP but decreases its efficiency as an anti-capper; binding of free profilin creates the opposite effect. Finally, we found that an additional component such as methylcellulose or fascin is required for actin bundle formation and motility mediated by VASP. PMID:25246528

  18. Molecular Evolution of the Oxygen-Binding Hemerythrin Domain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis during Precambrian times entailed the diversification of strategies minimizing reactive oxygen species-associated damage. Four families of oxygen-carrier proteins (hemoglobin, hemerythrin and the two non-homologous families of arthropodan and molluscan hemocyanins) are known to have evolved independently the capacity to bind oxygen reversibly, providing cells with strategies to cope with the evolutionary pressure of oxygen accumulation. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin was first studied in marine invertebrates but further research has made it clear that it is present in the three domains of life, strongly suggesting that its origin predated the emergence of eukaryotes. Results Oxygen-binding hemerythrins are a monophyletic sub-group of the hemerythrin/HHE (histidine, histidine, glutamic acid) cation-binding domain. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologs were unambiguously identified in 367/2236 bacterial, 21/150 archaeal and 4/135 eukaryotic genomes. Overall, oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues were found in the same proportion as single-domain and as long protein sequences. The associated functions of protein domains in long hemerythrin sequences can be classified in three major groups: signal transduction, phosphorelay response regulation, and protein binding. This suggests that in many organisms the reversible oxygen-binding capacity was incorporated in signaling pathways. A maximum-likelihood tree of oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues revealed a complex evolutionary history in which lateral gene transfer, duplications and gene losses appear to have played an important role. Conclusions Hemerythrin is an ancient protein domain with a complex evolutionary history. The distinctive iron-binding coordination site of oxygen-binding hemerythrins evolved first in prokaryotes, very likely prior to the divergence of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and spread into many bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic species. The later

  19. X-ray diffraction indicates that active cross-bridges bind to actin target zones in insect flight muscle.

    PubMed

    Tregear, R T; Edwards, R J; Irving, T C; Poole, K J; Reedy, M C; Schmitz, H; Towns-Andrews, E; Reedy, M K

    1998-03-01

    We report the first time-resolved study of the two-dimensional x-ray diffraction pattern during active contraction in insect flight muscle (IFM). Activation of demembranated Lethocerus IFM was triggered by 1.5-2.5% step stretches (risetime 10 ms; held for 1.5 s) giving delayed active tension that peaked at 100-200 ms. Bundles of 8-12 fibers were stretch-activated on SRS synchrotron x-ray beamline 16.1, and time-resolved changes in diffraction were monitored with a SRS 2-D multiwire detector. As active tension rose, the 14.5- and 7.2-nm meridionals fell, the first row line dropped at the 38.7 nm layer line while gaining a new peak at 19.3 nm, and three outer peaks on the 38.7-nm layer line rose. The first row line changes suggest restricted binding of active myosin heads to the helically preferred region in each actin target zone, where, in rigor, two-headed lead bridges bind, midway between troponin bulges that repeat every 38.7 nm. Halving this troponin repeat by binding of single active heads explains the intensity rise at 19.3 nm being coupled to a loss at 38.7 nm. The meridional changes signal movement of at least 30% of all myosin heads away from their axially ordered positions on the myosin helix. The 38.7- and 19.3-nm layer line changes signal stereoselective attachment of 7-23% of the myosin heads to the actin helix, although with too little ordering at 6-nm resolution to affect the 5.9-nm actin layer line. We conclude that stretch-activated tension of IFM is produced by cross-bridges that bind to rigor's lead-bridge target zones, comprising < or = 1/3 of the 75-80% that attach in rigor. PMID:9512040

  20. Two-headed binding of a processive myosin to F-actin.

    PubMed

    Walker, M L; Burgess, S A; Sellers, J R; Wang, F; Hammer, J A; Trinick, J; Knight, P J

    2000-06-15

    Myosins are motor proteins in cells. They move along actin by changing shape after making stereospecific interactions with the actin subunits. As these are arranged helically, a succession of steps will follow a helical path. However, if the myosin heads are long enough to span the actin helical repeat (approximately 36 nm), linear motion is possible. Muscle myosin (myosin II) heads are about 16 nm long, which is insufficient to span the repeat. Myosin V, however, has heads of about 31 nm that could span 36 nm and thus allow single two-headed molecules to transport cargo by walking straight. Here we use electron microscopy to show that while working, myosin V spans the helical repeat. The heads are mostly 13 actin subunits apart, with values of 11 or 15 also found. Typically the structure is polar and one head is curved, the other straighter. Single particle processing reveals the polarity of the underlying actin filament, showing that the curved head is the leading one. The shape of the leading head may correspond to the beginning of the working stroke of the motor. We also observe molecules attached by one head in this conformation. PMID:10866203

  1. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P.; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N.; Bayer, K. Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J.; Klip, Amira

    2012-01-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding–deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells. PMID:22918957

  2. A novel p53-binding domain in CUL7.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jocelyn S; Arai, Takehiro; DeCaprio, James A

    2006-09-15

    CUL7 is a member of the cullin RING ligase family and forms an SCF-like complex with SKP1 and FBXW8. CUL7 is required for normal mouse embryonic development and cellular proliferation, and is highly homologous to PARC, a p53-associated, parkin-like cytoplasmic protein. We determined that CUL7, in a manner similar to PARC, can bind directly to p53 but does not affect p53 expression. We identified a discrete, co-linear domain in CUL7 that is conserved in PARC and HERC2, and is necessary and sufficient for p53-binding. The presence of p53 stabilized expression of this domain and we demonstrate that this p53-binding domain of CUL7 contributes to the cytoplasmic localization of CUL7. The results support the model that p53 plays a role in regulation of CUL7 activity. PMID:16875676

  3. A novel p53-binding domain in CUL7

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, Jocelyn S.; Arai, Takehiro; De Caprio, James A. . E-mail: james_decaprio@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-09-15

    CUL7 is a member of the cullin RING ligase family and forms an SCF-like complex with SKP1 and FBXW8. CUL7 is required for normal mouse embryonic development and cellular proliferation, and is highly homologous to PARC, a p53-associated, parkin-like cytoplasmic protein. We determined that CUL7, in a manner similar to PARC, can bind directly to p53 but does not affect p53 expression. We identified a discrete, co-linear domain in CUL7 that is conserved in PARC and HERC2, and is necessary and sufficient for p53-binding. The presence of p53 stabilized expression of this domain and we demonstrate that this p53-binding domain of CUL7 contributes to the cytoplasmic localization of CUL7. The results support the model that p53 plays a role in regulation of CUL7 activity.

  4. Structural stabilization of GTP-binding domains in circularly permuted GTPases: Implications for RNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Baskaran; Verma, Sunil Kumar; Prakash, Balaji

    2006-01-01

    GTP hydrolysis by GTPases requires crucial residues embedded in a conserved G-domain as sequence motifs G1–G5. However, in some of the recently identified GTPases, the motif order is circularly permuted. All possible circular permutations were identified after artificially permuting the classical GTPases and subjecting them to profile Hidden Markov Model searches. This revealed G4–G5–G1–G2–G3 as the only possible circular permutation that can exist in nature. It was also possible to recognize a structural rationale for the absence of other permutations, which either destabilize the invariant GTPase fold or disrupt regions that provide critical residues for GTP binding and hydrolysis, such as Switch-I and Switch-II. The circular permutation relocates Switch-II to the C-terminus and leaves it unfastened, thus affecting GTP binding and hydrolysis. Stabilizing this region would require the presence of an additional domain following Switch-II. Circularly permuted GTPases (cpGTPases) conform to such a requirement and always possess an ‘anchoring’ C-terminal domain. There are four sub-families of cpGTPases, of which three possess an additional domain N-terminal to the G-domain. The biochemical function of these domains, based on available experimental reports and domain recognition analysis carried out here, are suggestive of RNA binding. The features that dictate RNA binding are unique to each subfamily. It is possible that RNA-binding modulates GTP binding or vice versa. In addition, phylogenetic analysis indicates a closer evolutionary relationship between cpGTPases and a set of universally conserved bacterial GTPases that bind the ribosome. It appears that cpGTPases are RNA-binding proteins possessing a means to relate GTP binding to RNA binding. PMID:16648363

  5. PDZ Domain Binding Selectivity Is Optimized Across the Mouse Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Stiffler, Michael A.; Chen, Jiunn R.; Grantcharova, Viara P.; Lei, Ying; Fuchs, Daniel; Allen, John E.; Zaslavskaia, Lioudmila A.; MacBeath, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    PDZ domains have long been thought to cluster into discrete functional classes defined by their peptide-binding preferences. We used protein microarrays and quantitative fluorescence polarization to characterize the binding selectivity of 157 mouse PDZ domains with respect to 217 genome-encoded peptides. We then trained a multidomain selectivity model to predict PDZ domain–peptide interactions across the mouse proteome with an accuracy that exceeds many large-scale, experimental investigations of protein-protein interactions. Contrary to the current paradigm, PDZ domains do not fall into discrete classes; instead, they are evenly distributed throughout selectivity space, which suggests that they have been optimized across the proteome to minimize cross-reactivity. We predict that focusing on families of interaction domains, which facilitates the integration of experimentation and modeling, will play an increasingly important role in future investigations of protein function. PMID:17641200

  6. Structure, Subunit Topology, and Actin-binding Activity of the Arp2/3 Complex from Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, R. Dyche; Stafford, Walter F.; Pollard, Thomas D.

    1997-01-01

    The Arp2/3 complex, first isolated from Acanthamoeba castellani by affinity chromatography on profilin, consists of seven polypeptides; two actinrelated proteins, Arp2 and Arp3; and five apparently novel proteins, p40, p35, p19, p18, and p14 (Machesky et al., 1994). The complex is homogeneous by hydrodynamic criteria with a Stokes' radius of 5.3 nm by gel filtration, sedimentation coefficient of 8.7 S, and molecular mass of 197 kD by analytical ultracentrifugation. The stoichiometry of the subunits is 1:1:1:1:1:1:1, indicating the purified complex contains one copy each of seven polypeptides. In electron micrographs, the complex has a bilobed or horseshoe shape with outer dimensions of ∼13 × 10 nm, and mathematical models of such a shape and size are consistent with the measured hydrodynamic properties. Chemical cross-linking with a battery of cross-linkers of different spacer arm lengths and chemical reactivities identify the following nearest neighbors within the complex: Arp2 and p40; Arp2 and p35; Arp3 and p35; Arp3 and either p18 or p19; and p19 and p14. By fluorescent antibody staining with anti-p40 and -p35, the complex is concentrated in the cortex of the ameba, especially in linear structures, possibly actin filament bundles, that lie perpendicular to the leading edge. Purified Arp2/3 complex binds actin filaments with a Kd of 2.3 μM and a stoichiometry of approximately one complex molecule per actin monomer. In electron micrographs of negatively stained samples, Arp2/3 complex decorates the sides of actin filaments. EDC/NHS cross-links actin to Arp3, p35, and a low molecular weight subunit, p19, p18, or p14. We propose structural and topological models for the Arp2/3 complex and suggest that affinity for actin filaments accounts for the localization of complex subunits to actinrich regions of Acanthamoeba. PMID:9015304

  7. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis. PMID:25448478

  8. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor protein diffusion by actin corrals and lipid raft domains receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien Yu; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2015-03-01

    To faithfully estimate a signal that varies in both space and time, the optimization strategy used by a live cell is to organize a collection of distributed and mobile receptors into a mobile active clustering. However, living eukaryotic cells are highly heterogeneous and stochastically dynamic. It is therefore important to develop an energetic model based on fundamental laws to verify that the underlying processes are energetically favorable. We developed an energetic model based on the generalized Langevin equation and the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane with a hierarchical structure of actin corrals, lipid domains, and receptor proteins. Single-molecule tracking data of EGFR acquired on live HeLa cells agrees with the simulation results. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method captures both the sensitivity of single-molecule processes, statistic accuracy of data analysis, and the hierarchical structure of plasma membranes.

  9. Mechanism of Actin Filament Bundling by Fascin

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Yang, Changsong; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-03-07

    Fascin is the main actin filament bundling protein in filopodia. Because of the important role filopodia play in cell migration, fascin is emerging as a major target for cancer drug discovery. However, an understanding of the mechanism of bundle formation by fascin is critically lacking. Fascin consists of four {beta}-trefoil domains. Here, we show that fascin contains two major actin-binding sites, coinciding with regions of high sequence conservation in {beta}-trefoil domains 1 and 3. The site in {beta}-trefoil-1 is located near the binding site of the fascin inhibitor macroketone and comprises residue Ser-39, whose phosphorylation by protein kinase C down-regulates actin bundling and formation of filopodia. The site in {beta}-trefoil-3 is related by pseudo-2-fold symmetry to that in {beta}-trefoil-1. The two sites are {approx}5 nm apart, resulting in a distance between actin filaments in the bundle of {approx}8.1 nm. Residue mutations in both sites disrupt bundle formation in vitro as assessed by co-sedimentation with actin and electron microscopy and severely impair formation of filopodia in cells as determined by rescue experiments in fascin-depleted cells. Mutations of other areas of the fascin surface also affect actin bundling and formation of filopodia albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that, in addition to the two major actin-binding sites, fascin makes secondary contacts with other filaments in the bundle. In a high resolution crystal structure of fascin, molecules of glycerol and polyethylene glycol are bound in pockets located within the two major actin-binding sites. These molecules could guide the rational design of new anticancer fascin inhibitors.

  10. Identification of Novel Anionic Phospholipid Binding Domains in Neutral Sphingomyelinase 2 with Selective Binding Preference*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bill X.; Clarke, Christopher J.; Matmati, Nabil; Montefusco, David; Bartke, Nana; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide are recognized as vital regulators of many biological processes. Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2) is one of the key enzymes regulating ceramide production. It was previously shown that the enzymatic activity of nSMase2 was dependent on anionic phospholipids (APLs). In this study, the structural requirements for APL-selective binding of nSMase2 were determined and characterized. Using lipid-protein overlay assays, nSMase2 interacted specifically and directly with several APLs, including phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid. Lipid-protein binding studies of deletion mutants identified two discrete APL binding domains in the N terminus of nSMase2. Further, mutagenesis experiments pinpointed the core sequences and major cationic amino acids in the domains that are necessary for the cooperative activation of nSMase2 by APLs. The first domain included the first amino-terminal hydrophobic segment and Arg-33, which were essential for nSMase2 to interact with APLs. The second binding domain was comprised of the second hydrophobic segment and Arg-92 and Arg-93. Moreover, mutation of one or both domains decreased APL binding and APL-dependent catalytic activity of nSMase2. Further, mutation of both domains in nSMase2 reduced its plasma membrane localization. Finally, these binding domains are also important for the capability of nSMase2 to rescue the defects of yeast lacking the nSMase homologue, ISC1. In conclusion, these data have identified the APL binding domains of nSMase2 for the first time. The analysis of interactions between nSMase2 and APLs will contribute to our understanding of signaling pathways mediated by sphingolipid metabolites. PMID:21550973

  11. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  12. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  13. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  14. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  15. Fluorescent labelling of the actin cytoskeleton in plants using a cameloid antibody

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Certain members of the Camelidae family produce a special type of antibody with only one heavy chain. The antigen binding domains are the smallest functional fragments of these heavy-chain only antibodies and as a consequence have been termed nanobodies. Discovery of these nanobodies has allowed the development of a number of therapeutic proteins and tools. In this study a class of nanobodies fused to fluorescent proteins (chromobodies), and therefore allowing antigen-binding and visualisation by fluorescence, have been used. Such chromobodies can be expressed in living cells and used as genetically encoded immunocytochemical markers. Results Here a modified version of the commercially available Actin-Chromobody® as a novel tool for visualising actin dynamics in tobacco leaf cells was tested. The actin-chromobody binds to actin in a specific manner. Treatment with latrunculin B, a drug which disrupts the actin cytoskeleton through inhibition of polymerisation results in loss of fluorescence after less than 30 min but this can be rapidly restored by washing out latrunculin B and thereby allowing the actin filaments to repolymerise. To test the effect of the actin-chromobody on actin dynamics and compare it to one of the conventional labelling probes, Lifeact, the effect of both probes on Golgi movement was studied as the motility of Golgi bodies is largely dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. With the actin-chromobody expressed in cells, Golgi body movement was slowed down but the manner of movement rather than speed was affected less than with Lifeact. Conclusions The actin-chromobody technique presented in this study provides a novel option for in vivo labelling of the actin cytoskeleton in comparison to conventionally used probes that are based on actin binding proteins. The actin-chromobody is particularly beneficial to study actin dynamics in plant cells as it does label actin without impairing dynamic movement and polymerisation of the actin

  16. The receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype C binds phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD(50) of ∼1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a "dual receptor" mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro domain. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides in both assays. Interactions with phosphoinositides may facilitate tighter binding between neuronal membranes and BoNT/C. PMID:22120109

  17. The evolution of putative starch-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Machovic, Martin; Janecek, Stefan

    2006-11-27

    The present bioinformatics analysis was focused on the starch-binding domains (SBDs) and SBD-like motifs sequentially related to carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families CBM20 and CBM21. Originally, these SBDs were known from microbial amylases only. At present homologous starch- and glycogen-binding domains (or putative SBD sequences) have been recognised in various plant and animal proteins. The sequence comparison clearly showed that the SBD-like sequences in genethonin-1, starch synthase III and glucan branching enzyme should possess the real SBD function since the two tryptophans (or at least two aromatics) of the typical starch-binding site 1 are conserved in their sequences. The same should apply also for the sequences corresponding with the so-called KIS-domain of plant AKINbetagamma protein that is a homologue of the animal AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The evolutionary tree classified the compared SBDs into three distinct groups: (i) the family CBM20 (the motifs from genethonins, laforins, starch excess 4 protein, beta-subunits of the animal AMPK and all plant and yeast homologues, and eventually from amylopullulanases); (ii) the family CBM21 (the motifs from regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase 1 together with those from starch synthase III); and (iii) the (CBM20+CBM21)-related group (the motifs from the pullulanase subfamily consisting of pullulanase, branching enzyme, isoamylase and maltooligosyl trehalohydrolase). PMID:17084392

  18. Structural Basis for Viral Late-Domain Binding to Alix

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,S.; Joshi, A.; Nagashima, K.; Freed, E.; Hurley, J.

    2007-01-01

    The modular protein Alix is a central node in endosomal-lysosomal trafficking and the budding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. The Gag p6 protein of HIV-1 contains a LYPx{sub n}LxxL motif that is required for Alix-mediated budding and binds a region of Alix spanning residues 360-702. The structure of this fragment of Alix has the shape of the letter 'V' and is termed the V domain. The V domain has a topologically complex arrangement of 11 {alpha}-helices, with connecting loops that cross three times between the two arms of the V. The conserved residue Phe676 is at the center of a large hydrophobic pocket and is crucial for binding to a peptide model of HIV-1 p6. Overexpression of the V domain inhibits HIV-1 release from cells. This inhibition of release is reversed by mutations that block binding of the Alix V domain to p6.

  19. Structures of the spectrin-ankyrin interaction binding domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Huang, Lei; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2010-01-07

    As key components of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, spectrin and ankyrin specifically interact to tether the spectrin cytoskeleton to the cell membrane. The structure of the spectrin binding domain of ankyrin and the ankyrin binding domain of spectrin have been solved to elucidate the structural basis for ankyrin-spectrin recognition. The structure of repeats 14 and 15 of spectrin shows that these repeats are similar to all other spectrin repeats. One feature that could account for the preference of ankyrin for these repeats is the presence of a conserved, negatively charged patch on one side of repeat 14. The structure of the ankyrin ZU5 domain shows a novel structure containing a {beta} core. The structure reveals that the canonical ZU5 consensus sequence is likely to be missing an important region that codes for a {beta} strand that forms part of the core of the domain. In addition, a positively charged region is suggestive of a binding surface for the negatively charged spectrin repeat 14. Previously reported mutants of ankyrin that map to this region lie mostly on the surface of the protein, although at least one is likely to be part of the core.

  20. Single-headed binding of a spin-labeled-HMM-ADP complex to F-actin. Saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance and sedimentation studies.

    PubMed Central

    Manuck, B A; Seidel, J C; Gergely, J

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of actin and spin-labeled heavy meromyosin (MSL-HMM) was studied in the presence and absence of adenosine diphosphate or 5'-adenyl-yl-imidodiphosphate (AMPPNP) to determine the contributions of single and double-headed binding. The extent of single-headed binding to actin was deduced from a comparison of the fraction of immobilized heads (fi) with the fraction of bound molecules (fs) determined by saturation-transfer EPR (ST-EPR) and sedimentation, respectively. The ST-EPR measurements depend on the reduced motion of the spin label rigidly bound to the HMM heads upon the interaction of the latter with actin. During titration of acto-MSL-HMM with nucleotide, we measured changes in fi and fs brought about by dissociation of MSL-HMM from actin. On titration with ADP, fs changed very little, remaining above 0.8, while fi decreased to approximately 0.5 at 10mM ADP, a result consistent with extensive single-headed binding of MSL-HMM to actin. On titration with AMPPNP, single-headed binding was not detected; viz., fi and fs decreased in parallel. It was not necessary to postulate a nucleotide induced state of the bound heads, differing in motional properties from that of rigor heads, to account for the results. PMID:3017466

  1. Fimbrin phosphorylation by metaphase Cdk1 regulates actin cable dynamics in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yansong; Han, Xuemei; Zheng, Liangzhen; Xie, Ying; Mu, Yuguang; Yates, John R; Drubin, David G

    2016-01-01

    Actin cables, composed of actin filament bundles nucleated by formins, mediate intracellular transport for cell polarity establishment and maintenance. We previously observed that metaphase cells preferentially promote actin cable assembly through cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activity. However, the relevant metaphase Cdk1 targets were not known. Here we show that the highly conserved actin filament crosslinking protein fimbrin is a critical Cdk1 target for actin cable assembly regulation in budding yeast. Fimbrin is specifically phosphorylated on threonine 103 by the metaphase cyclin-Cdk1 complex, in vivo and in vitro. On the basis of conformational simulations, we suggest that this phosphorylation stabilizes fimbrin's N-terminal domain, and modulates actin filament binding to regulate actin cable assembly and stability in cells. Overall, this work identifies fimbrin as a key target for cell cycle regulation of actin cable assembly in budding yeast, and suggests an underlying mechanism. PMID:27068241

  2. Fimbrin phosphorylation by metaphase Cdk1 regulates actin cable dynamics in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yansong; Han, Xuemei; Zheng, Liangzhen; Xie, Ying; Mu, Yuguang; Yates, John R.; Drubin, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Actin cables, composed of actin filament bundles nucleated by formins, mediate intracellular transport for cell polarity establishment and maintenance. We previously observed that metaphase cells preferentially promote actin cable assembly through cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activity. However, the relevant metaphase Cdk1 targets were not known. Here we show that the highly conserved actin filament crosslinking protein fimbrin is a critical Cdk1 target for actin cable assembly regulation in budding yeast. Fimbrin is specifically phosphorylated on threonine 103 by the metaphase cyclin–Cdk1 complex, in vivo and in vitro. On the basis of conformational simulations, we suggest that this phosphorylation stabilizes fimbrin's N-terminal domain, and modulates actin filament binding to regulate actin cable assembly and stability in cells. Overall, this work identifies fimbrin as a key target for cell cycle regulation of actin cable assembly in budding yeast, and suggests an underlying mechanism. PMID:27068241

  3. Rotational motion of rhodamine 6G tethered to actin through oligo(ethylene glycol) linkers studied by frequency-domain fluorescence anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Wazawa, Tetsuichi; Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Nagai, Takeharu; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the rotational motion of a fluorescent probe tethered to a protein helps to elucidate the local properties of the solvent and protein near the conjugation site of the probe. In this study, we have developed an instrument for frequency-domain fluorescence (FDF) anisotropy measurements, and studied how the local properties around a protein, actin, can be elucidated from the rotational motion of a dye tethered to actin. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was attached to Cys-374 using newly-synthesized R6G-maleimide with three different oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) linker lengths. The time-resolved anisotropy decay of R6G tethered to G-actin was revealed to be a combination of the two modes of the wobbling motion of R6G and the tumbling motion of G-actin. The rotational diffusion coefficient (RDC) of R6G wobbling was ~0.1 ns−1 at 20°C and increased with OEG linker length. The use of the three R6G-actin conjugates of different linker lengths was useful to not only figure out the linker length dependence of the rotational motion of R6G but also validate the analyses. In the presence of a cosolvent of glycerol, although the tumbling motion of G-actin was retarded in response to the bulk viscosity, the wobbling motion of R6G tethered to actin exhibited an increase of RDC as glycerol concentration increased. This finding suggests an intricate relationship between the fluid properties of the bulk solvent and the local environment around actin. PMID:27493858

  4. Structure of the RNA-Binding Domain of Telomerase: Implications For RNA Recognition and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Rouda,S.; Skordalakes, E.

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex, replicates the linear ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, thus taking care of the 'end of replication problem.' TERT contains an essential and universally conserved domain (TRBD) that makes extensive contacts with the RNA (TER) component of the holoenzyme, and this interaction is thought to facilitate TERT/TER assembly and repeat-addition processivity. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of TRBD from Tetrahymena thermophila. The nearly all-helical structure comprises a nucleic acid-binding fold suitable for TER binding. An extended pocket on the surface of the protein, formed by two conserved motifs (CP and T motifs) comprises TRBD's RNA-binding pocket. The width and the chemical nature of this pocket suggest that it binds both single- and double-stranded RNA, possibly stem I, and the template boundary element (TBE). Moreover, the structure provides clues into the role of this domain in TERT/TER stabilization and telomerase repeat-addition processivity.

  5. SARS Coronavirus-unique Domain (SUD): Three-domain Molecular Architecture in Solution and RNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Margaret A.; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Neuman, Benjamin W.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3) of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) includes a “SARS-unique region” (SUD) consisting of three globular domains separated by short linker peptide segments. This paper reports NMR structure determinations of the C-terminal domain (SUD-C) and of a two-domain construct (SUD-MC) containing the middle domain (SUD-M) and the C-terminal domain, and NMR data on the conformational states of the N-terminal domain (SUD-N) and the SUD-NM two-domain construct. Both SUD-N and SUD-NM are monomeric and globular in solution, and in SUD-NM there is high mobility in the two-residue interdomain linking sequence, with no preferred relative orientation of the two domains. SUD-C adopts a frataxin-like fold and has structural similarity to DNA-binding domains of DNA-modifying enzymes. The structures of both SUD-M (previously determined) and SUD-C (from the present study) are maintained in SUD-MC, where the two domains are flexibly linked. Gel shift experiments showed that both SUD-C and SUD-MC bind to single-stranded RNA and recognize purine bases more strongly than pyrimidine bases, whereby SUD-MC binds to a more restricted set of purine-containing RNA sequences than SUD-M. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments with observation of the 15N-labeled proteins further resulted in the delineation of the RNA binding sites, i.e., in SUD-M a positively charged surface area with a pronounced cavity, and in SUD-C several residues of an antiparallel β-sheet. Overall, the present data provide evidence for molecular mechanisms involving concerted actions of SUD-M and SUD-C, which result in specific RNA-binding that might be unique to the SUD, and thus to the SARS-CoV. PMID:20493876

  6. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and electron paramagnetic resonance studies on skeletal muscle actin indicate that the metal and nucleotide binding sites are separate.

    PubMed

    Barden, J A; Cooke, R; Wright, P E; dos Remedios, C G

    1980-12-01

    The distance separating the high-affinity binding sites of actin for a divalent metal ion and nucleotide was evaluated by using high-resolution proton NMR and EPR spectroscopy. Replacement of the Ca2+ or Mg2+ bound to the high-affinity divalent cation site of G-actin by trivalent lanthanide ions such as La3+, EU3+, or Gd3+ results in an increase in the mobility of the bound ATP as observed in the NMR spectra of G-actin monomers. Little difference was observed between the spectra obtained in the presence of the diamagnetic La3+ control and the paramagnetic ions Eu3+ and Gd3+ which respectively shift and broaden the proton resonances of amino acids in the vicinity of the binding site. Analysis of the NMR spectra indicates that the metal and nucleotide binding sites are separated by a distance of at least 16 A. In the past, the metal and ATP have been widely assumed to bind as a complex. Further verification that the two sites on actin are physically separated was obtained by using an ATP analogue with a nitroxide spin-label bound at the 6' position of the purine ring. An estimate of the distance was made between the site containing the ATP analogue and the paramagnetic ion, Mn2+, bound to the cation binding site. These EPR experiments were not affected by the state of polymerization of the actin. The data obtained by using this technique support the conclusion stated above, namely, that the cation and nucleotide sites on either G- or F-actin are well separated. PMID:6257295

  7. Insights into how nucleotide-binding domains power ABC transport.

    PubMed

    Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W; Bilton, Paul; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Sadler, Peter J; Campopiano, Dominic J; Sansom, Mark S P; Iwata, So

    2009-09-01

    The mechanism by which nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of ABC transporters power the transport of substrates across cell membranes is currently unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of an NBD, FbpC, from the Neisseria gonorrhoeae ferric iron uptake transporter with an unusual and substantial domain swap in the C-terminal regulatory domain. This entanglement suggests that FbpC is unable to open to the same extent as the homologous protein MalK. Using molecular dynamics we demonstrate that this is not the case: both NBDs open rapidly once ATP is removed. We conclude from this result that the closed structures of FbpC and MalK have higher free energies than their respective open states. This result has important implications for our understanding of the mechanism of power generation in ABC transporters, because the unwinding of this free energy ensures that the opening of these two NBDs is also powered. PMID:19748342

  8. Predicting binding within disordered protein regions to structurally characterised peptide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Khan, Waqasuddin; Duffy, Fergal; Pollastri, Gianluca; Shields, Denis C; Mooney, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Disordered regions of proteins often bind to structured domains, mediating interactions within and between proteins. However, it is difficult to identify a priori the short disordered regions involved in binding. We set out to determine if docking such peptide regions to peptide binding domains would assist in these predictions.We assembled a redundancy reduced dataset of SLiM (Short Linear Motif) containing proteins from the ELM database. We selected 84 sequences which had an associated PDB structures showing the SLiM bound to a protein receptor, where the SLiM was found within a 50 residue region of the protein sequence which was predicted to be disordered. First, we investigated the Vina docking scores of overlapping tripeptides from the 50 residue SLiM containing disordered regions of the protein sequence to the corresponding PDB domain. We found only weak discrimination of docking scores between peptides involved in binding and adjacent non-binding peptides in this context (AUC 0.58).Next, we trained a bidirectional recurrent neural network (BRNN) using as input the protein sequence, predicted secondary structure, Vina docking score and predicted disorder score. The results were very promising (AUC 0.72) showing that multiple sources of information can be combined to produce results which are clearly superior to any single source.We conclude that the Vina docking score alone has only modest power to define the location of a peptide within a larger protein region known to contain it. However, combining this information with other knowledge (using machine learning methods) clearly improves the identification of peptide binding regions within a protein sequence. This approach combining docking with machine learning is primarily a predictor of binding to peptide-binding sites, and is not intended as a predictor of specificity of binding to particular receptors. PMID:24019881

  9. The SH3 regulatory domain of the hematopoietic cell kinase Hck binds ELMO via its polyproline motif.

    PubMed

    Awad, Rida; Sévajol, Marion; Ayala, Isabel; Chouquet, Anne; Frachet, Philippe; Gans, Pierre; Reiser, Jean-Baptiste; Kleman, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic EnguLfment and cell MOtility (ELMO) proteins form an evolutionary conserved family of regulators involved in small GTPase dependent actin remodeling processes that regulates the guanine exchange factor activity of some of the Downstream Of CrK (DOCK) family members. Gathered data strongly suggest that DOCK activation by ELMO and the subsequent signaling result from a subtle balance in the binding of partners to ELMO. Among its putative upward modulators, the Hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), a member of the Src kinase superfamily, has been identified as a binding partner and a specific tyrosine kinase for ELMO1. Indeed, Hck is implicated in distinct molecular signaling pathways governing phagocytosis, cell adhesion, and migration of hematopoietic cells. Although ELMO1 has been shown to interact with the regulatory Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain of Hck, no direct evidence indicating the mode of interaction between Hck and ELMO1 have been provided in the literature. In the present study, we report convergent pieces of evidence that demonstrate the specific interaction between the SH3 domain of Hck and the polyproline motif of ELMO1. Our results also suggest that the tyrosine-phosphorylation state of ELMO1 tail might act as a putative modulator of Hck kinase activity towards ELMO1 that in turn participates in DOCK180 activation and further triggers subsequent signaling towards actin remodeling. PMID:25737835

  10. The SH3 regulatory domain of the hematopoietic cell kinase Hck binds ELMO via its polyproline motif

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Rida; Marion, Sévajol; Isabel, Ayala; Anne, Chouquet; Philippe, Frachet; Pierre, Gans; Jean-Baptiste, Reiser; Jean-Philippe, Kleman

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic EnguLfment and cell MOtility (ELMO) proteins form an evolutionary conserved family of regulators involved in small GTPase dependent actin remodeling processes that regulates the guanine exchange factor activity of some of the Downstream Of CrK (DOCK) family members. Gathered data strongly suggest that DOCK activation by ELMO and the subsequent signaling result from a subtle balance in the binding of partners to ELMO. Among its putative upward modulators, the Hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), a member of the Src kinase superfamily, has been identified as a binding partner and a specific tyrosine kinase for ELMO1. Indeed, Hck is implicated in distinct molecular signaling pathways governing phagocytosis, cell adhesion, and migration of hematopoietic cells. Although ELMO1 has been shown to interact with the regulatory Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain of Hck, no direct evidence indicating the mode of interaction between Hck and ELMO1 have been provided in the literature. In the present study, we report convergent pieces of evidence that demonstrate the specific interaction between the SH3 domain of Hck and the polyproline motif of ELMO1. Our results also suggest that the tyrosine-phosphorylation state of ELMO1 tail might act as a putative modulator of Hck kinase activity towards ELMO1 that in turn participates in DOCK180 activation and further triggers subsequent signaling towards actin remodeling. PMID:25737835

  11. [Molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration--perspectives and approaches from the studies on the actin-binding protein Girdin].

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Atsushi; Kato, Takuya; Asai, Naoya; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-03-01

    In embryonal development and pathogenesis of diseases, cells often get connected and form small groups to undergo "collective migration", rather than spread out individually. The examples include the migration of neural crest cells and neuroblasts during development and the invasion of cancers in surrounding stroma, indicating the importance and significance of collective behavior of cells in the body. Recent studies have revealed the mechanisms for collective cell migration, which had seemed not to be the subject of traditional cell biology on single cells in culture. The heterogeneity in cell groups is also a key in understanding the mechanisms for collective cell migration. In this article, we describe recently emerging mechanisms for collective cell migration, with a particular focus on our studies on the actin-binding protein Girdin and tripartite motif containing 27. PMID:27025099

  12. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  13. Ubiquitin binds to and regulates a subset of SH3 domains

    PubMed Central

    Stamenova, Svetoslava D.; French, Michael E.; He, Yuan; Francis, Smitha A.; Kramer, Zachary B.; Hicke, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Summary SH3 domains are modules of 50-70 amino acids that promote interactions among proteins, often participating in the assembly of large dynamic complexes. These domains bind to peptide ligands, which usually contain a core Pro-X-X-Pro (PXXP) sequence. Here we identify a class of SH3 domains that binds to ubiquitin. The yeast endocytic protein Sla1, as well as the mammalian proteins CIN85 and amphiphysin, carry ubiquitin-binding SH3 domains. Ubiquitin and peptide ligands bind to the same hydrophobic groove on the SH3 domain surface, and ubiquitin and a PXXP-containing protein fragment compete for binding to SH3 domains. We conclude that a subset of SH3 domains constitutes a distinct type of ubiquitin-binding domain, and that ubiquitin-binding can negatively regulate interaction of SH3 domains with canonical proline-rich ligands. PMID:17244534

  14. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tammy; Gaultney, Robert A.; Floden, Angela M.; Brissette, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp) is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysinses in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen (Plg), a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to Plg, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp–Plg interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound Plg to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds Plg via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that Plg bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding Plg are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:26500634

  15. Sequential coagulation factor VIIa domain binding to tissue factor

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterlund, Maria; Persson, Egon; Freskgard, Per-Ola . E-mail: msv@ifm.liu.se

    2005-12-02

    Vessel wall tissue factor (TF) is exposed to blood upon vascular damage which enables association with factor VIIa (FVIIa). This leads to initiation of the blood coagulation cascade through localization and allosteric induction of FVIIa procoagulant activity. To examine the docking pathway of the FVIIa-TF complex, various residues in the extracellular part of TF (sTF) that are known to interact with FVIIa were replaced with cysteines labelled with a fluorescent probe. By using stopped-flow fluorescence kinetic measurements in combination with surface plasmon resonance analysis, we studied the association of the resulting sTF variants with FVIIa. We found the docking trajectory to be a sequence of events in which the protease domain of FVIIa initiates contact with sTF. Thereafter, the two proteins are tethered via the first epidermal growth factor-like and finally the {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. The two labelled sTF residues interacting with the protease domain of FVIIa bind or become eventually ordered at different rates, revealing kinetic details pertinent to the allosteric activation of FVIIa by sTF. Moreover, when the Gla domain of FVIIa is removed the difference in the rate of association for the remaining domains is much more pronounced.

  16. Control of domain swapping in bovine odorant-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Roberto; Vincent, Florence; Ashcroft, Alison E; Accornero, Paolo; Grolli, Stefano; Valencia, Christel; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2002-01-01

    As revealed by the X-ray structure, bovine odorant-binding protein (OBPb) is a domain swapped dimer [Tegoni, Ramoni, Bignetti, Spinelli and Cambillau (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 863-867; Bianchet, Bains, Petosi, Pevsner, Snyder, Monaco and Amzel (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 934-939]. This contrasts with all known mammalian OBPs, which are monomers, and in particular with porcine OBP (OBPp), sharing 42.3% identity with OBPb. By the mechanism of domain swapping, monomers are proposed to evolve into dimers and oligomers, as observed in human prion. Comparison of bovine and porcine OBP sequences pointed at OBPp glycine 121, in the hinge linking the beta-barrel to the alpha-helix. The absence of this residue in OBPb might explain why the normal lipocalin beta-turn is not formed. In order to decipher the domain swapping determinants we have produced a mutant of OBPb in which a glycine residue was inserted after position 121, and a mutant of OBPp in which glycine 121 was deleted. The latter mutation did not result in dimerization, while OBPb-121Gly+ became monomeric, suggesting that domain swapping was reversed. Careful structural analysis revealed that besides the presence of a glycine in the hinge, the dimer interface formed by the C-termini and by the presence of the lipocalins conserved disulphide bridge may also control domain swapping. PMID:11931632

  17. Linking microfilaments to intracellular membranes: the actin-binding and vesicle-associated protein comitin exhibits a mannose-specific lectin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, E; Fucini, P; Stewart, M; Noegel, A A; Schleicher, M

    1996-01-01

    Comitin is a 24 kDa actin-binding protein from Dictyostelium discoideum that is located primarily on Golgi and vesicle membranes. We have probed the molecular basis of comitin's interaction with both actin and membranes using a series of truncation mutants obtained by expressing the appropriate cDNA in Escherichia coli. Comitin dimerizes in solution; its principle actin-binding activity is located between residues 90 and 135. The N-terminal 135 'core' residues of comitin contain a 3-fold sequence repeat that is homologous to several monocotyledon lectins and which retains key residues that determine these lectins' three-dimensional structure and mannose binding. These repeats of comitin appear to mediate its interaction with mannose residues in glycoproteins or glycolipids on the cytoplasmic surface of membrane vesicles from D.discoideum, and comitin can be released from membranes with mannose. Our data indicate that comitin binds to vesicle membranes via mannose residues and, by way of its interaction with actin, links these membranes to the cytoskeleton. Images PMID:8635456

  18. C0 and C1 N-terminal Ig domains of myosin binding protein C exert different effects on thin filament activation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Samantha P; Belknap, Betty; Van Sciver, Robert E; White, Howard D; Galkin, Vitold E

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in genes encoding myosin, the molecular motor that powers cardiac muscle contraction, and its accessory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C), are the two most common causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recent studies established that the N-terminal domains (NTDs) of cMyBP-C (e.g., C0, C1, M, and C2) can bind to and activate or inhibit the thin filament (TF). However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which NTDs modulate interaction of myosin with the TF remains unknown and the contribution of each individual NTD to TF activation/inhibition is unclear. Here we used an integrated structure-function approach using cryoelectron microscopy, biochemical kinetics, and force measurements to reveal how the first two Ig-like domains of cMyPB-C (C0 and C1) interact with the TF. Results demonstrate that despite being structural homologs, C0 and C1 exhibit different patterns of binding on the surface of F-actin. Importantly, C1 but not C0 binds in a position to activate the TF by shifting tropomyosin (Tm) to the "open" structural state. We further show that C1 directly interacts with Tm and traps Tm in the open position on the surface of F-actin. Both C0 and C1 compete with myosin subfragment 1 for binding to F-actin and effectively inhibit actomyosin interactions when present at high ratios of NTDs to F-actin. Finally, we show that in contracting sarcomeres, the activating effect of C1 is apparent only once low levels of Ca(2+) have been achieved. We suggest that Ca(2+) modulates the interaction of cMyBP-C with the TF in the sarcomere. PMID:26831109

  19. C0 and C1 N-terminal Ig domains of myosin binding protein C exert different effects on thin filament activation

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Samantha P.; Belknap, Betty; Van Sciver, Robert E.; White, Howard D.; Galkin, Vitold E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding myosin, the molecular motor that powers cardiac muscle contraction, and its accessory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C), are the two most common causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recent studies established that the N-terminal domains (NTDs) of cMyBP-C (e.g., C0, C1, M, and C2) can bind to and activate or inhibit the thin filament (TF). However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which NTDs modulate interaction of myosin with the TF remains unknown and the contribution of each individual NTD to TF activation/inhibition is unclear. Here we used an integrated structure–function approach using cryoelectron microscopy, biochemical kinetics, and force measurements to reveal how the first two Ig-like domains of cMyPB-C (C0 and C1) interact with the TF. Results demonstrate that despite being structural homologs, C0 and C1 exhibit different patterns of binding on the surface of F-actin. Importantly, C1 but not C0 binds in a position to activate the TF by shifting tropomyosin (Tm) to the “open” structural state. We further show that C1 directly interacts with Tm and traps Tm in the open position on the surface of F-actin. Both C0 and C1 compete with myosin subfragment 1 for binding to F-actin and effectively inhibit actomyosin interactions when present at high ratios of NTDs to F-actin. Finally, we show that in contracting sarcomeres, the activating effect of C1 is apparent only once low levels of Ca2+ have been achieved. We suggest that Ca2+ modulates the interaction of cMyBP-C with the TF in the sarcomere. PMID:26831109

  20. FMNL3 FH2-actin structure gives insight into formin-mediated actin nucleation and elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Morgan E; Heimsath, Ernest G; Gauvin, Timothy J; Higgs, Henry N; Kull, F Jon

    2012-12-09

    Formins are actin-assembly factors that act in a variety of actin-based processes. The conserved formin homology 2 (FH2) domain promotes filament nucleation and influences elongation through interaction with the barbed end. FMNL3 is a formin that induces assembly of filopodia but whose FH2 domain is a poor nucleator. The 3.4-Å structure of a mouse FMNL3 FH2 dimer in complex with tetramethylrhodamine-actin uncovers details of formin-regulated actin elongation. We observe distinct FH2 actin-binding regions; interactions in the knob and coiled-coil subdomains are necessary for actin binding, whereas those in the lasso-post interface are important for the stepping mechanism. Biochemical and cellular experiments test the importance of individual residues for function. This structure provides details for FH2-mediated filament elongation by processive capping and supports a model in which C-terminal non-FH2 residues of FMNL3 are required to stabilize the filament nucleus.

  1. Translation elongation factor 1A mutants with altered actin bundling activity show reduced aminoacyl-tRNA binding and alter initiation via eIF2α phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Winder B; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2014-07-25

    Apart from its canonical function in translation elongation, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) has been shown to interact with the actin cytoskeleton. Amino acid substitutions in eEF1A that reduce its ability to bind and bundle actin in vitro cause improper actin organization in vivo and reduce total translation. Initial in vivo analysis indicated the reduced translation was through initiation. The mutant strains exhibit increased levels of phosphorylated initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) dependent on the presence of the general control non-derepressible 2 (Gcn2p) protein kinase. Gcn2p causes downregulation of total protein synthesis at initiation in response to increases in deacylated tRNA levels in the cell. Increased levels of eIF2α phosphorylation are not due to a general reduction in translation elongation as eEF2 and eEF3 mutants do not exhibit this effect. Deletion of GCN2 from the eEF1A actin bundling mutant strains revealed a second defect in translation. The eEF1A actin-bundling proteins exhibit changes in their elongation activity at the level of aminoacyl-tRNA binding in vitro. These findings implicate eEF1A in a feedback mechanism for regulating translation at initiation. PMID:24936063

  2. Identification of regions within the Legionella pneumophila VipA effector protein involved in actin binding and polymerization and in interference with eukaryotic organelle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bugalhão, Joana N; Mota, Luís Jaime; Franco, Irina S

    2016-02-01

    The Legionella pneumophila effector protein VipA is an actin nucleator that co-localizes with actin filaments and early endosomes in infected macrophages and which interferes with organelle trafficking when expressed in yeast. To identify the regions of VipA involved in its subcellular localization and functions, we ectopically expressed specific VipA mutant proteins in eukaryotic cells. This indicated that the characteristic punctate distribution of VipA depends on its NH2 -terminal (amino acid residues 1-133) and central coiled-coil (amino acid residues 133-206) regions, and suggested a role for the COOH-terminal (amino acid residues 206-339) region in association with actin filaments and for the NH2 -terminal in co-localization with early endosomes. Co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro assays showed that the COOH-terminal region of VipA is necessary and sufficient to mediate actin binding, and is essential but insufficient to induce microfilament formation. Assays in yeast revealed that the NH2 and the COOH-terminal regions, and possibly an NPY motif within the NH2 region of VipA, are necessary for interference with organelle trafficking. Overall, this suggests that subversion of eukaryotic vesicular trafficking by VipA involves both its ability to associate with early endosomes via its NH2 -terminal region and its capacity to bind and polymerize actin through its COOH-terminal region. PMID:26626407

  3. Villin and actin in the mouse kidney brush-border membrane bind to and are degraded by meprins, an interaction that contributes to injury in ischemia-reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ongeri, Elimelda Moige; Anyanwu, Odinaka; Reeves, W. Brian

    2011-01-01

    Meprins, metalloproteinases abundantly expressed in the brush-border membranes (BBMs) of rodent proximal kidney tubules, have been implicated in the pathology of renal injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion (IR). Disruption of the meprin β gene and actinonin, a meprin inhibitor, both decrease kidney injury resulting from IR. To date, the in vivo kidney substrates for meprins are unknown. The studies herein implicate villin and actin as meprin substrates. Villin and actin bind to the cytoplasmic tail of meprin β, and both meprin A and B are capable of degrading villin and actin present in kidney proteins as well as purified recombinant forms of these proteins. The products resulting from degradation of villin and actin were unique to each meprin isoform. The meprin B cleavage site in villin was Glu744-Val745. Recombinant forms of rat meprin B and homomeric mouse meprin A had Km values for villin and actin of ∼1 μM (0.6–1.2 μM). The kcat values varied substantially (0.6–128 s−1), resulting in different efficiencies for cleavage, with meprin B having the highest kcat/Km values (128 M−1·s−1 × 106). Following IR, meprins and villin redistributed from the BBM to the cytosol. A 37-kDa actin fragment was detected in protein fractions from wild-type, but not in comparable preparations from meprin knockout mice. The levels of the 37-kDa actin fragment were significantly higher in kidneys subjected to IR. The data establish that meprins interact with and cleave villin and actin, and these cytoskeletal proteins are substrates for meprins. PMID:21795642

  4. Immunochemical analysis of the glucocorticoid receptor: identification of a third domain separate from the steroid-binding and DNA-binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Carlstedt-Duke, J; Okret, S; Wrange, O; Gustafsson, J A

    1982-01-01

    The glucocorticoid-receptor complex can be subdivided into three separate domains by limited proteolysis with trypsin or alpha-chymotrypsin. The following characteristics can be separated: steroid-binding activity (domain A), DNA-binding activity (domain B), and immunoactivity (domain C). We have previously reported the separation of the steroid-binding domain from the DNA-binding domain by limited proteolysis of the receptor with trypsin. In this paper, we report the detection by immunochemical analysis of a third domain of the glucocorticoid receptor, which does not bind hormone. Immunoactivity was detected by using specific antiglucocorticoid receptor antibodies raised in rabbits against purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor and the assay used was an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After digestion with alpha-chymotrypsin, the immunoactive region of the receptor (domain C) was separated from the other two domains (A and B). The immunoactive fragment was found to have a Stokes radius of 2.6 nm. Further digestion with alpha-chymotrypsin resulted in separation of the immunoactive fragment to give a fragment having a Stokes radius of 1.4 nm. The immunoactive domain could be separated from the half of the glucocorticoid receptor containing the steroid-binding and the DNA-binding domains (Stokes radius, 3.3 nm), by limited proteolysis of the receptor by alpha-chymotrypsin followed by gel filtration or chromatography on DNA-cellulose. PMID:6181503

  5. The actin-binding protein EPS8 binds VE-cadherin and modulates YAP localization and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Disanza, Andrea; Bravi, Luca; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam; Corada, Monica; Frittoli, Emanuela; Savorani, Cecilia; Lampugnani, Maria Grazia; Boggetti, Barbara; Niessen, Carien; Wrana, Jeff L.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)–cadherin transfers intracellular signals contributing to vascular hemostasis. Signaling through VE-cadherin requires association and activity of different intracellular partners. Yes-associated protein (YAP)/TAZ transcriptional cofactors are important regulators of cell growth and organ size. We show that EPS8, a signaling adapter regulating actin dynamics, is a novel partner of VE-cadherin and is able to modulate YAP activity. By biochemical and imaging approaches, we demonstrate that EPS8 associates with the VE-cadherin complex of remodeling junctions promoting YAP translocation to the nucleus and transcriptional activation. Conversely, in stabilized junctions, 14–3-3–YAP associates with the VE–cadherin complex, whereas Eps8 is excluded. Junctional association of YAP inhibits nuclear translocation and inactivates its transcriptional activity both in vitro and in vivo in Eps8-null mice. The absence of Eps8 also increases vascular permeability in vivo, but did not induce other major vascular defects. Collectively, we identified novel components of the adherens junction complex, and we introduce a novel molecular mechanism through which the VE-cadherin complex controls YAP transcriptional activity. PMID:26668327

  6. Polyphosphoinositide binding domains: key to inositol lipid biology

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Gerald R. V.; Balla, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphoinositides (PPIn) are an important family of phospholipids located on the cytoplasmic leaflet of eukaryotic cell membranes. Collectively, they are critical for the regulation many aspects of membrane homeostasis and signaling, with notable relevance to human physiology and disease. This regulation is achieved through the selective interaction of these lipids with hundreds of cellular proteins, and thus the capability to study these localized interactions is crucial to understanding their functions. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the principle types of PPIn-protein interactions, focusing on specific lipid-binding domains. We then discuss how these domains have been re-tasked by biologists as molecular probes for these lipids in living cells. Finally, we describe how the knowledge gained with these probes, when combined with other techniques, has led to the current view of the lipids’ localization and function in eukaryotes, focusing mainly on animal cells. PMID:25732852

  7. MODELING THE BINDING OF THE METABOLITES OF SOME POLYCYCLIC AROMTIC HYDROCARBONS TO THE LIGAND BINDING DOMAIN OF THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the binding of the metabolites of some Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor
    James Rabinowitz, Stephen Little, Katrina Brown, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC; Un...

  8. Targeting the inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein BIR3 binding domains.

    PubMed

    Jaquith, James B

    2014-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular apoptosis and cytokine signaling. IAP family members include XIAP, cIAP1, cIAP2, NAIP, survivin, Apollon/Bruce, ML-IAP/livin and TIAP. The IAPs have been targeted using both antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors. Several research teams have advanced compounds that bind the highly conserved BIR3 domains of the IAPs into clinical trials, as single agents and in combination with standard of care. This patent review highlights the medicinal chemistry strategies that have been applied to the development of clinical compounds. PMID:24998289

  9. Intersubunit binding domains within tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Yohrling, G J; Jiang, G C; Mockus, S M; Vrana, K E

    2000-08-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) belongs to the aromatic amino acid hydroxylase superfamily, which includes phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The crystal structures for both PAH and TH have been reported, but a crystallographic model of TPH remains elusive. For this reason, we have utilized the information presented in the TH crystal structure in combination with primary sequence alignments to design point mutations in potential structural domains of the TPH protein. Mutation of a TH salt bridge (K170E) was sufficient to alter enzyme macromolecular assembly. We found that the disruption of the cognate intersubunit dimerization salt bridge (K111-E223) in TPH, however, did not affect the macromolecular assembly of TPH. Enzyme peaks representing only tetramers were observed with size exclusion chromatography. By contrast, a single-point mutation within the tetramerization domain of TPH (L435A) was sufficient to disrupt the normal homotetrameric assembly of TPH. These studies indicate that, although the proposed salt bridge dimerization interface of TH is conserved in TPH, this hypothetical TPH intersubunit binding domain, K111-E223, is not required for the proper macromolecular assembly of the protein. However, leucine 435 within the tetramerization domain is necessary for the proper macromolecular assembly of TPH. PMID:10900078

  10. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  11. COP9 limits dendritic branching via Cullin3-dependent degradation of the actin-crosslinking BTB-domain protein Kelch.

    PubMed

    Djagaeva, Inna; Doronkin, Sergey

    2009-01-01

    Components of the COP9 signalosome (CSN), a key member of the conserved 26S proteasome degradation pathway, have been detected to be altered in patients of several debilitating syndromes. These findings suggest that CSN acts in neural circuits, but the exact function of CSN in brain remains unidentified. Previously, using Drosophila peripheral nervous system (PNS) as a model system, we determined that CSN is a critical regulator of dendritic morphogenesis. We found that defects in CSN led to the strikingly contrast phenotype of either reducing or stimulating dendritic branching. In particular, we have reported that CSN stimulates dendritic branching via Cullin1-mediated proteolysis. Here we describe that CSN inhibits dendritic arborization in PNS neurons acting via control of Cullin3 function: loss of Cullin3 causes excessive dendritic branching. We also identified a downstream target for Cullin3-dependent degradation in neurons--the actin-crosslinking BTB-domain protein Kelch. Inappropriate accumulation of Kelch, either due to the impaired Cullin3-dependent turnover, or ectopic expression of Kelch, leads to uncontrolled dendritic branching. These findings indicate that the CSN pathway modulates neuronal network in a multilayer manner, providing the foundation for new insight into the CSN role in human mental retardation disorders and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:19859546

  12. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  13. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  14. Deletion of the calmodulin-binding domain of Grb7 impairs cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and migration

    SciTech Connect

    García-Palmero, Irene; Villalobo, Antonio

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein. •Deleting the CaM-binding site impairs cell attachment and migration. •CaM antagonists inhibit Grb7-mediated cell migration. •We conclude that CaM controls Grb7-mediated cell migration. -- Abstract: The adaptor Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein that participates in signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and the control of angiogenesis, and plays a significant role in tumor growth, its metastatic spread and tumor-associated neo-vasculature formation. In this report we show that deletion of the CaM-binding site of Grb7, located in the proximal region of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, impairs cell migration, cell attachment to the extracellular matrix, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton occurring during this process. Moreover, we show that the cell-permeable CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) and N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-13) both retard the migration of cells expressing wild type Grb7, but not the migration of cells expressing the mutant protein lacking the CaM-binding site (Grb7Δ), underscoring the proactive role of CaM binding to Grb7 during this process.

  15. Glutathione Binding to the Bcl-2 Homology-3 Domain Groove

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Angela K.; Loucks, F. Alexandra; Schroeder, Emily K.; Bouchard, Ron J.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Bcl-2 protects cells against mitochondrial oxidative stress and subsequent apoptosis. However, the mechanism underlying the antioxidant function of Bcl-2 is currently unknown. Recently, Bax and several Bcl-2 homology-3 domain (BH3)-only proteins (Bid, Puma, and Noxa) have been shown to induce a pro-oxidant state at mitochondria (1-4). Given the opposing effects of Bcl-2 and Bax/BH3-only proteins on the redox state of mitochondria, we hypothesized that the antioxidant function of Bcl-2 is antagonized by its interaction with the BH3 domains of pro-apoptotic family members. Here, we show that BH3 mimetics that bind to a hydrophobic surface (the BH3 groove) of Bcl-2 induce GSH-sensitive mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons. BH3 mimetics displace a discrete mitochondrial GSH pool in neurons and suppress GSH transport into isolated rat brain mitochondria. Moreover, BH3 mimetics and the BH3-only protein, Bim, inhibit a novel interaction between Bcl-2 and GSH in vitro. These results suggest that Bcl-2 regulates an essential pool of mitochondrial GSH and that this regulation may depend upon Bcl-2 directly interacting with GSH via the BH3 groove. We conclude that this novel GSH binding property of Bcl-2 likely plays a central role in its antioxidant function at mitochondria. PMID:17690097

  16. Actinic Keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Actinic Keratosis (Solar Keratosis) Information for adults A A A Actinic ... the touch. Overview Actinic keratoses, also known as solar keratoses, are small rough or scaly areas of ...

  17. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-01-11

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [alpha-(32)P]8-N(3)-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  18. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Allan L.; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [α-32P]8-N3-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  19. NMR Solution Structure and DNA Binding Model of the DNA Binding Domain of Competence Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Carey A.; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Thompson, Richele J.; Perego, Marta; Cavanagh, John

    2010-01-01

    Competence protein A (ComA) is a response regulator protein involved in the development of genetic competence in the Gram-positive spore forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis, as well as the regulation of the production of degradative enzymes and antibiotic synthesis. ComA belongs to the NarL family of proteins which are characterized by a C-terminal transcriptional activator domain that consists of a bundle of four helices, where the second and third helices (α8 and α9) form a helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain. Using NMR spectroscopy, the high resolution three-dimensional solution structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of ComA (ComAC) has been determined. In addition, surface plasmon resonance and NMR protein-DNA titration experiments allowed for the analysis of the interaction of ComAC with its target DNA sequences. Combining the solution structure and biochemical data, a model of ComAC bound to the ComA recognition sequences on the srfA promoter has been developed. The model shows that for DNA binding, ComA uses the conserved helix-turn-helix motif present in other NarL family members. However, the model also reveals that ComA may use a slightly different part of the helix-turn-helix motif and there appears to be some associated domain re-orientation. These observations suggest a basis for DNA binding specificity within the NarL family. PMID:20302877

  20. Domain Selection in Metallothionein 1A: Affinity-Controlled Mechanisms of Zinc Binding and Cadmium Exchange.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Tyler B J; Irvine, Gordon W; Stillman, Martin J

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian metallothioneins (MTs) are small, metal binding proteins implicated in cellular metal ion homeostasis and heavy metal detoxification. Divalent, metal-saturated MTs form two distinct domains; the N-terminal β domain binds three metals using nine Cys residues, and the C-terminal α domain binds four metals with 11 Cys residues. Domain selection during zinc binding and cadmium exchange to human MT1A was examined using a series of competition reactions with mixtures of the isolated domain fragments. These experiments were conducted at two biologically significant pH conditions where MTs exist in vivo. Neither zinc binding nor cadmium exchange showed any significant degree of specificity or selectivity based on detailed analysis of electrospray ionization mass spectrometric and circular dichroic data. Under acidic conditions, zinc binding and cadmium exchange showed slight α domain selectivity because of the increased preference for cooperative clustering of the α domain. Modeling of the reactions showed that at both physiological (7.4) and acidic (5.8) pHs, zinc binding and cadmium exchanges occur essentially randomly between the two fragments. The metal binding affinity distributions between the domain fragments are comingled and not significantly separated as required for a domain specific mechanism. The models show rather that the order of the binding events follows the order of the binding affinities that are distributed across both domains and that this can be considered quantitatively by the KF(Cd)/KF(Zn) binding constant ratio for each metal bound. PMID:26167879

  1. YIH1 is an actin-binding protein that inhibits protein kinase GCN2 and impairs general amino acid control when overexpressed.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Swanson, Mark J; Ashcraft, Emily A; Jennings, Jennifer L; Fekete, Richard A; Link, Andrew J; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2004-07-16

    The general amino acid control (GAAC) enables yeast cells to overcome amino acid deprivation by activation of the alpha subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha) kinase GCN2 and consequent induction of GCN4, a transcriptional activator of amino acid biosynthetic genes. Binding of GCN2 to GCN1 is required for stimulation of GCN2 kinase activity by uncharged tRNA in starved cells. Here we show that YIH1, when overexpressed, dampens the GAAC response (Gcn- phenotype) by suppressing eIF2alpha phosphorylation by GCN2. The overexpressed YIH1 binds GCN1 and reduces GCN1-GCN2 complex formation, and, consistent with this, the Gcn- phenotype produced by YIH1 overexpression is suppressed by GCN2 overexpression. YIH1 interacts with the same GCN1 fragment that binds GCN2, and this YIH1-GCN1 interaction requires Arg-2259 in GCN1 in vitro and in full-length GCN1 in vivo, as found for GCN2-GCN1 interaction. However, deletion of YIH1 does not increase eIF2alpha phosphorylation or derepress the GAAC, suggesting that YIH1 at native levels is not a general inhibitor of GCN2 activity. We discovered that YIH1 normally resides in a complex with monomeric actin, rather than GCN1, and that a genetic reduction in actin levels decreases the GAAC response. This Gcn- phenotype was partially suppressed by deletion of YIH1, consistent with YIH1-mediated inhibition of GCN2 in actin-deficient cells. We suggest that YIH1 resides in a YIH1-actin complex and may be released for inhibition of GCN2 and stimulation of protein synthesis under specialized conditions or in a restricted cellular compartment in which YIH1 is displaced from monomeric actin. PMID:15126500

  2. Actin Dynamics in Growth Cone Motility and Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Timothy M.; Letourneau, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Motile growth cones lead growing axons through developing tissues to synaptic targets. These behaviors depend on the organization and dynamics of actin filaments that fill the growth cone leading margin (peripheral (P-) domain). Actin filament organization in growth cones is regulated by actin-binding proteins that control all aspects of filament assembly, turnover, interactions with other filaments and cytoplasmic components, and participation in producing mechanical forces. Actin filament polymerization drives protrusion of sensory filopodia and lamellipodia, and actin filament connections to the plasma membrane link the filament network to adhesive contacts of filopodia and lamellipodia with other surfaces. These contacts stabilize protrusions and transduce mechanical forces generated by actomyosin activity into traction that pulls an elongating axon along the path towards its target. Adhesive ligands and extrinsic guidance cues bind growth cone receptors and trigger signaling activities involving Rho GTPases, kinases, phosphatases, cyclic nucleotides and [Ca++] fluxes. These signals regulate actin binding proteins to locally modulate actin polymerization, interactions and force transduction to steer the growth cone leading margin towards the sources of attractive cues and away from repellent guidance cues. PMID:24164353

  3. Comparative analysis of tools for live cell imaging of actin network architecture

    PubMed Central

    Belin, Brittany J; Goins, Lauren M; Mullins, R Dyche

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fluorescent derivatives of actin and actin-binding domains are powerful tools for studying actin filament architecture and dynamics in live cells. Growing evidence, however, indicates that these probes are biased, and their cellular distribution does not accurately reflect that of the cytoskeleton. To understand the strengths and weaknesses of commonly used live-cell probes—fluorescent protein fusions of actin, Lifeact, F-tractin, and actin-binding domains from utrophin—we compared their distributions in cells derived from various model organisms. We focused on five actin networks: the peripheral cortex, lamellipodial and lamellar networks, filopodial bundles, and stress fibers. Using phalloidin as a standard, we identified consistent biases in the distribution of each probe. The localization of F-tractin is the most similar to that of phalloidin but induces organism-specific changes in cell morphology. Both Lifeact and GFP-actin concentrate in lamellipodial actin networks but are excluded from lamellar networks and filopodia. In contrast, the full utrophin actin-binding domain (Utr261) binds filaments of the lamellum but only weakly localizes to lamellipodia, while a shorter variant (Utr230) is restricted to the most stable subpopulations of actin filaments: cortical networks and stress fibers. In some cells, Utr230 also detects Golgi-associated filaments, previously detected by immunofluorescence but not visible by phalloidin staining. Consistent with its localization, Utr230 exhibits slow rates of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) compared to F-tractin, Utr261 and Lifeact, suggesting that it may be more useful for FRAP- and photo-activation-based studies of actin network dynamics. PMID:26317264

  4. The Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Stereotype C Binds Phosphoinositides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD50 of {approx} 1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a 'dual receptor' mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Here, using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides. Additional interactions to phosphoinositides may help BoNT/C bind membrane more tightly and transduct signals for subsequent steps of intoxication. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of host cell membrane recognition by BoNTs.

  5. The RNA binding domain of Pumilio antagonizes poly-adenosine binding protein and accelerates deadenylation.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Chase A; Raynard, Nathan A; Blewett, Nathan H; Van Etten, Jamie; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2014-08-01

    PUF proteins are potent repressors that serve important roles in stem cell maintenance, neurological processes, and embryonic development. These functions are driven by PUF protein recognition of specific binding sites within the 3' untranslated regions of target mRNAs. In this study, we investigated mechanisms of repression by the founding PUF, Drosophila Pumilio, and its human orthologs. Here, we evaluated a previously proposed model wherein the Pumilio RNA binding domain (RBD) binds Argonaute, which in turn blocks the translational activity of the eukaryotic elongation factor 1A. Surprisingly, we found that Argonautes are not necessary for repression elicited by Drosophila and human PUFs in vivo. A second model proposed that the RBD of Pumilio represses by recruiting deadenylases to shorten the mRNA's polyadenosine tail. Indeed, the RBD binds to the Pop2 deadenylase and accelerates deadenylation; however, this activity is not crucial for regulation. Rather, we determined that the poly(A) is necessary for repression by the RBD. Our results reveal that poly(A)-dependent repression by the RBD requires the poly(A) binding protein, pAbp. Furthermore, we show that repression by the human PUM2 RBD requires the pAbp ortholog, PABPC1. Pumilio associates with pAbp but does not disrupt binding of pAbp to the mRNA. Taken together, our data support a model wherein the Pumilio RBD antagonizes the ability of pAbp to promote translation. Thus, the conserved function of the PUF RBD is to bind specific mRNAs, antagonize pAbp function, and promote deadenylation. PMID:24942623

  6. Membrane Binding and Modulation of the PDZ Domain of PICK1

    PubMed Central

    Erlendsson, Simon; Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolding proteins serve to assemble protein complexes in dynamic processes by means of specific protein-protein and protein-lipid binding domains. Many of these domains bind either proteins or lipids exclusively; however, it has become increasingly evident that certain domains are capable of binding both. Especially, many PDZ domains, which are highly abundant protein-protein binding domains, bind lipids and membranes. Here we provide an overview of recent large-scale studies trying to generalize and rationalize the binding patterns as well as specificity of PDZ domains towards membrane lipids. Moreover, we review how these PDZ-membrane interactions are regulated in the case of the synaptic scaffolding protein PICK1 and how this might affect cellular localization and function. PMID:26501328

  7. Two domains of the epidermal growth factor receptor are involved in cytoskeletal interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wei; Wu Jing; Ge Gaoxiang; Lin Qishui

    2008-06-13

    Epidermal growth factor receptor can interact directly with F-actin through an actin-binding domain. In the present study, a mutant EGFR, lacking a previously identified actin-binding domain (ABD 1), was still able to bind elements of the cytoskeleton. A second EGFR actin-binding domain (ABD 2) was identified in the region of the receptor that includes Tyr-1148 by a yeast two-hybrid assay. GST fusion proteins comprising ABD 1 or ABD 2 bound actin in vitro and competed for actin-binding with the full-length EGFR. EGFR binding to actin was also studied in intact cells using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The localization of the EGFR/actin-binding complex changed after EGF stimulation. Fusion proteins containing mutations in ABD1 or ABD2 did not display a FRET signal. The results lead to the conclusion that the interaction between ABD1 and ABD2 and actin during EGF-induced signal transduction, and thus between EGFR and actin, are important in cell activation.

  8. ACD toxin-produced actin oligomers poison formin-controlled actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Heisler, David B.; Kudryashova, Elena; Grinevich, Dmitry O.; Suarez, Cristian; Winkelman, Jonathan D.; Birukov, Konstantin G.; Kotha, Sainath R.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Kovar, David R.; Kudryashov, Dmitri S.

    2015-01-01

    The actin crosslinking domain (ACD) is an actin-specific toxin produced by several pathogens, including life-threatening spp. of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, and Aeromonas hydrophila. Actin crosslinking by ACD is thought to lead to slow cytoskeleton failure owing to a gradual sequestration of actin in the form of nonfunctional oligomers. Here we found that ACD converted cytoplasmic actin into highly toxic oligomers that potently “poisoned” the ability of major actin assembly proteins, formins, to sustain actin polymerization. Thus, ACD can target the most abundant cellular protein by employing actin oligomers as secondary toxins to efficiently subvert cellular functions of actin while functioning at very low doses. PMID:26228148

  9. Ligand binding to WW tandem domains of YAP2 transcriptional regulator is under negative cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; Hoang, Lawrence M; Bhat, Vikas; McDonald, Caleb B; Sudol, Marius; Farooq, Amjad

    2014-12-01

    YES-associated protein 2 (YAP2) transcriptional regulator drives a multitude of cellular processes, including the newly discovered Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, by virtue of the ability of its WW domains to bind and recruit PPXY-containing ligands to specific subcellular compartments. Herein, we employ an array of biophysical tools to investigate allosteric communication between the WW tandem domains of YAP2. Our data show that the WW tandem domains of YAP2 negatively cooperate when binding to their cognate ligands. Moreover, the molecular origin of such negative cooperativity lies in an unfavorable entropic contribution to the overall free energy relative to ligand binding to isolated WW domains. Consistent with this notion, the WW tandem domains adopt a fixed spatial orientation such that the WW1 domain curves outwards and stacks onto the binding groove of the WW2 domain, thereby sterically hindering ligand binding to both itself and its tandem partner. Although ligand binding to both WW domains disrupts such interdomain stacking interaction, they reorient themselves and adopt an alternative fixed spatial orientation in the liganded state by virtue of their ability to engage laterally so as to allow their binding grooves to point outwards and away from each other. In short, while the ability of WW tandem domains to aid ligand binding is well documented, our demonstration that they may also be subject to negative binding cooperativity represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the molecular action of this ubiquitous family of protein modules. PMID:25283809

  10. Ligand Binding to WW Tandem Domains of YAP2 Transcriptional Regulator Is Under Negative Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Schuchardt, Brett J.; Mikles, David C.; Hoang, Lawrence M.; Bhat, Vikas; McDonald, Caleb B.; Sudol, Marius; Farooq, Amjad

    2014-01-01

    YAP2 transcriptional regulator drives a multitude of cellular processes, including the newly discovered Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, by virtue of the ability of its WW domains to bind and recruit PPXY-containing ligands to specific subcellular compartments. Herein, we employ an array of biophysical tools to investigate allosteric communication between the WW tandem domains of YAP2. Our data show that the WW tandem domains of YAP2 negatively cooperate when binding to their cognate ligands. Moreover, the molecular origin of such negative cooperativity lies in an unfavorable entropic contribution to the overall free energy relative to ligand binding to isolated WW domains. Consistent with this notion, the WW tandem domains adopt a fixed spatial orientation such that the WW1 domain curves outwards and stacks onto the binding groove of WW2 domain, thereby sterically hindering ligand binding to both itself and its tandem partner. Although ligand binding to both WW domains disrupts such interdomain stacking interaction, they reorient themselves and adopt an alternative fixed spatial orientation in the liganded state by virtue of their ability to engage laterally so as to allow their binding grooves to point outwards and away from each other. In short, while the ability of WW tandem domains to aid ligand binding is well-documented, our demonstration that they may also be subject to negative binding cooperativity represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the molecular action of this ubiquitous family of protein modules. PMID:25283809

  11. Nucleotides regulate the mechanical hierarchy between subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Daniela; Merz, Dale R.; Pelz, Benjamin; Theisen, Kelly E.; Yacyshyn, Gail; Mokranjac, Dejana; Dima, Ruxandra I.; Rief, Matthias; Žoldák, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through ligand-induced conformational changes is crucial for many signal transduction processes. The binding of a ligand alters the delicate energy balance within the protein structure, eventually leading to such conformational changes. In this study, we elucidate the energetic and mechanical changes within the subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of the heat shock protein of 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperone DnaK upon nucleotide binding. In an integrated approach using single molecule optical tweezer experiments, loop insertions, and steered coarse-grained molecular simulations, we find that the C-terminal helix of the NBD is the major determinant of mechanical stability, acting as a glue between the two lobes. After helix unraveling, the relative stability of the two separated lobes is regulated by ATP/ADP binding. We find that the nucleotide stays strongly bound to lobe II, thus reversing the mechanical hierarchy between the two lobes. Our results offer general insights into the nucleotide-induced signal transduction within members of the actin/sugar kinase superfamily. PMID:26240360

  12. Nucleotides regulate the mechanical hierarchy between subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Daniela; Merz, Dale R; Pelz, Benjamin; Theisen, Kelly E; Yacyshyn, Gail; Mokranjac, Dejana; Dima, Ruxandra I; Rief, Matthias; Žoldák, Gabriel

    2015-08-18

    The regulation of protein function through ligand-induced conformational changes is crucial for many signal transduction processes. The binding of a ligand alters the delicate energy balance within the protein structure, eventually leading to such conformational changes. In this study, we elucidate the energetic and mechanical changes within the subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of the heat shock protein of 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperone DnaK upon nucleotide binding. In an integrated approach using single molecule optical tweezer experiments, loop insertions, and steered coarse-grained molecular simulations, we find that the C-terminal helix of the NBD is the major determinant of mechanical stability, acting as a glue between the two lobes. After helix unraveling, the relative stability of the two separated lobes is regulated by ATP/ADP binding. We find that the nucleotide stays strongly bound to lobe II, thus reversing the mechanical hierarchy between the two lobes. Our results offer general insights into the nucleotide-induced signal transduction within members of the actin/sugar kinase superfamily. PMID:26240360

  13. Microtubule-associated Protein 2c Reorganizes Both Microtubules and Microfilaments into Distinct Cytological Structures in an Actin-binding Protein-280–deficient Melanoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, C. Casey; Leclerc, Nicole; Flanagan, Lisa A.; Lu, Mei; Janmey, Paul A.; Kosik, Kenneth S.

    1997-01-01

    The emergence of processes from cells often involves interactions between microtubules and microfilaments. Interactions between these two cytoskeletal systems are particularly apparent in neuronal growth cones. The juvenile isoform of the neuronal microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2c) is present in growth cones, where we hypothesize it mediates interactions between microfilaments and microtubules. To approach this problem in vivo, we used the human melanoma cell, M2, which lacks actin-binding protein-280 (ABP-280) and forms membrane blebs, which are not seen in wild-type or ABP-transfected cells. The microinjection of tau or mature MAP2 rescued the blebbing phenotype; MAP2c not only caused cessation of blebbing but also induced the formation of two distinct cellular structures. These were actin-rich lamellae, which often included membrane ruffles, and microtubule-bearing processes. The lamellae collapsed after treatment with cytochalasin D, and the processes retracted after treatment with colchicine. MAP2c was immunocytochemically visualized in zones of the cell that were devoid of tubulin, such as regions within the lamellae and in association with membrane ruffles. In vitro rheometry confirmed that MAP2c is an efficient actin gelation protein capable of organizing actin filaments into an isotropic array at very low concentrations; tau and mature MAP2 do not share this rheologic property. These results suggest that MAP2c engages in functionally specific interactions not only with microtubules but also with microfilaments. PMID:9049250

  14. SWAP-70 Identifies a Transitional Subset of Actin Filaments in Motile CellsV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hilpelä, Pirta; Oberbanscheidt, Pia; Hahne, Penelope; Hund, Martin; Kalhammer, Georg; Small, J. Victor; Bähler, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Functionally different subsets of actin filament arrays contribute to cellular organization and motility. We report the identification of a novel subset of loose actin filament arrays through regulated association with the widely expressed protein SWAP-70. These loose actin filament arrays were commonly located behind protruding lamellipodia and membrane ruffles. Visualization of these loose actin filament arrays was dependent on lamellipodial protrusion and the binding of the SWAP-70 PH-domain to a 3′-phosphoinositide. SWAP-70 with a functional pleckstrin homology-domain lacking the C-terminal 60 residues was targeted to the area of the loose actin filament arrays, but it did not associate with actin filaments. The C-terminal 60 residues were sufficient for actin filament association, but they provided no specificity for the subset of loose actin filament arrays. These results identify SWAP-70 as a phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling-dependent marker for a distinct, hitherto unrecognized, array of actin filaments. Overexpression of SWAP-70 altered the actin organization and lamellipodial morphology. These alterations were dependent on a proper subcellular targeting of SWAP-70. We propose that SWAP-70 regulates the actincytoskeletonasaneffectororadaptorproteininresponsetoagoniststimulatedphosphatidylinositol (3,4)-bisphosphate production and cell protrusion. PMID:12925760

  15. Short Stop provides an essential link between F-actin and microtubules during axon extension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungbok; Kolodziej, Peter A

    2002-03-01

    Coordination of F-actin and microtubule dynamics is important for cellular motility and morphogenesis, but little is known about underlying mechanisms. short stop (shot) encodes an evolutionarily conserved, neuronally expressed family of rod-like proteins required for sensory and motor axon extension in Drosophila melanogaster. We identify Shot isoforms that contain N-terminal F-actin and C-terminal microtubule-binding domains, and that crosslink F-actin and microtubules in cultured cells. The F-actin- and microtubule-binding domains of Shot are required in the same molecule for axon extension, though the length of the connecting rod domain can be dramatically reduced without affecting activity. Shot therefore functions as a cytoskeletal crosslinker in axon extension, rather than mediating independent interactions with F-actin and microtubules. A Ca(2+)-binding motif located adjacent to the microtubule-binding domain is also required for axon extension, suggesting that intracellular Ca(2+) release may regulate Shot activity. These results suggest that Shot coordinates regulated interactions between F-actin and microtubules that are crucial for neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:11874915

  16. Actin Interacts with Dengue Virus 2 and 4 Envelope Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jitoboam, Kunlakanya; Phaonakrop, Narumon; Libsittikul, Sirikwan; Thepparit, Chutima; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Smith, Duncan R.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) remains a significant public health problem in many tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. The DENV envelope (E) protein is the major antigenic determinant and the protein that mediates receptor binding and endosomal fusion. In contrast to some other DENV proteins, relatively few cellular interacting proteins have been identified. To address this issue a co-immuoprecipitation strategy was employed. The predominant co-immunoprecipitating proteins identified were actin and actin related proteins, however the results suggested that actin was the only bona fide interacting partner. Actin was shown to interact with the E protein of DENV 2 and 4, and the interaction between actin and DENV E protein was shown to occur in a truncated DENV consisting of only domains I and II. Actin was shown to decrease during infection, but this was not associated with a decrease in gene transcription. Actin-related proteins also showed a decrease in expression during infection that was not transcriptionally regulated. Cytoskeletal reorganization was not observed during infection, suggesting that the interaction between actin and E protein has a cell type specific component. PMID:27010925

  17. Integrin LFA-1 alpha subunit contains an ICAM-1 binding site in domains V and VI.

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, P; Bates, P A; Harvey, J; Bennett, R I; Hogg, N

    1994-01-01

    In order to identify a binding site for ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on the beta 2 integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), protein fragments of LFA-1 were made by in vitro translation of a series of constructs which featured domain-sized deletions starting from the N-terminus of the alpha subunit of LFA-1. Monoclonal antibodies and ICAM-1 were tested for their ability to bind to these protein fragments. Results show that the putative divalent cation binding domains V and VI contain an ICAM-1 binding site. A series of consecutive peptides covering these domains indicated two discontinuous areas as specific contact sites: residues 458-467 in domain V and residues 497-516 in domain VI. A three-dimensional model of these domains of LFA-1 was constructed based on the sequence similarity to known EF hands. The two regions critical for the interaction of LFA-1 with ICAM-1 lie adjacent to each other, the first next to the non-functional EF hand in domain V and the second coinciding with the potential divalent cation binding loop in domain VI. The binding of ICAM-1 with the domain V and VI region in solution was not sensitive to divalent cation chelation. In short, a critical motif for ICAM-1 binding to the alpha subunit of LFA-1 is shared between two regions of domains V and VI. Images PMID:7909511

  18. Cooperative DNA Binding and Sequence-Selective Recognition Conferred by the STAT Amino-Terminal Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Sun, Ya-Lin; Hoey, Timothy

    1996-08-01

    STAT proteins (signal transducers and activators of transcription) activate distinct target genes despite having similar DNA binding preferences. The transcriptional specificity of STAT proteins was investigated on natural STAT binding sites near the interferon-gamma gene. These sites are arranged in multiple copies and required cooperative interactions for STAT binding. The conserved amino-terminal domain of STAT proteins was required for cooperative DNA binding, although this domain was not essential for dimerization or binding to a single site. Cooperative binding interactions enabled the STAT proteins to recognize variations of the consensus site. These sites can be specific for the different STAT proteins and may function to direct selective transcriptional activation.

  19. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) heparin binding domain binds to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Kallapur, S G; Akeson, R A

    1992-12-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been strongly implicated in several aspects of neural development. NCAM mediated adhesion has been proposed to involve a homophilic interaction between NCAMs on adjacent cells. The heparin binding domain (HBD) is an amino acid sequence within NCAM and has been shown to be involved in NCAM mediated adhesion but the relationship of this domain to NCAM segments mediating homophilic adhesion has not been defined. In the present study, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the HBD has been used as a substrate to determine its role in NCAM mediated adhesion. A neural cell line expressing NCAM (B35) and its derived clone which does not express NCAM (B35 clone 3) adhered similarly to plates coated with HBD peptide. A polyclonal antiserum to NCAM inhibited B35 cell-HBD peptide adhesion by only 10%, a value not statistically different from inhibition caused by preimmune serum. Both these experiments suggested no direct NCAM-HBD interactions. To test whether the HBD peptide bound to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), HSPG synthesis was inhibited using beta-D-xyloside. After treatment, B35 cell adhesion to the HBD peptide, but not to control substrates, was significantly decreased. B35 cell adhesion to the HBD peptide could be inhibited by 10(-7) M heparin but not chondroitin sulfate. Preincubation of the substrate (HBD peptide) with heparin caused dramatic reduction of B35 cell-HBD peptide adhesion whereas preincubation of B35 cells with heparin caused only modest reductions in cell-HBD adhesion. Furthermore, inhibition of HSPG sulfation with sodium chlorate also decreased the adhesion of B35 cells to the HBD peptide. These results strongly suggest that, within the assay system, the NCAM HBD does not participate in homophilic interactions but binds to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan. This interaction potentially represents an important mechanism of NCAM adhesion and further supports the view that NCAM has

  20. T antigen origin-binding domain of simian virus 40: determinants of specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Sanford, David G; Luo, Xuelian; Sudmeier, James L; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Bullock, Peter A; Bachovchin, William W

    2004-06-01

    To better understand origin recognition and initiation of DNA replication, we have examined by NMR complexes formed between the origin-binding domain of SV40 T antigen (T-ag-obd), the initiator protein of the SV40 virus, and cognate and noncognate DNA oligomers. The results reveal two structural effects associated with "origin-specific" binding that are absent in nonspecific DNA binding. The first is the formation of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) involving His 203, a residue that genetic studies have previously identified as crucial to both specific and nonspecific DNA binding in full-length T antigen. In free T-ag-obd, the side chain of His 203 has a pK(a) value of approximately 5, titrating to the N(epsilon)(1)H tautomer at neutral pH (Sudmeier, J. L., et al. (1996) J. Magn. Reson., Ser. B 113, 236-247). In complexes with origin DNA, His 203 N(delta)(1) becomes protonated and remains nontitrating as the imidazolium cation at all pH values from 4 to 8. The H-bonded N(delta1)H resonates at 15.9 ppm, an unusually large N-H proton chemical shift, of a magnitude previously observed only in the catalytic triad of serine proteases at low pH. The formation of this H-bond requires the middle G/C base pair of the recognition pentanucleotide, GAGGC. The second structural effect is a selective distortion of the A/T base pair characterized by a large (0.6 ppm) upfield chemical-shift change of its Watson-Crick proton, while nearby H-bonded protons remain relatively unaffected. The results indicate that T antigen, like many other DNA-binding proteins, may employ "catalytic" or "transition-state-like" interactions in binding its cognate DNA (Jen-Jacobson, L. (1997) Biopolymers 44, 153-180), which may be the solution to the well-known paradox between the relatively modest DNA-binding specificity exhibited by initiator proteins and the high specificity of initiation. PMID:15170330

  1. Structural Basis of Rnd1 Binding to Plexin Rho GTPase Binding Domains (RBDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Hota, Prasanta K.; Tong, Yufeng; Li, Buren; Shen, Limin; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Borthakur, Susmita; Kim, SoonJeung; Tempel, Wolfram; Buck, Matthias; Park, Hee-Won

    2011-09-20

    Plexin receptors regulate cell adhesion, migration, and guidance. The Rho GTPase binding domain (RBD) of plexin-A1 and -B1 can bind GTPases, including Rnd1. By contrast, plexin-C1 and -D1 reportedly bind Rnd2 but associate with Rnd1 only weakly. The structural basis of this differential Rnd1 GTPase binding to plexin RBDs remains unclear. Here, we solved the structure of the plexin-A2 RBD in complex with Rnd1 and the structures of the plexin-C1 and plexin-D1 RBDs alone, also compared with the previously determined plexin-B1 RBD.Rnd1 complex structure. The plexin-A2 RBD {center_dot} Rnd1 complex is a heterodimer, whereas plexin-B1 and -A2 RBDs homodimerize at high concentration in solution, consistent with a proposed model for plexin activation. Plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs are monomeric, consistent with major residue changes in the homodimerization loop. In plexin-A2 and -B1, the RBD {beta}3-{beta}4 loop adjusts its conformation to allow Rnd1 binding, whereas minimal structural changes occur in Rnd1. The plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs lack several key non-polar residues at the corresponding GTPase binding surface and do not significantly interact with Rnd1. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements on plexin-C1 and -D1 mutants reveal that the introduction of non-polar residues in this loop generates affinity for Rnd1. Structure and sequence comparisons suggest a similar mode of Rnd1 binding to the RBDs, whereas mutagenesis suggests that the interface with the highly homologous Rnd2 GTPase is different in detail. Our results confirm, from a structural perspective, that Rnd1 does not play a role in the activation of plexin-C1 and -D1. Plexin functions appear to be regulated by subfamily-specific mechanisms, some of which involve different Rho family GTPases.

  2. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    Solar keratosis; Sun-induced skin changes - keratosis; Keratosis - actinic (solar) ... Some actinic keratoses become squamous cell skin cancer . Have your health care provider look at all skin growths as soon as you find them. Your provider will ...

  3. Binding to retinoblastoma pocket domain does not alter the inter-domain flexibility of the J domain of SV40 large T antigen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christina K; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Hammel, Michal; Pipas, James; Chazin, Walter J

    2012-02-15

    Simian Virus 40 uses the large T antigen (Tag) to bind and inactivate retinoblastoma tumor suppressor proteins (Rb), which can result in cellular transformation. Tag is a modular protein with four domains connected by flexible linkers. The N-terminal J domain of Tag is necessary for Rb inactivation. Binding of Rb is mediated by an LXCXE consensus motif immediately C-terminal to the J domain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to study the structural dynamics and interaction of Rb with the LXCXE motif, the J domain and a construct (N(260)) extending from the J domain through the origin binding domain (OBD). NMR and SAXS data revealed substantial flexibility between the domains in N(260). Binding of pRb to a construct containing the LXCXE motif and the J domain revealed weak interactions between pRb and the J domain. Analysis of the complex of pRb and N(260) indicated that the OBD is not involved and retains its dynamic independence from the remainder of Tag. These results support a 'chaperone' model in which the J domain of Tag changes its orientation as it acts upon different protein complexes. PMID:22227098

  4. Comparison of S. cerevisiae F-BAR domain structures reveals a conserved inositol phosphate binding site

    PubMed Central

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Alvarado, Diego; Schmitz, Karl R.; Kenniston, Jon A.; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY F-BAR domains control membrane interactions in endocytosis, cytokinesis, and cell signaling. Although generally thought to bind curved membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids, numerous functional studies argue that differences in lipid-binding selectivities of F-BAR domains are functionally important. Here, we compare membrane-binding properties of the S. cerevisiae F-BAR domains in vitro and in vivo. Whereas some F-BAR domains (such as Bzz1p and Hof1p F-BARs) bind equally well to all phospholipids, the F-BAR domain from the RhoGAP Rgd1p preferentially binds phosphoinositides. We determined X-ray crystal structures of F-BAR domains from Hof1p and Rgd1p, the latter bound to an inositol phosphate. The structures explain phospholipid-binding selectivity differences, and reveal an F-BAR phosphoinositide binding site that is fully conserved in a mammalian RhoGAP called Gmip, and is partly retained in certain other F-BAR domains. Our findings reveal previously unappreciated determinants of F-BAR domain lipid-binding specificity, and provide a basis for its prediction from sequence. PMID:25620000

  5. G-actin guides p53 nuclear transport: potential contribution of monomeric actin in altered localization of mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Taniya; Guha, Deblina; Manna, Argha; Panda, Abir Kumar; Bhat, Jyotsna; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2016-01-01

    p53 preserves genomic integrity by restricting anomaly at the gene level. Till date, limited information is available for cytosol to nuclear shuttling of p53; except microtubule-based trafficking route, which utilizes minus-end directed motor dynein. The present study suggests that monomeric actin (G-actin) guides p53 traffic towards the nucleus. Histidine-tag pull-down assay using purified p53(1–393)-His and G-actin confirms direct physical association between p53 and monomeric G-actin. Co-immunoprecipitation data supports the same. Confocal imaging explores intense perinuclear colocalization between p53 and G-actin. To address atomistic details of the complex, constraint-based docked model of p53:G-actin complex was generated based on crystal structures. MD simulation reveals that p53 DNA-binding domain arrests very well the G-actin protein. Docking benchmark studies have been carried out for a known crystal structure, 1YCS (complex between p53DBD and BP2), which validates the docking protocol we adopted. Co-immunoprecipitation study using “hot-spot” p53 mutants suggested reduced G-actin association with cancer-associated p53 conformational mutants (R175H and R249S). Considering these findings, we hypothesized that point mutation in p53 structure, which diminishes p53:G-actin complexation results in mutant p53 altered subcellular localization. Our model suggests p53Arg249 form polar-contact with Arg357 of G-actin, which upon mutation, destabilizes p53:G-actin interaction and results in cytoplasmic retention of p53R249S. PMID:27601274

  6. G-actin guides p53 nuclear transport: potential contribution of monomeric actin in altered localization of mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Saha, Taniya; Guha, Deblina; Manna, Argha; Panda, Abir Kumar; Bhat, Jyotsna; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2016-01-01

    p53 preserves genomic integrity by restricting anomaly at the gene level. Till date, limited information is available for cytosol to nuclear shuttling of p53; except microtubule-based trafficking route, which utilizes minus-end directed motor dynein. The present study suggests that monomeric actin (G-actin) guides p53 traffic towards the nucleus. Histidine-tag pull-down assay using purified p53(1-393)-His and G-actin confirms direct physical association between p53 and monomeric G-actin. Co-immunoprecipitation data supports the same. Confocal imaging explores intense perinuclear colocalization between p53 and G-actin. To address atomistic details of the complex, constraint-based docked model of p53:G-actin complex was generated based on crystal structures. MD simulation reveals that p53 DNA-binding domain arrests very well the G-actin protein. Docking benchmark studies have been carried out for a known crystal structure, 1YCS (complex between p53DBD and BP2), which validates the docking protocol we adopted. Co-immunoprecipitation study using "hot-spot" p53 mutants suggested reduced G-actin association with cancer-associated p53 conformational mutants (R175H and R249S). Considering these findings, we hypothesized that point mutation in p53 structure, which diminishes p53:G-actin complexation results in mutant p53 altered subcellular localization. Our model suggests p53Arg249 form polar-contact with Arg357 of G-actin, which upon mutation, destabilizes p53:G-actin interaction and results in cytoplasmic retention of p53R249S. PMID:27601274

  7. Dimeric WH2 repeats of VopF sequester actin monomers into non-nucleating linear string conformations: An X-ray scattering study.

    PubMed

    Avvaru, Balendu Sankara; Pernier, Julien; Carlier, Marie-France

    2015-05-01

    VopF and VopL are highly similar virulence-factors of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus respectively that disrupt the host's actin cytoskeleton, using a unique organization in dimerized WH2 repeats. Association of dimerized WH2 domains with the barbed face of actin confers multifunctional activities to VopF in vitro, including G-actin sequestration and filament nucleation, barbed end tracking and uncapping. Here, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements of complexes of VopF with actin and structural modeling reveal that VopF stabilizes linear actin-strings that differ from canonical actin filament architectures but represent non-polymerizable sequestered forms of actin. The results exclude that VopL binds the pointed end of actin filaments in the template filament nucleation mechanism derived from crystallographic studies. PMID:25818509

  8. Proline-rich sequences that bind to Src homology 3 domains with individual specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandropoulos, K; Cheng, G; Baltimore, D

    1995-01-01

    To study the binding specificity of Src homology 3 (SH3) domains, we have screened a mouse embryonic expression library for peptide fragments that interact with them. Several clones were identified that express fragments of proteins which, through proline-rich binding sites, exhibit differential binding specificity to various SH3 domains. Src-SH3-specific binding uses a sequence of 7 aa of the consensus RPLPXXP, in which the N-terminal arginine is very important. The SH3 domains of the Src-related kinases Fyn, Lyn, and Hck bind to this sequence with the same affinity as that of the Src SH3. In contrast, a quite different proline-rich sequence from the Btk protein kinase binds to the Fyn, Lyn, and Hck SH3 domains, but not to the Src SH3. Specific binding of the Abl SH3 requires a longer, more proline-rich sequence but no arginine. One clone that binds to both Src and Abl SH3 domains through a common site exhibits reversed binding orientation, in that an arginine indispensable for binding to all tested SH3 domains occurs at the C terminus. Another clone contains overlapping yet distinct Src and Abl SH3 binding sites. Binding to the SH3 domains is mediated by a common PXXP amino acid sequence motif present on all ligands, and specificity comes about from other interactions, often ones involving arginine. The rules governing in vivo usage of particular sites by particular SH3 domains are not clear, but one binding orientation may be more specific than another. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7536925

  9. An aprotinin binding site localized in the hormone binding domain of the estrogen receptor from calf uterus.

    PubMed

    Nigro, V; Medici, N; Abbondanza, C; Minucci, S; Moncharmont, B; Molinari, A M; Puca, G A

    1990-07-31

    It has been proposed that the estrogen receptor bears proteolytic activity responsible for its own transformation. This activity was inhibited by aprotinin. Incubation of transformed ER with aprotinin modified the proteolytic digestion of the hormone binding subunit by proteinase K. The smallest hormone-binding fragment of the ER, obtained by tryptic digestion, was still able to bind to aprotinin. These results suggest that aprotinin interacts with ER and the hormone-binding domain of ER is endowed with a specific aprotinin-binding site. PMID:1696480

  10. The BEN domain is a novel sequence-specific DNA-binding domain conserved in neural transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Serganov, Artem A.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Lai, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that Drosophila Insensitive (Insv) promotes sensory organ development and has activity as a nuclear corepressor for the Notch transcription factor Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)]. Insv lacks domains of known biochemical function but contains a single BEN domain (i.e., a “BEN-solo” protein). Our chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis confirmed binding of Insensitive to Su(H) target genes in the Enhancer of split gene complex [E(spl)-C]; however, de novo motif analysis revealed a novel site strongly enriched in Insv peaks (TCYAATHRGAA). We validate binding of endogenous Insv to genomic regions bearing such sites, whose associated genes are enriched for neural functions and are functionally repressed by Insv. Unexpectedly, we found that the Insv BEN domain binds specifically to this sequence motif and that Insv directly regulates transcription via this motif. We determined the crystal structure of the BEN–DNA target complex, revealing homodimeric binding of the BEN domain and extensive nucleotide contacts via α helices and a C-terminal loop. Point mutations in key DNA-contacting residues severely impair DNA binding in vitro and capacity for transcriptional regulation in vivo. We further demonstrate DNA-binding and repression activities by the mammalian neural BEN-solo protein BEND5. Altogether, we define novel DNA-binding activity in a conserved family of transcriptional repressors, opening a molecular window on this extensive gene family. PMID:23468431

  11. Formation of long and winding nuclear F-actin bundles by nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Kazumasa; Yuki, Ryuzaburo; Horiike, Yasuyoshi; Kubota, Sho; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Morii, Mariko; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Nakayama, Yuji; Kuga, Takahisa; Hashimoto, Yuuki; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2013-12-10

    The non-receptor-type tyrosine kinase c-Abl is involved in actin dynamics in the cytoplasm. Having three nuclear localization signals (NLSs) and one nuclear export signal, c-Abl shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Although monomeric actin and filamentous actin (F-actin) are present in the nucleus, little is known about the relationship between c-Abl and nuclear actin dynamics. Here, we show that nuclear-localized c-Abl induces nuclear F-actin formation. Adriamycin-induced DNA damage together with leptomycin B treatment accumulates c-Abl into the nucleus and increases the levels of nuclear F-actin. Treatment of c-Abl-knockdown cells with Adriamycin and leptomycin B barely increases the nuclear F-actin levels. Expression of nuclear-targeted c-Abl (NLS-c-Abl) increases the levels of nuclear F-actin even without Adriamycin, and the increased levels of nuclear F-actin are not inhibited by inactivation of Abl kinase activity. Intriguingly, expression of NLS-c-Abl induces the formation of long and winding bundles of F-actin within the nucleus in a c-Abl kinase activity-dependent manner. Furthermore, NLS-c-AblΔC, which lacks the actin-binding domain but has the full tyrosine kinase activity, is incapable of forming nuclear F-actin and in particular long and winding nuclear F-actin bundles. These results suggest that nuclear c-Abl plays critical roles in actin dynamics within the nucleus. - Highlights: • We show the involvement of c-Abl tyrosine kinase in nuclear actin dynamics. • Nuclear F-actin is formed by nuclear-localized c-Abl and its kinase-dead version. • The c-Abl actin-binding domain is prerequisite for nuclear F-actin formation. • Formation of long nuclear F-actin bundles requires nuclear c-Abl kinase activity. • We discuss a role for nuclear F-actin bundle formation in chromatin regulation.

  12. The ligand binding domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Immunological analysis.

    PubMed

    Kachalsky, S G; Aladjem, M; Barchan, D; Fuchs, S

    1993-03-01

    The interaction of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) binding site domain with specific antibodies and with alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) has been compared. The cloned and expressed ligand binding domain of the mouse AChR alpha-subunit binds alpha-BTX, whereas the mongoose-expressed domain is not recognized by alpha-BTX. On the other hand, both the mouse and mongoose domains bind to the site-specific monoclonal antibody 5.5. These results demonstrate that the structural requirements for binding of alpha-BTX and mcAb 5.5, both of which interact with the AChR binding site, are distinct from each other. PMID:8440381

  13. A SAM oligomerization domain shapes the genomic binding landscape of the LEAFY transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Sayou, Camille; Nanao, Max H.; Jamin, Marc; Posé, David; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Grégoire, Laura; Tichtinsky, Gabrielle; Denay, Grégoire; Ott, Felix; Peirats Llobet, Marta; Schmid, Markus; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms directing transcription factors (TFs) to specific genome regions is essential to understand and predict transcriptional regulation. TFs recognize short DNA motifs primarily through their DNA-binding domain. Some TFs also possess an oligomerization domain suspected to potentiate DNA binding but for which the genome-wide influence remains poorly understood. Here we focus on the LEAFY transcription factor, a master regulator of flower development in angiosperms. We have determined the crystal structure of its conserved amino-terminal domain, revealing an unanticipated Sterile Alpha Motif oligomerization domain. We show that this domain is essential to LEAFY floral function. Moreover, combined biochemical and genome-wide assays suggest that oligomerization is required for LEAFY to access regions with low-affinity binding sites or closed chromatin. This finding shows that domains that do not directly contact DNA can nevertheless have a profound impact on the DNA binding landscape of a TF. PMID:27097556

  14. A SAM oligomerization domain shapes the genomic binding landscape of the LEAFY transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Sayou, Camille; Nanao, Max H; Jamin, Marc; Posé, David; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Grégoire, Laura; Tichtinsky, Gabrielle; Denay, Grégoire; Ott, Felix; Peirats Llobet, Marta; Schmid, Markus; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms directing transcription factors (TFs) to specific genome regions is essential to understand and predict transcriptional regulation. TFs recognize short DNA motifs primarily through their DNA-binding domain. Some TFs also possess an oligomerization domain suspected to potentiate DNA binding but for which the genome-wide influence remains poorly understood. Here we focus on the LEAFY transcription factor, a master regulator of flower development in angiosperms. We have determined the crystal structure of its conserved amino-terminal domain, revealing an unanticipated Sterile Alpha Motif oligomerization domain. We show that this domain is essential to LEAFY floral function. Moreover, combined biochemical and genome-wide assays suggest that oligomerization is required for LEAFY to access regions with low-affinity binding sites or closed chromatin. This finding shows that domains that do not directly contact DNA can nevertheless have a profound impact on the DNA binding landscape of a TF. PMID:27097556

  15. Chloride channel activity of ClC-2 is modified by the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, N; Ramjeesingh, M; Wong, S; Varga, A; Garami, E; Bear, C E

    2000-01-01

    The chloride channel ClC-2 has been implicated in essential physiological functions, including cell-volume regulation and fluid secretion by specific epithelial tissues. Although ClC-2 is known to be activated by hyperpolarization and hypo-osmotic shock, the molecular basis for the regulation of this channel remains unclear. Here we show in the Xenopus oocyte expression system that the chloride-channel activity of ClC-2 is enhanced after treatment with the actin-disrupting agents cytochalasin and latrunkulin. These findings suggest that the actin cytoskeleton normally exerts an inhibitory effect on ClC-2 activity. An inhibitory domain was previously defined in the N-terminus of ClC-2, so we sought to determine whether this domain might interact directly with actin in binding assays in vitro. We found that a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the inhibitory domain was capable of binding actin in overlay and co-sedimentation assays. Further, the binding of actin to this relatively basic peptide (pI 8.4) might be mediated through electrostatic interactions because binding was inhibited at high concentrations of NaCl with a half-maximal decrease in signal at 180 mM NaCl. This work suggests that electrostatic interactions between the N-terminus of ClC-2 and the actin cytoskeleton might have a role in the regulation of this channel. PMID:11104687

  16. P130Cas Src-Binding and Substrate Domains Have Distinct Roles in Sustaining Focal Adhesion Disassembly and Promoting Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Meenderink, Leslie M.; Ryzhova, Larisa M.; Donato, Dominique M.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Kaverina, Irina; Hanks, Steven K.

    2010-01-01

    The docking protein p130Cas is a prominent Src substrate found in focal adhesions (FAs) and is implicated in regulating critical aspects of cell motility including FA disassembly and protrusion of the leading edge plasma membrane. To better understand how p130Cas acts to promote these events we examined requirements for established p130Cas signaling motifs including the SH3-binding site of the Src binding domain (SBD) and the tyrosine phosphorylation sites within the substrate domain (SD). Expression of wild type p130Cas in Cas −/− mouse embryo fibroblasts resulted in enhanced cell migration associated with increased leading-edge actin flux, increased rates of FA assembly/disassembly, and uninterrupted FA turnover. Variants lacking either the SD phosphorylation sites or the SBD SH3-binding motif were able to partially restore the migration response, while only a variant lacking both signaling functions was fully defective. Notably, the migration defects associated with p130Cas signaling-deficient variants correlated with longer FA lifetimes resulting from aborted FA disassembly attempts. However the SD mutational variant was fully defective in increasing actin assembly at the protruding leading edge and FA assembly/disassembly rates, indicating that SD phosphorylation is the sole p130Cas signaling function in regulating these processes. Our results provide the first quantitative evidence supporting roles for p130Cas SD tyrosine phosphorylation in promoting both leading edge actin flux and FA turnover during cell migration, while further revealing that the p130Cas SBD has a function in cell migration and sustained FA disassembly that is distinct from its known role of promoting SD tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:20976150

  17. Wnts grasp the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 at two distinct binding sites.

    PubMed

    Kerekes, Krisztina; Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2015-10-01

    Wnts have a structure resembling a hand with "thumb" and "index" fingers that grasp the cysteine rich domains of Frizzled receptors at two distinct binding sites. In the present work we show that the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 is also bound by Wnts at two sites. Using C-terminal domains of Wnt5a and Wnt7a and arginine-scanning mutagenesis of the WIF domain we demonstrate that, whereas the N-terminal, lipid-modified "thumb" of Wnts interacts with the alkyl-binding site of the WIF domain, the C-terminal domain of Wnts (Wnt-CTD) binds to a surface on the opposite side of the WIF domain. PMID:26342861

  18. PROPERTIES OF CATALYTIC, LINKER AND CHITIN-BINDING DOMAINS OF INSECT CHITINASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manduca sexta (tobacco hornworm) chitinase is a glycoprotein that consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain, a Ser/Thr-rich linker region, and a C-terminal chitin-binding domain. To delineate the properties of these domains, we have generated truncated forms of chitinase, which were expressed in i...

  19. Actin and Keratin are Binding Partners of the 1,25D3-MARRS Receptor/PDIA3/ERp57

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Tremaine; Nemere, lka

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that the 1,25D3-MARRS receptor is necessary for the rapid, pre-genomic effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on phosphate and/or calcium absorption in chick intestines. However, a clear understanding of the proteins involved in the signaling mechanisms by which the 1,25D3-MARRS receptor facilitates 1,25(OH)2D3-mediated phosphate or calcium uptake, as well as other cellular effects, is still under investigation. We used co-immunoprecipitation studies and mass spectroscopy to identify actin and keratin as proteins that interact with the 1,25D3-MARRS receptor. Using confocal microscopy, we visualized 1,25(OH)2D3- MARRS receptor localizations relative to actin and/or keratin distribution in chick enterocytes. Cells cultured in media containing phenol red had the 1,25D3-MARRS receptor and actin localized largely in the nucleus, which was dispersed upon addition of (OH)2 1,25(OH)2D3. In the absence of phenol red, staining was cytoplasmic. Addition of steroid caused diminished staining at 10 s and 30 s, with a return of intensity between 1 and 5 min. Nuclear staining was observed after 1 min. We found that F-actin concentrations are maximal when 1,25D3-MARRS receptor localizations within enterocytes are low suggesting that cyclical conversions of F-actin to G-actin are involved in the 1,25(OH)2D3-mediated redistribution of the 1,25D3-MARRS receptor within the cell. We also found that keratin distribution remains constant with 1,25(OH)2D3 exposure when Factin depolymerizes into G-actin, which suggests that actin and keratin work in concert to facilitate hormonemediated redistribution of the 1,25D3-MARRS receptor. We subsequently investigated whether the cyclical redistribution was related to either 1,25(OH)2D3-stimulated phosphate or calcium uptake, but no congruent pattern was found. PMID:26029286

  20. Solution structure of telomere binding domain of AtTRB2 derived from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Won Kyung; Kim, Heeyoun; Kim, Eunhee; Cheong, Chaejoon; Cho, Myeon Haeng; Lee, Weontae

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • We have determined solution structure of Myb domain of AtTRB2. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 is located in the N-terminal region. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 binds to plant telomeric DNA without fourth helix. • Helix 2 and 3 of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 are involved in DNA recognition. • AtTRB2 is a novel protein distinguished from other known plant TBP. - Abstract: Telomere homeostasis is regulated by telomere-associated proteins, and the Myb domain is well conserved for telomere binding. AtTRB2 is a member of the SMH (Single-Myb-Histone)-like family in Arabidopsis thaliana, having an N-terminal Myb domain, which is responsible for DNA binding. The Myb domain of AtTRB2 contains three α-helices and loops for DNA binding, which is unusual given that other plant telomere-binding proteins have an additional fourth helix that is essential for DNA binding. To understand the structural role for telomeric DNA binding of AtTRB2, we determined the solution structure of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 (AtTRB2{sub 1–64}) using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In addition, the inter-molecular interaction between AtTRB2{sub 1–64} and telomeric DNA has been characterized by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and NMR titration analyses for both plant (TTTAGGG)n and human (TTAGGG)n telomere sequences. Data revealed that Trp28, Arg29, and Val47 residues located in Helix 2 and Helix 3 are crucial for DNA binding, which are well conserved among other plant telomere binding proteins. We concluded that although AtTRB2 is devoid of the additional fourth helix in the Myb-extension domain, it is able to bind to plant telomeric repeat sequences as well as human telomeric repeat sequences.

  1. Trim32 is a ubiquitin ligase mutated in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H that binds to skeletal muscle myosin and ubiquitinates actin.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kramerova, Irina; Spencer, Melissa J

    2005-11-25

    Trim32 belongs to the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family, which is characterized by a common domain structure composed of a RING-finger, a B-box, and a coiled-coil motif. In addition to these motifs, Trim32 possesses six C-terminal NHL-domains. A point mutation in one NHL domain (D487N) has been linked to two forms of muscular dystrophy called limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H and sarcotubular myopathy. In the present study we demonstrate that Trim32 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts in conjunction with ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes UbcH5a, UbcH5c, and UbcH6. Western blot analysis showed that Trim32 is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle, and revealed its differential expression from one muscle to another. The level of Trim32 expression was elevated significantly in muscle undergoing remodeling due to changes in weight bearing. Furthermore, expression of Trim32 was induced in myogenic differentiation. Thus, variability in Trim32 expression in different skeletal muscles could be due to induction of Trim32 expression upon changes in physiological conditions. We show that Trim32 associates with skeletal muscle thick filaments, interacting directly with the head and neck region of myosin. Our data indicate that myosin is not a substrate of Trim32; however, Trim32 was found to ubiquitinate actin in vitro and to cause a decrease in the level of endogenous actin when transfected into HEK293 cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Trim32 is a ubiquitin ligase that is expressed in skeletal muscle, can be induced upon muscle unloading and reloading, associates with myofibrils and is able to ubiquitinate actin, suggesting its likely participation in myofibrillar protein turnover, especially during muscle adaptation. PMID:16243356

  2. Soybean agglutinin binding to corneal endothelial cell surfaces disrupts in situ monolayer integrity and actin organization and interferes with wound repair.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sheldon R; Wood, Meredith

    2009-03-01

    Rat corneal endothelium demonstrates cell-surface soybean agglutinin (SBA) binding during organ-culture or injury. When organ-cultured in medium containing SBA, the endothelial monolayer is disrupted because of cell-cell and cell-matrix alterations. SBA binding disorganizes the circumferential microfilament bundles (CMBs), an effect that is partially prevented by phallacidin preincubation. This disruption is reversible if tissues are returned to standard culture medium. Serum heightens SBA binding, whereas puromycin prevents it. Neither actinomycin D nor alpha-amanitin inhibits SBA binding, suggesting that SBA-binding protein(s) may be post-transcriptionally regulated. During injury-induced cell migration in the presence of SBA, cellular processes are blunted and fail to extend significantly outward. By 72 h post-injury, cells of SBA-treated tissues repopulate the wound but demonstrate little association with neighboring cells. Cells migrating in the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine appear normal but also fail to reassociate with other cells in the jury zone. Immunofluorescent staining for ZO-1 reveals punctuate patterns in cells of control tissues, whereas neither SBA- nor N-acetylgalactosamine-treated tissues exhibit ZO-1 staining. Terminal N-acetylgalactosamine removal fails to affect cell morphology, actin organization, or migration but prevents lectin binding. Our results suggest that SBA binding reflects the synthesis of a stress-induced protein(s) that may play a role in reestablishing cell-cell relationships during monolayer reorganization following injury. PMID:19145448

  3. Tobacco Arp3 is localized to actin-nucleating sites in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Maisch, Jan; Fišerová, Jindřiška; Fischer, Lukáš; Nick, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The polarity of actin is a central determinant of intracellular transport in plant cells. To visualize actin polarity in living plant cells, the tobacco homologue of the actin-related protein 3 (ARP3) was cloned and a fusion with the red fluorescent protein (RFP) was generated. Upon transient expression of these fusions in the tobacco cell line BY-2 (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2), punctate structures were observed near the nuclear envelope and in the cortical plasma. These dots could be shown to decorate actin filaments by expressing RFP–ARP3 in a marker line, where actin was tagged by GFP (green fluorescent protein)–FABD (fimbrin actin-binding domain 2). When actin filaments were disrupted by latrunculin B or by prolonged cold treatment, and subsequently allowed to recover, the actin filaments reformed from the RFP–ARP3 structures, that therefore represented actin nucleation sites. The intracellular distribution of these sites was followed during the formation of pluricellular files, and it was observed that the density of RFP–ARP3 increased in the apex of the polarized, terminal cells of a file, whereas it was equally distributed in the central cells of a file. These findings are interpreted in terms of position-dependent differences of actin organization. PMID:19129161

  4. STRUCTURAL FOLD, CONSERVATION AND FE(II) BINDING OF THE INTRACELLULAR DOMAIN OF PROKARYOTE FEOB

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-01-01

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain’s two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function. PMID:20123128

  5. EPR SPECTRA AND MOLECULAR DYNAMICS AGREE THAT THE NUCLEOTIDE POCKET OF MYOSIN V IS CLOSED AND THAT IT OPENS ON BINDING ACTIN

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Thomas J.; Naber, Nariman; Sutton, Shirley; Cooke, Roger; Pate, Edward

    2011-01-01

    We have used EPR spectroscopy and computational modeling of nucleotide-analog spin probes to investigate conformational changes at the nucleotide site of myosin V (MV). We find that in the absence of actin, the mobility of a spin-labeled diphosphate analog (SLADP) bound at the active site is strongly hindered, suggesting a closed nucleotide pocket. The mobility of the analog increases when the MV•SLADP complex binds to actin (A), implying an opening of the active site in the A•MV•SLADP complex. The probe mobilities are similar to those seen with myosin II, despite the fact that myosin V has dramatically altered kinetics. Molecular dynamics simulation was used to understand the EPR spectra in terms of the X-ray database. The X-ray structure of MV•ADP•BeFx shows a closed nucleotide site and has been proposed to be the detached state. The MV•ADP structure shows an open nucleotide site and has been proposed to be the A•MV•ADP state at the end of the working powerstroke. Molecular dynamics simulation of SLADP docked in the closed conformation gave a probe mobility comparable to that seen in EPR spectra of the MV•SLADP complex. The simulation of the open conformation gave a probe mobility that was 35°-40° greater than that observed experimentally for the A•MV•SLADP state. Thus EPR, X-ray diffraction and computational analysis support the closed conformation as a myosin V state that is detached from actin. The MD results indicate that the MV•ADP crystal structure is super-opened, which may correspond to the strained actin-bound post-powerstroke conformation resulting from head-head interaction in the dimeric, processive motor. PMID:21640122

  6. Fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes: sequence of the binding domain involved in adherence of streptococci to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Talay, S R; Valentin-Weigand, P; Jerlström, P G; Timmis, K N; Chhatwal, G S

    1992-01-01

    The sequence of the fibronectin-binding domain of the fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes (Sfb protein) was determined, and its role in streptococcal adherence was investigated by use of an Sfb fusion protein in adherence studies. A 1-kb DNA fragment coding for the binding domain of Sfb protein was cloned into the expression vector pEX31 to produce an Sfb fusion protein consisting of the N-terminal part of MS2 polymerase and a C-terminal fragment of the streptococcal protein. Induction of the vector promoter resulted in hyperexpression of fibronectin-binding fusion protein in the cytoplasm of the recombinant Escherichia coli cells. Sequence determination of the cloned 1-kb fragment revealed an in-frame reading frame for a 268-amino-acid peptide composed of a 37-amino-acid sequence which is completely repeated three times and incompletely repeated a fourth time. Cloning of one repeat into pEX31 resulted in expression of small fusion peptides that show fibronectin-binding activity, indicating that one repeat contains at least one binding domain. Each repeat exhibits two charged domains and shows high homology with the 38-amino-acid D3 repeat of the fibronectin-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus. Sequence comparison with other streptococcal ligand-binding surface proteins, including M protein, failed to reveal significant homology, which suggests that Sfb protein represents a novel type of functional protein in S. pyogenes. The Sfb fusion protein isolated from the cytoplasm of recombinant cells was purified by fast protein liquid chromatography. It showed a strong competitive inhibition of fibronectin binding to S. pyogenes and of the adherence of bacteria to cultured epithelial cells. In contrast, purified streptococcal lipoteichoic acid showed only a weak inhibition of fibronectin binding and streptococcal adherence. These results demonstrate that Sfb protein is directly involved in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of S. pyogenes to

  7. Structure-function relationships in the catalytic and starch binding domains of glucoamylase.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, P M; Reilly, P J

    1994-03-01

    Sixteen primary sequences from five sub-families of fungal, yeast and bacterial glucoamylases were related to structural information from the model of the catalytic domain of Aspergillus awamori var. X100 glucoamylase obtained by protein crystallography. This domain is composed of thirteen alpha-helices, with five conserved regions defining the active site. Interactions between methyl alpha-maltoside and active site residues were modelled, and the importance of these residues on the catalytic action of different glucoamylases was shown by their presence in each primary sequence. The overall structure of the starch binding domain of some fungal glucoamylases was determined based on homology to the C-terminal domains of Bacillus cyclodextrin glucosyl-transferases. Crystallography indicated that this domain contains 6-8 beta-strands and homology allowed the attribution of a disulfide bridge in the glucoamylase starch binding domain. Glucoamylase residues Thr525, Asn530 and Trp560, homologous to Bacillus stearothermophilus cyclodextrin glucosyltransferase residues binding to maltose in the C-terminal domain, could be involved in raw-starch binding. The structure and length of the linker region between the catalytic and starch binding domains in fungal glucoamylases can vary substantially, a further indication of the functional independence of the two domains. PMID:8177888

  8. IQGAP proteins reveal an atypical phosphoinositide (aPI) binding domain with a pseudo C2 domain fold.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Miles J; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R; van Aalten, Daan M F; Downes, C Peter; Batty, Ian H

    2012-06-29

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP(3)). The binding affinity for PtdInsP(3), together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP(3) effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules. PMID:22493426

  9. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  10. The Binding of Syndapin SH3 Domain to Dynamin Proline-rich Domain Involves Short and Long Distance Elements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lin; Xue, Jing; Kwan, Ann; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Wielens, Jerome; von Kleist, Lisa; Cubeddu, Liza; Guo, Zhong; Stow, Jennifer L; Parker, Michael W; Mackay, Joel P; Robinson, Phillip J

    2016-04-29

    Dynamin is a GTPase that mediates vesicle fission during synaptic vesicle endocytosis. Its long C-terminal proline-rich domain contains 13 PXXP motifs, which orchestrate its interactions with multiple proteins. The SH3 domains of syndapin and endophilin bind the PXXP motifs called Site 2 and 3 (Pro-786-Pro-793) at the N-terminal end of the proline-rich domain, whereas the amphiphysin SH3 binds Site 9 (Pro-833-Pro-836) toward the C-terminal end. In some proteins, SH3/peptide interactions also involve short distance elements, which are 5-15 amino acid extensions flanking the central PXXP motif for high affinity binding. Here we found two previously unrecognized elements in the central and the C-terminal end of the dynamin proline-rich domain that account for a significant increase in syndapin binding affinity compared with a previously reported Site 2 and Site 3 PXXP peptide alone. The first new element (Gly-807-Gly-811) is short distance element on the C-terminal side of Site 2 PXXP, which might contact a groove identified under the RT loop of the SH3 domain. The second element (Arg-838-Pro-844) is located about 50 amino acids downstream of Site 2. These two elements provide additional specificity to the syndapin SH3 domain outside of the well described polyproline-binding groove. Thus, the dynamin/syndapin interaction is mediated via a network of multiple contacts outside the core PXXP motif over a previously unrecognized extended region of the proline-rich domain. To our knowledge this is the first example among known SH3 interactions to involve spatially separated and extended long-range elements that combine to provide a higher affinity interaction. PMID:26893375

  11. Identification of the minimal binding region of a Plasmodium falciparum IgM binding PfEMP1 domain

    PubMed Central

    Semblat, Jean-Philippe; Ghumra, Ashfaq; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Wallis, Russell; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Raza, Ahmed; Rowe, J.Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Binding of host immunoglobulin is a common immune evasion mechanism demonstrated by microbial pathogens. Previous work showed that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum binds the Fc-region of human IgM molecules, resulting in a coating of IgM on the surface of infected erythrocytes. IgM binding is a property of P. falciparum strains showing virulence-related phenotypes such as erythrocyte rosetting. The parasite ligands for IgM binding are members of the diverse P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein One (PfEMP1) family. However, little is known about the amino acid sequence requirements for IgM binding. Here we studied an IgM binding domain from a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant, DBL4ζ of TM284var1, and found that the minimal IgM binding region mapped to the central region of the DBL domain, comprising all of subdomain 2 and adjoining parts of subdomains 1 and 3. Site-directed mutagenesis of charged amino acids within subdomain 2, predicted by molecular modelling to form the IgM binding site, showed no marked effect on IgM binding properties. Overall, this study identifies the minimal IgM binding region of a PfEMP1 domain, and indicates that the existing homology model of PfEMP1-IgM interaction is incorrect. Further work is needed to identify the specific interaction site for IgM within the minimal binding region of PfEMP1. PMID:26094597

  12. Mutations of the Mouse ELMO Domain Containing 1 Gene (Elmod1) Link Small GTPase Signaling to Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics in Hair Cell Stereocilia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Longo-Guess, Chantal M.; Gagnon, Leona H.

    2012-01-01

    Stereocilia, the modified microvilli projecting from the apical surfaces of the sensory hair cells of the inner ear, are essential to the mechanoelectrical transduction process underlying hearing and balance. The actin-filled stereocilia on each hair cell are tethered together by fibrous links to form a highly patterned hair bundle. Although many structural components of hair bundles have been identified, little is known about the signaling mechanisms that regulate their development, morphology, and maintenance. Here, we describe two naturally occurring, allelic mutations that result in hearing and balance deficits in mice, named roundabout (rda) and roundabout-2J (rda2J). Positional cloning identified both as mutations of the mouse ELMO domain containing 1 gene (Elmod1), a poorly characterized gene with no previously reported mutant phenotypes. The rda mutation is a 138 kb deletion that includes exons 1–5 of Elmod1, and rda2J is an intragenic duplication of exons 3–8 of Elmod1. The deafness associated with these mutations is caused by cochlear hair cell dysfunction, as indicated by conspicuous elongations and fusions of inner hair cell stereocilia and progressive degeneration of outer hair cell stereocilia. Mammalian ELMO-family proteins are known to be involved in complexes that activate small GTPases to regulate the actin cytoskeleton during phagocytosis and cell migration. ELMOD1 and ELMOD2 recently were shown to function as GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for the Arf family of small G proteins. Our finding connecting ELMOD1 deficiencies with stereocilia dysmorphologies thus establishes a link between the Ras superfamily of small regulatory GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton dynamics of hair cell stereocilia. PMID:22558334

  13. Mutations of the mouse ELMO domain containing 1 gene (Elmod1) link small GTPase signaling to actin cytoskeleton dynamics in hair cell stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth R; Longo-Guess, Chantal M; Gagnon, Leona H

    2012-01-01

    Stereocilia, the modified microvilli projecting from the apical surfaces of the sensory hair cells of the inner ear, are essential to the mechanoelectrical transduction process underlying hearing and balance. The actin-filled stereocilia on each hair cell are tethered together by fibrous links to form a highly patterned hair bundle. Although many structural components of hair bundles have been identified, little is known about the signaling mechanisms that regulate their development, morphology, and maintenance. Here, we describe two naturally occurring, allelic mutations that result in hearing and balance deficits in mice, named roundabout (rda) and roundabout-2J (rda(2J)). Positional cloning identified both as mutations of the mouse ELMO domain containing 1 gene (Elmod1), a poorly characterized gene with no previously reported mutant phenotypes. The rda mutation is a 138 kb deletion that includes exons 1-5 of Elmod1, and rda(2J) is an intragenic duplication of exons 3-8 of Elmod1. The deafness associated with these mutations is caused by cochlear hair cell dysfunction, as indicated by conspicuous elongations and fusions of inner hair cell stereocilia and progressive degeneration of outer hair cell stereocilia. Mammalian ELMO-family proteins are known to be involved in complexes that activate small GTPases to regulate the actin cytoskeleton during phagocytosis and cell migration. ELMOD1 and ELMOD2 recently were shown to function as GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for the Arf family of small G proteins. Our finding connecting ELMOD1 deficiencies with stereocilia dysmorphologies thus establishes a link between the Ras superfamily of small regulatory GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton dynamics of hair cell stereocilia. PMID:22558334

  14. An Unusual Cation-Binding Site and Distinct Domain-Domain Interactions Distinguish Class II Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate Synthases.

    PubMed

    Light, Samuel H; Krishna, Sankar N; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-03-01

    Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) catalyzes a critical step in the biosynthesis of a number of aromatic metabolites. An essential prokaryotic enzyme and the molecular target of the herbicide glyphosate, EPSPSs are the subject of both pharmaceutical and commercial interest. Two EPSPS classes that exhibit low sequence homology, differing substrate/glyphosate affinities, and distinct cation activation properties have previously been described. Here, we report structural studies of the monovalent cation-binding class II Coxiella burnetii EPSPS (cbEPSPS). Three cbEPSPS crystal structures reveal that the enzyme undergoes substantial conformational changes that alter the electrostatic potential of the active site. A complex with shikimate-3-phosphate, inorganic phosphate (Pi), and K(+) reveals that ligand induced domain closure produces an unusual cation-binding site bordered on three sides by the N-terminal domain, C-terminal domain, and the product Pi. A crystal structure of the class I Vibrio cholerae EPSPS (vcEPSPS) clarifies the basis of differential class I and class II cation responsiveness, showing that in class I EPSPSs a lysine side chain occupies the would-be cation-binding site. Finally, we identify distinct patterns of sequence conservation at the domain-domain interface and propose that the two EPSPS classes have evolved to differently optimize domain opening-closing dynamics. PMID:26813771

  15. Three-dimensional structure of the complex of actin and DNase I at 4.5 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Kabsch, W; Mannherz, H G; Suck, D

    1985-01-01

    The shape of an actin subunit has been derived from an improved 6 A map of the complex of rabbit skeletal muscle actin and bovine pancreatic DNase I obtained by X-ray crystallographic methods. The three-dimensional structure of DNase I determined independently at 2.5 A resolution was compared with the DNase I electron density in the actin:DNase map. The two structures are very similar at 6 A resolution thus leading to an unambiguous identification of actin as well as DNase I electron density. Furthermore the correct hand of the actin structure is determined from the DNase I atomic structure. The resolution of the actin structure was extended to 4.5 A by using a single heavy-atom derivative and the knowledge of the atomic coordinates of DNase I. The dimensions of an actin subunit are 67 A X 40 A X 37 A. It consists of a small and a large domain, the small domain containing the N terminus. Actin is an alpha,beta-protein with a beta-pleated sheet in each domain. These sheets are surrounded by several alpha-helices, comprising at least 40% of the structure. The phosphate peak of the adenine nucleotide is located between the two domains. The complex of actin and DNase I as found in solution (i.e., the actin:DNase I contacts which do not depend on crystal packing) was deduced from a comparison of monoclinic with orthorhombic crystals. Residues 44-46, 51, 52, 60-62 of DNase I are close to a loop region in the small domain of actin. At a distance of approximately 15 A there is a second contact in the large domain in which Glu13 of DNase I is involved. A possible binding region for myosin is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:4065103

  16. Molecular Cloning of a cDNA Encoding for Taenia solium TATA-Box Binding Protein 1 (TsTBP1) and Study of Its Interactions with the TATA-Box of Actin 5 and Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lima, Oscar; García-Gutierrez, Ponciano; Jiménez, Lucía; Zarain-Herzberg, Ángel; Lazzarini, Roberto; Landa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is an essential regulatory transcription factor for the TATA-box and TATA-box-less gene promoters. We report the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA that encodes a Taenia solium TATA-box binding protein 1 (TsTBP1). Deduced amino acid composition from its nucleotide sequence revealed that encodes a protein of 238 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 26.7 kDa, and a theoretical pI of 10.6. The NH2-terminal domain shows no conservation when compared with to pig and human TBP1s. However, it shows high conservation in size and amino acid identity with taeniids TBP1s. In contrast, the TsTBP1 COOH-terminal domain is highly conserved among organisms, and contains the amino acids involved in interactions with the TATA-box, as well as with TFIIA and TFIIB. In silico TsTBP1 modeling reveals that the COOH-terminal domain forms the classical saddle structure of the TBP family, with one α-helix at the end, not present in pig and human. Native TsTBP1 was detected in T. solium cysticerci´s nuclear extract by western blot using rabbit antibodies generated against two synthetic peptides located in the NH2 and COOH-terminal domains of TsTBP1. These antibodies, through immunofluorescence technique, identified the TBP1 in the nucleus of cells that form the bladder wall of cysticerci of Taenia crassiceps, an organism close related to T. solium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from T. solium cysticerci and antibodies against the NH2-terminal domain of TsTBP1 showed the interaction of native TsTBP1 with the TATA-box present in T. solium actin 5 (pAT5) and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Ts2-CysPrx) gene promoters; in contrast, when antibodies against the anti-COOH-terminal domain of TsTBP1 were used, they inhibited the binding of TsTBP1 to the TATA-box of the pAT5 promoter gene. PMID:26529408

  17. Molecular Cloning of a cDNA Encoding for Taenia solium TATA-Box Binding Protein 1 (TsTBP1) and Study of Its Interactions with the TATA-Box of Actin 5 and Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin Genes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lima, Oscar; García-Gutierrez, Ponciano; Jiménez, Lucía; Zarain-Herzberg, Ángel; Lazzarini, Roberto; Landa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is an essential regulatory transcription factor for the TATA-box and TATA-box-less gene promoters. We report the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA that encodes a Taenia solium TATA-box binding protein 1 (TsTBP1). Deduced amino acid composition from its nucleotide sequence revealed that encodes a protein of 238 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 26.7 kDa, and a theoretical pI of 10.6. The NH2-terminal domain shows no conservation when compared with to pig and human TBP1s. However, it shows high conservation in size and amino acid identity with taeniids TBP1s. In contrast, the TsTBP1 COOH-terminal domain is highly conserved among organisms, and contains the amino acids involved in interactions with the TATA-box, as well as with TFIIA and TFIIB. In silico TsTBP1 modeling reveals that the COOH-terminal domain forms the classical saddle structure of the TBP family, with one α-helix at the end, not present in pig and human. Native TsTBP1 was detected in T. solium cysticerci´s nuclear extract by western blot using rabbit antibodies generated against two synthetic peptides located in the NH2 and COOH-terminal domains of TsTBP1. These antibodies, through immunofluorescence technique, identified the TBP1 in the nucleus of cells that form the bladder wall of cysticerci of Taenia crassiceps, an organism close related to T. solium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from T. solium cysticerci and antibodies against the NH2-terminal domain of TsTBP1 showed the interaction of native TsTBP1 with the TATA-box present in T. solium actin 5 (pAT5) and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Ts2-CysPrx) gene promoters; in contrast, when antibodies against the anti-COOH-terminal domain of TsTBP1 were used, they inhibited the binding of TsTBP1 to the TATA-box of the pAT5 promoter gene. PMID:26529408

  18. EtpE Binding to DNase X Induces Ehrlichial Entry via CD147 and hnRNP-K Recruitment, Followed by Mobilization of N-WASP and Actin

    PubMed Central

    Mohan Kumar, Dipu; Lin, Mingqun; Xiong, Qingming; Webber, Mathew James; Kural, Comert

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obligate intracellular bacteria, such as Ehrlichia chaffeensis, perish unless they can enter eukaryotic cells. E. chaffeensis is the etiological agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis, an emerging infectious disease. To infect cells, Ehrlichia uses the C terminus of the outer membrane invasin entry-triggering protein (EtpE) of Ehrlichia (EtpE-C), which directly binds the mammalian cell surface glycosylphosphatidyl inositol-anchored protein, DNase X. How this binding drives Ehrlichia entry is unknown. Here, using affinity pulldown of host cell lysates with recombinant EtpE-C (rEtpE-C), we identified two new human proteins that interact with EtpE-C: CD147 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP-K). The interaction of CD147 with rEtpE-C was validated by far-Western blotting and coimmunoprecipitation of native EtpE with endogenous CD147. CD147 was ubiquitous on the cell surface and also present around foci of rEtpE-C-coated-bead entry. Functional neutralization of surface-exposed CD147 with a specific antibody inhibited Ehrlichia internalization and infection but not binding. Downregulation of CD147 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) impaired E. chaffeensis infection. Functional ablation of cytoplasmic hnRNP-K by a nanoscale intracellular antibody markedly attenuated bacterial entry and infection but not binding. EtpE-C also interacted with neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which is activated by hnRNP-K. Wiskostatin, which inhibits N-WASP activation, and cytochalasin D, which inhibits actin polymerization, inhibited Ehrlichia entry. Upon incubation with host cell lysate, EtpE-C but not an EtpE N-terminal fragment stimulated in vitro actin polymerization in an N-WASP- and DNase X-dependent manner. Time-lapse video images revealed N-WASP recruitment at EtpE-C-coated bead entry foci. Thus, EtpE-C binding to DNase X drives Ehrlichia entry by engaging CD147 and hnRNP-K and activating N-WASP-dependent actin polymerization. PMID:26530384

  19. Recognition of the disordered p53 transactivation domain by the transcriptional adapter zinc finger domains of CREB-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Krois, Alexander S; Ferreon, Josephine C; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2016-03-29

    An important component of the activity of p53 as a tumor suppressor is its interaction with the transcriptional coactivators cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and p300, which activate transcription of p53-regulated stress response genes and stabilize p53 against ubiquitin-mediated degradation. The highest affinity interactions are between the intrinsically disordered N-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of p53 and the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains of CBP/p300. The NMR spectra of simple binary complexes of the TAZ1 and TAZ2 domains with the p53TAD suffer from exchange broadening, but innovations in construct design and isotopic labeling have enabled us to obtain high-resolution structures using fusion proteins, uniformly labeled in the case of the TAZ2-p53TAD fusion and segmentally labeled through transintein splicing for the TAZ1-p53TAD fusion. The p53TAD is bipartite, with two interaction motifs, termed AD1 and AD2, which fold to form short amphipathic helices upon binding to TAZ1 and TAZ2 whereas intervening regions of the p53TAD remain flexible. Both the AD1 and AD2 motifs bind to hydrophobic surfaces of the TAZ domains, with AD2 making more extensive hydrophobic contacts consistent with its greater contribution to the binding affinity. Binding of AD1 and AD2 is synergistic, and structural studies performed with isolated motifs can be misleading. The present structures of the full-length p53TAD complexes demonstrate the versatility of the interactions available to an intrinsically disordered domain containing bipartite interaction motifs and provide valuable insights into the structural basis of the affinity changes that occur upon stress-related posttranslational modification. PMID:26976603

  20. A novel function of the monomeric CCTε subunit connects the serum response factor pathway to chaperone-mediated actin folding

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Kerryn L.; Svanström, Andreas; Spiess, Matthias; Karlsson, Roger; Grantham, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Correct protein folding is fundamental for maintaining protein homeostasis and avoiding the formation of potentially cytotoxic protein aggregates. Although some proteins appear to fold unaided, actin requires assistance from the oligomeric molecular chaperone CCT. Here we report an additional connection between CCT and actin by identifying one of the CCT subunits, CCTε, as a component of the myocardin-related cotranscription factor-A (MRTF-A)/serum response factor (SRF) pathway. The SRF pathway registers changes in G-actin levels, leading to the transcriptional up-regulation of a large number of genes after actin polymerization. These genes encode numerous actin-binding proteins as well as actin. We show that depletion of the CCTε subunit by siRNA enhances SRF signaling in cultured mammalian cells by an actin assembly-independent mechanism. Overexpression of CCTε in its monomeric form revealed that CCTε binds via its substrate-binding domain to the C-terminal region of MRTF-A and that CCTε is able to alter the nuclear accumulation of MRTF-A after stimulation by serum addition. Given that the levels of monomeric CCTε conversely reflect the levels of CCT oligomer, our results suggest that CCTε provides a connection between the actin-folding capacity of the cell and actin expression. PMID:26063733

  1. Defining a minimal estrogen receptor DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Mader, S; Chambon, P; White, J H

    1993-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a transcriptional regulator which binds to cognate palindromic DNA sequences known as estrogen response elements (EREs). A 66 amino acid core region which contains two zinc fingers and is highly conserved among the nuclear receptors is essential for site specific DNA recognition. However, it remains unclear how many flanking amino acids in addition to the zinc finger core are required for DNA binding. Here, we have characterized the minimal DNA binding region of the human ER by analysing the DNA binding properties of a series of deletion mutants expressed in bacteria. We find that the 66 amino acid zinc finger core of the DBD fails to bind DNA, and that the C-terminal end of the minimal ER DBD required for binding to perfectly palindromic EREs corresponds to the limit of 100% amino acid homology between the chicken and human receptors, which represents the boundary between regions C and D in the ER. Moreover, amino acids of region D up to 30 residues C-terminal to the zinc fingers greatly stabilize DNA binding by the DBD to perfectly palindromic EREs and are absolutely required for formation of gel retardation complexes by the DBD on certain physiological imperfectly palindromic EREs. These results indicate that in addition to the zinc finger core, amino acids C-terminal to the core in regions C and D play a key role in DNA binding by the ER, particularly to imperfectly palindromic response elements. The ER DBD expressed in E. coli binds as a dimer to ERE palindromes in a highly cooperative manner and forms only low levels of monomeric protein-DNA complexes on either palindromic or half-palindromic response elements. Conversion of ER amino acids 222 to 226, which lie within region C, to the corresponding residues of the human RAR alpha abolishes formation of dimeric protein-DNA complexes. Conversely, replacement of the same region of RAR alpha with ER residues 222 to 226 creates a derivative that, unlike the RAR alpha DBD, binds

  2. Characterization of substrate binding of the WW domains in human WWP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiahong; Wang, Nan; Jiang, Yafei; Tan, Hongwei; Zheng, Jimin; Chen, Guangju; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-07-01

    WW domains harbor substrates containing proline-rich motifs, but the substrate specificity and binding mechanism remain elusive for those WW domains less amenable for structural studies, such as human WWP2 (hWWP2). Herein we have employed multiple techniques to investigate the second WW domain (WW2) in hWWP2. Our results show that hWWP2 is a specialized E3 for PPxY motif-containing substrates only and does not recognize other amino acids and phospho-residues. The strongest binding affinity of WW2, and the incompatibility between each WW domain, imply a novel relationship, and our SPR experiment reveals a dynamic binding mode in Class-I WW domains for the first time. The results from alanine-scanning mutagenesis and modeling further point to functionally conserved residues in WW2. PMID:25999310

  3. MICAL-Family Proteins: Complex Regulators of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The molecules interacting with CasL (MICAL) family members participate in a multitude of activities, including axonal growth cone repulsion, membrane trafficking, apoptosis, and bristle development in flies. An interesting feature of MICAL proteins is the presence of an N-terminal flavo-mono-oxygenase domain. This mono-oxygenase domain generates redox potential with which MICALs can either oxidize proteins or produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Actin is one such protein that is affected by MICAL function, leading to dramatic cytoskeletal rearrangements. This review describes the MICAL-family members, and discusses their mechanisms of actin-binding and regulation of actin cytoskeleton organization. Recent Advances: Recent studies show that MICALs directly induce oxidation of actin molecules, leading to actin depolymerization. ROS production by MICALs also causes oxidation of collapsin response mediator protein-2, a microtubule assembly promoter, which subsequently undergoes phosphorylation. Critical Issues: MICAL proteins oxidize proteins through two mechanisms: either directly by oxidizing methionine residues or indirectly via the production of ROS. It remains unclear whether MICAL proteins employ both mechanisms or whether the activity of MICAL-family proteins might vary with different substrates. Future Directions: The identification of additional substrates oxidized by MICAL will shed new light on MICAL protein function. Additional directions include expanding studies toward the MICAL-like homologs that lack flavin adenine dinucleotide domains and oxidation activity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2059–2073. PMID:23834433

  4. SH3b Cell wall binding domains can enhance anti-staphylococcal activity of endolysin lytic domains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases and a potential new source of antimicrobials. A large subset of these proteins contain a C-terminal SH3b_5 cell wall binding domain that has been shown [for some] to be essential for accurate cell wall recognition and subsequent staphylolytic ac...

  5. Evaluation of Selected Binding Domains for the Analysis of Ubiquitinated Proteomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ansong, Charles; Brown, Joseph N.; Yang, Feng; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-08-01

    Ubiquitination is an abundant post-translational modification that consists of covalent attachment of ubiquitin to lysine residues or the N-terminus of proteins. Mono- and polyubiquitination have been shown to be involved in many critical eukaryotic cellular functions and are often disrupted by intracellular bacterial pathogens. Affinity enrichment of ubiquitinated proteins enables global analysis of this key modification. In this context, the use of ubiquitin-binding domains is a promising but relatively unexplored alternative to more broadly used immunoaffinity or tagged affinity enrichment methods. In this study, we evaluated the application of eight ubiquitin-binding domains that have differing affinities for ubiquitination states. Small-scale proteomics analysis identified ~200 ubiquitinated protein candidates per ubiquitin-binding domain pull-down experiment. Results from subsequent Western blot analyses that employed anti-ubiquitin or monoclonal antibodies against polyubiquitination at lysine 48 and 63 suggest that ubiquitin-binding domains from Dsk2 and ubiquilin-1 have the broadest specificity in that they captured most types of ubiquitination, whereas the binding domain from NBR1 was more selective to polyubiquitination. These data demonstrate that with optimized purification conditions, ubiquitin-binding domains can be an alternative tool for proteomic applications. This approach is especially promising for the analysis of tissues or cells resistant to transfection, of which the overexpression of tagged ubiquitin is a major hurdle.

  6. The endothelial cell binding determinant of human factor IX resides in the. gamma. -carboxyglutamic acid domain

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, J.R.; Roberts, H.R.; Stafford, D.W. ); Smith, K.J. United Blood Services, Albuquerque, NM )

    1992-02-18

    The blood coagulation factor IX(a) binds specifically to a site on endothelial cells with a K{sub d} of 2.0-3.0 nM. A number of previous studies have attempted to define the region(s) of factor IX(a) that mediate this interaction. These studies suggested that there are two regions of factor IX(a), the {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain and the epidermal growth factor like (EGF-like) domains, that mediate high-affinity binding to endothelial cells. Recently, however, the participation of the EGF1 domain has been excluded from the interaction. This indicated that if there was an EGF component of factor IX contributing to the binding affinity, then it must be in the second EGF-like domain. In order to further evaluate this relationship, the authors performed competitive binding experiments between {sup 125}I plasma factor IX and a set of six chimeric proteins composed of portions of factor VII and factor IX. The data suggest that the high-affinity interaction between factor IX and the endothelial cell binding site is mediated by the factor IX Gla domain and that the factor IX EGF domains are not involved in binding specificity.

  7. Open Conformation of Ezrin Bound to Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate and to F-actin Revealed by Neutron Scattering*

    PubMed Central

    Jayasundar, Jayant James; Ju, Jeong Ho; He, Lilin; Liu, Dazhi; Meilleur, Flora; Zhao, Jinkui; Callaway, David J. E.; Bu, Zimei

    2012-01-01

    Ezrin is a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM) of adapter proteins that are localized at the interface between the cell membrane and the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and they regulate a variety of cellular functions. The structure representing a dormant and closed conformation of an ERM protein has previously been determined by x-ray crystallography. Here, using contrast variation small angle neutron scattering, we reveal the structural changes of the full-length ezrin upon binding to the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and to F-actin. Ezrin binding to F-actin requires the simultaneous binding of ezrin to PIP2. Once bound to F-actin, the opened ezrin forms more extensive contacts with F-actin than generally depicted, suggesting a possible role of ezrin in regulating the interfacial structure and dynamics between the cell membrane and the underlying actin cytoskeleton. In addition, using gel filtration, we find that the conformational opening of ezrin in response to PIP2 binding is cooperative, but the cooperativity is disrupted by a phospho-mimic mutation S249D in the 4.1-ezrin/radixin/moesin (FERM) domain of ezrin. Using surface plasmon resonance, we show that the S249D mutation weakens the binding affinity and changes the kinetics of 4.1-ERM to PIP2 binding. The study provides the first structural view of the activated ezrin bound to PIP2 and to F-actin. PMID:22927432

  8. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. Methodology We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the “target zone”, situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. Conclusion We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force

  9. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  10. Ligand binding to the PDZ domains of postsynaptic density protein 95.

    PubMed

    Toto, Angelo; Pedersen, Søren W; Karlsson, O Andreas; Moran, Griffin E; Andersson, Eva; Chi, Celestine N; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2016-05-01

    Cellular scaffolding and signalling is generally governed by multidomain proteins, where each domain has a particular function. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) is involved in synapse formation and is a typical example of such a multidomain protein. Protein-protein interactions of PSD-95 are well studied and include the following three protein ligands: (i)N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluN2B, (ii) neuronal nitric oxide synthase and (iii) cysteine-rich protein (CRIPT), all of which bind to one or more of the three PDZ domains in PSD-95. While interactions for individual PDZ domains of PSD-95 have been well studied, less is known about the influence of neighbouring domains on the function of the respective individual domain. We therefore performed a systematic study on the ligand-binding kinetics of PSD-95 using constructs of different size for PSD-95 and its ligands. Regarding the canonical peptide-binding pocket and relatively short peptides (up to 15-mer), the PDZ domains in PSD-95 by and large work as individual binding modules. However, in agreement with previous studies, residues outside of the canonical binding pocket modulate the affinity of the ligands. In particular, the dissociation of the 101 amino acid CRIPT from PSD-95 is slowed down at least 10-fold for full-length PSD-95 when compared with the individual PDZ3 domain. PMID:26941280

  11. Identification of Novel Membrane-binding Domains in Multiple Yeast Cdc42 Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Satoe

    2007-01-01

    The Rho-type GTPase Cdc42 is a central regulator of eukaryotic cell polarity and signal transduction. In budding yeast, Cdc42 regulates polarity and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in part through the PAK-family kinase Ste20. Activation of Ste20 requires a Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) domain, which mediates its recruitment to membrane-associated Cdc42. Here, we identify a separate domain in Ste20 that interacts directly with membrane phospholipids and is critical for its function. This short region, termed the basic-rich (BR) domain, can target green fluorescent protein to the plasma membrane in vivo and binds PIP2-containing liposomes in vitro. Mutation of basic or hydrophobic residues in the BR domain abolishes polarized localization of Ste20 and its function in both MAP kinase–dependent and independent pathways. Thus, Cdc42 binding is required but is insufficient; instead, direct membrane binding by Ste20 is also required. Nevertheless, phospholipid specificity is not essential in vivo, because the BR domain can be replaced with several heterologous lipid-binding domains of varying lipid preferences. We also identify functionally important BR domains in two other yeast Cdc42 effectors, Gic1 and Gic2, suggesting that cooperation between protein–protein and protein–membrane interactions is a prevalent mechanism during Cdc42-regulated signaling and perhaps for other dynamic localization events at the cell cortex. PMID:17914055

  12. Proton-translocating nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase. Reconstitution of the extramembranous nucleotide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Hatefi, Y

    1995-11-24

    The nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase of bovine mitochondria is a homodimer of monomer M(r) = 109,065. The monomer is composed of three domains, an NH2-terminal 430-residue-long hydrophilic domain I that binds NAD(H), a central 400-residue-long hydrophobic domain II that is largely membrane intercalated and carries the enzyme's proton channel, and a COOH-terminal 200-residue-long hydrophilic domain III that binds NADP(H). Domains I and III protrude into the mitochondrial matrix, where they presumably come together to form the enzyme's catalytic site. The two-subunit transhydrogenase of Escherichia coli and the three-subunit transhydrogenase of Rhodospirillum rubrum have each the same overall tridomain hydropathy profile as the bovine enzyme. Domain I of the R. rubrum enzyme (the alpha 1 subunit) is water soluble and easily removed from the chromatophore membranes. We have isolated domain I of the bovine transhydrogenase after controlled trypsinolysis of the purified enzyme and have expressed in E. coli and purified therefrom domain III of this enzyme. This paper shows that an active bidomain transhydrogenase lacking domain II can be reconstituted by the combination of purified bovine domains I plus III or R. rubrum domain I plus bovine domain III. PMID:7499307

  13. Functional characterization of the Cdc42p binding domain of yeast Ste20p protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Wu, C; Leeuw, T; Fourest-Lieuvin, A; Segall, J E; Thomas, D Y

    1997-01-01

    Ste20p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the Ste20p/p65PAK family of protein kinases which are highly conserved from yeast to man and regulate conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Ste20p fulfills multiple roles in pheromone signaling, morphological switching and vegetative growth and binds Cdc42p, a Rho-like small GTP binding protein required for polarized morphogenesis. We have analyzed the functional consequences of mutations that prevent binding of Cdc42p to Ste20p. The complete amino-terminal, non-catalytic half of Ste20p, including the conserved Cdc42p binding domain, was dispensable for heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated pheromone signaling. However, the Cdc42p binding domain was necessary for filamentous growth in response to nitrogen starvation and for an essential function that Ste20p shares with its isoform Cla4p during vegetative growth. Moreover, the Cdc42p binding domain was required for cell-cell adhesion during conjugation. Subcellular localization of wild-type and mutant Ste20p fused to green fluorescent protein showed that the Cdc42p binding domain is needed to direct localization of Ste20p to regions of polarized growth. These results suggest that Ste20p is regulated in different developmental pathways by different mechanisms which involve heterotrimeric and small GTP binding proteins. PMID:9009270

  14. Structural and functional characterizations reveal the importance of a zinc binding domain in Bloom's syndrome helicase

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rong-bin; Rigolet, Pascal; Zargarian, Loussiné; Fermandjian, Serge; Xi, Xu Guang

    2005-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive human disorder characterized by genomic instability and a predisposition to a wide variety of cancers. The gene mutated in BS, BLM, encodes a protein containing three domains: an N-terminal domain whose function remains elusive, a helicase domain characterized by seven ‘signature’ motifs conserved in a wide range of helicases and a C-terminal extension that can be further divided into two sub-domains: RecQ-Ct and HRDC. The RecQ-Ct domain appears essential because two point-mutations altering highly conserved cysteine residues within this domain have been found in BS patients. We report herein that BLM contains a zinc ion. Modelling studies suggest that four conserved cysteine residues within the RecQ-Ct domain coordinate this zinc ion and subsequent mutagenesis studies further confirm this prediction. Biochemical and biophysical studies show that the ATPase, helicase and DNA binding activities of the mutants are severely modified. Structural analysis of both wild-type and mutant proteins reveal that alteration of cysteine residues does not significantly change the overall conformation. The observed defects in ATPase and helicase activities were inferred to result from a compromise of DNA binding. Our results implicate an important role of this zinc binding domain in both DNA binding and protein conformation. They could be pivotal for understanding the molecular basis of BS disease. PMID:15930159

  15. Ligand binding PAS domains in a genomic, cellular, and structural context

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jonathan T.; Crosson, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domains occur in proteins from all kingdoms of life. In the bacterial kingdom, PAS domains are commonly positioned at the amino terminus of signaling proteins such as sensor histidine kinases, cyclic-di-GMP synthases/hydrolases, and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Although these domains are highly divergent at the primary sequence level, the structures of dozens of PAS domains across a broad section of sequence space have been solved, revealing a conserved three-dimensional architecture. An all-versus-all alignment of 63 PAS structures demonstrates that the PAS domain family forms structural clades on the basis of two principal variables: (a) topological location inside or outside the plasma membrane and (b) the class of small molecule that they bind. The binding of a chemically diverse range of small-molecule metabolites is a hallmark of the PAS domain family. PAS ligand binding either functions as a primary cue to initiate a cellular signaling response or provides the domain with the capacity to respond to secondary physical or chemical signals such as gas molecules, redox potential, or photons. This review synthesizes the current state of knowledge of the structural foundations and evolution of ligand recognition and binding by PAS domains. PMID:21663441

  16. BclxL Changes Conformation upon Binding to Wild-type but Not Mutant p53 DNA Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Hagn, Franz; Klein, Christian; Demmer, Oliver; Marchenko, Natasha; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M.; Kessler, Horst

    2010-01-01

    p53 can induce apoptosis through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization by interaction of its DNA binding region with the anti-apoptotic proteins BclxL and Bcl2. However, little is known about the action of p53 at the mitochondria in molecular detail. By using NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization we characterized the binding of wild-type and mutant p53 DNA binding domains to BclxL and show that the wild-type p53 DNA binding domain leads to structural changes in the BH3 binding region of BclxL, whereas mutants fail to induce such effects due to reduced affinity. This was probed by induced chemical shift and residual dipolar coupling data. These data imply that p53 partly achieves its pro-apoptotic function at the mitochondria by facilitating interaction between BclxL and BH3-only proteins in an allosteric mode of action. Furthermore, we characterize for the first time the binding behavior of Pifithrin-μ, a specific small molecule inhibitor of the p53-BclxL interaction, and present a structural model of the protein-ligand complex. A rather unusual behavior is revealed whereby Pifithrin-μ binds to both sides of the protein-protein complex. These data should facilitate the rational design of more potent specific BclxL-p53 inhibitors. PMID:19955567

  17. BclxL changes conformation upon binding to wild-type but not mutant p53 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Hagn, Franz; Klein, Christian; Demmer, Oliver; Marchenko, Natasha; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M; Kessler, Horst

    2010-01-29

    p53 can induce apoptosis through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization by interaction of its DNA binding region with the anti-apoptotic proteins BclxL and Bcl2. However, little is known about the action of p53 at the mitochondria in molecular detail. By using NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization we characterized the binding of wild-type and mutant p53 DNA binding domains to BclxL and show that the wild-type p53 DNA binding domain leads to structural changes in the BH3 binding region of BclxL, whereas mutants fail to induce such effects due to reduced affinity. This was probed by induced chemical shift and residual dipolar coupling data. These data imply that p53 partly achieves its pro-apoptotic function at the mitochondria by facilitating interaction between BclxL and BH3-only proteins in an allosteric mode of action. Furthermore, we characterize for the first time the binding behavior of Pifithrin-mu, a specific small molecule inhibitor of the p53-BclxL interaction, and present a structural model of the protein-ligand complex. A rather unusual behavior is revealed whereby Pifithrin-mu binds to both sides of the protein-protein complex. These data should facilitate the rational design of more potent specific BclxL-p53 inhibitors. PMID:19955567

  18. Characterization of ERM transactivation domain binding to the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator subunit MED25

    PubMed Central

    Landrieu, Isabelle; Verger, Alexis; Baert, Jean-Luc; Rucktooa, Prakash; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Dewitte, Frédérique; Ferreira, Elisabeth; Lens, Zoé; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal acidic transactivation domain (TAD) of ERM/ETV5 (ERM38–68), a PEA3 group member of Ets-related transcription factors, directly interacts with the ACID/PTOV domain of the Mediator complex subunit MED25. Molecular details of this interaction were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The TAD is disordered in solution but has a propensity to adopt local transient secondary structure. We show that it folds upon binding to MED25 and that the resulting ERM–MED25 complex displays characteristics of a fuzzy complex. Mutational analysis further reveals that two aromatic residues in the ERM TAD (F47 and W57) are involved in the binding to MED25 and participate in the ability of ERM TAD to activate transcription. Mutation of a key residue Q451 in the VP16 H1 binding pocket of MED25 affects the binding of ERM. Furthermore, competition experiments show that ERM and VP16 H1 share a common binding interface on MED25. NMR data confirms the occupancy of this binding pocket by ERM TAD. Based on these experimental data, a structural model of a functional interaction is proposed. This study provides mechanistic insights into the Mediator–transactivator interactions. PMID:26130716

  19. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  20. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  1. The Role of Flexibility and Conformational Selection in the Binding Promiscuity of PDZ Domains

    PubMed Central

    Münz, Márton; Hein, Jotun; Biggin, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    In molecular recognition, it is often the case that ligand binding is coupled to conformational change in one or both of the binding partners. Two hypotheses describe the limiting cases involved; the first is the induced fit and the second is the conformational selection model. The conformational selection model requires that the protein adopts conformations that are similar to the ligand-bound conformation in the absence of ligand, whilst the induced-fit model predicts that the ligand-bound conformation of the protein is only accessible when the ligand is actually bound. The flexibility of the apo protein clearly plays a major role in these interpretations. For many proteins involved in signaling pathways there is the added complication that they are often promiscuous in that they are capable of binding to different ligand partners. The relationship between protein flexibility and promiscuity is an area of active research and is perhaps best exemplified by the PDZ domain family of proteins. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the relationship between flexibility and promiscuity in five PDZ domains: the human Dvl2 (Dishevelled-2) PDZ domain, the human Erbin PDZ domain, the PDZ1 domain of InaD (inactivation no after-potential D protein) from fruit fly, the PDZ7 domain of GRIP1 (glutamate receptor interacting protein 1) from rat and the PDZ2 domain of PTP-BL (protein tyrosine phosphatase) from mouse. We show that despite their high structural similarity, the PDZ binding sites have significantly different dynamics. Importantly, the degree of binding pocket flexibility was found to be closely related to the various characteristics of peptide binding specificity and promiscuity of the five PDZ domains. Our findings suggest that the intrinsic motions of the apo structures play a key role in distinguishing functional properties of different PDZ domains and allow us to make predictions that can be experimentally tested. PMID:23133356

  2. Diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins is influenced by the activity of dynamic cortical actin

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suvrajit; Lee, Il-Hyung; Polley, Anirban; Groves, Jay T.; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diffusion at the surface of living cells is believed to be predominantly driven by thermal kicks. However, there is growing evidence that certain cell surface molecules are driven by the fluctuating dynamics of cortical cytoskeleton. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we measure the diffusion coefficient of a variety of cell surface molecules over a temperature range of 24–37°C. Exogenously incorporated fluorescent lipids with short acyl chains exhibit the expected increase of diffusion coefficient over this temperature range. In contrast, we find that GPI-anchored proteins exhibit temperature-independent diffusion over this range and revert to temperature-dependent diffusion on cell membrane blebs, in cells depleted of cholesterol, and upon acute perturbation of actin dynamics and myosin activity. A model transmembrane protein with a cytosolic actin-binding domain also exhibits the temperature-independent behavior, directly implicating the role of cortical actin. We show that diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins also becomes temperature dependent when the filamentous dynamic actin nucleator formin is inhibited. However, changes in cortical actin mesh size or perturbation of branched actin nucleator Arp2/3 do not affect this behavior. Thus cell surface diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins and transmembrane proteins that associate with actin is driven by active fluctuations of dynamic cortical actin filaments in addition to thermal fluctuations, consistent with expectations from an “active actin-membrane composite” cell surface. PMID:26378258

  3. The DNA-Binding Domain of Yeast Rap1 Interacts with Double-Stranded DNA in Multiple Binding Modes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae repressor-activator protein 1 (Rap1) is an essential protein involved in multiple steps of DNA regulation, as an activator in transcription, as a repressor at silencer elements, and as a major component of the shelterin-like complex at telomeres. All the known functions of Rap1 require the known high-affinity and specific interaction of the DNA-binding domain with its recognition sequences. In this work, we focus on the interaction of the DNA-binding domain of Rap1 (Rap1DBD) with double-stranded DNA substrates. Unexpectedly, we found that while Rap1DBD forms a high-affinity 1:1 complex with its DNA recognition site, it can also form lower-affinity complexes with higher stoichiometries on DNA. These lower-affinity interactions are independent of the presence of the recognition sequence, and we propose they originate from the ability of Rap1DBD to bind to DNA in two different binding modes. In one high-affinity binding mode, Rap1DBD likely binds in the conformation observed in the available crystal structures. In the other alternative lower-affinity binding mode, we propose that a single Myb-like domain of the Rap1DBD makes interactions with DNA, allowing for more than one protein molecule to bind to the DNA substrates. Our findings suggest that the Rap1DBD does not simply target the protein to its recognition sequence but rather it might be a possible point of regulation. PMID:25382181

  4. Akt1 binds focal adhesion kinase via the Akt1 kinase domain independently of the pleckstrin homology domain.

    PubMed

    Basson, M D; Zeng, B; Wang, S

    2015-10-01

    Akt1 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) are protein kinases that play key roles in normal cell signaling. Individually, aberrant expression of these kinases has been linked to a variety of cancers. Together, Akt1/FAK interactions facilitate cancer metastasis by increasing cell adhesion under conditions of increased extracellular pressure. Pathological and iatrogenic sources of pressure arise from tumor growth against constraining stroma or direct perioperative manipulation. We previously reported that 15 mmHg increased extracellular pressure causes Akt1 to both directly interact with FAK and to phosphorylate and activate it. We investigated the nature of the Akt1/FAK binding by creating truncations of recombinant FAK, conjugated to glutathione S-transferase (GST), to pull down full-length Akt1. Western blots probing for Akt1 showed that FAK/Akt1 binding persisted in FAK truncations consisting of only amino acids 1-126, FAK(NT1), which contains the F1 subdomain of its band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, and moesin (FERM) domain. Using FAK(NT1) as bait, we then pulled down truncated versions of recombinant Akt1 conjugated to HA (human influenza hemagglutinin). Probes for GST-FAK(NT1) showed Akt1-FAK binding to occur in the absence of the both the Akt1 (N)-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and its adjacent hinge region. The Akt1 (C)-terminal regulatory domain was equally unnecessary for Akt1/FAK co-immunoprecipitation. Truncations involving the Akt1 catalytic domain showed that the domain by itself was enough to pull down FAK. Additionally, a fragment spanning from the PH domain to half way through the catalytic domain demonstrated increased FAK binding compared to full length Akt1. These results begin to delineate the Akt1/FAK interaction and can be used to manipulate their force-activated signal interactions. Furthermore, the finding that the N-terminal half of the Akt1 catalytic domain binds so strongly to FAK when cleaved from the rest of the protein may suggest a means

  5. Artificial zinc finger DNA binding domains: versatile tools for genome engineering and modulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mir A; Barrow, Joeva J; Shen, Yong; Haq, Md Imdadul; Bungert, Jörg

    2015-11-01

    Genome editing and alteration of gene expression by synthetic DNA binding activities gained a lot of momentum over the last decade. This is due to the development of new DNA binding molecules with enhanced binding specificity. The most commonly used DNA binding modules are zinc fingers (ZFs), TALE-domains, and the RNA component of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These binding modules are fused or linked to either nucleases that cut the DNA and induce DNA repair processes, or to protein domains that activate or repress transcription of genes close to the targeted site in the genome. This review focuses on the structure, design, and applications of ZF DNA binding domains (ZFDBDs). ZFDBDs are relatively small and have been shown to penetrate the cell membrane without additional tags suggesting that they could be delivered to cells without a DNA or RNA intermediate. Advanced algorithms that are based on extensive knowledge of the mode of ZF/DNA interactions are used to design the amino acid composition of ZFDBDs so that they bind to unique sites in the genome. Off-target binding has been a concern for all synthetic DNA binding molecules. Thus, increasing the specificity and affinity of ZFDBDs will have a significant impact on their use in analytical or therapeutic settings. PMID:25989233

  6. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  7. Membrane Binding and Self-Association of the Epsin N-Terminal Homology Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Jao, Christine C.; Lyman, Edward; Gallop, Jennifer L.; Peter, Brian J.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Langen, Ralf; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Epsin possesses a conserved epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain that acts as a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate‐lipid‐targeting and membrane‐curvature‐generating element. Upon binding phosphatidylinositol 4,5‐bisphosphate, the N-terminal helix (H0) of the ENTH domain becomes structured and aids in the aggregation of ENTH domains, which results in extensive membrane remodeling. In this article, atomistic and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the structure and the stability of ENTH domain aggregates on lipid bilayers. EPR experiments are also reported for systems composed of different ENTH-bound membrane morphologies, including membrane vesicles as well as preformed membrane tubules. The EPR data are used to help develop a molecular model of ENTH domain aggregates on preformed lipid tubules that are then studied by CG MD simulation. The combined computational and experimental approach suggests that ENTH domains exist predominantly as monomers on vesiculated structures, while ENTH domains self-associate into dimeric structures and even higher‐order oligomers on the membrane tubes. The results emphasize that the arrangement of ENTH domain aggregates depends strongly on whether the local membrane curvature is isotropic or anisotropic. The molecular mechanism of ENTH‐domain-induced membrane vesiculation and tubulation and the implications of the epsin's role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis resulting from the interplay between ENTH domain membrane binding and ENTH domain self-association are also discussed. PMID:22922484

  8. Flexible DNA binding of the BTB/POZ-domain protein FBI-1.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-08-01

    POZ-domain transcription factors are characterized by the presence of a protein-protein interaction domain called the POZ or BTB domain at their N terminus and zinc fingers at their C terminus. Despite the large number of POZ-domain transcription factors that have been identified to date and the significant insights that have been gained into their cellular functions, relatively little is known about their DNA binding properties. FBI-1 is a BTB/POZ-domain protein that has been shown to modulate HIV-1 Tat trans-activation and to repress transcription of some cellular genes. We have used various viral and cellular FBI-1 binding sites to characterize the interaction of a POZ-domain protein with DNA in detail. We find that FBI-1 binds to inverted sequence repeats downstream of the HIV-1 transcription start site. Remarkably, it binds efficiently to probes carrying these repeats in various orientations and spacings with no particular rotational alignment, indicating that its interaction with DNA is highly flexible. Indeed, FBI-1 binding sites in the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, the c-fos gene, and the c-myc P1 and P2 promoters reveal variously spaced direct, inverted, and everted sequence repeats with the consensus sequence G(A/G)GGG(T/C)(C/T)(T/C)(C/T) for each repeat. PMID:12750370

  9. Activation Domain-Mediated Enhancement of Activator Binding to Chromatin in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Christopher A.; Kingston, Robert E.

    1996-10-01

    DNA binding by transcriptional activators is typically an obligatory step in the activation of gene expression. Activator binding and subsequent steps in transcription are repressed by genomic chromatin. Studies in vitro have suggested that overcoming this repression is an important function of some activation domains. Here we provide quantitative in vivo evidence that the activation domain of GAL4-VP16 can increase the affinity of GAL4 for its binding site on genomic DNA in mammalian cells. Moreover, the VP16 activation domain has a much greater stimulatory effect on expression from a genomic reporter gene than on a transiently transfected reporter gene, where factor binding is more permissive. We found that not all activation domains showed a greater activation potential in a genomic context, suggesting that only some activation domains can function in vivo to alleviate the repressive effects of chromatin. These data demonstrate the importance of activation domains in relieving chromatin-mediated repression in vivo and suggest that one way they function is to increase binding of the activator itself.

  10. The binding of vinca domain agents to tubulin: structural and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Anthony; Knossow, Marcel; Wang, Chunguang; Gigant, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Vinca domain ligands are small molecules that interfere with the binding of vinblastine to tubulin and inhibit microtubule assembly. Many such compounds cause isodesmic association which results in difficulties in biochemical or structural studies of their interaction with tubulin. The complex of two tubulins with the stathmin-like domain of the RB3 protein (T(2)R) is a protofilament-like short assembly that does not assemble further. This has allowed structural studies of the binding of several vinca domain ligands by X-ray crystallography as crystals of the corresponding complexes diffract to near atomic resolution. This proved that their sites are located at the interface of two tubulin molecules arranged as in a curved protofilament. These sites overlap with that of vinblastine. Structural data are generally consistent with the results of available structure-function studies, though subtle differences exist. Binding in solution to the vinca domain displayed in T(2)R is conveniently studied by fluorescence spectroscopy or by monitoring inhibition of the T(2)R GTPase activity. In addition, inhibition of nucleotide exchange allows characterization of the binding to the vinca domain moiety displayed by the beta-subunit of an isolated tubulin molecule. T(2)R is therefore a useful tool to characterize and dissect the binding of vinca domain ligands to tubulin. In addition, these studies have provided new information on the interaction of tubulin with guanine nucleotides, namely on the mechanisms of nucleotide exchange and hydrolysis. PMID:20466145

  11. Simultaneous Binding of Two Peptidyl Ligands by a Src Homology 2 Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Jinjin; Yuan, Chunhua; Hard, Ryan L.; Park, In-Hee; Li, Chenglong; Bell, Charles; Pei, Dehua

    2012-03-15

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains mediate protein-protein interactions by recognizing phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing sequences of target proteins. In all of the SH2 domain-pY peptide interactions described to date, the SH2 domain binds to a single pY peptide. Here, determination of the cocrystal structure of the N-terminal SH2 domain of phosphatase SHP-2 bound to a class IV peptide (VIpYFVP) revealed a noncanonical 1:2 (protein-peptide) complex. The first peptide binds in a canonical manner with its pY side chain inserted in the usual binding pocket, while the second pairs up with the first to form two antiparallel {beta}-strands that extend the central {beta}-sheet of the SH2 domain. This unprecedented binding mode was confirmed in the solution phase by NMR experiments and shown to be adopted by pY peptides derived from cellular proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance studies revealed that the binding of the first peptide is pY-dependent, but phosphorylation is not required for the second peptide. Our findings suggest a potential new function for the SH2 domain as a molecular clamp to promote dimerization of signaling proteins.

  12. Calmodulin-binding domains in Alzheimer's disease proteins: extending the calcium hypothesis.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Myre, Michael A

    2004-08-01

    The calcium hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) invokes the disruption of calcium signaling as the underlying cause of neuronal dysfunction and ultimately apoptosis. As a primary calcium signal transducer, calmodulin (CaM) responds to cytosolic calcium fluxes by binding to and regulating the activity of target CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Ca(2+)-dependent CaMBPs primarily contain domains (CaMBDs) that can be classified into motifs based upon variations on the basic amphiphilic alpha-helix domain involving conserved hydrophobic residues at positions 1-10, 1-14 or 1-16. In contrast, an IQ or IQ-like domain often mediates Ca(2+)-independent CaM-binding. Based on these attributes, a search for CaMBDs reveals that many of the proteins intimately linked to AD may be calmodulin-binding proteins, opening new avenues for research on this devastating disease. PMID:15249195

  13. High throughput strategy to identify inhibitors of histone-binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Elise K.; Albaugh, Brittany N.; Denu, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Many epigenetic proteins recognize the posttranslational modification state of chromatin through their histone binding domains, and thereby recruit nuclear complexes to specific loci within the genome. A number of these domains have been implicated in cancer and other diseases through aberrant binding of chromatin; therefore, identifying small molecules that disrupt histone binding could be a powerful mechanism for disease therapy. We have developed a high throughput assay for the detection of histone peptide:domain interactions utilizing AlphaScreen technology. Here, we describe how the assay can be first optimized and then performed for high throughput screening of small molecule binding inhibitors. We also describe strategies for biochemical validation of small molecules identified. PMID:22910207

  14. Understanding the molecular basis of substrate binding specificity of PTB domains

    PubMed Central

    Sain, Neetu; Tiwari, Garima; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions mediated by phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains play a crucial role in various cellular processes. In order to understand the structural basis of substrate recognition by PTB domains, multiple explicit solvent atomistic simulations of 100ns duration have been carried out on 6 PTB-peptide complexes with known binding affinities. MM/PBSA binding energy values calculated from these MD trajectories and residue based statistical pair potential score show good correlation with the experimental dissociation constants. Our analysis also shows that the modeled structures of PTB domains can be used to develop less compute intensive residue level statistical pair potential based approaches for predicting interaction partners of PTB domains. PMID:27526776

  15. A small molecule directly inhibits the p53 transactivation domain from binding to replication protein A

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Jason G.; Carnes, Katie A.; Soto, Patricia; Liu, Shengqin; Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Oakley, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), essential for DNA replication, repair and DNA damage signalling, possesses six ssDNA-binding domains (DBDs), including DBD-F on the N-terminus of the largest subunit, RPA70. This domain functions as a binding site for p53 and other DNA damage and repair proteins that contain amphipathic alpha helical domains. Here, we demonstrate direct binding of both ssDNA and the transactivation domain 2 of p53 (p53TAD2) to DBD-F, as well as DBD-F-directed dsDNA strand separation by RPA, all of which are inhibited by fumaropimaric acid (FPA). FPA binds directly to RPA, resulting in a conformational shift as determined through quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in full length RPA. Structural analogues of FPA provide insight on chemical properties that are required for inhibition. Finally, we confirm the inability of RPA possessing R41E and R43E mutations to bind to p53, destabilize dsDNA and quench tryptophan fluorescence by FPA, suggesting that protein binding, DNA modulation and inhibitor binding all occur within the same site on DBD-F. The disruption of p53–RPA interactions by FPA may disturb the regulatory functions of p53 and RPA, thereby inhibiting cellular pathways that control the cell cycle and maintain the integrity of the human genome. PMID:23267009

  16. Crystal Structure of Human SSRP1 Middle Domain Reveals a Role in DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Zeng, Fuxing; Liu, Yiwei; Shao, Chen; Li, Sai; Lv, Hui; Shi, Yunyu; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    SSRP1 is a subunit of the FACT complex, an important histone chaperone required for transcriptional regulation, DNA replication and damage repair. SSRP1 also plays important roles in transcriptional regulation independent of Spt16 and interacts with other proteins. Here, we report the crystal structure of the middle domain of SSRP1. It consists of tandem pleckstrin homology (PH) domains. These domains differ from the typical PH domain in that PH1 domain has an extra conserved βαβ topology. SSRP1 contains the well-characterized DNA-binding HMG-1 domain. Our studies revealed that SSRP1-M can also participate in DNA binding, and that this binding involves one positively charged patch on the surface of the structure. In addition, SSRP1-M did not bind to histones, which was assessed through pull-down assays. This aspect makes the protein different from other related proteins adopting the double PH domain structure. Our studies facilitate the understanding of SSRP1 and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of interaction with DNA and histones of the FACT complex. PMID:26687053

  17. Rab11-FIP3 is a Rab11-binding protein that regulates breast cancer cell motility by modulating the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Jian; Tarbutton, Elizabeth; Wilson, Gayle; Prekeris, Rytis

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion and motility are very dynamic processes that require the temporal and spatial coordination of many cellular structures. ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) has emerged as master regulator of endocytic membrane traffic and cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement. Recently, a novel Arf6-binding protein known as FIP3/arfophilin/eferin has been identified. In addition to Arf6, FIP3 also interacts with Rab11, a small monomeric GTPase that regulates endocytic membrane transport. Both Arf6 and Rab11 GTPases have been implicated in regulation of cell motility. Here we test the role of FIP3 in breast carcinoma cell motility. First, we demonstrate that FIP3 is associated with recycling endosomes that are present at the leading edge of motile cells. Second, we show that FIP3 is required for the motility of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells. Third, we demonstrate that FIP3 regulates Rac1-dependent actin cytoskeleton dynamics and modulates the formation and ruffling of lamellipodia. Finally, we demonstrate that FIP3 regulates the localization of Arf6 at the plasma membrane of MDA-MB-231 cells. Based on our data we propose that FIP3 affects cell motility by regulating Arf6 localization to the plasma membrane of the leading edge, thus regulating polarized Rac1 activation and actin dynamics. PMID:19327867

  18. Identification of two independent nucleosome-binding domains in the transcriptional co-activator SPBP.

    PubMed

    Darvekar, Sagar; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Eriksen, Agnete Bratsberg; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2012-02-15

    Transcriptional regulation requires co-ordinated action of transcription factors, co-activator complexes and general transcription factors to access specific loci in the dense chromatin structure. In the present study we demonstrate that the transcriptional co-regulator SPBP [stromelysin-1 PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor)-responsive element binding protein] contains two independent chromatin-binding domains, the SPBP-(1551-1666) region and the C-terminal extended PHD [ePHD/ADD (extended plant homeodomain/ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L)] domain. The region 1551-1666 is a novel core nucleosome-interaction domain located adjacent to the AT-hook motif in the DNA-binding domain. This novel nucleosome-binding region is critically important for proper localization of SPBP in the cell nucleus. The ePHD/ADD domain associates with nucleosomes in a histone tail-dependent manner, and has significant impact on the dynamic interaction between SPBP and chromatin. Furthermore, SPBP and its homologue RAI1 (retinoic-acid-inducible protein 1), are strongly enriched on chromatin in interphase HeLa cells, and both proteins display low nuclear mobility. RAI1 contains a region with homology to the novel nucleosome-binding region SPBP-(1551-1666) and an ePHD/ADD domain with ability to bind nucleosomes. These results indicate that the transcriptional co-regulator SPBP and its homologue RAI1 implicated in Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome both belong to the expanding family of chromatin-binding proteins containing several domains involved in specific chromatin interactions. PMID:22081970

  19. Association of actin with alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Boyle, D.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The alpha crystallins are cytosolic proteins that co-localize and co-purify with actin-containing microfilaments. Affinity column chromatography employing both covalently-coupled actin or alpha crystallin was used to demonstrate specific and saturable binding of actin with alpha crystallin. This conclusion was confirmed by direct visualization of alpha aggregates bound to actin polymerized in vitro. The significance of this interaction in relation to the functional properties of these two polypeptides will be discussed.

  20. Mena–GRASP65 interaction couples actin polymerization to Golgi ribbon linking

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Danming; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Shijiao; Yuan, Hebao; Li, Jie; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein 65 (GRASP65) has been implicated in both Golgi stacking and ribbon linking by forming trans-oligomers through the N-terminal GRASP domain. Because the GRASP domain is globular and relatively small, but the gaps between stacks are large and heterogeneous, it remains puzzling how GRASP65 physically links Golgi stacks into a ribbon. To explore the possibility that other proteins may help GRASP65 in ribbon linking, we used biochemical methods and identified the actin elongation factor Mena as a novel GRASP65-binding protein. Mena is recruited onto the Golgi membranes through interaction with GRASP65. Depleting Mena or disrupting actin polymerization resulted in Golgi fragmentation. In cells, Mena and actin were required for Golgi ribbon formation after nocodazole washout; in vitro, Mena and microfilaments enhanced GRASP65 oligomerization and Golgi membrane fusion. Thus Mena interacts with GRASP65 to promote local actin polymerization, which facilitates Golgi ribbon linking. PMID:26538023

  1. Mutation analysis of the cellulose-binding domain of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulose-binding protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, M A; Doi, R H

    1994-01-01

    Cellulose-binding protein A (CbpA) has been previously shown to mediate the interaction between crystalline cellulose substrates and the cellulase enzyme complex of Clostridium cellulovorans. CbpA contains a family III cellulose-binding domain (CBD) which, when expressed independently, binds specifically to crystalline cellulose. A series of N- and C-terminal deletions and a series of small internal deletions of the CBD were created to determine whether the entire region previously described as a CBD is required for the cellulose-binding function. The N- and C-terminal deletions reduced binding affinity by 10- to 100-fold. Small internal deletions of the CBD resulted in substantial reduction of CBD function. Some, but not all, point mutations throughout the sequence had significant disruptive effects on the binding ability of the CBD. Thus, mutations in any region of the CBD had effects on the binding of the fragment to cellulose. The results indicate that the entire 163-amino-acid region of the CBD is required for maximal binding to crystalline cellulose. Images PMID:7961505

  2. Structure-function analysis of the DNA binding domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ABF1.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, G; Kim, J; Rho, H M; Jung, G

    1995-01-01

    To localize the DNA binding domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ars binding factor 1 (ABF1), a multifunctional DNA binding protein, plasmid constructs carrying point mutations and internal deletions in the ABF1 gene were generated and expressed in Escherichia coli. Normal and mutant ABF1 proteins were purified by affinity chromatography and their DNA binding activities were analyzed. The substitution of His61, Cys66 and His67 respectively, located in the zinc finger motif in the N-terminal region (amino acids 40-91), eliminated the DNA binding activity of ABF1 protein. Point mutations in the middle region of ABF1, specifically at Leu353, Leu399, Tyr403, Gly404, Phe410 and Lys434, also eliminated or reduced DNA binding activity. However, the DNA binding activity of point mutants of Ser307, Ser496 and Glu649 was the same as that of wild-type ABF1 protein and deletion mutants of amino acids 200-265, between the zinc finger region and the middle region (residues 323-496) retained DNA binding activity. As a result, we confirmed that the DNA binding domain of ABF1 appears to be bipartite and another DNA binding motif, other than the zinc finger motif, is situated between amino acid residues 323 and 496. Images PMID:7659521

  3. Structural and evolutionary divergence of cyclic nucleotide binding domains in eukaryotic pathogens: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Smita; Kennedy, Eileen J; Herberg, Friedrich W; Hui, Raymond; Taylor, Susan S; Langsley, Gordon; Kannan, Natarajan

    2015-10-01

    Many cellular functions in eukaryotic pathogens are mediated by the cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domain, which senses second messengers such as cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. Although CNB domain-containing proteins have been identified in many pathogenic organisms, an incomplete understanding of how CNB domains in pathogens differ from other eukaryotic hosts has hindered the development of selective inhibitors for CNB domains associated with infectious diseases. Here, we identify and classify CNB domain-containing proteins in eukaryotic genomes to understand the evolutionary basis for CNB domain functional divergence in pathogens. We identify 359 CNB domain-containing proteins in 31 pathogenic organisms and classify them into distinct subfamilies based on sequence similarity within the CNB domain as well as functional domains associated with the CNB domain. Our study reveals novel subfamilies with pathogen-specific variations in the phosphate-binding cassette. Analyzing these variations in light of existing structural and functional data provides new insights into ligand specificity and promiscuity and clues for drug design. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25847873

  4. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis. PMID:25664724

  5. Stability and Sugar Recognition Ability of Ricin-Like Carbohydrate Binding Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Nellas, Ricky B; Glover, Mary M; Shen, Tongye

    2011-01-01

    Lectins are a class of proteins known for their novel binding to saccharides. Understanding this sugar recognition process can be crucial in creating structure-based designs of proteins with various biological roles. We focus on the sugar binding of a particular lectin, ricin, which has two -trefoil carbohydrate-binding domains (CRDs) found in several plant protein toxins. The binding ability of possible sites of ricin-like CRD has been puzzling. The apo and various (multiple) ligand-bound forms of the sugar-binding domains of ricin were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. By evaluating structural stability, hydrogen bond dynamics, flexibility, and binding energy, we obtained a detailed picture of the sugar recognition of the ricin-like CRD. Unlike what was previously believed, we found that the binding abilities of the two known sites are not independent of each other. The binding ability of one site is positively affected by the other site. While the mean positions of different binding scenarios are not altered significantly, the flexibility of the binding pockets visibly decreases upon multiple ligand binding. This change in flexibility seems to be the origin of the binding cooperativity. All the hydrogen bonds that are strong in the monoligand state are also strong in the double-ligand complex, although the stability is much higher in the latter form due to cooperativity. These strong hydrogen bonds in a monoligand state are deemed to be the essential hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, by examining the structural correlation matrix, the two domains are structurally one entity. Galactose hydroxyl groups, OH4 and OH3, are the most critical parts in both site 1 and site 2 recognition.

  6. Arabidopsis VILLIN5, an Actin Filament Bundling and Severing Protein, Is Necessary for Normal Pollen Tube Growth[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Qu, Xiaolu; Bao, Chanchan; Khurana, Parul; Wang, Qiannan; Xie, Yurong; Zheng, Yiyan; Chen, Naizhi; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.; Huang, Shanjin

    2010-01-01

    A dynamic actin cytoskeleton is essential for pollen germination and tube growth. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the organization and turnover of the actin cytoskeleton in pollen remain poorly understood. Villin plays a key role in the formation of higher-order structures from actin filaments and in the regulation of actin dynamics in eukaryotic cells. It belongs to the villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily of actin binding proteins and is composed of six gelsolin-homology domains at its core and a villin headpiece domain at its C terminus. Recently, several villin family members from plants have been shown to sever, cap, and bundle actin filaments in vitro. Here, we characterized a villin isovariant, Arabidopsis thaliana VILLIN5 (VLN5), that is highly and preferentially expressed in pollen. VLN5 loss-of-function retarded pollen tube growth and sensitized actin filaments in pollen grains and tubes to latrunculin B. In vitro biochemical analyses revealed that VLN5 is a typical member of the villin family and retains a full suite of activities, including barbed-end capping, filament bundling, and calcium-dependent severing. The severing activity was confirmed with time-lapse evanescent wave microscopy of individual actin filaments in vitro. We propose that VLN5 is a major regulator of actin filament stability and turnover that functions in concert with oscillatory calcium gradients in pollen and therefore plays an integral role in pollen germination and tube growth. PMID:20807879

  7. Two Unique Ligand-Binding Clamps of Rhizopus oryzae Starch Binding Domain for Helical Structure Disruption of Amylose

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting-Ying; Ci, Yuan-Pei; Chou, Wei-I; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chou, Wei-Yao; Li, Kun-Mou; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2012-01-01

    The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD) has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21) members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs. PMID:22815939

  8. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... example, if you work outdoors) Had many severe sunburns early in life Are older Symptoms Actinic keratosis ... and tanning salons. Other things to know about sun exposure: Sun exposure is stronger in or near surfaces ...

  9. Actinic Cheilitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a precancerous condition related to cumulative lifetime sun exposure. The lower lip is most often affected. Individuals ... Wearing barrier clothing (eg, wide-brimmed hats) and sunscreen-containing lip balms can aid in preventing actinic ...

  10. Identification of two uridine binding domain peptides of the UDP-glucose-binding site of rabbit muscle glycogenin.

    PubMed

    Carrizo, M E; Curtino, J A

    1998-12-30

    Glycogenin, the autoglucosyltransferase that initiates the de novo biosynthesis of glycogen, photoaffinity labeled with [beta32P]5-azido-UDP-glucose. The photoinsertion of the azidouridine derivative showed activating ultraviolet light dependency, saturation effects, and inhibition by UDP-glucose, thus demonstrating the specificity of the interaction. In the absence of Mn2+, the requirement for the catalytic activity of glycogenin, the photolabeling decreased by 70%. Competitive binding experiments indicated that the pyrophosphate or a phosphate was the moiety of UDP-glucose implicated in the strongest interaction at the binding site. Proteolytic digestion of photolabeled glycogenin resulted in the identification of two labeled fragments, 89-143 and 168-233, that carried the uridine binding sites. This is the first report of the region of glycogenin that harbors the UDP-glucose-binding domain. PMID:9918805

  11. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, {Delta}N-hH1.4, were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both histones bind to chromatin, however, {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of {Delta}N-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain ({Delta}N-hH1.4). The {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that {Delta}N-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  12. Structure and Function of a G-actin Sequestering Protein with a Vital Role in Malaria Oocyst Development inside the Mosquito Vector*

    PubMed Central

    Hliscs, Marion; Sattler, Julia M.; Tempel, Wolfram; Artz, Jennifer D.; Dong, Aiping; Hui, Raymond; Matuschewski, Kai; Schüler, Herwig

    2010-01-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are evolutionary conserved G-actin-binding proteins that regulate microfilament turnover. CAPs have a modular structure consisting of an N-terminal adenylate cyclase binding domain, a central proline-rich segment, and a C-terminal actin binding domain. Protozoan parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa, such as Cryptosporidium and the malaria parasite Plasmodium, express small CAP orthologs with homology to the C-terminal actin binding domain (C-CAP). Here, we demonstrate by reverse genetics that C-CAP is dispensable for the pathogenic Plasmodium blood stages. However, c-cap(-) parasites display a complete defect in oocyst development in the insect vector. By trans-species complementation we show that the Cryptosporidium parvum ortholog complements the Plasmodium gene functions. Purified recombinant C. parvum C-CAP protein binds actin monomers and prevents actin polymerization. The crystal structure of C. parvum C-CAP shows two monomers with a right-handed β-helical fold intercalated at their C termini to form the putative physiological dimer. Our results reveal a specific vital role for an apicomplexan G-actin-binding protein during sporogony, the parasite replication phase that precedes formation of malaria transmission stages. This study also exemplifies how Plasmodium reverse genetics combined with biochemical and structural analyses of orthologous proteins can offer a fast track toward systematic gene characterization in apicomplexan parasites. PMID:20083609

  13. Crystal Structure of the Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 1 (Chd1) DNA-binding Domain in Complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma A.; Heroux A.; Jenkins K. R.; Bowman G. D.

    2011-12-09

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-dependent machines that dynamically alter the chromatin packaging of eukaryotic genomes by assembling, sliding, and displacing nucleosomes. The Chd1 chromatin remodeler possesses a C-terminal DNA-binding domain that is required for efficient nucleosome sliding and believed to be essential for sensing the length of DNA flanking the nucleosome core. The structure of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain was recently shown to consist of a SANT and SLIDE domain, analogous to the DNA-binding domain of the ISWI family, yet the details of how Chd1 recognized DNA were not known. Here we present the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chd1 DNA-binding domain in complex with a DNA duplex. The bound DNA duplex is straight, consistent with the preference exhibited by the Chd1 DNA-binding domain for extranucleosomal DNA. Comparison of this structure with the recently solved ISW1a DNA-binding domain bound to DNA reveals that DNA lays across each protein at a distinct angle, yet contacts similar surfaces on the SANT and SLIDE domains. In contrast to the minor groove binding seen for Isw1 and predicted for Chd1, the SLIDE domain of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain contacts the DNA major groove. The majority of direct contacts with the phosphate backbone occur only on one DNA strand, suggesting that Chd1 may not strongly discriminate between major and minor grooves.

  14. Mutations that bypass tRNA binding activate the intrinsically defective kinase domain in GCN2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongfang; Hu, Cuihua; Dong, Jinsheng; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2002-01-01

    The protein kinase GCN2 is activated in amino acid-starved cells on binding of uncharged tRNA to a histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS)-related domain. We isolated two point mutations in the protein kinase (PK) domain, R794G and F842L, that permit strong kinase activity in the absence of tRNA binding. These mutations also bypass the requirement for ribosome binding, dimerization, and association with the GCN1/GCN20 regulatory complex, suggesting that all of these functions facilitate tRNA binding to wild-type GCN2. While the isolated wild-type PK domain was completely inert, the mutant PK was highly active in vivo and in vitro. These results identify an inhibitory structure intrinsic to the PK domain that must be overcome on tRNA binding by interactions with a regulatory region, most likely the N terminus of the HisRS segment. As Arg 794 and Phe 842 are predicted to lie close to one another and to the active site, they may participate directly in misaligning active site residues. Autophosphorylation of the activation loop was stimulated by R794G and F842L, and the autophosphorylation sites remained critical for GCN2 function in the presence of these mutations. Our results imply a two-step activation mechanism involving distinct conformational changes in the PK domain. PMID:12023305

  15. Potent inhibition of Grb2 SH2 domain binding by non-phosphate-containing ligands.

    PubMed

    Yao, Z J; King, C R; Cao, T; Kelley, J; Milne, G W; Voigt, J H; Burke, T R

    1999-01-14

    Development of Grb2 Src homology 2 (SH2) domain binding inhibitors has important implications for treatment of a variety of diseases, including several cancers. In cellular studies, inhibitors of Grb2 SH2 domain binding have to date been large, highly charged peptides which relied on special transport devices for cell membrane penetration. Work presented in the current study examines a variety of pTyr mimetics in the context of a high-affinity Grb2 binding platform. Among the analogues studied are new non-phosphorus-containing pTyr mimetics 23a and 23b which, when incorporated into tripeptide structures 18f and 20f, are able to inhibit Grb2 SH2 domain binding with affinities among the best yet reported for non-phosphorus-containing SH2 domain inhibitors (IC50 values of 6.7 and 1.3 microM, respectively). The present study has also demonstrated the usefulness of the Nalpha-oxalyl group as an auxiliary which enhances the binding potency of both phosphorus- and non-phosphorus-containing pTyr mimetics. When combined with the (phosphonomethyl)phenylalanine (Pmp) residue to give analogues such as L-20d, potent inhibition of Grb2 SH2 domain binding can be achieved both in extracellular assays using isolated Grb2 SH2 domain protein and in intracellular systems measuring the association of endogenous Grb2 with its cognate p185erbB-2 ligand. These latter effects can be achieved at micromolar to submicromolar concentrations without prodrug derivatization. The oxalyl-containing pTyr mimetics presented in this study should be of general usefulness for the development of other Grb2 SH2 domain antagonists, independent of the beta-bend-mimicking platform utilized for their display. PMID:9888830

  16. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  17. Crucial role for the VWF A1 domain in binding to type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Flood, Veronica H; Schlauderaff, Abraham C; Haberichter, Sandra L; Slobodianuk, Tricia L; Jacobi, Paula M; Bellissimo, Daniel B; Christopherson, Pamela A; Friedman, Kenneth D; Gill, Joan Cox; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Montgomery, Robert R

    2015-04-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) contains binding sites for platelets and for vascular collagens to facilitate clot formation at sites of injury. Although previous work has shown that VWF can bind type IV collagen (collagen 4), little characterization of this interaction has been performed. We examined the binding of VWF to collagen 4 in vitro and extended this characterization to a murine model of defective VWF-collagen 4 interactions. The interactions of VWF and collagen 4 were further studied using plasma samples from a large study of both healthy controls and subjects with different types of von Willebrand disease (VWD). Our results show that collagen 4 appears to bind VWF exclusively via the VWF A1 domain, and that specific sequence variations identified through VWF patient samples and through site-directed mutagenesis in the VWF A1 domain can decrease or abrogate this interaction. In addition, VWF-dependent platelet binding to collagen 4 under flow conditions requires an intact VWF A1 domain. We observed that decreased binding to collagen 4 was associated with select VWF A1 domain sequence variations in type 1 and type 2M VWD. This suggests an additional mechanism through which VWF variants may alter hemostasis. PMID:25662333

  18. Crucial role for the VWF A1 domain in binding to type IV collagen

    PubMed Central

    Schlauderaff, Abraham C.; Haberichter, Sandra L.; Slobodianuk, Tricia L.; Jacobi, Paula M.; Bellissimo, Daniel B.; Christopherson, Pamela A.; Friedman, Kenneth D.; Gill, Joan Cox; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Montgomery, Robert R.; Abshire, T.; Dunn, A.; Bennett, C.; Lusher, J.; Rajpurkar, M.; Brown, D.; Shapiro, A.; Lentz, S.; Gill, J.; Leissinger, C.; Ragni, M.; Hord, J.; Manco-Johnson, M.; Strouse, J.; Ma, A.; Valentino, L.; Boggio, L.; Sharathkumar, A.; Gruppo, R.; Kerlin, B.; Journeycake, J.; Kulkarni, R.; Green, D.; Mahoney, D.; Mathias, L.; Bedros, A.; Diamond, C.; Neff, A.; DiMichele, D.; Giardina, P.; Cohen, A.; Paidas, M.; Werner, E.; Matsunaga, A.; Tarantino, M.; Shafer, F.; Konkle, B.; Cuker, A.; Kouides, P.; Stein, D.

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) contains binding sites for platelets and for vascular collagens to facilitate clot formation at sites of injury. Although previous work has shown that VWF can bind type IV collagen (collagen 4), little characterization of this interaction has been performed. We examined the binding of VWF to collagen 4 in vitro and extended this characterization to a murine model of defective VWF–collagen 4 interactions. The interactions of VWF and collagen 4 were further studied using plasma samples from a large study of both healthy controls and subjects with different types of von Willebrand disease (VWD). Our results show that collagen 4 appears to bind VWF exclusively via the VWF A1 domain, and that specific sequence variations identified through VWF patient samples and through site-directed mutagenesis in the VWF A1 domain can decrease or abrogate this interaction. In addition, VWF-dependent platelet binding to collagen 4 under flow conditions requires an intact VWF A1 domain. We observed that decreased binding to collagen 4 was associated with select VWF A1 domain sequence variations in type 1 and type 2M VWD. This suggests an additional mechanism through which VWF variants may alter hemostasis. PMID:25662333

  19. LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins bind to the serine/threonine-rich domain of thrombomodulin.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Eiji; Okamoto, Takayuki; Takagi, Yoshimi; Honda, Goichi; Suzuki, Koji; Imai, Hiroshi; Shimaoka, Motomu

    2016-05-13

    LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins regulate leukocyte trafficking in health and disease by binding primarily to IgSF ligand ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 on endothelial cells. Here we have shown that the anti-coagulant molecule thrombomodulin (TM), found on the surface of endothelial cells, functions as a potentially new ligand for leukocyte integrins. We generated a recombinant extracellular domain of human TM and Fc fusion protein (TM-domains 123-Fc), and showed that pheripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) bind to TM-domains 123-Fc dependent upon integrin activation. We then demonstrated that αL integrin-blocking mAb, αM integrin-blocking mAb, and β2 integrin-blocking mAb inhibited the binding of PBMCs to TM-domains 123-Fc. Furthermore, we show that the serine/threonine-rich domain (domain 3) of TM is required for the interaction with the LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins to occur on PBMCs. These results demonstrate that the LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins on leukocytes bind to TM, thereby establishing the molecular and structural basis underlying LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrin interaction with TM on endothelial cells. In fact, integrin-TM interactions might be involved in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte adhesion with endothelial cells. PMID:27055590

  20. The Actin Nucleator Cobl Is Controlled by Calcium and Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Natja; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Actin nucleation triggers the formation of new actin filaments and has the power to shape cells but requires tight control in order to bring about proper morphologies. The regulation of the members of the novel class of WASP Homology 2 (WH2) domain-based actin nucleators, however, thus far has largely remained elusive. Our study reveals signal cascades and mechanisms regulating Cordon-Bleu (Cobl). Cobl plays some, albeit not fully understood, role in early arborization of neurons and nucleates actin by a mechanism that requires a combination of all three of its actin monomer–binding WH2 domains. Our experiments reveal that Cobl is regulated by Ca2+ and multiple, direct associations of the Ca2+ sensor Calmodulin (CaM). Overexpression analyses and rescue experiments of Cobl loss-of-function phenotypes with Cobl mutants in primary neurons and in tissue slices demonstrated the importance of CaM binding for Cobl’s functions. Cobl-induced dendritic branch initiation was preceded by Ca2+ signals and coincided with local F-actin and CaM accumulations. CaM inhibitor studies showed that Cobl-mediated branching is strictly dependent on CaM activity. Mechanistic studies revealed that Ca2+/CaM modulates Cobl’s actin binding properties and furthermore promotes Cobl’s previously identified interactions with the membrane-shaping F-BAR protein syndapin I, which accumulated with Cobl at nascent dendritic protrusion sites. The findings of our study demonstrate a direct regulation of an actin nucleator by Ca2+/CaM and reveal that the Ca2+/CaM-controlled molecular mechanisms we discovered are crucial for Cobl’s cellular functions. By unveiling the means of Cobl regulation and the mechanisms, by which Ca2+/CaM signals directly converge on a cellular effector promoting actin filament formation, our work furthermore sheds light on how local Ca2+ signals steer and power branch initiation during early arborization of nerve cells—a key process in neuronal network formation. PMID

  1. Chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC4 (p64H1) binds directly to brain dynamin I in a complex containing actin, tubulin and 14-3-3 isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Suginta, W; Karoulias, N; Aitken, A; Ashley, R H

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) (p64-related) proteins are widely expressed, with an unusual dual localization as both soluble and integral membrane proteins. The molecular basis for their cellular localization and ion channel activity remains unclear. To help in addressing these problems, we identified novel rat brain CLIC4 (p64H1) binding partners by affinity chromatography, mass spectrometric analysis and microsequencing. Brain CLIC4 binds dynamin I, alpha-tubulin, beta-actin, creatine kinase and two 14-3-3 isoforms; the interactions are confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation. Gel overlay and reverse pull-down assays indicate that the binding of CLIC4 to dynamin I and 14-3-3zeta is direct. In HEK-293 cells, biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses show partial co-localization of recombinant CLIC4 with caveolin and with functional caveolae, which is consistent with a dynamin-associated role for CLIC4 in caveolar endocytosis. We speculate that brain CLIC4 might be involved in the dynamics of neuronal plasma membrane microdomains (micropatches) containing caveolin-like proteins and might also have other cellular roles related to membrane trafficking. Our results provide the basis for new hypotheses concerning novel ways in which CLIC proteins might be associated with cell membrane remodelling, the control of cell shape, and anion channel activity. PMID:11563969

  2. Plant Kinesin-Like Calmodulin Binding Protein Employs Its Regulatory Domain for Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Maia V.; Malanina, Galina G.; Waitzman, Joshua S.; Rice, Sarah E.; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein (KCBP), a Kinesin-14 family motor protein, is involved in the structural organization of microtubules during mitosis and trichome morphogenesis in plants. The molecular mechanism of microtubule bundling by KCBP remains unknown. KCBP binding to microtubules is regulated by Ca2+-binding proteins that recognize its C-terminal regulatory domain. In this work, we have discovered a new function of the regulatory domain. We present a crystal structure of an Arabidopsis KCBP fragment showing that the C-terminal regulatory domain forms a dimerization interface for KCBP. This dimerization site is distinct from the dimerization interface within the N-terminal domain. Side chains of hydrophobic residues of the calmodulin binding helix of the regulatory domain form the C-terminal dimerization interface. Biochemical experiments show that another segment of the regulatory domain located beyond the dimerization interface, its negatively charged coil, is unexpectedly and absolutely required to stabilize the dimers. The strong microtubule bundling properties of KCBP are unaffected by deletion of the C-terminal regulatory domain. The slow minus-end directed motility of KCBP is also unchanged in vitro. Although the C-terminal domain is not essential for microtubule bundling, we suggest that KCBP may use its two independent dimerization interfaces to support different types of bundled microtubule structures in cells. Two distinct dimerization sites may provide a mechanism for microtubule rearrangement in response to Ca2+ signaling since Ca2+- binding proteins can disengage KCBP dimers dependent on its C-terminal dimerization interface. PMID:23805258

  3. Plant Kinesin-Like Calmodulin Binding Protein Employs Its Regulatory Domain for Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Maia V; Malanina, Galina G; Waitzman, Joshua S; Rice, Sarah E; Fletterick, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein (KCBP), a Kinesin-14 family motor protein, is involved in the structural organization of microtubules during mitosis and trichome morphogenesis in plants. The molecular mechanism of microtubule bundling by KCBP remains unknown. KCBP binding to microtubules is regulated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins that recognize its C-terminal regulatory domain. In this work, we have discovered a new function of the regulatory domain. We present a crystal structure of an Arabidopsis KCBP fragment showing that the C-terminal regulatory domain forms a dimerization interface for KCBP. This dimerization site is distinct from the dimerization interface within the N-terminal domain. Side chains of hydrophobic residues of the calmodulin binding helix of the regulatory domain form the C-terminal dimerization interface. Biochemical experiments show that another segment of the regulatory domain located beyond the dimerization interface, its negatively charged coil, is unexpectedly and absolutely required to stabilize the dimers. The strong microtubule bundling properties of KCBP are unaffected by deletion of the C-terminal regulatory domain. The slow minus-end directed motility of KCBP is also unchanged in vitro. Although the C-terminal domain is not essential for microtubule bundling, we suggest that KCBP may use its two independent dimerization interfaces to support different types of bundled microtubule structures in cells. Two distinct dimerization sites may provide a mechanism for microtubule rearrangement in response to Ca(2+) signaling since Ca(2+)- binding proteins can disengage KCBP dimers dependent on its C-terminal dimerization interface. PMID:23805258

  4. Steady-state nuclear actin levels are determined by export competent actin pool.

    PubMed

    Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Huet, Guillaume; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2013-10-01

    A number of studies in the last decade have irrevocably promoted actin into a fully fledged member of the nuclear compartment, where it, among other crucial tasks, facilitates transcription and chromatin remodeling. Changes in nuclear actin levels have been linked to different cellular processes: decreased nuclear actin to quiescence and increased nuclear actin to differentiation. Importin 9 and exportin 6 transport factors are responsible for the continuous nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of actin, but the mechanisms, which result in modulated actin levels, have not been characterized. We find that in cells growing under normal growth conditions, the levels of nuclear actin vary considerably from cell to cell. To understand the basis for this, we have extensively quantified several cellular parameters while at the same time recording the import and export rates of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged actin. Surprisingly, our dataset shows that the ratio of nuclear to cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity, but not nuclear shape, size, cytoplasm size, or their ratio, correlates negatively with both import and export rate of actin. This suggests that high-nuclear actin content is maintained by both diminished import and export. The high nuclear actin containing cells still show high mobility of actin, but it is not export competent, suggesting increased binding of actin to nuclear complexes. Creation of such export incompetent actin pool would ensure enough actin is retained in the nucleus and make it available for the various nuclear functions described for actin. PMID:23749625

  5. Polyelectrolyte Complex for Heparin Binding Domain Osteogenic Growth Factor Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wing Moon Lam, Raymond; Abbah, Sunny Akogwu; Ming, Wang; Naidu, Mathanapriya; Ng, Felly; Tao, Hu; Goh Cho Hong, James; Ting, Kang; Hee Kit, Wong

    2016-01-01

    During reconstructive bone surgeries, supraphysiological amounts of growth factors are empirically loaded onto scaffolds to promote successful bone fusion. Large doses of highly potent biological agents are required due to growth factor instability as a result of rapid enzymatic degradation as well as carrier inefficiencies in localizing sufficient amounts of growth factor at implant sites. Hence, strategies that prolong the stability of growth factors such as BMP-2/NELL-1, and control their release could actually lower their efficacious dose and thus reduce the need for larger doses during future bone regeneration surgeries. This in turn will reduce side effects and growth factor costs. Self-assembled PECs have been fabricated to provide better control of BMP-2/NELL-1 delivery via heparin binding and further potentiate growth factor bioactivity by enhancing in vivo stability. Here we illustrate the simplicity of PEC fabrication which aids in the delivery of a variety of growth factors during reconstructive bone surgeries. PMID:27585207

  6. Detection of persistent organic pollutants binding modes with androgen receptor ligand binding domain by docking and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are persistent in the environment after release from industrial compounds, combustion productions or pesticides. The exposure of POPs has been related to various reproductive disturbances, such as reduced semen quality, testicular cancer, and imbalanced sex ratio. Among POPs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4’-DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the most widespread and well-studied compounds. Recent studies have revealed that 4,4’-DDE is an antagonist of androgen receptor (AR). However, the mechanism of the inhibition remains elusive. CB-153 is the most common congener of PCBs, while the action of CB-153 on AR is still under debate. Results Molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches have been employed to study binding modes and inhibition mechanism of 4,4’-DDE and CB-153 against AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Several potential binding sites have been detected and analyzed. One possible binding site is the same binding site of AR natural ligand androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Another one is on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function (AF2) region, which is crucial for the co-activators recruitment. Besides, a novel possible binding site was observed for POPs with low binding free energy with the receptor. Detailed interactions between ligands and the receptor have been represented. The disrupting mechanism of POPs against AR has also been discussed. Conclusions POPs disrupt the function of AR through binding to three possible biding sites on AR/LBD. One of them shares the same binding site of natural ligand of AR. Another one is on AF2 region. The third one is in a cleft near N-terminal of the receptor. Significantly, values of binding free energy of POPs with AR/LBD are comparable to that of natural ligand androgen DHT. PMID:24053684

  7. The calmodulin-binding domain of the mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein.

    PubMed

    Minami, Y; Kawasaki, H; Suzuki, K; Yahara, I

    1993-05-01

    The mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) and Ca(2+)-calmodulin were cross-linked at an equimolar ratio using a carbodiimide zero-length cross-linker. To identify the calmodulin-binding domain(s) of HSP90, CNBr-cleaved peptide fragments of HSP90 were mixed with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and cross-linked. Amino acid sequence determination revealed that an HSP90 alpha-derived peptide starting at the 486th amino acid residue was contained in the cross-linked products, which contains a calmodulin-binding motif (from Lys500 to Ile520). A similar motif is present also in HSP90 beta (from Lys491 to Val511). The synthetic peptides corresponding to these putative calmodulin-binding sequences were found to be cross-linked with Ca(2+)-calmodulin and to prevent the cross-linking of HSP90 and Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Both HSP90 alpha and HSP90 beta bind Ca2+. The HSP90 peptides bind HSP90 and thereby inhibit the binding of Ca2+. In addition, the HSP90 peptides augment the self-oligomerization of HSP90 induced at elevated temperatures. These results suggest that the calmodulin-binding domain of HSP90 might interact with another part of the same molecule and that Ca(2+)-calmodulin might modulate the structure and function of HSP90 through abolishing the intramolecular interaction. PMID:8486648

  8. A Substrate-induced Biotin Binding Pocket in the Carboxyltransferase Domain of Pyruvate Carboxylase*

    PubMed Central

    Lietzan, Adam D.; St. Maurice, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxyl transfer reactions by efficiently coordinating multiple reactions between spatially distinct active sites. Pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the bicarbonate- and MgATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To complete the overall reaction, the tethered biotin prosthetic group must first gain access to the biotin carboxylase domain and become carboxylated and then translocate to the carboxyltransferase domain, where the carboxyl group is transferred from biotin to pyruvate. Here, we report structural and kinetic evidence for the formation of a substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of PC from Rhizobium etli. Structures of the carboxyltransferase domain reveal that R. etli PC occupies a symmetrical conformation in the absence of the biotin carboxylase domain and that the carboxyltransferase domain active site is conformationally rearranged upon pyruvate binding. This conformational change is stabilized by the interaction of the conserved residues Asp590 and Tyr628 and results in the formation of the biotin binding pocket. Site-directed mutations at these residues reduce the rate of biotin-dependent reactions but have no effect on the rate of biotin-independent oxaloacetate decarboxylation. Given the conservation with carboxyltransferase domains in oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, the structure-based mechanism described for PC may be applicable to the larger family of biotin-dependent enzymes. PMID:23698000

  9. The Crystal Structure of the Heparin-Binding Reelin-N Domain of F-Spondin

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Kemin; Duquette, Mark; Liu, Jin-huan; Lawler, Jack; Wang, Jia-huai

    2008-09-23

    The extracellular matrix protein F-spondin mediates axon guidance during neuronal development. Its N-terminal domain, termed the reelin-N domain, is conserved in F-spondins, reelins, and other extracellular matrix proteins. In this study, a recombinant human reelin-N domain has been expressed, purified, and shown to bind heparin. The crystal structure of the reelin-N domain resolved to 2.0 {angstrom} reveals a variant immunoglobulin-like fold and potential heparin-binding sites. Substantial conformational variations even in secondary structure are observed between the two chemically identical reelin-N domains in one crystallographic asymmetric unit. The variations may result from extensive, highly specific interactions across the interface of the two reelin-N domains. The calculated values of buried surface area and the interface's shape complementarity are consistent with the formation of a weak dimer. The homophilic asymmetric dimer can potentially offer advantages in binding to ligands such as glycosaminoglycans, which may, in turn, bridge the two reelin-N domains and stabilize the dimer.

  10. Allosteric role of the large-scale domain opening in biological catch-binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2009-05-01

    The proposed model demonstrates the allosteric role of the two-domain region of the receptor protein in the increased lifetimes of biological receptor/ligand bonds subjected to an external force. The interaction between the domains is represented by a bounded potential, containing two minima corresponding to the attached and separated conformations of the two protein domains. The dissociative potential with a single minimum describing receptor/ligand binding fluctuates between deep and shallow states, depending on whether the domains are attached or separated. A number of valuable analytic expressions are derived and are used to interpret experimental data for two catch bonds. The P-selectin/P-selectin-glycoprotein-ligand-1 (PSGL-1) bond is controlled by the interface between the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and lectin domains of P-selectin, and the type 1 fimbrial adhesive protein (FimH)/mannose bond is governed by the interface between the lectin and pilin domains of FimH. Catch-binding occurs in these systems when the external force stretches the receptor proteins and increases the interdomain distance. The allosteric effect is supported by independent measurements, in which the domains are kept separated by attachment of another ligand. The proposed model accurately describes the experimentally observed anomalous behavior of the lifetimes of the P-selectin/PSGL-1 and FimH/mannose complexes as a function of applied force and provides valuable insights into the mechanism of catch-binding.

  11. FHOD proteins in actin dynamics—a formin’ class of its own

    PubMed Central

    Bechtold, Meike; Schultz, Jörg; Bogdan, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved a variety of actin-binding proteins to regulate the architecture and the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in time and space. The Diaphanous-related formins (DRF) represent a diverse group of Rho-GTPase-regulated actin regulators that control a range of actin structures composed of tightly-bundled, unbranched actin filaments as found in stress fibers and in filopodia. Under resting conditions, DRFs are auto-inhibited by an intra-molecular interaction between the C-terminal and the N-terminal domains. The auto-inhibition is thought to be released by binding of an activated RhoGTPase to the N-terminal GTPase-binding domain (GBD). However, there is growing evidence for more sophisticated variations from this simplified linear activation model. In this review we focus on the formin homology domain-containing proteins (FHOD), an unconventional group of DRFs. Recent findings on the molecular control and cellular functions of FHOD proteins in vivo are discussed in the light of the phylogeny of FHOD proteins. PMID:25483300

  12. P-glycoprotein substrate binding domains are located at the transmembrane domain/transmembrane domain interfaces: a combined photoaffinity labeling-protein homology modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Pleban, Karin; Kopp, Stephan; Csaszar, Edina; Peer, Michael; Hrebicek, Thomas; Rizzi, Andreas; Ecker, Gerhard F; Chiba, Peter

    2005-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an energy-dependent multidrug efflux pump conferring resistance to cancer chemotherapy. Characterization of the mechanism of drug transport at a molecular level represents an important prerequisite for the design of pump inhibitors, which resensitize cancer cells to standard chemotherapy. In addition, P-glycoprotein plays an important role for early absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity profiling in drug development. A set of propafenonetype substrate photoaffinity ligands has been used in this study in conjunction with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry to define the substrate binding domain(s) of P-gp in more detail. The highest labeling was observed in transmembrane segments 3, 5, 8, and 11. A homology model for P-gp was generated on the basis of the dimeric crystal structure of Vibrio cholerae MsbA, an essential lipid transporter. Thereafter, the labeling pattern was projected onto the 3D atomic-detail model of P-gp to allow a visualization of the binding domain(s). Labeling is predicted by the model to occur at the two transmembrane domain/transmembrane domain interfaces formed between the amino- and carboxyl-terminal half of P-gp. These interfaces are formed by transmembrane (TM) segments 3 and 11 on one hand and TM segments 5 and 8 on the other hand. Available data on LmrA and AcrB, two bacterial multidrug efflux pumps, suggest that binding at domain interfaces may be a general feature of polyspecific drug efflux pumps. PMID:15509712

  13. Effectors of animal and plant pathogens use a common domain to bind host phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Guo, Yirui; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.; Gardner, Kevin H.; Orth, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial Type III Secretion Systems deliver effectors into host cells to manipulate cellular processes to the advantage of the pathogen. Many host targets of these effectors are found on membranes. Therefore, to identify their targets, effectors often use specialized membrane-localization domains to localize to appropriate host membranes. However, the molecular mechanisms used by many domains are unknown. Here we identify a conserved bacterial phosphoinositide-binding domain (BPD) that is found in functionally diverse Type III effectors of both plant and animal pathogens. We show that members of the BPD family functionally bind phosphoinositides and mediate localization to host membranes. Moreover, NMR studies reveal that the BPD of the newly identified Vibrio parahaemolyticus Type III effector VopR is unfolded in solution, but folds into a specific structure upon binding its ligand phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate. Thus, our findings suggest a possible mechanism for promoting refolding of Type III effectors after delivery into host cells. PMID:24346350

  14. Bacterial cadherin domains as carbohydrate binding modules: determination of affinity constants to insoluble complex polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Weiner, Ronald M; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Cadherin (CA) and cadherin-like (CADG) doublet domains from the complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans 2-40, demonstrated reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides, which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. Here we describe a procedure based on adsorption of CA and CADG doublet domains to different insoluble complex polysaccharides, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) for visualizing and quantifying the distribution of cadherins between the bound and unbound fractions. Scatchard plots were employed to determine the kinetics of interactions of CA and CADG with several complex carbohydrates. On the basis of these binding studies, the CA and CADG doublet domains are proposed to form a new family of carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). PMID:22843394

  15. FHA domains as phospho-threonine binding modules in cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hammet, Andrew; Pike, Brietta L; McNees, Carolyn J; Conlan, Lindus A; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2003-01-01

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are present in >200 diverse proteins in all phyla from bacteria to mammals and seem to be particularly prevalent in proteins with cell cycle control functions. Recent work from several laboratories has considerably improved our understanding of the structure and function of these domains that were virtually unknown a few years ago, and the first disease associations of FHA domains have now emerged. FHA domains form 11-stranded beta-sandwiches that contain some 100-180 amino acid residues with a high degree of sequence diversity. FHA domains act as phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interaction modules that preferentially bind to phospho-threonine residues in their targets. Interestingly, point mutations in the human CHK2 gene that lead to single-residue amino acid substitutions in the FHA domain of this cell cycle checkpoint kinase have been found to cause a subset of cases of the Li-Fraumeni multi-cancer syndrome. PMID:12716058

  16. Ligand-Binding Properties of the Carboxyl-Terminal Repeat Domain of Streptococcus mutans Glucan-Binding Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Wolfgang; Banas, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypothesis and to quantitate the ligand-binding specificities of the GbpA GBD, several fusion proteins were generated and tested by affinity electrophoresis or by precipitation of protein-ligand complexes, allowing the determination of binding constants. It was determined that the 16 YG repeats in GbpA comprise its GBD and that GbpA has a greater affinity for dextran (a water-soluble form of glucan) than for mutan (a water-insoluble form of glucan). Placement of the GBD at the carboxyl terminus was necessary for maximum glucan binding, and deletion of as few as two YG repeats from either end of the GBD reduced the affinity for dextran by over 10-fold. Interestingly, the binding constant of GbpA for dextran was 34-fold higher than that calculated for the GBDs of two S. mutans GTFs, one of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-soluble glucan and the other of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan. PMID:10633107

  17. Ligand-binding properties of the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain of Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A.

    PubMed

    Haas, W; Banas, J A

    2000-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypothesis and to quantitate the ligand-binding specificities of the GbpA GBD, several fusion proteins were generated and tested by affinity electrophoresis or by precipitation of protein-ligand complexes, allowing the determination of binding constants. It was determined that the 16 YG repeats in GbpA comprise its GBD and that GbpA has a greater affinity for dextran (a water-soluble form of glucan) than for mutan (a water-insoluble form of glucan). Placement of the GBD at the carboxyl terminus was necessary for maximum glucan binding, and deletion of as few as two YG repeats from either end of the GBD reduced the affinity for dextran by over 10-fold. Interestingly, the binding constant of GbpA for dextran was 34-fold higher than that calculated for the GBDs of two S. mutans GTFs, one of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-soluble glucan and the other of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan. PMID:10633107

  18. Starch-binding domains in the CBM45 family--low-affinity domains from glucan, water dikinase and α-amylase involved in plastidial starch metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glaring, Mikkel A; Baumann, Martin J; Abou Hachem, Maher; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Natsuko; Santelia, Diana; Sigurskjold, Bent W; Zeeman, Samuel C; Blennow, Andreas; Svensson, Birte

    2011-04-01

    Starch-binding domains are noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules that mediate binding to granular starch. The starch-binding domains from the carbohydrate-binding module family 45 (CBM45, http://www.cazy.org) are found as N-terminal tandem repeats in a small number of enzymes, primarily from photosynthesizing organisms. Isolated domains from representatives of each of the two classes of enzyme carrying CBM45-type domains, the Solanum tuberosumα-glucan, water dikinase and the Arabidopsis thaliana plastidial α-amylase 3, were expressed as recombinant proteins and characterized. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to verify the conformational integrity of an isolated CBM45 domain, revealing a surprisingly high thermal stability (T(m) of 84.8 °C). The functionality of CBM45 was demonstrated in planta by yellow/green fluorescent protein fusions and transient expression in tobacco leaves. Affinities for starch and soluble cyclodextrin starch mimics were measured by adsorption assays, surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry analyses. The data indicate that CBM45 binds with an affinity of about two orders of magnitude lower than the classical starch-binding domains from extracellular microbial amylolytic enzymes. This suggests that low-affinity starch-binding domains are a recurring feature in plastidial starch metabolism, and supports the hypothesis that reversible binding, effectuated through low-affinity interaction with starch granules, facilitates dynamic regulation of enzyme activities and, hence, of starch metabolism. PMID:21294843

  19. The alpha2beta1 integrin inhibitor rhodocetin binds to the A-domain of the integrin alpha2 subunit proximal to the collagen-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Eble, Johannes A; Tuckwell, Danny S

    2003-01-01

    Rhodocetin is a snake venom protein that binds to alpha2beta1 integrin, inhibiting its interaction with its endogenous ligand collagen. We have determined the mechanism by which rhodocetin inhibits the function of alpha2beta1. The interaction of alpha2beta1 with collagen and rhodocetin differed: Ca(2+) ions and slightly acidic pH values increased the binding of alpha2beta1 integrin to rhodocetin in contrast with their attenuating effect on collagen binding, suggesting that rhodocetin preferentially binds to a less active conformation of alpha2beta1 integrin. The alpha2A-domain [von Willebrand factor domain A homology domain (A-domain) of the integrin alpha2 subunit] is the major site for collagen binding to alpha2beta1. Recombinant alpha2A-domain bound rhodocetin, demonstrating that the A-domain is also the rhodocetin-binding domain. Although the interaction of alpha2beta1 with rhodocetin is affected by altering divalent cations, the interaction of the A-domain was divalent-cation-independent. The rhodocetin-binding site on the alpha2A-domain was mapped first by identifying an anti-alpha2 antibody that blocked rhodocetin binding and then mapping the epitope of the antibody using human-mouse alpha2A-domain chimaeras; and secondly, by binding studies with alpha2A-domain, which bear point mutations in the vicinity of the mapped epitope. In this way, the rhodocetin-binding site was identified as the alpha3-alpha4 loop plus adjacent alpha-helices. This region is known to form part of the collagen-binding site, thus attaining a mainly competitive mode of inhibition by rhodocetin. PMID:12871211

  20. Inhibition of HIV derived lentiviral production by TAR RNA binding domain of TAT protein

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Michael Y; Zhang, Jiying; He, Yukai

    2005-01-01

    Background A critical step in the production of new HIV virions involves the TAT protein binding to the TAR element. The TAT protein contains in close proximity its TAR RNA binding domain and protein transduction domain (PTD). The PTD domain of TAT has been identified as being instrumental in the protein's ability to cross mammalian cell and nuclear membranes. All together, this information led us to form the hypothesis that a protein containing the TAR RNA binding domain could compete with the native full length TAT protein and effectively block the TAR RNA binding site in transduced HIV infected cells. Results We synthesized a short peptide named Tat-P, which contained the TAR RNA binding and PTD domains to examine whether the peptide has the potential of inhibiting TAT dependent HIV replication. We investigated the inhibiting effects of Tat-P in vitro using a HIV derived lentiviral vector model. We found that the TAT PTD domain not only efficiently transduced test cells, but also effectively inhibited the production of lentiviral particles in a TAT dependent manner. These results were also supported by data derived from the TAT activated LTR-luciferase expression model and RNA binding assays. Conclusion Tat-P may become part of a category of anti-HIV drugs that competes with full length TAT proteins to inhibit HIV replication. In addition, this study indicates that the HIV derived lentiviral vector system is a safe and reliable screening method for anti-HIV drugs, especially for those targeting the interaction of TAT and TAR RNAs. PMID:16293193

  1. Identification of pleckstrin-homology-domain-containing proteins with novel phosphoinositide-binding specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Dowler, S; Currie , R A; Campbell , D G; Deak, M; Kular, G; Downes, C P; Alessi, D R

    2000-01-01

    The second messenger phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)] is generated by the action of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), and regulates a plethora of cellular processes. An approach for dissecting the mechanisms by which these processes are regulated is to identify proteins that interact specifically with PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3). The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain has become recognized as the specialized module used by many proteins to interact with PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3). Recent work has led to the identification of a putative phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate-binding motif (PPBM) at the N-terminal regions of PH domains that interact with this lipid. We have searched expressed sequence tag databases for novel proteins containing PH domains possessing a PPBM. Surprisingly, many of the PH domains that we identified do not bind PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), but instead possess unexpected and novel phosphoinositide-binding specificities in vitro. These include proteins possessing PH domains that interact specifically with PtdIns(3,4)P(2) [TAPP1 (tandem PH-domain-containing protein-1) and TAPP2], PtdIns4P [FAPP1 (phosphatidylinositol-four-phosphate adaptor protein-1)], PtdIns3P [PEPP1 (phosphatidylinositol-three-phosphate-binding PH-domain protein-1) and AtPH1] and PtdIns(3,5)P(2) (centaurin-beta2). We have also identified two related homologues of PEPP1, termed PEPP2 and PEPP3, that may also interact with PtdIns3P. This study lays the foundation for future work to establish the phospholipid-binding specificities of these proteins in vivo, and their physiological role(s). PMID:11001876

  2. Simultaneous prediction of binding free energy and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions

    PubMed Central

    Crivelli, Joseph J.; Lemmon, Gordon; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between protein domains and linear peptides underlie many biological processes. Among these interactions, the recognition of C-terminal peptides by PDZ domains is one of the most ubiquitous. In this work, we present a mathematical model for PDZ domain-peptide interactions capable of predicting both affinity and specificity of binding based on x-ray crystal structures and comparative modeling with Rosetta. We developed our mathematical model using a large phage display dataset describing binding specificity for a wild type PDZ domain and 91 single mutants, as well as binding affinity data for a wild type PDZ domain binding to 28 different peptides. Structural refinement was carried out through several Rosetta protocols, the most accurate of which included flexible peptide docking and several iterations of side chain repacking and backbone minimization. Our findings emphasize the importance of backbone flexibility and the energetic contributions of side chain-side chain hydrogen bonds in accurately predicting interactions. We also determined that predicting PDZ domain-peptide interactions became increasingly challenging as the length of the peptide increased in the N-terminal direction. In the training dataset, predicted binding energies correlated with those derived through calorimetry and specificity switches introduced through single mutations at interface positions were recapitulated. In independent tests, our best performing protocol was capable of predicting dissociation constants well within one order of magnitude of the experimental values and specificity profiles at the level of accuracy of previous studies. To our knowledge, this approach represents the first integrated protocol for predicting both affinity and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions. PMID:24305904

  3. Two distinct domains of protein 4.1 critical for assembly of functional nuclei in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Heald, Rebecca; Lee, Gloria; Nunomura, Wataru; Gimm, J Aura; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2002-11-15

    Protein 4.1R, a multifunctional structural protein, acts as an adaptor in mature red cell membrane skeletons linking spectrin-actin complexes to plasma membrane-associated proteins. In nucleated cells protein 4.1 is not associated exclusively with plasma membrane but is also detected at several important subcellular locations crucial for cell division. To identify 4.1 domains having critical functions in nuclear assembly, 4.1 domain peptides were added to Xenopus egg extract nuclear reconstitution reactions. Morphologically disorganized, replication deficient nuclei assembled when spectrin-actin-binding domain or NuMA-binding C-terminal domain peptides were present. However, control variant spectrin-actin-binding domain peptides incapable of binding actin or mutant C-terminal domain peptides with reduced NuMA binding had no deleterious effects on nuclear reconstitution. To test whether 4.1 is required for proper nuclear assembly, 4.1 isoforms were depleted with spectrin-actin binding or C-terminal domain-specific antibodies. Nuclei assembled in the depleted extracts were deranged. However, nuclear assembly could be rescued by the addition of recombinant 4.1R. Our data establish that protein 4.1 is essential for nuclear assembly and identify two distinct 4.1 domains, initially characterized in cytoskeletal interactions, that have crucial and versatile functions in nuclear assembly. PMID:12171917

  4. Sequence Discrimination by Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of a DNA Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogos, Joseph A.; Hsu, Tien; Bolton, Jesse; Kafatos, Fotis C.

    1992-09-01

    Two major developmentally regulated isoforms of the Drosophila chorion transcription factor CF2 differ by an extra zinc finger within the DNA binding domain. The preferred DNA binding sites were determined and are distinguished by an internal duplication of TAT in the site recognized by the isoform with the extra finger. The results are consistent with modular interactions between zinc fingers and trinucleotides and also suggest rules for recognition of AT-rich DNA sites by zinc finger proteins. The results show how modular finger interactions with trinucleotides can be used, in conjunction with alternative splicing, to alter the binding specificity and increase the spectrum of sites recognized by a DNA binding domain. Thus, CF2 may potentially regulate distinct sets of target genes during development.

  5. Crystal structure of the DNA binding domain of the replication initiation protein E1 from papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Enemark, E J; Chen, G; Vaughn, D E; Stenlund, A; Joshua-Tor, L

    2000-07-01

    Papillomaviral infection causes both benign and malignant lesions and is a necessary cause of cervical carcinoma. Replication of this virus requires the replication initiation proteins E1 and E2, which bind cooperatively at the origin of replication (ori) as an (E1)2-(E2)2-DNA complex. This is a precursor to larger E1 complexes that distort and unwind the ori. We present the crystal structure of the E1 DNA binding domain refined to 1.9 A resolution. Residues critical for DNA binding are located on an extended loop and an alpha helix. We identify the E1 dimerization surface by selective mutations at an E1/E1 interface observed in the crystal and propose a model for the (E1)2-DNA complex. These and other observations suggest how the E1 DNA binding domain orchestrates assembly of the hexameric helicase on the ori. PMID:10949036

  6. ADAR Proteins: Double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barraud, Pierre; Allain, Frédéric H.-T

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine editing within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine is read as a guanine by most cellular processes and therefore these changes create codons for a different amino acid, stop codons or even a new splice-site allowing protein diversity generated from a single gene. We are reviewing here the current structural and molecular knowledge on RNA editing by the ADAR family of protein. We focus especially on two types of nucleic acid binding domains present in ADARs, namely the double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA binding domains. PMID:21728134

  7. Glucoamylase starch-binding domain of Aspergillus niger B1: molecular cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Paldi, Tzur; Levy, Ilan; Shoseyov, Oded

    2003-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are protein domains located within a carbohydrate-active enzyme, with a discrete fold that can be separated from the catalytic domain. Starch-binding domains (SBDs) are CBMs that are usually found at the C-terminus in many amylolytic enzymes. The SBD from Aspergillus niger B1 (CMI CC 324262) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as an independent domain and the recombinant protein was purified on starch. The A. niger B1 SBD was found to be similar to SBD from A. kawachii, A. niger var. awamori and A. shirusami (95-96% identity) and was classified as a member of the CBM family 20. Characterization of SBD binding to starch indicated that it is essentially irreversible and that its affinity to cationic or anionic starch, as well as to potato or corn starch, does not differ significantly. These observations indicate that the fundamental binding area on these starches is essentially the same. Natural and chemically modified starches are among the most useful biopolymers employed in the industry. Our study demonstrates that SBD binds effectively to both anionic and cationic starch. PMID:12646045

  8. Sec1/Munc18 protein Vps33 binds to SNARE domains and the quaternary SNARE complex

    PubMed Central

    Lobingier, Braden T.; Merz, Alexey J.

    2012-01-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins catalyze membrane fusion events in the secretory and endolysosomal systems, and all SNARE-mediated fusion processes require cofactors of the Sec1/Munc18 (SM) family. Vps33 is an SM protein and subunit of the Vps-C complexes HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) and CORVET (class C core vacuole/endosome tethering), which are central regulators of endocytic traffic. Here we present biochemical studies of interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar SNAREs and the HOPS holocomplex or Vps33 alone. HOPS binds the N-terminal Habc domain of the Qa-family SNARE Vam3, but Vps33 is not required for this interaction. Instead, Vps33 binds the SNARE domains of Vam3, Vam7, and Nyv1. Vps33 directly binds vacuolar quaternary SNARE complexes, and the affinity of Vps33 for SNARE complexes is greater than for individual SNAREs. Through targeted mutational analyses, we identify missense mutations of Vps33 that produce a novel set of defects, including cargo missorting and the loss of Vps33-HOPS association. Together these data suggest a working model for membrane docking: HOPS associates with N-terminal domains of Vam3 and Vam7 through Vps33-independent interactions, which are followed by binding of Vps33, the HOPS SM protein, to SNARE domains and finally to the quaternary SNARE complex. Our results also strengthen the hypothesis that SNARE complex binding is a core attribute of SM protein function. PMID:23051737

  9. A Novel Approach to Predict Core Residues on Cancer-Related DNA-Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Protein–DNA interactions are involved in different cancer pathways. In particular, the DNA-binding domains of proteins can determine where and how gene regulatory regions are bound in different cell lines at different stages. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method to predict and locate the core residues on cancer-related DNA-binding domains. In this study, we propose a computational method to predict and locate core residues on DNA-binding domains. In particular, we have selected the cancer-related DNA-binding domains for in-depth studies, namely, winged Helix Turn Helix family, homeodomain family, and basic Helix-Loop-Helix family. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the core residues involved in protein–DNA interactions, as verified by the existing structural data. Given its good performance, various aspects of the method are discussed and explored: for instance, different uses of prediction algorithm, different protein domains, and hotspot threshold setting. PMID:27279732

  10. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    SciTech Connect

    Briers, Yves; Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J.; Hendrix, Jelle; Engelborghs, Yves; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2009-05-29

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBD{sub KZ}), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage {phi}KZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBD{sub KZ} and green fluorescent protein (PBD{sub KZ}-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBD{sub KZ}-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} for the PBD{sub KZ}-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBD{sub KZ}-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  11. A Novel Approach to Predict Core Residues on Cancer-Related DNA-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in different cancer pathways. In particular, the DNA-binding domains of proteins can determine where and how gene regulatory regions are bound in different cell lines at different stages. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method to predict and locate the core residues on cancer-related DNA-binding domains. In this study, we propose a computational method to predict and locate core residues on DNA-binding domains. In particular, we have selected the cancer-related DNA-binding domains for in-depth studies, namely, winged Helix Turn Helix family, homeodomain family, and basic Helix-Loop-Helix family. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the core residues involved in protein-DNA interactions, as verified by the existing structural data. Given its good performance, various aspects of the method are discussed and explored: for instance, different uses of prediction algorithm, different protein domains, and hotspot threshold setting. PMID:27279732

  12. A bistable genetic switch based on designable DNA-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Lebar, Tina; Bezeljak, Urban; Golob, Anja; Jerala, Miha; Kadunc, Lucija; Pirš, Boštjan; Stražar, Martin; Vučko, Dušan; Zupančič, Uroš; Benčina, Mojca; Forstnerič, Vida; Gaber, Rok; Lonzarić, Jan; Majerle, Andreja; Oblak, Alja; Smole, Anže; Jerala, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Bistable switches are fundamental regulatory elements of complex systems, ranging from electronics to living cells. Designed genetic toggle switches have been constructed from pairs of natural transcriptional repressors wired to inhibit one another. The complexity of the engineered regulatory circuits can be increased using orthogonal transcriptional regulators based on designed DNA-binding domains. However, a mutual repressor-based toggle switch comprising DNA-binding domains of transcription-activator-like effectors (TALEs) did not support bistability in mammalian cells. Here, the challenge of engineering a bistable switch based on monomeric DNA-binding domains is solved via the introduction of a positive feedback loop composed of activators based on the same TALE domains as their opposing repressors and competition for the same DNA operator site. This design introduces nonlinearity and results in epigenetic bistability. This principle could be used to employ other monomeric DNA-binding domains such as CRISPR for applications ranging from reprogramming cells to building digital biological memory. PMID:25264186

  13. Evaluation of the Interaction between Phosphohistidine Analogues and Phosphotyrosine Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Tom E; Horner, Katherine A; Webb, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of peptides containing phosphohistidine analogues and their homologues with the prototypical phosphotyrosine binding SH2 domain from the eukaryotic cell signalling protein Grb2 by using a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and a fluorescence anisotropy competition assay. These investigations demonstrated that the triazole class of phosphohistidine analogues are capable of binding too, suggesting that phosphohistidine could potentially be detected by this class of proteins in vivo. PMID:24771713

  14. Interactions between the yeast SM22 homologue Scp1 and actin demonstrate the importance of actin bundling in endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, Dana M; Aghamohammadzadeh, Soheil; Smaczynska-de Rooij, Iwona I; Allwood, Ellen G; Winder, Steve J; Ayscough, Kathryn R

    2008-05-30

    The yeast SM22 homologue Scp1 has previously been shown to act as an actin-bundling protein in vitro. In cells, Scp1 localizes to the cortical actin patches that form as part of the invagination process during endocytosis, and its function overlaps with that of the well characterized yeast fimbrin homologue Sac6p. In this work we have used live cell imaging to demonstrate the importance of key residues in the Scp1 actin interface. We have defined two actin binding domains within Scp1 that allow the protein to both bind and bundle actin without the need for dimerization. Green fluorescent protein-tagged mutants of Scp1 also indicate that actin localization does not require the putative phosphorylation site Ser-185 to be functional. Deletion of SCP1 has few discernable effects on cell growth and morphology. However, we reveal that scp1 deletion is compensated for by up-regulation of Sac6. Furthermore, Scp1 levels are increased in the absence of sac6. The presence of compensatory pathways to up-regulate Sac6 or Scp1 levels in the absence of the other suggest that maintenance of sufficient bundling activity is critical within the cell. Analysis of cortical patch assembly and movement during endocytosis reveals a previously undetected role for Scp1 in movement of patches away from the plasma membrane. Additionally, we observe a dramatic increase in patch lifetime in a strain lacking both sac6 and scp1, demonstrating the central role played by actin-bundling proteins in the endocytic process. PMID:18400761

  15. Calcium binding to calmodulin mutants having domain-specific effects on the regulation of ion channels.

    PubMed

    VanScyoc, Wendy S; Newman, Rhonda A; Sorensen, Brenda R; Shea, Madeline A

    2006-12-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential, eukaryotic protein comprised of two highly homologous domains (N and C). CaM binds four calcium ions cooperatively, regulating a wide array of target proteins. A genetic screen of Paramecia by Kung [Kung, C. et al. (1992) Cell Calcium 13, 413-425] demonstrated that the domains of CaM have separable physiological roles: "under-reactive" mutations affecting calcium-dependent sodium currents mapped to the N-domain, while "over-reactive" mutations affecting calcium-dependent potassium currents localized to the C-domain of CaM. To determine whether and how these mutations affected intrinsic calcium-binding properties of CaM domains, phenylalanine fluorescence was used to monitor calcium binding to sites I and II (N-domain) and tyrosine fluorescence was used to monitor sites III and IV (C-domain). To explore interdomain interactions, binding properties of each full-length mutant were compared to those of its corresponding domain fragments. The calcium-binding properties of six under-reactive mutants (V35I/D50N, G40E, G40E/D50N, D50G, E54K, and G59S) and one over-reactive mutant (M145V) were indistinguishable from those of wild-type CaM, despite their deleterious physiological effects on ion-channel regulation. Four over-reactive mutants (D95G, S101F, E104K, and H135R) significantly decreased the calcium affinity of the C-domain. Of these, one (E104K) also increased the calcium affinity of the N-domain, demonstrating that the magnitude and direction of wild-type interdomain coupling had been perturbed. This suggests that, while some of these mutations alter calcium-binding directly, others probably alter CaM-channel association or calcium-triggered conformational change in the context of a ternary complex with the affected ion channel. PMID:17128970

  16. Structural and functional similarities between the nucleotide-binding domains of CFTR and GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, M R; Welsh, M J

    1995-01-01

    The opening and closing of the CFTR Cl- channel are regulated by ATP hydrolysis at its two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). However, the mechanism and functional significance of ATP hydrolysis are unknown. Sequence similarity between the NBDs of CFTR and GTP-binding proteins suggested the NBDs might have a structure and perhaps a function like that of GTP-binding proteins. Based on this similarity, we predicted that the terminal residue of the LSGGQ motif in the NBDs of CFTR corresponds to a highly conserved glutamine residue in GTP-binding proteins that directly catalyzes the GTPase reaction. Mutations of this residue in NBD1 or NBD2, which were predicted to increase or decrease the rate of hydrolysis, altered the duration of channel closed and open times in a specific manner without altering ion conduction properties or ADP-dependent inhibition. These results suggest that the NBDs of CFTR, and consequently other ABC transporters, may have a structure and a function analogous to those of GTP-binding proteins. We conclude that the rates of ATP hydrolysis at NBD1 and at NBD2 determine the duration of the two states of the channel, closed and open, much as the rate of GTP hydrolysis by GTP-binding proteins determines the duration of their active state. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:8599650

  17. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  18. KIF17 regulates RhoA-dependent actin remodeling at epithelial cell-cell adhesions.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Bipul R; Espenel, Cedric; Libanje, Fotine; Raingeaud, Joel; Morgan, Jessica; Jaulin, Fanny; Kreitzer, Geri

    2016-03-01

    The kinesin KIF17 localizes at microtubule plus-ends where it contributes to regulation of microtubule stabilization and epithelial polarization. We now show that KIF17 localizes at cell-cell adhesions and that KIF17 depletion inhibits accumulation of actin at the apical pole of cells grown in 3D organotypic cultures and alters the distribution of actin and E-cadherin in cells cultured in 2D on solid supports. Overexpression of full-length KIF17 constructs or truncation mutants containing the N-terminal motor domain resulted in accumulation of newly incorporated GFP-actin into junctional actin foci, cleared E-cadherin from cytoplasmic vesicles and stabilized cell-cell adhesions to challenge with calcium depletion. Expression of these KIF17 constructs also increased cellular levels of active RhoA, whereas active RhoA was diminished in KIF17-depleted cells. Inhibition of RhoA or its effector ROCK, or expression of LIMK1 kinase-dead or activated cofilin(S3A) inhibited KIF17-induced junctional actin accumulation. Interestingly, KIF17 activity toward actin depends on the motor domain but is independent of microtubule binding. Together, these data show that KIF17 can modify RhoA-GTPase signaling to influence junctional actin and the stability of the apical junctional complex of epithelial cells. PMID:26759174

  19. A lipid bound actin meshwork organizes liquid phase separation in model membranes

    PubMed Central

    Honigmann, Alf; Sadeghi, Sina; Keller, Jan; Hell, Stefan W; Eggeling, Christian; Vink, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell membrane is connected to a dense actin rich cortex. We present FCS and STED experiments showing that dense membrane bound actin networks have severe influence on lipid phase separation. A minimal actin cortex was bound to a supported lipid bilayer via biotinylated lipid streptavidin complexes (pinning sites). In general, actin binding to ternary membranes prevented macroscopic liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domain formation, even at low temperature. Instead, depending on the type of pinning lipid, an actin correlated multi-domain pattern was observed. FCS measurements revealed hindered diffusion of lipids in the presence of an actin network. To explain our experimental findings, a new simulation model is proposed, in which the membrane composition, the membrane curvature, and the actin pinning sites are all coupled. Our results reveal a mechanism how cells may prevent macroscopic demixing of their membrane components, while at the same time regulate the local membrane composition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01671.001 PMID:24642407

  20. Properties of the DNA-binding domain of the simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    McVey, D; Strauss, M; Gluzman, Y

    1989-01-01

    T antigen (Tag) from simian virus 40 binds specifically to two distinct sites in the viral origin of replication and to single-stranded DNA. Analysis of the protein domain responsible for these activities revealed the following. (i) The C-terminal boundary of the origin-specific and single-strand-specific DNA-binding domain is at or near amino acid 246; furthermore, the maximum of these DNA-binding activities coincides with a narrow C-terminal boundary, spanning 4 amino acids (246 to 249) and declines sharply in proteins with C termini which differ by a few (4 to 10) amino acids; (ii) a polypeptide spanning residues 132 to 246 of Tag is an independent domain responsible for origin-specific DNA binding and presumably for single-stranded DNA binding; and (iii) a comparison of identical N-terminal fragments of Tag purified from mammalian and bacterial cells revealed differential specificity and levels of activity between the two sources of protein. A role for posttranslational modification (phosphorylation) in controlling the DNA-binding activity of Tag is discussed. Images PMID:2555700

  1. Putative binding modes of Ku70-SAP domain with double strand DNA: a molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen; Pluth, Janice M; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-05-01

    The channel structure of the Ku protein elegantly reveals the mechanistic basis of sequence-independent DNA-end binding, which is essential to genome integrity after exposure to ionizing radiation or in V(D)J recombination. However, contradicting evidence indicates that this protein is also involved in the regulation of gene expression and in other regulatory processes with intact chromosomes. This computational study predicts that a putative DNA binding domain of this protein, the SAP domain, can form DNA-bound complexes with relatively high affinities (ΔG ≈ -20 kcal mol(-1)). The binding modes are searched by low frequency vibration modes driven by the fully flexible docking method while binding affinities are calculated by the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. We find this well defined 5 kDa domain with a helix-extended loop-helix structure is suitable to form favorable electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with either the major groove or the minor groove of DNA. The calculation also reveals the sequence specified binding preference which may relate to the observed pause sites when Ku translocates along DNA and the perplex binding of Ku with circular DNA. PMID:21947447

  2. PTP1B-dependent regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling by the actin-binding protein Mena.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shannon K; Ou