Science.gov

Sample records for actin binding proteins

  1. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  2. In Vitro Biochemical Characterization of Cytokinesis Actin-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dennis; Morganthaler, Alisha N; Kovar, David R; Suarez, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the biochemical and biophysical properties of purified proteins is critical to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms that facilitate complicated cellular processes such as cytokinesis. Here we outline in vitro assays to investigate the effects of cytokinesis actin-binding proteins on actin filament dynamics and organization. We describe (1) multicolor single-molecule TIRF microscopy actin assembly assays, (2) "bulk" pyrene actin assembly/disassembly assays, and (3) "bulk" sedimentation actin filament binding and bundling assays.

  3. Actin-binding proteins take the reins in growth cones.

    PubMed

    Pak, Chi W; Flynn, Kevin C; Bamburg, James R

    2008-02-01

    Higher-order actin-based networks (actin superstructures) are important for growth-cone motility and guidance. Principles for generating, organizing and remodelling actin superstructures have emerged from recent findings in cell-free systems, non-neuronal cells and growth cones. This Review examines how actin superstructures are initiated de novo at the leading-edge membrane and how the spontaneous organization of actin superstructures is driven by ensembles of actin-binding proteins. How the regulation of actin-binding proteins can affect growth-cone turning and axonal regeneration is also discussed.

  4. Actin binding proteins, spermatid transport and spermiation*

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M.; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    The transport of germ cells across the seminiferous epithelium is composed of a series of cellular events during the epithelial cycle essential to the completion of spermatogenesis. Without the timely transport of spermatids during spermiogenesis, spermatozoa that are transformed from step 19 spermatids in the rat testis fail to reach the luminal edge of the apical compartment and enter the tubule lumen at spermiation, thereby entering the epididymis for further maturation. Step 19 spermatids and/or sperms that remain in the epithelium will be removed by the Sertoli cell via phagocytosis to form phagosomes and be degraded by lysosomes, leading to subfertility and/or infertility. However, the biology of spermatid transport, in particular the final events that lead to spermiation remain elusive. Based on recent data in the field, we critically evaluate the biology of spermiation herein by focusing on the actin binding proteins (ABPs) that regulate the organization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, which is crucial for spermatid transport during this event. The hypothesis we put forth herein also highlights some specific areas of research that can be pursued by investigators in the years to come. PMID:24735648

  5. Three-dimensional structure of actin filaments and of an actin gel made with actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Niederman, R; Amrein, P C; Hartwig, J

    1983-05-01

    Purified muscle actin and mixtures of actin and actin-binding protein were examined in the transmission electron microscope after fixation, critical point drying, and rotary shadowing. The three-dimensional structure of the protein assemblies was analyzed by a computer-assisted graphic analysis applicable to generalized filament networks. This analysis yielded information concerning the frequency of filament intersections, the filament length between these intersections, the angle at which filaments branch at these intersections, and the concentration of filaments within a defined volume. Purified actin at a concentration of 1 mg/ml assembled into a uniform mass of long filaments which overlap at random angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Actin in the presence of macrophage actin-binding protein assembled into short, straight filaments, organized in a perpendicular branching network. The distance between branch points was inversely related to the molar ratio of actin-binding protein to actin. This distance was what would be predicted if actin filaments grew at right angles off of nucleation sites on the two ends of actin-binding protein dimers, and then annealed. The results suggest that actin in combination with actin-binding protein self-assembles to form a three-dimensional network resembling the peripheral cytoskeleton of motile cells.

  6. An actin cytoskeleton with evolutionarily conserved functions in the absence of canonical actin-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Paredez, Alexander R.; Assaf, Zoe June; Sept, David; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Dawson, Scott C.; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Cande, W. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia intestinalis, a human intestinal parasite and member of what is perhaps the earliest-diverging eukaryotic lineage, contains the most divergent eukaryotic actin identified to date and is the first eukaryote known to lack all canonical actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We sought to investigate the properties and functions of the actin cytoskeleton in Giardia to determine whether Giardia actin (giActin) has reduced or conserved roles in core cellular processes. In vitro polymerization of giActin produced filaments, indicating that this divergent actin is a true filament-forming actin. We generated an anti-giActin antibody to localize giActin throughout the cell cycle. GiActin localized to the cortex, nuclei, internal axonemes, and formed C-shaped filaments along the anterior of the cell and a flagella-bundling helix. These structures were regulated with the cell cycle and in encysting cells giActin was recruited to the Golgi-like cyst wall processing vesicles. Knockdown of giActin demonstrated that giActin functions in cell morphogenesis, membrane trafficking, and cytokinesis. Additionally, Giardia contains a single G protein, giRac, which affects the Giardia actin cytoskeleton independently of known target ABPs. These results imply that there exist ancestral and perhaps conserved roles for actin in core cellular processes that are independent of canonical ABPs. Of medical significance, the divergent giActin cytoskeleton is essential and commonly used actin-disrupting drugs do not depolymerize giActin structures. Therefore, the giActin cytoskeleton is a promising drug target for treating giardiasis, as we predict drugs that interfere with the Giardia actin cytoskeleton will not affect the mammalian host. PMID:21444821

  7. An actin cytoskeleton with evolutionarily conserved functions in the absence of canonical actin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Paredez, Alexander R; Assaf, Zoe June; Sept, David; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Dawson, Scott C; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Cande, W Z

    2011-04-12

    Giardia intestinalis, a human intestinal parasite and member of what is perhaps the earliest-diverging eukaryotic lineage, contains the most divergent eukaryotic actin identified to date and is the first eukaryote known to lack all canonical actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We sought to investigate the properties and functions of the actin cytoskeleton in Giardia to determine whether Giardia actin (giActin) has reduced or conserved roles in core cellular processes. In vitro polymerization of giActin produced filaments, indicating that this divergent actin is a true filament-forming actin. We generated an anti-giActin antibody to localize giActin throughout the cell cycle. GiActin localized to the cortex, nuclei, internal axonemes, and formed C-shaped filaments along the anterior of the cell and a flagella-bundling helix. These structures were regulated with the cell cycle and in encysting cells giActin was recruited to the Golgi-like cyst wall processing vesicles. Knockdown of giActin demonstrated that giActin functions in cell morphogenesis, membrane trafficking, and cytokinesis. Additionally, Giardia contains a single G protein, giRac, which affects the Giardia actin cytoskeleton independently of known target ABPs. These results imply that there exist ancestral and perhaps conserved roles for actin in core cellular processes that are independent of canonical ABPs. Of medical significance, the divergent giActin cytoskeleton is essential and commonly used actin-disrupting drugs do not depolymerize giActin structures. Therefore, the giActin cytoskeleton is a promising drug target for treating giardiasis, as we predict drugs that interfere with the Giardia actin cytoskeleton will not affect the mammalian host.

  8. Unconventional actins and actin-binding proteins in human protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Gupta, C M; Thiyagarajan, S; Sahasrabuddhe, A A

    2015-06-01

    Actin and its regulatory proteins play a key role in several essential cellular processes such as cell movement, intracellular trafficking and cytokinesis in most eukaryotes. While these proteins are highly conserved in higher eukaryotes, a number of unicellular eukaryotic organisms contain divergent forms of these proteins which have highly unusual biochemical and structural properties. Here, we review the biochemical and structural properties of these unconventional actins and their core binding proteins which are present in commonly occurring human protozoan parasites.

  9. Resemblance of actin-binding protein/actin gels to covalently crosslinked networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janmey, Paul A.; Hvidt, Søren; Lamb, Jennifer; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1990-05-01

    THE maintainance of the shape of cells is often due to their surface elasticity, which arises mainly from an actin-rich cytoplasmic cortex1,2. On locomotion, phagocytosis or fission, however, these cells become partially fluid-like. The finding of proteins that can bind to actin and control the assembly of, or crosslink, actin filaments, and of intracellular messages that regulate the activities of some of these actin-binding proteins, indicates that such 'gel sol' transformations result from the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich networks3. Alternatively, on the basis of a study of the mechanical properties of mixtures of actin filaments and an Acanthamoeba actin-binding protein, α-actinin, it has been proposed that these transformations can be accounted for by rapid exchange of crosslinks between actin filaments4: the cortical network would be solid when the deformation rate is greater than the rate of crosslink exchange, but would deform or 'creep' when deformation is slow enough to permit crosslinker molecules to rearrange. Here we report, however, that mixtures of actin filaments and actin-binding protein (ABP), an actin crosslinking protein of many higher eukaryotes, form gels Theologically equivalent to covalently crosslinked networks. These gels do not creep in response to applied stress on a time scale compatible with most cell-surface movements. These findings support a more complex and controlled mechanism underlying the dynamic mechanical properties of cortical cytoplasm, and can explain why cells do not collapse under the constant shear forces that often exist in tissues.

  10. Time-resolved studies of actin organization by multivalent ions and actin-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Purdy, Kirstin; Bartles, James R.; Chee Lai Wong, Gerard

    2007-03-01

    Actin is one of the principal components in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton, the architecture of which is highly regulated for a wide range of biological functions. In the presence of multivalent salts or actin-binding proteins, it is known that F-actin can organize into bundles or networks. In this work, we use time-resolved confocal microscopy to study the dynamics of actin bundle growth induced by multivalent ions and by espin, a prototypical actin binding protein that is known to induce bundles. For divalent ion induced bundles, we observe a rapid lateral saturation followed by longitudinal growth of bundles, in sharp contrast to the bundling mechanism of espin, which favors finite length bundles.

  11. Control of nuclear organization by F-actin binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, Karin; Jayo, Asier; Parsons, Maddy

    2017-03-04

    The regulation of nuclear shape and deformability is a key factor in controlling diverse events from embryonic development to cancer cell metastasis, but the mechanisms governing this process are still unclear. Our recent study demonstrated an unexpected role for the F-actin bundling protein fascin in controlling nuclear plasticity through a direct interaction with Nesprin-2. Nesprin-2 is a component of the LINC complex that is known to couple the F-actin cytoskeleton to the nuclear envelope. We demonstrated that fascin, which is predominantly associated with peripheral F-actin rich filopodia, binds directly to Nesprin-2 at the nuclear envelope in a range of cell types. Depleting fascin or specifically blocking the fascin-Nesprin-2 complex leads to defects in nuclear polarization, movement and cell invasion. These studies reveal a novel role for an F-actin bundling protein in control of nuclear plasticity and underline the importance of defining nuclear-associated roles for F-actin binding proteins in future.

  12. Identification of Actin-Binding Proteins from Maize Pollen

    SciTech Connect

    Staiger, C.J.

    2004-01-13

    Specific Aims--The goal of this project was to gain an understanding of how actin filament organization and dynamics are controlled in flowering plants. Specifically, we proposed to identify unique proteins with novel functions by investigating biochemical strategies for the isolation and characterization of actin-binding proteins (ABPs). In particular, our hunt was designed to identify capping proteins and nucleation factors. The specific aims included: (1) to use F-actin affinity chromatography (FAAC) as a general strategy to isolate pollen ABPs (2) to produce polyclonal antisera and perform subcellular localization in pollen tubes (3) to isolate cDNA clones for the most promising ABPs (4) to further purify and characterize ABP interactions with actin in vitro. Summary of Progress By employing affinity chromatography on F-actin or DNase I columns, we have identified at least two novel ABPs from pollen, PrABP80 (gelsolin-like) and ZmABP30, We have also cloned and expressed recombinant protein, as well as generated polyclonal antisera, for 6 interesting ABPs from Arabidopsis (fimbrin AtFIM1, capping protein a/b (AtCP), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (AtCAP), AtCapG & AtVLN1). We performed quantitative analyses of the biochemical properties for two of these previously uncharacterized ABPs (fimbrin and capping protein). Our studies provide the first evidence for fimbrin activity in plants, demonstrate the existence of barbed-end capping factors and a gelsolin-like severing activity, and provide the quantitative data necessary to establish and test models of F-actin organization and dynamics in plant cells.

  13. Endothelial actin-binding proteins and actin dynamics in leukocyte transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Schnoor, Michael

    2015-04-15

    The endothelium is the first barrier that leukocytes have to overcome during recruitment to sites of inflamed tissues. The leukocyte extravasation cascade is a complex multistep process that requires the activation of various adhesion molecules and signaling pathways, as well as actin remodeling, in both leukocytes and endothelial cells. Endothelial adhesion molecules, such as E-selectin or ICAM-1, are connected to the actin cytoskeleton via actin-binding proteins (ABPs). Although the contribution of receptor-ligand interactions to leukocyte extravasation has been studied extensively, the contribution of endothelial ABPs to the regulation of leukocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration remains poorly understood. This review focuses on recently published evidence that endothelial ABPs, such as cortactin, myosin, or α-actinin, regulate leukocyte extravasation by controlling actin dynamics, biomechanical properties of endothelia, and signaling pathways, such as GTPase activation, during inflammation. Thus, ABPs may serve as targets for novel treatment strategies for disorders characterized by excessive leukocyte recruitment.

  14. Actin-binding proteins sensitively mediate F-actin bundle stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claessens, Mireille M. A. E.; Bathe, Mark; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2006-09-01

    Bundles of filamentous actin (F-actin) form primary structural components of a broad range of cytoskeletal processes including filopodia, sensory hair cell bristles and microvilli. Actin-binding proteins (ABPs) allow the cell to tailor the dimensions and mechanical properties of the bundles to suit specific biological functions. Therefore, it is important to obtain quantitative knowledge on the effect of ABPs on the mechanical properties of F-actin bundles. Here we measure the bending stiffness of F-actin bundles crosslinked by three ABPs that are ubiquitous in eukaryotes. We observe distinct regimes of bundle bending stiffness that differ by orders of magnitude depending on ABP type, concentration and bundle size. The behaviour observed experimentally is reproduced quantitatively by a molecular-based mechanical model in which ABP shearing competes with F-actin extension/compression. Our results shed new light on the biomechanical function of ABPs and demonstrate how single-molecule properties determine mesoscopic behaviour. The bending mechanics of F-actin fibre bundles are general and have implications for cytoskeletal mechanics and for the rational design of functional materials.

  15. Coactosin-like protein, a human F-actin-binding protein: critical role of lysine-75.

    PubMed Central

    Provost, P; Doucet, J; Stock, A; Gerisch, G; Samuelsson, B; Rådmark, O

    2001-01-01

    Coactosin-like protein (CLP) was recently identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen using 5-lipoxygenase as bait. In the present study, we report the functional characterization of CLP as a human filamentous actin (F-actin)-binding protein. CLP mRNA shows a wide tissue distribution and is predominantly expressed in placenta, lung, kidney and peripheral-blood leucocytes. Endogenous CLP is localized in the cytosol of myeloid cells. Using a two-hybrid approach, actin was identified as a CLP-interacting protein. Binding experiments indicated that CLP associates with F-actin, but does not form a stable complex with globular actin. In transfected mammalian cells, CLP co-localized with actin stress fibres. CLP bound to actin filaments with a stoichiometry of 1:2 (CLP: actin subunits), but could be cross-linked to only one subunit of actin. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed the involvement of Lys(75) of CLP in actin binding, a residue highly conserved in related proteins and supposed to be exposed on the surface of the CLP protein. Our results identify CLP as a new human protein that binds F-actin in vitro and in vivo, and indicate that Lys(75) is essential for this interaction. PMID:11583571

  16. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  17. A statistical model of protein binding in parallel actin bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Homin; Grason, Gregory; Purdy Drew, Kirstin; Wong, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    We propose a coarse-grained lattice model of cross-linking proteins in parallel actin bundles. Based on this model that captures the interplay between geometrical frustration of binding and the intrinsic flexibility of filaments and linkers, we predict a unique regular ground-state structure of fully cross-linked bundles. We also discuss the linker-dependent thermodynamic transition of actin filaments from their native state to the overtwisted state and map out the ``twist-state'' phase diagram in terms of linker flexibility as well as the chemical potential. A flexible linker regime exhibits a continuous spectrum of intermediate twist states, while a stiff linker regime only allows for untwisted actin filaments and fully overtwisted bundles. Our predictions compare well with small-angle scattering studies of bundles formed in the presence of two types of reconstituted cross-linking proteins, fascin and espin. Additionally, this study reveals how subtle differences in crosslinking agents themselves may be used by cells to achieve self-organized bundles with dramatically different properties.

  18. Nuclear actin-binding proteins as modulators of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Gettemans, Jan; Van Impe, Katrien; Delanote, Veerle; Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joël; De Corte, Veerle

    2005-10-01

    Dynamic transformations in the organization of the cellular microfilament system are the driving force behind fundamental biological processes such as cellular motility, cytokinesis, wound healing and secretion. Eukaryotic cells express a plethora of actin-binding proteins (ABPs) allowing cells to control the organization of the actin cytoskeleton in a flexible manner. These structural proteins were, not surprisingly, originally described as (major) constituents of the cytoplasm. However, in recent years, there has been a steady flow of reports detailing not only translocation of ABPs into and out of the nucleus but also describing their role in the nuclear compartment. This review focuses on recent developments pertaining to nucleocytoplasmic transport of ABPs, including their mode of translocation and nuclear function. In particular, evidence that structurally and functionally unrelated cytoplasmic ABPs regulate transcription activation by various nuclear (steroid hormone) receptors is steadily accruing. Furthermore, the recent finding that actin is a necessary component of the RNA polymerase II-containing preinitiation complex opens up new opportunities for nuclear ABPs in gene transcription regulation.

  19. Moesin, ezrin, and p205 are actin-binding proteins associated with neutrophil plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Pestonjamasp, K; Amieva, M R; Strassel, C P; Nauseef, W M; Furthmayr, H; Luna, E J

    1995-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins in bovine neutrophil plasma membranes were identified using blot overlays with 125I-labeled F-actin. Along with surface-biotinylated proteins, membranes were enriched in major actin-binding polypeptides of 78, 81, and 205 kDa. Binding was specific for F-actin because G-actin did not bind. Further, unlabeled F-actin blocked the binding of 125I-labeled F-actin whereas other acidic biopolymers were relatively ineffective. Binding also was specifically inhibited by myosin subfragment 1, but not by CapZ or plasma gelsolin, suggesting that the membrane proteins, like myosin, bind along the sides of the actin filaments. The 78- and 81-kDa polypeptides were identified as moesin and ezrin, respectively, by co-migration on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation with antibodies specific for moesin and ezrin. Although not present in detectable amounts in bovine neutrophils, radixin (a third and closely related member of this gene family) also bound 125I-labeled F-actin on blot overlays. Experiments with full-length and truncated bacterial fusion proteins localized the actin-binding site in moesin to the extreme carboxy terminus, a highly conserved sequence. Immunofluorescence micrographs of permeabilized cells and cell "footprints" showed moesin co-localization with actin at the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane, consistent with a role as a membrane-actin-linking protein. Images PMID:7612961

  20. Use of a fusion protein between GFP and an actin-binding domain to visualize transient filamentous-actin structures.

    PubMed

    Pang, K M; Lee, E; Knecht, D A

    1998-03-26

    Many important processes in eukaryotic cells involve changes in the quantity, location and the organization of actin filaments [1] [2] [3]. We have been able to visualize these changes in live cells using a fusion protein (GFP-ABD) comprising the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria and the 25 kDa highly conserved actin-binding domain (ABD) from the amino terminus of the actin cross-linking protein ABP-120 [4]. In live cells of the soil amoeba Dictyostelium that were expressing GFP-ABD, the three-dimensional architecture of the actin cortex was clearly visualized. The pattern of GFP-ABD fluorescence in these cells coincided with that of rhodamine-phalloidin, indicating that GFP-ABD specifically binds filamentous (F) actin. On the ventral surface of non-polarized vegetative cells, a broad ring of F actin periodically assembled and contracted, whereas in polarized cells there were transient punctate F-actin structures; cells cycled between the polarized and non-polarized morphologies. During the formation of pseudopods, an increase in fluorescence intensity coincided with the initial outward deformation of the membrane. This is consistent with the models of pseudopod extension that predict an increase in the local density of actin filaments. In conclusion, GFP-ABD specifically binds F actin and allows the visualization of F-actin dynamics and cellular behavior simultaneously.

  1. Identification of actin binding protein, ABP-280, as a binding partner of human Lnk adaptor protein.

    PubMed

    He, X; Li, Y; Schembri-King, J; Jakes, S; Hayashi, J

    2000-08-01

    Human Lnk (hLnk) is an adaptor protein with multiple functional domains that regulates T cell activation signaling. In order to identify cellular Lnk binding partners, a yeast two-hybrid screening of human spleen cDNA library was carried out using human hLnk as bait. A polypeptide sequence identical to the C-terminal segment of the actin binding protein (ABP-280) was identified as a hLnk binding protein. The expressed hLnk and the FLAG tagged C-terminal 673 amino acid residues of ABP-280 or the endogenous ABP-280 in COS-7 cells could be co-immunoprecipitated using antibodies either to hLnk, FLAG or ABP-280, respectively. Furthermore, immunofluorescence confocal microscope showed that hLnk and ABP-280 co-localized at the plasma membrane and at juxtanuclear region of COS-7 cells. In Jurkat cells, the endogenous hLnk also associates with the endogenous ABP-280 indicating that the association of these two proteins is physiological. The interacting domains of both proteins were mapped using yeast two-hybrid assays. Our results indicate that hLnk binds to the residues 2006-2454 (repeats 19-23C) of ABP-280. The domain in hLnk that associates with ABP-280 was mapped to an interdomain region of 56 amino acids between pleckstrin homology and Src homology 2 domains. These results suggest that hLnk may exert its regulatory role through its association with ABP-280.

  2. An actin-binding protein, LlLIM1, mediates calcium and hydrogen regulation of actin dynamics in pollen tubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huei-Jing; Wan, Ai-Ru; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2008-08-01

    Actin microfilaments are crucial for polar cell tip growth, and their configurations and dynamics are regulated by the actions of various actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We explored the function of a lily (Lilium longiflorum) pollen-enriched LIM domain-containing protein, LlLIM1, in regulating the actin dynamics in elongating pollen tube. Cytological and biochemical assays verified LlLIM1 functioning as an ABP, promoting filamentous actin (F-actin) bundle assembly and protecting F-actin against latrunculin B-mediated depolymerization. Overexpressed LlLIM1 significantly disturbed pollen tube growth and morphology, with multiple tubes protruding from one pollen grain and coaggregation of FM4-64-labeled vesicles and Golgi apparatuses at the subapex of the tube tip. Moderate expression of LlLIM1 induced an oscillatory formation of asterisk-shaped F-actin aggregates that oscillated with growth period but in different phases at the subapical region. These results suggest that the formation of LlLIM1-mediated overstabilized F-actin bundles interfered with endomembrane trafficking to result in growth retardation. Cosedimentation assays revealed that the binding affinity of LlLIM1 to F-actin was simultaneously regulated by both pH and Ca(2+): LlLIM1 showed a preference for F-actin binding under low pH and low Ca(2+) concentration. The potential functions of LlLIM1 as an ABP sensitive to pH and calcium in integrating endomembrane trafficking, oscillatory pH, and calcium circumstances to regulate tip-focused pollen tube growth are discussed.

  3. Holding back the microfilament--structural insights into actin and the actin-monomer-binding proteins of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Olshina, Maya A; Wong, Wilson; Baum, Jake

    2012-05-01

    Parasites from the phylum Apicomplexa are responsible for several major diseases of man, including malaria and toxoplasmosis. These highly motile protozoa use a conserved actomyosin-based mode of movement to power tissue traversal and host cell invasion. The mode termed as 'gliding motility' relies on the dynamic turnover of actin, whose polymerisation state is controlled by a markedly limited number of identifiable regulators when compared with other eukaryotic cells. Recent studies of apicomplexan actin regulator structure-in particular those of the core triad of monomer-binding proteins, actin-depolymerising factor/cofilin, cyclase-associated protein/Srv2, and profilin-have provided new insights into possible mechanisms of actin regulation in parasite cells, highlighting divergent structural features and functions to regulators from other cellular systems. Furthermore, the unusual nature of apicomplexan actin itself is increasingly coming into the spotlight. Here, we review recent advances in understanding of the structure and function of actin and its regulators in apicomplexan parasites. In particular we explore the paradox between there being an abundance of unpolymerised actin, its having a seemingly increased potential to form filaments relative to vertebrate actin, and the apparent lack of visible, stable filaments in parasite cells.

  4. A new Tetrahymena actin-binding protein is localized in the division furrow.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, A; Kurasawa, Y; Watanabe, Y; Numata, O

    1998-04-01

    Using an F-actin affinity column, a 60 kDa fragment of a 71 kDa F-actin-binding protein was partially purified from Tetrahymena pyriformis. After digestion of the 60 kDa fragment with cyanogen bromide, the N-terminal 21-amino acid sequence of one of the resulting peptides was found to show sequence similarity to a region near the actin-binding site (amino acid residues 260-281) of yeast fimbrin. An antibody prepared against a synthesized 21-mer oligopeptide reacted with the 71 kDa proteins in T. pyriformis and T. thermophila cell extracts, suggesting that the 60 kDa fragment was produced from the 71 kDa protein through partial digestion occurring during isolation. The 60 kDa fragment bound to Tetrahymena F-actin as well as to rabbit skeletal muscle F-actin, and induced the bundling of Tetrahymena F-actin. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed colocalization of the 71 kDa protein and actin in the oral apparatus and the deep fiber bundles in T. pyriformis. On the other hand, in T. thermophila, the 71 kDa protein was localized in the oral apparatus and the contractile vacuole pores during the interphase. During cytokinesis, the 71 kDa protein was localized in the division furrow. Therefore, the 71 kDa protein seems to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, and to regulate the actin filament organization during phagocytosis and cytokinesis in Tetrahymena.

  5. An antifungal protein from Ginkgo biloba binds actin and can trigger cell death.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ningning; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Mühlhäuser, Philipp; Liu, Qiong; Riemann, Michael; Ulrich, Anne S; Nick, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Ginkbilobin is a short antifungal protein that had been purified and cloned from the seeds of the living fossil Ginkgo biloba. Homologues of this protein can be detected in all seed plants and the heterosporic fern Selaginella and are conserved with respect to domain structures, peptide motifs, and specific cysteine signatures. To get insight into the cellular functions of these conserved motifs, we expressed green fluorescent protein fusions of full-length and truncated ginkbilobin in tobacco BY-2 cells. We show that the signal peptide confers efficient secretion of ginkbilobin. When this signal peptide is either cleaved or masked, ginkbilobin binds and visualizes the actin cytoskeleton. This actin-binding activity of ginkbilobin is mediated by a specific subdomain just downstream of the signal peptide, and this subdomain can also coassemble with actin in vitro. Upon stable overexpression of this domain, we observe a specific delay in premitotic nuclear positioning indicative of a reduced dynamicity of actin. To elucidate the cellular response to the binding of this subdomain to actin, we use chemical engineering based on synthetic peptides comprising different parts of the actin-binding subdomain conjugated with the cell-penetrating peptide BP100 and with rhodamine B as a fluorescent reporter. Binding of this synthetic construct to actin efficiently induces programmed cell death. We discuss these findings in terms of a working model, where ginkbilobin can activate actin-dependent cell death.

  6. Isolation of an actin-binding protein from membranes of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We prepared a probe of radiolabeled, glutaraldehyde cross-linked filamentous actin (F-actin) to study binding of actin to membranes of Dictyostelium discoideum. The probe bound to membranes or detergent extracts of membranes with a high affinity and in a saturable manner. The binding could be reduced by boiling of either the actin probe or the membranes, or by addition of excess native F-actin, but not by addition of an equivalent amount of bovine serum albumin, to the assay. The probe labeled several proteins when used to overlay sodium dodecyl sulfate gels of Dictyostelium membranes. One of these labeled proteins was a 24,000-mol-wt protein (p24), which was soluble only in the presence of a high concentration of sodium deoxycholate (5%, wt/vol) at room temperature or above. The p24 was purified by selective detergent extraction and column chromatography. When tested in a novel two-phase binding assay, p24 bound both native monomeric actin (G-actin) and F- actin in a specific manner. In this assay, G-actin bound p24 with a submicromolar affinity. PMID:3972891

  7. Game of Zones: how actin-binding proteins organize muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Klopfenstein, Dieter R.; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Locomotion of C. elegans requires coordinated, efficient transmission of forces generated on the molecular scale by myosin and actin filaments in myocytes to dense bodies and the hypodermis and cuticle enveloping body wall muscles. The complex organization of the acto-myosin scaffold with its accessory proteins provides a fine-tuned machinery regulated by effectors that guarantees that sarcomere units undergo controlled, reversible cycles of contraction and relaxation. Actin filaments in sarcomeres dynamically undergo polymerization and depolymerization. In a recent study, the actin-binding protein DBN-1, the C. elegans ortholog of human drebrin and drebrin-like proteins, was discovered to stabilize actin in muscle cells. DBN-1 reversibly changes location between actin filaments and myosin-rich regions during muscle contraction. Mutations in DBN-1 result in mislocalization of other actin-binding proteins. Here we discuss implications of this finding for the regulation of sarcomere actin stability and the organization of other actin-binding proteins. PMID:27383012

  8. Interactions of actin, myosin, and a new actin-binding protein of rabbit pulmonary macrophages. II. Role in cytoplasmic movement and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Stossel, T P; Hartwig, J H

    1976-03-01

    Actin and myosin of rabbit pulmonary macrophages are influenced by two other proteins. A protein cofactor is required for the actin activation of macrophage myosin Mg2 ATPase activity, and a high molecular weight actin-binding protein aggregates actin filaments (Stossel T.P., and J.H. Hartwig. 1975. J. Biol. Chem. 250:5706-5711)9 When warmed in 0.34 M sucrose solution containing Mg2-ATP and dithiothreitol, these four proteins interact cooperatively. Acin-binding protein in the presence of actin causes the actin to form a gel, which liquifies when cooled. The myosin contracts the gel into an aggregate, and the rate of aggregation is accelerated by the cofactor. Therefore, we believe that these four proteins also effec the temperature-dependent gelation and aggregation of crude sucrose extracts pulmonary macrophages containing Mg2-ATP and dithiothreitol. The gelled extracts are composed of tangled filaments. Relative to homogenates of resting macrophages, the distribution of actin-binding protein in homogenates of phagocytizing macrophages is altered such that 2-6 times more actin-binding protein is soluble. Sucrose extracts of phagocytizing macrophages gel more rapidly than extracts of resting macrophages. Phagocytosis by pulmonary macrophages involves the formation of peripheral pseudopods containing filaments. The findings suggest that the actin-binding protein initiates a cooperative interaction of contractile proteins to generate cytoplasmic gelation, and that phagocytosis influences the behavior of the actin-binding protein.

  9. Inhibition of tobacco mosaic virus movement by expression of an actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Christina; Niehl, Annette; Sambade, Adrian; Steinmetz, André; Heinlein, Manfred

    2009-04-01

    The tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) required for the cell-to-cell spread of viral RNA interacts with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as with the cytoskeleton during infection. Whereas associations of MP with ER and microtubules have been intensely investigated, research on the role of actin has been rather scarce. We demonstrate that Nicotiana benthamiana plants transgenic for the actin-binding domain 2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin (AtFIM1) fused to green fluorescent protein (ABD2:GFP) exhibit a dynamic ABD2:GFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton and myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking. These plants also support the movement of TMV. In contrast, both myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking and TMV movement are dominantly inhibited when ABD2:GFP is expressed transiently. Inhibition is mediated through binding of ABD2:GFP to actin filaments, since TMV movement is restored upon disruption of the ABD2:GFP-labeled actin network with latrunculin B. Latrunculin B shows no significant effect on the spread of TMV infection in either wild-type plants or ABD2:GFP transgenic plants under our treatment conditions. We did not observe any binding of MP along the length of actin filaments. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that TMV movement does not require an intact actomyosin system. Nevertheless, actin-binding proteins appear to have the potential to exert control over TMV movement through the inhibition of myosin-associated protein trafficking along the ER membrane.

  10. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C decorates F-actin: Implications for cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Andrew E.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Harris, Samantha P.; Trewhella, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is an accessory protein of striated muscle sarcomeres that is vital for maintaining regular heart function. Its 4 N-terminal regulatory domains, C0-C1-m-C2 (C0C2), influence actin and myosin interactions, the basic contractile proteins of muscle. Using neutron contrast variation data, we have determined that C0C2 forms a repeating assembly with filamentous actin, where the C0 and C1 domains of C0C2 attach near the DNase I-binding loop and subdomain 1 of adjacent actin monomers. Direct interactions between the N terminus of cMyBP-C and actin thereby provide a mechanism to modulate the contractile cycle by affecting the regulatory state of the thin filament and its ability to interact with myosin. PMID:19011110

  11. Binding of a C-terminal fragment (residues 369 to 435) of vitamin D-binding protein to actin.

    PubMed

    Buch, Stefan; Gremm, Dagmar; Wegner, Albrecht; Mannherz, Hans Georg

    2002-10-01

    The vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) binds to monomeric actin with high affinity. The variation in DBP isoforms is due to genetic polymorphism and varying glycosylation. To obtain a homogeneous preparation, the cDNA for human DBP and truncations thereof were cloned and various systems were applied for heterologous bacterial and yeast expression. The full-length protein and the N- and C-terminal halves of DBP remained insoluble probably because the protein did not fold to its native three-dimensional structure due to formation of accidental intra- and inter-molecular disulfide bonds during expression in bacteria or yeast. This problem was overcome by cloning of a C-terminal fragment comprising residues 369 to 435 that did not contain disulfide bonds and was completely soluble. Binding of the C-terminal fragment to monomeric actin was demonstrated by comigration with actin during native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance, however, at considerably lower affinity than full-length DBP. This suggests that in addition to the C-terminal amino acid sequence other parts (amino acid residues or sugar moieties) of DBP participate in actin binding. The C-terminal fragment was found to inhibit denaturation of actin and to decrease the rate of actin polymerisation both at the barbed and at the pointed end in a concentration-dependent manner. According to a quantitative analysis of the polymerisation kinetics, association of actin monomers to nucleate filaments was not prevented by binding of the C-terminal fragment to actin. These data suggest that the sites on the surface of actin that are involved in actin nucleation and elongation are different.

  12. Actin-Binding Protein Requirement for Cortical Stability and Efficient Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, C. Casey; Gorlin, Jed B.; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Hartwig, John H.; Janmey, Paul A.; Randolph Byers, H.; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1992-01-01

    Three unrelated tumor cell lines derived from human malignant melanomas lack actin-binding protein (ABP), which cross-links actin filaments in vitro and connects these filaments to plasma membrane glycoproteins. The ABP-deficient cells have impaired locomotion and display circumferential blebbing of the plasma membrane. Expression of ABP in one of the lines after transfection restored translocational motility and reduced membrane blebbing. These findings establish that ABP functions to stabilize cortical actin in vivo and is required for efficient cell locomotion.

  13. Isolation and partial characterization of a 110-kD dimer actin-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Two Triton-insoluble fractions were isolated from Acanthamoeba castellanii. The major non-membrane proteins in both fractions were actin (30-40%), myosin II (4-9%), myosin I (1-5%), and a 55-kD polypeptide (10%). The 55-kD polypeptide did not react with antibodies against tubulins from turkey brain, paramecium, or yeast. All of these proteins were much more concentrated in the Triton-insoluble fractions than in the whole homogenate or soluble supernatant. The 55-kD polypeptide was extracted with 0.3 M NaCl, fractionated by ammonium sulfate, and purified to near homogeneity by DEAE-cellulose and hydroxyapatite chromatography. The purified protein had a molecular mass of 110 kD and appeared to be a homodimer by isoelectric focusing. The 110-kD dimer bound to F-actin with a maximal binding stoichiometry of 0.5 mol/mol of actin (1 mol of 55-kD subunit/mol of actin). Although the 110-kD protein enhanced the sedimentation of F-actin, it did not affect the low shear viscosity of F-actin solutions nor was bundling of F-actin observed by electron microscopy. The 110-kD dimer protein inhibited the actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activities of Acanthamoeba myosin I and myosin II in a concentration-dependent manner. By indirect immunofluorescence, the 110-kD protein was found to be localized in the peripheral cytoplasm near the plasma membrane which is also enriched in F-actin filaments and myosin I. PMID:2942552

  14. Actin-binding proteins implicated in the formation of the punctate actin foci stimulated by the self-incompatibility response in Papaver.

    PubMed

    Poulter, Natalie S; Staiger, Christopher J; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2010-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key target for signaling networks and plays a central role in translating signals into cellular responses in eukaryotic cells. Self-incompatibility (SI) is an important mechanism responsible for preventing self-fertilization. The SI system of Papaver rhoeas pollen involves a Ca(2+)-dependent signaling network, including massive actin depolymerization as one of the earliest cellular responses, followed by the formation of large actin foci. However, no analysis of these structures, which appear to be aggregates of filamentous (F-)actin based on phalloidin staining, has been carried out to date. Here, we characterize and quantify the formation of F-actin foci in incompatible Papaver pollen tubes over time. The F-actin foci increase in size over time, and we provide evidence that their formation requires actin polymerization. Once formed, these SI-induced structures are unusually stable, being resistant to treatments with latrunculin B. Furthermore, their formation is associated with changes in the intracellular localization of two actin-binding proteins, cyclase-associated protein and actin-depolymerizing factor. Two other regulators of actin dynamics, profilin and fimbrin, do not associate with the F-actin foci. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first insights into the actin-binding proteins and mechanisms involved in the formation of these intriguing structures, which appear to be actively formed during the SI response.

  15. Regulation of blood-testis barrier by actin binding proteins and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is an important ultrastructure in the testis since the onset of spermatogenesis coincides with the establishment of a functional barrier in rodents and humans. It is also noted that a delay in the assembly of a functional BTB following treatment of neonatal rats with drugs such as diethylstilbestrol or adjudin also delays the first wave of spermiation. While the BTB is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers, it undergoes extensive remodeling, in particular at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones across the immunological barrier. Without this timely transport of preleptotene spermatocytes derived from type B spermatogonia, meiosis will be arrested, causing aspermatogenesis. Yet the biology and regulation of the BTB remains largely unexplored since the morphological studies in the 1970s. Recent studies, however, have shed new light on the biology of the BTB. Herein, we critically evaluate some of these findings, illustrating that the Sertoli cell BTB is regulated by actin binding proteins (ABPs), likely supported by non-receptor protein kinases, to modulate the organization of actin microfilament bundles at the site. Furthermore, microtubule (MT)-based cytoskeleton is also working in concert with the actin-based cytoskeleton to confer BTB dynamics. This timely review provides an update on the unique biology and regulation of the BTB based on the latest findings in the field, focusing on the role of ABPs and non-receptor protein kinases. PMID:26628556

  16. Regulation of blood-testis barrier by actin binding proteins and protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Tang, Elizabeth I; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-03-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is an important ultrastructure in the testis, since the onset of meiosis and spermiogenesis coincides with the establishment of a functional barrier in rodents and humans. It is also noted that a delay in the assembly of a functional BTB following treatment of neonatal rats with drugs such as diethylstilbestrol or adjudin also delays the first wave of spermiation. While the BTB is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers, it undergoes extensive remodeling, in particular, at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones across the immunological barrier. Without this timely transport of preleptotene spermatocytes derived from type B spermatogonia, meiosis will be arrested, causing aspermatogenesis. Yet the biology and regulation of the BTB remains largely unexplored since the morphological studies in the 1970s. Recent studies, however, have shed new light on the biology of the BTB. Herein, we critically evaluate some of these findings, illustrating that the Sertoli cell BTB is regulated by actin-binding proteins (ABPs), likely supported by non-receptor protein kinases, to modulate the organization of actin microfilament bundles at the site. Furthermore, microtubule-based cytoskeleton is also working in concert with the actin-based cytoskeleton to confer BTB dynamics. This timely review provides an update on the unique biology and regulation of the BTB based on the latest findings in the field, focusing on the role of ABPs and non-receptor protein kinases.

  17. F-actin-binding protein drebrin regulates CXCR4 recruitment to the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martínez, Manuel; Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Cabrero, José Román; Barrero-Villar, Marta; Rey, Mercedes; Mittelbrunn, María; Lamana, Amalia; Morlino, Giulia; Calabia, Carmen; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Shirao, Tomoaki; Vázquez, Jesús; González-Amaro, Roberto; Veiga, Esteban; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2010-04-01

    The adaptive immune response depends on the interaction of T cells and antigen-presenting cells at the immune synapse. Formation of the immune synapse and the subsequent T-cell activation are highly dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. In this work, we describe that T cells express drebrin, a neuronal actin-binding protein. Drebrin colocalizes with the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and F-actin at the peripheral supramolecular activation cluster in the immune synapse. Drebrin interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of CXCR4 and both proteins redistribute to the immune synapse with similar kinetics. Drebrin knockdown in T cells impairs the redistribution of CXCR4 and inhibits actin polymerization at the immune synapse as well as IL-2 production. Our data indicate that drebrin exerts an unexpected and relevant functional role in T cells during the generation of the immune response.

  18. The Actin Filament-Binding Protein Coronin Regulates Motility in Plasmodium Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Bane, Kartik S.; Singer, Mirko; Reinig, Miriam; Klug, Dennis; Heiss, Kirsten; Baum, Jake; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Parasites causing malaria need to migrate in order to penetrate tissue barriers and enter host cells. Here we show that the actin filament-binding protein coronin regulates gliding motility in Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, the highly motile forms of a rodent malaria-causing parasite transmitted by mosquitoes. Parasites lacking coronin show motility defects that impair colonization of the mosquito salivary glands but not migration in the skin, yet result in decreased transmission efficiency. In non-motile sporozoites low calcium concentrations mediate actin-independent coronin localization to the periphery. Engagement of extracellular ligands triggers an intracellular calcium release followed by the actin-dependent relocalization of coronin to the rear and initiation of motility. Mutational analysis and imaging suggest that coronin organizes actin filaments for productive motility. Using coronin-mCherry as a marker for the presence of actin filaments we found that protein kinase A contributes to actin filament disassembly. We finally speculate that calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling regulate a switch from rapid parasite motility to host cell invasion by differentially influencing actin dynamics. PMID:27409081

  19. In vitro and in vivo evidence for actin association of the naphthylphthalamic acid-binding protein from zucchini hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. H.; Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Dixon, M. W.; Muday, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA)-binding protein is part of the auxin efflux carrier, the protein complex that controls polar auxin transport in plant tissues. This study tested the hypothesis that the NPA-binding protein (NBP) is associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vitro and that an intact actin cytoskeleton is required for polar auxin transport in vivo. Cytoskeletal polymerization was altered in extracts of zucchini hypocotyls with reagents that stabilized either the polymeric or monomeric forms of actin or tubulin. Phalloidin treatment altered actin polymerization, as demonstrated by immunoblot analyses following native and denaturing electrophoresis. Phalloidin increased both filamentous actin (F-actin) and NPA-binding activity, while cytochalasin D and Tris decreased both F-actin and NPA-binding activity in cytoskeletal pellets. The microtubule stabilizing drug taxol increased pelletable tubulin, but did not alter either the amount of pelletable actin or NPA-binding activity. Treatment of etiolated zucchini hypocotyls with cytochalasin D decreased the amount of auxin transport and its regulation by NPA. These experimental results are consistent with an in vitro actin cytoskeletal association of the NPA-binding protein and with the requirement of an intact actin cytoskeleton for maximal polar auxin transport in vivo.

  20. A green fluorescent protein fusion to actin-binding domain 2 of Arabidopsis fimbrin highlights new features of a dynamic actin cytoskeleton in live plant cells.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, Michael B; Staiger, Chris J; Rose, Ray J; McCurdy, David W

    2004-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton coordinates numerous cellular processes required for plant development. The functions of this network are intricately linked to its dynamic arrangement, and thus progress in understanding how actin orchestrates cellular processes relies on critical evaluation of actin organization and turnover. To investigate the dynamic nature of the actin cytoskeleton, we used a fusion protein between green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the second actin-binding domain (fABD2) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin, AtFIM1. The GFP-fABD2 fusion protein labeled highly dynamic and dense actin networks in diverse species and cell types, revealing structural detail not seen with alternative labeling methods, such as the commonly used mouse talin GFP fusion (GFP-mTalin). Further, we show that expression of the GFP-fABD2 fusion protein in Arabidopsis, unlike GFP-mTalin, has no detectable adverse effects on plant morphology or development. Time-lapse confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analyses of the actin cytoskeleton labeled with GFP-fABD2 revealed that lateral-filament migration and sliding of individual actin filaments or bundles are processes that contribute to the dynamic and continually reorganizing nature of the actin scaffold. These new observations of the dynamic actin cytoskeleton in plant cells using GFP-fABD2 reveal the value of this probe for future investigations of how actin filaments coordinate cellular processes required for plant development.

  1. Characterization and regulation of an additional actin-filament-binding site in large isoforms of the stereocilia actin-bundling protein espin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lili; Beeler, Dina M; Bartles, James R

    2014-03-15

    The espin actin-bundling proteins, which are produced as isoforms of different sizes from a single gene, are required for the growth of hair cell stereocilia. We have characterized an additional actin-filament-binding site present in the extended amino-termini of large espin isoforms. Constitutively active in espin 2, the site increased the size of actin bundles formed in vitro and inhibited actin fluorescence recovery in microvilli. In espin 1, which has an N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain, the site was autoinhibited by binding between the ankyrin repeat domain and a peptide near the actin-binding site. Deletion of this peptide from espin 1 activated its actin-binding site. The peptide resembled tail homology domain I of myosin III, a ligand of the ankyrin repeat domain localized with espin 1 at the tip of stereocilia. A myosin III tail homology domain I peptide, but not scrambled control peptides, inhibited internal binding of the ankyrin repeat domain and released the espin 1 actin-binding site from autoinhibition. Thus, this regulation could result in local activation of the additional actin-binding site of espin 1 by myosin III in stereocilia.

  2. Creating biomolecular motors based on dynein and actin-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, Akane; Amino, Misako; Yoshio, Maki; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Kojima, Hiroaki; Furuta, Ken'ya

    2016-11-01

    Biomolecular motors such as myosin, kinesin and dynein are protein machines that can drive directional movement along cytoskeletal tracks and have the potential to be used as molecule-sized actuators. Although control of the velocity and directionality of biomolecular motors has been achieved, the design and construction of novel biomolecular motors remains a challenge. Here we show that naturally occurring protein building blocks from different cytoskeletal systems can be combined to create a new series of biomolecular motors. We show that the hybrid motors—combinations of a motor core derived from the microtubule-based dynein motor and non-motor actin-binding proteins—robustly drive the sliding movement of an actin filament. Furthermore, the direction of actin movement can be reversed by simply changing the geometric arrangement of these building blocks. Our synthetic strategy provides an approach to fabricating biomolecular machines that work along artificial tracks at nanoscale dimensions.

  3. Actin-binding Protein Drebrin Regulates HIV-1-triggered Actin Polymerization and Viral Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; Álvarez, Susana; Ursa, Ángeles; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Muñoz-Fernández, María A.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 contact with target cells triggers F-actin rearrangements that are essential for several steps of the viral cycle. Successful HIV entry into CD4+ T cells requires actin reorganization induced by the interaction of the cellular receptor/co-receptor complex CD4/CXCR4 with the viral envelope complex gp120/gp41 (Env). In this report, we analyze the role of the actin modulator drebrin in HIV-1 viral infection and cell to cell fusion. We show that drebrin associates with CXCR4 before and during HIV infection. Drebrin is actively recruited toward cell-virus and Env-driven cell to cell contacts. After viral internalization, drebrin clustering is retained in a fraction of the internalized particles. Through a combination of RNAi-based inhibition of endogenous drebrin and GFP-tagged expression of wild-type and mutant forms, we establish drebrin as a negative regulator of HIV entry and HIV-mediated cell fusion. Down-regulation of drebrin expression promotes HIV-1 entry, decreases F-actin polymerization, and enhances profilin local accumulation in response to HIV-1. These data underscore the negative role of drebrin in HIV infection by modulating viral entry, mainly through the control of actin cytoskeleton polymerization in response to HIV-1. PMID:23926103

  4. Tankyrase-binding protein TNKS1BP1 regulates actin cytoskeleton rearrangement and cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Tomokazu; Yoshida, Haruka; Katori, Masamichi; Migita, Toshiro; Muramatsu, Yukiko; Miyake, Mao; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Saiura, Akio; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-15

    Tankyrase, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) that promotes telomere elongation and Wnt/β-catenin signaling, has various binding partners, suggesting that it has as-yet unidentified functions. Here we report that the tankyrase-binding protein TNKS1BP1 regulates actin cytoskeleton and cancer cell invasion, which is closely associated with cancer progression. TNKS1BP1 colocalized with actin filaments and negatively regulated cell invasion. In TNKS1BP1-depleted cells, actin filament dynamics, focal adhesion, and lamellipodia ruffling were increased with activation of the ROCK-LIMK-cofilin pathway. TNKS1BP1 bound the actin capping protein CapZA2. TNKS1BP1 depletion dissociated CapZA2 from the cytoskeleton, leading to cofilin phosphorylation and enhanced cell invasion. Tankyrase overexpression increased cofilin phosphorylation, dissociated CapZA2 from cytoskeleton, and enhanced cell invasion in a PARP activity-dependent manner. In clinical samples of pancreatic cancer, TNKS1BP1 expression was reduced in invasive regions. We propose that the tankyrase-TNKS1BP1 axis constitutes a post-translational modulator of cell invasion whose aberration promotes cancer malignancy.

  5. Crystal structure of the actin binding domain of the cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Dodatko, Tetyana; Fedorov, Alexander A; Grynberg, Marcin; Patskovsky, Yury; Rozwarski, Denise A; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Kondraskina, Elena; Irving, Tom; Godzik, Adam; Almo, Steven C

    2004-08-24

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is a modular actin monomer binding protein that directly regulates filament dynamics and has been implicated in a number of complex developmental and morphological processes, including mRNA localization and the establishment of cell polarity. The crystal structure of the C-terminal dimerization and actin monomer binding domain (C-CAP) reveals a highly unusual dimer, composed of monomers possessing six coils of right-handed beta-helix flanked by antiparallel beta-strands. Domain swapping, involving the last two strands of each monomer, results in the formation of an extended dimer with an extensive interface. This structural and biochemical characterization provides new insights into the organization and potential mechanistic properties of the multiprotein assemblies that integrate dynamic actin processes into the overall physiology of the cell. An unanticipated finding is that the unique tertiary structure of the C-CAP monomer provides a structural model for a wide range of molecules, including RP2 and cofactor C, proteins involved in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and tubulin maturation, respectively, as well as several uncharacterized proteins that exhibit very diverse domain organizations. Thus, the unusual right-handed beta-helical fold present in C-CAP appears to support a wide range of biological functions.

  6. Disruption of actin-binding domain-containing Dystonin protein causes dystonia musculorum in mice.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masao; Watanabe, Keisuke; Bepari, Asim K; Nashimoto, Jun-Ichiro; Araki, Kimi; Sano, Hiromi; Chiken, Satomi; Nambu, Atsushi; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Takebayashi, Hirohide

    2014-11-01

    The Dystonin gene (Dst) is responsible for dystonia musculorum (dt), an inherited mouse model of hereditary neuropathy accompanied by progressive motor symptoms such as dystonia and cerebellar ataxia. Dst-a isoforms, which contain actin-binding domains, are predominantly expressed in the nervous system. Although sensory neuron degeneration in the peripheral nervous system during the early postnatal stage is a well-recognised phenotype in dt, the histological characteristics and neuronal circuits in the central nervous system responsible for motor symptoms remain unclear. To analyse the causative neuronal networks and roles of Dst isoforms, we generated novel multipurpose Dst gene trap mice, in which actin-binding domain-containing isoforms are disrupted. Homozygous mice showed typical dt phenotypes with sensory degeneration and progressive motor symptoms. The gene trap allele (Dst(Gt) ) encodes a mutant Dystonin-LacZ fusion protein, which is detectable by X-gal (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactoside) staining. We observed wide expression of the actin-binding domain-containing Dystonin isoforms in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system. This raised the possibility that not only secondary neuronal defects in the CNS subsequent to peripheral sensory degeneration but also cell-autonomous defects in the CNS contribute to the motor symptoms. Expression analysis of immediate early genes revealed decreased neuronal activity in the cerebellar-thalamo-striatal pathway in the homozygous brain, implying the involvement of this pathway in the dt phenotype. These novel Dst(Gt) mice showed that a loss-of-function mutation in the actin-binding domain-containing Dystonin isoforms led to typical dt phenotypes. Furthermore, this novel multipurpose Dst(Gt) allele offers a unique tool for analysing the causative neuronal networks involved in the dt phenotype.

  7. Tubulin binding protein, CacyBP/SIP, induces actin polymerization and may link actin and tubulin cytoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gabriela; Nieznanski, Krzysztof; Jozwiak, Jolanta; Slomnicki, Lukasz P; Redowicz, Maria J; Filipek, Anna

    2010-11-01

    CacyBP/SIP, originally identified as a S100A6 target, was shown to interact with some other S100 proteins as well as with Siah-1, Skp1, tubulin and ERK1/2 kinases (reviewed in Schneider and Filipek, Amino Acids, 2010). Here, we show that CacyBP/SIP interacts and co-localizes with actin in NB2a cells. Using a zero-length cross-linker we found that both proteins bound directly to each other. Co-sedimentation assays revealed that CacyBP/SIP induced G-actin polymerization and formation of unique circular actin filament bundles. The N-terminal fragment of CacyBP/SIP (residues 1-179) had similar effect on actin polymerization as the entire CacyBP/SIP protein, while the C-terminal one (residues 178-229) had not. To check the influence of CacyBP/SIP on cell morphology as well as on cell adhesion and migration, a stable NIH 3T3 cell line with an increased level of CacyBP/SIP was generated. We found that the adhesion and migration rates of the modified cells were changed in comparison with the control ones. Interestingly, the co-sedimentation and proximity ligation assays indicated that CacyBP/SIP could simultaneously interact with tubulin and actin, suggesting that CacyBP/SIP might link actin and tubulin cytoskeletons.

  8. Actin filament organization in activated mast cells is regulated by heterotrimeric and small GTP-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Rat peritoneal mast cells, both intact and permeabilized, have been used widely as model secretory cells. GTP-binding proteins and calcium play a major role in controlling their secretory response. Here we have examined changes in the organization of actin filaments in intact mast cells after activation by compound 48/80, and in permeabilized cells after direct activation of GTP-binding proteins by GTP-gamma-S. In both cases, a centripetal redistribution of cellular F-actin was observed: the content of F-actin was reduced in the cortical region and increased in the cell interior. The overall F-actin content was increased. Using permeabilized cells, we show that AIF4-, an activator of heterotrimeric G proteins, induces the disassembly of F-actin at the cortex, while the appearance of actin filaments in the interior of the cell is dependent on two small GTPases, rho and rac. Rho was found to be responsible for de novo actin polymerization, presumably from a membrane-bound monomeric pool, while rac was required for an entrapment of the released cortical filaments. Thus, a heterotrimeric G-protein and the small GTPases, rho and rac, participate in affecting the changes in the actin cytoskeleton observed after activation of mast cells. PMID:8051203

  9. An actin monomer binding activity localizes to the carboxyl-terminal half of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Chen, Z; Horenstein, J; Weber, A; Field, J

    1995-03-10

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex contains at least two subunits, a 200-kDa catalytic subunit and a 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein, CAP (also called Srv2p). Genetic studies suggested two roles for CAP, one as a positive regulator of cAMP levels in yeast and a second role as a cytoskeletal regulator. We present evidence showing that CAP sequesters monomeric actin (Kd in the range of 0.5-5 microM), decreasing actin incorporation into actin filaments. Anti-CAP monoclonal antibodies co-immunoprecipitate a protein with a molecular size of about 46 kDa. When CAP was purified from yeast using an anti-CAP monoclonal antibody column, the 46-kDa protein co-purified with a stoichiometry of about 1:1 with CAP. Western blots identified the 46-kDa protein as yeast actin. CAP also bound to muscle actin in vitro in immunoprecipitation assays and falling ball viscometry assays. Experiments with pyrene-labeled actin demonstrated that CAP sequesters actin monomers. The actin monomer binding activity is localized to the carboxyl-terminal half of CAP. Together, these data suggest that yeast CAP regulates the yeast cytoskeleton by sequestering actin monomers.

  10. Effects of cardiac Myosin binding protein-C on actin motility are explained with a drag-activation-competition model.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam; Docken, Steffen; Harris, Samantha P

    2015-01-06

    Although mutations in cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) cause heart disease, its role in muscle contraction is not well understood. A mechanism remains elusive partly because the protein can have multiple effects, such as dual biphasic activation and inhibition observed in actin motility assays. Here we develop a mathematical model for the interaction of cMyBP-C with the contractile proteins actin and myosin and the regulatory protein tropomyosin. We use this model to show that a drag-activation-competition mechanism accurately describes actin motility measurements, while models lacking either drag or competition do not. These results suggest that complex effects can arise simply from cMyBP-C binding to actin.

  11. Effects of Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C on Actin Motility Are Explained with a Drag-Activation-Competition Model

    PubMed Central

    Walcott, Sam; Docken, Steffen; Harris, Samantha P.

    2015-01-01

    Although mutations in cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) cause heart disease, its role in muscle contraction is not well understood. A mechanism remains elusive partly because the protein can have multiple effects, such as dual biphasic activation and inhibition observed in actin motility assays. Here we develop a mathematical model for the interaction of cMyBP-C with the contractile proteins actin and myosin and the regulatory protein tropomyosin. We use this model to show that a drag-activation-competition mechanism accurately describes actin motility measurements, while models lacking either drag or competition do not. These results suggest that complex effects can arise simply from cMyBP-C binding to actin. PMID:25564844

  12. Actin Polymerization is Stimulated by Actin Crosslinking Protein Palladin

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H.; Beck, Moriah R.

    2016-01-01

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the coordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. Here we show that the actin binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro crosslinking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of G-actin, akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  13. Vitronectin induces phosphorylation of ezrin/radixin/moesin actin-binding proteins through binding to its novel neuronal receptor telencephalin.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Yutaka; Kawasaki, Miwa; Matsuno, Hitomi; Mitsui, Sachiko; Mori, Kensaku; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro

    2012-11-09

    Vitronectin (VN) is an extracellular matrix protein abundantly present in blood and a wide variety of tissues and plays important roles in a number of biological phenomena mainly through its binding to αV integrins. However, its definite function in the brain remains largely unknown. Here we report the identification of telencephalin (TLCN/ICAM-5) as a novel VN receptor on neuronal dendrites. VN strongly binds to TLCN, a unique neuronal member of the ICAM family, which is specifically expressed on dendrites of spiny neurons in the mammalian telencephalon. VN-coated microbeads induce the formation of phagocytic cup-like plasma membrane protrusions on dendrites of cultured hippocampal neurons and trigger the activation of TLCN-dependent intracellular signaling cascade including the phosphorylation of ezrin/radixin/moesin actin-binding proteins and recruitment of F-actin and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate for morphological transformation of the dendritic protrusions. These results suggest that the extracellular matrix molecule VN and its neuronal receptor TLCN play a pivotal role in the phosphorylation of ezrin/radixin/moesin proteins and the formation of phagocytic cup-like structures on neuronal dendrites.

  14. Association of dopamine D(3) receptors with actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280).

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Chuanyu; Weingarten, Paul; Bunzow, James R; Grandy, David K; Zhou, Qun Yong

    2002-03-01

    Proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors have been identified as regulators of receptor localization and signaling. In our previous studies, a cytoskeletal protein, actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280), was found to associate with the third cytoplasmic loop of dopamine D(2) receptors. In this study, we demonstrate that ABP-280 also interacts with dopamine D(3) receptors, but not with D(4) receptors. Similar to the dopamine D(2) receptor, the D(3)/ABP-280 association is of signaling importance. In human melanoma M2 cells lacking ABP-280, D(3) receptors were unable to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) production significantly. D(4) receptors, however, exhibited a similar degree of inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in ABP-280-deficient M2 cells and ABP-280-replent M2 subclones (A7 cells). Further experiments revealed that the D(3)/ABP-280 interaction was critically dependent upon a 36 amino acid carboxyl domain of the D(3) receptor third loop, which is conserved in the D(2) receptor but not in the D(4) receptor. Our results demonstrate a subtype-specific regulation of dopamine D(2)-family receptor signaling by the cytoskeletal protein ABP-280.

  15. Modulation of dopamine D(2) receptor signaling by actin-binding protein (ABP-280).

    PubMed

    Li, M; Bermak, J C; Wang, Z W; Zhou, Q Y

    2000-03-01

    Proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors have recently been identified as regulators of receptor anchoring and signaling. In this study, actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280), a widely expressed cytoskeleton-associated protein that plays an important role in regulating cell morphology and motility, was found to associate with the third cytoplasmic loop of dopamine D(2) receptors. The specificity of this interaction was originally identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen and confirmed by protein binding. The functional significance of the D(2) receptor-ABP-280 association was evaluated in human melanoma cells lacking ABP-280. D(2) receptor agonists were less potent in inhibiting forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in these cells. Maximal inhibitory responses of D(2) receptor activation were also reduced. Further yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that ABP-280 association is critically dependent on the carboxyl domain of the D(2) receptor third cytoplasmic loop, where there is a potential serine phosphorylation site (S358). Serine 358 was replaced with aspartic acid to mimic the effects of receptor phosphorylation. This mutant (D(2)S358D) displayed compromised binding to ABP-280 and coupling to adenylate cyclase. PKC activation also generated D(2) receptor signaling attenuation, but only in ABP-containing cells, suggesting a PKC regulatory role in D(2)-ABP association. A mechanism for these results may be derived from a role of ABP-280 in the clustering of D(2) receptors, as determined by immunocytochemical analysis in ABP-deficient and replete cells. Our results suggest a new molecular mechanism of modulating D(2) receptor signaling by cytoskeletal protein interaction.

  16. Ultra-fast optical manipulation of single proteins binding to the actin cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Marco; Gardini, Lucia; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-02-01

    In the last decade, forces and mechanical stresses acting on biological systems are emerging as regulatory factors essential for cell life. Emerging evidences indicate that factors such as applied forces or the rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) determine the shape and function of cells and organisms1. Classically, the regulation of biological systems is described through a series of biochemical signals and enzymatic reactions, which direct the processes and cell fate. However, mechanotransduction, i.e. the conversion of mechanical forces into biochemical and biomolecular signals, is at the basis of many biological processes fundamental for the development and differentiation of cells, for their correct function and for the development of pathologies. We recently developed an in vitro system that allows the investigation of force-dependence of the interaction of proteins binding the actin cytoskeleton, at the single molecule level. Our system displays a delay of only ~10 μs between formation of the molecular bond and application of the force and is capable of detecting interactions as short as 100 μs. Our assay allows direct measurements of load-dependence of lifetimes of single molecular bonds and conformational changes of single proteins and molecular motors. We demonstrate our technique on molecular motors, using myosin II from fast skeletal muscle and on protein-DNA interaction, specifically on Lactose repressor (LacI). The apparatus is stabilized to less than 1 nm with both passive and active stabilization, allowing resolving specific binding regions along the actin filament and DNA molecule. Our technique extends single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy to molecular complexes that have been inaccessible up to now, opening new perspectives for the investigation of the effects of forces on biological processes.

  17. DNA binding properties of the actin-related protein Arp8 and its role in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Osakabe, Akihisa; Takahashi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Hirokazu; Otawa, Kenji; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Oma, Yukako; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Shibahara, Kei-ich; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Harata, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Actin and actin-related proteins (Arps), which are members of the actin family, are essential components of many of these remodeling complexes. Actin, Arp4, Arp5, and Arp8 are found to be evolutionarily conserved components of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is involved in transcriptional regulation, DNA replication, and DNA repair. A recent report showed that Arp8 forms a module in the INO80 complex and this module can directly capture a nucleosome. In the present study, we showed that recombinant human Arp8 binds to DNAs, and preferentially binds to single-stranded DNA. Analysis of the binding of adenine nucleotides to Arp8 mutants suggested that the ATP-binding pocket, located in the evolutionarily conserved actin fold, plays a regulatory role in the binding of Arp8 to DNA. To determine the cellular function of Arp8, we derived tetracycline-inducible Arp8 knockout cells from a cultured human cell line. Analysis of results obtained after treating these cells with aphidicolin and camptothecin revealed that Arp8 is involved in DNA repair. Together with the previous observation that Arp8, but not γ-H2AX, is indispensable for recruiting INO80 complex to DSB in human, results of our study suggest an individual role for Arp8 in DNA repair.

  18. Functional characterization of protein 4.1 homolog in amphioxus: defining a cryptic spectrin-actin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixia; Wang, Yuan; Li, Zhaohe; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-10-07

    Vertebrate 4.1 proteins have a spectrin-actin-binding (SAB) domain, which is lacking in all the invertebrate 4.1 proteins indentified so far, and it was therefore proposed that the SAB domain emerged with the advent of vertebrates during evolution. Here we demonstrated for the first time that amphioxus (an invertebrate chordate) protein 4.1, though lacking a recognizable SAB, was able to bind both spectrin and actin, with a binding capacity comparable to that of human protein 4.1. Detailed structure-activity analyses revealed that the unique domain U2/3 was a newly identified SAB-like domain capable of interacting with spectrin and actin, suggesting the presence of a "cryptic" SAB domain in amphioxus 4.1 protein. We also showed that amphioxus 4.1 protein gene was the common ancestor of vertebrate 4.1 protein genes, from which 4.1R, 4.1N, 4.1G, and 4.1B genes originated. This work will encourage further study on the structure-activity of invertebrate 4.1 protein and its interacting proteins.

  19. On the association of glycoprotein Ib and actin-binding protein in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Glycoprotein (GP) Ib was purified from lysates of human platelets prepared in the presence or absence of inhibitors of the endogenous calcium-activated neutral protease (CANP) by immunoaffinity chromatography, employing the GPIb-specific murine monoclonal antibody, AP1, coupled to Sepharose CL4B. When derived from lysates prepared in the presence of EDTA or leupeptin, the eluate from the AP1-affinity column contained a 240,000-260,000-mol-wt protein in addition to GPIb. In SDS PAGE, this protein was stained by Coomassie Blue R, but not by the periodic acid-Schiff reagent, and it was not labeled with 125I in intact platelets by the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed method. When derived from lysates prepared in the absence of CANP inhibitors, the eluate contained only GPIb and its proteolytic derivative, glycocalicin. A change in the electrophoretic mobility of GPIb consistent with its association with the 240,000-260,000-mol-wt protein was confirmed by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. By an immunoblot technique involving transfer of proteins eluted from the AP1-affinity column and separated by SDS PAGE onto a nitrocellulose membrane, the 240,000-260,000-mol-wt protein bound polyclonal goat antibody raised against rabbit macrophage actin-binding protein (ABP). On the basis of these results, we conclude the GPIb is tightly associated with ABP under conditions in which the endogenous CANP is inhibited, and that this apparent transmembrane complex of GPIb-ABP can be isolated in lysates of nonactivated human platelets. PMID:3155520

  20. Phosphorylation of actin-binding protein (ABP-280; filamin) by tyrosine kinase p56lck modulates actin filament cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Pal Sharma, C; Goldmann, Wolfgang H

    2004-01-01

    Actin-binding protein (ABP-280; filamin) is a phosphoprotein present in the periphery of the cytoplasm where it can cross-link actin filaments, associate with lipid membranes, and bind to membrane surface receptors. Given its function and localization in the cell, we decided to investigate the possibility of whether it serves as substrate for p56lck, a lymphocyte-specific member of the src family of protein tyrosine kinases associated with cell surface glycoproteins. The interaction of p56lck with membrane glycoproteins is important for cell development and functional activation. Here, we show that purified p56lck interacts and catalyzes in vitro kinase reactions. Tyrosine phosphorylation by p56lck is restricted to a single peptide of labeled ABP-280 shown by protease digest. The addition of phorbol ester to cells results in the inhibition of phosphorylation of ABP-280 by p56lck. These results show a decrease in phosphorylation suggesting conformationally induced regulation. Dynamic light scattering confirmed increased actin filament cross-linking due to phosphorylation of ABP-280 by p56lck.

  1. Cytoskeleton alterations in melanoma: aberrant expression of cortactin, an actin-binding adapter protein, correlates with melanocytic tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xu-Zhi; Garcia, Marileila Varella; Li, Tian-yu; Khor, Li-Yan; Gajapathy, R Sujatha; Spittle, Cindy; Weed, Scott; Lessin, Stuart R; Wu, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cortactin is a multidomain actin-binding protein important for the functions of cytoskeleton by regulating cortical actin dynamics. It is involved in a diverse array of basic cellular functions. Tumorigenesis and tumor progression involves alterations in actin cytoskeleton proteins. We sought to study the role of cortactin in melanocytic tumor progression using immunohistochemistry on human tissues. The results reveal quantitative differences between benign and malignant lesions. Significantly higher cortactin expression is found in melanomas than in nevi (P<0.0001), with levels greater in metastatic than in invasive melanomas (P<0.05). Qualitatively, tumor tissues often show aberrant cortactin localization at the cell periphery, corresponding to its colocalization with filamentous actin in cell cortex of cultured melanoma cells. This suggests an additional level of protein dysregulation. Furthermore, in patients with metastatic disease, high-level cortactin expression correlates with poor disease-specific survival. Our data, in conjunction with outcome data on several other types of human cancers and experimental data from melanoma cell lines, supports a potential role of aberrant cortactin expression in melanoma tumor progression and a rational for targeting key elements of actin-signaling pathway for developmental therapeutics in melanomas. PMID:19898426

  2. Expression of drebrin, an actin binding protein, in basal cell carcinoma, trichoblastoma and trichoepithelioma.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Yoko; Iwamoto, Ikuko; Kanoh, Hiroyuki; Seishima, Mariko; Nagata, Koh-ichi

    2014-06-01

    Drebrin, an F-actin binding protein, is known to play important roles in cell migration, synaptogenesis and neural plasticity. Although drebrin was long thought to be specific for neuronal cells, its expression has recently been reported in non-neuronal cells. As for skin-derived cells, drebrin was shown to be enriched at adhering junctions (AJs) in cultured primary keratinocytes and also be highly expressed in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. Since BCC and two types of benign neoplasm, trichoblastoma and trichoepithelioma, are considered to derive from the same origin, follicular germinative cells, it is sometimes difficult to morphologically distinguish BCC from trichoblastoma and trichoepithelioma. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical staining of drebrin in BCC, trichoblastoma and trichoepithelioma, to examine whether drebrin could serve as a biomarker for BCC diagnosis. In western blotting, drebrin was detected highly and moderately in the lysates from a squamous cell carcinoma cell line, DJM-1, and normal human epidermis, respectively. In immunofluorescence analyses, drebrin was colocalized with markers of AJs and tight junctions in DJM-1 cells and detected at cell-cell junction areas of human normal epidermis tissue. We then examined the distribution patterns of drebrin in BCC, trichoblastoma and trichoepithelioma. In BCC tissues, intense and homogeneous drebrin expression was observed mainly at tumor cell-cell boundaries. In contrast, drebrin was stained only weakly and non-homogeneously in trichoblastoma and trichoepthelioma tissue samples. For differential diagnosis of BCC, drebrin may be a novel and useful marker.

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Associated Protein (PI3KAP)/XB130 Crosslinks Actin Filaments through Its Actin Binding and Multimerization Properties In Vitro and Enhances Endocytosis in HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Daisuke; Akama, Takeshi; Chida, Kazuhiro; Minami, Shiro; Ito, Koichi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Actin-crosslinking proteins control actin filament networks and bundles and contribute to various cellular functions including regulation of cell migration, cell morphology, and endocytosis. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-associated protein (PI3KAP)/XB130 has been reported to be localized to actin filaments (F-actin) and required for cell migration in thyroid carcinoma cells. Here, we show a role for PI3KAP/XB130 as an actin-crosslinking protein. First, we found that the carboxyl terminal region of PI3KAP/XB130 containing amino acid residues 830–840 was required and sufficient for localization to F-actin in NIH3T3 cells, and this region is directly bound to F-actin in vitro. Moreover, actin-crosslinking assay revealed that recombinant PI3KAP/XB130 crosslinked F-actin. In general, actin-crosslinking proteins often multimerize to assemble multiple actin-binding sites. We then investigated whether PI3KAP/XB130 could form a multimer. Blue native-PAGE analysis showed that recombinant PI3KAP/XB130 was detected at 250–1200 kDa although the molecular mass was approximately 125 kDa, suggesting that PI3KAP/XB130 formed multimers. Furthermore, we found that the amino terminal 40 amino acids were required for this multimerization by co-immunoprecipitation assay in HEK293T cells. Deletion mutants of PI3KAP/XB130 lacking the actin-binding region or the multimerizing region did not crosslink actin filaments, indicating that actin binding and multimerization of PI3KAP/XB130 were necessary to crosslink F-actin. Finally, we examined roles of PI3KAP/XB130 on endocytosis, an actin-related biological process. Overexpression of PI3KAP/XB130 enhanced dextran uptake in HEK 293 cells. However, most of the cells transfected with the deletion mutant lacking the actin-binding region incorporated dextran to a similar extent as control cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PI3KAP/XB130 crosslinks F-actin through both its actin-binding region and multimerizing region and

  4. Polycystin-2 (TRPP2) Regulation by Ca2+ Is Effected and Diversified by Actin-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cantero, María del Rocío; Cantiello, Horacio F.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium regulation of Ca2+-permeable ion channels is an important mechanism in the control of cell function. Polycystin-2 (PC2, TRPP2), a member of the transient receptor potential superfamily, is a nonselective cation channel with Ca2+ permeability. The molecular mechanisms associated with PC2 regulation by Ca2+ remain ill-defined. We recently demonstrated that PC2 from human syncytiotrophoblast (PC2hst) but not the in vitro translated protein (PC2iv), functionally responds to changes in intracellular (cis) Ca2+. In this study we determined the regulatory effect(s) of Ca2+-sensitive and -insensitive actin-binding proteins (ABPs) on PC2iv channel function in a lipid bilayer system. The actin-bundling protein α-actinin increased PC2iv channel function in the presence of cis Ca2+, although instead was inhibitory in its absence. Conversely, filamin that shares actin-binding domains with α-actinin had a strong inhibitory effect on PC2iv channel function in the presence, but no effect in the absence of cis Ca2+. Gelsolin stimulated PC2iv channel function in the presence, but not the absence of cis Ca2+. In contrast, profilin that shares actin-binding domains with gelsolin, significantly increased PC2iv channel function both in the presence and absence of Ca2+. The distinct effect(s) of the ABPs on PC2iv channel function demonstrate that Ca2+ regulation of PC2 is actually mediated by direct interaction(s) with structural elements of the actin cytoskeleton. These data indicate that specific ABP-PC2 complexes would confer distinct Ca2+-sensitive properties to the channel providing functional diversity to the cytoskeletal control of transient receptor potential channel regulation. PMID:25954877

  5. Mbh 1: a novel gelsolin/severin-related protein which binds actin in vitro and exhibits nuclear localization in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, G C; Ziff, E B

    1991-01-01

    We describe the characterization of a novel cDNA, mbh1 (myc basic motif homolog-1), which was found during a search for candidate factors which might interact with the c-Myc oncoprotein. Embedded within the amino acid sequence encoded by mbh1 is a region distantly related to the basic/helix-loop-helix (B/HLH) DNA-binding motif and a potential nuclear localization signal. Mbh1 encodes a polypeptide structurally similar to the actin-severing proteins gelsolin and severin. Translation of mbh1 RNA in rabbit reticulocyte extracts produces an approximately 45 kd protein capable of binding actin-coupled agarose beads in vitro in a Ca2(+)-dependent manner. Antiserum raised to a trpE/mbh1 bacterial fusion protein recognizes an approximately 45 kb protein in murine 3T3 fibroblasts, suggesting that the cDNA encodes the complete Mbh1 protein. Examination of Mbh1 localization in 3T3 fibroblasts by indirect immunofluorescence reveals a larger cell population showing diffuse staining, and a smaller population exhibiting a distinct nuclear stain. Western analysis corroborates this intracellular localization and indicates that total cellular levels and localization of Mbh1 are not affected by the cell growth state. The data suggest that Mbh1 may play a role in regulating cytoplasmic and/or nuclear architecture through potential interactions with actin. Images PMID:1849072

  6. Chlamydia trachomatis Tarp harbors distinct G and F actin binding domains that bundle actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Jiwani, Shahanawaz; Alvarado, Stephenie; Ohr, Ryan J; Romero, Adriana; Nguyen, Brenda; Jewett, Travis J

    2013-02-01

    All species of Chlamydia undergo a unique developmental cycle that transitions between extracellular and intracellular environments and requires the capacity to invade new cells for dissemination. A chlamydial protein called Tarp has been shown to nucleate actin in vitro and is implicated in bacterial entry into human cells. Colocalization studies of ectopically expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-Tarp indicate that actin filament recruitment is restricted to the C-terminal half of the effector protein. Actin filaments are presumably associated with Tarp via an actin binding alpha helix that is also required for actin nucleation in vitro, but this has not been investigated. Tarp orthologs from C. pneumoniae, C. muridarum, and C. caviae harbor between 1 and 4 actin binding domains located in the C-terminal half of the protein, but C. trachomatis serovar L2 has only one characterized domain. In this work, we examined the effects of domain-specific mutations on actin filament colocalization with EGFP-Tarp. We now demonstrate that actin filament colocalization with Tarp is dependent on two novel F-actin binding domains that endow the Tarp effector with actin-bundling activity. Furthermore, Tarp-mediated actin bundling did not require actin nucleation, as the ability to bundle actin filaments was observed in mutant Tarp proteins deficient in actin nucleation. These data shed molecular insight on the complex cytoskeletal rearrangements required for C. trachomatis entry into host cells.

  7. Synthetic actin-binding domains reveal compositional constraints for function.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Maria; Gimona, Mario

    2008-01-01

    The actin-binding domains of many proteins consist of a canonical type 1/type 2 arrangement of the structurally conserved calponin homology domain. Using the actin-binding domain of alpha-actinin-1 as a scaffold we have generated synthetic actin-binding domains by altering position and composition of the calponin homology domains. We show that the presence of two calponin homology domains alone and in the context of an actin-binding domain is not sufficient for actin-binding, and that both single and homotypic type 2 calponin homology domain tandems fail to bind to actin in vitro and in transfected cells. In contrast, single and tandem type 1 calponin homology domain arrays bind actin directly but result in defective turnover rates on actin filaments, and in aberrant actin bundling when introduced into the full-length alpha-actinin molecule. An actin-binding domain harboring the calponin homology domains in an inverted position, however, functions both in isolation and in the context of the dimeric alpha-actinin molecule. Our data demonstrate that the dynamics and specificity of actin-binding via actin-binding domains requires both the filament binding properties of the type 1, and regulation by type 2 calponin homology domains, and appear independent of their position.

  8. The Disruption of the Cytoskeleton during Semaphorin 3A induced Growth Cone Collapse Correlates with Differences in Actin Organization and Associated Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A; Bridgman, Paul C

    2010-01-01

    Repulsive guidance cues induce growth cone collapse or collapse and retraction. Collapse results from disruption and loss of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin rich regions of growth cones contain binding proteins that influence filament organization, such as Arp2/3, cortactin, and fascin, but little is known about the role that these proteins play in collapse. Here we show that Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A), which is repulsive to mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, has unequal effects on actin binding proteins and their associated filaments. The immunofluorescence staining intensity of Arp-2 and cortactin decreases relative to total protein, while in unextracted growth cones fascin increases. Fascin and myosin IIB staining redistribute and show increased overlap. The degree of actin filament loss during collapse correlates with filament superstructures detected by rotary shadow electron microscopy. Collapse results in the loss of branched f-actin meshworks, while actin bundles are partially retained to varying degrees. Taken together with the known affects of Sema 3A on actin, this suggests a model for collapse that follows a sequence; depolymerization of actin meshworks followed by partial depolymerization of fascin associated actin bundles and their movement to the neurite to complete collapse. The relocated fascin associated actin bundles may provide the substrate for actomyosin contractions that produce retraction. PMID:19513995

  9. The putative pocket protein binding site of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus BV/ODV-C42 is required for virus-induced nuclear actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Wang, Yun; Bai, Huimin; Wang, Qian; Song, Jianhua; Zhou, Yuan; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Xinwen

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear filamentous actin (F-actin) is essential for nucleocapsid morphogenesis of lepidopteran nucleopolyhedroviruses. Previously, we had demonstrated that Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) BV/ODV-C42 (C42) is involved in nuclear actin polymerization by recruiting P78/83, an AcMNPV orf9-encoded N-WASP homology protein that is capable of activating an actin-related-protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex to initiate actin polymerization, to the nucleus. To further investigate the role of C42 in virus-induced actin polymerization, the recombinant bacmid vAc(p78/83nls-gfp), with a c42 knockout, p78/83 tagged with a nuclear localization signal coding sequence, and egfp as a reporter gene under the control of the Pp10 promoter, was constructed and transfected to Sf9 cells. In the nuclei of vAc(p78/83nls-gfp)-transfected cells, polymerized F-actin filaments were absent, whereas other actin polymerization elements (i.e., P78/83, G-actin, and Arp2/3 complex) were present. This in vivo evidence indicated that C42 actively participates in the nuclear actin polymerization process as a key element, besides its role in recruiting P78/83 to the nucleus. In order to collect in vitro evidence for the participation of C42 in actin polymerization, an anti-C42 antibody was used to neutralize the viral nucleocapsid, which is capable of initiating actin polymerization in vitro. Both the kinetics of pyrene-actin polymerization and F-actin-specific staining by phalloidin indicated that anti-C42 can significantly attenuate the efficiency of F-actin formation compared to that with control antibodies. Furthermore, we have identified the putative pocket protein binding sequence (PPBS) on C42 that is essential for C42 to exert its function in nuclear actin polymerization.

  10. F-actin binding protein, anillin, regulates integrity of intercellular junctions in human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Feygin, Alex; Ivanov, Andrei I.

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ) are key morphological features of differentiated epithelial cells that regulate the integrity and permeability of tissue barriers. Structure and remodeling of epithelial junctions depends on their association with the underlying actomyosin cytoskeleton. Anillin is a unique scaffolding protein interacting with different cytoskeletal components, including actin filaments and myosin motors. Its role in the regulation of mammalian epithelial junctions remains unexplored. Downregulation of anillin expression in human prostate, colonic, and lung epithelial cells triggered AJ and TJ disassembly without altering the expression of junctional proteins. This junctional disassembly was accompanied by dramatic disorganization of the perijunctional actomyosin belt; while the general architecture of the actin cytoskeleton, and activation status of non-muscle myosin II, remained unchanged. Furthermore, loss of anillin disrupted the adducin-spectrin membrane skeleton at the areas of cell-cell contact, selectively decreased γ-adducin expression, and induced cytoplasmic aggregation of αII-spectrin. Anillin knockdown activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and JNK inhibition restored AJ and TJ integrity and cytoskeletal organization in anillin-depleted cells. These findings suggest a novel role for anillin in regulating intercellular adhesion in model human epithelia by mechanisms involving the suppression of JNK activity and controlling the assembly of the perijunctional cytoskeleton. PMID:25809162

  11. Actin affinity chromatography in the purification of human, avian and other mammalian plasma proteins binding vitamin D and its metabolites (Gc globulins).

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, J G; Kowalski, M A; Sanger, J W

    1984-01-01

    The human plasma protein binding vitamin D and its metabolites (Gc globulin; group-specific component) has been isolated from human plasma by column affinity chromatography on gels to which monomeric actin was covalently attached. Rabbit skeletal-muscle G-actin was covalently coupled to amino-agarose gels before the application of human plasma. At actin/protein molar ratios of 4-8:1, excellent recovery (approximately 58%) of purified binding protein was achieved. After 0.75 M-NaCl washes, the binding protein was eluted from the columns in 3 M-guanidinium chloride, dialysed and analysed. These eluates contained the binding protein as 34-100% of the total protein, reflecting a 130-fold average purification in this single step. In the presence of Ca2+, gelsolin (another plasma protein that binds actin) was apparently retained by the affinity column, but this was prevented by chelation of plasma Ca2+. The actin affinity step also was effective in the isolation of the binding protein from rat, rabbit and chicken plasma, as indicated by autoradiographs of purified fractions analysed by gel electrophoresis after incubation with 25-hydroxy[26,27-3H]cholecalciferol. Further isolation by hydroxyapatite chromatography yielded a purified binding protein which displayed characteristic binding activity toward vitamin D metabolites and G-actin, and retained its physicochemical features. This brief purification sequence is relatively simple and efficient, and should prove to be useful to investigators studying this interesting plasma protein. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6547042

  12. REM sleep deprivation attenuates actin-binding protein cortactin: a link between sleep and hippocampal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher J; Meighan, Peter C; Taishi, Ping; Krueger, James M; Harding, Joseph W; Wright, John W

    2006-06-12

    Rapid eye-movement sleep (REMS) is thought to affect synaptic plasticity. Cortactin is a cytoskeletal protein critically involved in the regulation of actin branching and stabilization including the actin backbone of dendritic spines. Hippocampal cortactin levels, phosphorylation, and processing appear to be altered during learning and long-term potentiation (LTP); consistent with a role for cortactin in the dendritic restructuring that accompanies synaptic plasticity. In this study juvenile male Sprague-Dawley rats were selectively REMS-deprived (RD) for 48 h by the flowerpot method. Cage control (CC) and large pedestal control (PC) animals were used for comparison. Animals were euthanized immediately, or 12 h, after removal from the pedestal. The hippocampus was dissected, flash-frozen, and stored for subsequent Western blot or quantitative RT-PCR analysis of cortactin. Cortactin mRNA/cDNA levels initially rose in PC and RD rats but returned to CC levels by 12 h after removal from the pedestal. Predictably cortactin protein levels were initially unchanged but were up-regulated after 12 h. The PC group had more total and tyrosine-phosphorylated cortactin protein expression than the RD and CC groups. This increase in cortactin was likely due to the exposure of the rats to the novel environment of the deprivation chambers thus triggering plasticity events. The lack of REMS, however, severely hampered cortactin protein up-regulation and phosphorylation observed in the PC group suggesting an attenuation of plasticity-related events. Thus, these data support a functional link between REMS and cytoskeletal reorganization in the hippocampus, a process that is essential for synaptic plasticity.

  13. Dynamics of the actin-binding protein drebrin in motile cells and definition of a juxtanuclear drebrin-enriched zone.

    PubMed

    Peitsch, Wiebke K; Bulkescher, Jutta; Spring, Herbert; Hofmann, Ilse; Goerdt, Sergij; Franke, Werner W

    2006-08-01

    The actin-binding protein (ABP) drebrin, isoform E2, is involved in remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and in formation of cell processes, but its role in cell migration has not yet been investigated. Therefore, we have studied the organization of drebrin in motile cultured cells such as murine B16F1 melanoma and human SV80 fibroblast cells, using live cell confocal microscopy. In cells overexpressing DNA constructs encoding drebrin linked to EGFP, numerous long, branched cell processes were formed which slowly retracted and extended, whereas forward movement was halted. In contrast, stably transfected B16F1 cells containing drebrin-EGFP at physiological levels displayed lamellipodia and were able to migrate on laminin. Surprisingly, in such cells, drebrin was absent from anterior lamellipodia but was enriched in a specific juxtanuclear zone, the "drebrin-enriched zone" (DZ), and in the tail. In leading edges of SV80 cells, characterized by pronounced actin microspikes, drebrin was specifically enriched along posterior portions of the microspikes, together with tropomyosin. Drebrin knock-down by small interfering RNAs did not impair movements of SV80 cells. Our results confirm the role of drebrin E2 in the formation of branching processes and further indicate that during cell migration, the protein contributes to retraction of the cell body and the tail but not to lamellipodia formation. In particular, the novel, sizable juxtanuclear DZ structure will have to be characterized in future experiments with respect to its molecular assembly and cell biological functions.

  14. 65-kilodalton protein phosphorylated by interleukin 2 stimulation bears two putative actin-binding sites and two calcium-binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zu, Youli; Shigesada, Katsuya; Hanaoka, Masao; Namba, Yuziro ); Nishida, Eisuke ); Kubota, Ichiro ); Kohno, Michiaki )

    1990-09-11

    The authors have previously characterized a 65-kilodalton protein (p65) as an interleukin 2 stimulated phosphoprotein in human T cells and showed that three endopeptide sequences of p65 are present in the sequence of l-plastin. In this paper, they present the complete primary structure of p65 based on the cDNA isolated from a human T lymphocyte (KUT-2) cDNA library. Analysis of p65 sequences and the amino acid composition of cleaved p65 N-terminal peptide indicated that the deduced p65 amino acid sequence exactly coincides with that of l-plastin over the C-terminal 580 residues and has a 57-residue extension at the N-terminus to l-plastin. Computer-assisted structural analysis revealed that p65 is a multidomain molecule involving at least three intriguing functional domains: two putative calcium-binding sites along the N-terminal 80 amino acid residues; a putative calmodulin-binding site following the calcium-binding region; and two tandem repeats of putative actin-binding domains in its middle and C-terminal parts, each containing approximately 240 amino acid residues. These results suggest that p65 belongs to actin-binding proteins.

  15. Direct Observation of Tropomyosin Binding to Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, William M.; Lehman, William; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Tropomyosin is an elongated α-helical coiled-coil that binds to seven consecutive actin subunits along the long-pitch helix of actin filaments. Once bound, tropomyosin polymerizes end-to-end and both stabilizes F-actin and regulates access of various actin binding proteins including myosin in muscle and non-muscle cells. Single tropomyosin molecules bind weakly to F-actin with millimolar Kd, whereas the end-to-end linked tropomyosin associates with about a one thousand-fold greater affinity. Despite years of study, the assembly mechanism of tropomyosin onto actin filaments remains unclear. In the current study, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to directly monitor the cooperative binding of fluorescently labeled tropomyosin molecules to phalloidin-stabilized actin filaments. We find that tropomyosin molecules assemble from multiple growth sites following random low affinity binding of single molecules to actin. As the length of the tropomyosin chain increases, the probability of detachment decreases, which leads to further chain growth. Tropomyosin chain extension is linearly dependent on tropomyosin concentration, occurring at approximately 100 monomers/(μM*s). The random tropomyosin binding to F-actin leads to discontinuous end-to-end association where gaps in the chain continuity smaller than the required seven sequential actin monomers are available. Direct observation of tropomyosin detachment revealed the number of gaps in actin-bound tropomyosin, the time course of gap annealing, and the eventual filament saturation process. PMID:26033920

  16. The enhancement of nuclear receptor transcriptional activation by a mouse actin-binding protein, alpha actinin 2.

    PubMed

    Huang, S M; Huang, C J; Wang, W M; Kang, J C; Hsu, W C

    2004-04-01

    The p160 coactivators, steroid receptor coactivator 1, glucocorticoid receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) and the activator of thyroid and retinoic acid receptor, have two activation domains, AD1 and AD2, which transmit the activation signal from the DNA-bound nuclear receptor to the chromatin and/or transcription machinery. In screening for mammalian proteins that bind the AD2 of GRIP1, we identified a mouse actin-binding protein, alpha actinin 2 (mACTN2). mACTN2 was expressed in the heart, skeletal muscle, lung, brain and testis, but there was no expression in the spleen, liver or kidney. Interestingly, the expression level of mACTN2 in the developing embryo depended on the embryonic stage. We further demonstrated that mACTN2 could enhance two transactivation activities of GRIP1, which in turn could enhance the homodimerization of mACTN2. Importantly, mACTN2 not only served as a primary coactivator for androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and thyroid receptor activities, but also acted synergistically with GRIP1 to enhance these nuclear receptor (NR) functions. However, the NR binding motif, LXXLL, conserved in mACTN2 and other actinin family proteins, might be a dispensable domain for its coactivator roles in NRs. These findings suggested that mACTN2 might play an important role in GRIP1-induced NR coactivator functions.

  17. Actin polymerization is stimulated by actin cross-linking protein palladin.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H; Beck, Moriah R

    2016-02-15

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the co-ordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. In the present study, we show that the actin-binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro cross-linking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of globular or monomeric actin (G-actin), akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or through conformational changes.

  18. Actin binding domain of filamin distinguishes posterior from anterior actin filaments in migrating Dictyostelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Keitaro; Nagasaki, Akira; Adachi, Hiroyuki; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.

    2016-01-01

    Actin filaments in different parts of a cell interact with specific actin binding proteins (ABPs) and perform different functions in a spatially regulated manner. However, the mechanisms of those spatially-defined interactions have not been fully elucidated. If the structures of actin filaments differ in different parts of a cell, as suggested by previous in vitro structural studies, ABPs may distinguish these structural differences and interact with specific actin filaments in the cell. To test this hypothesis, we followed the translocation of the actin binding domain of filamin (ABDFLN) fused with photoswitchable fluorescent protein (mKikGR) in polarized Dictyostelium cells. When ABDFLN-mKikGR was photoswitched in the middle of a polarized cell, photoswitched ABDFLN-mKikGR rapidly translocated to the rear of the cell, even though actin filaments were abundant in the front. The speed of translocation (>3 μm/s) was much faster than that of the retrograde flow of cortical actin filaments. Rapid translocation of ABDFLN-mKikGR to the rear occurred normally in cells lacking GAPA, the only protein, other than actin, known to bind ABDFLN. We suggest that ABDFLN recognizes a certain feature of actin filaments in the rear of the cell and selectively binds to them, contributing to the posterior localization of filamin.

  19. Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A Activation by Competition with WH2 Domain Proteins for Actin Binding

    PubMed Central

    Weissbach, Julia; Schikora, Franziska; Weber, Anja; Kessels, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are coactivators of serum response factor (SRF)-mediated gene expression. Activation of MRTF-A occurs in response to alterations in actin dynamics and critically requires the dissociation of repressive G-actin–MRTF-A complexes. However, the mechanism leading to the release of MRTF-A remains unclear. Here we show that WH2 domains compete directly with MRTF-A for actin binding. Actin nucleation-promoting factors, such as N-WASP and WAVE2, as well as isolated WH2 domains, including those of Spire2 and Cobl, activate MRTF-A independently of changes in actin dynamics. Simultaneous inhibition of Arp2-Arp3 or mutation of the CA region only partially reduces MRTF-A activation by N-WASP and WAVE2. Recombinant WH2 domains and the RPEL domain of MRTF-A bind mutually exclusively to cellular and purified G-actin in vitro. The competition by different WH2 domains correlates with MRTF-SRF activation. Following serum stimulation, nonpolymerizable actin dissociates from MRTF-A, and de novo formation of the G-actin–RPEL complex is impaired by a transferable factor. Our work demonstrates that WH2 domains activate MRTF-A and contribute to target gene regulation by a competitive mechanism, independently of their role in actin filament formation. PMID:26976641

  20. YIH1 is an actin-binding protein that inhibits protein kinase GCN2 and impairs general amino acid control when overexpressed.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Swanson, Mark J; Ashcraft, Emily A; Jennings, Jennifer L; Fekete, Richard A; Link, Andrew J; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2004-07-16

    The general amino acid control (GAAC) enables yeast cells to overcome amino acid deprivation by activation of the alpha subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha) kinase GCN2 and consequent induction of GCN4, a transcriptional activator of amino acid biosynthetic genes. Binding of GCN2 to GCN1 is required for stimulation of GCN2 kinase activity by uncharged tRNA in starved cells. Here we show that YIH1, when overexpressed, dampens the GAAC response (Gcn- phenotype) by suppressing eIF2alpha phosphorylation by GCN2. The overexpressed YIH1 binds GCN1 and reduces GCN1-GCN2 complex formation, and, consistent with this, the Gcn- phenotype produced by YIH1 overexpression is suppressed by GCN2 overexpression. YIH1 interacts with the same GCN1 fragment that binds GCN2, and this YIH1-GCN1 interaction requires Arg-2259 in GCN1 in vitro and in full-length GCN1 in vivo, as found for GCN2-GCN1 interaction. However, deletion of YIH1 does not increase eIF2alpha phosphorylation or derepress the GAAC, suggesting that YIH1 at native levels is not a general inhibitor of GCN2 activity. We discovered that YIH1 normally resides in a complex with monomeric actin, rather than GCN1, and that a genetic reduction in actin levels decreases the GAAC response. This Gcn- phenotype was partially suppressed by deletion of YIH1, consistent with YIH1-mediated inhibition of GCN2 in actin-deficient cells. We suggest that YIH1 resides in a YIH1-actin complex and may be released for inhibition of GCN2 and stimulation of protein synthesis under specialized conditions or in a restricted cellular compartment in which YIH1 is displaced from monomeric actin.

  1. A polar-localized iron-binding protein determines the polar targeting of Burkholderia BimA autotransporter and actin tail formation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuhe; Xu, Yue; Yao, Qing; Niu, Miao; Shao, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens including Shigella, Listeria, Mycobacteria, Rickettsia and Burkholderia spp. deploy a specialized surface protein onto one pole of the bacteria to induce filamentous actin tail formation for directional movement within host cytosol. The mechanism underlying polar targeting of the actin tail proteins is unknown. Here we perform a transposon screen in Burkholderia thailandensis and identify a conserved bimC that is required for actin tail formation mediated by BimA from B. thailandensis and its closely related pathogenic species B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. bimC is located upstream of bimA in the same operon. Loss of bimC results in even distribution of BimA on the outer membrane surface, where actin polymerization still occurs. BimC is targeted to the same bacterial pole independently of BimA. BimC confers polar targeting of BimA prior to BimA translocation across bacterial inner membrane. BimC is an iron-binding protein, requiring a four-cysteine cluster at the carboxyl terminus. Mutation of the cysteine cluster disrupts BimC polar localization. Truncation analyses identify the transmembrane domain in BimA being responsible for its polar targeting. Consistently, BimC can interact with BimA transmembrane domain in an iron binding-dependent manner. Our study uncovers a new mechanism that determines the polar distribution of bacteria-induced actin tail in infected host cells.

  2. MARCKS actin-binding capacity mediates actin filament assembly during mitosis in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Krista; Mello, Tommaso; Liotta, Francesco; Galli, Andrea; Caligiuri, Alessandra; Annunziato, Francesco; Pinzani, Massimo

    2012-08-15

    Cross-linking between the actin cytoskeleton and plasma membrane actin-binding proteins is a key interaction responsible for the mechanical properties of the mitotic cell. Little is known about the identity, the localization, and the function of actin filament-binding proteins during mitosis in human hepatic stellate cells (hHSC). The aim of the present study was to identify and analyze the cross talk between actin and myristoylated alanine-rich kinase C substrate (MARCKS), an important PKC substrate and actin filament-binding protein, during mitosis in primary hHSC. Confocal analysis and chromosomal fraction analysis of mitotic hHSC demonstrated that phosphorylated (P)-MARCKS displays distinct phase-dependent localizations, accumulates at the perichromosomal layer, and is a centrosomal protein belonging to the chromosomal cytosolic fraction. Aurora B kinase (AUBK), an important mitotic regulator, β-actin, and P-MARCKS concentrate at the cytokinetic midbody during cleavage furrow formation. This localization is critical since MARCKS-depletion in hHSC is characterized by a significant loss in cytosolic actin filaments and cortical β-actin that induces cell cycle inhibition and dislocation of AUBK. A depletion of AUBK in hHSC affects cell cycle, resulting in multinucleation. Quantitative live cell imaging demonstrates that the actin filament-binding capacity of MARCKS is key to regulate mitosis since the cell cycle inhibitory effect in MARCKS-depleted cells caused abnormal cell morphology and an aberrant cytokinesis, resulting in a significant increase in cell cycle time. These findings implicate that MARCKS, an important PKC substrate, is essential for proper cytokinesis and that MARCKS and its partner actin are key mitotic regulators during cell cycle in hHSC.

  3. Identification of regions within the Legionella pneumophila VipA effector protein involved in actin binding and polymerization and in interference with eukaryotic organelle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bugalhão, Joana N; Mota, Luís Jaime; Franco, Irina S

    2016-02-01

    The Legionella pneumophila effector protein VipA is an actin nucleator that co-localizes with actin filaments and early endosomes in infected macrophages and which interferes with organelle trafficking when expressed in yeast. To identify the regions of VipA involved in its subcellular localization and functions, we ectopically expressed specific VipA mutant proteins in eukaryotic cells. This indicated that the characteristic punctate distribution of VipA depends on its NH2 -terminal (amino acid residues 1-133) and central coiled-coil (amino acid residues 133-206) regions, and suggested a role for the COOH-terminal (amino acid residues 206-339) region in association with actin filaments and for the NH2 -terminal in co-localization with early endosomes. Co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro assays showed that the COOH-terminal region of VipA is necessary and sufficient to mediate actin binding, and is essential but insufficient to induce microfilament formation. Assays in yeast revealed that the NH2 and the COOH-terminal regions, and possibly an NPY motif within the NH2 region of VipA, are necessary for interference with organelle trafficking. Overall, this suggests that subversion of eukaryotic vesicular trafficking by VipA involves both its ability to associate with early endosomes via its NH2 -terminal region and its capacity to bind and polymerize actin through its COOH-terminal region.

  4. Actin binding to lipid-inserted alpha-actinin.

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, M; Zimmermann, R M; Bärmann, M; Gaub, H E

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of alpha-actinin with lipid films and actin filaments was investigated. First alpha-actinin was incorporated in lipid films at the air/water interface. Injection of alpha-actinin into the subphase of a lipid monolayer led to a significant increase of the surface pressure only for lipid films consisting of a mixture of a negatively charged lipid with a high proportion of diacylglycerol. These alpha-actinin-containing films were transferred onto silanized quartz slides. Photobleaching experiments in the evanescent field allowed quantification of the lateral number density of the lipid-bound alpha-actinin. In combination with the area increase from the monolayer experiments, the photobleaching measurements suggest that alpha-actinin is incorporated into the lipid film in such a way that actin binding sites are accessible from the bulk phase. Binding experiments confirmed that the alpha-actinin selectively binds actin filaments in this configuration. We also showed that, in contrast to actin filaments which are adsorbed directly onto planar surfaces, the alpha-actinin-bound actin filaments are recognized and cleaved by the actin-severing protein gelsolin. Thus we have constructed an in vitro system which opens new ways for investigations of membrane-associated actin-binding proteins and of the physical behavior of actin filaments in the close neighborhood to membranes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:8298017

  5. Linking microfilaments to intracellular membranes: the actin-binding and vesicle-associated protein comitin exhibits a mannose-specific lectin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, E; Fucini, P; Stewart, M; Noegel, A A; Schleicher, M

    1996-01-01

    Comitin is a 24 kDa actin-binding protein from Dictyostelium discoideum that is located primarily on Golgi and vesicle membranes. We have probed the molecular basis of comitin's interaction with both actin and membranes using a series of truncation mutants obtained by expressing the appropriate cDNA in Escherichia coli. Comitin dimerizes in solution; its principle actin-binding activity is located between residues 90 and 135. The N-terminal 135 'core' residues of comitin contain a 3-fold sequence repeat that is homologous to several monocotyledon lectins and which retains key residues that determine these lectins' three-dimensional structure and mannose binding. These repeats of comitin appear to mediate its interaction with mannose residues in glycoproteins or glycolipids on the cytoplasmic surface of membrane vesicles from D.discoideum, and comitin can be released from membranes with mannose. Our data indicate that comitin binds to vesicle membranes via mannose residues and, by way of its interaction with actin, links these membranes to the cytoskeleton. Images PMID:8635456

  6. Two separate functions are encoded by the carboxyl-terminal domains of the yeast cyclase-associated protein and its mammalian homologs. Dimerization and actin binding.

    PubMed

    Zelicof, A; Protopopov, V; David, D; Lin, X Y; Lustgarten, V; Gerst, J E

    1996-07-26

    The yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was identified as a component of the RAS-activated cyclase complex. CAP consists of two functional domains separated by a proline-rich region. One domain, which localizes to the amino terminus, mediates RAS signaling through adenylyl cyclase, while a domain at the carboxyl terminus is involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis. Recently, the carboxyl terminus of yeast CAP was shown to sequester actin, but whether this function has been conserved, and is the sole function of this domain, is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal domains of CAP and CAP homologs have two separate functions. We show that carboxyl-terminals of both yeast CAP and a mammalian CAP homolog, MCH1, bind to actin. We also show that this domain contains a signal for dimerization, allowing both CAP and MCH1 to form homodimers and heterodimers. The properties of actin binding and dimerization are mediated by separate regions on the carboxyl terminus; the last 27 amino acids of CAP being critical for actin binding. Finally, we present evidence that links a segment of the proline-rich region of CAP to its localization in yeast. Together, these results suggest that all three domains of CAP proteins are functional.

  7. An actin-binding protein, CAP, is expressed in a subset of rat taste bud cells.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Y; Yasuoka, A; Asano-Miyoshi, M; Abe, K; Emori, Y

    2001-02-12

    Single cell cDNA libraries were constructed from taste bud cells of rat circumvallate papillae. Using three steps of screening, including differential hybridization, sequence analyses and in situ hybridization, a clone encoding a rat homolog of yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) was identified to be highly expressed in a subset of taste bud cells.

  8. Farnesylcysteine analogues inhibit store-regulated Ca2+ entry in human platelets: evidence for involvement of small GTP-binding proteins and actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, J A; Sage, S O

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of Ca(2+) entry into fura-2-loaded human platelets by preventing the prenylation of proteins such as small GTP-binding proteins. The farnesylcysteine analogues farnesylthioacetic acid (FTA) and N-acetyl-S-geranylgeranyl-L-cysteine (AGGC), which are inhibitors of the methylation of prenylated and geranylgeranylated proteins respectively, significantly decreased thrombin-evoked increases in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in the presence, but not in the absence, of external Ca(2+), suggesting a relatively selective inhibition of Ca(2+) entry over internal release. Both these compounds and N-acetyl-S-farnesyl-L-cysteine, which had similar effects to those of FTA, also decreased Ca(2+) entry evoked by the depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin. The inactive control N-acetyl-S-geranyl-L-cysteine was without effect. Patulin, an inhibitor of prenylation that is inert with respect to methyltransferases, also decreased store-regulated Ca(2+) entry. Cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, significantly decreased store-regulated Ca(2+) entry in a time-dependent manner. Both cytochalasin D and the farnesylcysteine analogues FTA and AGGC inhibited actin polymerization; however, when evoking the same extent of decrease in actin filament formation, FTA and AGGC showed greater inhibitory effects on Ca(2+) entry, indicating a cytoskeleton-independent component in the regulation of Ca(2+) entry by small GTP-binding-protein. These findings suggest that prenylated proteins such as small GTP-binding proteins are involved in store-regulated Ca(2+) entry through actin cytoskeleton-dependent and cytoskeleton-independent mechanisms in human platelets. PMID:10727417

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans Kettin, a Large Immunoglobulin-like Repeat Protein, Binds to Filamentous Actin and Provides Mechanical Stability to the Contractile Apparatuses in Body Wall Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kanako; Yu, Robinson; Mohri, Kurato

    2006-01-01

    Kettin is a large actin-binding protein with immunoglobulin-like (Ig) repeats, which is associated with the thin filaments in arthropod muscles. Here, we report identification and functional characterization of kettin in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that one of the monoclonal antibodies that were raised against C. elegans muscle proteins specifically reacts with kettin (Ce-kettin). We determined the entire cDNA sequence of Ce-kettin that encodes a protein of 472 kDa with 31 Ig repeats. Arthropod kettins are splice variants of much larger connectin/titin-related proteins. However, the gene for Ce-kettin is independent of other connectin/titin-related genes. Ce-kettin localizes to the thin filaments near the dense bodies in both striated and nonstriated muscles. The C-terminal four Ig repeats and the adjacent non-Ig region synergistically bind to actin filaments in vitro. RNA interference of Ce-kettin caused weak disorganization of the actin filaments in body wall muscle. This phenotype was suppressed by inhibiting muscle contraction by a myosin mutation, but it was enhanced by tetramisole-induced hypercontraction. Furthermore, Ce-kettin was involved in organizing the cytoplasmic portion of the dense bodies in cooperation with α-actinin. These results suggest that kettin is an important regulator of myofibrillar organization and provides mechanical stability to the myofibrils during contraction. PMID:16597697

  10. Pharmacological characterization of actin-binding (-)-doliculide.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Florian; Braig, Simone; Chen, Tao; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Vollmar, Angelika M

    2014-09-15

    Natural compounds offer a broad spectrum of potential drug candidates against human malignancies. Several cytostatic drugs, which are in clinical use for decades, derive directly from natural sources or are synthetically optimized derivatives of natural lead structures. An eukaryote target molecule to which many natural derived anti-cancer drugs bind to is the microtubule network. Of similar importance for the cell is the actin cytoskeleton, responsible for cell movements, migration of cells and cytokinesis. Nature provides also a broad range of compounds directed against actin as intracellular target, but none of these actin-targeting compounds has ever been brought to clinical trials. One reason why actin-binding compounds have not yet been considered for further clinical investigations is that little is known about their pharmacological properties in cancer cells. Herein, we focused on the closer characterization of doliculide, an actin binding natural compound of marine origin in the breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231. We used fluorescence-recovery-after-photobleaching (FRAP) analysis to determine doliculide's early effects on the actin cytoskeleton and rhodamin-phalloidin staining for long-term effects on the actin CSK. After validating the disruption of the actin network, we further investigated the functional effects of doliculide. Doliculide treatment leads to inhibition of proliferation and impairs the migratory potential. Finally, we could also show that doliculide leads to the induction of apoptosis in both cell lines. Our data for the first time provide a closer characterization of doliculide in breast cancer cells and propagate doliculide for further investigations as lead structure and potential therapeutic option as actin-targeting compound.

  11. Investigation of hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity in mice deficient in the actin-binding protein Drebrin

    PubMed Central

    Willmes, Claudia G.; Mack, Till G. A.; Ledderose, Julia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Wozny, Christian; Eickholt, Britta J.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in controlling the structure and function of synapses. It is vital for activity-dependent modulation of synaptic transmission and long-term changes in synaptic morphology associated with memory consolidation. Several regulators of actin dynamics at the synapse have been identified, of which a salient one is the postsynaptic actin stabilising protein Drebrin (DBN). It has been suggested that DBN modulates neurotransmission and changes in dendritic spine morphology associated with synaptic plasticity. Given that a decrease in DBN levels is correlated with cognitive deficits associated with ageing and dementia, it was hypothesised that DBN protein abundance instructs the integrity and function of synapses. We created a novel DBN deficient mouse line. Analysis of gross brain and neuronal morphology revealed no phenotype in the absence of DBN. Electrophysiological recordings in acute hippocampal slices and primary hippocampal neuronal cultures showed that basal synaptic transmission, and both long-term and homeostatic synaptic plasticity were unchanged, suggesting that loss of DBN is not sufficient in inducing synapse dysfunction. We propose that the overall lack of changes in synaptic function and plasticity in DBN deficient mice may indicate robust compensatory mechanisms that safeguard cytoskeleton dynamics at the synapse. PMID:28198431

  12. UNC-45/CRO1/She4p (UCS) Protein Forms Elongated Dimer and Joins Two Myosin Heads Near Their Actin Binding Region

    SciTech Connect

    H Shi; G Blobel

    2011-12-31

    UNC-45/CRO1/She4p (UCS) proteins have variously been proposed to affect the folding, stability, and ATPase activity of myosins. They are the only proteins known to interact directly with the motor domain. To gain more insight into UCS function, we determined the atomic structure of the yeast UCS protein, She4p, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. We found that 16 helical repeats are organized into an L-shaped superhelix with an amphipathic N-terminal helix dangling off the short arm of the L-shaped molecule. In the crystal, She4p forms a 193-{angstrom}-long, zigzag-shaped dimer through three distinct and evolutionary conserved interfaces. We have identified She4p's C-terminal region as a ligand for a 27-residue-long epitope on the myosin motor domain. Remarkably, this region consists of two adjacent, but distinct, binding epitopes localized at the nucleotide-responsive cleft between the nucleotide- and actin-filament-binding sites. One epitope is situated inside the cleft, the other outside the cleft. After ATP hydrolysis and Pi ejection, the cleft narrows at its base from 20 to 12 {angstrom} thereby occluding the inside the cleft epitope, while leaving the adjacent, outside the cleft binding epitope accessible to UCS binding. Hence, one cycle of higher and lower binding affinity would accompany one ATP hydrolysis cycle and a single step in the walk on an actin filament rope. We propose that a UCS dimer links two myosins at their motor domains and thereby functions as one of the determinants for step size of myosin on actin filaments.

  13. New Insights into Mechanism and Regulation of Actin Capping Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, John A.; Sept, David

    2008-01-01

    The heterodimeric actin capping protein, referred to here as “CP,” is an essential element of the actin cytoskeleton, binding to the barbed ends of actin filaments and regulating their polymerization. In vitro, CP has a critical role in the dendritic nucleation process of actin assembly mediated by Arp2/3 complex, and in vivo, CP is important for actin assembly and actin-based process of morphogenesis and differentiation. Recent studies have provided new insight into the mechanism of CP binding the barbed end, which raises new possibilities for the dynamics of CP and actin in cells. In addition, a number of molecules that bind and regulate CP have been discovered, suggesting new ideas for how CP may integrate into diverse processes of cell physiology. PMID:18544499

  14. Myosin IIIB uses an actin-binding motif in its espin-1 cargo to reach the tips of actin protrusions.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Raymond C; Manor, Uri; Salles, Felipe T; Grati, M'hamed; Dose, Andrea C; Unrath, William C; Quintero, Omar A; Yengo, Christopher M; Kachar, Bechara

    2012-02-21

    Myosin IIIA (MYO3A) targets actin protrusion tips using a motility mechanism dependent on both motor and tail actin-binding activity [1]. We show that myosin IIIB (MYO3B) lacks tail actin-binding activity and is unable to target COS7 cell filopodia tips, yet is somehow able to target stereocilia tips. Strikingly, when MYO3B is coexpressed with espin-1 (ESPN1), a MYO3A cargo protein endogenously expressed in stereocilia [2], MYO3B targets and carries ESPN1 to COS7 filopodia tips. We show that this tip localization is lost when we remove the ESPN1 C terminus actin-binding site. We also demonstrate that, like MYO3A [2], MYO3B can elongate filopodia by transporting ESPN1 to the polymerizing end of actin filaments. The mutual dependence of MYO3B and ESPN1 for tip localization reveals a novel mechanism for the cell to regulate myosin tip localization via a reciprocal relationship with cargo that directly participates in actin binding for motility. Our results are consistent with a novel form of motility for class III myosins that requires both motor and tail domain actin-binding activity and show that the actin-binding tail can be replaced by actin-binding cargo. This study also provides a framework to better understand the late-onset hearing loss phenotype in patients with MYO3A mutations.

  15. Identification and characterization of the actin-binding motif of phostensin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Fan; Lai, Ning-Sheng; Huang, Kuang-Yung; Huang, Hsien-Lu; Lu, Ming-Chi; Lin, Yu-Shan; Chen, Chun-Yu; Liu, Su-Qin; Lin, Ta-Hsien; Huang, Hsien-Bin

    2012-11-28

    Phostensin, a protein phosphatase 1 F-actin cytoskeleton-targeting subunit encoded by KIAA1949, consists of 165 amino acids and caps the pointed ends of actin filaments. Sequence alignment analyses suggest that the C-terminal region of phostensin, spanning residues 129 to 155, contains a consensus actin-binding motif. Here, we have verified the existence of an actin-binding motif in the C-terminal domain of phostensin using colocalization, F-actin co-sedimentation and single filament binding assays. Our data indicate that the N-terminal region of phostensin (1-129) cannot bind to actin filaments and cannot retard the pointed end elongation of gelsolin-actin seeds. Furthermore, the C-terminal region of phostensin (125-165) multiply bind to the sides of actin filaments and lacks the ability to block the pointed end elongation, suggesting that the actin-binding motif is located in the C-terminal region of the phostensin. Further analyses indicate that phostensin binding to the pointed end of actin filament requires N-terminal residues 35 to 51. These results suggest that phostensin might fold into a rigid structure, allowing the N-terminus to sterically hinder the binding of C-terminus to the sides of actin filament, thus rendering phostensin binding to the pointed ends of actin filaments.

  16. Probing the flexibility of tropomyosin and its binding to filamentous actin using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Barua, Bipasha; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E

    2013-10-15

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is a coiled-coil protein that binds to filamentous actin (F-actin) and regulates its interactions with actin-binding proteins like myosin by moving between three positions on F-actin (the blocked, closed, and open positions). To elucidate the molecular details of Tm flexibility in relation to its binding to F-actin, we conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations for both Tm alone and Tm-F-actin complex in the presence of explicit solvent (total simulation time >400 ns). Based on the simulations, we systematically analyzed the local flexibility of the Tm coiled coil using multiple parameters. We found a good correlation between the regions with high local flexibility and a number of destabilizing regions in Tm, including six clusters of core alanines. Despite the stabilization by F-actin binding, the distribution of local flexibility in Tm is largely unchanged in the absence and presence of F-actin. Our simulations showed variable fluctuations of individual Tm periods from the closed position toward the open position. In addition, we performed Tm-F-actin binding calculations based on the simulation trajectories, which support the importance of Tm flexibility to Tm-F-actin binding. We identified key residues of Tm involved in its dynamic interactions with F-actin, many of which have been found in recent mutational studies to be functionally important, and the rest of which will make promising targets for future mutational experiments.

  17. Actin-binding protein coronin 1A controls osteoclastic bone resorption by regulating lysosomal secretion of cathepsin K

    PubMed Central

    Ohmae, Saori; Noma, Naruto; Toyomoto, Masayasu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Takeiri, Masatoshi; Fuji, Hiroaki; Takemoto, Kenji; Iwaisako, Keiko; Fujita, Tomoko; Takeda, Norihiko; Kawatani, Makoto; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Asagiri, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix proteins via the secretion of lysosomal enzymes. However, the precise mechanisms by which lysosomal components are transported and fused to the bone-apposed plasma membrane, termed ruffled border membrane, remain elusive. Here, we identified coronin 1A as a negative regulator of exocytotic release of cathepsin K, one of the most important bone-degrading enzymes in osteoclasts. The modulation of coronin 1A expression did not alter osteoclast differentiation and extracellular acidification, but strongly affected the secretion of cathepsin K and osteoclast bone-resorption activity, suggesting the coronin 1A-mediated regulation of lysosomal trafficking and protease exocytosis. Further analyses suggested that coronin 1A prevented the lipidation-mediated sorting of the autophagy-related protein LC3 to the ruffled border and attenuated lysosome–plasma membrane fusion. In this process, the interactions between coronin 1A and actin were crucial. Collectively, our findings indicate that coronin 1A is a pivotal component that regulates lysosomal fusion and the secretion pathway in osteoclast-lineage cells and may provide a novel therapeutic target for bone diseases. PMID:28300073

  18. Actin-binding protein coronin 1A controls osteoclastic bone resorption by regulating lysosomal secretion of cathepsin K.

    PubMed

    Ohmae, Saori; Noma, Naruto; Toyomoto, Masayasu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Takeiri, Masatoshi; Fuji, Hiroaki; Takemoto, Kenji; Iwaisako, Keiko; Fujita, Tomoko; Takeda, Norihiko; Kawatani, Makoto; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Asagiri, Masataka

    2017-03-16

    Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix proteins via the secretion of lysosomal enzymes. However, the precise mechanisms by which lysosomal components are transported and fused to the bone-apposed plasma membrane, termed ruffled border membrane, remain elusive. Here, we identified coronin 1A as a negative regulator of exocytotic release of cathepsin K, one of the most important bone-degrading enzymes in osteoclasts. The modulation of coronin 1A expression did not alter osteoclast differentiation and extracellular acidification, but strongly affected the secretion of cathepsin K and osteoclast bone-resorption activity, suggesting the coronin 1A-mediated regulation of lysosomal trafficking and protease exocytosis. Further analyses suggested that coronin 1A prevented the lipidation-mediated sorting of the autophagy-related protein LC3 to the ruffled border and attenuated lysosome-plasma membrane fusion. In this process, the interactions between coronin 1A and actin were crucial. Collectively, our findings indicate that coronin 1A is a pivotal component that regulates lysosomal fusion and the secretion pathway in osteoclast-lineage cells and may provide a novel therapeutic target for bone diseases.

  19. Cooperativity and Frustration in Protein-Mediated Parallel Actin Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Homin; Drew, Kirstin R. Purdy; Bartles, James R.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Grason, Gregory M.

    2009-12-01

    We examine the mechanism of bundling of cytoskeletal actin filaments by two representative bundling proteins, fascin and espin. Small-angle x-ray studies show that increased binding from linkers drives a systematic overtwist of actin filaments from their native state, which occurs in a linker-dependent fashion. Fascin bundles actin into a continuous spectrum of intermediate twist states, while espin only allows for untwisted actin filaments and fully overtwisted bundles. Based on a coarse-grained, statistical model of protein binding, we show that the interplay between binding geometry and the intrinsic flexibility of linkers mediates cooperative binding in the bundle. We attribute the respective continuous (discontinuous) bundling mechanisms of fascin (espin) to difference in the stiffness of linker bonds themselves.

  20. Interaction of actin and the chloroplast protein import apparatus.

    PubMed

    Jouhet, Juliette; Gray, John C

    2009-07-10

    Actin filaments are major components of the cytoskeleton and play numerous essential roles, including chloroplast positioning and plastid stromule movement, in plant cells. Actin is present in pea chloroplast envelope membrane preparations and is localized at the surface of the chloroplasts, as shown by agglutination of intact isolated chloroplasts by antibodies to actin. To identify chloroplast envelope proteins involved in actin binding, we have carried out actin co-immunoprecipitation and co-sedimentation experiments on detergent-solubilized pea chloroplast envelope membranes. Proteins co-immunoprecipitated with actin were identified by mass spectrometry and by Western blotting and included the Toc159, Toc75, Toc34, and Tic110 components of the TOC-TIC protein import apparatus. A direct interaction of actin with Escherichia coli-expressed Toc159, but not Toc33, was shown by co-sedimentation experiments, suggesting that Toc159 is the component of the TOC complex that interacts with actin on the cytosolic side of the outer envelope membrane. The physiological significance of this interaction is unknown, but it may play a role in the import of nuclear-encoded photosynthesis proteins.

  1. Actin, actin-related proteins and profilin in diatoms: a comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Aumeier, Charlotte; Polinski, Ellen; Menzel, Diedrik

    2015-10-01

    Diatoms are heterokont unicellular algae with a widespread distribution throughout all aquatic habitats. Research on diatoms has advanced significantly over the last decade due to available genetic transformation methods and publicly available genome databases. Yet up to now, proteins involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton in diatoms are largely unknown. Consequently, this work focuses on actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs) encoded in the diatom genomes of Thalassiosira pseudonana, Thalassiosira oceanica, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries. Our comparative genomic study revealed that most diatoms possess only a single conventional actin and a small set of ARPs. Among these are the highly conserved cytoplasmic Arp1 protein and the nuclear Arp4 as well as Arp6. Diatom genomes contain genes coding for two structurally different homologues of Arp4 that might serve specific functions. All diatom species examined here lack ARP2 and ARP3 proteins, suggesting that diatoms are not capable of forming the Arp2/3 complex, which is essential in most eukaryotes for actin filament branching and plus-end dynamics. Interestingly, none of the sequenced representatives of the Bacillariophyta phylum code for profilin. Profilin is an essential actin-binding protein regulating the monomer actin pool and is involved in filament plus-end dynamics. This is the first report of organisms not containing profilin.

  2. The ADF/cofilin family: actin-remodeling proteins.

    PubMed

    Maciver, Sutherland K; Hussey, Patrick J

    2002-01-01

    The ADF/cofilins are a family of actin-binding proteins expressed in all eukaryotic cells so far examined. Members of this family remodel the actin cytoskeleton, for example during cytokinesis, when the actin-rich contractile ring shrinks as it contracts through the interaction of ADF/cofilins with both monomeric and filamentous actin. The depolymerizing activity is twofold: ADF/cofilins sever actin filaments and also increase the rate at which monomers leave the filament's pointed end. The three-dimensional structure of ADF/cofilins is similar to a fold in members of the gelsolin family of actin-binding proteins in which this fold is typically repeated three or six times; although both families bind polyphosphoinositide lipids and actin in a pH-dependent manner, they share no obvious sequence similarity. Plants and animals have multiple ADF/cofilin genes, belonging in vertebrates to two types, ADF and cofilins. Other eukaryotes (such as yeast, Acanthamoeba and slime moulds) have a single ADF/cofilin gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the ADF/cofilins reveals that, with few exceptions, their relationships reflect conventional views of the relationships between the major groups of organisms.

  3. Binding of actin to thioglycolic acid modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles for antibody conjugation.

    PubMed

    Maltas, Esra; Ertekin, Betul

    2015-01-01

    Thioglycolic acid modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TG-APTS-SPION) were synthesized by using (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) and thioglycolic acid (TG). Actin was immobilized on the nanoparticle surfaces. Binding amount of the actin (Act) on TG-APTS-SPIONs was determined by using a calibration curve equation that was drawn using fluorescence spectra at 280 and 342 nm of excitation and emission wavelengths. Anti-Actin (anti-Act) was interacted with the actin immobilized TG-APTS-SPIONs as primary antibody. Horse radish peroxidase (HRP) was also interacted with antibody conjugated nanoparticles as secondary antibody. The binding capacity of primary and secondary antibodies was also estimated by fluorescence spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis were also clarified binding of the protein and antibodies to the nanoparticles' surfaces. Western blot analysis was also done for actin conjunction with anti Act antibody to confirm binding of the antibody to the protein.

  4. Allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments drives mutually exclusive binding with cofilin and myosin.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Kien Xuan; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Kijima, Saku T; Kodera, Noriyuki; Ueno, Hiroaki; Furutani-Umezu, Nozomi; Nakajima, Jun; Noguchi, Taro Q P; Nagasaki, Akira; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2016-10-20

    Heavy meromyosin (HMM) of myosin II and cofilin each binds to actin filaments cooperatively and forms clusters along the filaments, but it is unknown whether the two cooperative bindings are correlated and what physiological roles they have. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that HMM-GFP and cofilin-mCherry each bound cooperatively to different parts of actin filaments when they were added simultaneously in 0.2 μM ATP, indicating that the two cooperative bindings are mutually exclusive. In 0.1 mM ATP, the motor domain of myosin (S1) strongly inhibited the formation of cofilin clusters along actin filaments. Under this condition, most actin protomers were unoccupied by S1 at any given moment, suggesting that transiently bound S1 alters the structure of actin filaments cooperatively and/or persistently to inhibit cofilin binding. Consistently, cosedimentation experiments using copolymers of actin and actin-S1 fusion protein demonstrated that the fusion protein affects the neighboring actin protomers, reducing their affinity for cofilin. In reciprocal experiments, cofilin-actin fusion protein reduced the affinity of neighboring actin protomers for S1. Thus, allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments contributes to mutually exclusive cooperative binding of myosin II and cofilin to actin filaments, and presumably to the differential localization of both proteins in cells.

  5. Allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments drives mutually exclusive binding with cofilin and myosin

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Kien Xuan; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Kijima, Saku T.; Kodera, Noriyuki; Ueno, Hiroaki; Furutani-Umezu, Nozomi; Nakajima, Jun; Noguchi, Taro Q. P.; Nagasaki, Akira; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy meromyosin (HMM) of myosin II and cofilin each binds to actin filaments cooperatively and forms clusters along the filaments, but it is unknown whether the two cooperative bindings are correlated and what physiological roles they have. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that HMM-GFP and cofilin-mCherry each bound cooperatively to different parts of actin filaments when they were added simultaneously in 0.2 μM ATP, indicating that the two cooperative bindings are mutually exclusive. In 0.1 mM ATP, the motor domain of myosin (S1) strongly inhibited the formation of cofilin clusters along actin filaments. Under this condition, most actin protomers were unoccupied by S1 at any given moment, suggesting that transiently bound S1 alters the structure of actin filaments cooperatively and/or persistently to inhibit cofilin binding. Consistently, cosedimentation experiments using copolymers of actin and actin-S1 fusion protein demonstrated that the fusion protein affects the neighboring actin protomers, reducing their affinity for cofilin. In reciprocal experiments, cofilin-actin fusion protein reduced the affinity of neighboring actin protomers for S1. Thus, allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments contributes to mutually exclusive cooperative binding of myosin II and cofilin to actin filaments, and presumably to the differential localization of both proteins in cells. PMID:27762277

  6. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  7. Identification of obscure yet conserved actin-associated proteins in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Paredez, Alexander R; Nayeri, Arash; Xu, Jennifer W; Krtková, Jana; Cande, W Zacheus

    2014-06-01

    Consistent with its proposed status as an early branching eukaryote, Giardia has the most divergent actin of any eukaryote and lacks core actin regulators. Although conserved actin-binding proteins are missing from Giardia, its actin is utilized similarly to that of other eukaryotes and functions in core cellular processes such as cellular organization, endocytosis, and cytokinesis. We set out to identify actin-binding proteins in Giardia using affinity purification coupled with mass spectroscopy (multidimensional protein identification technology [MudPIT]) and have identified >80 putative actin-binding proteins. Several of these have homology to conserved proteins known to complex with actin for functions in the nucleus and flagella. We validated localization and interaction for seven of these proteins, including 14-3-3, a known cytoskeletal regulator with a controversial relationship to actin. Our results indicate that although Giardia lacks canonical actin-binding proteins, there is a conserved set of actin-interacting proteins that are evolutionarily indispensable and perhaps represent some of the earliest functions of the actin cytoskeleton.

  8. Identification of Obscure yet Conserved Actin-Associated Proteins in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Nayeri, Arash; Xu, Jennifer W.; Krtková, Jana; Cande, W. Zacheus

    2014-01-01

    Consistent with its proposed status as an early branching eukaryote, Giardia has the most divergent actin of any eukaryote and lacks core actin regulators. Although conserved actin-binding proteins are missing from Giardia, its actin is utilized similarly to that of other eukaryotes and functions in core cellular processes such as cellular organization, endocytosis, and cytokinesis. We set out to identify actin-binding proteins in Giardia using affinity purification coupled with mass spectroscopy (multidimensional protein identification technology [MudPIT]) and have identified >80 putative actin-binding proteins. Several of these have homology to conserved proteins known to complex with actin for functions in the nucleus and flagella. We validated localization and interaction for seven of these proteins, including 14-3-3, a known cytoskeletal regulator with a controversial relationship to actin. Our results indicate that although Giardia lacks canonical actin-binding proteins, there is a conserved set of actin-interacting proteins that are evolutionarily indispensable and perhaps represent some of the earliest functions of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24728194

  9. Actin-interacting Protein 1 Promotes Disassembly of Actin-depolymerizing Factor/Cofilin-bound Actin Filaments in a pH-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Kazumi; Hayakawa, Kimihide; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Actin-interacting protein 1 (AIP1) is a conserved WD repeat protein that promotes disassembly of actin filaments when actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is present. Although AIP1 is known to be essential for a number of cellular events involving dynamic rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, the regulatory mechanism of the function of AIP1 is unknown. In this study, we report that two AIP1 isoforms from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, known as UNC-78 and AIPL-1, are pH-sensitive in enhancement of actin filament disassembly. Both AIP1 isoforms only weakly enhance disassembly of ADF/cofilin-bound actin filaments at an acidic pH but show stronger disassembly activity at neutral and basic pH values. However, a severing-defective mutant of UNC-78 shows pH-insensitive binding to ADF/cofilin-decorated actin filaments, suggesting that the process of filament severing or disassembly, but not filament binding, is pH-dependent. His-60 of AIP1 is located near the predicted binding surface for the ADF/cofilin-actin complex, and an H60K mutation of AIP1 partially impairs its pH sensitivity, suggesting that His-60 is involved in the pH sensor for AIP1. These biochemical results suggest that pH-dependent changes in AIP1 activity might be a novel regulatory mechanism of actin filament dynamics. PMID:26747606

  10. Synthetic mimetics of actin-binding macrolides: rational design of actin-targeted drugs.

    PubMed

    Perrins, Richard D; Cecere, Giuseppe; Paterson, Ian; Marriott, Gerard

    2008-03-01

    Actin polymerization and dynamics are involved in a wide range of cellular processes such as cell division and migration of tumor cells. At sites of cell lysis, such as those occurring during a stroke or inflammatory lung diseases, actin is released into the serum where it polymerizes, leading to problems with clot dissolution and sputum viscosity. Therefore, drugs that target these actin-mediated processes may provide one mechanism to treat these conditions. Marine-organism-derived macrolides, such as reidispongiolide A, can bind to, sever, and inhibit polymerization of actin. Our studies show that the function of these complex macrolides resides in their tail region, whereas the head group stabilizes the actin-drug complex. Synthetic compounds derived from this tail region could therefore be used as a mimetic of the natural product, providing a range of designer compounds to treat actin-associated diseases or as probes to study actin polymerization.

  11. Effects of binding factors on structural elements in F-actin.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Damon; Stamm, John D; Altenbach, Christian; Shvetsov, Alexander; Kokabi, Kaveh; Rubenstein, Peter A; Hubbell, Wayne L; Reisler, Emil

    2009-01-20

    Understanding the dynamics of the actin filament is essential to a detailed description of their interactions and role in the cell. Previous studies have linked the dynamic properties of actin filaments (F-actin) to three structural elements contributing to a hydrophobic pocket, namely, the hydrophobic loop, the DNase I binding loop, and the C-terminus. Here, we examine how these structural elements are influenced by factors that stabilize or destabilize F-actin, using site-directed spin-labeled (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), fluorescence, and cross-linking techniques. Specifically, we employ cofilin, an actin destabilizing protein that binds and severs filaments, and phalloidin, a fungal toxin that binds and stabilizes F-actin. We find that cofilin shifts both the DNase I binding loop and the hydrophobic loop away from the C-terminus in F-actin, as demonstrated by weakened spin-spin interactions, and alters the environment of spin probes on residues of these two loops. In contrast, although phalloidin strongly stabilizes F-actin, it causes little or no local change in the environment of the loop residues. This indicates that the stabilizing effect of phalloidin is achieved mainly through constraining structural fluctuations in F-actin and suggests that factors and interactions that control these fluctuations have an important role in the cytoskeleton dynamics.

  12. PTP1B-dependent regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling by the actin-binding protein Mena.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shannon K; Oudin, Madeleine J; Tadros, Jenny; Neil, Jason; Del Rosario, Amanda; Joughin, Brian A; Ritsma, Laila; Wyckoff, Jeff; Vasile, Eliza; Eddy, Robert; Philippar, Ulrike; Lussiez, Alisha; Condeelis, John S; van Rheenen, Jacco; White, Forest; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Gertler, Frank B

    2015-11-01

    During breast cancer progression, alternative mRNA splicing produces functionally distinct isoforms of Mena, an actin regulator with roles in cell migration and metastasis. Aggressive tumor cell subpopulations express Mena(INV), which promotes tumor cell invasion by potentiating EGF responses. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we report that Mena associates constitutively with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B and mediates a novel negative feedback mechanism that attenuates receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. On EGF stimulation, complexes containing Mena and PTP1B are recruited to the EGFR, causing receptor dephosphorylation and leading to decreased motility responses. Mena also interacts with the 5' inositol phosphatase SHIP2, which is important for the recruitment of the Mena-PTP1B complex to the EGFR. When Mena(INV) is expressed, PTP1B recruitment to the EGFR is impaired, providing a mechanism for growth factor sensitization to EGF, as well as HGF and IGF, and increased resistance to EGFR and Met inhibitors in signaling and motility assays. In sum, we demonstrate that Mena plays an important role in regulating growth factor-induced signaling. Disruption of this attenuation by Mena(INV) sensitizes tumor cells to low-growth factor concentrations, thereby increasing the migration and invasion responses that contribute to aggressive, malignant cell phenotypes.

  13. Lamellipodin promotes actin assembly by clustering Ena/VASP proteins and tethering them to actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Scott D; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Enabled/Vasodilator (Ena/VASP) proteins promote actin filament assembly at multiple locations, including: leading edge membranes, focal adhesions, and the surface of intracellular pathogens. One important Ena/VASP regulator is the mig-10/Lamellipodin/RIAM family of adaptors that promote lamellipod formation in fibroblasts and drive neurite outgrowth and axon guidance in neurons. To better understand how MRL proteins promote actin network formation we studied the interactions between Lamellipodin (Lpd), actin, and VASP, both in vivo and in vitro. We find that Lpd binds directly to actin filaments and that this interaction regulates its subcellular localization and enhances its effect on VASP polymerase activity. We propose that Lpd delivers Ena/VASP proteins to growing barbed ends and increases their polymerase activity by tethering them to filaments. This interaction represents one more pathway by which growing actin filaments produce positive feedback to control localization and activity of proteins that regulate their assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06585.001 PMID:26295568

  14. The actin cytoskeleton may control the polar distribution of an auxin transport protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, G. K.; Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The gravitropic bending of plants has long been linked to the changes in the transport of the plant hormone auxin. To understand the mechanism by which gravity alters auxin movement, it is critical to know how polar auxin transport is initially established. In shoots, polar auxin transport is basipetal (i.e., from the shoot apex toward the base). It is driven by the basal localization of the auxin efflux carrier complex. One mechanism for localizing this efflux carrier complex to the basal membrane may be through attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. The efflux carrier protein complex is believed to consist of several polypeptides, including a regulatory subunit that binds auxin transport inhibitors, such as naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Several lines of experimentation have been used to determine if the NPA binding protein interacts with actin filaments. The NPA binding protein has been shown to partition with the actin cytoskeleton during detergent extraction. Agents that specifically alter the polymerization state of the actin cytoskeleton change the amount of NPA binding protein and actin recovered in these cytoskeletal pellets. Actin-affinity columns were prepared with polymers of actin purified from zucchini hypocotyl tissue. NPA binding activity was eluted in a single peak from the actin filament column. Cytochalasin D, which fragments the actin cytoskeleton, was shown to reduce polar auxin transport in zucchini hypocotyls. The interaction of the NPA binding protein with the actin cytoskeleton may localize it in one plane of the plasma membrane, and thereby control the polarity of auxin transport.

  15. Role of the actin-binding protein profilin1 in radial migration and glial cell adhesion of granule neurons in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Rust, Marco B; Kullmann, Jan A; Witke, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Profilins are small G-actin-binding proteins essential for cytoskeletal dynamics. Of the four mammalian profilin isoforms, profilin1 shows a broad expression pattern, profilin2 is abundant in the brain, and profilin3 and profilin4 are restricted to the testis. In vitro studies on cancer and epithelial cell lines suggested a role for profilins in cell migration and cell-cell adhesion. Genetic studies in mice revealed the importance of profilin1 in neuronal migration, while profilin2 has apparently acquired a specific function in synaptic physiology. We recently reported a mouse mutant line lacking profilin1 in the brain; animals display morphological defects that are typical for impaired neuronal migration. We found that during cerebellar development, profilin1 is specifically required for radial migration and glial cell adhesion of granule neurons. Profilin1 mutants showed cerebellar hypoplasia and aberrant organization of cerebellar cortex layers, with ectopically arranged granule neurons. In this commentary, we briefly introduce the profilin family and summarize the current knowledge on profilin activity in cell migration and adhesion. Employing cerebellar granule cells as a model, we shed some light on the mechanisms by which profilin1 may control radial migration and glial cell adhesion. Finally, a potential implication of profilin1 in human developmental neuropathies is discussed.

  16. The evolution of the actin binding NET superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Timothy J.; Deeks, Michael J.; Wang, Pengwei; Hussey, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Networked (NET) superfamily are plant-specific actin binding proteins which specifically label different membrane compartments and identify specialized sites of interaction between actin and membranes unique to plants. There are 13 members of the superfamily in Arabidopsis, which group into four distinct clades or families. NET homologs are absent from the genomes of metazoa and fungi; furthermore, in plantae, NET sequences are also absent from the genome of mosses and more ancient extant plant clades. A single family of the NET proteins is found encoded in the club moss genome, an extant species of the earliest vascular plants. Gymnosperms have examples from families 4 and 3, with a hybrid form of NET1 and 2 which shows characteristics of both NET1 and NET2. In addition to NET3 and 4 families, the NET1 and pollen-expressed NET2 families are found only as independent sequences in Angiosperms. This is consistent with the divergence of reproductive actin. The four families are conserved across Monocots and Eudicots, with the numbers of members of each clade expanding at this point, due, in part, to regions of genome duplication. Since the emergence of the NET superfamily at the dawn of vascular plants, they have continued to develop and diversify in a manner which has mirrored the divergence and increasing complexity of land-plant species. PMID:24926301

  17. The evolution of the actin binding NET superfamily.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Timothy J; Deeks, Michael J; Wang, Pengwei; Hussey, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Networked (NET) superfamily are plant-specific actin binding proteins which specifically label different membrane compartments and identify specialized sites of interaction between actin and membranes unique to plants. There are 13 members of the superfamily in Arabidopsis, which group into four distinct clades or families. NET homologs are absent from the genomes of metazoa and fungi; furthermore, in plantae, NET sequences are also absent from the genome of mosses and more ancient extant plant clades. A single family of the NET proteins is found encoded in the club moss genome, an extant species of the earliest vascular plants. Gymnosperms have examples from families 4 and 3, with a hybrid form of NET1 and 2 which shows characteristics of both NET1 and NET2. In addition to NET3 and 4 families, the NET1 and pollen-expressed NET2 families are found only as independent sequences in Angiosperms. This is consistent with the divergence of reproductive actin. The four families are conserved across Monocots and Eudicots, with the numbers of members of each clade expanding at this point, due, in part, to regions of genome duplication. Since the emergence of the NET superfamily at the dawn of vascular plants, they have continued to develop and diversify in a manner which has mirrored the divergence and increasing complexity of land-plant species.

  18. Disease-associated mutant alpha-actinin-4 reveals a mechanism for regulating its F-actin-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Weins, Astrid; Schlondorff, Johannes S; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Denker, Bradley M; Hartwig, John H; Stossel, Thomas P; Pollak, Martin R

    2007-10-09

    Alpha-actinin-4 is a widely expressed protein that employs an actin-binding site with two calponin homology domains to crosslink actin filaments (F-actin) in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner in vitro. An inherited, late-onset form of kidney failure is caused by point mutations in the alpha-actinin-4 actin-binding domain. Here we show that alpha-actinin-4/F-actin aggregates, observed in vivo in podocytes of humans and mice with disease, likely form as a direct result of the increased actin-binding affinity of the protein. We document that exposure of a buried actin-binding site 1 in mutant alpha-actinin-4 causes an increase in its actin-binding affinity, abolishes its Ca(2+) regulation in vitro, and diverts its normal localization from actin stress fibers and focal adhesions in vivo. Inactivation of this buried actin-binding site returns the affinity of the mutant to that of the WT protein and abolishes aggregate formation in cells. In vitro, actin filaments crosslinked by the mutant alpha-actinin-4 exhibit profound changes of structural and biomechanical properties compared with WT alpha-actinin-4. On a molecular level, our findings elucidate the physiological importance of a dynamic interaction of alpha-actinin with F-actin in podocytes in vivo. We propose that a conformational change with full exposure of actin-binding site 1 could function as a switch mechanism to regulate the actin-binding affinity of alpha-actinin and possibly other calponin homology domain proteins under physiological conditions.

  19. A membrane cytoskeleton from Dictyostelium discoideum. I. Identification and partial characterization of an actin-binding activity

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum plasma membranes isolated by each of three procedures bind F-actin. The interactions between these membranes and actin are examined by a novel application of falling ball viscometry. Treating the membranes as multivalent actin-binding particles analogous to divalent actin-gelation factors, we observe large increases in viscosity (actin cross-linking) when membranes of depleted actin and myosin are incubated with rabbit skeletal muscle F-actin. Pre- extraction of peripheral membrane proteins with chaotropes or the inclusion of Triton X-100 during the assay does not appreciably diminish this actin cross-linking activity. Lipid vesicles, heat- denatured membranes, proteolyzed membranes, or membranes containing endogenous actin show minimal actin cross-linking activity. Heat- denatured, but not proteolyzed, membranes regain activity when assayed in the presence of Triton X-100. Thus, integral membrane proteins appear to be responsible for some or all of the actin cross-linking activity of D. discoideum membranes. In the absence of MgATP, Triton X- 100 extraction of isolated D. discoideum membranes results in a Triton- insoluble residue composed of actin, myosin, and associated membrane proteins. The inclusion of MgATP before and during Triton extraction greatly diminishes the amount of protein in the Triton-insoluble residue without appreciably altering its composition. Our results suggest the existence of a protein complex stabilized by actin and/or myosin (membrane cytoskeleton) associated with the D. discoideum plasma membrane. PMID:6894148

  20. Total synthesis of (-)-doliculide, structure-activity relationship studies and its binding to F-actin.

    PubMed

    Matcha, Kiran; Madduri, Ashoka V R; Roy, Sayantani; Ziegler, Slava; Waldmann, Herbert; Hirsch, Anna K H; Minnaard, Adriaan J

    2012-11-26

    Actin, an abundant protein in most eukaryotic cells, is one of the targets in cancer research. Recently, a great deal of attention has been paid to the synthesis and function of actin-targeting compounds and their use as effective molecular probes in chemical biology. In this study, we have developed an efficient synthesis of (-)-doliculide, a very potent actin binder with a higher cell-membrane permeability than phalloidin. Actin polymerization assays with (-)-doliculide and two analogues on HeLa and BSC-1 cells, together with a prediction of their binding mode to F-actin by unbiased computational docking, show that doliculide stabilizes F-actin in a similar way to jasplakinolide and chondramide C.

  1. Arg/Abl2 modulates the affinity and stoichiometry of binding of cortactin to F-actin.

    PubMed

    MacGrath, Stacey M; Koleske, Anthony J

    2012-08-21

    The Abl family nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Arg/Abl2 interacts with cortactin, an Arp2/3 complex activator, to promote actin-driven cell edge protrusion. Both Arg and cortactin bind directly to filamentous actin (F-actin). While protein-protein interactions between Arg and cortactin have well-characterized downstream effects on the actin cytoskeleton, it is unclear whether and how Arg and cortactin affect each other's actin binding properties. We employ actin cosedimentation assays to show that Arg increases the stoichiometry of binding of cortactin to F-actin at saturation. Using a series of Arg deletion mutants and fragments, we demonstrate that the Arg C-terminal calponin homology domain is necessary and sufficient to increase the stoichiometry of binding of cortactin to F-actin. We also show that interactions between Arg and cortactin are required for optimal affinity between cortactin and the actin filament. Our data suggest a mechanism for Arg-dependent stimulation of binding of cortactin to F-actin, which may facilitate the recruitment of cortactin to sites of local actin network assembly.

  2. Identification of another actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex binding site in neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) that complements actin polymerization induced by the Arp2/3 complex activating (VCA) domain of N-WASP.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, S; Miki, H; Takenawa, T

    2001-08-31

    Neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) is an essential regulator of actin cytoskeleton formation via its association with the actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex. It is believed that the C-terminal Arp2/3 complex-activating domain (verprolin homology, cofilin homology, and acidic (VCA) or C-terminal region of WASP family proteins domain) of N-WASP is usually kept masked (autoinhibition) but is opened upon cooperative binding of upstream regulators such as Cdc42 and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). However, the mechanisms of autoinhibition and association with Arp2/3 complex are still unclear. We focused on the acidic region of N-WASP because it is thought to interact with Arp2/3 complex and may be involved in autoinhibition. Partial deletion of acidic residues from the VCA portion alone greatly reduced actin polymerization activity, demonstrating that the acidic region contributes to Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. Surprisingly, the same partial deletion of the acidic region in full-length N-WASP led to constitutive activity comparable with the activity seen with the VCA portion. Therefore, the acidic region in full-length N-WASP plays an indispensable role in the formation of the autoinhibited structure. This mutant contains WASP-homology (WH) 1 domain with weak affinity to the Arp2/3 complex, leading to activity in the absence of part of the acidic region. Furthermore, the actin comet formed by the DeltaWH1 mutant of N-WASP was much smaller than that of wild-type N-WASP. Partial deletion of acidic residues did not affect actin comet size, indicating the importance of the WH1 domain in actin structure formation. Collectively, the acidic region of N-WASP plays an essential role in Arp2/3 complex activation as well as in the formation of the autoinhibited structure, whereas the WH1 domain complements the activation of the Arp2/3 complex achieved through the VCA portion.

  3. Myosin binding surface on actin probed by hydroxyl radical footprinting and site-directed labels.

    PubMed

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Kamal, J K Amisha; Benchaar, Sabrina; Chance, Mark R; Reisler, Emil

    2011-11-25

    Actin and myosin are the two main proteins required for cell motility and muscle contraction. The structure of their strongly bound complex-rigor state-is a key for delineating the functional mechanism of actomyosin motor. Current knowledge of that complex is based on models obtained from the docking of known atomic structures of actin and myosin subfragment 1 (S1; the head and neck region of myosin) into low-resolution electron microscopy electron density maps, which precludes atomic- or side-chain-level information. Here, we use radiolytic protein footprinting for global mapping of sites across the actin molecules that are impacted directly or allosterically by myosin binding to actin filaments. Fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and cysteine actin mutants are used for independent, residue-specific probing of S1 effects on two structural elements of actin. We identify actin residue candidates involved in S1 binding and provide experimental evidence to discriminate between the regions of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Focusing on the role of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop) and the W-loop residues of actin in their interactions with S1, we found that the emission properties of acrylodan and the mobility of electron paramagnetic resonance spin labels attached to cysteine mutants of these residues change strongly and in a residue-specific manner upon S1 binding, consistent with the recently proposed direct contacts of these loops with S1. As documented in this study, the direct and indirect changes on actin induced by myosin are more extensive than known until now and attest to the importance of actin dynamics to actomyosin function.

  4. Structural and Functional Dissection of the Abp1 ADFH Actin-binding Domain Reveals Versatile In Vivo Adapter Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Quintero-Monzon,O.; Rodal, A.; Strokopytov, B.; Almo, S.; Goode, B.

    2005-01-01

    Abp1 is a multidomain protein that regulates the Arp2/3 complex and links proteins involved in endocytosis to the actin cytoskeleton. All of the proposed cellular functions of Abp1 involve actin filament binding, yet the actin binding site(s) on Abp1 have not been identified, nor has the importance of actin binding for Abp1 localization and function in vivo been tested. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Abp1 actin-binding actin depolymerizing factor homology (ADFH) domain and dissect its activities by mutagenesis. Abp1-ADFH domain and ADF/cofilin structures are similar, and they use conserved surfaces to bind actin; however, there are also key differences that help explain their differential effects on actin dynamics. Using point mutations, we demonstrate that actin binding is required for localization of Abp1 in vivo, the lethality caused by Abp1 overexpression, and the ability of Abp1 to activate Arp2/3 complex. Furthermore, we genetically uncouple ABP1 functions that overlap with SAC6, SLA1, and SLA2, showing they require distinct combinations of activities and interactions. Together, our data provide the first structural and functional view of the Abp1-actin interaction and show that Abp1 has distinct cellular roles as an adapter, linking different sets of ligands for each function.

  5. Loss of cargo binding in the human myosin VI deafness mutant (R1166X) leads to increased actin filament binding

    PubMed Central

    Arden, Susan D.; Tumbarello, David A.; Butt, Tariq; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in myosin VI have been associated with autosomal-recessive (DFNB37) and autosomal-dominant (DFNA22) deafness in humans. Here, we characterise an myosin VI nonsense mutation (R1166X) that was identified in a family with hereditary hearing loss in Pakistan. This mutation leads to the deletion of the C-terminal 120 amino acids of the myosin VI cargo-binding domain, which includes the WWY-binding motif for the adaptor proteins LMTK2, Tom1 as well as Dab2. Interestingly, compromising myosin VI vesicle-binding ability by expressing myosin VI with the R1166X mutation or with single point mutations in the adaptor-binding sites leads to increased F-actin binding of this myosin in vitro and in vivo. As our results highlight the importance of cargo attachment for regulating actin binding to the motor domain, we perform a detailed characterisation of adaptor protein binding and identify single amino acids within myosin VI required for binding to cargo adaptors. We not only show that the adaptor proteins can directly interact with the cargo-binding tail of myosin VI, but our in vitro studies also suggest that multiple adaptor proteins can bind simultaneously to non-overlapping sites in the myosin VI tail. In conclusion, our characterisation of the human myosin VI deafness mutant (R1166X) suggests that defects in cargo binding may leave myosin VI in a primed/activated state with an increased actin-binding ability. PMID:27474411

  6. Yeast mitochondria contain ATP-sensitive, reversible actin-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarino, D A; Boldogh, I; Smith, M G; Rosand, J; Pon, L A

    1994-01-01

    Sedimentation assays were used to demonstrate and characterize binding of isolated yeast mitochondria to phalloidin-stabilized yeast F-actin. These actin-mitochondrial interactions are ATP sensitive, saturable, reversible, and do not depend upon mitochondrial membrane potential. Protease digestion of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins or saturation of myosin-binding sites on F-actin with the S1 subfragment of skeletal myosin block binding. These observations indicate that a protein (or proteins) on the mitochondrial surface mediates ATP-sensitive, reversible binding of mitochondria to the lateral surface of microfilaments. Actin copurifies with mitochondria during subcellular fractionation and is released from the organelle upon treatment with ATP. Thus, actin-mitochondrial interactions resembling those observed in vitro may also exist in intact yeast cells. Finally, a yeast mutant bearing a temperature-sensitive mutation in the actin-encoding ACT1 gene (act1-3) displays temperature-dependent defects in transfer of mitochondria from mother cells to newly developed buds during yeast cell mitosis. Images PMID:7812049

  7. WAVE binds Ena/VASP for enhanced Arp2/3 complex–based actin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Noguera, Philippe; Abou-Ghali, Majdouline; Manzi, John; Faqir, Fahima; Lamora, Audrey; Guérin, Christophe; Blanchoin, Laurent; Plastino, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The WAVE complex is the main activator of the Arp2/3 complex for actin filament nucleation and assembly in the lamellipodia of moving cells. Other important players in lamellipodial protrusion are Ena/VASP proteins, which enhance actin filament elongation. Here we examine the molecular coordination between the nucleating activity of the Arp2/3 complex and the elongating activity of Ena/VASP proteins for the formation of actin networks. Using an in vitro bead motility assay, we show that WAVE directly binds VASP, resulting in an increase in Arp2/3 complex–based actin assembly. We show that this interaction is important in vivo as well, for the formation of lamellipodia during the ventral enclosure event of Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. Ena/VASP's ability to bind F-actin and profilin-complexed G-actin are important for its effect, whereas Ena/VASP tetramerization is not necessary. Our data are consistent with the idea that binding of Ena/VASP to WAVE potentiates Arp2/3 complex activity and lamellipodial actin assembly. PMID:25355952

  8. αT-Catenin Is a Constitutive Actin-binding α-Catenin That Directly Couples the Cadherin·Catenin Complex to Actin Filaments*

    PubMed Central

    Wickline, Emily D.; Dale, Ian W.; Merkel, Chelsea D.; Heier, Jonathon A.; Stolz, Donna B.

    2016-01-01

    α-Catenin is the primary link between the cadherin·catenin complex and the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian αE-catenin is allosterically regulated: the monomer binds the β-catenin·cadherin complex, whereas the homodimer does not bind β-catenin but interacts with F-actin. As part of the cadherin·catenin complex, αE-catenin requires force to bind F-actin strongly. It is not known whether these properties are conserved across the mammalian α-catenin family. Here we show that αT (testes)-catenin, a protein unique to amniotes that is expressed predominantly in the heart, is a constitutive actin-binding α-catenin. We demonstrate that αT-catenin is primarily a monomer in solution and that αT-catenin monomer binds F-actin in cosedimentation assays as strongly as αE-catenin homodimer. The β-catenin·αT-catenin heterocomplex also binds F-actin with high affinity unlike the β-catenin·αE-catenin complex, indicating that αT-catenin can directly link the cadherin·catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Finally, we show that a mutation in αT-catenin linked to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, V94D, promotes homodimerization, blocks β-catenin binding, and in cardiomyocytes disrupts localization at cell-cell contacts. Together, our data demonstrate that αT-catenin is a constitutively active actin-binding protein that can physically couple the cadherin·catenin complex to F-actin in the absence of tension. We speculate that these properties are optimized to meet the demands of cardiomyocyte adhesion. PMID:27231342

  9. eNOS S-nitrosylates β-actin on Cys374 and regulates PKC-θ at the immune synapse by impairing actin binding to profilin-1.

    PubMed

    García-Ortiz, Almudena; Martín-Cofreces, Noa B; Ibiza, Sales; Ortega, Ángel; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Alicia; Trullo, Antonio; Victor, Víctor M; Calvo, Enrique; Sot, Begoña; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Vázquez, Jesús; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M

    2017-04-01

    The actin cytoskeleton coordinates the organization of signaling microclusters at the immune synapse (IS); however, the mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We show here that nitric oxide (NO) generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) controls the coalescence of protein kinase C-θ (PKC-θ) at the central supramolecular activation cluster (c-SMAC) of the IS. eNOS translocated with the Golgi to the IS and partially colocalized with F-actin around the c-SMAC. This resulted in reduced actin polymerization and centripetal retrograde flow of β-actin and PKC-θ from the lamellipodium-like distal (d)-SMAC, promoting PKC-θ activation. Furthermore, eNOS-derived NO S-nitrosylated β-actin on Cys374 and impaired actin binding to profilin-1 (PFN1), as confirmed with the transnitrosylating agent S-nitroso-L-cysteine (Cys-NO). The importance of NO and the formation of PFN1-actin complexes on the regulation of PKC-θ was corroborated by overexpression of PFN1- and actin-binding defective mutants of β-actin (C374S) and PFN1 (H119E), respectively, which reduced the coalescence of PKC-θ at the c-SMAC. These findings unveil a novel NO-dependent mechanism by which the actin cytoskeleton controls the organization and activation of signaling microclusters at the IS.

  10. Role of the actin bundling protein fascin in growth cone morphogenesis: localization in filopodia and lamellipodia.

    PubMed

    Cohan, C S; Welnhofer, E A; Zhao, L; Matsumura, F; Yamashiro, S

    2001-02-01

    Growth cones at the distal tips of growing nerve axons contain bundles of actin filaments distributed throughout the lamellipodium and that project into filopodia. The regulation of actin bundling by specific actin binding proteins is likely to play an important role in many growth cone behaviors. Although the actin binding protein, fascin, has been localized in growth cones, little information is available on its functional significance. We used the large growth cones of the snail Helisoma to determine whether fascin was involved in temporal changes in actin filaments during growth cone morphogenesis. Fascin localized to radially oriented actin bundles in lamellipodia (ribs) and filopodia. Using a fascin antibody and a GFP fascin construct, we found that fascin incorporated into actin bundles from the beginning of growth cone formation at the cut end of axons. Fascin associated with most of the actin bundle except the proximal 6--12% adjacent to the central domain, which is the region associated with actin disassembly. Later, during growth cone morphogenesis when actin ribs shortened, the proximal fascin-free zone of bundles increased, but fascin was retained in the distal, filopodial portion of bundles. Treatment with tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), which phosphorylates fascin and decreases its affinity for actin, resulted in loss of all actin bundles from growth cones. Our findings suggest that fascin may be particularly important for the linear structure and dynamics of filopodia and for lamellipodial rib dynamics by regulating filament organization in bundles.

  11. Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin on actin during thin filament activation.

    PubMed

    Lehman, William; Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Our thesis is that thin filament function can only be fully understood and muscle regulation then elucidated if atomic structures of the thin filament are available to reveal the positions of tropomyosin on actin in all physiological states. After all, it is tropomyosin influenced by troponin that regulates myosin-crossbridge cycling on actin and therefore controls contraction in all muscles. In addition, we maintain that a complete appreciation of thin filament activation also requires that the mechanical properties of tropomyosin itself are recognized and then related to the effect of myosin-association on actin. Taking the Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin into account, coupled with our electron microscopy structures and computational chemistry, we propose a comprehensive mechanism for tropomyosin regulatory movement over the actin filament surface that explains the cooperative muscle activation process. In fact, well-known point mutations of critical amino acids on the actin-tropomyosin binding interface disrupt Gestalt-binding and are associated with a number of inherited myopathies. Moreover, dysregulation of tropomyosin may also be a factor that interferes with the gatekeeping operation of non-muscle tropomyosin in the controlling interactions of a wide variety of cellular actin-binding proteins. The clinical relevance of Gestalt-binding is discussed in articles by the Marston and the Gunning groups in this special journal issue devoted to the impact of tropomyosin on biological systems.

  12. Involvement of PCH family proteins in cytokinesis and actin distribution.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, J; Li, R

    2000-04-15

    Pombe Cdc15 homology (PCH) proteins constitute an extensive protein family whose members have been found in diverse eukaryotic organisms. These proteins are characterized by the presence of several conserved sequence and structural motifs. Recent studies in yeast and mammalian cultured cells have implicated these proteins in actin-based processes, in particular, cytokinesis. Here we review the recent findings on the in vivo localization, function, and binding partners of PCH family members. We also provide new microscopy data regarding the in vivo dynamics of a budding yeast PCH protein involved in cytokinesis.

  13. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  14. Direct binding of F actin to the cytoplasmic domain of the alpha 2 integrin chain in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, J. D.; Plopper, G.; Ingber, D. E.; Hartwig, J. H.; Kupper, T. S.

    1995-01-01

    The transmembrane integrins have been shown to interact with the cytoskeleton via noncovalent binding between cytoplasmic domains (CDs) of integrin beta chains and various actin binding proteins within the focal adhesion complex. Direct or indirect integrin alpha chain CD binding to the actin cytoskeleton has not been reported. We show here that actin, as an abundant constituent of focal adhesion complex proteins isolated from fibroblasts, binds strongly and specifically to alpha 2 CD, but not to alpha 1 CD peptide. Similar specific binding to alpha 2 CD peptide was seen for highly purified F actin, free of putative actin-binding proteins. The bound complex of actin and peptide was visualized directly by coprecipitation, and actin binding was abrogated by removal of a five amino acid sequence from the alpha 2 CD peptide. Our findings may explain the earlier observation that, while integrins alpha 2 beta 1 and alpha 1 beta 1 both bind to collagen, only alpha 2 beta 1 can mediate contraction of extracellular collagen matrices.

  15. Protein Kinase D Controls Actin Polymerization and Cell Motility through Phosphorylation of Cortactin*

    PubMed Central

    Eiseler, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; De Kimpe, Line; Van Lint, Johan; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We here identify protein kinase D (PKD) as an upstream regulator of the F-actin-binding protein cortactin and the Arp actin polymerization machinery. PKD phosphorylates cortactin in vitro and in vivo at serine 298 thereby generating a 14-3-3 binding motif. In vitro, a phosphorylation-deficient cortactin-S298A protein accelerated VCA-Arp-cortactin-mediated synergistic actin polymerization and showed reduced F-actin binding, indicative of enhanced turnover of nucleation complexes. In vivo, cortactin co-localized with the nucleation promoting factor WAVE2, essential for lamellipodia extension, in the actin polymerization zone in Heregulin-treated MCF-7 cells. Using a 3-dye FRET-based approach we further demonstrate that WAVE2-Arp and cortactin prominently interact at these structures. Accordingly, cortactin-S298A significantly enhanced lamellipodia extension and directed cell migration. Our data thus unravel a previously unrecognized mechanism by which PKD controls cancer cell motility. PMID:20363754

  16. G-actin sequestering protein thymosin-β4 regulates the activity of myocardin-related transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Ken'ichiro

    2013-08-02

    Myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are robust coactivators of serum response factor (SRF). MRTFs contain three copies of the RPEL motif at their N-terminus, and they bind to monomeric globular actin (G-actin). Previous studies illustrate that G-actin binding inhibits MRTF activity by preventing the MRTFs nuclear accumulation. In the living cells, the majority of G-actin is sequestered by G-actin binding proteins that prevent spontaneous actin polymerization. Here, we demonstrate that the most abundant G-actin sequestering protein thymosin-β4 (Tβ4) was involved in the regulation of subcellular localization and activity of MRTF-A. Tβ4 competed with MRTF-A for G-actin binding; thus, interfering with G-actin-MRTF-A complex formation. Tβ4 overexpression induced the MRTF-A nuclear accumulation and activation of MRTF-SRF signaling. The activation rate of MRTF-A by the Tβ4 mutant L17A, whose affinity for G-actin is very low, was lower than that by wild-type Tβ4. In contrast, the β-actin mutant 3DA, which has a lower affinity for Tβ4, more effectively suppressed MRTF-A activity than wild-type β-actin. Furthermore, ectopic Tβ4 increased the endogenous expression of SRF-dependent actin cytoskeletal genes. Thus, Tβ4 is an important MRTF regulator that controls the G-actin-MRTFs interaction.

  17. Structural definition of the F-actin-binding THATCH domain from HIP1R.

    PubMed

    Brett, Tom J; Legendre-Guillemin, Valerie; McPherson, Peter S; Fremont, Daved H

    2006-02-01

    Huntingtin-interacting protein-1 related (HIP1R) has a crucial protein-trafficking role, mediating associations between actin and clathrin-coated structures at the plasma membrane and trans-Golgi network. Here, we characterize the F-actin-binding region of HIP1R, termed the talin-HIP1/R/Sla2p actin-tethering C-terminal homology (THATCH) domain. The 1.9-A crystal structure of the human HIP1R THATCH core reveals a large sequence-conserved surface patch created primarily by residues from the third and fourth helices of a unique five-helix bundle. Point mutations of seven contiguous patch residues produced significant decreases in F-actin binding. We also show that THATCH domains have a conserved C-terminal latch capable of oligomerizing the core, thereby modulating F-actin engagement. Collectively, these results establish a framework for investigating the links between endocytosis and actin dynamics mediated by THATCH domain-containing proteins.

  18. Nuclear actin and protein 4.1: Essential interactions during nuclear assembly in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Chen, Cynthia; Penman, Sheldon; Heald, Rebecca

    2003-06-11

    Structural protein 4.1, which has crucial interactions within the spectin-actin lattice of the human red cell membrane skeleton, also is widely distributed at diverse intracellular sites in nucleated cells. We previously showed that 4.1 is essential for assembly of functional nuclei in vitro and that the capacity of 4.1 to bind actin is required. Here we report that 4.1 and actin colocalize in mammalian cell nuclei using fluorescence microscopy and, by higher resolution cell whole mount electron microscopy, are associated on nuclear filaments. We also devised a cell-free assay using Xenopus egg extract containing fluorescent actin to follow actin during nuclear assembly. By directly imaging actin under non-perturbing conditions, the total nuclear actin population is retained and is visualized in situ relative to intact chromatin. We detected actin initially when chromatin and nuclear pores began assembling. As the nuclear lamina assembled, but preceding DNA synthesis, a discrete actin network formed throughout the nucleus. Protein 4.1 epitopes also were detected when actin began to accumulate in nuclei, producing a diffuse coincident pattern. As nuclei matured, actin was detected both coincident with and also independent of 4.1 epitopes. To test whether acquisition of nuclear actin is required for nuclear assembly, the actin inhibitor latrunculin A was added to Xenopus egg extracts during nuclear assembly. Latrunculin A strongly perturbed nuclear assembly and produced distorted nuclear structures containing neither actin nor protein 4.1. Our results suggest that actin as well as 4.1 is necessary for nuclear assembly and that 4.1-actin interactions may be critical.

  19. Interactions among a Fimbrin, a Capping Protein, and an Actin-depolymerizing Factor in Organization of the Fission Yeast Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kentaro; Satoh, Kazuomi; Morimatsu, Akeshi; Ohnuma, Masaaki; Mabuchi, Issei

    2001-01-01

    We report studies of the fission yeast fimbrin-like protein Fim1, which contains two EF-hand domains and two actin-binding domains (ABD1 and ABD2). Fim1 is a component of both F-actin patches and the F-actin ring, but not of F-actin cables. Fim1 cross-links F-actin in vitro, but a Fim1 protein lacking either EF-hand domains (Fim1A12) or both the EF-hand domains and ABD1 (Fim1A2) has no actin cross-linking activity. Overexpression of Fim1 induced the formation of F-actin patches throughout the cell cortex, whereas the F-actin patches disappear in cells overexpressing Fim1A12 or Fim1A2. Thus, the actin cross-linking activity of Fim1 is probably important for the formation of F-actin patches. The overexpression of Fim1 also excluded the actin-depolymerizing factor Adf1 from the F-actin patches and inhibited the turnover of actin in these structures. Thus, Fim1 may function in stabilizing the F-actin patches. We also isolated the gene encoding Acp1, a subunit of the heterodimeric F-actin capping protein. fim1 acp1 double null cells showed more severe defects in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton than those seen in each single mutant. Thus, Fim1 and Acp1 may function in a similar manner in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Finally, genetic studies suggested that Fim1 may function in cytokinesis in cooperation with Cdc15 (PSTPIP) and Rng2 (IQGAP), respectively. PMID:11694585

  20. Mammalian CARMIL Inhibits Actin Filament Capping by Capping Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changsong; Pring, Martin; Wear, Martin A.; Huang, Minzhou; Cooper, John A.; Svitkina, Tatyana M.; Zigmond, Sally H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Actin polymerization in cells occurs via filament elongation at the barbed end. Proteins that cap the barbed end terminate this elongation. Heterodimeric capping protein (CP) is an abundant and ubiquitous protein that caps the barbed end. We find that the mouse homolog of the adaptor protein CARMIL (mCARMIL) binds CP with high affinity and decreases its affinity for the barbed end. Addition of mCARMIL to cell extracts increases the rate and extent of Arp2/3 or spectrin-actin seed-induced polymerization. In cells, GFP-mCARMIL concentrates in lamellipodia and increases the fraction of cells with large lamellipodia. Decreasing mCARMIL levels by siRNA transfection lowers theF-actin level and slows cell migration through a mechanism that includes decreased lamellipodia protrusion. This phenotype is reversed by full-length mCARMIL but not mCARMIL lacking the domain that binds CP. Thus, mCARMIL is a key regulator of CP and has profound effects on cell behavior. PMID:16054028

  1. Arabidopsis microtubule-destabilizing protein 25 functions in pollen tube growth by severing actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tao; Liu, Xiaomin; Li, Jiejie; Sun, Jingbo; Song, Leina; Mao, Tonglin

    2014-01-01

    The formation of distinct actin filament arrays in the subapical region of pollen tubes is crucial for pollen tube growth. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the organization and dynamics of the actin filaments in this region remain to be determined. This study shows that Arabidopsis thaliana MICROTUBULE-DESTABILIZING PROTEIN25 (MDP25) has the actin filament-severing activity of an actin binding protein. This protein negatively regulated pollen tube growth by modulating the organization and dynamics of actin filaments in the subapical region of pollen tubes. MDP25 loss of function resulted in enhanced pollen tube elongation and inefficient fertilization. MDP25 bound directly to actin filaments and severed individual actin filaments, in a manner that was dramatically enhanced by Ca(2+), in vitro. Analysis of a mutant that bears a point mutation at the Ca(2+) binding sites demonstrated that the subcellular localization of MDP25 was determined by cytosolic Ca(2+) level in the subapical region of pollen tubes, where MDP25 was disassociated from the plasma membrane and moved into the cytosol. Time-lapse analysis showed that the F-actin-severing frequency significantly decreased and a high density of actin filaments was observed in the subapical region of mdp25-1 pollen tubes. This study reveals a mechanism whereby calcium enhances the actin filament-severing activity of MDP25 in the subapical region of pollen tubes to modulate pollen tube growth.

  2. Functional synergy of actin filament cross-linking proteins.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yiider; Schafer, Benjamin W; Almo, Steven C; Wirtz, Denis

    2002-07-12

    The organization of filamentous actin (F-actin) in resilient networks is coordinated by various F-actin cross-linking proteins. The relative tolerance of cells to null mutations of genes that code for a single actin cross-linking protein suggests that the functions of those proteins are highly redundant. This apparent functional redundancy may, however, reflect the limited resolution of available assays in assessing the mechanical role of F-actin cross-linking/bundling proteins. Using reconstituted F-actin networks and rheological methods, we demonstrate how alpha-actinin and fascin, two F-actin cross-linking/bundling proteins that co-localize along stress fibers and in lamellipodia, could synergistically enhance the resilience of F-actin networks in vitro. These two proteins can generate microfilament arrays that "yield" at a strain amplitude that is much larger than each one of the proteins separately. F-actin/alpha-actinin/fascin networks display strain-induced hardening, whereby the network "stiffens" under shear deformations, a phenomenon that is non-existent in F-actin/fascin networks and much weaker in F-actin/alpha-actinin networks. Strain-hardening is further enhanced at high rates of deformation and high concentrations of actin cross-linking proteins. A simplified model suggests that the optimum results of the competition between the increased stiffness of bundles and their decreased density of cross-links. Our studies support a re-evaluation of the notion of functional redundancy among cytoskeletal regulatory proteins.

  3. Phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal protein CAP1 controls its association with cofilin and actin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guo-Lei; Zhang, Haitao; Wu, Huhehasi; Ghai, Pooja; Field, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell signaling can control the dynamic balance between filamentous and monomeric actin by modulating actin regulatory proteins. One family of actin regulating proteins that controls actin dynamics comprises cyclase-associated proteins 1 and 2 (CAP1 and 2, respectively). However, cell signals that regulate CAPs remained unknown. We mapped phosphorylation sites on mouse CAP1 and found S307 and S309 to be regulatory sites. We further identified glycogen synthase kinase 3 as a kinase phosphorylating S309. The phosphomimetic mutant S307D/S309D lost binding to its partner cofilin and, when expressed in cells, caused accumulation of actin stress fibers similar to that in cells with reduced CAP expression. In contrast, the non-phosphorylatable S307A/S309A mutant showed drastically increased cofilin binding and reduced binding to actin. These results suggest that the phosphorylation serves to facilitate release of cofilin for a subsequent cycle of actin filament severing. Moreover, our results suggest that S307 and S309 function in tandem; neither the alterations in binding cofilin and/or actin, nor the defects in rescuing the phenotype of the enlarged cell size in CAP1 knockdown cells was observed in point mutants of either S307 or S309. In summary, we identify a novel regulatory mechanism of CAP1 through phosphorylation. PMID:25315833

  4. Phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal protein CAP1 controls its association with cofilin and actin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guo-Lei; Zhang, Haitao; Wu, Huhehasi; Ghai, Pooja; Field, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Cell signaling can control the dynamic balance between filamentous and monomeric actin by modulating actin regulatory proteins. One family of actin regulating proteins that controls actin dynamics comprises cyclase-associated proteins 1 and 2 (CAP1 and 2, respectively). However, cell signals that regulate CAPs remained unknown. We mapped phosphorylation sites on mouse CAP1 and found S307 and S309 to be regulatory sites. We further identified glycogen synthase kinase 3 as a kinase phosphorylating S309. The phosphomimetic mutant S307D/S309D lost binding to its partner cofilin and, when expressed in cells, caused accumulation of actin stress fibers similar to that in cells with reduced CAP expression. In contrast, the non-phosphorylatable S307A/S309A mutant showed drastically increased cofilin binding and reduced binding to actin. These results suggest that the phosphorylation serves to facilitate release of cofilin for a subsequent cycle of actin filament severing. Moreover, our results suggest that S307 and S309 function in tandem; neither the alterations in binding cofilin and/or actin, nor the defects in rescuing the phenotype of the enlarged cell size in CAP1 knockdown cells was observed in point mutants of either S307 or S309. In summary, we identify a novel regulatory mechanism of CAP1 through phosphorylation.

  5. Actin-crosslinking protein regulation of filament movement in motility assays: a theoretical model.

    PubMed Central

    Janson, L W; Taylor, D L

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of single actin filaments on a myosin-coated coverslip has been modeled by several authors. One model adds a component of "frictional drag" by myosin heads that oppose movement of the actin filaments. We have extended this concept by including the resistive drag from actin crosslinking proteins to understand better the relationship among crosslinking number, actin-myosin force generation, and motility. The validity of this model is supported by agreement with the experimental results from a previous study in which crosslinking proteins were added with myosin molecules under otherwise standard motility assay conditions. The theoretical relationship provides a means to determine many physical parameters that characterize the interaction between a single actin filament and a single actin-crosslinking molecule (various types). In particular, the force constant of a single filamin molecule is calculated as 1.105 pN, approximately 3 times less than a driving myosin head (3.4 pN). Knowledge of this parameter and others derived from this model allows a better understanding of the interaction between myosin and the actin/actin-binding protein cytoskeleton and the role of actin-binding proteins in the regulation and modulation of motility. PMID:7811954

  6. Structure of the 34 kDa F-actin-bundling protein ABP34 from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Ji-Sun; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2015-09-01

    The crystal structure of the 34 kDa F-actin-bundling protein ABP34 from Dictyostelium discoideum was solved by Ca(2+)/S-SAD phasing and refined at 1.89 Å resolution. ABP34 is a calcium-regulated actin-binding protein that cross-links actin filaments into bundles. Its in vitro F-actin-binding and F-actin-bundling activities were confirmed by a co-sedimentation assay and transmission electron microscopy. The co-localization of ABP34 with actin in cells was also verified. ABP34 adopts a two-domain structure with an EF-hand-containing N-domain and an actin-binding C-domain, but has no reported overall structural homologues. The EF-hand is occupied by a calcium ion with a pentagonal bipyramidal coordination as in the canonical EF-hand. The C-domain structure resembles a three-helical bundle and superposes well onto the rod-shaped helical structures of some cytoskeletal proteins. Residues 216-244 in the C-domain form part of the strongest actin-binding sites (193-254) and exhibit a conserved sequence with the actin-binding region of α-actinin and ABP120. Furthermore, the second helical region of the C-domain is kinked by a proline break, offering a convex surface towards the solvent area which is implicated in actin binding. The F-actin-binding model suggests that ABP34 binds to the side of the actin filament and residues 216-244 fit into a pocket between actin subdomains -1 and -2 through hydrophobic interactions. These studies provide insights into the calcium coordination in the EF-hand and F-actin-binding site in the C-domain of ABP34, which are associated through interdomain interactions.

  7. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin

    SciTech Connect

    Bekyarova, T.I.; Reedy, M.C.; Baumann, B.A.J.; Tregear, R.T.; Ward, A.; Krzic, U.; Prince, K.M.; Perz-Edwards, R.J.; Reconditi, M.; Gore, D.; Irving, T.C.; Reedy, M.K.

    2008-09-03

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the 'steric blocking' mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca{sup 2+} with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at high [Ca{sup 2+}], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca{sup 2+}], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored 'actin target zones.' Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca{sup 2+}] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca{sup 2+}], Vi-'paralyzed' fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa {approx} 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding 'brakes' by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions.

  8. Sequence and Comparative Genomic Analysis of Actin-related ProteinsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Jean; Oma, Yukako; Vallar, Laurent; Friederich, Evelyne; Poch, Olivier; Winsor, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Actin-related proteins (ARPs) are key players in cytoskeleton activities and nuclear functions. Two complexes, ARP2/3 and ARP1/11, also known as dynactin, are implicated in actin dynamics and in microtubule-based trafficking, respectively. ARP4 to ARP9 are components of many chromatin-modulating complexes. Conventional actins and ARPs codefine a large family of homologous proteins, the actin superfamily, with a tertiary structure known as the actin fold. Because ARPs and actin share high sequence conservation, clear family definition requires distinct features to easily and systematically identify each subfamily. In this study we performed an in depth sequence and comparative genomic analysis of ARP subfamilies. A high-quality multiple alignment of ∼700 complete protein sequences homologous to actin, including 148 ARP sequences, allowed us to extend the ARP classification to new organisms. Sequence alignments revealed conserved residues, motifs, and inserted sequence signatures to define each ARP subfamily. These discriminative characteristics allowed us to develop ARPAnno (http://bips.u-strasbg.fr/ARPAnno), a new web server dedicated to the annotation of ARP sequences. Analyses of sequence conservation among actins and ARPs highlight part of the actin fold and suggest interactions between ARPs and actin-binding proteins. Finally, analysis of ARP distribution across eukaryotic phyla emphasizes the central importance of nuclear ARPs, particularly the multifunctional ARP4. PMID:16195354

  9. A mitochondria-anchored isoform of the actin-nucleating spire protein regulates mitochondrial division

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Uri; Bartholomew, Sadie; Golani, Gonen; Christenson, Eric; Kozlov, Michael; Higgs, Henry; Spudich, James; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial division, essential for survival in mammals, is enhanced by an inter-organellar process involving ER tubules encircling and constricting mitochondria. The force for constriction is thought to involve actin polymerization by the ER-anchored isoform of the formin protein inverted formin 2 (INF2). Unknown is the mechanism triggering INF2-mediated actin polymerization at ER-mitochondria intersections. We show that a novel isoform of the formin-binding, actin-nucleating protein Spire, Spire1C, localizes to mitochondria and directly links mitochondria to the actin cytoskeleton and the ER. Spire1C binds INF2 and promotes actin assembly on mitochondrial surfaces. Disrupting either Spire1C actin- or formin-binding activities reduces mitochondrial constriction and division. We propose Spire1C cooperates with INF2 to regulate actin assembly at ER-mitochondrial contacts. Simulations support this model's feasibility and demonstrate polymerizing actin filaments can induce mitochondrial constriction. Thus, Spire1C is optimally positioned to serve as a molecular hub that links mitochondria to actin and the ER for regulation of mitochondrial division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08828.001 PMID:26305500

  10. A mitochondria-anchored isoform of the actin-nucleating spire protein regulates mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Manor, Uri; Bartholomew, Sadie; Golani, Gonen; Christenson, Eric; Kozlov, Michael; Higgs, Henry; Spudich, James; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-08-25

    Mitochondrial division, essential for survival in mammals, is enhanced by an inter-organellar process involving ER tubules encircling and constricting mitochondria. The force for constriction is thought to involve actin polymerization by the ER-anchored isoform of the formin protein inverted formin 2 (INF2). Unknown is the mechanism triggering INF2-mediated actin polymerization at ER-mitochondria intersections. We show that a novel isoform of the formin-binding, actin-nucleating protein Spire, Spire1C, localizes to mitochondria and directly links mitochondria to the actin cytoskeleton and the ER. Spire1C binds INF2 and promotes actin assembly on mitochondrial surfaces. Disrupting either Spire1C actin- or formin-binding activities reduces mitochondrial constriction and division. We propose Spire1C cooperates with INF2 to regulate actin assembly at ER-mitochondrial contacts. Simulations support this model's feasibility and demonstrate polymerizing actin filaments can induce mitochondrial constriction. Thus, Spire1C is optimally positioned to serve as a molecular hub that links mitochondria to actin and the ER for regulation of mitochondrial division.

  11. Reconstitution and dissection of the 600-kDa Srv2/CAP complex: roles for oligomerization and cofilin-actin binding in driving actin turnover.

    PubMed

    Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Jonasson, Erin M; Bertling, Enni; Talarico, Lou; Chaudhry, Faisal; Sihvo, Maarit; Lappalainen, Pekka; Goode, Bruce L

    2009-04-17

    Srv2/cyclase-associated protein is expressed in virtually all plant, animal, and fungal organisms and has a conserved role in promoting actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin-mediated actin turnover. This is achieved by the abilities of Srv2 to recycle cofilin from ADP-actin monomers and to promote nucleotide exchange (ATP for ADP) on actin monomers. Despite this important and universal role in facilitating actin turnover, the mechanism underlying Srv2 function has remained elusive. Previous studies have demonstrated a critical functional role for the G-actin-binding C-terminal half of Srv2. Here we describe an equally important role in vivo for the N-terminal half of Srv2 in driving actin turnover. We pinpoint this activity to a conserved patch of surface residues on the N-terminal dimeric helical folded domain of Srv2, and we show that this functional site interacts with cofilin-actin complexes. Furthermore, we show that this site is essential for Srv2 acceleration of cofilin-mediated actin turnover in vitro. A cognate Srv2-binding site is identified on a conserved surface of cofilin, suggesting that this function likely extends to other organisms. In addition, our analyses reveal that higher order oligomerization of Srv2 depends on its N-terminal predicted coiled coil domain and that oligomerization optimizes Srv2 function in vitro and in vivo. Based on these data, we present a revised model for the mechanism by which Srv2 promotes actin turnover, in which coordinated activities of its N- and C-terminal halves catalyze sequential steps in recycling cofilin and actin monomers.

  12. Diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins is influenced by the activity of dynamic cortical actin.

    PubMed

    Saha, Suvrajit; Lee, Il-Hyung; Polley, Anirban; Groves, Jay T; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2015-11-05

    Molecular diffusion at the surface of living cells is believed to be predominantly driven by thermal kicks. However, there is growing evidence that certain cell surface molecules are driven by the fluctuating dynamics of cortical cytoskeleton. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we measure the diffusion coefficient of a variety of cell surface molecules over a temperature range of 24-37 °C. Exogenously incorporated fluorescent lipids with short acyl chains exhibit the expected increase of diffusion coefficient over this temperature range. In contrast, we find that GPI-anchored proteins exhibit temperature-independent diffusion over this range and revert to temperature-dependent diffusion on cell membrane blebs, in cells depleted of cholesterol, and upon acute perturbation of actin dynamics and myosin activity. A model transmembrane protein with a cytosolic actin-binding domain also exhibits the temperature-independent behavior, directly implicating the role of cortical actin. We show that diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins also becomes temperature dependent when the filamentous dynamic actin nucleator formin is inhibited. However, changes in cortical actin mesh size or perturbation of branched actin nucleator Arp2/3 do not affect this behavior. Thus cell surface diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins and transmembrane proteins that associate with actin is driven by active fluctuations of dynamic cortical actin filaments in addition to thermal fluctuations, consistent with expectations from an "active actin-membrane composite" cell surface.

  13. Diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins is influenced by the activity of dynamic cortical actin

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suvrajit; Lee, Il-Hyung; Polley, Anirban; Groves, Jay T.; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diffusion at the surface of living cells is believed to be predominantly driven by thermal kicks. However, there is growing evidence that certain cell surface molecules are driven by the fluctuating dynamics of cortical cytoskeleton. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we measure the diffusion coefficient of a variety of cell surface molecules over a temperature range of 24–37°C. Exogenously incorporated fluorescent lipids with short acyl chains exhibit the expected increase of diffusion coefficient over this temperature range. In contrast, we find that GPI-anchored proteins exhibit temperature-independent diffusion over this range and revert to temperature-dependent diffusion on cell membrane blebs, in cells depleted of cholesterol, and upon acute perturbation of actin dynamics and myosin activity. A model transmembrane protein with a cytosolic actin-binding domain also exhibits the temperature-independent behavior, directly implicating the role of cortical actin. We show that diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins also becomes temperature dependent when the filamentous dynamic actin nucleator formin is inhibited. However, changes in cortical actin mesh size or perturbation of branched actin nucleator Arp2/3 do not affect this behavior. Thus cell surface diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins and transmembrane proteins that associate with actin is driven by active fluctuations of dynamic cortical actin filaments in addition to thermal fluctuations, consistent with expectations from an “active actin-membrane composite” cell surface. PMID:26378258

  14. CAS-1, a C. elegans cyclase-associated protein, is required for sarcomeric actin assembly in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    Assembly of contractile apparatuses in striated muscle requires precisely regulated reorganization of the actin cytoskeletal proteins into sarcomeric organization. Regulation of actin filament dynamics is one of the essential processes of myofibril assembly, but the mechanism of actin regulation in striated muscle is not clearly understood. Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is a key enhancer of actin filament dynamics in striated muscle in both vertebrates and nematodes. Here, we report that CAS-1, a cyclase-associated protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, promotes ADF/cofilin-dependent actin filament turnover in vitro and is required for sarcomeric actin organization in striated muscle. CAS-1 is predominantly expressed in striated muscle from embryos to adults. In vitro, CAS-1 binds to actin monomers and enhances exchange of actin-bound ATP/ADP even in the presence of UNC-60B, a muscle-specific ADF/cofilin that inhibits the nucleotide exchange. As a result, CAS-1 and UNC-60B cooperatively enhance actin filament turnover. The two proteins also cooperate to shorten actin filaments. A cas-1 mutation is homozygous lethal with defects in sarcomeric actin organization. cas-1-mutant embryos and worms have aggregates of actin in muscle cells, and UNC-60B is mislocalized to the aggregates. These results provide genetic and biochemical evidence that cyclase-associated protein is a critical regulator of sarcomeric actin organization in striated muscle.

  15. ASP-56, a new actin sequestering protein from pig platelets with homology to CAP, an adenylate cyclase-associated protein from yeast.

    PubMed

    Gieselmann, R; Mann, K

    1992-02-24

    A new 56 kDa actin-binding protein (ASP-56) was isolated from pig platelet lysate. In falling ball viscosimetry it caused a reduction in viscosity that could be attributed to a decrease in the concentration of polymeric actin. Fluorescence measurements with NBD-labelled actin showed reduction of polymeric actin, too. These results could be explained by sequestering of actin in a non-polymerizable 1:1 ASP-56/actin complex. Sequencing of about 20 tryptic peptides of ASP-56 and comparison with known sequences revealed about 60% homology to the adenylate cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from yeast.

  16. Myosin-Va binds to and mechanochemically couples microtubules to actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tracy T; Chang, Wakam; Masters, Sarah E; Mooseker, Mark S

    2004-01-01

    Myosin-Va was identified as a microtubule binding protein by cosedimentation analysis in the presence of microtubules. Native myosin-Va purified from chick brain, as well as the expressed globular tail domain of this myosin, but not head domain bound to microtubule-associated protein-free microtubules. Binding of myosin-Va to microtubules was saturable and of moderately high affinity (approximately 1:24 Myosin-Va:tubulin; Kd = 70 nM). Myosin-Va may bind to microtubules via its tail domain because microtubule-bound myosin-Va retained the ability to bind actin filaments resulting in the formation of cross-linked gels of microtubules and actin, as assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. In low Ca2+, ATP addition induced dissolution of these gels, but not release of myosin-Va from MTs. However, in 10 microM Ca2+, ATP addition resulted in the contraction of the gels into aster-like arrays. These results demonstrate that myosin-Va is a microtubule binding protein that cross-links and mechanochemically couples microtubules to actin filaments.

  17. A high-affinity interaction with ADP-actin monomers underlies the mechanism and in vivo function of Srv2/cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Pieta K; Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Kugler, Jamie; Moseley, James B; Almo, Steven C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Goode, Bruce L

    2004-11-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP), also called Srv2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a conserved actin monomer-binding protein that promotes cofilin-dependent actin turnover in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying this function. Here, we show that S. cerevisiae CAP binds with strong preference to ADP-G-actin (Kd 0.02 microM) compared with ATP-G-actin (Kd 1.9 microM) and competes directly with cofilin for binding ADP-G-actin. Further, CAP blocks actin monomer addition specifically to barbed ends of filaments, in contrast to profilin, which blocks monomer addition to pointed ends of filaments. The actin-binding domain of CAP is more extensive than previously suggested and includes a recently solved beta-sheet structure in the C-terminus of CAP and adjacent sequences. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we define evolutionarily conserved residues that mediate binding to ADP-G-actin and demonstrate that these activities are required for CAP function in vivo in directing actin organization and polarized cell growth. Together, our data suggest that in vivo CAP competes with cofilin for binding ADP-actin monomers, allows rapid nucleotide exchange to occur on actin, and then because of its 100-fold weaker binding affinity for ATP-actin compared with ADP-actin, allows other cellular factors such as profilin to take the handoff of ATP-actin and facilitate barbed end assembly.

  18. A single charge in the actin binding domain of fascin can independently tune the linear and non-linear response of an actin bundle network.

    PubMed

    Maier, M; Müller, K W; Heussinger, C; Köhler, S; Wall, W A; Bausch, A R; Lieleg, O

    2015-05-01

    Actin binding proteins (ABPs) not only set the structure of actin filament assemblies but also mediate the frequency-dependent viscoelastic moduli of cross-linked and bundled actin networks. Point mutations in the actin binding domain of those ABPs can tune the association and dissociation dynamics of the actin/ABP bond and thus modulate the network mechanics both in the linear and non-linear response regime. We here demonstrate how the exchange of a single charged amino acid in the actin binding domain of the ABP fascin triggers such a modulation of the network rheology. Whereas the overall structure of the bundle networks is conserved, the transition point from strain-hardening to strain-weakening sensitively depends on the cross-linker off-rate and the applied shear rate. Our experimental results are consistent both with numerical simulations of a cross-linked bundle network and a theoretical description of the bundle network mechanics which is based on non-affine bending deformations and force-dependent cross-link dynamics.

  19. The association of myosin IB with actin waves in dictyostelium requires both the plasma membrane-binding site and actin-binding region in the myosin tail.

    PubMed

    Brzeska, Hanna; Pridham, Kevin; Chery, Godefroy; Titus, Margaret A; Korn, Edward D

    2014-01-01

    F-actin structures and their distribution are important determinants of the dynamic shapes and functions of eukaryotic cells. Actin waves are F-actin formations that move along the ventral cell membrane driven by actin polymerization. Dictyostelium myosin IB is associated with actin waves but its role in the wave is unknown. Myosin IB is a monomeric, non-filamentous myosin with a globular head that binds to F-actin and has motor activity, and a non-helical tail comprising a basic region, a glycine-proline-glutamine-rich region and an SH3-domain. The basic region binds to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane through a short basic-hydrophobic site and the Gly-Pro-Gln region binds F-actin. In the current work we found that both the basic-hydrophobic site in the basic region and the Gly-Pro-Gln region of the tail are required for the association of myosin IB with actin waves. This is the first evidence that the Gly-Pro-Gln region is required for localization of myosin IB to a specific actin structure in situ. The head is not required for myosin IB association with actin waves but binding of the head to F-actin strengthens the association of myosin IB with waves and stabilizes waves. Neither the SH3-domain nor motor activity is required for association of myosin IB with actin waves. We conclude that myosin IB contributes to anchoring actin waves to the plasma membranes by binding of the basic-hydrophobic site to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane and binding of the Gly-Pro-Gln region to F-actin in the wave.

  20. The Association of Myosin IB with Actin Waves in Dictyostelium Requires Both the Plasma Membrane-Binding Site and Actin-Binding Region in the Myosin Tail

    PubMed Central

    Brzeska, Hanna; Pridham, Kevin; Chery, Godefroy; Titus, Margaret A.; Korn, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    F-actin structures and their distribution are important determinants of the dynamic shapes and functions of eukaryotic cells. Actin waves are F-actin formations that move along the ventral cell membrane driven by actin polymerization. Dictyostelium myosin IB is associated with actin waves but its role in the wave is unknown. Myosin IB is a monomeric, non-filamentous myosin with a globular head that binds to F-actin and has motor activity, and a non-helical tail comprising a basic region, a glycine-proline-glutamine-rich region and an SH3-domain. The basic region binds to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane through a short basic-hydrophobic site and the Gly-Pro-Gln region binds F-actin. In the current work we found that both the basic-hydrophobic site in the basic region and the Gly-Pro-Gln region of the tail are required for the association of myosin IB with actin waves. This is the first evidence that the Gly-Pro-Gln region is required for localization of myosin IB to a specific actin structure in situ. The head is not required for myosin IB association with actin waves but binding of the head to F-actin strengthens the association of myosin IB with waves and stabilizes waves. Neither the SH3-domain nor motor activity is required for association of myosin IB with actin waves. We conclude that myosin IB contributes to anchoring actin waves to the plasma membranes by binding of the basic-hydrophobic site to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane and binding of the Gly-Pro-Gln region to F-actin in the wave. PMID:24747353

  1. A Balance of Capping Protein and Profilin Functions Is Required to Regulate Actin Polymerization in Drosophila Bristle

    PubMed Central

    Hopmann, Roberta; Miller, Kathryn G.

    2003-01-01

    Profilin is a well-characterized protein known to be important for regulating actin filament assembly. Relatively few studies have addressed how profilin interacts with other actin-binding proteins in vivo to regulate assembly of complex actin structures. To investigate the function of profilin in the context of a differentiating cell, we have studied an instructive genetic interaction between mutations in profilin (chickadee) and capping protein (cpb). Capping protein is the principal protein in cells that caps actin filament barbed ends. When its function is reduced in the Drosophila bristle, F-actin levels increase and the actin cytoskeleton becomes disorganized, causing abnormal bristle morphology. chickadee mutations suppress the abnormal bristle phenotype and associated abnormalities of the actin cytoskeleton seen in cpb mutants. Furthermore, overexpression of profilin in the bristle mimics many features of the cpb loss-of-function phenotype. The interaction between cpb and chickadee suggests that profilin promotes actin assembly in the bristle and that a balance between capping protein and profilin activities is important for the proper regulation of F-actin levels. Furthermore, this balance of activities affects the association of actin structures with the membrane, suggesting a link between actin filament dynamics and localization of actin structures within the cell. PMID:12529431

  2. The interaction between the adaptor protein APS and Enigma is involved in actin organisation.

    PubMed

    Barrès, Romain; Gonzalez, Teresa; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2005-08-15

    APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) is an adaptor protein phosphorylated by several tyrosine kinase receptors including the insulin receptor. To identify novel binding partners of APS, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening. We identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein that was previously shown to be associated with the actin cytoskeleton. In HEK 293 cells, Enigma interacted specifically with APS, but not with the APS-related protein SH2-B. This interaction required the NPTY motif of APS and the LIM domains of Enigma. In NIH-3T3 cells that express the insulin receptor, Enigma and APS were partially co-localised with F-actin in small ruffling structures. Insulin increased the complex formation between APS and Enigma and their co-localisation in large F-actin containing ruffles. While in NIH-3T3 and HeLa cells the co-expression of both Enigma and APS did not modify the actin cytoskeleton organisation, expression of Enigma alone led to the formation of F-actin clusters. Similar alteration in actin cytoskeleton organisation was observed in cells expressing both Enigma and APS with a mutation in the NPTY motif. These results identify Enigma as a novel APS-binding protein and suggest that the APS/Enigma complex plays a critical role in actin cytoskeleton organisation.

  3. Identification of Arabidopsis cyclase-associated protein 1 as the first nucleotide exchange factor for plant actin.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Faisal; Guérin, Christophe; von Witsch, Matthias; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J

    2007-08-01

    The actin cytoskeleton powers organelle movements, orchestrates responses to abiotic stresses, and generates an amazing array of cell shapes. Underpinning these diverse functions of the actin cytoskeleton are several dozen accessory proteins that coordinate actin filament dynamics and construct higher-order assemblies. Many actin-binding proteins from the plant kingdom have been characterized and their function is often surprisingly distinct from mammalian and fungal counterparts. The adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) has recently been shown to be an important regulator of actin dynamics in vivo and in vitro. The disruption of actin organization in cap mutant plants indicates defects in actin dynamics or the regulated assembly and disassembly of actin subunits into filaments. Current models for actin dynamics maintain that actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin removes ADP-actin subunits from filament ends and that profilin recharges these monomers with ATP by enhancing nucleotide exchange and delivery of subunits onto filament barbed ends. Plant profilins, however, lack the essential ability to stimulate nucleotide exchange on actin, suggesting that there might be a missing link yet to be discovered from plants. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana CAP1 (AtCAP1) is an abundant cytoplasmic protein; it is present at a 1:3 M ratio with total actin in suspension cells. AtCAP1 has equivalent affinities for ADP- and ATP-monomeric actin (Kd approximately 1.3 microM). Binding of AtCAP1 to ATP-actin monomers inhibits polymerization, consistent with AtCAP1 being an actin sequestering protein. However, we demonstrate that AtCAP1 is the first plant protein to increase the rate of nucleotide exchange on actin. Even in the presence of ADF/cofilin, AtCAP1 can recharge actin monomers and presumably provide a polymerizable pool of subunits to profilin for addition onto filament ends. In turnover assays, plant profilin, ADF, and CAP act cooperatively to promote flux

  4. Cyclase-associated proteins: CAPacity for linking signal transduction and actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hubberstey, Andrew V; Mottillo, Emilio P

    2002-04-01

    Many extracellular signals elicit changes in the actin cytoskeleton, which are mediated through an array of signaling proteins and pathways. One family of proteins that plays a role in regulating actin remodeling in response to cellular signals are the cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs). CAPs are highly conserved monomeric actin binding proteins present in a wide range of organisms including yeast, fly, plants, and mammals. The original CAP was isolated as a component of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex that serves as an effector of Ras during nutritional signaling. CAPs are multifunctional molecules that contain domains involved in actin binding, adenylyl cyclase association in yeast, SH3 binding, and oligomerization. Genetic studies in yeast have implicated CAPs in vesicle trafficking and endocytosis. CAPs play a developmental role in multicellular organisms, and studies of Drosophila have illuminated the importance of the actin cytoskeleton during eye development and in establishing oocyte polarity. This review will highlight the critical structural and functional domains of CAPs, describe recent studies that have implied important roles for these proteins in linking cell signaling with actin polymerization, and highlight their roles in vesicle trafficking and development.

  5. Direct actin binding to A- and B-type lamin tails and actin filament bundling by the lamin A tail

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Dan N; Zastrow, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear intermediate filament networks formed by A- and B-type lamins are major components of the nucleoskeleton. Lamins have growing links to human physiology and disease including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), lipodystrophy, cardiomyopathy, neuropathy, cerebellar disorders and segmental accelerated ‘aging’ syndromes. How lamins interact with other nucleoskeletal components, and even the identities of these other components, are open questions. Previous studies suggested lamins might bind actin. We report that the recombinant C-terminal tail domain of human A- and B-type lamins binds directly to purified actin in high-speed pelleting assays. This interaction maps to a conserved Actin Binding site (AB-1) comprising lamin A residues 461–536 in the Ig-fold domain, which are 54% identical in lamin B1. Two EDMD-causing missense mutations (R527P and L530P) in lamin A that are predicted to disrupt the Ig-fold, each reduced F-actin binding by ∼66%, whereas the surface-exposed lipodystrophy-causing R482Q mutation had no significant effect. The lamin A tail was unique among lamins in having a second actin-binding site (AB-2). This second site was mapped to lamin A tail residues 564–608, based on actin-binding results for the lamin C tail and internal deletions in the lamin A tail that cause Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (Δ35, Δ50) or restrictive dermopathy (Δ90). Supporting the presence of two actin-binding sites, recombinant precursor (unmodified) and mature lamin A tails (not C or B1 tails) each bundled F-actin in vitro: furthermore F-actin bundling was reduced 25–40% by the R527P, L530P, Δ35 and Δ50 mutations, and was abolished by Δ90. Unexpectedly, the mature lamin A tail bound F-actin significantly more efficiently than did the prelamin A tail; this suggested unmodified residues 647–664, unique to prelamin A, might auto-inhibit binding to actin (and potentially other partners). These biochemical results suggest direct mechanisms

  6. Two kinesin-like proteins mediate actin-based chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Yamada, Noboru; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Yonekura, Hisashi; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Kadota, Akeo; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-05-11

    Organelle movement is essential for efficient cellular function in eukaryotes. Chloroplast photorelocation movement is important for plant survival as well as for efficient photosynthesis. Chloroplast movement generally is actin dependent and mediated by blue light receptor phototropins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, phototropins mediate chloroplast movement by regulating short actin filaments on chloroplasts (cp-actin filaments), and the chloroplast outer envelope protein CHUP1 is necessary for cp-actin filament accumulation. However, other factors involved in cp-actin filament regulation during chloroplast movement remain to be determined. Here, we report that two kinesin-like proteins, KAC1 and KAC2, are essential for chloroplasts to move and anchor to the plasma membrane. A kac1 mutant showed severely impaired chloroplast accumulation and slow avoidance movement. A kac1kac2 double mutant completely lacked chloroplast photorelocation movement and showed detachment of chloroplasts from the plasma membrane. KAC motor domains are similar to those of the kinesin-14 subfamily (such as Ncd and Kar3) but do not have detectable microtubule-binding activity. The C-terminal domain of KAC1 could interact with F-actin in vitro. Instead of regulating microtubules, KAC proteins mediate chloroplast movement via cp-actin filaments. We conclude that plants have evolved a unique mechanism to regulate actin-based organelle movement using kinesin-like proteins.

  7. A 36 kDa monomeric protein and its complex with a 10 kDa protein both isolated from bovine aorta are calpactin-like proteins that differ in their Ca2+-dependent calmodulin-binding and actin-severing properties.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, F; Derancourt, J; Capony, J P; Watrin, A; Cavadore, J C

    1988-01-01

    Interaction of plasma membrane with the cytoskeleton involves a large number of proteins, among them a 36 kDa protein that was found to be involved in the interaction with actin filaments. We have isolated a 36 kDa protein from bovine aorta as a monomer and in a complex with a 10 kDa protein. Partial amino acid sequence determinations show that the 36 kDa and 10 kDa proteins isolated from bovine aorta are analogous to or identical with corresponding proteins purified from bovine intestine already described by Kristensen, Saris, Hunter, Hicks, Noonan, Glenney & Tack [(1986) Biochemistry 25, 4497-4503]. We report here that the association of the 10 kDa protein with the 36 kDa protein confers specific calmodulin-binding and actin-severing properties on the complex that are not possessed by the 36 kDa monomer alone. These findings suggest that the protein complex could be involved in thin-filament-related structures or could modulate some Ca2+-regulated events mediated by calmodulin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:2970844

  8. Mammalian homolog of the yeast cyclase associated protein, CAP/Srv2p, regulates actin filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Field, J

    2000-02-01

    Control of cell shape and motility requires rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. One cytoskeletal protein that may regulate actin dynamics is CAP (cyclase associated protein; CAP/Srv2p; ASP-56). CAP was first isolated from yeast as an adenylyl cyclase associated protein required for RAS regulation of cAMP signaling. In addition, CAP also regulates the actin cytoskeleton primarily through an actin monomer binding activity. CAP homologs are found in many eukaryotes, including mammals where they also bind actin, but little is known about their biological function. We, therefore, designed experiments to address CAP1 regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. CAP1 localized to membrane ruffles and actin stress fibers in fixed cells of various types. To address localization in living cells, we constructed GFP-CAP1 fusion proteins and found that fusion proteins lacking the actin-binding region localized like the wild type protein. We also performed microinjection studies with affinity-purified anti-CAP1 antibodies in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts and found that the antibodies attenuated serum stimulation of stress fibers. Finally, CAP1 purified from platelets through a monoclonal antibody affinity purification step stimulated the formation of stress fiber-like filaments when it was microinjected into serum-starved Swiss 3T3 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that CAP1 promotes assembly of the actin cytoskeleton.

  9. The Actinome of Dictyostelium discoideum in Comparison to Actins and Actin-Related Proteins from Other Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jayabalan M.; Fey, Petra; Ramalingam, Nagendran; Liu, Xiao I.; Rohlfs, Meino; Noegel, Angelika A.; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Glöckner, Gernot; Schleicher, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Actin belongs to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotic cells which harbor usually many conventional actin isoforms as well as actin-related proteins (Arps). To get an overview over the sometimes confusing multitude of actins and Arps, we analyzed the Dictyostelium discoideum actinome in detail and compared it with the genomes from other model organisms. The D. discoideum actinome comprises 41 actins and actin-related proteins. The genome contains 17 actin genes which most likely arose from consecutive gene duplications, are all active, in some cases developmentally regulated and coding for identical proteins (Act8-group). According to published data, the actin fraction in a D. discoideum cell consists of more than 95% of these Act8-type proteins. The other 16 actin isoforms contain a conventional actin motif profile as well but differ in their protein sequences. Seven actin genes are potential pseudogenes. A homology search of the human genome using the most typical D. discoideum actin (Act8) as query sequence finds the major actin isoforms such as cytoplasmic beta-actin as best hit. This suggests that the Act8-group represents a nearly perfect actin throughout evolution. Interestingly, limited data from D. fasciculatum, a more ancient member among the social amoebae, show different relationships between conventional actins. The Act8-type isoform is most conserved throughout evolution. Modeling of the putative structures suggests that the majority of the actin-related proteins is functionally unrelated to canonical actin. The data suggest that the other actin variants are not necessary for the cytoskeleton itself but rather regulators of its dynamical features or subunits in larger protein complexes. PMID:18612387

  10. Direct Membrane Binding by Bacterial Actin MreB

    PubMed Central

    Salje, Jeanne; van den Ent, Fusinita; de Boer, Piet; Löwe, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Summary Bacterial actin MreB is one of the key components of the bacterial cytoskeleton. It assembles into short filaments that lie just underneath the membrane and organize the cell wall synthesis machinery. Here we show that MreB from both T. maritima and E. coli binds directly to cell membranes. This function is essential for cell shape determination in E. coli and is proposed to be a general property of many, if not all, MreBs. We demonstrate that membrane binding is mediated by a membrane insertion loop in TmMreB and by an N-terminal amphipathic helix in EcMreB and show that purified TmMreB assembles into double filaments on a membrane surface that can induce curvature. This, the first example of a membrane-binding actin filament, prompts a fundamental rethink of the structure and dynamics of MreB filaments within cells. PMID:21816350

  11. The conserved Tarp actin binding domain is important for chlamydial invasion.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Travis J; Miller, Natalie J; Dooley, Cheryl A; Hackstadt, Ted

    2010-07-15

    The translocated actin recruiting phosphoprotein (Tarp) is conserved among all pathogenic chlamydial species. Previous reports identified single C. trachomatis Tarp actin binding and proline rich domains required for Tarp mediated actin nucleation. A peptide antiserum specific for the Tarp actin binding domain was generated and inhibited actin polymerization in vitro and C. trachomatis entry in vivo, indicating an essential role for Tarp in chlamydial pathogenesis. Sequence analysis of Tarp orthologs from additional chlamydial species and C. trachomatis serovars indicated multiple putative actin binding sites. In order to determine whether the identified actin binding domains are functionally conserved, GST-Tarp fusions from multiple chlamydial species were examined for their ability to bind and nucleate actin. Chlamydial Tarps harbored variable numbers of actin binding sites and promoted actin nucleation as determined by in vitro polymerization assays. Our findings indicate that Tarp mediated actin binding and nucleation is a conserved feature among diverse chlamydial species and this function plays a critical role in bacterial invasion of host cells.

  12. Magnesium Modulates Actin Binding and ADP Release in Myosin Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Anja M.; Trivedi, Darshan V.; Rauscher, Anna A.; Wang, Yuan; Takagi, Yasuharu; Palmer, Bradley M.; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Debold, Edward P.; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the magnesium dependence of five class II myosins, including fast skeletal muscle myosin, smooth muscle myosin, β-cardiac myosin (CMIIB), Dictyostelium myosin II (DdMII), and nonmuscle myosin IIA, as well as myosin V. We found that the myosins examined are inhibited in a Mg2+-dependent manner (0.3–9.0 mm free Mg2+) in both ATPase and motility assays, under conditions in which the ionic strength was held constant. We found that the ADP release rate constant is reduced by Mg2+ in myosin V, smooth muscle myosin, nonmuscle myosin IIA, CMIIB, and DdMII, although the ADP affinity is fairly insensitive to Mg2+ in fast skeletal muscle myosin, CMIIB, and DdMII. Single tryptophan probes in the switch I (Trp-239) and switch II (Trp-501) region of DdMII demonstrate these conserved regions of the active site are sensitive to Mg2+ coordination. Cardiac muscle fiber mechanic studies demonstrate cross-bridge attachment time is increased at higher Mg2+ concentrations, demonstrating that the ADP release rate constant is slowed by Mg2+ in the context of an activated muscle fiber. Direct measurements of phosphate release in myosin V demonstrate that Mg2+ reduces actin affinity in the M·ADP·Pi state, although it does not change the rate of phosphate release. Therefore, the Mg2+ inhibition of the actin-activated ATPase activity observed in class II myosins is likely the result of Mg2+-dependent alterations in actin binding. Overall, our results suggest that Mg2+ reduces the ADP release rate constant and rate of attachment to actin in both high and low duty ratio myosins. PMID:25006251

  13. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N; Bayer, K Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira

    2012-10-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding-deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells.

  14. Plant villin, lily P-135-ABP, possesses G-actin binding activity and accelerates the polymerization and depolymerization of actin in a Ca2+-sensitive manner.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Etsuo; Tominaga, Motoki; Mabuchi, Issei; Tsuji, Yasunori; Staiger, Christopher J; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Shimmen, Teruo

    2005-10-01

    From germinating pollen of lily, two types of villins, P-115-ABP and P-135-ABP, have been identified biochemically. Ca(2+)-CaM-dependent actin-filament binding and bundling activities have been demonstrated for both villins previously. Here, we examined the effects of lily villins on the polymerization and depolymerization of actin. P-115-ABP and P-135-ABP present in a crude protein extract prepared from germinating pollen bound to a DNase I affinity column in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Purified P-135-ABP reduced the lag period that precedes actin filament polymerization from monomers in the presence of either Ca(2+) or Ca(2+)-CaM. These results indicated that P-135-ABP can form a complex with G-actin in the presence of Ca(2+) and this complex acts as a nucleus for polymerization of actin filaments. However, the nucleation activity of P-135-ABP is probably not relevant in vivo because the assembly of G-actin saturated with profilin, a situation that mimics conditions found in pollen, was not accelerated in the presence of P-135-ABP. P-135-ABP also enhanced the depolymerization of actin filaments during dilution-mediated disassembly. Growth from filament barbed ends in the presence of Ca(2+)-CaM was also prevented, consistent with filament capping activity. These results suggested that lily villin is involved not only in the arrangement of actin filaments into bundles in the basal and shank region of the pollen tube, but also in regulating and modulating actin dynamics through its capping and depolymerization (or fragmentation) activities in the apical region of the pollen tube, where there is a relatively high concentration of Ca(2+).

  15. The N-terminal tropomyosin- and actin-binding sites are important for leiomodin 2’s function

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Thu; Moroz, Natalia; Pappas, Christopher T.; Novak, Stefanie M.; Tolkatchev, Dmitri; Wooldridge, Dayton; Mayfield, Rachel M.; Helms, Gregory; Gregorio, Carol C.; Kostyukova, Alla S.

    2016-01-01

    Leiomodin is a potent actin nucleator related to tropomodulin, a capping protein localized at the pointed end of the thin filaments. Mutations in leiomodin-3 are associated with lethal nemaline myopathy in humans, and leiomodin-2–knockout mice present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The arrangement of the N-terminal actin- and tropomyosin-binding sites in leiomodin is contradictory and functionally not well understood. Using one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and the pointed-end actin polymerization assay, we find that leiomodin-2, a major cardiac isoform, has an N-terminal actin-binding site located within residues 43–90. Moreover, for the first time, we obtain evidence that there are additional interactions with actin within residues 124–201. Here we establish that leiomodin interacts with only one tropomyosin molecule, and this is the only site of interaction between leiomodin and tropomyosin. Introduction of mutations in both actin- and tropomyosin-binding sites of leiomodin affected its localization at the pointed ends of the thin filaments in cardiomyocytes. On the basis of our new findings, we propose a model in which leiomodin regulates actin poly­merization dynamics in myocytes by acting as a leaky cap at thin filament pointed ends. PMID:27307584

  16. The role of cyclase-associated protein in regulating actin filament dynamics - more than a monomer-sequestration factor.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-08-01

    Dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is fundamental to a number of cell biological events. A variety of actin-regulatory proteins modulate polymerization and depolymerization of actin and contribute to actin cytoskeletal reorganization. Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved actin-monomer-binding protein that has been studied for over 20 years. Early studies have shown that CAP sequesters actin monomers; recent studies, however, have revealed more active roles of CAP in actin filament dynamics. CAP enhances the recharging of actin monomers with ATP antagonistically to ADF/cofilin, and also promotes the severing of actin filaments in cooperation with ADF/cofilin. Self-oligomerization and binding to other proteins regulate activities and localization of CAP. CAP has crucial roles in cell signaling, development, vesicle trafficking, cell migration and muscle sarcomere assembly. This Commentary discusses the recent advances in our understanding of the functions of CAP and its implications as an important regulator of actin cytoskeletal dynamics, which are involved in various cellular activities.

  17. A Dictyostelium mutant lacking an F-actin cross-linking protein, the 120-kD gelation factor

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins are known to regulate in vitro the assembly of actin into supramolecular structures, but evidence for their activities in living nonmuscle cells is scarce. Amebae of Dictyostelium discoideum are nonmuscle cells in which mutants defective in several actin-binding proteins have been described. Here we characterize a mutant deficient in the 120-kD gelation factor, one of the most abundant F-actin cross- linking proteins of D. discoideum cells. No F-actin cross-linking activity attributable to the 120-kD protein was detected in mutant cell extracts, and antibodies recognizing different epitopes on the polypeptide showed the entire protein was lacking. Under the conditions used, elimination of the gelation factor did not substantially alter growth, shape, motility, or chemotactic orientation of the cells towards a cAMP source. Aggregates of the mutant developed into fruiting bodies consisting of normally differentiated spores and stalk cells. In cytoskeleton preparations a dense network of actin filaments as typical of the cell cortex, and bundles as they extend along the axis of filopods, were recognized. A significant alteration found was an enhanced accumulation of actin in cytoskeletons of the mutant when cells were stimulated with cyclic AMP. Our results indicate that control of cell shape and motility does not require the fine-tuned interactions of all proteins that have been identified as actin-binding proteins by in vitro assays. PMID:1698791

  18. The chloroplast outer membrane protein CHUP1 interacts with actin and profilin.

    PubMed

    Schmidt von Braun, Serena; Schleiff, Enrico

    2008-04-01

    Chloroplasts accumulate in response to low light, whereas high light induces an actin-dependent avoidance movement. This is a long known process, but its molecular base is barely understood. Only recently first components of the blue light perceiving signal cascade initiating this process were described. Among these, a protein was identified by the analysis of a deletion mutant in the corresponding gene resulting in a chloroplast unusual positioning phenotype. The protein was termed CHUP1 and initial results suggested chloroplast localization. We demonstrate that the protein is indeed exclusively and directly targeted to the chloroplast surface. The analysis of the deletion mutant of CHUP1 using microarray analysis shows an influence on the expression of genes found to be up-regulated, but not on genes found to be down-regulated upon high light exposure in wild-type. Analyzing a putative role of CHUP1 as a linker between chloroplasts and the cytoskeleton, we demonstrate an interaction with actin, which is independent on the filamentation status of actin. Moreover, binding of CHUP1 to profilin -- an actin modifying protein -- could be shown and an enhancing effect of CHUP1 on the interaction of profilin to actin is demonstrated. Therefore, a role of CHUP1 in bridging chloroplasts to actin filaments and a regulatory function in actin polymerization can be discussed.

  19. PFA fixation enables artifact-free super-resolution imaging of the actin cytoskeleton and associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Leyton-Puig, Daniela; Kedziora, Katarzyna M.; Isogai, Tadamoto; van den Broek, Bram; Jalink, Kees

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Super-resolution microscopy (SRM) allows precise localization of proteins in cellular organelles and structures, including the actin cytoskeleton. Yet sample preparation protocols for SRM are rather anecdotal and still being optimized. Thus, SRM-based imaging of the actin cytoskeleton and associated proteins often remains challenging and poorly reproducible. Here, we show that proper paraformaldehyde (PFA)-based sample preparation preserves the architecture of the actin cytoskeleton almost as faithfully as gold-standard glutaraldehyde fixation. We show that this fixation is essential for proper immuno-based localization of actin-binding and actin-regulatory proteins involved in the formation of lamellipodia and ruffles, such as mDia1, WAVE2 and clathrin heavy chain, and provide detailed guidelines for the execution of our method. In summary, proper PFA-based sample preparation increases the multi-color possibilities and the reproducibility of SRM of the actin cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. PMID:27378434

  20. The C-terminal dimerization motif of cyclase-associated protein is essential for actin monomer regulation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shohei; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-12-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved actin-regulatory protein that functions together with actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin to enhance actin filament dynamics. CAP has multiple functional domains, and the function to regulate actin monomers is carried out by its C-terminal half containing a Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein homology 2 (WH2) domain, a CAP and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 (CARP) domain, and a dimerization motif. WH2 and CARP are implicated in binding to actin monomers and important for enhancing filament turnover. However, the role of the dimerization motif is unknown. Here, we investigated the function of the dimerization motif of CAS-2, a CAP isoform in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, in actin monomer regulation. CAS-2 promotes ATP-dependent recycling of ADF/cofilin-bound actin monomers for polymerization by enhancing exchange of actin-bound nucleotides. The C-terminal half of CAS-2 (CAS-2C) has nearly as strong activity as full-length CAS-2. Maltose-binding protein (MBP)-tagged CAS-2C is a dimer. However, MBP-CAS-2C with a truncation of either one or two C-terminal β-strands is monomeric. Truncations of the dimerization motif in MBP-CAS-2C nearly completely abolish its activity to sequester actin monomers from polymerization and enhance nucleotide exchange on actin monomers. As a result, these CAS-2C variants, also in the context of full-length CAS-2, fail to compete with ADF/cofilin to release actin monomers for polymerization. CAS-2C variants lacking the dimerization motif exhibit enhanced binding to actin filaments, which is mediated by WH2. Taken together, these results suggest that the evolutionarily conserved dimerization motif of CAP is essential for its C-terminal region to exert the actin monomer-specific regulatory function.

  1. Arabidopsis Microtubule-Destabilizing Protein 25 Functions in Pollen Tube Growth by Severing Actin Filaments[W

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tao; Liu, Xiaomin; Li, Jiejie; Sun, Jingbo; Song, Leina; Mao, Tonglin

    2014-01-01

    The formation of distinct actin filament arrays in the subapical region of pollen tubes is crucial for pollen tube growth. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the organization and dynamics of the actin filaments in this region remain to be determined. This study shows that Arabidopsis thaliana MICROTUBULE-DESTABILIZING PROTEIN25 (MDP25) has the actin filament–severing activity of an actin binding protein. This protein negatively regulated pollen tube growth by modulating the organization and dynamics of actin filaments in the subapical region of pollen tubes. MDP25 loss of function resulted in enhanced pollen tube elongation and inefficient fertilization. MDP25 bound directly to actin filaments and severed individual actin filaments, in a manner that was dramatically enhanced by Ca2+, in vitro. Analysis of a mutant that bears a point mutation at the Ca2+ binding sites demonstrated that the subcellular localization of MDP25 was determined by cytosolic Ca2+ level in the subapical region of pollen tubes, where MDP25 was disassociated from the plasma membrane and moved into the cytosol. Time-lapse analysis showed that the F-actin-severing frequency significantly decreased and a high density of actin filaments was observed in the subapical region of mdp25-1 pollen tubes. This study reveals a mechanism whereby calcium enhances the actin filament–severing activity of MDP25 in the subapical region of pollen tubes to modulate pollen tube growth. PMID:24424096

  2. Ca2+ regulation of gelsolin activity: binding and severing of F-actin.

    PubMed Central

    Kinosian, H J; Newman, J; Lincoln, B; Selden, L A; Gershman, L C; Estes, J E

    1998-01-01

    Regulation of the F-actin severing activity of gelsolin by Ca2+ has been investigated under physiologic ionic conditions. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity measurements indicate that gelsolin contains at least two Ca2+ binding sites with affinities of 2.5 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(5) M-1. At F-actin and gelsolin concentrations in the range of those found intracellularly, gelsolin is able to bind F-actin with half-maximum binding at 0.14 microM free Ca2+ concentration. Steady-state measurements of gelsolin-induced actin depolymerization suggest that half-maximum depolymerization occurs at approximately 0.4 microM free Ca2+ concentration. Dynamic light scattering measurements of the translational diffusion coefficient for actin filaments and nucleated polymerization assays for number concentration of actin filaments both indicate that severing of F-actin occurs slowly at micromolar free Ca2+ concentrations. The data suggest that binding of Ca2+ to the gelsolin-F-actin complex is the rate-limiting step for F-actin severing by gelsolin; this Ca2+ binding event is a committed step that results in a Ca2+ ion bound at a high-affinity, EGTA-resistant site. The very high affinity of gelsolin for the barbed end of an actin filament drives the binding reaction equilibrium toward completion under conditions where the reaction rate is slow. PMID:9826630

  3. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. PMID:25916847

  4. Mammalian verprolin CR16 acts as a modulator of ITSN scaffold proteins association with actin.

    PubMed

    Kropyvko, Sergii; Gryaznova, Tetyana; Morderer, Dmytro; Rynditch, Alla

    2017-03-18

    Actin cytoskeleton rearrangements are required for normal cell functioning, and their deregulation leads to various pathologies. Members of two mammalian protein families - ITSNs (ITSN1 and ITSN2) and verprolins (WIP, CR16 and WIRE) are involved in Cdc42/N-WASP/Arp2/3 signaling pathway-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Recently we demonstrated that ITSNs interact with the actin-regulating protein WIP. Here, we show that other member of verprolin family, CR16, also forms complexes with ITSN1 and ITSN2 in human cell lines. The actin-binding protein CR16 modulates ITSN/β-actin association. Moreover, overexpressed CR16 promoted co-localization of ITSN1 with F-actin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Our data demonstrated that CR16 mRNA is expressed in glioblastoma and breast tumors. These findings provide the basis for further functional investigations of the ITSN/CR16 complex that may play an important role in actin remodeling and cellular invasion.

  5. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin.

  6. FHOD proteins in actin dynamics--a formin' class of its own.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Meike; Schultz, Jörg; Bogdan, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved a variety of actin-binding proteins to regulate the architecture and the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in time and space. The Diaphanous-related formins (DRF) represent a diverse group of Rho-GTPase-regulated actin regulators that control a range of actin structures composed of tightly-bundled, unbranched actin filaments as found in stress fibers and in filopodia. Under resting conditions, DRFs are auto-inhibited by an intra-molecular interaction between the C-terminal and the N-terminal domains. The auto-inhibition is thought to be released by binding of an activated RhoGTPase to the N-terminal GTPase-binding domain (GBD). However, there is growing evidence for more sophisticated variations from this simplified linear activation model. In this review we focus on the formin homology domain-containing proteins (FHOD), an unconventional group of DRFs. Recent findings on the molecular control and cellular functions of FHOD proteins in vivo are discussed in the light of the phylogeny of FHOD proteins.

  7. The actin-binding protein profilin is required for germline stem cell maintenance and germ cell enclosure by somatic cyst cells.

    PubMed

    Shields, Alicia R; Spence, Allyson C; Yamashita, Yukiko M; Davies, Erin L; Fuller, Margaret T

    2014-01-01

    Specialized microenvironments, or niches, provide signaling cues that regulate stem cell behavior. In the Drosophila testis, the JAK-STAT signaling pathway regulates germline stem cell (GSC) attachment to the apical hub and somatic cyst stem cell (CySC) identity. Here, we demonstrate that chickadee, the Drosophila gene that encodes profilin, is required cell autonomously to maintain GSCs, possibly facilitating localization or maintenance of E-cadherin to the GSC-hub cell interface. Germline specific overexpression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli 2 (APC2) rescued GSC loss in chic hypomorphs, suggesting an additive role of APC2 and F-actin in maintaining the adherens junctions that anchor GSCs to the niche. In addition, loss of chic function in the soma resulted in failure of somatic cyst cells to maintain germ cell enclosure and overproliferation of transit-amplifying spermatogonia.

  8. Structure and mechanism of mouse cyclase-associated protein (CAP1) in regulating actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Golden, Leslie; Sokolova, Olga; Goode, Bruce L

    2014-10-31

    Srv2/CAP is a conserved actin-binding protein with important roles in driving cellular actin dynamics in diverse animal, fungal, and plant species. However, there have been conflicting reports about whether the activities of Srv2/CAP are conserved, particularly between yeast and mammalian homologs. Yeast Srv2 has two distinct functions in actin turnover: its hexameric N-terminal-half enhances cofilin-mediated severing of filaments, while its C-terminal-half catalyzes dissociation of cofilin from ADP-actin monomers and stimulates nucleotide exchange. Here, we dissected the structure and function of mouse CAP1 to better understand its mechanistic relationship to yeast Srv2. Although CAP1 has a shorter N-terminal oligomerization sequence compared with Srv2, we find that the N-terminal-half of CAP1 (N-CAP1) forms hexameric structures with six protrusions, similar to N-Srv2. Further, N-CAP1 autonomously binds to F-actin and decorates the sides and ends of filaments, altering F-actin structure and enhancing cofilin-mediated severing. These activities depend on conserved surface residues on the helical-folded domain. Moreover, N-CAP1 enhances yeast cofilin-mediated severing, and conversely, yeast N-Srv2 enhances human cofilin-mediated severing, highlighting the mechanistic conservation between yeast and mammals. Further, we demonstrate that the C-terminal actin-binding β-sheet domain of CAP1 is sufficient to catalyze nucleotide-exchange of ADP-actin monomers, while in the presence of cofilin this activity additionally requires the WH2 domain. Thus, the structures, activities, and mechanisms of mouse and yeast Srv2/CAP homologs are remarkably well conserved, suggesting that the same activities and mechanisms underlie many of the diverse actin-based functions ascribed to Srv2/CAP homologs in different organisms.

  9. Direct interaction of actin filaments with F-BAR protein pacsin2

    PubMed Central

    Kostan, Julius; Salzer, Ulrich; Orlova, Albina; Törö, Imre; Hodnik, Vesna; Senju, Yosuke; Zou, Juan; Schreiner, Claudia; Steiner, Julia; Meriläinen, Jari; Nikki, Marko; Virtanen, Ismo; Carugo, Oliviero; Rappsilber, Juri; Lappalainen, Pekka; Lehto, Veli-Pekka; Anderluh, Gregor; Egelman, Edward H; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Two mechanisms have emerged as major regulators of membrane shape: BAR domain-containing proteins, which induce invaginations and protrusions, and nuclear promoting factors, which cause generation of branched actin filaments that exert mechanical forces on membranes. While a large body of information exists on interactions of BAR proteins with membranes and regulatory proteins of the cytoskeleton, little is known about connections between these two processes. Here, we show that the F-BAR domain protein pacsin2 is able to associate with actin filaments using the same concave surface employed to bind to membranes, while some other tested N-BAR and F-BAR proteins (endophilin, CIP4 and FCHO2) do not associate with actin. This finding reveals a new level of complexity in membrane remodeling processes. PMID:25216944

  10. The Role of Caldesmon and its Phosphorylation by ERK on the Binding Force of Unphosphorylated Myosin to Actin

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Horia Nicolae; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Kachmar, Linda; Benedetti, Andrea; Sobieszek, Apolinary; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies conducted at the whole muscle level have shown that smooth muscle can maintain tension with low ATP consumption. Whereas it is generally accepted that this property (latch-state) is a consequence of the dephosphorylation of myosin during its attachment to actin, free dephosphorylated myosin can also bind to actin and contribute to force maintenance. We investigated the role of caldesmon (CaD) in regulating the binding force of unphosphorylated tonic smooth muscle myosin to actin. Methods To measure the effect of CaD on the binding of unphosphorylated myosin to actin (in the presence of ATP), we used a single beam laser trap assay to quantify the average unbinding force (Funb) in the absence or presence of caldesmon, ERK-phosphorylated CaD, or CaD plus tropomyosin. Results Funb from unregulated actin (0.10 ± 0.01 pN) was significantly increased in the presence of CaD (0.17 ± 0.02 pN), tropomyosin (0.17 ± 0.02 pN) or both regulatory proteins (0.18 ± 0.02 pN). ERK phosphorylation of CaD significantly reduced the Funb (0.06 ± 0.01 pN). Inspection of the traces of the Funb as a function of time suggests that ERK phosphorylation of CaD decreases the binding force of myosin to actin or accelerates its detachment. Conclusions CaD enhances the binding force of unphosphorylated myosin to actin potentially contributing to the latch-state. ERK phosphorylation of CaD decreases this binding force to very low levels. General Significance This study suggests a mechanism that likely contributes to the latch-state and that explains the muscle relaxation from the latch-state. PMID:25108062

  11. ZNF185, an actin-cytoskeleton-associated growth inhibitory LIM protein in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-S; Gong, A; Young, C Y F

    2007-01-04

    We have recently identified ZNF185 as a gene that is downregulated in prostate cancer (PCa), in part via epigenetic alteration, and maybe associated with disease progression. In this study, we cloned the ZNF185 cDNA from normal human prostate tissues and investigated its biological function. We show that ZNF185 is a novel actin-cytoskeleton-associated Lin-l 1, Isl-1 and Mec-3 (LIM) domain-containing protein that localizes to F-actin structures, and is enriched at focal adhesions. We find that the NH(2)-terminal region, which we designate the actin-targeting domain, facilitates ZNF185 binding to actin in vitro and is both necessary and sufficient to mediate actin-cytoskeleton targeting of ZNF185, whereas the LIM domain, which is localized in the COOH-terminus is dispensable for this phenomenon. Interestingly, ectopic expression of full-length ZNF185, but not a mutant lacking the actin-targeting domain, could suppress proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of PCa cells. Together, our data suggest that ZNF185 may function as a tumor-suppressor protein by associating with the actin-cytoskeleton.

  12. Cooperative regulation of myosin-S1 binding to actin filaments by a continuous flexible Tm-Tn chain.

    PubMed

    Mijailovich, Srboljub M; Kayser-Herold, Oliver; Li, Xiaochuan; Griffiths, Hugh; Geeves, Michael A

    2012-12-01

    The regulation of striated muscle contraction involves cooperative interactions between actin filaments, myosin-S1 (S1), tropomyosin (Tm), troponin (Tn), and calcium. These interactions are modeled by treating overlapping tropomyosins as a continuous flexible chain (CFC), weakly confined by electrostatic interactions with actin. The CFC is displaced locally in opposite directions on the actin surface by the binding of either S1 or Troponin I (TnI) to actin. The apparent rate constants for myosin and TnI binding to and detachment from actin are then intrinsically coupled via the CFC model to the presence of neighboring bound S1s and TnIs. Monte Carlo simulations at prescribed values of the CFC stiffness, the CFC's degree of azimuthal confinement, and the angular displacements caused by the bound proteins were able to predict the stopped-flow transients of S1 binding to regulated F-actin. The transients collected over a large range of calcium concentrations could be well described by adjusting a single calcium-dependent parameter, the rate constant of TnI detachment from actin, k(-I). The resulting equilibrium constant K(B) ≡ 1/K(I) varied sigmoidally with the free calcium, increasing from 0.12 at low calcium (pCa >7) to 12 at high calcium (pCa <5.5) with a Hill coefficient of ~2.15. The similarity of the curves for excess-actin and excess-myosin data confirms their allosteric relationship. The spatially explicit calculations confirmed variable sizes for the cooperative units and clustering of bound myosins at low calcium concentrations. Moreover, inclusion of negative cooperativity between myosin units predicted the observed slowing of myosin binding at excess-myosin concentrations.

  13. The integral membrane protein, ponticulin, acts as a monomer in nucleating actin assembly

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Ponticulin, an F-actin binding transmembrane glycoprotein in Dictyostelium plasma membranes, was isolated by detergent extraction from cytoskeletons and purified to homogeneity. Ponticulin is an abundant membrane protein, averaging approximately 10(6) copies/cell, with an estimated surface density of approximately 300 per microns2. Ponticulin solubilized in octylglucoside exhibited hydrodynamic properties consistent with a ponticulin monomer in a spherical or slightly ellipsoidal detergent micelle with a total molecular mass of 56 +/- 6 kD. Purified ponticulin nucleated actin polymerization when reconstituted into Dictyostelium lipid vesicles, but not when a number of commercially available lipids and lipid mixtures were substituted for the endogenous lipid. The specific activity was consistent with that expected for a protein comprising 0.7 +/- 0.4%, by mass, of the plasma membrane protein. Ponticulin in octylglucoside micelles bound F- actin but did not nucleate actin assembly. Thus, ponticulin-mediated nucleation activity was sensitive to the lipid environment, a result frequently observed with transmembrane proteins. At most concentrations of Dictyostelium lipid, nucleation activity increased linearly with increasing amounts of ponticulin, suggesting that the nucleating species is a ponticulin monomer. Consistent with previous observations of lateral interactions between actin filaments and Dictyostelium plasma membranes, both ends of ponticulin-nucleated actin filaments appeared to be free for monomer assembly and disassembly. Our results indicate that ponticulin is a major membrane protein in Dictyostelium and that, in the proper lipid matrix, it is sufficient for lateral nucleation of actin assembly. To date, ponticulin is the only integral membrane protein known to directly nucleate actin polymerization. PMID:8432731

  14. Biochemical interaction of an actin-capping protein, CapZ, with NAP-22.

    PubMed

    Odagaki, Sin-Ichi; Kumanogoh, Haruko; Nakamura, Shun; Maekawa, Shohei

    2009-07-01

    NAP-22 is a neuronal protein localized in the presynaptic membrane and synaptic vesicles and recovered in a Triton-insoluble low-density microdomain fraction after biochemical fractionation of the synaptic plasma membrane. NAP-22 organizes membrane microdomains through binding to membrane lipids such as cholesterol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. In this study, NAP-22-binding proteins were screened through the pull-down assay using brain-derived NAP-22 bound to Sepharose 4B. An actin-capping protein, CapZ, was identified in the precipitate through mass spectrometry and Western blotting. CapZ was then expressed in E. coli and the purified protein-bound NAP-22 directly. Because bacterially expressed NAP-22 bound CapZ, it was determined that the N-terminal myristoyl moiety of NAP-22 is not necessary for the binding. The binding of NAP-22 showed no effect on the actin nucleation activity of CapZ measured with centrifugation and viscometric assays. Hence, the CapZ-NAP-22 complex could work as the nucleation site of actin polymerization or as the actin filament-anchoring site on the membrane microdomain.

  15. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-related protein Arp2 is involved in the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Arp2p is an essential yeast actin-related protein. Disruption of the corresponding ARP2 gene leads to a terminal phenotype characterized by the presence of a single large bud. Thus, Arp2p may be important for a late stage of the cell cycle (Schwob, E., and R.P. Martin, 1992. Nature (Lond.). 355:179-182). We have localized Arp2p by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific peptide antibodies revealed punctate staining under the plasma membrane, which partially colocalizes with actin. Temperature-sensitive arp2 mutations were created by PCR mutagenesis and selected by an ade2/SUP11 sectoring screen. One temperature-sensitive mutant that was characterized, arp2-H330L, was osmosensitive and had an altered actin cytoskeleton at a nonpermissive temperature, suggesting a role of Arp2p in the actin cytoskeleton. Random budding patterns were observed in both haploid and diploid arp2- H330L mutant cells. Endocytosis, as judged by Lucifer yellow uptake, was severely reduced in the mutant, at all temperatures. In addition, genetic interaction was observed between temperature-sensitive alleles arp2-H330L and cdc10-1. CDC10 is a gene encoding a neck filament- associated protein that is necessary for polarized growth and cytokinesis. Overall, the immunolocalization, mutant phenotypes, and genetic interaction suggest that the Arp2 protein is an essential component of the actin cytoskeleton that is involved in membrane growth and polarity, as well as in endocytosis. PMID:8698808

  16. Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton by an Interaction of IQGAP Related Protein GAPA with Filamin and Cortexillin I

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Daniela; Müller, Rolf; Rivero, Francisco; Faix, Jan; Schleicher, Michael; Noegel, Angelika A.

    2010-01-01

    Filamin and Cortexillin are F-actin crosslinking proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum allowing actin filaments to form three-dimensional networks. GAPA, an IQGAP related protein, is required for cytokinesis and localizes to the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. Here we describe a novel interaction with Filamin which is required for cytokinesis and regulation of the F-actin content. The interaction occurs through the actin binding domain of Filamin and the GRD domain of GAPA. A similar interaction takes place with Cortexillin I. We further report that Filamin associates with Rac1a implying that filamin might act as a scaffold for small GTPases. Filamin and activated Rac associate with GAPA to regulate actin remodelling. Overexpression of filamin and GAPA in the various strains suggests that GAPA regulates the actin cytoskeleton through interaction with Filamin and that it controls cytokinesis through association with Filamin and Cortexillin. PMID:21085675

  17. Molecular Cloning of a cDNA Encoding for Taenia solium TATA-Box Binding Protein 1 (TsTBP1) and Study of Its Interactions with the TATA-Box of Actin 5 and Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lima, Oscar; García-Gutierrez, Ponciano; Jiménez, Lucía; Zarain-Herzberg, Ángel; Lazzarini, Roberto; Landa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is an essential regulatory transcription factor for the TATA-box and TATA-box-less gene promoters. We report the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA that encodes a Taenia solium TATA-box binding protein 1 (TsTBP1). Deduced amino acid composition from its nucleotide sequence revealed that encodes a protein of 238 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 26.7 kDa, and a theoretical pI of 10.6. The NH2-terminal domain shows no conservation when compared with to pig and human TBP1s. However, it shows high conservation in size and amino acid identity with taeniids TBP1s. In contrast, the TsTBP1 COOH-terminal domain is highly conserved among organisms, and contains the amino acids involved in interactions with the TATA-box, as well as with TFIIA and TFIIB. In silico TsTBP1 modeling reveals that the COOH-terminal domain forms the classical saddle structure of the TBP family, with one α-helix at the end, not present in pig and human. Native TsTBP1 was detected in T. solium cysticerci´s nuclear extract by western blot using rabbit antibodies generated against two synthetic peptides located in the NH2 and COOH-terminal domains of TsTBP1. These antibodies, through immunofluorescence technique, identified the TBP1 in the nucleus of cells that form the bladder wall of cysticerci of Taenia crassiceps, an organism close related to T. solium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from T. solium cysticerci and antibodies against the NH2-terminal domain of TsTBP1 showed the interaction of native TsTBP1 with the TATA-box present in T. solium actin 5 (pAT5) and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Ts2-CysPrx) gene promoters; in contrast, when antibodies against the anti-COOH-terminal domain of TsTBP1 were used, they inhibited the binding of TsTBP1 to the TATA-box of the pAT5 promoter gene. PMID:26529408

  18. Molecular Cloning of a cDNA Encoding for Taenia solium TATA-Box Binding Protein 1 (TsTBP1) and Study of Its Interactions with the TATA-Box of Actin 5 and Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin Genes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lima, Oscar; García-Gutierrez, Ponciano; Jiménez, Lucía; Zarain-Herzberg, Ángel; Lazzarini, Roberto; Landa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is an essential regulatory transcription factor for the TATA-box and TATA-box-less gene promoters. We report the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA that encodes a Taenia solium TATA-box binding protein 1 (TsTBP1). Deduced amino acid composition from its nucleotide sequence revealed that encodes a protein of 238 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 26.7 kDa, and a theoretical pI of 10.6. The NH2-terminal domain shows no conservation when compared with to pig and human TBP1s. However, it shows high conservation in size and amino acid identity with taeniids TBP1s. In contrast, the TsTBP1 COOH-terminal domain is highly conserved among organisms, and contains the amino acids involved in interactions with the TATA-box, as well as with TFIIA and TFIIB. In silico TsTBP1 modeling reveals that the COOH-terminal domain forms the classical saddle structure of the TBP family, with one α-helix at the end, not present in pig and human. Native TsTBP1 was detected in T. solium cysticerci´s nuclear extract by western blot using rabbit antibodies generated against two synthetic peptides located in the NH2 and COOH-terminal domains of TsTBP1. These antibodies, through immunofluorescence technique, identified the TBP1 in the nucleus of cells that form the bladder wall of cysticerci of Taenia crassiceps, an organism close related to T. solium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from T. solium cysticerci and antibodies against the NH2-terminal domain of TsTBP1 showed the interaction of native TsTBP1 with the TATA-box present in T. solium actin 5 (pAT5) and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Ts2-CysPrx) gene promoters; in contrast, when antibodies against the anti-COOH-terminal domain of TsTBP1 were used, they inhibited the binding of TsTBP1 to the TATA-box of the pAT5 promoter gene.

  19. Actinous enigma or enigmatic actin

    PubMed Central

    Povarova, Olga I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2014-01-01

    Being the most abundant protein of the eukaryotic cell, actin continues to keep its secrets for more than 60 years. Everything about this protein, its structure, functions, and folding, is mysteriously counterintuitive, and this review represents an attempt to solve some of the riddles and conundrums commonly found in the field of actin research. In fact, actin is a promiscuous binder with a wide spectrum of biological activities. It can exist in at least three structural forms, globular, fibrillar, and inactive (G-, F-, and I-actin, respectively). G-actin represents a thermodynamically instable, quasi-stationary state, which is formed in vivo as a result of the energy-intensive, complex posttranslational folding events controlled and driven by cellular folding machinery. The G-actin structure is dependent on the ATP and Mg2+ binding (which in vitro is typically substituted by Ca2+) and protein is easily converted to the I-actin by the removal of metal ions and by action of various denaturing agents (pH, temperature, and chemical denaturants). I-actin cannot be converted back to the G-form. Foldable and “natively folded” forms of actin are always involved in interactions either with the specific protein partners, such as Hsp70 chaperone, prefoldin, and the CCT chaperonin during the actin folding in vivo or with Mg2+ and ATP as it takes place in the G-form. We emphasize that the solutions for the mysteries of actin multifunctionality, multistructurality, and trapped unfolding can be found in the quasi-stationary nature of this enigmatic protein, which clearly possesses many features attributed to both globular and intrinsically disordered proteins.

  20. A human β-III-spectrin spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 mutation causes high-affinity F-actin binding

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Adam W.; Crain, Jonathan; Thomas, David D.; Hays, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) is a human neurodegenerative disease that stems from mutations in the SPTBN2 gene encoding the protein β-III-spectrin. Here we investigated the molecular consequence of a SCA5 missense mutation that results in a L253P substitution in the actin-binding domain (ABD) of β-III-spectrin. We report that the L253P substitution in the isolated β-III-spectrin ABD causes strikingly high F-actin binding affinity (Kd = 75.5 nM) compared to the weak F-actin binding affinity of the wild-type ABD (Kd = 75.8 μM). The mutation also causes decreased thermal stability (Tm = 44.6 °C vs 59.5 °C). Structural analyses indicate that leucine 253 is in a loop at the interface of the tandem calponin homology (CH) domains comprising the ABD. Leucine 253 is predicted to form hydrophobic contacts that bridge the CH domains. The decreased stability of the mutant indicates that these bridging interactions are probably disrupted, suggesting that the high F-actin binding affinity of the mutant is due to opening of the CH domain interface. These results support a fundamental role for leucine 253 in regulating opening of the CH domain interface and binding of the ABD to F-actin. This study indicates that high-affinity actin binding of L253P β-III-spectrin is a likely driver of neurodegeneration. PMID:26883385

  1. Bulkiness or aromatic nature of tyrosine-143 of actin is important for the weak binding between F-actin and myosin-ADP-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Gomibuchi, Yuki; Uyeda, Taro Q.P.; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The effect of mutation of Tyr143 that becomes more exposed on assembly was examined. •Mutation of tyrosine-143 of Dictyostelium actin changed actin polymerizability. •The bulkiness or aromatic nature of Tyr143 is important for the weak binding. •The weak interaction between myosin and actin strengthened by Tyr143Trp mutation. -- Abstract: Actin filaments (F-actin) interact with myosin and activate its ATPase to support force generation. By comparing crystal structures of G-actin and the quasi-atomic model of F-actin based on high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, the tyrosine-143 was found to be exposed more than 60 Å{sup 2} to the solvent in F-actin. Because tyrosine-143 flanks the hydrophobic cleft near the hydrophobic helix that binds to myosin, the mutant actins, of which the tyrosine-143 was replaced with tryptophan, phenylalanine, or isoleucine, were generated using the Dictyostelium expression system. It polymerized significantly poorly when induced by NaCl, but almost normally by KCl. In the presence of phalloidin and KCl, the extents of the polymerization of all the mutant actins were comparable to that of the wild-type actin so that the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity could be reliably compared. The affinity of skeletal heavy meromyosin to F-actin and the maximum ATPase activity (V{sub max}) were estimated by a double reciprocal plot. The Tyr143Trp-actin showed the higher affinity (smaller K{sub app}) than that of the wild-type actin, with the V{sub max} being almost unchanged. The K{sub app} and V{sub max} of the Tyr143Phe-actin were similar to those of the wild-type actin. However, the activation by Tyr143Ile-actin was much smaller than the wild-type actin and the accurate determination of K{sub app} was difficult. Comparison of the myosin ATPase activated by the various mutant actins at the same concentration of F-actin showed that the extent of activation correlates well with the solvent-accessible surface areas (ASA

  2. Crk Adaptors Negatively Regulate Actin Polymerization in Pedestals Formed by Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) by Binding to Tir Effector

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Villa, José Manuel; Benito-León, María; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa

    2014-01-01

    Infections by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) cause diarrhea linked to high infant mortality in developing countries. EPEC adheres to epithelial cells and induces the formation of actin pedestals. Actin polymerization is driven fundamentally through signaling mediated by Tir bacterial effector protein, which inserts in the plasma membrane of the infected cell. Tir binds Nck adaptor proteins, which in turn recruit and activate N-WASP, a ubiquitous member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome family of proteins. N-WASP activates the Arp2/3 complex to promote actin polymerization. Other proteins aside from components of the Tir-Nck-N-WASP pathway are recruited to the pedestals but their functions are unknown. Here we investigate the function of two alternatively spliced isoforms of Crk adaptors (CrkI/II) and the paralog protein CrkL during pedestal formation by EPEC. We found that the Crk isoforms act as redundant inhibitors of pedestal formation. The SH2 domain of CrkII and CrkL binds to phosphorylated tyrosine 474 of Tir and competes with Nck to bind Tir, preventing its recruitment to pedestals and thereby inhibiting actin polymerization. EPEC infection induces phosphorylation of the major regulatory tyrosine in CrkII and CrkL, possibly preventing the SH2 domain of these proteins from interacting with Tir. Phosphorylated CrkII and CrkL proteins localize specifically to the plasma membrane in contact with EPEC. Our study uncovers a novel role for Crk adaptors at pedestals, opening a new perspective in how these oncoproteins regulate actin polymerization. PMID:24675776

  3. ATP-dependent regulation of actin monomer-filament equilibrium by cyclase-associated protein and ADF/cofilin.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-07-15

    CAP (cyclase-associated protein) is a conserved regulator of actin filament dynamics. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, CAS-1 is an isoform of CAP that is expressed in striated muscle and regulates sarcomeric actin assembly. In the present study, we report that CAS-2, a second CAP isoform in C. elegans, attenuates the actin-monomer-sequestering effect of ADF (actin depolymerizing factor)/cofilin to increase the steady-state levels of actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. CAS-2 binds to actin monomers without a strong preference for either ATP- or ADP-actin. CAS-2 strongly enhances the exchange of actin-bound nucleotides even in the presence of UNC-60A, a C. elegans ADF/cofilin that inhibits nucleotide exchange. UNC-60A induces the depolymerization of actin filaments and sequesters actin monomers, whereas CAS-2 reverses the monomer-sequestering effect of UNC-60A in the presence of ATP, but not in the presence of only ADP or the absence of ATP or ADP. A 1:100 molar ratio of CAS-2 to UNC-60A is sufficient to increase actin filaments. CAS-2 has two independent actin-binding sites in its N- and C-terminal halves, and the C-terminal half is necessary and sufficient for the observed activities of the full-length CAS-2. These results suggest that CAS-2 (CAP) and UNC-60A (ADF/cofilin) are important in the ATP-dependent regulation of the actin monomer-filament equilibrium.

  4. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Haruka; Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation.

  5. The crystal structure of the actin binding domain from alpha-actinin in its closed conformation: structural insight into phospholipid regulation of alpha-actinin.

    PubMed

    Franzot, Giacomo; Sjöblom, Björn; Gautel, Mathias; Djinović Carugo, Kristina

    2005-04-22

    Alpha-actinin is the major F-actin crosslinking protein in both muscle and non-muscle cells. We report the crystal structure of the actin binding domain of human muscle alpha-actinin-3, which is formed by two consecutive calponin homology domains arranged in a "closed" conformation. Structural studies and available biochemical data on actin binding domains suggest that two calponin homology domains come in a closed conformation in the native apo-form, and that conformational changes involving the relative orientation of the two calponin homology domains are required for efficient binding to actin filaments. The actin binding activity of muscle isoforms is supposed to be regulated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2), which binds to the second calponin homology domain. On the basis of structural analysis we propose a distinct binding site for PtdIns(4,5)P2, where the fatty acid moiety would be oriented in a direction that allows it to interact with the linker sequence between the actin binding domain and the first spectrin-like repeat, regulating thereby the binding of the C-terminal calmodulin-like domain to this linker.

  6. Direct Microtubule-Binding by Myosin-10 Orients Centrosomes toward Retraction Fibers and Subcortical Actin Clouds.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Mijung; Bagonis, Maria; Danuser, Gaudenz; Pellman, David

    2015-08-10

    Positioning of centrosomes is vital for cell division and development. In metazoan cells, spindle positioning is controlled by a dynamic pool of subcortical actin that organizes in response to the position of retraction fibers. These actin "clouds" are proposed to generate pulling forces on centrosomes and mediate spindle orientation. However, the motors that pull astral microtubules toward these actin structures are not known. Here, we report that the unconventional myosin, Myo10, couples actin-dependent forces from retraction fibers and subcortical actin clouds to centrosomes. Myo10-mediated centrosome positioning requires its direct microtubule binding. Computational image analysis of large microtubule populations reveals a direct effect of Myo10 on microtubule dynamics and microtubule-cortex interactions. Myo10's role in centrosome positioning is distinct from, but overlaps with, that of dynein. Thus, Myo10 plays a key role in integrating the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to position centrosomes and mitotic spindles.

  7. Role of the DNase-I-binding loop in dynamic properties of actin filament.

    PubMed

    Khaitlina, Sofia Yu; Strzelecka-Gołaszewska, Hanna

    2002-01-01

    Effects of proteolytic modifications of the DNase-I-binding loop (residues 39-51) in subdomain 2 of actin on F-actin dynamics were investigated by measuring the rates of the polymer subunit exchange with the monomer pool at steady state and of ATP hydrolysis associated with it, and by determination of relative rate constants for monomer addition to and dissociation from the polymer ends. Cleavage of actin between Gly-42 and Val-43 by protease ECP32 resulted in enhancement of the turnover rate of polymer subunits by an order of magnitude or more, in contrast to less than a threefold increase produced by subtilisin cleavage between Met-47 and Gly-48. Probing the structure of the modified actins by limited digestion with trypsin revealed a correlation between the increased F-actin dynamics and a change in the conformation of subdomain 2, indicating a more open state of the filament subunits relative to intact F-actin. The cleavage with trypsin and steady-state ATPase were cooperatively inhibited by phalloidin, with half-maximal effects at phalloidin to actin molar ratio of 1:8 and full inhibition at a 1:1 ratio. The results support F-actin models in which only the N-terminal segment of loop 39-51 is involved in monomer-monomer contacts, and suggest a possibility of regulation of actin dynamics in the cell through allosteric effects on this segment of the actin polypeptide chain.

  8. AKAP-independent localization of type-II protein kinase A to dynamic actin microspikes.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Robert L; Birger, Monique; Gaston, Kara J; Howe, Alan K

    2009-09-01

    Regulation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in subcellular space is required for cytoskeletal dynamics and chemotaxis. Currently, spatial regulation of PKA is thought to require the association of PKA regulatory (R) subunits with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that the regulatory RIIalpha subunit of PKA associates with dynamic actin microspikes in an AKAP-independent manner. Both endogenous RIIalpha and a GFP-RIIalpha fusion protein co-localize with F-actin in microspikes within hippocampal neuron growth cones and the leading edge lamellae of NG108-15 cells. Live-cell imaging demonstrates that RIIalpha-associated microspikes are highly dynamic and that the coupling of RIIalpha to actin is tight, as the movement of both actin and RIIalpha are immediately and coincidently stopped by low-dose cytochalasin D. Importantly, co-localization of RIIalpha and actin in these structures is resistant to displacement by a cell-permeable disrupter of PKA-AKAP interactions. Biochemical fractionation confirms that a substantial pool of PKA RIIalpha is associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton and is resistant to extraction by a peptide inhibitor of AKAP interactions. Finally, mutation of the AKAP-binding domain of RIIalpha fails to disrupt its association with actin microspikes. These data provide the first demonstration of the physical association of a kinase with such dynamic actin structures, as well as the first demonstration of the ability of type-II PKA to localize to discrete subcellular structures independently of canonical AKAP function. This association is likely to be important for microfilament dynamics and cell migration and may prime the investigation of novel mechanisms for localizing PKA activity.

  9. AKAP-Independent Localization of Type-II Protein Kinase A to Dynamic Actin Microspikes

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Robert L.; Birger, Monique; Gaston, Kara J.; Howe, Alan K.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in subcellular space is required for cytoskeletal dynamics and chemotaxis. Currently, spatial regulation of PKA is thought to require the association of PKA regulatory (R) subunits with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that the regulatory RIIα subunit of PKA associates with dynamic actin microspikes in an AKAP-independent manner. Both endogenous RIIα and a GFP-RIIα fusion protein co-localize with F-actin in microspikes within hippocampal neuron growth cones and the leading edge lamellae of NG108-15 cells. Live-cell imaging demonstrates that RIIα-associated microspikes are highly dynamic and that the coupling of RIIα to actin is tight, as the movement of both actin and RIIα are immediately and coincidently stopped by low-dose cytochalasin D. Importantly, co-localization of RIIα and actin in these structures is resistant to displacement by a cell-permeable disrupter of PKA-AKAP interactions. Biochemical fractionation confirms that a substantial pool of PKA RIIα is associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton and is resistant to extraction by a peptide inhibitor of AKAP interactions. Finally, mutation of the AKAP-binding domain of RIIα fails to disrupt its association with actin microspikes. These data provide the first demonstration of the physical association of a kinase with such dynamic actin structures, as well as the first demonstration of the ability of type-II PKA to localize to discrete subcellular structures independently of canonical AKAP function. This association is likely to be important for microfilament dynamics and cell migration and may prime the investigation of novel mechanisms for localizing PKA activity. PMID:19536823

  10. [Conformational changes of actin induced by strong or weak myosin subfragment-1 binding].

    PubMed

    Dedova, I V; Avrova, S V; Vikhoreva, N N; Vikhorev, R G; Hazlett, T L; Van der Meer, W; Dos Remedios, C G; Borovikov, Iu S

    2004-01-01

    Movements of different areas of polypeptide chains within F-actin monomers induced by S1 or pPDM-S1 binding were studied by polarized fluorimetry. Thin filaments of ghost muscle were reconstructed by adding G-actin labeled with fluorescent probes attached alternatively to different sites of actin molecule. These sites were: Cys-374 labeled with 1,5-IAEDANS, TMRIA or 5-IAF; Lys-373 labeled with NBD-Cl; Lys-113 labeled with Alexa-488; Lys-61 labeled with FITC; Gln-41 labeled with DED and Cys-10 labeled with 1,5-IAEDANS, 5-IAF or fluorescein-maleimid. In addition, we used TRITC-, FITC-falloidin and e-ADP that were located, respectively, in filament groove and interdomain cleft. The data were analysed by model-dependent and model-independent methods (see appendixes). The orientation and mobility of fluorescent probes were significantly changed when actin and myosin interacted, depending on fluorophore location and binding site of actomyosin. Strong binding of S with actin leads to 1) a decrease in the orientation of oscillators of derivatives of falloidin (TRITC-falloidin, FITC-falloidin) and actin-bound nucleotide (e-ADP); 2) an increase in the orientation of dye oscillators located in the "front' surface of the small domain (where actin is viewed in the standard orientation with subdomains 1/2 and 3/4 oriented to the right and to the left, respectively); 3) a decrease in the angles of dye oscillators located on the "back" surface of subdomain-1. In contrast, a weak binding of S1 to actin induces the opposite effects in orientation of these probes. These data suggest that during the ATP hydrolysis cycle myosin heads induce a change in actin monomer (a tilt and twisting of its small domain). Presumably, these alterations in F-actin conformation play an important role in muscle contraction.

  11. Differential binding of tropomyosin isoforms to actin modified with m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Skórzewski, Radosław; Robaszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Jarzebińska, Justyna; Suder, Piotr; Silberring, Jerzy; Moraczewska, Joanna

    2009-11-01

    Differential interactions of tropomyosin (TM) isoforms with actin can be important for determination of the thin filament functions. A mechanism of tropomyosin binding to actin was studied by comparing interactions of five alphaTM isoforms with actin modified with m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (MBS) and with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC). MBS attachment sites were revealed with mass spectrometry methods. We found that the predominant actin fraction was cross-linked by MBS within subdomain 3. A smaller fraction of the modified actin was cross-linked within subdomain 2 and between subdomains 2 and 1. Moreover, investigated actins carried single labels in subdomains 1, 2, and 3. Such extensive modification caused a large decrease in actin affinity for skeletal and smooth muscle tropomyosins, nonmuscle TM2, and chimeric TM1b9a. In contrast, binding of nonmuscle isoform TM5a was less affected. Isoform's affinity for actin modified in subdomain 2 by binding of FITC to Lys61 was intermediate between the affinity for native actin and MBS-modified actin except for TM5a, which bound to FITC-actin with similar affinity as to actin modified with MBS. The analysis of binding curves according to the McGhee-von Hippel model revealed that binding to an isolated site, as well as cooperativity of binding to a contiguous site, was affected by both actin modifications in a TM isoform-specific manner.

  12. p53 and MDM2 protein expression in actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Maria da Conceição Andrade; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Xavier, Flávia Caló Aquino; Moreira, André Luis Gomes; Reis, Sílvia Regina Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially malignant lip lesion caused by excessive and prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation, which can lead to histomorphological alterations indicative of abnormal cell differentiation. In this pathology, varying degrees of epithelial dysplasia may be found. There are few published studies regarding the p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis. Fifty-eight cases diagnosed with actinic cheilitis were histologically evaluated using Banóczy and Csiba (1976) parameters, and were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using the streptavidin-biotin method in order to assess p53 and MDM2 protein expression. All studied cases expressed p53 proteins in basal and suprabasal layers. In the basal layer, the nuclei testing positive for p53 were stained intensely, while in the suprabasal layer, cells with slightly stained nuclei were predominant. All cases also tested positive for the MDM2 protein, but with varying degrees of nuclear expression and a predominance of slightly stained cells. A statistically significant correlation between the percentage of p53 and MDM2-positive cells was established, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia. The expression of p53 and MDM2 proteins in actinic cheilitis can be an important indicator in lip carcinogenesis, regardless of the degree of epithelial dysplasia.

  13. Actin-Capping Protein and the Hippo pathway regulate F-actin and tissue growth in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Beatriz García; Gaspar, Pedro; Brás-Pereira, Catarina; Jezowska, Barbara; Rebelo, Sofia Raquel; Janody, Florence

    2011-06-01

    The conserved Hippo tumor suppressor pathway is a key kinase cascade that controls tissue growth by regulating the nuclear import and activity of the transcription co-activator Yorkie. Here, we report that the actin-Capping Protein αβ heterodimer, which regulates actin polymerization, also functions to suppress inappropriate tissue growth by inhibiting Yorkie activity. Loss of Capping Protein activity results in abnormal accumulation of apical F-actin, reduced Hippo pathway activity and the ectopic expression of several Yorkie target genes that promote cell survival and proliferation. Reduction of two other actin-regulatory proteins, Cofilin and the cyclase-associated protein Capulet, cause abnormal F-actin accumulation, but only the loss of Capulet, like that of Capping Protein, induces ectopic Yorkie activity. Interestingly, F-actin also accumulates abnormally when Hippo pathway activity is reduced or abolished, independently of Yorkie activity, whereas overexpression of the Hippo pathway component expanded can partially reverse the abnormal accumulation of F-actin in cells depleted for Capping Protein. Taken together, these findings indicate a novel interplay between Hippo pathway activity and actin filament dynamics that is essential for normal growth control.

  14. The PDZ Domain of the LIM Protein Enigma Binds to β-Tropomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Pamela M.; Kenny, Daryn A.; Gill, Gordon N.

    1999-01-01

    PDZ and LIM domains are modular protein interaction motifs present in proteins with diverse functions. Enigma is representative of a family of proteins composed of a series of conserved PDZ and LIM domains. The LIM domains of Enigma and its most related family member, Enigma homology protein, bind to protein kinases, whereas the PDZ domains of Enigma and family member actin-associated LIM protein bind to actin filaments. Enigma localizes to actin filaments in fibroblasts via its PDZ domain, and actin-associated LIM protein binds to and colocalizes with the actin-binding protein α-actinin-2 at Z lines in skeletal muscle. We show that Enigma is present at the Z line in skeletal muscle and that the PDZ domain of Enigma binds to a skeletal muscle target, the actin-binding protein tropomyosin (skeletal β-TM). The interaction between Enigma and skeletal β-TM was specific for the PDZ domain of Enigma, was abolished by mutations in the PDZ domain, and required the PDZ-binding consensus sequence (Thr-Ser-Leu) at the extreme carboxyl terminus of skeletal β-TM. Enigma interacted with isoforms of tropomyosin expressed in C2C12 myotubes and formed an immunoprecipitable complex with skeletal β-TM in transfected cells. The association of Enigma with skeletal β-TM suggests a role for Enigma as an adapter protein that directs LIM-binding proteins to actin filaments of muscle cells. PMID:10359609

  15. Drebrin-like protein DBN-1 is a sarcomere component that stabilizes actin filaments during muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Bodensiek, Kai; Fakhri, Nikta; von Roden, Kerstin; Schaap, Iwan A T; Majoul, Irina; Schmidt, Christoph F; Klopfenstein, Dieter R

    2015-07-06

    Actin filament organization and stability in the sarcomeres of muscle cells are critical for force generation. Here we identify and functionally characterize a Caenorhabditis elegans drebrin-like protein DBN-1 as a novel constituent of the muscle contraction machinery. In vitro, DBN-1 exhibits actin filament binding and bundling activity. In vivo, DBN-1 is expressed in body wall muscles of C. elegans. During the muscle contraction cycle, DBN-1 alternates location between myosin- and actin-rich regions of the sarcomere. In contracted muscle, DBN-1 is accumulated at I-bands where it likely regulates proper spacing of α-actinin and tropomyosin and protects actin filaments from the interaction with ADF/cofilin. DBN-1 loss of function results in the partial depolymerization of F-actin during muscle contraction. Taken together, our data show that DBN-1 organizes the muscle contractile apparatus maintaining the spatial relationship between actin-binding proteins such as α-actinin, tropomyosin and ADF/cofilin and possibly strengthening actin filaments by bundling.

  16. The Drosophila javelin Gene Encodes a Novel Actin-Associated Protein Required for Actin Assembly in the Bristle ▿

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Shira; Bakhrat, Anna; Bitan, Amir; Abdu, Uri

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster bristle is a highly polarized cell that builds specialized cytoskeletal structures. Whereas actin is required for increasing bristle length, microtubules are essential for bristle axial growth. To identify new proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization during bristle development, we focused on identifying and characterizing the javelin (jv) locus. We found that in a jv mutant, the bristle tip is swollen and abnormal organization of bristle grooves is seen over the entire bristle. Using confocal and electron microscopy, we found that in jv mutant bristles, actin bundles do not form properly due to a loss of actin filaments within the bundle. We show that jv is an allele of the predicted CG32397 gene that encodes a protein with no homologs outside insects. Expression of the Jv protein fused to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) shows that the protein is colocalized with actin bundles in the bristle. Moreover, expression of Jv-GFP within the germ line led to the formation of ectopic actin bundles that surround the nucleus of nurse cells. Thus, we report that Jv is a novel actin-associated protein required for actin assembly during Drosophila bristle development. PMID:21930794

  17. Proteomic analysis of secretagogue-stimulated neutrophils implicates a role for actin and actin-interacting proteins in Rac2-mediated granule exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are abundant leukocytes that play a primary role in defence against pathogens. Neutrophils enter sites of infection where they eliminate pathogens via phagocytosis and the release of antimicrobial mediators via degranulation. Rho GTPases, particularly Rac2, play a key role in neutrophil degranulation. The purpose of this study was to identify Rac2-dependent changes in protein abundance in stimulated neutrophils. Methods We performed a proteomic analysis on secretagogue-stimulated bone marrow neutrophils that were isolated from wild-type and Rac2-/- mice. Protein abundance was analyzed by 2-dimensional SDS-PAGE of fluorescently labelled samples which allowed the detection ~3500 proteins. Results We identified 22 proteins that showed significant changes in abundance after secretagogue-stimulation of wild-type neutrophils, which did not occur in neutrophils isolated from Rac2-/- mice. As expected, the abundance of several granule proteins was reduced in wild-type cells; this did not occur in Rac2-/- neutrophils which confirms the requirement for Rac2 in degranulation. We also found changes in abundance of many actin remodelling proteins including coronin-1A, β-actin and the F-actin capping protein, (CapZ-β). Coronin-1A showed elevated levels of several isoforms after stimulation of neutrophils from wild-type, but not from Rac2-/- mice. These isoforms were immunoreactive with anti-phospho-threonine antibodies, suggesting that neutrophil stimulation triggers a Rac2-dependent kinase cascade that results in the phosphorylation of coronin-1A. Conclusion The control of Rac2-mediated degranulation in neutrophils likely functions through actin remodelling via activation of several actin-binding proteins. We found coronin-1A to be a novel downstream effector protein of this pathway that is threonine phosphorylated in response to secretagogue stimulation. PMID:22081935

  18. Mammalian and malaria parasite cyclase-associated proteins catalyze nucleotide exchange on G-actin through a conserved mechanism.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Maarit; Bertling, Enni; Chebotareva, Natalia A; Baum, Jake; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-01-11

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are among the most highly conserved regulators of actin dynamics, being present in organisms from mammals to apicomplexan parasites. Yeast, plant, and mammalian CAPs are large multidomain proteins, which catalyze nucleotide exchange on actin monomers from ADP to ATP and recycle actin monomers from actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin for new rounds of filament assembly. However, the mechanism by which CAPs promote nucleotide exchange is not known. Furthermore, how apicomplexan CAPs, which lack many domains present in yeast and mammalian CAPs, contribute to actin dynamics is not understood. We show that, like yeast Srv2/CAP, mouse CAP1 interacts with ADF/cofilin and ADP-G-actin through its N-terminal α-helical and C-terminal β-strand domains, respectively. However, in the variation to yeast Srv2/CAP, mouse CAP1 has two adjacent profilin-binding sites, and it interacts with ATP-actin monomers with high affinity through its WH2 domain. Importantly, we revealed that the C-terminal β-sheet domain of mouse CAP1 is essential and sufficient for catalyzing nucleotide exchange on actin monomers, although the adjacent WH2 domain is not required for this function. Supporting these data, we show that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum CAP, which is entirely composed of the β-sheet domain, efficiently promotes nucleotide exchange on actin monomers. Collectively, this study provides evidence that catalyzing nucleotide exchange on actin monomers via the β-sheet domain is the most highly conserved function of CAPs from mammals to apicomplexan parasites. Other functions, including interactions with profilin and ADF/cofilin, evolved in more complex organisms to adjust the specific role of CAPs in actin dynamics.

  19. The Structural Determinants of Macrolide-Actin Binding: In Silico Insights

    PubMed Central

    Melville, James L.; Moal, Iain H.; Baker-Glenn, Charles; Shaw, Peter E.; Pattenden, Gerald; Hirst, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    By the use of x-ray structures and flexible docking, we have developed the first in silico ligand-based view of the structural determinants of the binding of small molecule mimics of gelsolin, natural products bound to actin. Our technique highlights those residues on the actin binding site forming important hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the ligands. Significantly, through the flexible docking of toxin fragments, we have also identified potential residues on the actin binding site that have yet to be exploited. Guided by these observations, we have demonstrated that kabiramide C can be modified to produce a structure with a predicted binding energy increased by 20% while the molecular mass is reduced by 20%, clearly indicating the potential for future elaboration of structures targeting this important component of the cytoskeleton. PMID:17351011

  20. Neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein is implicated in the actin-based motility of Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Miki, H; Takenawa, T; Sasakawa, C

    1998-01-01

    Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, is capable of directing its own movement in the cytoplasm of infected epithelial cells. The bacterial surface protein VirG recruits host components mediating actin polymerization, which is thought to serve as the propulsive force. Here, we show that neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which is a critical target for filopodium formation downstream of Cdc42, is required for assembly of the actin tail generated by intracellular S.flexneri. N-WASP accumulates at the front of the actin tail and is capable of interacting with VirG in vitro and in vivo, a phenomenon that is not observed in intracellular Listeria monocytogenes. The verprolin-homology region in N-WASP was required for binding to the glycine-rich repeats domain of VirG, an essential domain for recruitment of F-actin on intracellular S.flexneri. Overexpression of a dominant-negative N-WASP mutant greatly inhibited formation of the actin tail by intracellular S.flexneri. Furthermore, depletion of N-WASP from Xenopus egg extracts shut off Shigella actin tail assembly, and this was restored upon addition of N-WASP protein, suggesting that N-WASP is a critical host factor for the assembly of the actin tail by intracellular Shigella. PMID:9582270

  1. Role of Proteins of the Ena/VASP Family in Actin-based Motility of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Valérie; Loisel, Thomas P.; Harbeck, Birgit; Wehman, Ann; Gröbe, Lothar; Jockusch, Brigitte M.; Wehland, Jürgen; Gertler, Frank B.; Carlier, Marie-France

    1999-01-01

    Intracellular propulsion of Listeria monocytogenes is the best understood form of motility dependent on actin polymerization. We have used in vitro motility assays of Listeria in platelet and brain extracts to elucidate the function of the focal adhesion proteins of the Ena (Drosophila Enabled)/VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein) family in actin-based motility. Immunodepletion of VASP from platelet extracts and of Evl (Ena/VASP-like protein) from brain extracts of Mena knockout (−/−) mice combined with add-back of recombinant (bacterial or eukaryotic) VASP and Evl show that VASP, Mena, and Evl play interchangeable roles and are required to transform actin polymerization into active movement and propulsive force. The EVH1 (Ena/VASP homology 1) domain of VASP is in slow association–dissociation equilibrium high-affinity binding to the zyxin-homologous, proline-rich region of ActA. VASP also interacts with F-actin via its COOH-terminal EVH2 domain. Hence VASP/ Ena/Evl link the bacterium to the actin tail, which is required for movement. The affinity of VASP for F-actin is controlled by phosphorylation of serine 157 by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Phospho-VASP binds with high affinity (0.5 × 108 M−1); dephospho-VASP binds 40-fold less tightly. We propose a molecular ratchet model for insertional polymerization of actin, within which frequent attachment–detachment of VASP to F-actin allows its sliding along the growing filament. PMID:10087267

  2. Structure of the mid-region of tropomyosin: Bending and binding sites for actin

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jerry H.; Zhou, Zhaocai; Reshetnikova, Ludmilla; Robinson, Howard; Yammani, Rama D.; Tobacman, Larry S.; Cohen, Carolyn

    2005-01-01

    Tropomyosin is a two-chain α-helical coiled coil whose periodic interactions with the F-actin helix are critical for thin filament stabilization and the regulation of muscle contraction. Here we deduce the mechanical and chemical basis of these interactions from the 2.3-Å-resolution crystal structure of the middle three of tropomyosin's seven periods. Geometrically specific bends of the coiled coil, produced by clusters of core alanines, and variable bends about gaps in the core, produced by isolated alanines, occur along the molecule. The crystal packing is notable in signifying that the functionally important fifth period includes an especially favorable protein-binding site, comprising an unusual apolar patch on the surface together with surrounding charged residues. Based on these and other results, we have constructed a specific model of the thin filament, with the N-terminal halves of each period (i.e., the so-called “α zones”) of tropomyosin axially aligned with subdomain 3 of each monomer in F-actin. PMID:16365313

  3. Structure of the Mid-Region Tropomyosin: Bending and Binding Sites for Actin

    SciTech Connect

    Brown,J.; Zhou, Z.; Reshetnikova, L.; Robinson, H.; Yammani, R.; Tobacman, L.; Cohen, C.

    2005-01-01

    Tropomyosin is a two-chain {alpha}-helical coiled coil whose periodic interactions with the F-actin helix are critical for thin filament stabilization and the regulation of muscle contraction. Here we deduce the mechanical and chemical basis of these interactions from the 2.3-Angstrom-resolution crystal structure of the middle three of tropomyosin's seven periods. Geometrically specific bends of the coiled coil, produced by clusters of core alanines, and variable bends about gaps in the core, produced by isolated alanines, occur along the molecule. The crystal packing is notable in signifying that the functionally important fifth period includes an especially favorable protein-binding site, comprising an unusual apolar patch on the surface together with surrounding charged residues. Based on these and other results, we have constructed a specific model of the thin filament, with the N-terminal halves of each period (i.e., the so-called '{alpha} zones') of tropomyosin axially aligned with subdomain 3 of each monomer in F-actin.

  4. Sequence and domain organization of scruin, an actin-cross-linking protein in the acrosomal process of Limulus sperm

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The acrosomal process of Limulus sperm is an 80-microns long finger of membrane supported by a crystalline bundle of actin filaments. The filaments in this bundle are crosslinked by a 102-kD protein, scruin present in a 1:1 molar ratio with actin. Recent image reconstruction of scruin decorated actin filaments at 13-A resolution shows that scruin is organized into two equally sized domains bound to separate actin subunits in the same filament. We have cloned and sequenced the gene for scruin from a Limulus testes cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence of scruin reflects the domain organization of scruin: it consists of a tandem pair of homologous domains joined by a linker region. The domain organization of scruin is confirmed by limited proteolysis of the purified acrosomal process. Three different proteases cleave the native protein in a 5-kD Protease-sensitive region in the middle of the molecule to generate an NH2-terminal 47-kD and a COOH-terminal 56-kD protease-resistant domains. Although the protein sequence of scruin has no homology to any known actin-binding protein, it has similarities to several proteins, including four open reading frames of unknown function in poxviruses, as well as kelch, a Drosophila protein localized to actin-rich ring canals. All proteins that show homologies to scruin are characterized by the presence of an approximately 50-amino acid residue motif that is repeated between two and seven times. Crystallographic studies reveal this motif represents a four beta-stranded fold that is characteristic of the "superbarrel" structural fold found in the sialidase family of proteins. These results suggest that the two domains of scruin seen in EM reconstructions are superbarrel folds, and they present the possibility that other members of this family may also bind actin. PMID:7822422

  5. Kv3.3 Channels Bind Hax-1 and Arp2/3 to Assemble a Stable Local Actin Network that Regulates Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalan; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Fleming, Matthew R; Amiri, Anahita; El-Hassar, Lynda; Surguchev, Alexei A; Hyland, Callen; Jenkins, David P; Desai, Rooma; Brown, Maile R; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Waters, Michael F; Large, Charles H; Horvath, Tamas L; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar; Vaccarino, Flora M; Forscher, Paul; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-04-07

    Mutations in the Kv3.3 potassium channel (KCNC3) cause cerebellar neurodegeneration and impair auditory processing. The cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 contains a proline-rich domain conserved in proteins that activate actin nucleation through Arp2/3. We found that Kv3.3 recruits Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in formation of a relatively stable cortical actin filament network resistant to cytochalasin D that inhibits fast barbed end actin assembly. These Kv3.3-associated actin structures are required to prevent very rapid N-type channel inactivation during short depolarizations of the plasma membrane. The effects of Kv3.3 on the actin cytoskeleton are mediated by the binding of the cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 to Hax-1, an anti-apoptotic protein that regulates actin nucleation through Arp2/3. A human Kv3.3 mutation within a conserved proline-rich domain produces channels that bind Hax-1 but are impaired in recruiting Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in growth cones with deficient actin veils in stem cell-derived neurons.

  6. Fimbrin is a homologue of the cytoplasmic phosphoprotein plastin and has domains homologous with calmodulin and actin gelation proteins.

    PubMed

    de Arruda, M V; Watson, S; Lin, C S; Leavitt, J; Matsudaira, P

    1990-09-01

    Fimbrin is an actin-bundling protein found in intestinal microvilli, hair cell stereocilia, and fibroblast filopodia. The complete protein sequence (630 residues) of chicken intestine fimbrin has been determined from two full-length cDNA clones. The sequence encodes a small amino-terminal domain (115 residues) that is homologous with two calcium-binding sites of calmodulin and a large carboxy-terminal domain (500 residues) consisting of a fourfold-repeated 125-residue sequence. This repeat is homologous with the actin-binding domain of alpha-actinin and the amino-terminal domains of dystrophin, actin-gelation protein, and beta-spectrin. The presence of this duplicated domain in fimbrin links actin bundling proteins and gelation proteins into a common family of actin cross-linking proteins. Fimbrin is also homologous in sequence with human L-plastin and T-plastin. L-plastin is found in only normal or transformed leukocytes where it becomes phosphorylated in response to IL 1 or phorbol myristate acetate. T-plastin is found in cells of solid tissues where it does not become phosphorylated. Neoplastic cells derived from solid tissues express both isoforms. The differences in expression, sequence, and phosphorylation suggest possible functional differences between fimbrin isoforms.

  7. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  8. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  9. Involvement of a small GTP binding protein in HIV-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Audoly, Gilles; Popoff, Michel R; Gluschankof, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    Background There is evidence suggesting that actin binding to HIV-1 encoded proteins, or even actin dynamics themselves, might play a key role in virus budding and/or release from the infected cell. A crucial step in the reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton is the engagement of various different GTP binding proteins. We have thus studied the involvement of GTP-binding proteins in the final steps of the HIV-1 viral replication cycle. Results Our results demonstrate that virus production is abolished when cellular GTP binding proteins involved in actin polymerisation are inhibited with specific toxins. Conclusion We propose a new HIV budding working model whereby Gag interactions with pre-existing endosomal cellular tracks as well as with a yet non identified element of the actin polymerisation pathway are required in order to allow HIV-1 to be released from the infected cell. PMID:16080789

  10. Concerted upregulation of CLP36 and smooth muscle actin protein expression in human endometrium during decidualization.

    PubMed

    Miehe, Ulrich; Neumaier-Wagner, Peruka; Kadyrov, Mamed; Goyal, Pankaj; Alfer, Joachim; Rath, Werner; Huppertz, Berthold

    2005-01-01

    The human endometrium prepares for implantation of the blastocyst by reorganization of its whole cellular network. Endometrial stroma cells change their phenotype starting around the 23rd day of the menstrual cycle. These predecidual stroma cells first appear next to spiral arteries, and after implantation these cells further differentiate into decidual stroma cells. The phenotypical changes in these cells during decidualization are characterized by distinct changes in the actin filaments and filament-related proteins such as alpha-actinin. The carboxy-terminal LIM domain protein with a molecular weight of 36 kDa (CLP36) is a cytoskeletal component that has been shown to associate with contractile actin filaments and to bind to alpha-actinin supporting a role for CLP36 in cytoskeletal reorganization and signal transduction by binding to signaling proteins. The expression patterns of CLP36, alpha-actinin and actin were studied in endometrial stroma cells from different stages of the menstrual cycle and in decidual stroma cells from the 6th week of gestation until the end of pregnancy. During the menstrual cycle, CLP36 is only expressed in the luminal and glandular epithelium but not in endometrial stroma cells. During decidualization and throughout pregnancy, a parallel upregulation of CLP36 and smooth muscle actin, an early marker of decidualization in the baboon, was observed in endometrial decidual cells. Since both proteins maintain a high expression level throughout pregnancy, a role of both proteins is suggested in the stabilization of the cytoskeleton of these cells that come into close contact with invading trophoblast cells.

  11. Refilins are short-lived Actin-bundling proteins that regulate lamellipodium protrusion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Olivia; Gilquin, Benoît; Assard, Nicole; Stuelsatz, Pascal; Delphin, Christian; Lachuer, Joël; Gidrol, Xavier; Baudier, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Refilins (RefilinA and RefilinB) are members of a novel family of Filamin binding proteins that function as molecular switches to conformationally alter the Actin filament network into bundles. We show here that Refilins are extremely labile proteins. An N-terminal PEST/DSG(X)2-4S motif mediates ubiquitin-independent rapid degradation. A second degradation signal is localized within the C-terminus. Only RefilinB is protected from rapid degradation by an auto-inhibitory domain that masks the PEST/DSG(X)2-4S motif. Dual regulation of RefilinA and RefilinB stability was confirmed in rat brain NG2 precursor cells (polydendrocyte). Using loss- and gain-of-function approaches we show that in these cells, and in U373MG cells, Refilins contribute to the dynamics of lamellipodium protrusion by catalysing Actin bundle formation within the lamella Actin network. These studies extend the Actin bundling function of the Refilin-Filamin complex to dynamic regulation of cell membrane remodelling. PMID:27744291

  12. Refilins are short-lived Actin-bundling proteins that regulate lamellipodium protrusion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gay, Olivia; Gilquin, Benoît; Assard, Nicole; Stuelsatz, Pascal; Delphin, Christian; Lachuer, Joël; Gidrol, Xavier; Baudier, Jacques

    2016-10-15

    Refilins (RefilinA and RefilinB) are members of a novel family of Filamin binding proteins that function as molecular switches to conformationally alter the Actin filament network into bundles. We show here that Refilins are extremely labile proteins. An N-terminal PEST/DSG(X)2-4S motif mediates ubiquitin-independent rapid degradation. A second degradation signal is localized within the C-terminus. Only RefilinB is protected from rapid degradation by an auto-inhibitory domain that masks the PEST/DSG(X)2-4S motif. Dual regulation of RefilinA and RefilinB stability was confirmed in rat brain NG2 precursor cells (polydendrocyte). Using loss- and gain-of-function approaches we show that in these cells, and in U373MG cells, Refilins contribute to the dynamics of lamellipodium protrusion by catalysing Actin bundle formation within the lamella Actin network. These studies extend the Actin bundling function of the Refilin-Filamin complex to dynamic regulation of cell membrane remodelling.

  13. Polarity protein Crumbs homolog-3 (CRB3) regulates ectoplasmic specialization dynamics through its action on F-actin organization in Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Lui, Wing-yee; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    Crumbs homolog 3 (or Crumbs3, CRB3) is a polarity protein expressed by Sertoli and germ cells at the basal compartment in the seminiferous epithelium. CRB3 also expressed at the blood-testis barrier (BTB), co-localized with F-actin, TJ proteins occludin/ZO-1 and basal ES (ectoplasmic specialization) proteins N-cadherin/β-catenin at stages IV-VII only. The binding partners of CRB3 in the testis were the branched actin polymerization protein Arp3, and the barbed end-capping and bundling protein Eps8, illustrating its possible role in actin organization. CRB3 knockdown (KD) by RNAi in Sertoli cells with an established tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier perturbed the TJ-barrier via changes in the distribution of TJ- and basal ES-proteins at the cell-cell interface. These changes were the result of CRB3 KD-induced re-organization of actin microfilaments, in which actin microfilaments were truncated, and extensively branched, thereby destabilizing F-actin-based adhesion protein complexes at the BTB. Using Polyplus in vivo-jetPEI as a transfection medium with high efficiency for CRB3 KD in the testis, the CRB3 KD testes displayed defects in spermatid and phagosome transport, and also spermatid polarity due to a disruption of F-actin organization. In summary, CRB3 is an actin microfilament regulator, playing a pivotal role in organizing actin filament bundles at the ES. PMID:27358069

  14. Structure and function of a G-actin sequestering protein with a vital role in malaria oocyst development inside the mosquito vector.

    PubMed

    Hliscs, Marion; Sattler, Julia M; Tempel, Wolfram; Artz, Jennifer D; Dong, Aiping; Hui, Raymond; Matuschewski, Kai; Schüler, Herwig

    2010-04-09

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are evolutionary conserved G-actin-binding proteins that regulate microfilament turnover. CAPs have a modular structure consisting of an N-terminal adenylate cyclase binding domain, a central proline-rich segment, and a C-terminal actin binding domain. Protozoan parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa, such as Cryptosporidium and the malaria parasite Plasmodium, express small CAP orthologs with homology to the C-terminal actin binding domain (C-CAP). Here, we demonstrate by reverse genetics that C-CAP is dispensable for the pathogenic Plasmodium blood stages. However, c-cap(-) parasites display a complete defect in oocyst development in the insect vector. By trans-species complementation we show that the Cryptosporidium parvum ortholog complements the Plasmodium gene functions. Purified recombinant C. parvum C-CAP protein binds actin monomers and prevents actin polymerization. The crystal structure of C. parvum C-CAP shows two monomers with a right-handed beta-helical fold intercalated at their C termini to form the putative physiological dimer. Our results reveal a specific vital role for an apicomplexan G-actin-binding protein during sporogony, the parasite replication phase that precedes formation of malaria transmission stages. This study also exemplifies how Plasmodium reverse genetics combined with biochemical and structural analyses of orthologous proteins can offer a fast track toward systematic gene characterization in apicomplexan parasites.

  15. A complex of ZO-1 and the BAR-domain protein TOCA-1 regulates actin assembly at the tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Tietgens, Amber Jean; Krystofiak, Evan; Kachar, Bechara; Anderson, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and sealing of the tight junction barrier are critically dependent on the perijunctional actin cytoskeleton, yet little is known about physical and functional links between barrier-forming proteins and actin. Here we identify a novel functional complex of the junction scaffolding protein ZO-1 and the F-BAR–domain protein TOCA-1. Using MDCK epithelial cells, we show that an alternative splice of TOCA-1 adds a PDZ-binding motif, which binds ZO-1, targeting TOCA-1 to barrier contacts. This isoform of TOCA-1 recruits the actin nucleation–promoting factor N-WASP to tight junctions. CRISPR-Cas9–mediated knockout of TOCA-1 results in increased paracellular flux and delayed recovery in a calcium switch assay. Knockout of TOCA-1 does not alter FRAP kinetics of GFP ZO-1 or occludin, but longer term (12 h) time-lapse microscopy reveals strikingly decreased tight junction membrane contact dynamics in knockout cells compared with controls. Reexpression of TOCA-1 with, but not without, the PDZ-binding motif rescues both altered flux and membrane contact dynamics. Ultrastructural analysis shows actin accumulation at the adherens junction in TOCA-1–knockout cells but unaltered freeze-fracture fibril morphology. Identification of the ZO-1/TOCA-1 complex provides novel insights into the underappreciated dependence of the barrier on the dynamic nature of cell-to-cell contacts and perijunctional actin. PMID:26063734

  16. Treponema denticola Major Outer Sheath Protein Induces Actin Assembly at Free Barbed Ends by a PIP2-Dependent Uncapping Mechanism in Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Michelle B.; Koh, Adeline; Glogauer, Michael; Ellen, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    The major outer sheath protein (Msp) of Treponema denticola perturbs actin dynamics in fibroblasts by inducing actin reorganization, including subcortical actin filament assembly, leading to defective calcium flux, diminished integrin engagement of collagen, and retarded cell migration. Yet, its mechanisms of action are unknown. We challenged Rat-2 fibroblasts with enriched native Msp. Msp activated the small GTPases Rac1, RhoA and Ras, but not Cdc42, yet only Rac1 localized to areas of actin rearrangement. We used Rac1 dominant negative transfection and chemical inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) to show that even though Rac1 activation was PI3K-dependent, neither was required for Msp-induced actin rearrangement. Actin free barbed end formation (FBE) by Msp was also PI3K-independent. Immunoblotting experiments showed that gelsolin and CapZ were released from actin filaments, whereas cofilin remained in an inactive state. Msp induced phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) formation through activation of a phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase and its recruitment to areas of actin assembly at the plasma membrane. Using a PIP2 binding peptide or lipid phosphatase inhibitor, PIP2 was shown to be required for Msp-mediated actin uncapping and FBE formation. Evidently, Msp induces actin assembly in fibroblasts by production and recruitment of PIP2 and release of the capping proteins CapZ and gelsolin from actin barbed ends. PMID:21901132

  17. Identification of a cyclase-associated protein (CAP) homologue in Dictyostelium discoideum and characterization of its interaction with actin.

    PubMed

    Gottwald, U; Brokamp, R; Karakesisoglou, I; Schleicher, M; Noegel, A A

    1996-02-01

    In search for novel actin binding proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum we have isolated a cDNA clone coding for a protein of approximately 50 kDa that is highly homologous to the class of adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins (CAP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the amino-terminal part of CAP is involved in the regulation of the adenylyl cyclase whereas the loss of the carboxyl-terminal domain results in morphological and nutritional defects. To study the interaction of Dictyostelium CAP with actin, the complete protein and its amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal domains were expressed in Escherichia coli and used in actin binding assays. CAP sequestered actin in a Ca2+ independent way. This activity was localized to the carboxyl-terminal domain. CAP and its carboxyl-terminal domain led to a fluorescence enhancement of pyrene-labeled G-actin up to 50% indicating a direct interaction, whereas the amino-terminal domain did not enhance. In polymerization as well as in viscometric assays the ability of the carboxyl-terminal domain to sequester actin and to prevent F-actin formation was approximately two times higher than that of intact CAP. The sequestering activity of full length CAP could be inhibited by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), whereas the activity of the carboxyl-terminal domain alone was not influenced, suggesting that the amino-terminal half of the protein is required for the PIP2 modulation of the CAP function. In profilin-minus cells the CAP concentration is increased by approximately 73%, indicating that CAP may compensate some profilin functions in vivo. In migrating D. discoideum cells CAP was enriched at anterior and posterior plasma membrane regions. Only a weak staining of the cytoplasm was observed. In chemotactically stimulated cells the protein was very prominent in leading fronts. The data suggest an involvement of D. discoideum CAP in microfilament reorganization near the plasma membrane in a PIP2-regulated manner.

  18. The ATP binding cassette transporter, ABCG1, localizes to cortical actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Pandzic, Elvis; Gelissen, Ingrid C.; Whan, Renee; Barter, Philip J.; Sviridov, Dmitri; Gaus, Katharina; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Cochran, Blake J.

    2017-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 1 (ABCG1) exports cellular cholesterol to high-density lipoproteins (HDL). However, a number of recent studies have suggested ABCG1 is predominantly localised to intracellular membranes. In this study, we found that ABCG1 was organized into two distinct cellular pools: one at the plasma membrane and the other associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The plasma membrane fraction was organized into filamentous structures that were associated with cortical actin filaments. Inhibition of actin polymerization resulted in complete disruption of ABCG1 filaments. Cholesterol loading of the cells increased the formation of the filamentous ABCG1, the proximity of filamentous ABCG1 to actin filaments and the diffusion rate of membrane associated ABCG1. Our findings suggest that the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role in the plasma membrane localization of ABCG1. PMID:28165022

  19. Vinculin Interacts with the Chlamydia Effector TarP Via a Tripartite Vinculin Binding Domain to Mediate Actin Recruitment and Assembly at the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, Tristan R; Pedrosa, Antonio T; Peacock, Thomas P; Carabeo, Rey A

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian protein vinculin is often a target of bacterial pathogens to subvert locally host cell actin dynamics. In Chlamydia infection, vinculin has been implicated in RNA interference screens, but the molecular basis for vinculin requirement has not been characterized. In this report, we show that vinculin was involved in the actin recruitment and F-actin assembly at the plasma membrane to facilitate invasion. Vinculin was recruited to the plasma membrane via its interaction with a specific tripartite motif within TarP that resembles the vinculin-binding domain (VBD) found in the Shigella invasion factor IpaA. The TarP-mediated plasma membrane recruitment of vinculin resulted in the localized recruitment of actin. In vitro pulldown assays for protein-protein interaction and imaging-based evaluation of recruitment to the plasma membrane demonstrated the essential role of the vinculin-binding site 1 (VBS1), and the dispensability of VBS2 and VBS3. As further support for the functionality of VBD-vinculin interaction, VBD-mediated actin recruitment required vinculin. Interestingly, while both vinculin and the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) colocalized at the sites of adhesion, the recruitment of one was independent of the other; and the actin recruitment function of the VBD/vinculin signaling axis was independent of the LD/FAK pathway.

  20. Unphosphorylated calponin enhances the binding force of unphosphorylated myosin to actin

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Horia Nicolae; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Kachmar, Linda; Ijpma, Gijs; Hilbert, Lennart; Matusovskiy, Oleg; Benedetti, Andrea; Sobieszek, Apolinary; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background Smooth muscle has the distinctive ability to maintain force for long periods of time and at low energy costs. While it is generally agreed that this property, called the latch-state, is due to the dephosphorylation of myosin while attached to actin, dephosphorylated-detached myosin can also attach to actin and may contribute to force maintenance. Thus, we investigated the role of calponin in regulating and enhancing the binding force of unphosphorylated tonic muscle myosin to actin. Methods To measure the effect of calponin on the binding of unphosphorylated myosin to actin, we used the laser trap assay to quantify the average force of unbinding (Funb) in the absence and presence of calponin or phosphorylated calponin. Results Funb from F-actin alone (0.12±0.01pN; mean±SE) was significantly increased in the presence of calponin (0.20±0.02pN). This enhancement was lost when calponin was phosphorylated (0.12±0.01pN). To further verify that this enhancement of Funb was due to cross-linking of actin to myosin by calponin, we repeated the measurements at high ionic strength. Indeed, the Funb obtained at a [KCl] of 25mM (0.21±0.02pN; mean±SE) was significantly decreased at a [KCl] of 150mM, (0.13±0.01pN). Conclusions This study provides direct molecular level-evidence that calponin enhances the binding force of unphosphorylated myosin to actin by cross-linking them and that this is reversed upon calponin phosphorylation. Thus, calponin might play an important role in the latch-state. General Significance This study suggests a new mechanism that likely contributes to the latch-state, a fundamental and important property of smooth muscle that remains unresolved. PMID:23747303

  1. Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) acts directly on F-actin to accelerate cofilin-mediated actin severing across the range of physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Normoyle, Kieran P M; Brieher, William M

    2012-10-12

    Fast actin depolymerization is necessary for cells to rapidly reorganize actin filament networks. Utilizing a Listeria fluorescent actin comet tail assay to monitor actin disassembly rates, we observed that although a mixture of actin disassembly factors (cofilin, coronin, and actin-interacting protein 1 is sufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological G-actin concentrations this mixture was insufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological F-actin concentrations. Using biochemical complementation, we purified cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from thymus extracts as a factor that protects against the inhibition of excess F-actin. CAP has been shown to participate in actin dynamics but has been thought to act by liberating cofilin from ADP·G-actin monomers to restore cofilin activity. However, we found that CAP augments cofilin-mediated disassembly by accelerating the rate of cofilin-mediated severing. We also demonstrated that CAP acts directly on F-actin and severs actin filaments at acidic, but not neutral, pH. At the neutral pH characteristic of cytosol in most mammalian cells, we demonstrated that neither CAP nor cofilin are capable of severing actin filaments. However, the combination of CAP and cofilin rapidly severed actin at all pH values across the physiological range. Therefore, our results reveal a new function for CAP in accelerating cofilin-mediated actin filament severing and provide a mechanism through which cells can maintain high actin turnover rates without having to alkalinize cytosol, which would affect many biochemical reactions beyond actin depolymerization.

  2. A 27,000-D core of the Dictyostelium 34,000-D protein retains Ca(2+)- regulated actin cross-linking but lacks bundling activity

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Actin cross-linking proteins are important for formation of isotropic F- actin networks and anisotropic bundles of filaments in the cytoplasm of eucaryotic cells. A 34,000-D protein from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum mediates formation of actin bundles in vitro, and is specifically incorporated into filopodia. The actin cross- linking activity of this protein is inhibited by the presence of micromolar calcium. A 27,000-D fragment obtained by digestion with alpha-chymotrypsin lacks the amino-terminal six amino acids and the carboxyl-terminal 7,000 D of the intact polypeptide. The 27,000-D fragment retains F-actin binding activity assessed by cosedimentation assays and by 125I-[F-actin] blot overlay technique, F-actin cross- linking activity as assessed by viscometry, and calcium binding activity. Ultrastructural analyses indicate that the 27,000-D fragment is deficient in the bundling activity characteristic of the intact 34,000-D protein. Actin filaments are aggregated into microdomains but not bundle in the presence of the 27,000-D fragment. A polarized light scattering assay was used to demonstrate that the 34,000-D protein increases the orientational correlation among F-actin filaments. The 27,000-D fragment does not increase the orientation of the actin filaments as assessed by this technique. A terminal segment(s) of the 34,000-D protein, lacking in the 27,000-D fragment, contributes significantly to the ability to cross-link actin filaments into bundles. PMID:8436589

  3. Evidence for physical and functional interactions among two Saccharomyces cerevisiae SH3 domain proteins, an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein and the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Lila, T; Drubin, D G

    1997-01-01

    In a variety of organisms, a number of proteins associated with the cortical actin cytoskeleton contain SH3 domains, suggesting that these domains may provide the physical basis for functional interactions among structural and regulatory proteins in the actin cytoskeleton. We present evidence that SH3 domains mediate at least two independent functions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-binding protein Abp1p in vivo. Abp1p contains a single SH3 domain that has recently been shown to bind in vitro to the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein Srv2p. Immunofluorescence analysis of Srv2p subcellular localization in strains carrying mutations in either ABP1 or SRV2 reveals that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the normal association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. We also show that a site in Abp1p itself is specifically bound by the SH3 domain of the actin-associated protein Rvs167p. Genetic analysis provides evidence that Abp1p and Rvs167p have functions that are closely interrelated. Abp1 null mutations, like rvs167 mutations, result in defects in sporulation and reduced viability under certain suboptimal growth conditions. In addition, mutations in ABP1 and RVS167 yield similar profiles of genetic "synthetic lethal" interactions when combined with mutations in genes encoding other cytoskeletal components. Mutations which specifically disrupt the SH3 domain-mediated interaction between Abp1p and Srv2p, however, show none of the shared phenotypes of abp1 and rvs167 mutations. We conclude that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and that Abp1p performs a distinct function that is likely to involve binding by the Rvs167p SH3 domain. Overall, work presented here illustrates how SH3 domains can integrate the activities of multiple actin cytoskeleton proteins in response to varying environmental conditions. Images PMID:9190214

  4. Evidence for physical and functional interactions among two Saccharomyces cerevisiae SH3 domain proteins, an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein and the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Lila, T; Drubin, D G

    1997-02-01

    In a variety of organisms, a number of proteins associated with the cortical actin cytoskeleton contain SH3 domains, suggesting that these domains may provide the physical basis for functional interactions among structural and regulatory proteins in the actin cytoskeleton. We present evidence that SH3 domains mediate at least two independent functions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-binding protein Abp1p in vivo. Abp1p contains a single SH3 domain that has recently been shown to bind in vitro to the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein Srv2p. Immunofluorescence analysis of Srv2p subcellular localization in strains carrying mutations in either ABP1 or SRV2 reveals that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the normal association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. We also show that a site in Abp1p itself is specifically bound by the SH3 domain of the actin-associated protein Rvs167p. Genetic analysis provides evidence that Abp1p and Rvs167p have functions that are closely interrelated. Abp1 null mutations, like rvs167 mutations, result in defects in sporulation and reduced viability under certain suboptimal growth conditions. In addition, mutations in ABP1 and RVS167 yield similar profiles of genetic "synthetic lethal" interactions when combined with mutations in genes encoding other cytoskeletal components. Mutations which specifically disrupt the SH3 domain-mediated interaction between Abp1p and Srv2p, however, show none of the shared phenotypes of abp1 and rvs167 mutations. We conclude that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and that Abp1p performs a distinct function that is likely to involve binding by the Rvs167p SH3 domain. Overall, work presented here illustrates how SH3 domains can integrate the activities of multiple actin cytoskeleton proteins in response to varying environmental conditions.

  5. The CPEB3 Protein Is a Functional Prion that Interacts with the Actin Cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Joseph S; Fioriti, Luana; Lamba, Nayan; Colnaghi, Luca; Karl, Kevin; Derkatch, Irina L; Kandel, Eric R

    2015-06-23

    The mouse cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein 3 (CPEB3) is a translational regulator implicated in long-term memory maintenance. Invertebrate orthologs of CPEB3 in Aplysia and Drosophila are functional prions that are physiologically active in the aggregated state. To determine if this principle applies to the mammalian CPEB3, we expressed it in yeast and found that it forms heritable aggregates that are the hallmark of known prions. In addition, we confirm in the mouse the importance of CPEB3's prion formation for CPEB3 function. Interestingly, deletion analysis of the CPEB3 prion domain uncovered a tripartite organization: two aggregation-promoting domains surround a regulatory module that affects interaction with the actin cytoskeleton. In all, our data provide direct evidence that CPEB3 is a functional prion in the mammalian brain and underline the potential importance of an actin/CPEB3 feedback loop for the synaptic plasticity underlying the persistence of long-term memory.

  6. Early events of fertilization in sea urchin eggs are sensitive to actin-binding organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Chun, Jong T; Limatola, Nunzia; Vasilev, Filip; Santella, Luigia

    2014-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that many aspects of the intracellular Ca(2+) increase in fertilized eggs of starfish are significantly influenced by the state of the actin cytoskeleton. In addition, the actin cytoskeleton appeared to play comprehensive roles in modulating cortical granules exocytosis and sperm entry during the early phase of fertilization. In the present communication, we have extended our work to sea urchin which is believed to have bifurcated from the common ancestor in the phylogenetic tree some 500 million years ago. To corroborate our earlier findings in starfish, we have tested how the early events of fertilization in sea urchin eggs are influenced by four different actin-binding drugs that promote either depolymerization or stabilization of actin filaments. We found that all the actin drugs commonly blocked sperm entry in high doses and significantly reduced the speed of the Ca(2+) wave. At low doses, however, cytochalasin B and phalloidin increased the rate of polyspermy. Overall, certain aspects of Ca(2+) signaling in these eggs were in line with the morphological changes induced by the actin drugs. That is, the time interval between the cortical flash and the first Ca(2+) spot at the sperm interaction site (the latent period) was significantly prolonged in the eggs pretreated with cytochalasin B or latrunculin A, whereas the Ca(2+) decay kinetics after the peak was specifically attenuated in the eggs pretreated with jasplakinolide or phalloidin. In addition, the sperm interacting with the eggs pretreated with actin drugs often generated multiple Ca(2+) waves, but tended to fail to enter the egg. Thus, our results indicated that generation of massive Ca(2+) waves is neither indicative of sperm entry nor sufficient for cortical granules exocytosis in the inseminated sea urchin eggs, whereas the structure and functionality of the actin cytoskeleton are the major determining factors in the two processes.

  7. The membrane-associated protein, supervillin, accelerates F-actin-dependent rapid integrin recycling and cell motility.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhiyou; Takizawa, Norio; Wilson, Korey A; Smith, Tara C; Delprato, Anna; Davidson, Michael W; Lambright, David G; Luna, Elizabeth J

    2010-06-01

    In migrating cells, the cytoskeleton coordinates signal transduction and redistribution of transmembrane proteins, including integrins and growth factor receptors. Supervillin is an F-actin- and myosin II-binding protein that tightly associates with signaling proteins in cholesterol-rich, 'lipid raft' membrane microdomains. We show here that supervillin also can localize with markers for early and sorting endosomes (EE/SE) and with overexpressed components of the Arf6 recycling pathway in the cell periphery. Supervillin tagged with the photoswitchable fluorescent protein, tdEos, moves both into and away from dynamic structures resembling podosomes at the basal cell surface. Rapid integrin recycling from EE/SE is inhibited in supervillin-knockdown cells, but the rates of integrin endocytosis and recycling from the perinuclear recycling center (PNRC) are unchanged. A lack of synergy between supervillin knockdown and the actin filament barbed-end inhibitor, cytochalasin D, suggests that both treatments affect actin-dependent rapid recycling. Supervillin also enhances signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) 1 and 2 and increases the velocity of cell translocation. These results suggest that supervillin, F-actin and associated proteins coordinate a rapid, basolateral membrane recycling pathway that contributes to ERK signaling and actin-based cell motility.

  8. The Membrane-associated Protein, Supervillin, Accelerates F-actin-dependent Rapid Integrin Recycling and Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhiyou; Takizawa, Norio; Wilson, Korey A.; Smith, Tara C.; Delprato, Anna; Davidson, Michael W.; Lambright, David G.; Luna, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    In migrating cells, the cytoskeleton coordinates signal transduction and re-distributions of transmembrane proteins, including integrins and growth factor receptors. Supervillin is an F-actin- and myosin II-binding protein that tightly associates with signaling proteins in cholesterol-rich, “lipid raft” membrane microdomains. We show here that supervillin also can localize with markers for early and sorting endosomes (EE/SE) and with overexpressed components of the Arf6 recycling pathway in the cell periphery. Supervillin tagged with the photoswitchable fluorescent protein, tdEos, moves both into and away from dynamic structures resembling podosomes at the basal cell surface. Rapid integrin recycling from EE/SE is inhibited in supervillin-knockdown cells, but the rates of integrin endocytosis and recycling from the perinuclear recycling center (PNRC) are unchanged. A lack of synergy between supervillin knockdown and the actin filament barbed-end inhibitor, cytochalasin D, suggests that both treatments affect actin-dependent rapid recycling. Supervillin also enhances signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK) and increases the velocity of cell translocation. These results suggest that supervillin, F-actin, and associated proteins may coordinate a rapid, basolateral membrane recycling pathway that contributes to ERK signaling and actin-based cell motility. PMID:20331534

  9. Cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) promotes cofilin-induced actin dynamics in mammalian nonmuscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bertling, Enni; Hotulainen, Pirta; Mattila, Pieta K; Matilainen, Tanja; Salminen, Marjo; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2004-05-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved actin monomer binding proteins present in all eukaryotes. However, the mechanism by which CAPs contribute to actin dynamics has been elusive. In mammals, the situation is further complicated by the presence of two CAP isoforms whose differences have not been characterized. Here, we show that CAP1 is widely expressed in mouse nonmuscle cells, whereas CAP2 is the predominant isoform in developing striated muscles. In cultured NIH3T3 and B16F1 cells, CAP1 is a highly abundant protein that colocalizes with cofilin-1 to dynamic regions of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Analysis of CAP1 knockdown cells demonstrated that this protein promotes rapid actin filament depolymerization and is important for cell morphology, migration, and endocytosis. Interestingly, depletion of CAP1 leads to an accumulation of cofilin-1 into abnormal cytoplasmic aggregates and to similar cytoskeletal defects to those seen in cofilin-1 knockdown cells, demonstrating that CAP1 is required for proper subcellular localization and function of ADF/cofilin. Together, these data provide the first direct in vivo evidence that CAP promotes rapid actin dynamics in conjunction with ADF/cofilin and is required for several central cellular processes in mammals.

  10. The actin-binding protein Canoe/AF-6 forms a complex with Robo and is required for Slit-Robo signaling during axon pathfinding at the CNS midline.

    PubMed

    Slováková, Jana; Speicher, Stephan; Sánchez-Soriano, Natalia; Prokop, Andreas; Carmena, Ana

    2012-07-18

    Axon guidance is a key process during nervous system development and regeneration. One of the best established paradigms to study the mechanisms underlying this process is the axon decision of whether or not to cross the midline in the Drosophila CNS. An essential regulator of that decision is the well conserved Slit-Robo signaling pathway. Slit guidance cues act through Robo receptors to repel axons from the midline. Despite good progress in our knowledge about these proteins, the intracellular mechanisms associated with Robo function remain poorly defined. In this work, we found that the scaffolding protein Canoe (Cno), the Drosophila orthologue of AF-6/Afadin, is essential for Slit-Robo signaling. Cno is expressed along longitudinal axonal pioneer tracts, and longitudinal Robo/Fasciclin2-positive axons aberrantly cross the midline in cno mutant embryos. cno mutant primary neurons show a significant reduction of Robo localized in growth cone filopodia and Cno forms a complex with Robo in vivo. Moreover, the commissureless (comm) phenotype (i.e., lack of commissures due to constitutive surface presentation of Robo in all neurons) is suppressed in comm, cno double-mutant embryos. Specific genetic interactions between cno, slit, robo, and genes encoding other components of the Robo pathway, such as Neurexin-IV, Syndecan, and Rac GTPases, further confirm that Cno functionally interacts with the Slit-Robo pathway. Our data argue that Cno is a novel regulator of the Slit-Robo signaling pathway, crucial for regulating the subcellular localization of Robo and for transducing its signaling to the actin cytoskeleton during axon guidance at the midline.

  11. 12S-lipoxygenase protein associates with {alpha}-actin fibers in human umbilical artery vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisinger, Gary . E-mail: gary_w@tasmc.health.gov.il; Limor, Rona; Marcus-Perlman, Yonit; Knoll, Esther; Kohen, Fortune; Schinder, Vera; Firer, Michael; Stern, Naftali

    2007-05-11

    The current study sets out to characterize the intracellular localization of the platelet-type 12S-lipoxygenase (12-LO), an enzyme involved in angiotensin-II induced signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Immunohistochemical analysis of VSMC in vitro or human umbilical arteries in vivo showed a clear cytoplasmic localization. On immunogold electron microscopy, 12-LO was found primarily associated with cytoplasmic VSMC muscle fibrils. Upon angiotensin-II treatment of cultured VSMC, immunoprecipitated 12-LO was found bound to {alpha}-actin, a component of the cytoplasmic myofilaments. 12-LO/{alpha}-actin binding was blocked by VSMC pretreatment with the 12-LO inhibitors, baicalien or esculetine and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Moreover, the binding of 12-LO to {alpha}-actin was not associated with 12-LO serine or tyrosine phosphorylation. These observations suggest a previously unrecognized angiotensin-II dependent protein interaction in VSMC through which 12-LO protein may be trafficked, for yet undiscovered purposes towards the much more abundantly expressed cytoskeletal protein {alpha}-actin.

  12. Rai14 (retinoic acid induced protein 14) is involved in regulating f-actin dynamics at the ectoplasmic specialization in the rat testis*.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaojing; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2013-01-01

    Rai14 (retinoic acid induced protein 14) is an actin binding protein first identified in the liver, highly expressed in the placenta, the testis, and the eye. In the course of studying actin binding proteins that regulate the organization of actin filament bundles in the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific actin-rich adherens junction (AJ) type, Rai14 was shown to be one of the regulatory proteins at the ES. In the rat testis, Rai14 was found to be expressed by Sertoli and germ cells, structurally associated with actin and an actin cross-linking protein palladin. Its expression was the highest at the ES in the seminiferous epithelium of adult rat testes, most notably at the apical ES at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, and expressed stage-specifically during the epithelial cycle in stage VII-VIII tubules. However, Rai14 was also found at the basal ES near the basement membrane, associated with the blood-testis barrier (BTB) in stage VIII-IX tubules. A knockdown of Rai14 in Sertoli cells cultured in vitro by RNAi was found to perturb the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability function in vitro, mediated by a disruption of F-actin, which in turn led to protein mis-localization at the Sertoli cell BTB. When Rai14 in the testis in vivo was knockdown by RNAi, defects in spermatid polarity and adhesion, as well as spermatid transport were noted mediated via changes in F-actin organization and mis-localization of proteins at the apical ES. In short, Rai14 is involved in the re-organization of actin filaments in Sertoli cells during the epithelial cycle, participating in conferring spermatid polarity and cell adhesion in the testis.

  13. Endocytic protein intersectin-l regulates actin assembly via Cdc42 and N-WASP.

    PubMed

    Hussain, N K; Jenna, S; Glogauer, M; Quinn, C C; Wasiak, S; Guipponi, M; Antonarakis, S E; Kay, B K; Stossel, T P; Lamarche-Vane, N; McPherson, P S

    2001-10-01

    Intersectin-s is a modular scaffolding protein regulating the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. In addition to the Eps15 homology (EH) and Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of intersectin-s, the neuronal variant (intersectin-l) also has Dbl homology (DH), pleckstrin homology (PH) and C2 domains. We now show that intersectin-l functions through its DH domain as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Cdc42. In cultured cells, expression of DH-domain-containing constructs cause actin rearrangements specific for Cdc42 activation. Moreover, in vivo studies reveal that stimulation of Cdc42 by intersectin-l accelerates actin assembly via N-WASP and the Arp2/3 complex. N-WASP binds directly to intersectin-l and upregulates its GEF activity, thereby generating GTP-bound Cdc42, a critical activator of N-WASP. These studies reveal a role for intersectin-l in a novel mechanism of N-WASP activation and in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

  14. Identification of two nuclear factor-binding domains on the chicken cardiac actin promoter: implications for regulation of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Quitschke, W W; DePonti-Zilli, L; Lin, Z Y; Paterson, B M

    1989-01-01

    The cis-acting regions that appear to be involved in negative regulation of the chicken alpha-cardiac actin promoter both in vivo and in vitro have been identified. A nuclear factor(s) binding to the proximal region mapped over the TATA element between nucleotides -50 and -25. In the distal region, binding spanned nucleotides -136 to -112, a region that included a second CArG box (CArG2) 5' to the more familiar CCAAT-box (CArG1) consensus sequence. Nuclear factors binding to these different domains were found in both muscle and nonmuscle preparations but were detectable at considerably lower levels in tissues expressing the alpha-cardiac actin gene. In contrast, concentrations of the beta-actin CCAAT-box binding activity were similar in all extracts tested. The role of these factor-binding domains on the activity of the cardiac actin promoter in vivo and in vitro and the prevalence of the binding factors in nonmuscle extracts are consistent with the idea that these binding domains and their associated factors are involved in the tissue-restricted expression of cardiac actin through both positive and negative regulatory mechanisms. In the absence of negative regulatory factors, these same binding domains act synergistically, via other factors, to activate the cardiac actin promoter during myogenesis. Images PMID:2552286

  15. Reconstitution of actin-based motility of Listeria and Shigella using pure proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Thomas P.; Boujemaa, Rajaa; Pantaloni, Dominique; Carlier, Marie-France

    1999-10-01

    Actin polymerization is essential for cell locomotion and is thought to generate the force responsible for cellular protrusions. The Arp2/3 complex is required to stimulate actin assembly at the leading edge in response to signalling. The bacteria Listeria and Shigella bypass the signalling pathway and harness the Arp2/3 complex to induce actin assembly and to propel themselves in living cells. However, the Arp2/3 complex alone is insufficient to promote movement. Here we have used pure components of the actin cytoskeleton to reconstitute sustained movement in Listeria and Shigella in vitro. Actin-based propulsion is driven by the free energy released by ATP hydrolysis linked to actin polymerization, and does not require myosin. In addition to actin and activated Arp2/3 complex, actin depolymerizing factor (ADF, or cofilin) and capping protein are also required for motility as they maintain a high steady-state level of G-actin, which controls the rate of unidirectional growth of actin filaments at the surface of the bacterium. The movement is more effective when profilin, α-actinin and VASP (for Listeria) are also included. These results have implications for our understanding of the mechanism of actin-based motility in cells.

  16. Biochemical analysis of potential sites for protein 4.1-mediated anchoring of the spectrin-actin skeleton to the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Workman, R F; Low, P S

    1998-03-13

    Erythrocyte protein 4.1 has been hypothesized to link the spectrin-actin junctional complex directly to the cytoplasmic domain of glycophorin C, but this bridging function has never been directly demonstrated. Because an alternative protein-mediated bridge between the junctional complex and the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 is also plausible, we have undertaken to characterize the membrane sites to which protein 4.1 can anchor the spectrin and actin skeleton. We demonstrate that proteolytic removal of the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 has minimal effect on the ability of protein 4.1 to promote 125I-labeled spectrin and actin binding to KI-stripped erythrocyte membrane vesicles. We also show that quantitative blockade of all band 3 sites with either monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies to band 3 is equally ineffective in preventing protein 4.1-mediated association of spectrin and actin with the membrane. In contrast, obstruction of protein 4.1 binding to its docking site on the cytoplasmic pole of glycophorin C is demonstrated to reduce the same protein 4.1 bridging function by approximately 85%. We conclude from these data that (i) glycophorin C contributes the primary anchoring site of the protein 4.1-mediated bridge to the spectrin-actin skeleton; (ii) band 3 is incapable of serving the same function; and (iii) additional minor protein 4.1 bridging sites may exist on the human erythrocyte membrane.

  17. Srv2/cyclase-associated protein forms hexameric shurikens that directly catalyze actin filament severing by cofilin.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Faisal; Breitsprecher, Dennis; Little, Kristin; Sharov, Grigory; Sokolova, Olga; Goode, Bruce L

    2013-01-01

    Actin filament severing is critical for the dynamic turnover of cellular actin networks. Cofilin severs filaments, but additional factors may be required to increase severing efficiency in vivo. Srv2/cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a widely expressed protein with a role in binding and recycling actin monomers ascribed to domains in its C-terminus (C-Srv2). In this paper, we report a new biochemical and cellular function for Srv2/CAP in directly catalyzing cofilin-mediated severing of filaments. This function is mediated by its N-terminal half (N-Srv2), and is physically and genetically separable from C-Srv2 activities. Using dual-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we determined that N-Srv2 stimulates filament disassembly by increasing the frequency of cofilin-mediated severing without affecting cofilin binding to filaments. Structural analysis shows that N-Srv2 forms novel hexameric star-shaped structures, and disrupting oligomerization impairs N-Srv2 activities and in vivo function. Further, genetic analysis shows that the combined activities of N-Srv2 and Aip1 are essential in vivo. These observations define a novel mechanism by which the combined activities of cofilin and Srv2/CAP lead to enhanced filament severing and support an emerging view that actin disassembly is controlled not by cofilin alone, but by a more complex set of factors working in concert.

  18. Muscle Lim Protein isoform negatively regulates striated muscle actin dynamics and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Arvanitis, Demetrios A.; Papalouka, Vasiliki; Terzis, Gerasimos; Roumeliotis, Theodoros I.; Spengos, Konstantinos; Garbis, Spiros D.; Manta, Panagiota; Kranias, Evangelia G.; Sanoudou, Despina

    2015-01-01

    Muscle Lim Protein (MLP) has emerged as a critical regulator of striated muscle physiology and pathophysiology. Mutations in cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3 (CSRP3), the gene encoding MLP, have been directly associated with human cardiomyopathies, while aberrant expression patterns are reported in human cardiac and skeletal muscle diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that MLP has an important role in both myogenic differentiation and myocyte cytoarchitecture, although the full spectrum of its intracellular roles has not been delineated. We report the discovery of an alternative splice variant of MLP, designated as MLP-b, showing distinct expression in neuromuscular disease and direct roles in actin dynamics and muscle differentiation. This novel isoform originates by alternative splicing of exons 3 and 4. At the protein level, it contains the N-terminus first half LIM domain of MLP and a unique sequence of 22 amino acids. Physiologically it is expressed during early differentiation, whereas its overexpression reduces C2C12 differentiation and myotube formation. This may be mediated through its inhibition of MLP/CFL2-mediated F-actin dynamics. In differentiated striated muscles, MLP-b localizes to the sarcomeres and binds directly to Z-disc components including α-actinin, T-cap and MLP. Our findings unveil a novel player in muscle physiology and pathophysiology that is implicated in myogenesis as a negative regulator of myotube formation, and in differentiated striated muscles as a contributor to sarcomeric integrity. PMID:24860983

  19. beta-Catenin associates with the actin-bundling protein fascin in a noncadherin complex

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Catenins were first characterized as linking the cytoplasmic domains of cadherin cell-cell adhesion molecules to the cortical actin cytoskeleton. In addition to their essential role in modulating cadherin adhesivity, catenins have more recently been indicated to participate in cell and developmental signaling pathways. beta-Catenin, for example, associates directly with at least two receptor tyrosine kinases and transduces developmental signals within the Wnt pathway. Catenins also complex with the tumor suppressor protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), which appears to have a role in regulating cell proliferation. We have used the yeast two-hybrid method to reveal that fascin, a bundler of actin filaments, binds to beta-catenin's central Armadillo repeat domain. Western blotting of immunoprecipitates from cell line and mouse and rat brain extracts indicate that this interaction exists in vivo. Fascin and beta-catenin's association was further substantiated in vitro using purified proteins isolated from recombinant bacterial and baculoviral sources. Immunoprecipitation analysis indicates that fascin additionally binds to plakoglobin, which is highly homologous to beta-catenin but not to p120cas, a newly described catenin which contains a more divergent Armadillo-repeat domain. Immunoprecipitation, in vitro competition, and domain-mapping experiments demonstrate that fascin and E-cadherin utilize a similar binding site within beta-catenin, such that they form mutually exclusive complexes with beta-catenin. Immunofluorescence microscopy reveals that fascin and beta-catenin colocalize at cell-cell borders and dynamic cell leading edges of epithelial and endothelial cells. In addition to cell-cell borders, cadherins were unexpectedly observed to colocalize with fascin and beta-catenin at cell leading edges. It is conceivable that beta-catenin participates in modulating cytoskeletal dynamics in association with the microfilament-bundling protein fascin, perhaps in a

  20. F-actin structure destabilization and DNase I binding loop: fluctuations mutational cross-linking and electron microscopy analysis of loop states and effects on F-actin.

    PubMed

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Sept, David; Kudryashov, Dmitri S; Reisler, Emil

    2010-01-22

    The conformational dynamics of filamentous actin (F-actin) is essential for the regulation and functions of cellular actin networks. The main contribution to F-actin dynamics and its multiple conformational states arises from the mobility and flexibility of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop; residues 40-50) on subdomain 2. Therefore, we explored the structural constraints on D-loop plasticity at the F-actin interprotomer space by probing its dynamic interactions with the hydrophobic loop (H-loop), the C-terminus, and the W-loop via mutational disulfide cross-linking. To this end, residues of the D-loop were mutated to cysteines on yeast actin with a C374A background. These mutants showed no major changes in their polymerization and nucleotide exchange properties compared to wild-type actin. Copper-catalyzed disulfide cross-linking was investigated in equimolar copolymers of cysteine mutants from the D-loop with either wild-type (C374) actin or mutant S265C/C374A (on the H-loop) or mutant F169C/C374A (on the W-loop). Remarkably, all tested residues of the D-loop could be cross-linked to residues 374, 265, and 169 by disulfide bonds, demonstrating the plasticity of the interprotomer region. However, each cross-link resulted in different effects on the filament structure, as detected by electron microscopy and light-scattering measurements. Disulfide cross-linking in the longitudinal orientation produced mostly no visible changes in filament morphology, whereas the cross-linking of D-loop residues >45 to the H-loop, in the lateral direction, resulted in filament disruption and the presence of amorphous aggregates on electron microscopy images. A similar aggregation was also observed upon cross-linking the residues of the D-loop (>41) to residue 169. The effects of disulfide cross-links on F-actin stability were only partially accounted for by the simulations of current F-actin models. Thus, our results present evidence for the high level of conformational plasticity in

  1. Identification of a cyclase-associated protein (CAP) homologue in Dictyostelium discoideum and characterization of its interaction with actin.

    PubMed Central

    Gottwald, U; Brokamp, R; Karakesisoglou, I; Schleicher, M; Noegel, A A

    1996-01-01

    In search for novel actin binding proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum we have isolated a cDNA clone coding for a protein of approximately 50 kDa that is highly homologous to the class of adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins (CAP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the amino-terminal part of CAP is involved in the regulation of the adenylyl cyclase whereas the loss of the carboxyl-terminal domain results in morphological and nutritional defects. To study the interaction of Dictyostelium CAP with actin, the complete protein and its amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal domains were expressed in Escherichia coli and used in actin binding assays. CAP sequestered actin in a Ca2+ independent way. This activity was localized to the carboxyl-terminal domain. CAP and its carboxyl-terminal domain led to a fluorescence enhancement of pyrene-labeled G-actin up to 50% indicating a direct interaction, whereas the amino-terminal domain did not enhance. In polymerization as well as in viscometric assays the ability of the carboxyl-terminal domain to sequester actin and to prevent F-actin formation was approximately two times higher than that of intact CAP. The sequestering activity of full length CAP could be inhibited by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), whereas the activity of the carboxyl-terminal domain alone was not influenced, suggesting that the amino-terminal half of the protein is required for the PIP2 modulation of the CAP function. In profilin-minus cells the CAP concentration is increased by approximately 73%, indicating that CAP may compensate some profilin functions in vivo. In migrating D. discoideum cells CAP was enriched at anterior and posterior plasma membrane regions. Only a weak staining of the cytoplasm was observed. In chemotactically stimulated cells the protein was very prominent in leading fronts. The data suggest an involvement of D. discoideum CAP in microfilament reorganization near the plasma membrane in a PIP2-regulated manner. Images PMID

  2. Metabolic and evolutionary origin of actin-binding polyketides from diverse organisms.

    PubMed

    Ueoka, Reiko; Uria, Agustinus R; Reiter, Silke; Mori, Tetsushi; Karbaum, Petra; Peters, Eike E; Helfrich, Eric J N; Morinaka, Brandon I; Gugger, Muriel; Takeyama, Haruko; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Piel, Jörn

    2015-09-01

    Actin-targeting macrolides comprise a large, structurally diverse group of cytotoxins isolated from remarkably dissimilar micro- and macroorganisms. In spite of their disparate origins and structures, many of these compounds bind actin at the same site and exhibit structural relationships reminiscent of modular, combinatorial drug libraries. Here we investigate biosynthesis and evolution of three compound groups: misakinolides, scytophycin-type compounds and luminaolides. For misakinolides from the sponge Theonella swinhoei WA, our data suggest production by an uncultivated 'Entotheonella' symbiont, further supporting the relevance of these bacteria as sources of bioactive polyketides and peptides in sponges. Insights into misakinolide biosynthesis permitted targeted genome mining for other members, providing a cyanobacterial luminaolide producer as the first cultivated source for this dimeric compound family. The data indicate that this polyketide family is bacteria-derived and that the unusual macrolide diversity is the result of combinatorial pathway modularity for some compounds and of convergent evolution for others.

  3. Arabidopsis actin capping protein (AtCP) subunits have different expression patterns, and downregulation of AtCPB confers increased thermotolerance of Arabidopsis after heat shock stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Qian, Dong; Fan, Tingting; Jia, Honglei; An, Lizhe; Xiang, Yun

    2012-09-01

    As a heterodimer actin-binding protein, capping protein is composed of α and β subunits, and can stabilize the actin filament cytoskeleton by binding to F-actin ends to inhibit G-actin addition or loss from that end. Until now, studies on plant capping protein have focused on biochemical functions in vitro, and so the expression patterns and physiological functions of actin capping protein in Arabidopsis (AtCP) are poorly understood. In the present study, real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis showed that although AtCP α and β subunits (i.e. AtCPA and AtCPB) were expressed in various tissues, their expression patterns were significantly different. GUS staining further indicated they were present in different parts of the same organs. We also demonstrated that the expression levels of both subunits were induced by heat shock stress. However, only the atcpβ-mutant showed enhanced thermotolerance, and confocal microscopy showed that the actin filaments of the atcpβ-mutant were much more complete than that in the wild-type and the atcpα-mutant after heat treatment at 45 °C for 40 and 45 min. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AtCPA and AtCPB showed distinct expression patterns in vivo, and that downregulation of AtCPB conferred increased plant thermotolerance after heat shock stress.

  4. Similarity of the three-dimensional structures of actin and the ATPase fragment of a 70-kDa heat shock cognate protein.

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, K M; McKay, D B; Kabsch, W; Holmes, K C

    1991-01-01

    Although there is very little sequence identity between the two proteins, the structures of rabbit skeletal muscle actin (375-amino acid residues) and the 44-kDa ATPase fragment of the bovine 70-kDa heat shock cognate protein (HSC70; 386 residues) are very similar. The alpha-carbon positions of 241 pairs of amino acid residues that are structurally equivalent within the two proteins can be superimposed with a root-mean-square difference in distance of 2.3 A; of these, 39 residues are identical, and 56 are conservative substitutions. In addition, the conformations of ADP are very similar in both proteins. A local sequence "fingerprint," which may be diagnostic of the adenine nucleotide beta-phosphate-binding pocket, has been derived. The fingerprint identifies members of the glycerol kinase family as candidates likely to have a similar structure in their nucleotide-binding domains. The structural differences between the two molecules mainly occur in loop regions of actin known to be involved in interactions with other monomers in the actin filament or in the binding of myosin; the corresponding regions in heat shock proteins may have functions that are as yet undetermined. Placing the Ca2+ ATP of actin on the ATPase fragment structure suggests Asp-206 (corresponding to His-161 of actin) as a candidate proton acceptor for the ATPase reaction. Images PMID:1828889

  5. Following the Viterbi Path to Deduce Flagellar Actin-Interacting Proteins of Leishmania spp.: Report on Cofilins and Twinfilins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Ana Carolina L.; Araújo, Fabiana F.; Kamimura, Michel T.; Medeiros, Sarah R.; Viana, Daniel A.; Oliveira, Fátima de Cássia E.; Filho, Raimundo Araújo; Costa, Marcília P.; Oliveira, Diana M.

    2007-11-01

    For performing vital cellular processes, such as motility, eukaryotic cells rely on the actin cytoskeleton, whose structure and dynamics are tightly controlled by a large number of actin-interacting (AIP) or actin-related/regulating (ARP) proteins. Trypanosomatid protozoa, such as Leishmania, rely on their flagellum for motility and sensory reception, which are believed to allow parasite migration, adhesion, invasion and even persistence on mammalian host tissues to cause disease. Actin can determine cell stiffness and transmit force during mechanotransduction, cytokinesis, cell motility and other cellular shape changes, while the identification and analyses of AIPs can help to improve understanding of their mechanical properties on physiological architectures, such as the present case regarding Leishmania flagellar apparatus. This work conveniently apply bioinformatics tools in some refined pattern recognition techniques (such as hidden Markov models (HMMs) through the Viterbi algorithm/path) in order to improve the recognition of actin-binding/interacting activity through identification of AIPs in genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of Leishmania species. We here report cofilin and twinfilin as putative components of the flagellar apparatus, a direct bioinformatics contribution in the secondary annotation of Leishmania and trypanosomatid genomes.

  6. N-WASP, a novel actin-depolymerizing protein, regulates the cortical cytoskeletal rearrangement in a PIP2-dependent manner downstream of tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Miki, H; Miura, K; Takenawa, T

    1996-01-01

    Here we identify a 65 kDa protein (N-WASP) from brain that binds the SH3 domains of Ash/Grb2. The sequence is homologous to Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP). N-WASP has several functional motifs, such as a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and cofilin-homologous region, through which N-WASP depolymerizes actin filaments. When overexpressed in COS 7 cells, the wild-type N-WASP causes several surface protrusions where N-WASP co-localizes with actin filaments. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment induces the complex formation of EGF receptors and N-WASP, and produces microspikes. On the other hand, two mutants, C38W (a point mutation in the PH domain) and deltaVCA (deletion of the actin binding domain), localize predominantly in the nucleus and do not cause a change in the cytoskeleton, irrespective of EGF treatment. Interestingly, the C38W PH domain binds less effectively to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) than the wild-type PH domain. These results suggest the importance of the PIP2 binding ability of the PH domain and the actin binding for retention in membranes. Collectively, we conclude that N-WASP transmits signals from tyrosine kinases to cause a polarized rearrangement of cortical actin filaments dependent on PIP2. Images PMID:8895577

  7. Actin-associated Proteins in the Pathogenesis of Podocyte Injury.

    PubMed

    He, Fang-Fang; Chen, Shan; Su, Hua; Meng, Xian-Fang; Zhang, Chun

    2013-11-01

    Podocytes have a complex cellular architecture with interdigitating processes maintained by a precise organization of actin filaments. The actin-based foot processes of podocytes and the interposed slit diaphragm form the final barrier to proteinuria. The function of podocytes is largely based on the maintenance of the normal foot process structure with actin cytoskeleton. Cytoskeletal dynamics play important roles during normal podocyte development, in maintenance of the healthy glomerular filtration barrier, and in the pathogenesis of glomerular diseases. In this review, we focused on recent findings on the mechanisms of organization and reorganization of these actin-related molecules in the pathogenesis of podocyte injury and potential therapeutics targeting the regulation of actin cytoskeleton in podocytopathies.

  8. Structure and function analysis of the CMS/CIN85 protein family identifies actin-bundling properties and heterotypic-complex formation.

    PubMed

    Gaidos, Gabriel; Soni, Shefali; Oswald, Duane J; Toselli, Paul A; Kirsch, Kathrin H

    2007-07-15

    Members of the CMS/CIN85 protein family participate in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and play a crucial role in maintaining the kidney filtration barrier. The CMS protein structure includes three Src homology 3 (SH3) domains and a proline-rich (PR) region that is connected by a 'linker' sequence to a coiled-coil (CC) domain. We show that CMS is a component of special actin-rich adhesion structures--podosomes--and demonstrate specific actin-binding properties of CMS. We have found that the entire C-terminal half of CMS is necessary for efficient binding to filamentous actin (F-actin). CMS and CIN85 can crosslink F-actin into bundles, a function that depends on the PR region and the CC domain. Removal of these domains reduces migration. CMS can also form heterotypic complexes with CIN85. CIN85 is expressed as multiple isoforms that share the CC domain, suggesting that heterotypic interactions with CMS provides a mechanism to regulate CMS binding to F-actin and thus for modulating dynamic rearrangements of the cytoskeleton.

  9. The Role of CKIP-1 in Cell Morphology Depends on Its Interaction with Actin-capping Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Canton, David A.; Olsten, Mary Ellen K.; Niederstrasser, Hanspeter; Cooper, John A.; Litchfield, David W.

    2008-01-01

    CKIP-1 is a pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein that induces alterations of the actin cytoskeleton and cell morphology when expressed in human osteosarcoma cells. CKIP-1 interacts with the heterodimeric actin-capping protein in cells, so we postulated that this interaction was responsible for the observed cytoskeletal and morphological effects of CKIP-1. To test this postulate, we used peptide “walking arrays” and alignments of CKIP-1 with CARMIL, another CP-binding protein, to identify Arg-155 and Arg-157 of CKIP-1 as residues potentially required for its interactions with CP. CKIP-1 mutants harboring Arg-155 and Arg-157 substitutions exhibited greatly decreased CP binding, while retaining wild-type localization, the ability to interact with protein kinase CK2, and self-association. To examine the phenotype associated with expression of these mutants, we generated tetracycline-inducible human osteosarcoma cells lines expressing R155E,R157E mutants of CKIP-1. Examination of these cell lines reveals that CKIP-1 R155E,R157E did not induce the distinct changes in cell morphology and the actin cytoskeleton that are characteristic of wild-type CKIP-1 demonstrating that the interaction between CKIP-1 and CP is required for these cellular effects. PMID:16987810

  10. Erythrocyte Protein 4.1 Binds and Regulates Myosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, Gary R.; Racusen, Richard H.

    1989-12-01

    Myosin was recently identified in erythrocytes and was shown to partition both with membrane and cytosolic fractions, suggesting that it may be loosely bound to membranes [Fowler, V. M., Davis, J. Q. & Bennett, V. (1985) J. Cell Biol. 100, 47-55, and Wong, A. J., Kiehart, D. P. & Pollard, T. D. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 46-49]; however, the molecular basis for this binding was unclear. The present studies employed immobilized monomeric myosin to examine the interaction of myosin with erythrocyte protein 4.1. In human erythrocytes, protein 4.1 binds to integral membrane proteins and mediates spectrin-actin assembly. Protein 4.1 binds to rabbit skeletal muscle myosin with a Kd = 140 nM and a stoichiometry consistent with 1:1 binding. Heavy meromyosin competes for protein 4.1 binding with Ki = 36-54 nM; however, the S1 fragment (the myosin head) competes less efficiently. Affinity chromatography of partial chymotryptic digests of protein 4.1 on immobilized myosin identified a 10-kDa domain of protein 4.1 as the myosin-binding site. In functional studies, protein 4.1 partially inhibited the actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin with Ki = 51 nM. Liver cytosolic and erythrocyte myosins preactivated with myosin light-chain kinase were similarly inhibited by protein 4.1. These studies show that protein 4.1 binds, modulates, and thus may regulate myosin. This interaction might serve to generate the contractile forces involved in Mg2+-ATP-dependent shape changes in erythrocytes and may additionally serve as a model for myosin organization and regulation in non-muscle cells.

  11. Conformational selection during weak binding at the actin and myosin interface.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, J; Root, D D

    2000-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the powerstroke in muscle is examined by resonance energy transfer techniques. Recent models suggesting a pre-cocking of the myosin head involving an enormous rotation between the lever arm and the catalytic domain were tested by measuring separation distances among myosin subfragment-2, the nucleotide site, and the regulatory light chain in the presence of nucleotide transition state analogs. Only small changes (<0.5 nm) were detected that are consistent with internal conformational changes of the myosin molecule, but not with extreme differences in the average lever arm position suggested by some atomic models. These results were confirmed by stopped-flow resonance energy transfer measurements during single ATP turnovers on myosin. To examine the participation of actin in the powerstroke process, resonance energy transfer between the regulatory light chain on myosin subfragment-1 and the C-terminus of actin was measured in the presence of nucleotide transition state analogs. The efficiency of energy transfer was much greater in the presence of ADP-AlF(4), ADP-BeF(x), and ADP-vanadate than in the presence of ADP or no nucleotide. These data detect profound differences in the conformations of the weakly and strongly attached cross-bridges that appear to result from a conformational selection that occurs during the weak binding of the myosin head to actin. PMID:10969011

  12. Formin and capping protein together embrace the actin filament in a ménage à trois

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Kerleau, Mikael; Kühn, Sonja; Pernier, Julien; Romet-Lemonne, Guillaume; Jégou, Antoine; Carlier, Marie-France

    2015-01-01

    Proteins targeting actin filament barbed ends play a pivotal role in motile processes. While formins enhance filament assembly, capping protein (CP) blocks polymerization. On their own, they both bind barbed ends with high affinity and very slow dissociation. Their barbed-end binding is thought to be mutually exclusive. CP has recently been shown to be present in filopodia and controls their morphology and dynamics. Here we explore how CP and formins may functionally coregulate filament barbed-end assembly. We show, using kinetic analysis of individual filaments by microfluidics-assisted fluorescence microscopy, that CP and mDia1 formin are able to simultaneously bind barbed ends. This is further confirmed using single-molecule imaging. Their mutually weakened binding enables rapid displacement of one by the other. We show that formin FMNL2 behaves similarly, thus suggesting that this is a general property of formins. Implications in filopodia regulation and barbed-end structural regulation are discussed. PMID:26564775

  13. Molecular dynamics and high throughput binding free energy calculation of anti-actin anticancer drugs-New insights for better design.

    PubMed

    L, Roopa; R, Pravin Kumar; M M, Sudheer Mohammed

    2016-10-01

    Actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in cancerous cell progression. Till date many anticancer toxins are discovered that binds to different sites of actin. Mechanism of action of these toxins varies with respect to the site where they bind to actin. Latrunculin A (LAT) binds closely to nucleotide binding site and Reidispongiolide binds to the barbed end of actin. LAT is reported to reduce the displacement of domain 2 with respect to domain 1 and allosterically modulate nucleotide exchange. On the other hand Reidispongiolide binds with the higher affinity to actin and competes with the DNaseI binding loop once the inter-monomer interaction has been formed. Evolving better actin binders being the aim of this study we conducted a comparative molecular dynamics of these two actin-drug complexes and actin complexed with ATP alone, 50ns each. High throughput binding free energy calculations in conjugation with the high-throughput MD simulations was used to predict modifications in these two renowned anti-actin anticancer drugs for better design. Per residue energy profiling that contribute to free energy of binding shows that there is an unfavourable energy at the site where Asp157 interacts with 2-thiazolidinone moiety of LAT. Similarly, unfavourable energies are reported near macrocyclic region of Reidispongiolide specifically near carbons 7, 11 & 25 and tail region carbons 27 & 30. These predicted sites can be used for modifications and few of these are discussed in this work based on the interactions with the binding site residues. The study reveals specific interactions that are involved in the allosteric modulation of ATP by these two compounds. Glu207 closely interacting with LAT A initiates the allosteric effect on ATP binding site specifically affecting residues Asp184, Lys215 and Lys336. RGA bound actin shows high anti-correlated motions between sub domain 3 and 4. Unlike LAT A, Reidispongiolide induces a flat structure of actin which definitely should

  14. Determination of the alpha-actinin-binding site on actin filaments by cryoelectron microscopy and image analysis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of actin filaments decorated with the actin-binding domain of chick smooth muscle alpha-actinin (alpha A1-2) has been determined to 21-A resolution. The shape and location of alpha A1-2 was determined by subtracting maps of F-actin from the reconstruction of decorated filaments. alpha A1-2 resembles a bell that measures approximately 38 A at its base and extends 42 A from its base to its tip. In decorated filaments, the base of alpha A1-2 is centered about the outer face of subdomain 2 of actin and contacts subdomain 1 of two neighboring monomers along the long-pitch (two-start) helical strands. Using the atomic model of F-actin (Lorenz, M., D. Popp, and K. C. Holmes. 1993. J. Mol. Biol. 234:826-836.), we have been able to test directly the likelihood that specific actin residues, which have been previously identified by others, interact with alpha A1-2. Our results indicate that residues 86-117 and 350-375 comprise distinct binding sites for alpha-actinin on adjacent actin monomers. PMID:8034744

  15. The prion protein binds thiamine.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Berjanskii, Mark V; Hau, David; Li, Li; Huang, Alan; Lee, Rose; Gibbs, Ebrima; Ladner, Carol; Dong, Ying Wei; Abera, Ashenafi; Cashman, Neil R; Wishart, David S

    2011-11-01

    Although highly conserved throughout evolution, the exact biological function of the prion protein is still unclear. In an effort to identify the potential biological functions of the prion protein we conducted a small-molecule screening assay using the Syrian hamster prion protein [shPrP(90-232)]. The screen was performed using a library of 149 water-soluble metabolites that are known to pass through the blood-brain barrier. Using a combination of 1D NMR, fluorescence quenching and surface plasmon resonance we identified thiamine (vitamin B1) as a specific prion ligand with a binding constant of ~60 μM. Subsequent studies showed that this interaction is evolutionarily conserved, with similar binding constants being seen for mouse, hamster and human prions. Various protein construct lengths, both with and without the unstructured N-terminal region in the presence and absence of copper, were examined. This indicates that the N-terminus has no influence on the protein's ability to interact with thiamine. In addition to thiamine, the more biologically abundant forms of vitamin B1 (thiamine monophosphate and thiamine diphosphate) were also found to bind the prion protein with similar affinity. Heteronuclear NMR experiments were used to determine thiamine's interaction site, which is located between helix 1 and the preceding loop. These data, in conjunction with computer-aided docking and molecular dynamics, were used to model the thiamine-binding pharmacophore and a comparison with other thiamine binding proteins was performed to reveal the common features of interaction.

  16. Structural Insights into the Inhibition of Actin-Capping Protein by Interactions with Phosphatidic Acid and Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-Bisphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Pleskot, Roman; Pejchar, Přemysl; Žárský, Viktor; Staiger, Christopher J.; Potocký, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that coordinates numerous fundamental processes in eukaryotic cells. Dozens of actin-binding proteins are known to be involved in the regulation of actin filament organization or turnover and many of these are stimulus-response regulators of phospholipid signaling. One of these proteins is the heterodimeric actin-capping protein (CP) which binds the barbed end of actin filaments with high affinity and inhibits both addition and loss of actin monomers at this end. The ability of CP to bind filaments is regulated by signaling phospholipids, which inhibit the activity of CP; however, the exact mechanism of this regulation and the residues on CP responsible for lipid interactions is not fully resolved. Here, we focus on the interaction of CP with two signaling phospholipids, phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2). Using different methods of computational biology such as homology modeling, molecular docking and coarse-grained molecular dynamics, we uncovered specific modes of high affinity interaction between membranes containing PA/phosphatidylcholine (PC) and plant CP, as well as between PIP2/PC and animal CP. In particular, we identified differences in the binding of membrane lipids by animal and plant CP, explaining previously published experimental results. Furthermore, we pinpoint the critical importance of the C-terminal part of plant CPα subunit for CP–membrane interactions. We prepared a GST-fusion protein for the C-terminal domain of plant α subunit and verified this hypothesis with lipid-binding assays in vitro. PMID:23133367

  17. THRUMIN1 is a light-regulated actin-bundling protein involved in chloroplast motility.

    PubMed

    Whippo, Craig W; Khurana, Parul; Davis, Phillip A; DeBlasio, Stacy L; DeSloover, Daniel; Staiger, Christopher J; Hangarter, Roger P

    2011-01-11

    Chloroplast movement in response to changing light conditions optimizes photosynthetic light absorption. This repositioning is stimulated by blue light perceived via the phototropin photoreceptors and is transduced to the actin cytoskeleton. Some actin-based motility systems use filament reorganizations rather than myosin-based translocations. Recent research favors the hypothesis that chloroplast movement is driven by actin reorganization at the plasma membrane, but no proteins affecting chloroplast movements have been shown to associate with both the plasma membrane and actin filaments in vivo. Here we identified THRUMIN1 as a critical link between phototropin photoreceptor activity at the plasma membrane and actin-dependent chloroplast movements. THRUMIN1 bundles filamentous actin in vitro, and it localizes to the plasma membrane and displays light- and phototropin-dependent localization to microfilaments in vivo. These results suggest that phototropin-induced actin bundling via THRUMIN1 is important for chloroplast movement. A mammalian homolog of THRUMIN1, GRXCR1, has been implicated in auditory responses and hair cell stereocilla development as a regulator of actin architecture. Studies of THRUMIN1 will help elucidate the function of this family of eukaryotic proteins.

  18. Structure of the Rigor Actin-Tropomyosin-Myosin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Elmar; Müller, Mirco; Penczek, Pawel A.; Mannherz, Hans Georg; Manstein, Dietmar J.; Raunser, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of myosin with actin filaments is the central feature of muscle contraction and cargo movement along actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. Myosin converts the chemical energy stored in ATP into force and movement along actin filaments. Myosin binding to actin induces conformational changes that are coupled to the nucleotide-binding pocket and amplified by a specialized region of the motor domain for efficient force generation. Tropomyosin plays a key role in regulating the productive interaction between myosins and actin. Here, we report the 8 Å resolution structure of the actin-tropomyosin-myosin complex determined by cryo electron microscopy. The pseudo-atomic model of the complex obtained from fitting crystal structures into the map defines the large actin-myosin-tropomyosin interface and the molecular interactions between the proteins in detail and allows us to propose a structural model for tropomyosin dependent myosin binding to actin and actin-induced nucleotide release from myosin. PMID:22817895

  19. Viral infectivity and intracellular distribution of matrix (M) protein of canine distemper virus are affected by actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Klauschies, F; Gützkow, T; Hinkelmann, S; von Messling, V; Vaske, B; Herrler, G; Haas, L

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the role of cytoskeletal components in canine distemper virus (CDV) replication, various agents were used that interfere with turnover of actin filaments and microtubules. Only inhibition of actin filaments significantly reduced viral infectivity. Analysis of the intracellular localization of the viral matrix (M) protein revealed that it aligned along actin filaments. Treatment with actin filament-disrupting drugs led to a marked intracellular redistribution of M protein during infection as well as transfection. In contrast, the localization of the CDV fusion (F) protein was not significantly changed during transfection. Thus, a M protein-actin filament interaction appears to be important for generation of infectious CDV.

  20. A short splice form of Xin-actin binding repeat containing 2 (XIRP2) lacking the Xin repeats is required for maintenance of stereocilia morphology and hearing function.

    PubMed

    Francis, Shimon P; Krey, Jocelyn F; Krystofiak, Evan S; Cui, Runjia; Nanda, Sonali; Xu, Wenhao; Kachar, Bechara; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G; Shin, Jung-Bum

    2015-02-04

    Approximately one-third of known deafness genes encode proteins located in the hair bundle, the sensory hair cell's mechanoreceptive organelle. In previous studies, we used mass spectrometry to characterize the hair bundle's proteome, resulting in the discovery of novel bundle proteins. One such protein is Xin-actin binding repeat containing 2 (XIRP2), an actin-cross-linking protein previously reported to be specifically expressed in striated muscle. Because mutations in other actin-cross-linkers result in hearing loss, we investigated the role of XIRP2 in hearing function. In the inner ear, XIRP2 is specifically expressed in hair cells, colocalizing with actin-rich structures in bundles, the underlying cuticular plate, and the circumferential actin belt. Analysis using peptide mass spectrometry revealed that the bundle harbors a previously uncharacterized XIRP2 splice variant, suggesting XIRP2's role in the hair cell differs significantly from that reported in myocytes. To determine the role of XIRP2 in hearing, we applied clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated genome-editing technology to induce targeted mutations into the mouse Xirp2 gene, resulting in the elimination of XIRP2 protein expression in the inner ear. Functional analysis of hearing in the resulting Xirp2-null mice revealed high-frequency hearing loss, and ultrastructural scanning electron microscopy analyses of hair cells demonstrated stereocilia degeneration in these mice. We thus conclude that XIRP2 is required for long-term maintenance of hair cell stereocilia, and that its dysfunction causes hearing loss in the mouse.

  1. Purification of Capping Protein Using the Capping Protein Binding Site of CARMIL as an Affinity Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Capping Protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function and regulation. PMID:19427903

  2. Purification of capping protein using the capping protein binding site of CARMIL as an affinity matrix.

    PubMed

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A

    2009-10-01

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here, we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST-fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function, and regulation.

  3. A Steric Antagonism of Actin Polymerization by a Salmonella Virulence Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Margarit,S.; Davidson, W.; Frego, L.; Stebbins, F.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella spp. require the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of the SpvB protein for intracellular growth and systemic virulence. SpvB covalently modifies actin, causing cytoskeletal disruption and apoptosis. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of SpvB, and we show by mass spectrometric analysis that SpvB modifies actin at Arg177, inhibiting its ATPase activity. We also describe two crystal structures of SpvB-modified, polymerization-deficient actin. These structures reveal that ADP-ribosylation does not lead to dramatic conformational changes in actin, suggesting a model in which this large family of toxins inhibits actin polymerization primarily through steric disruption of intrafilament contacts.

  4. Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-1 Regulates Arp2/3-dependent Actin Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Kemp, Hui-Chia; Brieher, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial parasite that uses host proteins to assemble an Arp2/3-dependent actin comet tail to power its movement through the host cell. Initiation of comet tail assembly is more efficient in cytosol than it is under defined conditions, indicating that unknown factors contribute to the reaction. We therefore fractionated cytosol and identified CRMP-1 as a factor that facilitates Arp2/3-dependent Listeria actin cloud formation in the presence of Arp2/3 and actin alone. It also scored as an important factor for Listeria actin comet tail formation in brain cytosol. CRMP-1 does not nucleate actin assembly on its own, nor does it directly activate the Arp2/3 complex. Rather, CRMP-1 scored as an auxiliary factor that promoted the ability of Listeria ActA protein to activate the Arp2/3 complex to trigger actin assembly. CRMP-1 is one member of a family of five related proteins that modulate cell motility in response to extracellular signals. Our results demonstrate an important role for CRMP-1 in Listeria actin comet tail formation and open the possibility that CRMP-1 controls cell motility by modulating Arp2/3 activation. PMID:26598519

  5. 3-Methylhistidine in actin and other muscle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P.; Harris, C. I.; Perry, S. V.

    1967-01-01

    1. By the use of the extended elution system for basic amino acid analysis, 3-methylhistidine has been detected in hydrolysates of actin isolated from mammalian, fish and bird skeletal muscle. 2. Evidence is presented to indicate that 3-methylhistidine forms part of the primary structure and that in rabbit actin this residue is restricted to one peptide fraction obtained from the tryptic digest. 3. Rabbit skeletal-muscle actin has a 3-methylhistidine:histidine ratio 1:7·6, indicating a minimum molecular weight of 47600. 4. Adult rabbit myosin contains approximately 2 3-methylhistidine residues/mol. These residues are localized in the heavy meromyosin part of the molecule, and are restricted to the major component obtained after succinylation. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:6056634

  6. Requirements for F-BAR proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 in actin dynamics and membrane trafficking during Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte growth and embryonic epidermal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Chiara; Troglio, Flavia; Bai, Zhiyong; Patel, Falshruti B; Zucconi, Adriana; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Disanza, Andrea; Stradal, Theresia B; Cassata, Giuseppe; Confalonieri, Stefano; Hardin, Jeffrey D; Soto, Martha C; Grant, Barth D; Scita, Giorgio

    2009-10-01

    The TOCA family of F-BAR-containing proteins bind to and remodel lipid bilayers via their conserved F-BAR domains, and regulate actin dynamics via their N-Wasp binding SH3 domains. Thus, these proteins are predicted to play a pivotal role in coordinating membrane traffic with actin dynamics during cell migration and tissue morphogenesis. By combining genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular biochemical experiments in mammalian cells, we showed that: i) loss of CeTOCA proteins reduced the efficiency of Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in oocytes. Genetic interference with CeTOCAs interacting proteins WSP-1 and WVE-1, and other components of the WVE-1 complex, produced a similar effect. Oocyte endocytosis defects correlated well with reduced egg production in these mutants. ii) CeTOCA proteins localize to cell-cell junctions and are required for proper embryonic morphogenesis, to position hypodermal cells and to organize junctional actin and the junction-associated protein AJM-1. iii) Double mutant analysis indicated that the toca genes act in the same pathway as the nematode homologue of N-WASP/WASP, wsp-1. Furthermore, mammalian TOCA-1 and C. elegans CeTOCAs physically associated with N-WASP and WSP-1 directly, or WAVE2 indirectly via ABI-1. Thus, we propose that TOCA proteins control tissues morphogenesis by coordinating Clathrin-dependent membrane trafficking with WAVE and N-WASP-dependent actin-dynamics.

  7. Requirements for F-BAR Proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 in Actin Dynamics and Membrane Trafficking during Caenorhabditis elegans Oocyte Growth and Embryonic Epidermal Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Falshruti B.; Zucconi, Adriana; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Disanza, Andrea; Stradal, Theresia B.; Cassata, Giuseppe; Confalonieri, Stefano; Hardin, Jeffrey D.; Soto, Martha C.; Grant, Barth D.; Scita, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    The TOCA family of F-BAR–containing proteins bind to and remodel lipid bilayers via their conserved F-BAR domains, and regulate actin dynamics via their N-Wasp binding SH3 domains. Thus, these proteins are predicted to play a pivotal role in coordinating membrane traffic with actin dynamics during cell migration and tissue morphogenesis. By combining genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular biochemical experiments in mammalian cells, we showed that: i) loss of CeTOCA proteins reduced the efficiency of Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in oocytes. Genetic interference with CeTOCAs interacting proteins WSP-1 and WVE-1, and other components of the WVE-1 complex, produced a similar effect. Oocyte endocytosis defects correlated well with reduced egg production in these mutants. ii) CeTOCA proteins localize to cell–cell junctions and are required for proper embryonic morphogenesis, to position hypodermal cells and to organize junctional actin and the junction-associated protein AJM-1. iii) Double mutant analysis indicated that the toca genes act in the same pathway as the nematode homologue of N-WASP/WASP, wsp-1. Furthermore, mammalian TOCA-1 and C. elegans CeTOCAs physically associated with N-WASP and WSP-1 directly, or WAVE2 indirectly via ABI-1. Thus, we propose that TOCA proteins control tissues morphogenesis by coordinating Clathrin-dependent membrane trafficking with WAVE and N-WASP–dependent actin-dynamics. PMID:19798448

  8. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy region gene 1 is a dynamic RNA-associated and actin-bundling protein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chia-Yun Jessica; van Koningsbruggen, Silvana; Long, Steven W; Straasheijm, Kirsten; Klooster, Rinse; Jones, Takako I; Bellini, Michel; Levesque, Lyne; Brieher, William M; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Jones, Peter L

    2011-08-12

    FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1) is a dynamic nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that, in skeletal muscle, shows additional localization to the sarcomere. Maintaining appropriate levels of FRG1 protein is critical for muscular and vascular development in vertebrates; however, its precise molecular function is unknown. This study investigates the molecular functions of human FRG1, along with mouse FRG1 and Xenopus frg1, using molecular, biochemical, and cellular-biological approaches, to provide further insight into its roles in vertebrate development. The nuclear fraction of the endogenous FRG1 is localized in nucleoli, Cajal bodies, and actively transcribed chromatin; however, contrary to overexpressed FRG1, the endogenous FRG1 is not associated with nuclear speckles. We characterize the nuclear and nucleolar import of FRG1, the potential effect of phosphorylation, and its interaction with the importin karyopherin α2. Consistent with a role in RNA biogenesis, human FRG1 is associated with mRNA in vivo and invitro, interacts directly with TAP (Tip-associated protein; the major mRNA export receptor), and is a dynamic nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling protein supporting a function for FRG1 in mRNA transport. Biochemically, we characterize FRG1 actin binding activity and show that the cytoplasmic pool of FRG1 is dependent on an intact actin cytoskeleton for its localization. These data provide the first biochemical activities (actin binding and RNA binding) for human FRG1 and the characterization of the endogenous human FRG1, together indicating that FRG1 is involved in multiple aspects of RNA biogenesis, including mRNA transport and, potentially, cytoplasmic mRNA localization.

  9. Actin-associated protein palladin promotes tumor cell invasion by linking extracellular matrix degradation to cell cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    von Nandelstadh, Pernilla; Gucciardo, Erika; Lohi, Jouko; Li, Rui; Sugiyama, Nami; Carpen, Olli; Lehti, Kaisa

    2014-09-01

    Basal-like breast carcinomas, characterized by unfavorable prognosis and frequent metastases, are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. During this process, cancer cells undergo cytoskeletal reorganization and up-regulate membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP; MMP14), which functions in actin-based pseudopods to drive invasion by extracellular matrix degradation. However, the mechanisms that couple matrix proteolysis to the actin cytoskeleton in cell invasion have remained unclear. On the basis of a yeast two-hybrid screen for the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic tail-binding proteins, we identify here a novel Src-regulated protein interaction between the dynamic cytoskeletal scaffold protein palladin and MT1-MMP. These proteins were coexpressed in invasive human basal-like breast carcinomas and corresponding cell lines, where they were associated in the same matrix contacting and degrading membrane complexes. The silencing and overexpression of the 90-kDa palladin isoform revealed the functional importance of the interaction with MT1-MMP in pericellular matrix degradation and mesenchymal tumor cell invasion, whereas in MT1-MMP-negative cells, palladin overexpression was insufficient for invasion. Moreover, this invasion was inhibited in a dominant-negative manner by an immunoglobulin domain-containing palladin fragment lacking the dynamic scaffold and Src-binding domains. These results identify a novel protein interaction that links matrix degradation to cytoskeletal dynamics and migration signaling in mesenchymal cell invasion.

  10. Correlation between the structure and biochemical activities of FtsA, an essential cell division protein of the actin family.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, M; Valencia, A; Ferrándiz, M J; Sander, C; Vicente, M

    1994-01-01

    Cell division protein FtsA, predicted to belong to the actin family, is present in different cell compartments depending on its phosphorylation state. The FtsA fraction isolated from the cytoplasm is phosphorylated and capable of binding ATP, while the membrane-bound form is unphosphorylated and does not bind ATP. A variant of the protein FtsA102, in which the nucleotide binding site was destroyed by mutagenesis of a highly conserved residue predicted to be needed for the binding, does not bind ATP. Another variant, FtsA104, cannot be phosphorylated because the predicted phosphorylatable residue has been replaced by a non-phosphorylatable one. This protein although unable to bind ATP in vitro, is able to rescue the reversible ftsA2, the irreversible ftsA3 and, almost with the same efficiency, the ftsA16 amber alleles. Consequently, phosphorylation and ATP binding may not be essential for the function of FtsA. Alternatively they may have a regulatory role on the action of FtsA in the septator. Images PMID:7957059

  11. Correlation between the structure and biochemical activities of FtsA, an essential cell division protein of the actin family.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, M; Valencia, A; Ferrándiz, M J; Sander, C; Vicente, M

    1994-10-17

    Cell division protein FtsA, predicted to belong to the actin family, is present in different cell compartments depending on its phosphorylation state. The FtsA fraction isolated from the cytoplasm is phosphorylated and capable of binding ATP, while the membrane-bound form is unphosphorylated and does not bind ATP. A variant of the protein FtsA102, in which the nucleotide binding site was destroyed by mutagenesis of a highly conserved residue predicted to be needed for the binding, does not bind ATP. Another variant, FtsA104, cannot be phosphorylated because the predicted phosphorylatable residue has been replaced by a non-phosphorylatable one. This protein although unable to bind ATP in vitro, is able to rescue the reversible ftsA2, the irreversible ftsA3 and, almost with the same efficiency, the ftsA16 amber alleles. Consequently, phosphorylation and ATP binding may not be essential for the function of FtsA. Alternatively they may have a regulatory role on the action of FtsA in the septator.

  12. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-11-26

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  13. Pivotal and distinct role for Plasmodium actin capping protein alpha during blood infection of the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Ganter, Markus; Rizopoulos, Zaira; Schüler, Herwig; Matuschewski, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Accurate regulation of microfilament dynamics is central to cell growth, motility and response to environmental stimuli. Stabilizing and depolymerizing proteins control the steady-state levels of filamentous (F-) actin. Capping protein (CP) binds to free barbed ends, thereby arresting microfilament growth and restraining elongation to remaining free barbed ends. In all CPs characterized to date, alpha and beta subunits form the active heterodimer. Here, we show in a eukaryotic parasitic cell that the two CP subunits can be functionally separated. Unlike the beta subunit, the CP alpha subunit of the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium is refractory to targeted gene deletion during blood infection in the mammalian host. Combinatorial complementation of Plasmodium berghei CP genes with the orthologs from Plasmodium falciparum verified distinct activities of CP alpha and CP alpha/beta during parasite life cycle progression. Recombinant Plasmodium CP alpha could be produced in Escherichia coli in the absence of the beta subunit and the protein displayed F-actin capping activity. Thus, the functional separation of two CP subunits in a parasitic eukaryotic cell and the F-actin capping activity of CP alpha expand the repertoire of microfilament regulatory mechanisms assigned to CPs. PMID:25565321

  14. Pivotal and distinct role for Plasmodium actin capping protein alpha during blood infection of the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Ganter, Markus; Rizopoulos, Zaira; Schüler, Herwig; Matuschewski, Kai

    2015-04-01

    Accurate regulation of microfilament dynamics is central to cell growth, motility and response to environmental stimuli. Stabilizing and depolymerizing proteins control the steady-state levels of filamentous (F-) actin. Capping protein (CP) binds to free barbed ends, thereby arresting microfilament growth and restraining elongation to remaining free barbed ends. In all CPs characterized to date, alpha and beta subunits form the active heterodimer. Here, we show in a eukaryotic parasitic cell that the two CP subunits can be functionally separated. Unlike the beta subunit, the CP alpha subunit of the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium is refractory to targeted gene deletion during blood infection in the mammalian host. Combinatorial complementation of Plasmodium berghei CP genes with the orthologs from Plasmodium falciparum verified distinct activities of CP alpha and CP alpha/beta during parasite life cycle progression. Recombinant Plasmodium CP alpha could be produced in Escherichia coli in the absence of the beta subunit and the protein displayed F-actin capping activity. Thus, the functional separation of two CP subunits in a parasitic eukaryotic cell and the F-actin capping activity of CP alpha expand the repertoire of microfilament regulatory mechanisms assigned to CPs.

  15. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  17. How actin crosslinking and bundling proteins cooperate to generate an enhanced cell mechanical response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Yiider; Kole, Thomas P.; Lee, Jerry S H.; Fedorov, Elena; Almo, Steven C.; Schafer, Benjamin W.; Wirtz, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Actin-crosslinking proteins organize actin filaments into dynamic and complex subcellular scaffolds that orchestrate important mechanical functions, including cell motility and adhesion. Recent mutation studies have shown that individual crosslinking proteins often play seemingly non-essential roles, leading to the hypothesis that they have considerable redundancy in function. We report live-cell, in vitro, and theoretical studies testing the mechanical role of the two ubiquitous actin-crosslinking proteins, alpha-actinin and fascin, which co-localize to stress fibers and the basis of filopodia. Using live-cell particle tracking microrheology, we show that the addition of alpha-actinin and fascin elicits a cell mechanical response that is significantly greater than that originated by alpha-actinin or fascin alone. These live-cell measurements are supported by quantitative rheological measurements with reconstituted actin filament networks containing pure proteins that show that alpha-actinin and fascin can work in concert to generate enhanced cell stiffness. Computational simulations using finite element modeling qualitatively reproduce and explain the functional synergy of alpha-actinin and fascin. These findings highlight the cooperative activity of fascin and alpha-actinin and provide a strong rationale that an evolutionary advantage might be conferred by the cooperative action of multiple actin-crosslinking proteins with overlapping but non-identical biochemical properties. Thus the combination of structural proteins with similar function can provide the cell with unique properties that are required for biologically optimal responses.

  18. Actin-Interacting Protein 1 Contributes to Intranuclear Rod Assembly in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa-Ankerhold, Hellen C.; Daszkiewicz, Wioleta; Schleicher, Michael; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Intranuclear rods are aggregates consisting of actin and cofilin that are formed in the nucleus in consequence of chemical or mechanical stress conditions. The formation of rods is implicated in a variety of pathological conditions, such as certain myopathies and some neurological disorders. It is still not well understood what exactly triggers the formation of intranuclear rods, whether other proteins are involved, and what the underlying mechanisms of rod assembly or disassembly are. In this study, Dictyostelium discoideum was used to examine appearance, stages of assembly, composition, stability, and dismantling of rods. Our data show that intranuclear rods, in addition to actin and cofilin, are composed of a distinct set of other proteins comprising actin-interacting protein 1 (Aip1), coronin (CorA), filactin (Fia), and the 34 kDa actin-bundling protein B (AbpB). A finely tuned spatio-temporal pattern of protein recruitment was found during formation of rods. Aip1 is important for the final state of rod compaction indicating that Aip1 plays a major role in shaping the intranuclear rods. In the absence of both Aip1 and CorA, rods are not formed in the nucleus, suggesting that a sufficient supply of monomeric actin is a prerequisite for rod formation. PMID:28074884

  19. Bacterial nucleators: actin' on actin

    PubMed Central

    Bugalhão, Joana N.; Mota, Luís Jaime; Franco, Irina S.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key target of numerous microbial pathogens, including protozoa, fungi, bacteria and viruses. In particular, bacterial pathogens produce and deliver virulence effector proteins that hijack actin dynamics to enable bacterial invasion of host cells, allow movement within the host cytosol, facilitate intercellular spread or block phagocytosis. Many of these effector proteins directly or indirectly target the major eukaryotic actin nucleator, the Arp2/3 complex, by either mimicking nucleation promoting factors or activating upstream small GTPases. In contrast, this review is focused on a recently identified class of effector proteins from Gram-negative bacteria that function as direct actin nucleators. These effector proteins mimic functional activities of formins, WH2-nucleators and Ena/VASP assembly promoting factors demonstrating that bacteria have coopted the complete set of eukaryotic actin assembly pathways. Structural and functional analyses of these nucleators have revealed several motifs and/or mechanistic activities that are shared with eukaryotic actin nucleators. However, functional effects of these proteins during infection extend beyond plain actin polymerization leading to interference with other host cell functions such as vesicle trafficking, cell cycle progression and cell death. Therefore, their use as model systems could not only help in the understanding of the mechanistic details of actin polymerization but also provide novel insights into the connection between actin dynamics and other cellular pathways. PMID:26416078

  20. A posttranslational modification of beta-actin contributes to the slow dissociation of the spectrin-protein 4.1-actin complex of irreversibly sickled cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Irreversibly sickled cells (ISCs) remain sickled even under conditions where they are well oxygenated and hemoglobin is depolymerized. In our studies we demonstrate that triton extracted ISC core skeletons containing only spectrin, protein 4.1, and actin also retain their sickled shape; while reversibly sickled cell (RSC) skeletons remodel to a round or biconcave shape. We also demonstrate that these triton extracted ISC core skeletons dissociate more slowly upon incubation at 37 degrees C than do RSC or control (AA) core skeletons. This observation may supply the basis for the inability of the ISC core skeleton to remodel its shape. Using an in vitro ternary complex dissociation assay, we demonstrate that a modification in beta-actin is the major determinant of the slow dissociation of the spectrin-protein 4.1-actin complex isolated from the ISC core skeleton. We demonstrate that the difference between ISC and control beta-actin is the inaccessibility of two cysteine residues in ISC beta-actin to labeling by thiol reactive reagents; due to the formation of a disulfide bridge between cysteine284 and cysteine373 in ISC beta-actin, or alternatively another modification of cysteine284 and cysteine373 which is reversible with DTT and adds less than 100 D to the molecular weight of beta-actin. PMID:7876306

  1. Spontaneous oscillatory contraction without regulatory proteins in actin filament-reconstituted fibers.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Ishiwata, S

    1998-09-01

    Skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers exhibits spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in the presence of MgATP, MgADP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi)1 but the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not yet clear. We have investigated the role of regulatory proteins in SPOC using cardiac muscle fibers of which the actin filaments had been reconstituted without tropomyosin and troponin, according to a previously reported method (Fujita et al., 1996. Biophys. J. 71:2307-2318). That is, thin filaments in glycerinated cardiac muscle fibers were selectively removed by treatment with gelsolin. Then, by adding exogenous actin to these thin filament-free cardiac muscle fibers under polymerizing conditions, actin filaments were reconstituted. The actin filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers generated active tension in a Ca(2+)-insensitive manner because of the lack of regulatory proteins. Herein we have developed a new solvent condition under which SPOC occurs, even in actin filament-reconstituted fibers: the coexistence of 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), a reversible inhibitor of actomyosin interactions, with MgATP, MgADP and Pi. The role of BDM in the mechanism of SPOC in the actin filament-reconstituted fibers was analogous to that of the inhibitory function of the tropomyosin-troponin complex (-Ca2+) in the control fibers. The present results suggest that SPOC is a phenomenon that is intrinsic to the actomyosin motor itself.

  2. Spontaneous oscillatory contraction without regulatory proteins in actin filament-reconstituted fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, H; Ishiwata, S

    1998-01-01

    Skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers exhibits spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in the presence of MgATP, MgADP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi)1 but the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not yet clear. We have investigated the role of regulatory proteins in SPOC using cardiac muscle fibers of which the actin filaments had been reconstituted without tropomyosin and troponin, according to a previously reported method (Fujita et al., 1996. Biophys. J. 71:2307-2318). That is, thin filaments in glycerinated cardiac muscle fibers were selectively removed by treatment with gelsolin. Then, by adding exogenous actin to these thin filament-free cardiac muscle fibers under polymerizing conditions, actin filaments were reconstituted. The actin filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers generated active tension in a Ca(2+)-insensitive manner because of the lack of regulatory proteins. Herein we have developed a new solvent condition under which SPOC occurs, even in actin filament-reconstituted fibers: the coexistence of 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), a reversible inhibitor of actomyosin interactions, with MgATP, MgADP and Pi. The role of BDM in the mechanism of SPOC in the actin filament-reconstituted fibers was analogous to that of the inhibitory function of the tropomyosin-troponin complex (-Ca2+) in the control fibers. The present results suggest that SPOC is a phenomenon that is intrinsic to the actomyosin motor itself. PMID:9726945

  3. Gc protein (vitamin D-binding protein): Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Okamura, Natsuko; Murakami, Aya; Kubo, Shinichi; Kirk, Kenneth L; Hori, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    The Gc protein (human group-specific component (Gc), a vitamin D-binding protein or Gc globulin), has important physiological functions that include involvement in vitamin D transport and storage, scavenging of extracellular G-actin, enhancement of the chemotactic activity of C5a for neutrophils in inflammation and macrophage activation (mediated by a GalNAc-modified Gc protein (GcMAF)). In this review, the structure and function of the Gc protein is focused on especially with regard to Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity. A discussion of the research strategy "GcMAF as a target for drug discovery" is included, based on our own research.

  4. Actin-binding cleft closure in myosin II probed by site-directed spin labeling and pulsed EPR.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jennifer C; Burr, Adam R; Svensson, Bengt; Kennedy, Daniel J; Allingham, John; Titus, Margaret A; Rayment, Ivan; Thomas, David D

    2008-09-02

    We present a structurally dynamic model for nucleotide- and actin-induced closure of the actin-binding cleft of myosin, based on site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in Dictyostelium myosin II. The actin-binding cleft is a solvent-filled cavity that extends to the nucleotide-binding pocket and has been predicted to close upon strong actin binding. Single-cysteine labeling sites were engineered to probe mobility and accessibility within the cleft. Addition of ADP and vanadate, which traps the posthydrolysis biochemical state, influenced probe mobility and accessibility slightly, whereas actin binding caused more dramatic changes in accessibility, consistent with cleft closure. We engineered five pairs of cysteine labeling sites to straddle the cleft, each pair having one label on the upper 50-kDa domain and one on the lower 50-kDa domain. Distances between spin-labeled sites were determined from the resulting spin-spin interactions, as measured by continuous wave EPR for distances of 0.7-2 nm or pulsed EPR (double electron-electron resonance) for distances of 1.7-6 nm. Because of the high distance resolution of EPR, at least two distinct structural states of the cleft were resolved. Each of the biochemical states tested (prehydrolysis, posthydrolysis, and rigor), reflects a mixture of these structural states, indicating that the coupling between biochemical and structural states is not rigid. The resulting model is much more dynamic than previously envisioned, with both open and closed conformations of the cleft interconverting, even in the rigor actomyosin complex.

  5. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  6. Crystal structure of a nuclear actin ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tingting; Sun, Lingfei; Jiang, Yuxiang; Huang, Shanjin; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Zhucheng

    2016-08-09

    Actin polymerizes and forms filamentous structures (F-actin) in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. It also exists in the nucleus and regulates various nucleic acid transactions, particularly through its incorporation into multiple chromatin-remodeling complexes. However, the specific structure of actin and the mechanisms that regulate its polymeric nature inside the nucleus remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of nuclear actin (N-actin) complexed with actin-related protein 4 (Arp4) and the helicase-SANT-associated (HSA) domain of the chromatin remodeler Swr1. The inner face and barbed end of N-actin are sequestered by interactions with Arp4 and the HSA domain, respectively, which prevents N-actin from polymerization and binding to many actin regulators. The two major domains of N-actin are more twisted than those of globular actin (G-actin), and its nucleotide-binding pocket is occluded, freeing N-actin from binding to and regulation by ATP. These findings revealed the salient structural features of N-actin that distinguish it from its cytoplasmic counterpart and provide a rational basis for its functions and regulation inside the nucleus.

  7. Crystal structure of a nuclear actin ternary complex

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tingting; Sun, Lingfei; Jiang, Yuxiang; Huang, Shanjin; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Zhucheng

    2016-01-01

    Actin polymerizes and forms filamentous structures (F-actin) in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. It also exists in the nucleus and regulates various nucleic acid transactions, particularly through its incorporation into multiple chromatin-remodeling complexes. However, the specific structure of actin and the mechanisms that regulate its polymeric nature inside the nucleus remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of nuclear actin (N-actin) complexed with actin-related protein 4 (Arp4) and the helicase-SANT–associated (HSA) domain of the chromatin remodeler Swr1. The inner face and barbed end of N-actin are sequestered by interactions with Arp4 and the HSA domain, respectively, which prevents N-actin from polymerization and binding to many actin regulators. The two major domains of N-actin are more twisted than those of globular actin (G-actin), and its nucleotide-binding pocket is occluded, freeing N-actin from binding to and regulation by ATP. These findings revealed the salient structural features of N-actin that distinguish it from its cytoplasmic counterpart and provide a rational basis for its functions and regulation inside the nucleus. PMID:27457955

  8. Actin capping protein alpha maintains vestigial-expressing cells within the Drosophila wing disc epithelium.

    PubMed

    Janody, Florence; Treisman, Jessica E

    2006-09-01

    Tissue patterning must be translated into morphogenesis through cell shape changes mediated by remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. We have found that Capping protein alpha (Cpa) and Capping protein beta (Cpb), which prevent extension of the barbed ends of actin filaments, are specifically required in the wing blade primordium of the Drosophila wing disc. cpa or cpb mutant cells in this region, but not in the remainder of the wing disc, are extruded from the epithelium and undergo apoptosis. Excessive actin filament polymerization is not sufficient to explain this phenotype, as loss of Cofilin or Cyclase-associated protein does not cause cell extrusion or death. Misexpression of Vestigial, the transcription factor that specifies the wing blade, both increases cpa transcription and makes cells dependent on cpa for their maintenance in the epithelium. Our results suggest that Vestigial specifies the cytoskeletal changes that lead to morphogenesis of the adult wing.

  9. Gelsolin, a protein that caps the barbed ends and severs actin filaments, enhances the actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes in host cells.

    PubMed

    Laine, R O; Phaneuf, K L; Cunningham, C C; Kwiatkowski, D; Azuma, T; Southwick, F S

    1998-08-01

    The actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes requires the addition of actin monomers to the barbed or plus ends of actin filaments. Immunofluorescence micrographs have demonstrated that gelsolin, a protein that both caps barbed ends and severs actin filaments, is concentrated directly behind motile bacteria at the junction between the actin filament rocket tail and the bacterium. In contrast, CapG, a protein that strictly caps actin filaments, fails to localize near intracellular Listeria. To explore the effect of increasing concentrations of gelsolin on bacterial motility, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts stably transfected with gelsolin cDNA were infected with Listeria. The C5 cell line containing 2.25 times control levels of gelsolin supported significantly higher velocities of bacterial movement than did control fibroblasts (mean +/- standard error of the mean, 0.09 +/- 0.003 micro(m)/s [n = 176] versus 0.05 +/- 0.003 micro(m)/s [n = 65]). The rate of disassembly of the Listeria-induced actin filament rocket tail was found to be independent of gelsolin content. Therefore, if increases in gelsolin content result in increases in Listeria-induced rocket tail assembly rates, a positive correlation between gelsolin content and tail length would be expected. BODIPY-phalloidin staining of four different stably transfected NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines confirmed this expectation (r = 0.92). Rocket tails were significantly longer in cells with a high gelsolin content. Microinjection of gelsolin 1/2 (consisting of the amino-terminal half of native gelsolin) also increased bacterial velocity by more than 2.2 times. Microinjection of CapG had no effect on bacterial movement. Cultured skin fibroblasts derived from gelsolin-null mice were capable of supporting intracellular Listeria motility at velocities comparable to those supported by wild-type skin fibroblasts. These experiments demonstrated that the surface of Listeria contains a polymerization zone that can block the barbed

  10. Actin dynamics: old friends with new stories.

    PubMed

    Staiger, Christopher J; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2006-12-01

    Actin dynamics, or the rapid turnover of actin filaments, play a central role in numerous cellular processes. A large and diverse cast of characters, accessory proteins known as actin-binding proteins, modulate actin dynamics. They do this by binding to the monomer pool, interacting with the side and ends of filaments, creating breaks along a filament, and generating new filaments de novo. Recent biochemical and single-filament imaging analyses of several conserved classes of plant actin-binding proteins reveal unusual and unexpected properties. Examples that are highlighted in this review include: an abundant monomer-binding protein that catalyzes nucleotide exchange; a barbed-end capping protein that is dissociated from filament ends by the signaling lipid, phosphatidic acid; a villin-like bundling protein that lacks all Ca(2+)-regulated activities; and a formin family member that is non-processive and is sufficient to generate actin filament bundles. These and other stories motivate a careful description of the properties of plant proteins in vitro as a prelude to greater insight into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation of actin dynamics in vivo.

  11. Different motif requirements for the localization zipcode element of β-actin mRNA binding by HuD and ZBP1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Hee; Lee, Seung Joon; Gardiner, Amy S.; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Yoo, Soonmoon

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) with their target transcripts are essential for regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level including mRNA export/localization, stability, and translation. ZBP1 and HuD are RBPs that play pivotal roles in mRNA transport and local translational control in neuronal processes. While HuD possesses three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), ZBP1 contains two RRMs and four K homology (KH) domains that either increase target specificity or provide a multi-target binding capability. Here we used isolated cis-element sequences of the target mRNA to examine directly protein-RNA interactions in cell-free systems. We found that both ZBP1 and HuD bind the zipcode element in rat β-actin mRNA's 3′ UTR. Differences between HuD and ZBP1 were observed in their binding preference to the element. HuD showed a binding preference for U-rich sequence. In contrast, ZBP1 binding to the zipcode RNA depended more on the structural level, as it required the proper spatial organization of a stem-loop that is mainly determined by the U-rich element juxtaposed to the 3′ end of a 5′-ACACCC-3′ motif. On the basis of this work, we propose that ZBP1 and HuD bind to overlapping sites in the β-actin zipcode, but they recognize different features of this target sequence. PMID:26152301

  12. Novel regulation of Ski protein stability and endosomal sorting by actin cytoskeleton dynamics in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Caligaris, Cassandre; Del Valle-Espinosa, Eugenio; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; González-Arenas, Nelly R; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Briones-Orta, Marco A; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2015-02-13

    TGF-β-induced antimitotic signals are highly regulated during cell proliferation under normal and pathological conditions, such as liver regeneration and cancer. Up-regulation of the transcriptional cofactors Ski and SnoN during liver regeneration may favor hepatocyte proliferation by inhibiting TGF-β signals. In this study, we found a novel mechanism that regulates Ski protein stability through TGF-β and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Ski protein is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm of normal hepatocytes, and the molecular mechanisms controlling Ski protein stability involve the participation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cytoplasmic Ski is partially associated with actin and localized in cholesterol-rich vesicles. Ski protein stability is decreased by TGF-β/Smads, GPCR/Rho signals, and actin polymerization, whereas GPCR/cAMP signals and actin depolymerization promote Ski protein stability. In conclusion, TGF-β and GPCR signals differentially regulate Ski protein stability and sorting in hepatocytes, and this cross-talk may occur during liver regeneration.

  13. Novel Regulation of Ski Protein Stability and Endosomal Sorting by Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics in Hepatocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Caligaris, Cassandre; Del Valle-Espinosa, Eugenio; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; González-Arenas, Nelly R.; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Briones-Orta, Marco A.; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2015-01-01

    TGF-β-induced antimitotic signals are highly regulated during cell proliferation under normal and pathological conditions, such as liver regeneration and cancer. Up-regulation of the transcriptional cofactors Ski and SnoN during liver regeneration may favor hepatocyte proliferation by inhibiting TGF-β signals. In this study, we found a novel mechanism that regulates Ski protein stability through TGF-β and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Ski protein is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm of normal hepatocytes, and the molecular mechanisms controlling Ski protein stability involve the participation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cytoplasmic Ski is partially associated with actin and localized in cholesterol-rich vesicles. Ski protein stability is decreased by TGF-β/Smads, GPCR/Rho signals, and actin polymerization, whereas GPCR/cAMP signals and actin depolymerization promote Ski protein stability. In conclusion, TGF-β and GPCR signals differentially regulate Ski protein stability and sorting in hepatocytes, and this cross-talk may occur during liver regeneration. PMID:25561741

  14. Data of protein-RNA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook; Park, Byungkyu; Choi, Daesik; Han, Kyungsook

    2017-02-01

    Despite the increasing number of protein-RNA complexes in structure databases, few data resources have been made available which can be readily used in developing or testing a method for predicting either protein-binding sites in RNA sequences or RNA-binding sites in protein sequences. The problem of predicting protein-binding sites in RNA has received much less attention than the problem of predicting RNA-binding sites in protein. The data presented in this paper are related to the article entitled "PRIdictor: Protein-RNA Interaction predictor" (Tuvshinjargal et al. 2016) [1]. PRIdictor can predict protein-binding sites in RNA as well as RNA-binding sites in protein at the nucleotide- and residue-levels. This paper presents four datasets that were used to test four prediction models of PRIdictor: (1) model RP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from protein and RNA sequences, (2) model RaP for predicting protein-binding sites in RNA from RNA sequence alone, (3) model PR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein and RNA sequences, and (4) model PaR for predicting RNA-binding sites in protein from protein sequence alone. The datasets supplied in this article can be used as a valuable resource to evaluate and compare different methods for predicting protein-RNA binding sites.

  15. Actin Family Proteins in the Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Exhibit Functional Roles in the Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 with Hemin.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Hirokazu; Akiyama, Yusuke; Katoh, Yasutake; Oma, Yukako; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Shibahara, Kei-Ichi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear actin family proteins, comprising of actin and actin-related proteins (Arps), are essential functional components of the multiple chromatin remodeling complexes. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is evolutionarily conserved and has roles in transcription, DNA replication and repair, consists of actin and actin-related proteins Arp4, Arp5, and Arp8. We generated Arp5 knockout (KO) and Arp8 KO cells from the human Nalm-6 pre-B cell line and used these KO cells to examine the roles of Arp5 and Arp8 in the transcriptional regulation mediated by the INO80 complex. In both of Arp5 KO and Arp8 KO cells, the oxidative stress-induced expression of HMOX1 gene, encoding for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was significantly impaired. Consistent with these observations, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that oxidative stress caused an increase in the binding of the INO80 complex to the regulatory sites of HMOX1 in wild-type cells. The binding of INO80 complex to chromatin was reduced in Arp8 KO cells compared to that in the wild-type cells. On the other hand, the binding of INO80 complex to chromatin in Arp5 KO cells was similar to that in the wild-type cells even under the oxidative stress condition. However, both remodeling of chromatin at the HMOX1 regulatory sites and binding of a transcriptional activator to these sites were impaired in Arp5 KO cells, indicating that Arp5 is required for the activation of the INO80 complex. Collectively, these results suggested that these nuclear Arps play indispensable roles in the function of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex.

  16. Actin Family Proteins in the Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Exhibit Functional Roles in the Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 with Hemin

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Hirokazu; Akiyama, Yusuke; Katoh, Yasutake; Oma, Yukako; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Shibahara, Kei-ichi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear actin family proteins, comprising of actin and actin-related proteins (Arps), are essential functional components of the multiple chromatin remodeling complexes. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is evolutionarily conserved and has roles in transcription, DNA replication and repair, consists of actin and actin-related proteins Arp4, Arp5, and Arp8. We generated Arp5 knockout (KO) and Arp8 KO cells from the human Nalm-6 pre-B cell line and used these KO cells to examine the roles of Arp5 and Arp8 in the transcriptional regulation mediated by the INO80 complex. In both of Arp5 KO and Arp8 KO cells, the oxidative stress-induced expression of HMOX1 gene, encoding for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was significantly impaired. Consistent with these observations, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that oxidative stress caused an increase in the binding of the INO80 complex to the regulatory sites of HMOX1 in wild-type cells. The binding of INO80 complex to chromatin was reduced in Arp8 KO cells compared to that in the wild-type cells. On the other hand, the binding of INO80 complex to chromatin in Arp5 KO cells was similar to that in the wild-type cells even under the oxidative stress condition. However, both remodeling of chromatin at the HMOX1 regulatory sites and binding of a transcriptional activator to these sites were impaired in Arp5 KO cells, indicating that Arp5 is required for the activation of the INO80 complex. Collectively, these results suggested that these nuclear Arps play indispensable roles in the function of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex. PMID:28270832

  17. Mutational Analysis Reveals a Noncontractile but Interactive Role of Actin and Profilin in Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Synthesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Harpen, Mary; Barik, Tiasha; Musiyenko, Alla; Barik, Sailen

    2009-01-01

    As obligatory parasites, viruses co-opt a variety of cellular functions for robust replication. The expression of the nonsegmented negative-strand RNA genome of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a significant pediatric pathogen, absolutely requires actin and is stimulated by the actin-regulatory protein profilin. As actin is a major contractile protein, it was important to determine whether the known functional domains of actin and profilin were important for their ability to activate RSV transcription. Analyses of recombinant mutants in a reconstituted RSV transcription system suggested that the divalent-cation-binding domain of actin is critically needed for binding to the RSV genome template and for the activation of viral RNA synthesis. In contrast, the nucleotide-binding domain and the N-terminal acidic domain were needed neither for template binding nor for transcription. Specific surface residues of actin, required for actin-actin contact during filamentation, were also nonessential for viral transcription. Unlike actin, profilin did not directly bind to the viral template but was recruited by actin. Mutation of the interactive residues of actin or profilin, resulting in the loss of actin-profilin binding, also abolished profilin's ability to stimulate viral transcription. Together, these results suggest that actin acts as a classical transcription factor for the virus by divalent-cation-dependent binding to the viral template and that profilin acts as a transcriptional cofactor, in part by associating with actin. This essential viral role of actin is independent of its contractile cellular role. PMID:19710142

  18. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  19. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  20. Capping Protein Modulates Actin Remodeling in Response to Reactive Oxygen Species during Plant Innate Immunity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingyan

    2017-01-01

    Plants perceive microbe-associated molecular patterns and damage-associated molecular patterns to activate innate immune signaling events, such as bursts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The actin cytoskeleton remodels during the first 5 min of innate immune signaling in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) epidermal cells; however, the immune signals that impinge on actin cytoskeleton and its response regulators remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that rapid actin remodeling upon elicitation with diverse microbe-associated molecular patterns and damage-associated molecular patterns represent a conserved plant immune response. Actin remodeling requires ROS generated by the defense-associated NADPH oxidase, RBOHD. Moreover, perception of flg22 by its cognate receptor complex triggers actin remodeling through the activation of RBOHD-dependent ROS production. Our genetic studies reveal that the ubiquitous heterodimeric capping protein transduces ROS signaling to the actin cytoskeleton during innate immunity. Additionally, we uncover a negative feedback loop between actin remodeling and flg22-induced ROS production. PMID:27909046

  1. Mammalian CAP (Cyclase-associated protein) in the world of cell migration: Roles in actin filament dynamics and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guo-Lei; Zhang, Haitao; Field, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is essential for a variety of fundamental biological processes such as embryonic development, wound healing, and immune response. Aberrant cell migration also underlies pathological conditions such as cancer metastasis, in which morphological transformation promotes spreading of cancer to new sites. Cell migration is driven by actin dynamics, which is the repeated cycling of monomeric actin (G-actin) into and out of filamentous actin (F-actin). CAP (Cyclase-associated protein, also called Srv2) is a conserved actin-regulatory protein, which is implicated in cell motility and the invasiveness of human cancers. It cooperates with another actin regulatory protein, cofilin, to accelerate actin dynamics. Hence, knockdown of CAP1 slows down actin filament turnover, which in most cells leads to reduced cell motility. However, depletion of CAP1 in HeLa cells, while causing reduction in dynamics, actually led to increased cell motility. The increases in motility are likely through activation of cell adhesion signals through an inside-out signaling. The potential to activate adhesion signaling competes with the negative effect of CAP1 depletion on actin dynamics, which would reduce cell migration. In this commentary, we provide a brief overview of the roles of mammalian CAP1 in cell migration, and highlight a likely mechanism underlying the activation of cell adhesion signaling and elevated motility caused by depletion of CAP1.

  2. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Somesh

    2015-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25792565

  3. Ligand-induced changes in the location of actin, myosin, 95K (alpha- actinin), and 120K protein in amebae of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    In this study we investigated concanavalin A (Con A) induced changes in the locations of actin, myosin, 120K, and 95K (alpha-actinin) to determine the extent to which actin and myosin are reorganized during capping and the roles that 120K and 95K might play in this reorganization. We observed the location of each protein by indirect immunofluorescence using affinity purified antibodies. Four morphological states were distinguished in vegetative Dictyostelium amebae: ameboid cells before Con A binding, patched cells, capped cells, and ameboid cells with caps. The location of each protein was distinct in ameboid cells both before and after capping Actin and 120K were found in the cell cortex usually associated with surface projections, and myosin and 95K were diffusely distributed. Myosin was excluded from surface projections in ameboid cells. During patching, all four proteins were localized below Con A patches. During capping, actin, myosin, and 95K protein moved with the Con A patches into the cap whereas 120K protein was excluded from the cap. During the late stages of cap formation actin and myosin were progressively lost from the cap, and 120K became concentrated in new actin-filled projections that formed away from the cap. However, 95K remained tightly associated with the cap. Poisoning cells with sodium azide inhibited capping but not patching of ligand. In azide-poisoned cells, myosin and 95K did not co-patch with Con A, whereas copatching of 120K and actin with Con A occurred as usual. Our results support the hypothesis that capping is an actomyosin-mediated motile event that involves a sliding interaction between actin filaments, which are anchored through the membrane to ligand patches, and myosin in the cortex. They are also consistent with a role for 120K in the formation of surface projections by promoting growth and/or cross-linking of actin filaments within projections, and with a role for 95K in regulating actomyosin-mediated contractility, earlier

  4. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay identifies vitamin D binding protein (Gc-globulin) in human, rat, and mouse sera.

    PubMed

    Tang, W X; Bazaraa, H M; Magiera, H; Cooke, N E; Haddad, J G

    1996-06-01

    Serum vitamin D binding protein (DBP, also known as Gc-globulin) is a multifunctional protein capable of binding both vitamin D metabolites and actin. DBP can be visualized when analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by staining. Confirmation of its identity had previously required immunoprecipitation with specific anti-DBP antisera or occupancy of the protein with radioactive vitamin D sterols. We present studies showing that preincubation of G-actin with mammalian sera produced a discernible DBP protein band shift on native gel electrophoresis. Addition of DNaseI, a 33-kDa intracellular protein with an avid actin-binding site, to the incubations resulted in a supershift of DBP-actin complexes to an even more cathodal region of the gels. Following incubations with human, rat, and murine sera the same actin shift occurred as did the actin plus DNaseI supershift. The migrations of each complex were correlated with purified DBP migrations under identical conditions. It was confirmed that the supershifted bands contained DBP by Western blotting and detection of DBP by binding of 25-OH[3H]D3. After intravenous G-actin injections into living mice, a serum DBP-actin complex could be detected on native gels as the uncomplexed DBP band decreased in intensity. This simple, direct-staining technique appears to be suitable for identifying DBP/Gc phenotypes in human populations as well as for semiquantitatively monitoring the plasma actin-scavenger system in vivo in animal models or in human diseases.

  5. Decavanadate binding to a high affinity site near the myosin catalytic centre inhibits F-actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Tiago, Teresa; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2004-05-11

    Decameric vanadate (V(10)) inhibits the actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity, noncompetitively with actin or with ATP upon interaction with a high-affinity binding site (K(i) = 0.27 +/- 0.05 microM) in myosin subfragment-1 (S1). The binding of V(10) to S1 can be monitored from titration with V(10) of the fluorescence of S1 labeled at Cys-707 and Cys-697 with N-iodo-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (IAEDANS) or 5-(iodoacetamido) fluorescein, which showed the presence of only one V(10) binding site per monomer with a dissociation constant of 0.16-0.7 microM, indicating that S1 labeling with these dyes produced only a small distortion of the V(10) binding site. The large quenching of AEDANS-labeled S1 fluorescence produced by V(10) indicated that the V(10) binding site is close to Cys-697 and 707. Fluorescence studies demonstrated the following: (i) the binding of V(10) to S1 is not competitive either with actin or with ADP.V(1) or ADP.AlF(4); (ii) the affinity of V(10) for the complex S1/ADP.V(1) and S1/ADP.AlF(4) is 2- and 3-fold lower than for S1; and (iii) it is competitive with the S1 "back door" ligand P(1)P(5)-diadenosine pentaphosphate. A local conformational change in S1 upon binding of V(10) is supported by (i) a decrease of the efficiency of fluorescence energy transfer between eosin-labeled F-actin and fluorescein-labeled S1, and (ii) slower reassociation between S1 and F-actin after ATP hydrolysis. The results are consistent with binding of V(10) to the Walker A motif of ABC ATPases, which in S1 corresponds to conserved regions of the P-loop which form part of the phosphate tube.

  6. Behind the scenes of vitamin D binding protein: more than vitamin D binding.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Speeckaert, Reinhart; Speeckaert, Marijn M

    2015-10-01

    Although being discovered in 1959, the number of published papers in recent years reveals that vitamin D binding protein (DBP), a member of the albuminoid superfamily, is a hot research topic. Besides the three major phenotypes (DBP1F, DBP1S and DBP2), more than 120 unique variants have been described of this polymorphic protein. The presence of DBP has been demonstrated in different body fluids (serum, urine, breast milk, ascitic fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva and seminal fluid) and organs (brain, heart, lungs, kidneys, placenta, spleen, testes and uterus). Although the major function is binding, solubilization and transport of vitamin D and its metabolites, the name of this glycoprotein hides numerous other important biological functions. In this review, we will focus on the analytical aspects of the determination of DBP and discuss in detail the multifunctional capacity [actin scavenging, binding of fatty acids, chemotaxis, binding of endotoxins, influence on T cell response and influence of vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) on bone metabolism and cancer] of this abundant plasma protein.

  7. EF-hand proteins and the regulation of actin-myosin interaction in the eutardigrade Hypsibius klebelsbergi (tardigrada).

    PubMed

    Prasath, Thiruketheeswaran; Greven, Hartmut; D'Haese, Jochen

    2012-06-01

    Many tardigrade species resist harsh environmental conditions by entering anhydrobiosis or cryobiosis. Desiccation as well as freeze resistance probably leads to changes of the ionic balance that includes the intracellular calcium concentration. In order to search for protein modifications affecting the calcium homoeostasis, we studied the regulatory system controlling actin-myosin interaction of the eutardigrade Hypsibius klebelsbergi and identified full-length cDNA clones for troponin C (TnC, 824 bp), calmodulin (CaM, 1,407 bp), essential myosin light chain (eMLC, 1,015 bp), and regulatory myosin light chain (rMLC, 984 bp) from a cDNA library. All four proteins belong to the EF-hand superfamily typified by a calcium coordinating helix-loop-helix motif. Further, we cloned and obtained recombinant TnC and both MLCs. CaM and TnC revealed four and two potential calcium-binding domains, respectively. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated calcium-induced conformational transition of TnC. From both MLCs, only the rMLC showed one potential N-terminal EF-hand domain. Additionally, sequence properties suggest phosphorylation of this myosin light chain. Based on our results, we suggest a dual-regulated system at least in somatic muscles for tardigrades with a calcium-dependent tropomyosin-troponin complex bound to the actin filaments and a phosphorylation of the rMLC turning on and off both actin and myosin. Our results indicate no special modifications of the molecular structure and function of the EF-hand proteins in tardigrades. Phylogenetic trees of 131 TnCs, 96 rMLCs, and 62 eMLCs indicate affinities to Ecdysozoa, but also to some other taxa suggesting that our results reflect the complex evolution of these proteins rather than phylogenetic relationships.

  8. Actin-related protein Arp6 influences H2A.Z-dependent and -independent gene expression and links ribosomal protein genes to nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takahito; Shimada, Kenji; Oma, Yukako; Kalck, Véronique; Akimura, Kazumi; Taddei, Angela; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Kugou, Kazuto; Ohta, Kunihiro; Gasser, Susan M; Harata, Masahiko

    2010-04-15

    Actin-related proteins are ubiquitous components of chromatin remodelers and are conserved from yeast to man. We have examined the role of the budding yeast actin-related protein Arp6 in gene expression, both as a component of the SWR1 complex (SWR-C) and in its absence. We mapped Arp6 binding sites along four yeast chromosomes using chromatin immunoprecipitation from wild-type and swr1 deleted (swr1Delta) cells. We find that a majority of Arp6 binding sites coincide with binding sites of Swr1, the catalytic subunit of SWR-C, and with the histone H2A variant Htz1 (H2A.Z) deposited by SWR-C. However, Arp6 binding detected at centromeres, the promoters of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, and some telomeres is independent of Swr1 and Htz1 deposition. Given that RP genes and telomeres both show association with the nuclear periphery, we monitored the ability of Arp6 to mediate the localization of chromatin to nuclear pores. Arp6 binding is sufficient to shift a randomly positioned locus to nuclear periphery, even in a swr1Delta strain. Arp6 is also necessary for the pore association of its targeted RP promoters possibly through cell cycle-dependent factors. Loss of Arp6, but not Htz1, leads to an up-regulation of these RP genes. In contrast, the pore-association of GAL1 correlates with Htz1 deposition, and loss of Arp6 reduces both GAL1 activation and peripheral localization. We conclude that Arp6 functions both together with the nucleosome remodeler Swr1 and also without it, to mediate Htz1-dependent and Htz1-independent binding of chromatin domains to nuclear pores. This association is shown to have modulating effects on gene expression.

  9. Nuclear Actin in Development and Transcriptional Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Misu, Shinji; Takebayashi, Marina; Miyamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Actin is a highly abundant protein in eukaryotic cells and dynamically changes its polymerized states with the help of actin-binding proteins. Its critical function as a constituent of cytoskeleton has been well-documented. Growing evidence demonstrates that actin is also present in nuclei, referred to as nuclear actin, and is involved in a number of nuclear processes, including transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The contribution of nuclear actin to transcriptional regulation can be explained by its direct interaction with transcription machineries and chromatin remodeling factors and by controlling the activities of transcription factors. In both cases, polymerized states of nuclear actin affect the transcriptional outcome. Nuclear actin also plays an important role in activating strongly silenced genes in somatic cells for transcriptional reprogramming. When these nuclear functions of actin are considered, it is plausible to speculate that nuclear actin is also implicated in embryonic development, in which numerous genes need to be activated in a well-coordinated manner. In this review, we especially focus on nuclear actin's roles in transcriptional activation, reprogramming and development, including stem cell differentiation and we discuss how nuclear actin can be an important player in development and cell differentiation.

  10. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  11. WH2 domain: a small, versatile adapter for actin monomers.

    PubMed

    Paunola, Eija; Mattila, Pieta K; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2002-02-20

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a central role in many cell biological processes. The structure and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are regulated by numerous actin-binding proteins that usually contain one of the few known actin-binding motifs. WH2 domain (WASP homology domain-2) is a approximately 35 residue actin monomer-binding motif, that is found in many different regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, including the beta-thymosins, ciboulot, WASP (Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein), verprolin/WIP (WASP-interacting protein), Srv2/CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) and several uncharacterized proteins. The most highly conserved residues in the WH2 domain are important in beta-thymosin's interactions with actin monomers, suggesting that all WH2 domains may interact with actin monomers through similar interfaces. Our sequence database searches did not reveal any WH2 domain-containing proteins in plants. However, we found three classes of these proteins: WASP, Srv2/CAP and verprolin/WIP in yeast and animals. This suggests that the WH2 domain is an ancient actin monomer-binding motif that existed before the divergence of fungal and animal lineages.

  12. Bundling of actin filaments by elongation factor 1 alpha inhibits polymerization at filament ends

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1 alpha) is an abundant protein that binds aminoacyl-tRNA and ribosomes in a GTP-dependent manner. EF1 alpha also interacts with the cytoskeleton by binding and bundling actin filaments and microtubules. In this report, the effect of purified EF1 alpha on actin polymerization and depolymerization is examined. At molar ratios present in the cytosol, EF1 alpha significantly blocks both polymerization and depolymerization of actin filaments and increases the final extent of actin polymer, while at high molar ratios to actin, EF1 alpha nucleates actin polymerization. Although EF1 alpha binds actin monomer, this monomer-binding activity does not explain the effects of EF1 alpha on actin polymerization at physiological molar ratios. The mechanism for the inhibition of polymerization is related to the actin-bundling activity of EF1 alpha. Both ends of the actin filament are inhibited for polymerization and both bundling and the inhibition of actin polymerization are affected by pH within the same physiological range; at high pH both bundling and the inhibition of actin polymerization are reduced. Additionally, it is seen that the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to EF1 alpha releases EF1 alpha's inhibiting effect on actin polymerization. These data demonstrate that EF1 alpha can alter the assembly of F-actin, a filamentous scaffold on which non- membrane-associated protein translation may be occurring in vivo. PMID:8947553

  13. Reconstitution of a Minimal Actin Cortex by Coupling Actin Filaments to Reconstituted Membranes.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Sven K

    2016-01-01

    A thin layer of actin filaments in many eukaryotic cell types drives pivotal aspects of cell morphogenesis and is generally cited as the actin cortex. Myosin driven contractility and actin cytoskeleton membrane interactions form the basis of fundamental cellular processes such as cytokinesis, cell migration, and cortical flows. How the interplay between the actin cytoskeleton, the membrane, and actin binding proteins drives these processes is far from being understood. The complexity of the actin cortex in living cells and the hardly feasible manipulation of the omnipotent cellular key players, namely actin, myosin, and the membrane, are challenging in order to gain detailed insights about the underlying mechanisms. Recent progress in developing bottom-up in vitro systems where the actin cytoskeleton is combined with reconstituted membranes may provide a complementary route to reveal general principles underlying actin cortex properties. In this chapter the reconstitution of a minimal actin cortex by coupling actin filaments to a supported membrane is described. This minimal system may be very well suited to study for example protein interactions on membrane bound actin filaments in a very controlled and quantitative manner as it may be difficult to perform in living systems.

  14. Actin-related proteins localized in the nucleus: from discovery to novel roles in nuclear organization.

    PubMed

    Oma, Yukako; Harata, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The actin family consists of conventional actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), and the members show moderate similarity and share the same basal structure. Following the finding of various ARPs in the cytoplasm in the 1990s, multiple subfamilies that are localized predominantly in the nucleus were identified. Consistent with these cytological observations, subsequent biochemical analyses revealed the involvement of the nuclear ARPs in ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling and histone acetyltransferase complexes. In addition to their contribution to chromatin remodeling, recent studies have shown that nuclear ARPs have roles in the organization of the nucleus that are independent of the activity of the above-mentioned complexes. Therefore, nuclear ARPs are recognized as novel key regulators of genome function, and affect not only the remodeling of chromatin but also the spatial arrangement and dynamics of chromatin within the nucleus.

  15. Actin Capping Protein is required for Dendritic Spine Development and Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yanjie; Tang, Xin; Vitriol, Eric; Chen, Gong; Zheng, James Q.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic spines serve as the postsynaptic platform for most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain and their shape and size are tightly correlated with synaptic strength. The actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in the spine structure and its modifications during synapse development and plasticity, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here we report that actin capping protein (CP), a regulator of actin filament growth, plays an essential role for spine development and synapse formation. We found that CP expression in rat hippocampus is elevated at and after the stage of substantial synapse formation. CP knockdown in hippocampal cultures resulted in a marked decline in the spine density accompanied by increased filopodia-like protrusions. Moreover, the spines of CP knockdown neurons exhibited an altered morphology, highlighted by multiple thin filopodia-like protrusions emerging from the spine head. Finally, the number of functional synapses was reduced by CP knockdown as evidenced by a reduction in the density of paired pre- and postsynaptic markers and in the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. These findings indicate that capping of actin filaments by CP represents an essential step for the remodeling of the actin architecture underlying spine morphogenesis and synaptic formation during development. PMID:21752999

  16. Antagonistic regulation of F-BAR protein assemblies controls actin polymerization during podosome formation.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Kazuya; Kondo, Akihiro; Kurisu, Shusaku; Hasegawa, Junya; Itoh, Toshiki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2013-05-15

    FBP17, an F-BAR domain protein, has emerged as a crucial factor linking the plasma membrane to WASP-mediated actin polymerization. Although it is well established that FBP17 has a powerful self-polymerizing ability that promotes actin nucleation on membranes in vitro, knowledge of inhibitory factors that counteract this activity in vivo is limited. Here, we demonstrate that the assembly of FBP17 on the plasma membranes is antagonized by PSTPIP2, another F-BAR protein implicated in auto-inflammatory disorder. Knockdown of PSTPIP2 in macrophage promotes the assembly of FBP17 as well as subsequent actin nucleation at podosomes, resulting in an enhancement of matrix degradation. This phenotype is rescued by expression of PSTPIP2 in a manner dependent on its F-BAR domain. Time-lapse total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy observations reveal that the self-assembly of FBP17 at the podosomal membrane initiates actin polymerization, whereas the clustering of PSTPIP2 has an opposite effect. Biochemical analysis and live-cell imaging show that PSTPIP2 inhibits actin polymerization by competing with FBP17 for assembly at artificial as well as the plasma membrane. Interestingly, the assembly of FBP17 is dependent on WASP, and its dissociation by WASP inhibition strongly induces a self-organization of PSTPIP2 at podosomes. Thus, our data uncover a previously unappreciated antagonism between different F-BAR domain assemblies that determines the threshold of actin polymerization for the formation of functional podosomes and may explain how the absence of PSTPIP2 causes auto-inflammatory disorder.

  17. Chlamydial TARP is a bacterial nucleator of actin.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Travis J; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Mead, David J; Hackstadt, Ted

    2006-10-17

    Chlamydia trachomatis entry into host cells results from a parasite-directed remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. A type III secreted effector, TARP (translocated actin recruiting phosphoprotein), has been implicated in the recruitment of actin to the site of internalization. To elucidate the role of TARP in actin recruitment, we identified host cell proteins that associated with recombinant GST-TARP fusions. TARP directly associated with actin, and this interaction promoted actin nucleation as determined by in vitro polymerization assays. Domain analysis of TARP identified an actin-binding domain that bears structural and primary amino acid sequence similarity to WH2 domain family proteins. In addition, a proline-rich domain was found to promote TARP oligomerization and was required for TARP-dependent nucleation of new actin filaments. Our findings reveal a mechanism by which chlamydiae induce localized cytoskeletal changes by the translocated effector TARP during entry into host cells.

  18. Arabidopsis ACTIN-DEPOLYMERIZING FACTOR7 Severs Actin Filaments and Regulates Actin Cable Turnover to Promote Normal Pollen Tube Growth[W

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yiyan; Xie, Yurong; Jiang, Yuxiang; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2013-01-01

    Actin filaments are often arranged into higher-order structures, such as the longitudinal actin cables that generate the reverse fountain cytoplasmic streaming pattern present in pollen tubes. While several actin binding proteins have been implicated in the generation of these cables, the mechanisms that regulate their dynamic turnover remain largely unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana ACTIN-DEPOLYMERIZING FACTOR7 (ADF7) is required for turnover of longitudinal actin cables. In vitro biochemical analyses revealed that ADF7 is a typical ADF that prefers ADP-G-actin over ATP-G-actin. ADF7 inhibits nucleotide exchange on actin and severs filaments, but its filament severing and depolymerizing activities are less potent than those of the vegetative ADF1. ADF7 primarily decorates longitudinal actin cables in the shanks of pollen tubes. Consistent with this localization pattern, the severing frequency and depolymerization rate of filaments significantly decreased, while their maximum lifetime significantly increased, in adf7 pollen tube shanks. Furthermore, an ADF7–enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion with defective severing activity but normal G-actin binding activity could not complement adf7, providing compelling evidence that the severing activity of ADF7 is vital for its in vivo functions. These observations suggest that ADF7 evolved to promote turnover of longitudinal actin cables by severing actin filaments in pollen tubes. PMID:24058157

  19. Pearling instability of membrane tubes driven by curved proteins and actin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelerčič, U.; Gov, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    Membrane deformation inside living cells is crucial for the proper shaping of various intracellular organelles and is necessary during the fission/fusion processes that allow membrane recycling and transport (e.g. endocytosis). Proteins that induce membrane curvature play a key role in such processes, mostly by adsorbing to the membrane and forming a scaffold that deforms the membrane according to the curvature of the proteins. In this paper we explore the possibility of membrane tube destabilization through a pearling mechanism enabled by the combined effects of the adsorbed curved proteins and the actin polymerization that they recruit. The pearling instability can serve as the initiation for fission of the tube into vesicles. We find that adsorbed curved proteins are more likely to stabilize the tubes, while the actin polymerization can provide the additional constrictive force needed for the robust instability. We discuss the relevance of the theoretical results to in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  20. Initial binding of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli to host cells and subsequent induction of actin rearrangements depend on filamentous EspA-containing surface appendages.

    PubMed

    Ebel, F; Podzadel, T; Rohde, M; Kresse, A U; Krämer, S; Deibel, C; Guzmán, C A; Chakraborty, T

    1998-10-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) induce so-called attaching and effacing lesions that enable the tight adherence of these pathogens to the gut epithelium. All of the genes necessary for this process are present in the locus of enterocyte effacement, which encodes a type III secretion system, the secreted Esp proteins and the surface protein intimin. In this study we sequenced the espA gene of STEC, generated and characterized a corresponding deletion mutant and raised EspA-specific monoclonal antibodies to analyse the functional role of this protein during infection. EspA was detected in often filament-like structures decorating all bacteria that had attached to HeLa cells. These appendages were especially prominent on bacteria that had not yet induced the formation of actin pedestals, indicating that they mediate the initial contact of STEC to their target cells. Consistently, a deletion of the espA gene completely abolished the capacity of such STEC mutants to bind to HeLa cells and to induce actin rearrangements. Surface appendages similar to those described in this study are also formed by Pseudomonas syringae and may represent a structural element common to many bacterial pathogens that deliver proteins into their target cells via a type III secretion system.

  1. Engineering RNA-binding proteins for biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Varani, Gabriele

    2013-08-01

    RNA-binding proteins play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression. Many have modular structures and combine relatively few common domains in various arrangements to recognize RNA sequences and/or structures. Recent progress in engineering the specificity of the PUF class RNA-binding proteins has shown that RNA-binding domains may be combined with various effector or functional domains to regulate the metabolism of targeted RNAs. Designer RNA-binding proteins with tailored sequence specificity will provide valuable tools for biochemical research as well as potential therapeutic applications. In this review, we discuss the suitability of various RNA-binding domains for engineering RNA-binding specificity, based on the structural basis for their recognition. We also compare various protein engineering and design methods applied to RNA-binding proteins, and discuss future applications of these proteins.

  2. CARMIL is a potent capping protein antagonist: identification of a conserved CARMIL domain that inhibits the activity of capping protein and uncaps capped actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Uruno, Takehito; Remmert, Kirsten; Hammer, John A

    2006-04-14

    Acanthamoeba CARMIL was previously shown to co-purify with capping protein (CP) and to bind pure CP. Here we show that this interaction inhibits the barbed end-capping activity of CP. Even more strikingly, this interaction drives the uncapping of actin filaments previously capped with CP. These activities are CP-specific; CARMIL does not inhibit the capping activities of either gelsolin or CapG and does not uncap gelsolin-capped filaments. Although full-length (FL) CARMIL (residues 1-1121) possesses both anti-CP activities, C-terminal fragments like glutathione S-transferase (GST)-P (940-1121) that contain the CARMIL CP binding site are at least 10 times more active. We localized the full activities of GST-P to its C-terminal 51 residues (1071-1121). This sequence contains a stretch of 25 residues that is highly conserved in CARMIL proteins from protozoa, flies, worms, and vertebrates (CARMIL Homology domain 3; CAH3). Point mutations showed that the majority of the most highly conserved residues within CAH3 are critical for the anti-CP activity of GST-AP (862-1121). Finally, we found that GST-AP binds CP approximately 20-fold more tightly than does FL-CARMIL. This observation together with the elevated activities of C-terminal fragments relative to FL-CARMIL suggests that FL-CARMIL might exist primarily in an autoinhibited state. Consistent with this idea, proteolytic cleavage of FL-CARMIL with thrombin generated an approximately 14-kDa C-terminal fragment that expresses full anti-CP activities. We propose that, after some type of physiological activation event, FL-CARMIL could function in vivo as a potent CP antagonist. Given the pivotal role that CP plays in determining the global actin phenotype of cells, our results suggest that CARMIL may play an important role in the physiological regulation of actin assembly.

  3. Quantitative apical membrane proteomics reveals vasopressin-induced actin dynamics in collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Chin-San; Chen, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Po-Jen; Chen, Pei-Yu; Lin, Shu-Yu; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Fenton, Robert A.; Knepper, Mark A.; Yu, Ming-Jiun

    2013-01-01

    In kidney collecting duct cells, filamentous actin (F-actin) depolymerization is a critical step in vasopressin-induced trafficking of aquaporin-2 to the apical plasma membrane. However, the molecular components of this response are largely unknown. Using stable isotope-based quantitative protein mass spectrometry and surface biotinylation, we identified 100 proteins that showed significant abundance changes in the apical plasma membrane of mouse cortical collecting duct cells in response to vasopressin. Fourteen of these proteins are involved in actin cytoskeleton regulation, including actin itself, 10 actin-associated proteins, and 3 regulatory proteins. Identified were two integral membrane proteins (Clmn, Nckap1) and one actin-binding protein (Mpp5) that link F-actin to the plasma membrane, five F-actin end-binding proteins (Arpc2, Arpc4, Gsn, Scin, and Capzb) involved in F-actin reorganization, and two actin adaptor proteins (Dbn1, Lasp1) that regulate actin cytoskeleton organization. There were also protease (Capn1), protein kinase (Cdc42bpb), and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 2 (Arhgef2) that mediate signal-induced F-actin changes. Based on these findings, we devised a live-cell imaging method to observe vasopressin-induced F-actin dynamics in polarized mouse cortical collecting duct cells. In response to vasopressin, F-actin gradually disappeared near the center of the apical plasma membrane while consolidating laterally near the tight junction. This F-actin peripheralization was blocked by calcium ion chelation. Vasopressin-induced apical aquaporin-2 trafficking and forskolin-induced water permeability increase were blocked by F-actin disruption. In conclusion, we identified a vasopressin-regulated actin network potentially responsible for vasopressin-induced apical F-actin dynamics that could explain regulation of apical aquaporin-2 trafficking and water permeability increase. PMID:24085853

  4. Enigma interacts with adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains to control insulin-induced actin cytoskeleton remodeling and glucose transporter 4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Barrès, Romain; Grémeaux, Thierry; Gual, Philippe; Gonzalez, Teresa; Gugenheim, Jean; Tran, Albert; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2006-11-01

    APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) initiates a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-independent pathway involved in insulin-stimulated glucose transport. We recently identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein, as a partner of APS and showed that APS-Enigma complex plays a critical role in actin cytoskeleton organization in fibroblastic cells. Because actin rearrangement is important for insulin-induced glucose transporter 4 (Glut 4) translocation, we studied the potential involvement of Enigma in insulin-induced glucose transport in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Enigma mRNA was expressed in differentiated adipocytes and APS and Enigma were colocalized with cortical actin. Expression of an APS mutant unable to bind Enigma increased the insulin-induced Glut 4 translocation to the plasma membrane. By contrast, overexpression of Enigma inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transport and Glut 4 translocation without alterations in proximal insulin signaling. This inhibitory effect was prevented with the deletion of the LIM domains of Enigma. Using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy of green fluorescent protein-actin, we demonstrated that the overexpression of Enigma altered insulin-induced actin rearrangements, whereas the expression of Enigma without its LIM domains was without effect. A physiological link between increased expression of Enigma and an alteration in insulin-induced glucose uptake was suggested by the increase in Enigma mRNA expression in adipose tissue of diabetic obese patients. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the interaction between APS and Enigma is involved in insulin-induced Glut 4 translocation by regulating cortical actin remodeling and raise the possibility that modification of APS/Enigma ratio could participate in the alteration of insulin-induced glucose uptake in adipose tissue.

  5. Labeling F-actin barbed ends with rhodamine-actin in permeabilized neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Marsick, Bonnie M; Letourneau, Paul C

    2011-03-17

    The motile tips of growing axons are called growth cones. Growth cones lead navigating axons through developing tissues by interacting with locally expressed molecular guidance cues that bind growth cone receptors and regulate the dynamics and organization of the growth cone cytoskeleton. The main target of these navigational signals is the actin filament meshwork that fills the growth cone periphery and that drives growth cone motility through continual actin polymerization and dynamic remodeling. Positive or attractive guidance cues induce growth cone turning by stimulating actin filament (F-actin) polymerization in the region of the growth cone periphery that is nearer the source of the attractant cue. This actin polymerization drives local growth cone protrusion, adhesion of the leading margin and axonal elongation toward the attractant. Actin filament polymerization depends on the availability of sufficient actin monomer and on polymerization nuclei or actin filament barbed ends for the addition of monomer. Actin monomer is abundantly available in chick retinal and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) growth cones. Consequently, polymerization increases rapidly when free F-actin barbed ends become available for monomer addition. This occurs in chick DRG and retinal growth cones via the local activation of the F-actin severing protein actin depolymerizing factor (ADF/cofilin) in the growth cone region closer to an attractant. This heightened ADF/cofilin activity severs actin filaments to create new F-actin barbed ends for polymerization. The following method demonstrates this mechanism. Total content of F-actin is visualized by staining with fluorescent phalloidin. F-actin barbed ends are visualized by the incorporation of rhodamine-actin within growth cones that are permeabilized with the procedure described in the following, which is adapted from previous studies of other motile cells. When rhodamine-actin is added at a concentration above the critical concentration

  6. Synthetic lethality screen identifies a novel yeast myosin I gene (MYO5): myosin I proteins are required for polarization of the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The organization of the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role in cell physiology in motile and nonmotile organisms. Nonetheless, the function of the actin based motor molecules, members of the myosin superfamily, is not well understood. Deletion of MYO3, a yeast gene encoding a "classic" myosin I, has no detectable phenotype. We used a synthetic lethality screen to uncover genes whose functions might overlap with those of MYO3 and identified a second yeast myosin 1 gene, MYO5. MYO5 shows 86 and 62% identity to MYO3 across the motor and non- motor regions. Both genes contain an amino terminal motor domain, a neck region containing two IQ motifs, and a tail domain consisting of a positively charged region, a proline-rich region containing sequences implicated in ATP-insensitive actin binding, and an SH3 domain. Although myo5 deletion mutants have no detectable phenotype, yeast strains deleted for both MYO3 and MYO5 have severe defects in growth and actin cytoskeletal organization. Double deletion mutants also display phenotypes associated with actin disorganization including accumulation of intracellular membranes and vesicles, cell rounding, random bud site selection, sensitivity to high osmotic strength, and low pH as well as defects in chitin and cell wall deposition, invertase secretion, and fluid phase endocytosis. Indirect immunofluorescence studies using epitope-tagged Myo5p indicate that Myo5p is localized at actin patches. These results indicate that MYO3 and MYO5 encode classical myosin I proteins with overlapping functions and suggest a role for Myo3p and Myo5p in organization of the actin cytoskeleton of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:8682864

  7. A structural study of F-actin - filamin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens-Braunstein, Ashley; Nguyen, Lam; Hirst, Linda

    2010-03-01

    The cell's ability to move and contract is attributed to the semi-flexible filamentous protein, F -actin, one of the three filaments in the cytoskeleton. Actin bundling can be formed by a cross-linking actin binding protein (ABP) filamin. By examining filamin's cross-linking abilities at different concentrations and molar ratios, we can study the flexibility, structure and multiple network formations created when cross-linking F-actin with this protein. We have studied the phase diagram of this protein system using fluorescence microscopy, analyzing the network structures observed in the context of a coarse grained molecular dynamics simulation carried out by our group.

  8. Nuclear Actin in Development and Transcriptional Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Misu, Shinji; Takebayashi, Marina; Miyamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Actin is a highly abundant protein in eukaryotic cells and dynamically changes its polymerized states with the help of actin-binding proteins. Its critical function as a constituent of cytoskeleton has been well-documented. Growing evidence demonstrates that actin is also present in nuclei, referred to as nuclear actin, and is involved in a number of nuclear processes, including transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The contribution of nuclear actin to transcriptional regulation can be explained by its direct interaction with transcription machineries and chromatin remodeling factors and by controlling the activities of transcription factors. In both cases, polymerized states of nuclear actin affect the transcriptional outcome. Nuclear actin also plays an important role in activating strongly silenced genes in somatic cells for transcriptional reprogramming. When these nuclear functions of actin are considered, it is plausible to speculate that nuclear actin is also implicated in embryonic development, in which numerous genes need to be activated in a well-coordinated manner. In this review, we especially focus on nuclear actin’s roles in transcriptional activation, reprogramming and development, including stem cell differentiation and we discuss how nuclear actin can be an important player in development and cell differentiation. PMID:28326098

  9. Calcium-binding proteins and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckingham, K.; Lu, A. Q.; Andruss, B. F.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The known roles for calcium-binding proteins in developmental signaling pathways are reviewed. Current information on the calcium-binding characteristics of three classes of cell-surface developmental signaling proteins (EGF-domain proteins, cadherins and integrins) is presented together with an overview of the intracellular pathways downstream of these surface receptors. The developmental roles delineated to date for the universal intracellular calcium sensor, calmodulin, and its targets, and for calcium-binding regulators of the cytoskeleton are also reviewed.

  10. Stain-Free total protein staining is a superior loading control to β-actin for Western blots.

    PubMed

    Gilda, Jennifer E; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2013-09-15

    Semi-quantification of proteins using Western blots typically involves normalization against housekeeping genes such as β-actin. More recently, Ponceau S and Coomassie blue staining have both been shown to be suitable alternatives to housekeeping genes as loading controls. Stain-Free total protein staining offers the advantage of no staining or destaining steps. Evaluation of the use of Stain-Free staining as an alternative to β-actin or the protein stain Ponceau S showed that Stain-Free staining was superior to β-actin and as good as or better than Ponceau S staining as a loading control for Western blots.

  11. Myosin subfragment 1 structures reveal a partially bound nucleotide and a complex salt bridge that helps couple nucleotide and actin binding.

    PubMed

    Risal, Dipesh; Gourinath, S; Himmel, Daniel M; Szent-Györgyi, Andrew G; Cohen, Carolyn

    2004-06-15

    Structural studies of myosin have indicated some of the conformational changes that occur in this protein during the contractile cycle, and we have now observed a conformational change in a bound nucleotide as well. The 3.1-A x-ray structure of the scallop myosin head domain (subfragment 1) in the ADP-bound near-rigor state (lever arm =45 degrees to the helical actin axis) shows the diphosphate moiety positioned on the surface of the nucleotide-binding pocket, rather than deep within it as had been observed previously. This conformation strongly suggests a specific mode of entry and exit of the nucleotide from the nucleotide-binding pocket through the so-called "front door." In addition, using a variety of scallop structures, including a relatively high-resolution 2.75-A nucleotide-free near-rigor structure, we have identified a conserved complex salt bridge connecting the 50-kDa upper and N-terminal subdomains. This salt bridge is present only in crystal structures of muscle myosin isoforms that exhibit a strong reciprocal relationship (also known as coupling) between actin and nucleotide affinity.

  12. The Alzheimer Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) and Fe65, an APP-Binding Protein, Regulate Cell Movement

    PubMed Central

    Sabo, Shasta L.; Ikin, Annat F.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Greengard, Paul

    2001-01-01

    FE65 binds to the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP), but the function of this interaction has not been identified. Here, we report that APP and FE65 are involved in regulation of cell movement. APP and FE65 colocalize with actin and Mena, an Abl-associated signaling protein thought to regulate actin dynamics, in lamellipodia. APP and FE65 specifically concentrate with β1-integrin in dynamic adhesion sites known as focal complexes, but not in more static adhesion sites known as focal adhesions. Overexpression of APP accelerates cell migration in an MDCK cell wound–healing assay. Coexpression of APP and FE65 dramatically enhances the effect of APP on cell movement, probably by regulating the amount of APP at the cell surface. These data are consistent with a role for FE65 and APP, possibly in a Mena-containing macromolecular complex, in regulation of actin-based motility. PMID:11425871

  13. Drosophila protein kinase N (Pkn) is a negative regulator of actin-myosin activity during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tânia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2014-10-15

    Nurse cell dumping is an actin-myosin based process, where 15 nurse cells of a given egg chamber contract and transfer their cytoplasmic content through the ring canals into the growing oocyte. We isolated two mutant alleles of protein kinase N (pkn) and showed that Pkn negatively-regulates activation of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton during the onset of dumping. Using live-cell imaging analysis we observed that nurse cell dumping rates sharply increase during the onset of fast dumping. Such rate increase was severely impaired in pkn mutant nurse cells due to excessive nurse cell actin-myosin activity and/or loss of tissue integrity. Our work demonstrates that the transition between slow and fast dumping is a discrete event, with at least a five to six-fold dumping rate increase. We show that Pkn negatively regulates nurse cell actin-myosin activity. This is likely to be important for directional cytoplasmic flow. We propose Pkn provides a negative feedback loop to help avoid excessive contractility after local activation of Rho GTPase.

  14. Enhancement of radiosensitivity in H1299 cancer cells by actin-associated protein cofilin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-J. . E-mail: lee_yi_jang@hotmail.com; Sheu, T.-J.; Keng, Peter C.

    2005-09-23

    Cofilin is an actin-associated protein that belongs to the actin depolymerization factor/cofilin family and is important for regulation of actin dynamics. Cofilin can import actin monomers into the nucleus under certain stress conditions, however the biological effects of nuclear transport are unclear. In this study, we found that over-expression of cofilin led to increased radiation sensitivity in human non-small lung cancer H1299 cells. Cell survival as determined by colony forming assay showed that cells over-expressing cofilin were more sensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) than normal cells. To determine whether the DNA repair capacity was altered in cofilin over-expressing cells, comet assays were performed on irradiated cells. Repair of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation was detected in cofilin over-expressing cells after 24 h of recovery. Consistent with this observation, the key components for repair of DNA double-strand breaks, including Rad51, Rad52, and Ku70/Ku80, were down-regulated in cofilin over-expressing cells after IR exposure. These findings suggest that cofilin can influence radiosensitivity by altering DNA repair capacity.

  15. A protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit modulates blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements through regulating actin cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Wang, Jinqian; Xing, Da

    2012-08-01

    Chloroplast avoidance movements mediated by phototropin 2 (phot2) are one of most important physiological events in the response to high-fluence blue light (BL), which reduces damage to the photosynthetic machinery under excess light. Protein phosphatase 2A-2 (PP2A-2) is an isoform of the catalytic subunit of PP2A, which regulates a number of developmental processes. To investigate whether PP2A-2 was involved in high-fluence BL-induced chloroplast avoidance movements, we first analyzed chloroplast migration in the leaves of the pp2a-2 mutant in response to BL. The data showed that PP2A-2 might act as a positive regulator in phot2-mediated chloroplast avoidance movements, but not in phot1-mediated chloroplast accumulation movements. Then, the effect of okadaic acid (OA) and cantharidin (selective PP2A inhibitors) on high-fluence BL response was further investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells. Within a certain concentration range, exogenously applied OA or cantharidin inhibited the high-fluence BL-induced chloroplast movements in a concentration-dependent manner. Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin phosphorylation assays demonstrated that PP2A-2 can activate/dephosphorylate ADF/cofilin, an actin-binding protein, in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells. Consistent with this observation, the experiments showed that OA could inhibit ADF1 binding to the actin and suppress the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton after high-fluence BL irradiation. The adf1 and adf3 mutants also exhibited reduced high-fluence BL-induced chloroplast avoidance movements. In conclusion, we identified that PP2A-2 regulated the activation of ADF/cofilin, which, in turn, regulated actin cytoskeleton remodeling and was involved in phot2-mediated chloroplast avoidance movements.

  16. Shrimp arginine kinase being a binding protein of WSSV envelope protein VP31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cuiyan; Gao, Qiang; Liang, Yan; Li, Chen; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Viral entry into the host is the earliest stage of infection in the viral life cycle in which attachment proteins play a key role. VP31 (WSV340/WSSV396), an envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide domain known as a cellular attachment site. At present, the process of VP31 interacting with shrimp host cells has not been explored. Therefore, the VP31 gene was cloned into pET30a (+), expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 and purified with immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Four gill cellular proteins of shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis) were pulled down by an affinity column coupled with recombinant VP31 (rVP31), and the amino acid sequences were identified with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Hemocyanin, beta-actin, arginine kinase (AK), and an unknown protein were suggested as the putative VP31 receptor proteins. SDS-PAGE showed that AK is the predominant binding protein of VP31. An i n vitro binding activity experiment indicated that recombinant AK's (rAK) binding activity with rVP31 is comparable to that with the same amount of WSSV. These results suggested that AK, as a member of the phosphagen kinase family, plays a role in WSSV infection. This is the first evidence showing that AK is a binding protein of VP31. Further studies on this topic will elucidate WSSV infection mechanism in the future.

  17. Sonic Hedgehog Guides Axons via Zipcode Binding Protein 1-Mediated Local Translation.

    PubMed

    Lepelletier, Léa; Langlois, Sébastien D; Kent, Christopher B; Welshhans, Kristy; Morin, Steves; Bassell, Gary J; Yam, Patricia T; Charron, Frédéric

    2017-02-15

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) attracts spinal cord commissural axons toward the floorplate. How Shh elicits changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that drive growth cone turning is unknown. We find that the turning of rat commissural axons up a Shh gradient requires protein synthesis. In particular, Shh stimulation increases β-actin protein at the growth cone even when the cell bodies have been removed. Therefore, Shh induces the local translation of β-actin at the growth cone. We hypothesized that this requires zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1), an mRNA-binding protein that transports β-actin mRNA and releases it for local translation upon phosphorylation. We found that Shh stimulation increases phospho-ZBP1 levels in the growth cone. Disruption of ZBP1 phosphorylation in vitro abolished the turning of commissural axons toward a Shh gradient. Disruption of ZBP1 function in vivo in mouse and chick resulted in commissural axon guidance errors. Therefore, ZBP1 is required for Shh to guide commissural axons. This identifies ZBP1 as a new mediator of noncanonical Shh signaling in axon guidance.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sonic hedgehog (Shh) guides axons via a noncanonical signaling pathway that is distinct from the canonical Hedgehog signaling pathway that specifies cell fate and morphogenesis. Axon guidance is driven by changes in the growth cone in response to gradients of guidance molecules. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of how Shh orchestrates changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that are required for growth cone turning. Here, we show that the guidance of axons by Shh requires protein synthesis. Zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1) is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates the local translation of proteins, including actin, in the growth cone. We demonstrate that ZBP1 is required for Shh-mediated axon guidance, identifying a new member of the noncanonical Shh signaling pathway.

  18. Actin and ubiquitin protein sequences support a cercozoan/foraminiferan ancestry for the plasmodiophorid plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Archibald, John M; Keeling, Patrick J

    2004-01-01

    The plasmodiophorids are a group of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that cause disease in a variety of economically significant crops. Plasmodiophorids have traditionally been considered fungi but have more recently been suggested to be members of the Cercozoa, a morphologically diverse group of amoeboid, flagellate, and amoeboflagellate protists. The recognition that Cercozoa constitute a monophyletic lineage has come from phylogenetic analyses of small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. Protein sequence data have suggested that the closest relatives of Cercozoa are the Foraminifera. To further test a cercozoan origin for the plasmodiophorids, we isolated actin genes from Plasmodiophora brassicae, Sorosphaera veronicae, and Spongospora subterranea, and polyubiquitin gene fragments from P. brassicae and S. subterranea. We also isolated actin genes from the chlorarachniophyte Lotharella globosa. In protein phylogenies of actin, the plasmodiophorid sequences consistently branch with Cercozoa and Foraminifera, and weakly branch as the sister group to the foraminiferans. The plasmodiophorid polyubiquitin sequences contain a single amino acid residue insertion at the functionally important processing point between ubiquitin monomers, the same place in which an otherwise unique insertion exists in the cercozoan and foraminiferan proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that plasmodiophorids are indeed related to Cercozoa and Foraminifera, although the relationships amongst these groups remain unresolved.

  19. The uptake machinery of clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins--a cell delivery system for fusion proteins and polypeptide drugs.

    PubMed

    Barth, Holger; Blöcker, Dagmar; Aktories, Klaus

    2002-12-01

    Several bacterial protein toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin, Clostridum perfringens iota toxin, Clostridium difficile ADP-ribosyltransferase, and the Bacillus-produced vegetative insecticidal proteins, target the cytoskeleton by ADP-ribosylation of actin. All these toxins are binary in structure and consist of an enzyme component, possessing ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and a separated binding and translocation component, which is involved in the delivery of the enzyme component into the cell. The toxins are not only important virulence factors but also cell biological tools to study the function of the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, the binary toxins turned out to be effective transporter systems for the delivery of specific fusion toxins (e.g., Rho-ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme) into cells. The present review describes the biological functions of the toxins, focuses on recent studies on the uptake and delivery mechanism and discusses the usage as a drug delivery system.

  20. Export of virulence proteins by malaria-infected erythrocytes involves remodeling of host actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Rug, Melanie; Cyrklaff, Marek; Mikkonen, Antti; Lemgruber, Leandro; Kuelzer, Simone; Sanchez, Cecilia P; Thompson, Jennifer; Hanssen, Eric; O'Neill, Matthew; Langer, Christine; Lanzer, Michael; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Maier, Alexander G; Cowman, Alan F

    2014-11-27

    Following invasion of human red blood cells (RBCs) by the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, a remarkable process of remodeling occurs in the host cell mediated by trafficking of several hundred effector proteins to the RBC compartment. The exported virulence protein, P falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), is responsible for cytoadherence of infected cells to host endothelial receptors. Maurer clefts are organelles essential for protein trafficking, sorting, and assembly of protein complexes. Here we demonstrate that disruption of PfEMP1 trafficking protein 1 (PfPTP1) function leads to severe alterations in the architecture of Maurer's clefts. Furthermore, 2 major surface antigen families, PfEMP1 and STEVOR, are no longer displayed on the host cell surface leading to ablation of cytoadherence to host receptors. PfPTP1 functions in a large complex of proteins and is required for linking of Maurer's clefts to the host actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Monobodies and other synthetic binding proteins for expanding protein science.

    PubMed

    Sha, Fern; Salzman, Gabriel; Gupta, Ankit; Koide, Shohei

    2017-03-01

    Synthetic binding proteins are constructed using nonantibody molecular scaffolds. Over the last two decades, in-depth structural and functional analyses of synthetic binding proteins have improved combinatorial library designs and selection strategies, which have resulted in potent platforms that consistently generate binding proteins to diverse targets with affinity and specificity that rival those of antibodies. Favorable attributes of synthetic binding proteins, such as small size, freedom from disulfide bond formation and ease of making fusion proteins, have enabled their unique applications in protein science, cell biology and beyond. Here, we review recent studies that illustrate how synthetic binding proteins are powerful probes that can directly link structure and function, often leading to new mechanistic insights. We propose that synthetic proteins will become powerful standard tools in diverse areas of protein science, biotechnology and medicine.

  2. Cytoplasmic Actin: Purification and Single Molecule Assembly Assays

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Scott D.; Zuchero, J. Bradley; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential to all eukaryotic cells. In addition to playing important structural roles, assembly of actin into filaments powers diverse cellular processes, including cell motility, cytokinesis, and endocytosis. Actin polymerization is tightly regulated by its numerous cofactors, which control spatial and temporal assembly of actin as well as the physical properties of these filaments. Development of an in vitro model of actin polymerization from purified components has allowed for great advances in determining the effects of these proteins on the actin cytoskeleton. Here we describe how to use the pyrene actin assembly assay to determine the effect of a protein on the kinetics of actin assembly, either directly or as mediated by proteins such as nucleation or capping factors. Secondly, we show how fluorescently labeled phalloidin can be used to visualize the filaments that are created in vitro to give insight into how proteins regulate actin filament structure. Finally, we describe a method for visualizing dynamic assembly and disassembly of single actin filaments and fluorescently labeled actin binding proteins using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. PMID:23868587

  3. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spracklen, Andrew J; Fagan, Tiffany N; Lovander, Kaylee E; Tootle, Tina L

    2014-09-15

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools--Utrophin, Lifeact, and F-tractin--for characterizing the actin remodeling events occurring within the germline-derived nurse cells during Drosophila mid-oogenesis or follicle development. Specifically, we used the UAS/GAL4 system to express these tools at different levels and in different cells, and analyzed these tools for effects on fertility, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, and ability to label filamentous actin (F-actin) structures by both fixed and live imaging. While both Utrophin and Lifeact robustly label F-actin structures within the Drosophila germline, when strongly expressed they cause sterility and severe actin defects including cortical actin breakdown resulting in multi-nucleate nurse cells, early F-actin filament and aggregate formation during stage 9 (S9), and disorganized parallel actin filament bundles during stage 10B (S10B). However, by using a weaker germline GAL4 driver in combination with a higher temperature, Utrophin can label F-actin with minimal defects. Additionally, strong Utrophin expression within the germline causes F-actin formation in the nurse cell nuclei and germinal vesicle during mid-oogenesis. Similarly, Lifeact expression results in nuclear F-actin only within the germinal vesicle. F-tractin expresses at a lower level than the other two labeling tools, but labels cytoplasmic F-actin structures well without causing sterility or striking actin defects. Together these studies reveal how critical it is to evaluate the utility of each actin labeling tool

  4. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Spracklen, Andrew J.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Lovander, Kaylee E.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools – Utrophin, Lifeact, and F-tractin – for characterizing the actin remodeling events occurring within the germline-derived nurse cells during Drosophila mid-oogenesis or follicle development. Specifically, we used the UAS/GAL4 system to express these tools at different levels and in different cells, and analyzed these tools for effects on fertility, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, and ability to label filamentous actin (F-actin) structures by both fixed and live imaging. While both Utrophin and Lifeact robustly label F-actin structures within the Drosophila germline, when strongly expressed they cause sterility and severe actin defects including cortical actin breakdown resulting in multi-nucleate nurse cells, early F-actin filament and aggregate formation during stage 9 (S9), and disorganized parallel actin filament bundles during stage 10B (S10B). However, by using a weaker germline GAL4 driver in combination with a higher temperature, Utrophin can label F-actin with minimal defects. Additionally, strong Utrophin expression within the germline causes F-actin formation in the nurse cell nuclei and germinal vesicle during mid-oogenesis. Similarly, Lifeact expression results in nuclear F-actin only within the germinal vesicle. F-tractin expresses at a lower level than the other two labeling tools, but labels cytoplasmic F-actin structures well without causing sterility or striking actin defects. Together these studies reveal how critical it is to evaluate the utility of each actin labeling

  5. Structural Characterization of the Binding of Myosin*ADP*Pi to Actin in Permeabilized Rabbit Psoas Muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,S.; Gu, J.; Belknap, B.; White, H.; Yu, L.

    2006-01-01

    When myosin is attached to actin in a muscle cell, various structures in the filaments are formed. The two strongly bound states (A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP and A{center_dot}M) and the weakly bound A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP states are reasonably well understood. The orientation of the strongly bound myosin heads is uniform ('stereospecific' attachment), and the attached heads exhibit little spatial fluctuation. In the prehydrolysis weakly bound A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP state, the orientations of the attached myosin heads assume a wide range of azimuthal and axial angles, indicating considerable flexibility in the myosin head. The structure of the other weakly bound state, A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i}, however, is poorly understood. This state is thought to be the critical pre-power-stroke state, poised to make the transition to the strongly binding, force-generating states, and hence it is of particular interest for understanding the mechanism of contraction. However, because of the low affinity between myosin and actin in the A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} state, the structure of this state has eluded determination both in isolated form and in muscle cells. With the knowledge recently gained in the structures of the weakly binding M{center_dot}ATP, M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} states and the weakly attached A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP state in muscle fibers, it is now feasible to delineate the in vivo structure of the attached state of A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i}. The series of experiments presented in this article were carried out under relaxing conditions at 25{sup o}C, where {approx}95% of the myosin heads in the skinned rabbit psoas muscle contain the hydrolysis products. The affinity for actin is enhanced by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) or by lowering the ionic strength in the bathing solution. Solution kinetics and binding constants were determined in the presence and in

  6. A new model for the interaction of dystrophin with F-actin

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The F-actin binding and cross-linking properties of skeletal muscle dystrophin-glycoprotein complex were examined using high and low speed cosedimentation assays, microcapillary falling ball viscometry, and electron microscopy. Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex binding to F-actin saturated near 0.042 +/- 0.005 mol/ mol, which corresponds to one dystrophin per 24 actin monomers. Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex bound to F-actin with an average apparent Kd for dystrophin of 0.5 microM. These results demonstrate that native, full-length dystrophin in the glycoprotein complex binds F-actin with some properties similar to those measured for several members of the actin cross-linking super- family of proteins. However, we failed to observe dystrophin- glycoprotein complex-induced cross-linking of F-actin by three different methods, each positively controlled with alpha-actinin. Furthermore, high speed cosedimentation analysis of dystrophin- glycoprotein complex digested with calpain revealed a novel F-actin binding site located near the middle of the dystrophin rod domain. Recombinant dystrophin fragments corresponding to the novel actin binding site and the first 246 amino acids of dystrophin both bound F- actin but with significantly lower affinity and higher capacity than was observed with purified dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Finally, dystrophin-glycoprotein complex was observed to significantly slow the depolymerization of F-actin, Suggesting that dystrophin may lie along side an actin filament through interaction with multiple actin monomers. These data suggest that although dystrophin is most closely related to the actin cross-linking superfamily based on sequence homology, dystrophin binds F-actin in a manner more analogous to actin side-binding proteins. PMID:8909541

  7. The Cortical Localization of the Microtubule Orientation Protein, Kar9p, Is Dependent upon Actin and Proteins Required for Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rita K.; Matheos, Dina; Rose, Mark D.

    1999-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, positioning of the mitotic spindle requires both the cytoplasmic microtubules and actin. Kar9p is a novel cortical protein that is required for the correct position of the mitotic spindle and the orientation of the cytoplasmic microtubules. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)– Kar9p localizes to a single spot at the tip of the growing bud and the mating projection. However, the cortical localization of Kar9p does not require microtubules (Miller, R.K., and M.D. Rose. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 140: 377), suggesting that Kar9p interacts with other proteins at the cortex. To investigate Kar9p's cortical interactions, we treated cells with the actin-depolymerizing drug, latrunculin-A. In both shmoos and mitotic cells, Kar9p's cortical localization was completely dependent on polymerized actin. Kar9p localization was also altered by mutations in four genes, spa2Δ, pea2Δ, bud6Δ, and bni1Δ, required for normal polarization and actin cytoskeleton functions and, of these, bni1Δ affected Kar9p localization most severely. Like kar9Δ, bni1Δ mutants exhibited nuclear positioning defects during mitosis and in shmoos. Furthermore, like kar9Δ, the bni1Δ mutant exhibited misoriented cytoplasmic microtubules in shmoos. Genetic analysis placed BNI1 in the KAR9 pathway for nuclear migration. However, analysis of kar9Δ bni1Δ double mutants suggested that Kar9p retained some function in bni1Δ mitotic cells. Unlike the polarization mutants, kar9Δ shmoos had a normal morphology and diploids budded in the correct bipolar pattern. Furthermore, Bni1p localized normally in kar9Δ. We conclude that Kar9p's function is specific for cytoplasmic microtubule orientation and that Kar9p's role in nuclear positioning is to coordinate the interactions between the actin and microtubule networks. PMID:10085294

  8. The Hill model for binding myosin S1 to regulated actin is not equivalent to the McKillop-Geeves model.

    PubMed

    Mijailovich, Srboljub M; Li, Xiaochuan; Griffiths, R Hugh; Geeves, Michael A

    2012-03-16

    The Hill two-state cooperativity model and the McKillop-Geeves (McK-G) three-state model predict very similar binding traces of myosin subfragment 1 (S1) binding to regulated actin filaments in the presence and absence of calcium, and both fit the experimental data reasonably well [Chen et al., Biophys. J., 80, 2338-2349]. Here, we compared the Hill model and the McK-G model for binding myosin S1 to regulated actin against three sets of experimental data: the titration of regulated actin with S1 and the kinetics of S1 binding of regulated actin with either excess S1 to actin or excess actin to S1. Each data set was collected for a wide range of specified calcium concentrations. Both models were able to generate reasonable fits to the time course data and to titration data. The McK-G model can fit all three data sets with the same calcium-concentration-sensitive parameters. Only K(B) and K(T) show significant calcium dependence, and the parameters have a classic pCa curve. A unique set of the Hill model parameters was extremely difficult to estimate from the best fits of multiple sets of data. In summary, the McK-G cooperativity model more uniquely resolves parameters estimated from kinetic and titration data than the Hill model, predicts a sigmoidal dependence of key parameters with calcium concentration, and is simpler and more suitable for practical use.

  9. The Yeast V159N Actin Mutant Reveals Roles for Actin Dynamics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Belmont, Lisa D.; Drubin, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Actin with a Val 159 to Asn mutation (V159N) forms actin filaments that depolymerize slowly because of a failure to undergo a conformational change after inorganic phosphate release. Here we demonstrate that expression of this actin results in reduced actin dynamics in vivo, and we make use of this property to study the roles of rapid actin filament turnover. Yeast strains expressing the V159N mutant (act1-159) as their only source of actin have larger cortical actin patches and more actin cables than wild-type yeast. Rapid actin dynamics are not essential for cortical actin patch motility or establishment of cell polarity. However, fluid phase endocytosis is defective in act1-159 strains. act1-159 is synthetically lethal with cofilin and profilin mutants, supporting the conclusion that mutations in all of these genes impair the polymerization/ depolymerization cycle. In contrast, act1-159 partially suppresses the temperature sensitivity of a tropomyosin mutant, and the loss of cytoplasmic cables seen in fimbrin, Mdm20p, and tropomyosin null mutants, suggesting filament stabilizing functions for these actin-binding proteins. Analysis of the cables in these double-mutant cells supports a role for fimbrin in organizing cytoplasmic cables and for Mdm20p and tropomyosin in excluding cofilin from the cables. PMID:9732289

  10. F- and G-actin homeostasis regulates mechanosensitive actin nucleation by formins.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Chiharu; Kiuchi, Tai; Akiba, Yushi; Mizuno, Hiroaki; Maruoka, Masahiro; Narumiya, Shuh; Mizuno, Kensaku; Watanabe, Naoki

    2013-04-01

    Physical force evokes rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Signalling pathways such as tyrosine kinases, stretch-activated Ca(2+) channels and Rho GTPases are involved in force sensing. However, how signals are transduced to actin assembly remains obscure. Here we show mechanosensitive actin polymerization by formins (formin homology proteins). Cells overexpressing mDia1 increased the amount of F-actin on release of cell tension. Fluorescence single-molecule speckle microscopy revealed rapid induction of processive actin assembly by mDia1 on cell cortex deformation. mDia1 lacking the Rho-binding domain and other formins exhibited mechanosensitive actin nucleation, suggesting Rho-independent activation. Mechanosensitive actin nucleation by mDia1 required neither Ca(2+) nor kinase signalling. Overexpressing LIM kinase abrogated the induction of processive mDia1. Furthermore, s-FDAPplus (sequential fluorescence decay after photoactivation) analysis revealed a rapid actin monomer increase on cell cortex deformation. Our direct visualization of the molecular behaviour reveals a mechanosensitive actin filament regeneration mechanism in which G-actin released by actin remodelling plays a pivotal role.

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase induces actin cytoskeleton reorganization in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Lisa; Carpentier, Sarah; Platek, Anna; Hussain, Nusrat; Gueuning, Marie-Agnès; Vertommen, Didier; Ozkan, Yurda; Sid, Brice; Hue, Louis; Courtoy, Pierre J; Rider, Mark H; Horman, Sandrine

    2010-06-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a known regulator of cellular and systemic energy balance, is now recognized to control cell division, cell polarity and cell migration, all of which depend on the actin cytoskeleton. Here we report the effects of A769662, a pharmacological activator of AMPK, on cytoskeletal organization and signalling in epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. We show that AMPK activation induced shortening or radiation of stress fibers, uncoupling from paxillin and predominance of cortical F-actin. In parallel, Rho-kinase downstream targets, namely myosin regulatory light chain and cofilin, were phosphorylated. These effects resembled the morphological changes in MDCK cells exposed to hyperosmotic shock, which led to Ca(2+)-dependent AMPK activation via calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta(CaMKKbeta), a known upstream kinase of AMPK. Indeed, hypertonicity-induced AMPK activation was markedly reduced by the STO-609 CaMKKbeta inhibitor, as was the increase in MLC and cofilin phosphorylation. We suggest that AMPK links osmotic stress to the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  12. Structural reorganization of parallel actin bundles by crosslinking proteins: Incommensurate states of twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Homin; Grason, Gregory M.

    2010-11-01

    We construct a coarse-grained model of parallel actin bundles crosslinked by compact globular bundling proteins, such as fascin and espin, necessary components of filopodial and mechanosensory bundles. Consistent with structural observations of bundles, we find that the optimal geometry for crosslinking is overtwisted, requiring a coherent structural change of the helical geometry of the filaments. We study the linker-dependent thermodynamic transition of bundled actin filaments from their native state to the overtwisted state and map out the “twist-state” phase diagram in terms of the availability as well as the flexibility of crosslinker proteins. We predict that the transition from the uncrosslinked to fully crosslinked state is highly sensitive to linker flexibility: flexible crosslinking smoothly distorts the twist state of bundled filaments, while rigidly crosslinked bundles undergo a phase transition, rapidly overtwisting filaments over a narrow range of free crosslinker concentrations. Additionally, we predict a rich spectrum of intermediate structures, composed of alternating domains of sparsely bound (untwisted) and strongly bound (overtwisted) filaments. This model reveals that subtle differences in crosslinking agents themselves modify not only the detailed structure of parallel actin bundles, but also the thermodynamic pathway by which they form.

  13. Polycomb group protein ezh2 controls actin polymerization and cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Su, I-hsin; Dobenecker, Marc-Werner; Dickinson, Ephraim; Oser, Matthew; Basavaraj, Ashwin; Marqueron, Raphael; Viale, Agnes; Reinberg, Danny; Wülfing, Christoph; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2005-05-06

    Polycomb group protein Ezh2, one of the key regulators of development in organisms from flies to mice, exerts its epigenetic function through regulation of histone methylation. Here, we report the existence of the cytosolic Ezh2-containing methyltransferase complex and tie the function of this complex to regulation of actin polymerization in various cell types. Genetic evidence supports the essential role of cytosolic Ezh2 in actin polymerization-dependent processes such as antigen receptor signaling in T cells and PDGF-induced dorsal circular ruffle formation in fibroblasts. Revealed function of Ezh2 points to a broader usage of lysine methylation in regulation of both nuclear and extra-nuclear signaling processes.

  14. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions. PMID:26540053

  15. Actin/alpha-actinin-dependent transport of AMPA receptors in dendritic spines: role of the PDZ-LIM protein RIL.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Torsten W; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Licznerski, Pawel; Pawlak, Verena; Kolleker, Alexander; Rozov, Andrei; Kim, Jinhyun; Dittgen, Tanjew; Köhr, Georg; Sheng, Morgan; Seeburg, Peter H; Osten, Pavel

    2004-09-29

    The efficacy of excitatory transmission in the brain depends to a large extent on synaptic AMPA receptors, hence the importance of understanding the delivery and recycling of the receptors at the synaptic sites. Here we report a novel regulation of the AMPA receptor transport by a PDZ (postsynaptic density-95/Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor zona occludens 1) and LIM (Lin11/rat Isl-1/Mec3) domain-containing protein, RIL (reversion-induced LIM protein). We show that RIL binds to the AMPA glutamate receptor subunit GluR-A C-terminal peptide via its LIM domain and to alpha-actinin via its PDZ domain. RIL is enriched in the postsynaptic density fraction isolated from rat forebrain, strongly localizes to dendritic spines in cultured neurons, and coprecipitates, together with alpha-actinin, in a protein complex isolated by immunoprecipitation of AMPA receptors from forebrain synaptosomes. Functionally, in heterologous cells, RIL links AMPA receptors to the alpha-actinin/actin cytoskeleton, an effect that appears to apply selectively to the endosomal surface-internalized population of the receptors. In cultured neurons, an overexpression of recombinant RIL increases the accumulation of AMPA receptors in dendritic spines, both at the total level, as assessed by immunodetection of endogenous GluR-A-containing receptors, and at the synaptic surface, as assessed by recording of miniature EPSCs. Our results thus indicate that RIL directs the transport of GluR-A-containing AMPA receptors to and/or within dendritic spines, in an alpha-actinin/actin-dependent manner, and that such trafficking function promotes the synaptic accumulation of the receptors.

  16. Structure and Function of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ralf R.; Leong, Steven R.; Flaggs, Gail W.; Gray, Patrick W.; Wright, Samuel D.; Mathison, John C.; Tobias, Peter S.; Ulevitch, Richard J.

    1990-09-01

    The primary structure of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), a trace plasma protein that binds to the lipid A moiety of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), was deduced by sequencing cloned complementary DNA. LBP shares sequence identity with another LPS binding protein found in granulocytes, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, and with cholesterol ester transport protein of the plasma. LBP may control the response to LPS under physiologic conditions by forming high-affinity complexes with LPS that bind to monocytes and macrophages, which then secrete tumor necrosis factor. The identification of this pathway for LPS-induced monocyte stimulation may aid in the development of treatments for diseases in which Gram-negative sepsis or endotoxemia are involved.

  17. Mammalian adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) regulates cofilin function, the actin cytoskeleton, and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Ghai, Pooja; Wu, Huhehasi; Wang, Changhui; Field, Jeffrey; Zhou, Guo-Lei

    2013-07-19

    CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) was first identified in yeast as a protein that regulates both the actin cytoskeleton and the Ras/cAMP pathway. Although the role in Ras signaling does not extend beyond yeast, evidence supports that CAP regulates the actin cytoskeleton in all eukaryotes including mammals. In vitro actin polymerization assays show that both mammalian and yeast CAP homologues facilitate cofilin-driven actin filament turnover. We generated HeLa cells with stable CAP1 knockdown using RNA interference. Depletion of CAP1 led to larger cell size and remarkably developed lamellipodia as well as accumulation of filamentous actin (F-actin). Moreover, we found that CAP1 depletion also led to changes in cofilin phosphorylation and localization as well as activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and enhanced cell spreading. CAP1 forms complexes with the adhesion molecules FAK and Talin, which likely underlie the cell adhesion phenotypes through inside-out activation of integrin signaling. CAP1-depleted HeLa cells also had substantially elevated cell motility as well as invasion through Matrigel. In summary, in addition to generating in vitro and in vivo evidence further establishing the role of mammalian CAP1 in actin dynamics, we identified a novel cellular function for CAP1 in regulating cell adhesion.

  18. FSGS3/CD2AP is a barbed-end capping protein that stabilizes actin and strengthens adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Vivian W; Brieher, William M

    2013-12-09

    By combining in vitro reconstitution biochemistry with a cross-linking approach, we have identified focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 3/CD2-associated protein (FSGS3/CD2AP) as a novel actin barbed-end capping protein responsible for actin stability at the adherens junction. FSGS3/CD2AP colocalizes with E-cadherin and α-actinin-4 at the apical junction in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised actin stability and decreased actin accumulation at the adherens junction. Using a novel apparatus to apply mechanical stress to cell-cell junctions, we showed that knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised adhesive strength, resulting in tearing between cells and disruption of barrier function. Our results reveal a novel function of FSGS3/CD2AP and a previously unrecognized role of barbed-end capping in junctional actin dynamics. Our study underscores the complexity of actin regulation at cell-cell contacts that involves actin activators, inhibitors, and stabilizers to control adhesive strength, epithelial behavior, and permeability barrier integrity.

  19. Fluorescence energy transfer between points in G-actin: the nucleotide-binding site, the metal-binding site and Cys-373 residue.

    PubMed

    Miki, M; Wahl, P

    1985-04-05

    Fluorescence energy transfers were studied in order to investigate the spatial relationships between the nucleotide-binding site, the metal-binding site and the Cys-373 residue in the G-actin molecule. When 1-N6-ethenoadenosine-5'-triphosphate (epsilon-ATP) in the nucleotide-binding site and Co2+ or Ni2+ in the metal-binding site were used as fluorescence donor and acceptor, respectively, the fluorescence intensity of epsilon-ATP was perfectly quenched by Ni2+ or Co2+. This indicated that the nucleotide-binding site is very close to the metal-binding site; the distance should be less than 10 A. When N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (IAEDANS) bound to Cys-373 residue and Co2+ in the metal-binding site were used as a fluorescence donor and an acceptor, respectively, the transfer efficiency was equal to 5 +/- 1%. The corresponding distance was calculated to be 23-32 A, assuming a random orientation factor K2 = 2/3.

  20. SVOP Is a Nucleotide Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jia; Bajjalieh, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) and SV2-related protein (SVOP) are transporter-like proteins that localize to neurotransmitter-containing vesicles. Both proteins share structural similarity with the major facilitator (MF) family of small molecule transporters. We recently reported that SV2 binds nucleotides, a feature that has also been reported for another MF family member, the human glucose transporter 1 (Glut1). In the case of Glut1, nucleotide binding affects transport activity. In this study, we determined if SVOP also binds nucleotides and assessed its nucleotide binding properties. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed in vitro photoaffinity labeling experiments with the photoreactive ATP analogue, 8-azido-ATP[γ] biotin and purified recombinant SVOP-FLAG fusion protein. We found that SVOP is a nucleotide-binding protein, although both its substrate specificity and binding site differ from that of SV2. Within the nucleotides tested, ATP, GTP and NAD show same level of inhibition on SVOP-FLAG labeling. Dose dependent studies indicated that SVOP demonstrates the highest affinity for NAD, in contrast to SV2, which binds both NAD and ATP with equal affinity. Mapping of the binding site revealed a single region spanning transmembrane domains 9–12, which contrasts to the two binding sites in the large cytoplasmic domains in SV2A. Conclusions/Significance SVOP is the third MF family member to be found to bind nucleotides. Given that the binding sites are unique in SVOP, SV2 and Glut1, this feature appears to have arisen separately. PMID:19390693

  1. Protein Kinases Possibly Mediate Hypergravity-Induced Changes in F-Actin Expression by Endothelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Felisha D.; Melhado, Caroline D.; Bosah, Francis N.; Harris-Hooker, Sandra A.; Sanford, Gary L.

    1998-01-01

    Basic cellular functions such as electrolyte concentration, cell growth rate, glucose utilization, bone formation, response to growth stimulation, and exocytosis are modified in microgravity. These studies indicate that microgravity affects a number of physiological systems and included in this are cell signaling mechanisms. Rijken and coworkers performed growth factor studies that showed PKC signaling and actin microfilament organization appears to be sensitive to microgravity, suggesting that the inhibition of signal transduction by microgravity may be related to alterations in actin microfilament organization. However, similar studies have not been done for vascular cells. Vascular endothelial cells play critical roles in providing nutrients to organ and tissues and in wound repair. The major deterrent to ground-based microgravity studies is that it is impossible to achieved true microgravity for longer than a few minutes on earth. Hence, it has not been possible to conduct prolonged microgravity studies except for two models that simulate certain aspects of microgravity. However, hypergravity is quite easily achieved. Several researchers have shown that hypergravity will increase the proliferation of several different cell lines while decreasing cell motility and slowing liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy, These studies indicate the hypergravity also alters the behavior of most cells. Several investigators have shown that hypergravity affects the activation of several protein kinases (PKs) in cells. In this study, we investigated whether hypergravity alters the expression of f-actin by bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) and the role of PK's (calmodulin 11 dependent, PKA and PKC) as mediators of these effects.

  2. Placental Vitamin D-Binding Protein Expression in Human Idiopathic Fetal Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Wookey, Alice F.; Chollangi, Tejasvy; Yong, Hannah E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein is a multifunctional serum protein with multiple actions related to normal health. Vitamin D-binding protein transports vitamin D and influences the metabolism of this key hormone but it also has additional immunomodulatory and actin-clearing properties. We investigated whether vitamin D-binding protein expression is altered in fetal growth restriction-associated placental dysfunction. Protein was extracted from 35 placentae derived from 17 healthy control subjects and 18 gestation-matched subjects with fetal growth restriction (FGR). FGR subjects were further subdivided as idiopathic (n = 9) and nonidiopathic (n = 9). Vitamin D-binding protein and 25(OH) vitamin D were measured by ELISA and normalized to protein concentration. The results showed significantly reduced levels of placental vitamin D-binding protein (control versus FGR, p < 0.05, Student's t-test) that were strongly associated with idiopathic fetal growth restriction (p < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis), whereas levels of vitamin D-binding protein were not associated with placental 25(OH) vitamin D stores (p = 0.295, Pearson's correlation). As such, vitamin D-binding protein may be a factor in unexplained placental dysfunction associated with idiopathic fetal growth restriction and may potentially serve as a biomarker of this disease. PMID:28293436

  3. Actin Re-Organization Induced by Chlamydia trachomatis Serovar D - Evidence for a Critical Role of the Effector Protein CT166 Targeting Rac

    PubMed Central

    May, Martin; Sommer, Kirsten; Ebeling, Jenny; Hofmann, Fred; Genth, Harald; Klos, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis causes infections of urogenital tract, eyes or lungs. Alignment reveals homology of CT166, a putative effector protein of urogenital C. trachomatis serovars, with the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain of clostridial glucosylating toxins (CGTs). CGTs contain an essential DXD-motif and mono-glucosylate GTP-binding proteins of the Rho/Ras families, the master regulators of the actin cytoskeleton. CT166 is preformed in elementary bodies of C. trachomatis D and is detected in the host-cell shortly after infection. Infection with high MOI of C. trachomatis serovar D containing the CT166 ORF induces actin re-organization resulting in cell rounding and a decreased cell diameter. A comparable phenotype was observed in HeLa cells treated with the Rho-GTPase-glucosylating Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB) or HeLa cells ectopically expressing CT166. CT166 with a mutated DXD-motif (CT166-mut) exhibited almost unchanged actin dynamics, suggesting that CT166-induced actin re-organization depends on the glucosyltransferase motif of CT166. The cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) from E. coli deamidates and thereby activates Rho-GTPases and transiently protects them against TcdB-induced glucosylation. CNF1-treated cells were found to be protected from TcdB- and CT166-induced actin re-organization. CNF1 treatment as well as ectopic expression of non-glucosylable Rac1-G12V, but not RhoA-G14A, reverted CT166-induced actin re-organization, suggesting that CT166-induced actin re-organization depends on the glucosylation of Rac1. In accordance, over-expression of CT166-mut diminished TcdB induced cell rounding, suggesting shared substrates. Cell rounding induced by high MOI infection with C. trachomatis D was reduced in cells expressing CT166-mut or Rac1-G12V, and in CNF1 treated cells. These observations indicate that the cytopathic effect of C. trachomatis D is mediated by CT166 induced Rac1 glucosylation. Finally

  4. Role of G protein signaling in the formation of the fibrin(ogen)-integrin αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton complex in platelets.

    PubMed

    Budnik, Ivan; Shenkman, Boris; Savion, Naphtali

    2016-09-01

    Effective platelet function requires formation of a physical link between fibrin(ogen), integrin αIIbβ3, and cytoplasmic actin filaments. We investigated the role of the Gαq, Gαi, and Gα12/13 families of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) in the assembly of a ligand-αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton complex. Selective and combined activation of the G proteins was achieved by using combinations of various platelet agonists and inhibitors. Formation and stability of fibrinogen-αIIbβ3 interaction were evaluated by the extent of platelet aggregation and the rate of eptifibatide-induced platelet disaggregation; association of αIIbβ3 with the cytoskeleton was analyzed by western blot. Formation of the fibrin-αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton complex was evaluated by rotational thromboelastometry assay in which clot formation was induced by the mixture of reptilase and factor XIIIa. We demonstrated that involvement of heterotrimeric G proteins in the formation of the ligand-αIIbβ3-cytoskeleton complex depends on whether fibrinogen or fibrin serves as the integrin ligand. Formation of the fibrinogen-αIIbβ3-cytoskeleton complex requires combined activation of at least two G protein pathways while the maximal αIIbβ3-cytoskeleton association and the strongest αIIbβ3-fibrinogen binding supporting irreversible platelet aggregation require combined activation of all three-Gαq, Gαi, and Gα12/13-G protein families. In contrast, formation of the fibrin-αIIbβ3-cytoskeleton complex mediating clot retraction is critically dependent on the activation of the Gαi family, especially on the activation of Gαz.

  5. Cross-linking myosin subfragment 1 Cys-697 and Cys-707 modifies ATP and actin binding site interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Kirshenbaum, K.; Papp, S.; Highsmith, S.

    1993-01-01

    Skeletal muscle myosin is an enzyme that interacts allosterically with MgATP and actin to transduce the chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis into work. By modifying myosin structure, one can change this allosteric interaction and gain insight into its mechanism. Chemical cross-linking with N,N'-p-phenylenedimaleimide (pPDM) of Cys-697 to Cys-707 of the myosin-ADP complex eliminates activity and produces a species that resembles myosin with ATP bound (Burke et al., 1976). Nucleotide-free pPDM-modified myosin subfragment 1 (S1) was prepared, and its structural and allosteric properties were investigated by comparing the nucleotide and actin interactions of S1 to those of pPDM-S1. The structural properties of the nucleotide-free pPDM-S1 are different from those of S1 in several respects. pPDM-S1 intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence intensity is reduced 28%, indicating a large increase of an internal quenching reaction (the fluorescence intensity of the related vanadate complex of S1, S1-MgADP-Vi, is reduced by a similar degree). Tryptophan fluorescence anisotropy increases from 0.168 for S1 to 0.192 for pPDM-S1, indicating that the unquenched tryptophan population in pPDM-S1 has reduced local freedom of motion. The actin affinity of pPDM-S1 is over 6,000-fold lower than that of S1, and the absolute value of the product of the net effective electric charges at the acto-S1 interface is reduced from 8.1 esu2 for S1 to 1.6 esu2 for pPDM-S1. In spite of these changes, the structural response of pPDM-S1 to nucleotide and the allosteric communication between its ATP and actin sites remain intact. Compared to pPDM-S1, the fluorescence intensity of pPDM-S1 *MgADP is increased 50%(compared to 8 and 31% increases, respectively, for MgADP and MgATP binding to S1). Compared to acto-pPDM-S1, the absolute value of the product of the net effective electric charge at the actin binding interface of acto-pPDM-S1 *MgADP increases 7.3 esu2 (compared to a 0.9 esu2 decrease and an 11.0 esu2

  6. Study of actin and its interactions with heavy meromyosin and the regulatory proteins by the pulse fluorimetry in polarized light of a fluorescent probe attached to an actin cysteine.

    PubMed

    Tawada, K; Wahl, P; Auchet, J C

    1978-08-01

    The decay of anisotropy of the N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine fluorescence attached to cysteine-373 of actin can be characterized by two correlation times theta1 and theta2. theta1 has a value of several nanoseconds and is thought to represent some local protein motion. theta2 is of the order of several hundreds of nanoseconds. Its value increases with actin concentration. It represents an average of the G and F actin correlation times. When actin interacts with heavy meromyosin, theta2 increases and becomes infinite at a molar ratio of one heavy meromyosin molecule per four actin protomers. It is concluded that a definite complex is then formed between F actin and heavy meromyosin. In the same time, G actin concentration becomes equal to zero. Finally, when F actin forms a complex with the regulatory proteins tropomyosin and troponin, the value of theta2 is greater in the absence than in the presence of Ca2+. This result indicates that micromolar concentrations of Ca2+ induces a conformation change of the complex of F actin with the regulatory proteins.

  7. Inhibition of CapZ during myofibrillogenesis alters assembly of actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The actin filaments of myofibrils are highly organized; they are of a uniform length and polarity and are situated in the sarcomere in an aligned array. We hypothesized that the barbed-end actin-binding protein, CapZ, directs the process of actin filament assembly during myofibrillogenesis. We tested this hypothesis by inhibiting the actin- binding activity of CapZ in developing myotubes in culture using two different methods. First, injection of a monoclonal antibody that prevents the interaction of CapZ and actin disrupts the non-striated bundles of actin filaments formed during the early stages of myofibril formation in skeletal myotubes in culture. The antibody, when injected at concentrations lower than that required for disrupting the actin filaments, binds at nascent Z-disks. Since the interaction of CapZ and the monoclonal antibody are mutually exclusive, this result indicates that CapZ binds nascent Z-disks independent of an interaction with actin filaments. In a second approach, expression in myotubes of a mutant form of CapZ that does not bind actin results in a delay in the appearance of actin in a striated pattern in myofibrils. The organization of alpha-actinin at Z-disks also is delayed, but the organization of titin and myosin in sarcomeres is not significantly altered. We conclude that the interaction of CapZ and actin is important for the organization of actin filaments of the sarcomere. PMID:7822423

  8. Cross-linking study on skeletal muscle actin: properties of suberimidate-treated actin.

    PubMed

    Ohara, O; Takahashi, S; Ooi, T; Fujiyoshi, Y

    1982-06-01

    Cross-linking experiments were performed on muscle skeletal actin, using imidoesters of various chain lengths. Chemical analyses on all products except one (derived from succinimidate) show evidence of the presence of intramolecular cross-links in the molecule. The detailed properties of suberimidate-treated actin (SA) are as follows: SA contains nearly 1 mol of intramolecular cross-link per mol of actin and less than 15% of intermolecularly cross-linked products. Even at a low salt concentration, SA is polymeric, exchanges slowly its bound nucleotide with free nucleotides in solution, and shows an F-actin-type CD spectrum. Electron micrographs of SA reveal that SA exists actually as fibrous polymers in solutions of low ionic strength, although the fibers seem to be less rigid than those at high salt concentration. The F-form of SA at a high salt concentration is indistinguishable from intact F-actin. SA can bind heavy meromyosin and activate the ATPase of heavy meromyosin as observed for intact F-actin. Tropomyosin binds SA only at a high salt concentration. These results show that SA possesses the properties of F-actin even in media of low salt concentration, which are favorable for depolymerization of F-actin. Thus, we may infer that the conformation of SA is frozen in the F-state of actin by the introduction of intramolecular cross-links in the protein.

  9. Titin in insect spermatocyte spindle fibers associates with microtubules, actin, myosin and the matrix proteins skeletor, megator and chromator.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Lacramioara; Xia, Xuequin; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen; Andrew, Deborah J; Forer, Arthur

    2007-07-01

    Titin, the giant elastic protein found in muscles, is present in spindles of crane-fly and locust spermatocytes as determined by immunofluorescence staining using three antibodies, each raised against a different, spatially separated fragment of Drosophila titin (D-titin). All three antibodies stained the Z-lines and other regions in insect myofibrils. In western blots of insect muscle extract the antibodies reacted with high molecular mass proteins, ranging between rat nebulin (600-900 kDa) and rat titin (3000-4000 kDa). Mass spectrometry of the high molecular mass band from the Coomassie-Blue-stained gel of insect muscle proteins indicates that the protein the antibodies bind to is titin. The pattern of staining in insect spermatocytes was slightly different in the two species, but in general all three anti-D-titin antibodies stained the same components: the chromosomes, prophase and telophase nuclear membranes, the spindle in general, along kinetochore and non-kinetochore microtubules, along apparent connections between partner half-bivalents during anaphase, and various cytoplasmic components, including the contractile ring. That the same cellular components are stained in close proximity by the three different antibodies, each against a different region of D-titin, is strong evidence that the three antibodies identify a titin-like protein in insect spindles, which we identified by mass spectrometry analysis as being titin. The spindle matrix proteins skeletor, megator and chromator are present in many of the same structures, in positions very close to (or the same as) D-titin. Myosin and actin also are present in spindles in close proximity to D-titin. The varying spatial arrangements of these proteins during the course of division suggest that they interact to form a spindle matrix with elastic properties provided by a titin-like protein.

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secreted protein BipC: role in actin modulation and translocation activities required for the bacterial intracellular lifecycle

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen Tyng; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Rajamani, Lakshminarayanan; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2016-01-01

    Melioidosis, an infection caused by the facultative intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, has been classified as an emerging disease with the number of patients steadily increasing at an alarming rate. B. pseudomalleipossess various virulence determinants that allow them to invade the host and evade the host immune response, such as the type III secretion systems (TTSS). The products of this specialized secretion system are particularly important for the B. pseudomallei infection. Lacking in one or more components of the TTSS demonstrated different degrees of defects in the intracellular lifecycle of B. pseudomallei. Further understanding the functional roles of proteins involved in B. pseudomallei TTSS will enable us to dissect the enigma of B. pseudomallei-host cell interaction. In this study, BipC (a translocator), which was previously reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei, was further characterized using the bioinformatics and molecular approaches. The bipCgene, coding for a putative invasive protein, was first PCR amplified from B. pseudomallei K96243 genomic DNA and cloned into an expression vector for overexpression in Escherichia coli. The soluble protein was subsequently purified and assayed for actin polymerization and depolymerization. BipC was verified to subvert the host actin dynamics as demonstrated by the capability to polymerize actin in vitro. Homology modeling was also attempted to predict the structure of BipC. Overall, our findings identified that the protein encoded by the bipC gene plays a role as an effector involved in the actin binding activity to facilitate internalization of B. pseudomalleiinto the host cells. PMID:28028452

  11. GPCRs and actin-cytoskeleton dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; González-Espinosa, Claudia; Espinosa-Riquer, Zyanya P; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    A multitude of physiological processes regulated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling are accomplished by the participation of active rearrangements of the cytoskeleton. In general, it is common that a cross talk occurs among networks of microfilaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments in order to reach specific cell responses. In particular, actin-cytoskeleton dynamics regulate processes such as cell shape, cell division, cell motility, and cell polarization, among others. This chapter describes the current knowledge about the regulation of actin-cytoskeleton dynamic by diverse GPCR signaling pathways, and also includes some protocols combining immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy for the visualization of the different rearrangements of the actin-cytoskeleton. We report how both the S1P-GPCR/G12/13/Rho/ROCK and glucagon-GPCR/Gs/cAMP axes induce differential actin-cytoskeleton rearrangements in epithelial cells. We also show that specific actin-binding molecules, like phalloidin and LifeAct, are very useful to analyze F-actin reorganization by confocal microscopy, and also that both molecules show similar results in fixed cells, whereas the anti-actin antibody is useful to detect both the G- and F-actin, as well as their compartmentalization. Thus, it is highly recommended to utilize different approaches to investigate the regulation of actin dynamics by GPCR signaling, with the aim to get a better picture of the phenomenon under study.

  12. Arf1 and Arf6 Promote Ventral Actin Structures formed by acute Activation of Protein Kinase C and Src

    PubMed Central

    Caviston, Juliane P.; Cohen, Lee Ann; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2016-01-01

    Arf proteins regulate membrane traffic and organelle structure. Although Arf6 is known to initiate actin-based changes in cell surface architecture, Arf1 may also function at the plasma membrane. Here we show that acute activation of protein kinase C (PKC) induced by the phorbol ester PMA led to the formation of motile actin structures on the ventral surface of Beas-2b cells, a lung bronchial epithelial cell line. Ventral actin structures also formed in PMA-treated HeLa cells that had elevated levels of Arf activation. For both cell types, formation of the ventral actin structures was enhanced by expression of active forms of either Arf1 or Arf6, and by the expression of guanine nucleotide exchange factors that activate these Arfs. By contrast, formation of these structures was blocked by inhibitors of PKC and Src, and required phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate, Rac, Arf6 and Arf1. Furthermore, expression of ASAP1, an Arf1 GTPase activating protein (GAP) was more effective at inhibiting the ventral actin structures than was ACAP1, an Arf6 GAP. This study adds to the expanding role for Arf1 in the periphery and identifies a requirement for Arf1, a “Golgi Arf”, in the reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton on ventral surfaces, against the substratum. PMID:24916416

  13. Surface-Based Protein Binding Pocket Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2011-01-01

    Protein similarity comparisons may be made on a local or global basis and may consider sequence information or differing levels of structural information. We present a local 3D method that compares protein binding site surfaces in full atomic detail. The approach is based on the morphological similarity method which has been widely applied for global comparison of small molecules. We apply the method to all-by-all comparisons two sets of human protein kinases, a very diverse set of ATP-bound proteins from multiple species, and three heterogeneous benchmark protein binding site data sets. Cases of disagreement between sequence-based similarity and binding site similarity yield informative examples. Where sequence similarity is very low, high pocket similarity can reliably identify important binding motifs. Where sequence similarity is very high, significant differences in pocket similarity are related to ligand binding specificity and similarity. Local protein binding pocket similarity provides qualitatively complementary information to other approaches, and it can yield quantitative information in support of functional annotation. PMID:21769944

  14. Identification of trichoplein, a novel keratin filament-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Miwako; Izawa, Ichiro; Inoko, Akihito; Hayashi, Yuko; Nagata, Koh-ichi; Yokoyama, Tomoya; Usukura, Jiro; Inagaki, Masaki

    2005-03-01

    Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/18) are major components of the intermediate filaments (IFs) of simple epithelia. We report here the identification of a novel protein termed trichoplein. This protein shows a low degree of sequence similarity to trichohyalin, plectin and myosin heavy chain, and is a K8/18-binding protein. Among interactions between trichoplein and various IF proteins that we tested using two-hybrid methods, trichoplein interacted significantly with K16 and K18, and to some extent with K5, K6a, K8 and K14. In in vitro co-sedimentation assays, trichoplein directly binds to K8/18, but not with vimentin, desmin, actin filaments or microtubules. An antibody raised against trichoplein specifically recognized a polypeptide with a relative molecular mass of 61 kDa in cell lysates. Trichoplein was immunoprecipitated using this antibody in a complex with K8/18 and immunostaining revealed that trichoplein colocalized with K8/18 filaments in HeLa cells. In polarized Caco-2 cells, trichoplein colocalized not only with K8/18 filaments in the apical region but also with desmoplakin, a constituent of desmosomes. In the absorptive cells of the small intestine, trichoplein colocalized with K8/18 filaments at the apical cortical region, and was also concentrated at desmosomes. Taken together, these results suggest that trichoplein is a keratin-binding protein that may be involved in the organization of the apical network of keratin filaments and desmosomes in simple epithelial cells.

  15. Slac2-c (synaptotagmin-like protein homologue lacking C2 domains-c), a novel linker protein that interacts with Rab27, myosin Va/VIIa, and actin.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Mitsunori; Kuroda, Taruho S

    2002-11-08

    Slac2-a (synaptotagmin-like protein (Slp) homologue lacking C2 domains-a)/melanophilin is a melanosome-associated protein that links Rab27A on melanosomes with myosin Va, an actin-based motor protein, and formation of the tripartite protein complex (Rab27A.Slac2-a.myosin Va) has been suggested to regulate melanosome transport (Fukuda, M., Kuroda, T. S., and Mikoshiba, K. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 12432-12436). Here we report the structure of a novel form of Slac2, named Slac2-c, that is homologous to Slac2-a. Slac2-a and Slac2-c exhibit the same overall structure, consisting of a highly conserved N-terminal Slp homology domain (about 50% identity) and a less conserved C-terminal myosin Va-binding domain (about 20% identity). As with other Slac2 members and the Slp family, the Slp homology domain of Slac2-c was found to interact specifically with the GTP-bound form of Rab27A/B both in vitro and in intact cells, and the C-terminal domain of Slac2-c interacted with myosin Va and myosin VIIa. In addition, we discovered that the most C-terminal conserved region of Slac2-a (amino acids 400-590) and Slac2-c (amino acids 670-856), which is not essential for myosin Va binding, directly binds actin and that expression of these regions in PC12 cells and melanoma cells colocalized with actin filaments at the cell periphery, suggesting a novel role of Slac2-a/c in capture of Rab27-containing organelles in the actin-enriched cell periphery.

  16. Lipid binding proteins from parasitic platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    TWO MAIN FAMILIES OF LIPID BINDING PROTEINS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED IN PARASITIC PLATYHELMINTHES: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesize their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms. HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates. Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organization, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localization, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment.

  17. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  18. The polarity protein Inturned links NPHP4 to Daam1 to control the subapical actin network in multiciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Takayuki; Hoff, Sylvia; Schell, Christoph; Helmstädter, Martin; Kretz, Oliver; Kuechlin, Sebastian; Yakulov, Toma A; Engel, Christina; Müller, Barbara; Bensch, Robert; Ronneberger, Olaf; Huber, Tobias B; Lienkamp, Soeren S; Walz, Gerd

    2015-12-07

    Motile cilia polarization requires intracellular anchorage to the cytoskeleton; however, the molecular machinery that supports this process remains elusive. We report that Inturned plays a central role in coordinating the interaction between cilia-associated proteins and actin-nucleation factors. We observed that knockdown of nphp4 in multiciliated cells of the Xenopus laevis epidermis compromised ciliogenesis and directional fluid flow. Depletion of nphp4 disrupted the subapical actin layer. Comparison to the structural defects caused by inturned depletion revealed striking similarities. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the two proteins interact with each other and that Inturned mediates the formation of ternary protein complexes between NPHP4 and DAAM1. Knockdown of daam1, but not formin-2, resulted in similar disruption of the subapical actin web, whereas nphp4 depletion prevented the association of Inturned with the basal bodies. Thus, Inturned appears to function as an adaptor protein that couples cilia-associated molecules to actin-modifying proteins to rearrange the local actin cytoskeleton.

  19. The polarity protein Inturned links NPHP4 to Daam1 to control the subapical actin network in multiciliated cells

    PubMed Central

    Yasunaga, Takayuki; Hoff, Sylvia; Schell, Christoph; Helmstädter, Martin; Kretz, Oliver; Kuechlin, Sebastian; Yakulov, Toma A.; Engel, Christina; Müller, Barbara; Bensch, Robert; Ronneberger, Olaf; Huber, Tobias B.; Lienkamp, Soeren S.

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia polarization requires intracellular anchorage to the cytoskeleton; however, the molecular machinery that supports this process remains elusive. We report that Inturned plays a central role in coordinating the interaction between cilia-associated proteins and actin-nucleation factors. We observed that knockdown of nphp4 in multiciliated cells of the Xenopus laevis epidermis compromised ciliogenesis and directional fluid flow. Depletion of nphp4 disrupted the subapical actin layer. Comparison to the structural defects caused by inturned depletion revealed striking similarities. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the two proteins interact with each other and that Inturned mediates the formation of ternary protein complexes between NPHP4 and DAAM1. Knockdown of daam1, but not formin-2, resulted in similar disruption of the subapical actin web, whereas nphp4 depletion prevented the association of Inturned with the basal bodies. Thus, Inturned appears to function as an adaptor protein that couples cilia-associated molecules to actin-modifying proteins to rearrange the local actin cytoskeleton. PMID:26644512

  20. Protein kinase D promotes plasticity-induced F-actin stabilization in dendritic spines and regulates memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Bencsik, Norbert; Szíber, Zsófia; Liliom, Hanna; Tárnok, Krisztián; Borbély, Sándor; Gulyás, Márton; Rátkai, Anikó; Szűcs, Attila; Hazai-Novák, Diána; Ellwanger, Kornelia; Rácz, Bence; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Hausser, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Actin turnover in dendritic spines influences spine development, morphology, and plasticity, with functional consequences on learning and memory formation. In nonneuronal cells, protein kinase D (PKD) has an important role in stabilizing F-actin via multiple molecular pathways. Using in vitro models of neuronal plasticity, such as glycine-induced chemical long-term potentiation (LTP), known to evoke synaptic plasticity, or long-term depolarization block by KCl, leading to homeostatic morphological changes, we show that actin stabilization needed for the enlargement of dendritic spines is dependent on PKD activity. Consequently, impaired PKD functions attenuate activity-dependent changes in hippocampal dendritic spines, including LTP formation, cause morphological alterations in vivo, and have deleterious consequences on spatial memory formation. We thus provide compelling evidence that PKD controls synaptic plasticity and learning by regulating actin stability in dendritic spines. PMID:26304723

  1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the chlamydial effector protein Tarp is species specific and not required for recruitment of actin.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Dawn R; Dooley, Cheryl A; Grieshaber, Scott S; Carabeo, Reynaldo A; Fields, Kenneth A; Hackstadt, Ted

    2005-07-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular pathogens that efficiently induce their endocytosis by susceptible eukaryotic host cells. Recently, a Chlamydia trachomatis type III secreted effector protein, Tarp, was found to be translocated and tyrosine phosphorylated at the site of entry and associated with the recruitment of actin that coincides with endocytosis. C. trachomatis Tarp possesses up to six direct repeats of approximately 50 amino acids each. The majority of the tyrosine residues are found within this repeat region. Here we have ectopically expressed distinct domains of Tarp in HeLa 229 cells and demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation occurs primarily within the repeat region, while recruitment of actin is mediated by the C-terminal domain of the protein. A comparison of other sequenced chlamydial genomes revealed that each contains an ortholog of Tarp, although Chlamydia muridarum, Chlamydophila caviae, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae Tarp lack the large repeat region. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting using an antiphosphotyrosine antibody show no evidence of phosphotyrosine at the site of entry of C. muridarum, C. caviae, and C. pneumoniae, although each species similarly recruits actin. Ectopic expression of full-length C. trachomatis and C. caviae Tarp confirmed that both recruit actin but only C. trachomatis Tarp is tyrosine phosphorylated. The data indicate that the C-terminal domain of Tarp is essential for actin recruitment and that tyrosine phosphorylation may not be an absolute requirement for actin recruitment. The results further suggest the potential for additional, unknown signal transduction pathways associated specifically with C. trachomatis.

  2. Mcp4, a Meiotic Coiled-Coil Protein, Plays a Role in F-Actin Positioning during Schizosaccharomyces pombe Meiosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaka, Ayami; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Saito, Takamune T.; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Some meiosis-specific proteins of Schizosaccharomyces pombe harbor coiled-coil motifs and play essential roles in meiotic progression. Here we describe Mcp4, a novel meiosis-specific protein whose expression is abruptly induced at the horsetail phase and which remains expressed until sporulation is finished. Fluorescence microscopic analysis revealed that Mcp4 alters its subcellular localization during meiosis in a manner that partially resembles the movement of F-actin during meiosis. Mcp4 and F-actin never colocalize; rather, they are located in a side-by-side manner. When forespore membrane formation begins at metaphase II, the Mcp4 signals assemble at the lagging face of the dividing nuclei. At this stage, they are sandwiched between F-actin and the nucleus. Mcp4, in turn, appears to sandwich F-actin with Meu14. In mcp4Δ cells at anaphase II, the F-actin, which is normally dumbbell-shaped, adopts an abnormal balloon shape. Spores of mcp4Δ cells were sensitive to NaCl, although their shape and viability were normal. Taken together, we conclude that Mcp4 plays a role in the accurate positioning of F-actin during S. pombe meiosis. PMID:17435009

  3. Actin filament-associated protein 1 is required for cSrc activity and secretory activation in the lactating mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Cunnick, Jess M; Kim, Stephanie; Hadsell, James; Collins, Stephen; Cerra, Carmine; Reiser, Patti; Flynn, Daniel C; Cho, Youngjin

    2014-01-01

    Actin filament-associated protein 1 (AFAP1) is an adaptor protein of cSrc that binds to filamentous actin and regulates the activity of this tyrosine kinase to affect changes to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. In breast and prostate cancer cells, AFAP1 has been shown to regulate cellular responses requiring actin cytoskeletal changes such as adhesion, invadopodia formation and invasion. However, a normal physiological role for AFAP1 has remained elusive. In this study, we generated an AFAP1 knockout mouse model that establishes a novel physiological role for AFAP1 in lactation. Specifically, these animals displayed a defect in lactation that resulted in an inability to efficiently nurse. Histologically, the mammary glands of the lactating knockout mice were distinguished by the accumulation of large cytoplasmic lipid droplets in the alveolar epithelial cells. There was a reduction in lipid synthesis and the expression of lipogenic genes without a corresponding reduction in the production of beta-casein, a milk protein. Furthermore, these defects were associated with histological and biochemical signs of precocious involution. This study also demonstrated that AFAP1 responds to prolactin, a lactogenic hormone, by forming a complex with cSrc and becoming tyrosine phosphorylated. Together, these observations pointed to a defect in secretory activation. Certain characteristics of this phenotype mirrored the defect in secretory activation in the cSrc knockout mouse, but most importantly, the activity of cSrc in the mammary gland was reduced during early lactation in the AFAP1 null mouse and the localization of active cSrc at the apical surface of luminal epithelial cells during lactation was selectively lost in the absence of AFAP1. These data define, for the first time, the requirement of AFAP1 for the spatial and temporal regulation of cSrc activity in the normal breast, specifically for milk production. PMID:25043309

  4. Folding funnels, binding funnels, and protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Kumar, S.; Ma, B.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    Folding funnels have been the focus of considerable attention during the last few years. These have mostly been discussed in the general context of the theory of protein folding. Here we extend the utility of the concept of folding funnels, relating them to biological mechanisms and function. In particular, here we describe the shape of the funnels in light of protein synthesis and folding; flexibility, conformational diversity, and binding mechanisms; and the associated binding funnels, illustrating the multiple routes and the range of complexed conformers. Specifically, the walls of the folding funnels, their crevices, and bumps are related to the complexity of protein folding, and hence to sequential vs. nonsequential folding. Whereas the former is more frequently observed in eukaryotic proteins, where the rate of protein synthesis is slower, the latter is more frequent in prokaryotes, with faster translation rates. The bottoms of the funnels reflect the extent of the flexibility of the proteins. Rugged floors imply a range of conformational isomers, which may be close on the energy landscape. Rather than undergoing an induced fit binding mechanism, the conformational ensembles around the rugged bottoms argue that the conformers, which are most complementary to the ligand, will bind to it with the equilibrium shifting in their favor. Furthermore, depending on the extent of the ruggedness, or of the smoothness with only a few minima, we may infer nonspecific, broad range vs. specific binding. In particular, folding and binding are similar processes, with similar underlying principles. Hence, the shape of the folding funnel of the monomer enables making reasonable guesses regarding the shape of the corresponding binding funnel. Proteins having a broad range of binding, such as proteolytic enzymes or relatively nonspecific endonucleases, may be expected to have not only rugged floors in their folding funnels, but their binding funnels will also behave similarly

  5. Thymosin beta4: actin regulation and more.

    PubMed

    Yarmola, Elena G; Klimenko, Evguenia S; Fujita, Go; Bubb, Michael R

    2007-09-01

    The intracellular function of thymosin beta(4) is not limited to simple sequestration of globular actin. Our recent studies revealed that thymosin beta(4) affects actin critical concentration and forms a ternary complex with actin and profilin. The consequences of this complex formation can be very significant. Our new data demonstrate that it is likely that profilin affects binding of thymosin beta(4) to actin in the ternary complex through allosteric changes in actin rather than through competition for the binding site. The N- and C-terminal thymosin beta(4) helices are known to be unstructured in aqueous solution and to adopt helical conformation in organic solvents or upon binding to actin. Osmolytes stabilize protein structure, and TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide) specifically stabilizes hydrogen bonds. This increases affinity of intact thymosin beta(4) to actin significantly, but the increase is much less for thymosin beta(4) sulfoxide. Our data show that oxidation does not alter binding of profilin to form a ternary complex, and therefore it is very likely that there is no direct steric interference by methionine 6 of thymosin beta(4). Rather, since TMAO has little effect on thymosin beta(4) sulfoxide, this observation is consistent with the hypothesis that methionine oxidation prevents helix transition. The experiment with truncated versions of thymosin beta(4) also supports this hypothesis. Oxidation and formation of the helices are important for both intra- and extracellular properties of thymosin beta(4). We found that actin and, in lesser extent, profilin-actin complex protect thymosin beta(4) from oxidation.

  6. Membrane trafficking in protozoa SNARE proteins, H+-ATPase, actin, and other key players in ciliates.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Due to their well-defined pathways of vesicle trafficking and manyfold mutants ciliates have served as good model systems. Further studies required the development of databases, now available for Paramecium and Tetrahymena. A variety of key players have been identified and characterized based on BLAST search, domain analysis, localization, and gene-silencing studies. They include NSF (N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor), SNAREs (soluble NSF attachment protein [SNAP] receptors), the H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) and actin, while Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) and Rab-type small GTPases, COPs (coatamer proteins) and many others remain to be elucidated. The number of SNAREs, H(+)-ATPase subunits, and actins ever found within one cell type are unexpectedly high and most of the manifold vesicle types seem to be endowed with specific molecular components pertinent to trafficking. As in higher eukaryotes, multifactorial targeting likely occurs. It appears that, in parallel to higher organisms, ciliates have evolved a similar structural and molecular complexity of vesicle trafficking.

  7. Fascin, an Actin-bundling Protein, Induces Membrane Protrusions and Increases Cell Motility of Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Shigeko; Yamakita, Yoshihiko; Ono, Shoichiro; Matsumura, Fumio

    1998-01-01

    Fascin is an actin-bundling protein that is found in membrane ruffles, microspikes, and stress fibers. The expression of fascin is greatly increased in many transformed cells, as well as in specialized normal cells including neuronal cells and antigen-presenting dendritic cells. A morphological characteristic common to these cells expressing high levels of fascin is the development of many membrane protrusions in which fascin is predominantly present. To examine whether fascin contributes to the alterations in microfilament organization at the cell periphery, we have expressed fascin in LLC-PK1 epithelial cells to levels as high as those found in transformed cells and in specialized normal cells. Expression of fascin results in large changes in morphology, the actin cytoskeleton, and cell motility: fascin-transfected cells form an increased number of longer and thicker microvilli on apical surfaces, extend lamellipodia-like structures at basolateral surfaces, and show disorganization of cell–cell contacts. Cell migration activity is increased by 8–17 times when assayed by modified Boyden chamber. Microinjection of a fascin protein into LLC-PK1 cells causes similar morphological alterations including the induction of lamellipodia at basolateral surfaces and formation of an increased number of microvilli on apical surfaces. Furthermore, microinjection of fascin into REF-52 cells, normal fibroblasts, induces the formation of many lamellipodia at all regions of cell periphery. These results together suggest that fascin is directly responsible for membrane protrusions through reorganization of the microfilament cytoskeleton at the cell periphery. PMID:9571235

  8. Pattern formation in actin gels: A study in the mechanics of gels formed by the important cytoskeletal protein actin, especially as applied to cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balter, Ariel

    We have studied pattern formation in actin gels to better understand how they function in biological systems, especially in the motility mechanism used by some pathogenic bacteria such as Listeria. By coating themselves with certain enzymes, these bacteria appropriate actin (a protein) from the surrounding host cell's cytoplasm and cause a network or "gel" of actin filaments to grow on their outer surface. As the resulting "comet tail" shaped protrusion grows, it pushes the bacterium away. In experiments, polystyrene beads coated with the same enzymes will also generate comet tails and swim in a very similar manner. However, these bead experiments have also generated anomalous results such as the formation of many comet tails. In some experiments, when two comet tails formed they systematically grew into regular, oppositely handed helices. The formation of any comet tails on a bead poses a physical conundrum. The bacterial enzyme coating is asymmetrical so the comet tail forms in a particular place. But the beads are symmetrical, so comet tails formation constitutes symmetry breaking and spontaneous pattern formation. We have modeled this process as a competition between elastic energy (which favors many tails) and chemical energy (which favors few tails). Our analytical model explains the factors that experimentally determine the number of tails, and numerical simulations confirm these predictions. To understand the helical tails, we did extensive data analysis involving image processing, statistical analysis and mathematical modeling of images of the helical tails. We identified some important features of how the twin tails form. For instance, the tail growth rate is independent of drag force, and bead rotation must accompany helical tail formation. We also created a physical model for helical growth. Numerical simulations of our model show that at very low Reynolds number, a cylindrical object growing under the conditions of an actin comet tail can spontaneously

  9. Cofilin is a Component of Intranuclear and Cytoplasmic Actin Rods Induced in Cultured Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Eisuke; Iida, Kazuko; Yonezawa, Naoto; Koyasu, Shigeo; Yahara, Ichiro; Sakai, Hikoichi

    1987-08-01

    Incubation of cultured cells under specific conditions induces a dramatic change in the actin organization: induction of intranuclear and/or cytoplasmic actin rods (actin paracrystal-like intracellular structures). We have found that cofilin, a 21-kDa actin-binding protein, is a component of these rods. Antibodies directed against cofilin labeled intranuclear actin rods induced in cells treated with dimethyl sulfoxide or exposed to heat shock and also labeled cytoplasmic actin rods induced in cells incubated in specific salt buffers. Moreover, we found that these actin rods are not stained with fluorescent phalloidin derivatives at all and appear to be right-handed helices, different from straight bundles of F-actin such as stress fibers. In vitro experiments revealed that cofilin and phalloidin compete with each other for binding to F-actin. Since cofilin and phalloidin have the ability to stoichiometrically bind actin molecule in the filament in vitro, the above results seem to suggest that cofilin directly binds to actin molecule in nearly an equimolar ratio in these rods. We call these rods ``actin/cofilin rods.''

  10. Actin dynamics and cofilin-actin rods in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Bamburg, James R.; Bernstein, Barbara W.

    2017-01-01

    Cytoskeletal abnormalities and synaptic loss, typical of both familial and sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD), are induced by diverse stresses such as neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and energetic stress, each of which may be initiated or enhanced by proinflammatory cytokines or amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Extracellular Aβ-containing plaques and intracellular phospho-tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles are postmortem pathologies required to confirm AD and have been the focus of most studies. However, AD brain, but not normal brain, also have increased levels of cytoplasmic rod-shaped bundles of filaments composed of ADF/cofilin-actin in a 1:1 complex (rods). Cofilin, the major ADF/cofilin isoform in mammalian neurons, severs actin filaments at low cofilin/actin ratios and stabilizes filaments at high cofilin/actin ratios. It binds cooperatively to ADP-actin subunits in F-actin. Cofilin is activated by dephosphorylation and may be oxidized in stressed neurons to form disulfide-linked dimers, required for bundling cofilin-actin filaments into stable rods. Rods form within neurites causing synaptic dysfunction by sequestering cofilin, disrupting normal actin dynamics, blocking transport, and exacerbating mitochondrial membrane potential loss. Aβ and proinflammatory cytokines induce rods through a cellular prion protein-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase and production of reactive oxygen species. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of cofilin biochemistry, rod formation, and the development of cognitive deficits. We will then discuss rod formation as a molecular pathway for synapse loss that may be common between all three prominent current AD hypotheses, thus making rods an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26873625

  11. Direct observation of dendritic actin filament networks nucleated by Arp2/3 complex and WASP/Scar proteins.

    PubMed

    Blanchoin, L; Amann, K J; Higgs, H N; Marchand, J B; Kaiser, D A; Pollard, T D

    2000-04-27

    Most nucleated cells crawl about by extending a pseudopod that is driven by the polymerization of actin filaments in the cytoplasm behind the leading edge of the plasma membrane. These actin filaments are linked into a network by Y-branches, with the pointed end of each filament attached to the side of another filament and the rapidly growing barbed end facing forward. Because Arp2/3 complex nucleates actin polymerization and links the pointed end to the side of another filament in vitro, a dendritic nucleation model has been proposed in which Arp2/3 complex initiates filaments from the sides of older filaments. Here we report, by using a light microscopy assay, many new features of the mechanism. Branching occurs during, rather than after, nucleation by Arp2/3 complex activated by the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) or Scar protein; capping protein and profilin act synergistically with Arp2/3 complex to favour branched nucleation; phosphate release from aged actin filaments favours dissociation of Arp2/3 complex from the pointed ends of filaments; and branches created by Arp2/3 complex are relatively rigid. These properties result in the automatic assembly of the branched actin network after activation by proteins of the WASP/Scar family and favour the selective disassembly of proximal regions of the network.

  12. Control of actin filament dynamics at barbed ends by WH2 domains: from capping to permissive and processive assembly.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Marie-France; Pernier, Julien; Avvaru, Balendu Sankara

    2013-10-01

    WH2 domains are multifunctional regulators of actin assembly that can either sequester G-actin or allow polarized barbed end growth. They all bind similarly to a hydrophobic pocket at the barbed face of actin. Depending on their electrostatic environment, WH2 domains can nucleate actin assembly by facilitating the formation of prenuclei dimers along the canonical spontaneous assembly pathway. They also modulate filament barbed end dynamics in a versatile fashion, acting either as barbed end cappers or assisting barbed end growth like profilin or uncapping barbed ends and potentially mediating processive elongation like formins when they are dimerized. Tandem repeats of WH2 domains can sever filaments and either remain bound to created barbed ends like gelsolin, or strip off an ADP-actin subunit from the severed polymer end, depending on their relative affinity for terminal ADP-F-actin or ADP-G-actin. In summary, WH2 domains recapitulate all known elementary regulatory functions so far found in individual actin-binding proteins. By combining different discrete sets of these multifunctional properties, they acquire specific functions in various actin-based processes, and participate in activities as diverse as filament branching, filopodia extension, or actin remodeling in ciliogenesis and asymmetric meiotic division. They also integrate these functions with other actin-binding motifs present either in the same protein or in a complex with another protein, expanding the range of complexity in actin regulation. The details of their molecular mechanisms and the underlying structural basis provide exciting avenues in actin research.

  13. The small G-protein MglA connects to the MreB actin cytoskeleton at bacterial focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Treuner-Lange, Anke; Macia, Eric; Guzzo, Mathilde; Hot, Edina; Faure, Laura M.; Jakobczak, Beata; Espinosa, Leon; Alcor, Damien; Ducret, Adrien; Keilberg, Daniela; Castaing, Jean Philippe; Lacas Gervais, Sandra; Franco, Michel

    2015-01-01

    In Myxococcus xanthus the gliding motility machinery is assembled at the leading cell pole to form focal adhesions, translocated rearward to propel the cell, and disassembled at the lagging pole. We show that MglA, a Ras-like small G-protein, is an integral part of this machinery. In this function, MglA stimulates the assembly of the motility complex by directly connecting it to the MreB actin cytoskeleton. Because the nucleotide state of MglA is regulated spatially and MglA only binds MreB in the guanosine triphosphate–bound form, the motility complexes are assembled at the leading pole and dispersed at the lagging pole where the guanosine triphosphatase activating protein MglB disrupts the MglA–MreB interaction. Thus, MglA acts as a nucleotide-dependent molecular switch to regulate the motility machinery spatially. The function of MreB in motility is independent of its function in peptidoglycan synthesis, representing a coopted function. Our findings highlight a new function for the MreB cytoskeleton and suggest that G-protein–cytoskeleton interactions are a universally conserved feature. PMID:26169353

  14. Regulatory role of the second gelsolin-like domain of Caenorhabditis elegans gelsolin-like protein 1 (GSNL-1) in its calcium-dependent conformation and actin-regulatory activities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongmei; Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans gelsolin-like protein-1 (GSNL-1) is an unconventional member of the gelsolin family of actin-regulatory proteins. Unlike typical gelsolin-related proteins with three or six G domains, GSNL-1 has four gelsolin-like (G) domains (G1–G4) and exhibits calcium-dependent actin filament severing and capping activities. The first G domain (G1) of GSNL-1 is necessary for its actin-regulatory activities. However, how other domains in GSNL-1 participate in regulation of its functions is not understood. Here, we report biochemical evidence that the second G domain (G2) of GSNL-1 has a regulatory role in its calcium-dependent conformation and actin-regulatory activities. Comparison of the sequences of gelsolin-related proteins from various species indicates that sequences of G2 are highly conserved. Among the conserved residues in G2, we focused on D162 of GSNL-1, since equivalent residues in gelsolin and severin are part of the calcium-binding sites and is a pathogenic mutation site in human gelsolin causing familial amyloidosis, Finnish-type. The D162N mutation does not alter the inactive and fully calcium-activated states of GSNL-1 for actin filament severing (at 20 nM GSNL-1) and capping activities (at 50 nM GSNL-1). However, under these conditions, the mutant shows reduced calcium sensitivity for activation. By contrast, the D162N mutation strongly enhances susceptibility of GSNL-1 to chymotrypsin digestion only at high calcium concentrations but not at low calcium concentrations. The mutation also reduces affinity of GSNL-1 with actin monomers. These results suggest that G2 of GSNL-1 functions as a regulatory domain for its calcium-dependent actin-regulatory activities by mediating conformational changes of the GSNL-1 molecule. PMID:23475707

  15. Mechanism of Actin Filament Bundling by Fascin

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Yang, Changsong; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-03-07

    Fascin is the main actin filament bundling protein in filopodia. Because of the important role filopodia play in cell migration, fascin is emerging as a major target for cancer drug discovery. However, an understanding of the mechanism of bundle formation by fascin is critically lacking. Fascin consists of four {beta}-trefoil domains. Here, we show that fascin contains two major actin-binding sites, coinciding with regions of high sequence conservation in {beta}-trefoil domains 1 and 3. The site in {beta}-trefoil-1 is located near the binding site of the fascin inhibitor macroketone and comprises residue Ser-39, whose phosphorylation by protein kinase C down-regulates actin bundling and formation of filopodia. The site in {beta}-trefoil-3 is related by pseudo-2-fold symmetry to that in {beta}-trefoil-1. The two sites are {approx}5 nm apart, resulting in a distance between actin filaments in the bundle of {approx}8.1 nm. Residue mutations in both sites disrupt bundle formation in vitro as assessed by co-sedimentation with actin and electron microscopy and severely impair formation of filopodia in cells as determined by rescue experiments in fascin-depleted cells. Mutations of other areas of the fascin surface also affect actin bundling and formation of filopodia albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that, in addition to the two major actin-binding sites, fascin makes secondary contacts with other filaments in the bundle. In a high resolution crystal structure of fascin, molecules of glycerol and polyethylene glycol are bound in pockets located within the two major actin-binding sites. These molecules could guide the rational design of new anticancer fascin inhibitors.

  16. The kinesin-like proteins, KAC1/2, regulate actin dynamics underlying chloroplast light-avoidance in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Yen-Chen; Bibeau, Jeffrey P; Lemoi, Kyle P; Tüzel, Erkan; Vidali, Luis

    2015-01-01

    In plants, light determines chloroplast position; these organelles show avoidance and accumulation responses in high and low fluence-rate light, respectively. Chloroplast motility in response to light is driven by cytoskeletal elements. The actin cytoskeleton mediates chloroplast photorelocation responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. In contrast, in the moss Physcomitrella patens, both, actin filaments and microtubules can transport chloroplasts. Because of the surprising evidence that two kinesin-like proteins (called KACs) are important for actin-dependent chloroplast photorelocation in vascular plants, we wanted to determine the cytoskeletal system responsible for the function of these proteins in moss. We performed gene-specific silencing using RNA interference in P. patens. We confirmed existing reports using gene knockouts, that PpKAC1 and PpKAC2 are required for chloroplast dispersion under uniform white light conditions, and that the two proteins are functionally equivalent. To address the specific cytoskeletal elements responsible for motility, this loss-of-function approach was combined with cytoskeleton-targeted drug studies. We found that, in P. patens, these KACs mediate the chloroplast light-avoidance response in an actin filament-dependent, rather than a microtubule-dependent manner. Using correlation-decay analysis of cytoskeletal dynamics, we found that PpKAC stabilizes cortical actin filaments, but has no effect on microtubule dynamics.

  17. Mechanics of composite actin networks: in vitro and cellular perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2014-03-01

    Actin filaments and associated actin binding proteins play an essential role in governing the mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells. Even though cells have multiple actin binding proteins (ABPs) that exist simultaneously to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of the cellular cytoskeleton, how these proteins work together to determine the properties of actin networks is not well understood. The ABP, palladin, is essential for the integrity of cell morphology and movement during development. Palladin coexists with alpha-actinin in stress fibers and focal adhesions and binds to both actin and alpha-actinin. To obtain insight into how mutually interacting actin crosslinking proteins modulate the properties of actin networks, we have characterized the micro-structure and mechanics of actin networks crosslinked with palladin and alpha-actinin. Our studies on composite networks of alpha-actinin/palladin/actin show that palladin and alpha-actinin synergistically determine network viscoelasticity. We have further examined the role of palladin in cellular force generation and mechanosensing. Traction force microscopy revealed that TAFs are sensitive to substrate stiffness as they generate larger forces on substrates of increased stiffness. Contrary to expectations, knocking down palladin increased the forces generated by cells, and also inhibited the ability to sense substrate stiffness for very stiff gels. This was accompanied by significant differences in the actin organization and adhesion dynamics of palladin knock down cells. Perturbation experiments also suggest altered myosin activity in palladin KD cells. Our results suggest that the actin crosslinkers such as palladin and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant behavior as in cancer metastasis.

  18. Aspects of Protein, Chemistry, Part II: Oxygen-Binding Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Compares differences in function and behavior of two oxygen-binding proteins, myoglobin found in muscle and hemoglobin found in blood. Describes the mechanism of oxygen-binding and allosteric effect in hemoglobin; also describes the effect of pH on the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen. (CS)

  19. The control of actin nucleotide exchange by thymosin beta 4 and profilin. A potential regulatory mechanism for actin polymerization in cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt-Clermont, P J; Furman, M I; Wachsstock, D; Safer, D; Nachmias, V T; Pollard, T D

    1992-01-01

    We present evidence for a new mechanism by which two major actin monomer binding proteins, thymosin beta 4 and profilin, may control the rate and the extent of actin polymerization in cells. Both proteins bind actin monomers transiently with a stoichiometry of 1:1. When bound to actin, thymosin beta 4 strongly inhibits the exchange of the nucleotide bound to actin by blocking its dissociation, while profilin catalytically promotes nucleotide exchange. Because both proteins exchange rapidly between actin molecules, low concentrations of profilin can overcome the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of thymosin beta 4 on the nucleotide exchange. These reactions may allow variations in profilin concentration (which may be regulated by membrane polyphosphoinositide metabolism) to control the ratio of ATP-actin to ADP-actin. Because ATP-actin subunits polymerize more readily than ADP-