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Sample records for actin cross-linking factor

  1. Microtubule-Actin Cross-Linking Factor 1: Domains, Interaction Partners, and Tissue-Specific Functions.

    PubMed

    Goryunov, Dmitry; Liem, Ronald K H

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of most eukaryotic cells is composed of three principal filamentous components: actin filaments, microtubules (MTs), and intermediate filaments. It is a highly dynamic system that plays crucial roles in a wide range of cellular processes, including migration, adhesion, cytokinesis, morphogenesis, intracellular traffic and signaling, and structural flexibility. Among the large number of cytoskeleton-associated proteins characterized to date, microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1 (MACF1) is arguably the most versatile integrator and modulator of cytoskeleton-related processes. MACF1 belongs to the plakin family of proteins, and within it, to the spectraplakin subfamily. These proteins are characterized by the ability to bridge MT and actin cytoskeletal networks in a dynamic fashion, which underlies their involvement in the regulation of cell migration, axonal extension, and vesicular traffic. Studying MACF1 functions has provided insights not only into the regulation of the cytoskeleton but also into molecular mechanisms of both normal cellular physiology and cellular pathology. Multiple MACF1 isoforms exist, composed of a large variety of alternatively spliced domains. Each of these domains mediates a specific set of interactions and functions. These functions are manifested in tissue and cell-specific phenotypes observed in conditional MACF1 knockout mice. The conditional models described to date reveal critical roles of MACF1 in mammalian skin, nervous system, heart muscle, and intestinal epithelia. Complete elimination of MACF1 is early embryonic lethal, indicating an essential role for MACF1 in early development. Further studies of MACF1 domains and their interactions will likely reveal multiple new roles of this protein in various tissues. PMID:26778566

  2. Actin polymerization is stimulated by actin cross-linking protein palladin.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H; Beck, Moriah R

    2016-02-15

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the co-ordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. In the present study, we show that the actin-binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro cross-linking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of globular or monomeric actin (G-actin), akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or through conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  3. Polymorphism of Cross-Linked Actin Networks in Giant Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limozin, Laurent; Sackmann, Erich

    2002-09-01

    Actin networks cross-linked by natural linkers α-actinin and filamin are generated in giant vesicles by polymerization through ionophore-mediated influx of Mg2+. α-actinin induces the formation of randomly linked networks at 25 °C which transform at <15 °C into spiderweblike gels or ringlike bundles depending on the vesicle size. Muscle filamin forms ringlike structures under all experimental conditions which can supercoil by subsequent Mg2+ addition. The polymorphism is rationalized in terms of recent models of bivalent ion coupled semiflexible polyelectrolytes and by considering the topology of the linkers.

  4. Arabidopsis CROLIN1, a Novel Plant Actin-binding Protein, Functions in Cross-linking and Stabilizing Actin Filaments*

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Honglei; Li, Jisheng; Zhu, Jingen; Fan, Tingting; Qian, Dong; Zhou, Yuelong; Wang, Jiaojiao; Ren, Haiyun; Xiang, Yun; An, Lizhe

    2013-01-01

    Higher order actin filament structures are necessary for cytoplasmic streaming, organelle movement, and other physiological processes. However, the mechanism by which the higher order cytoskeleton is formed in plants remains unknown. In this study, we identified a novel actin-cross-linking protein family (named CROLIN) that is well conserved only in the plant kingdom. There are six isovariants of CROLIN in the Arabidopsis genome, with CROLIN1 specifically expressed in pollen. In vitro biochemical analyses showed that CROLIN1 is a novel actin-cross-linking protein with binding and stabilizing activities. Remarkably, CROLIN1 can cross-link actin bundles into actin networks. CROLIN1 loss of function induces pollen germination and pollen tube growth hypersensitive to latrunculin B. All of these results demonstrate that CROLIN1 may play an important role in stabilizing and remodeling actin filaments by binding to and cross-linking actin filaments. PMID:24072702

  5. Actin cross-link assembly and disassembly mechanics for alpha-Actinin and fascin.

    PubMed

    Courson, David S; Rock, Ronald S

    2010-08-20

    Self-assembly of complex structures is commonplace in biology but often poorly understood. In the case of the actin cytoskeleton, a great deal is known about the components that include higher order structures, such as lamellar meshes, filopodial bundles, and stress fibers. Each of these cytoskeletal structures contains actin filaments and cross-linking proteins, but the role of cross-linking proteins in the initial steps of structure formation has not been clearly elucidated. We employ an optical trapping assay to investigate the behaviors of two actin cross-linking proteins, fascin and alpha-actinin, during the first steps of structure assembly. Here, we show that these proteins have distinct binding characteristics that cause them to recognize and cross-link filaments that are arranged with specific geometries. alpha-Actinin is a promiscuous cross-linker, linking filaments over all angles. It retains this flexibility after cross-links are formed, maintaining a connection even when the link is rotated. Conversely, fascin is extremely selective, only cross-linking filaments in a parallel orientation. Surprisingly, bundles formed by either protein are extremely stable, persisting for over 0.5 h in a continuous wash. However, using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescence decay experiments, we find that the stable fascin population can be rapidly competed away by free fascin. We present a simple avidity model for this cross-link dissociation behavior. Together, these results place constraints on how cytoskeletal structures assemble, organize, and disassemble in vivo. PMID:20551315

  6. H2O2-treated actin: assembly and polymer interactions with cross-linking proteins.

    PubMed Central

    DalleDonne, I; Milzani, A; Colombo, R

    1995-01-01

    During inflammation, hydrogen peroxide, produced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, provokes cell death mainly by disarranging filamentous (polymerized) actin (F-actin). To show the molecular mechanism(s) by which hydrogen peroxide could alter actin dynamics, we analyzed the ability of H2O2-treated actin samples to polymerize as well as the suitability of actin polymers (from oxidized monomers) to interact with cross-linking proteins. H2O2-treated monomeric (globular) actin (G-actin) shows an altered time course of polymerization. The increase in the lag phase and the lowering in both the polymerization rate and the polymerization extent have been evidenced. Furthermore, steady-state actin polymers, from oxidized monomers, are more fragmented than control polymers. This seems to be ascribable to the enhanced fragility of oxidized filaments rather than to the increase in the nucleation activity, which markedly falls. These facts; along with the unsuitability of actin polymers from oxidized monomers to interact with both filamin and alpha-actinin, suggest that hydrogen peroxide influences actin dynamics mainly by changing the F-actin structure. H2O2, via the oxidation of actin thiols (in particular, the sulfhydryl group of Cys-374), likely alters the actin C-terminus, influencing both subunit/subunit interactions and the spatial structure of the binding sites for cross-linking proteins in F-actin. We suggest that most of the effects of hydrogen peroxide on actin could be explained in the light of the "structural connectivity," demonstrated previously in actin. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 9 PMID:8599677

  7. A Combination of Actin Treadmilling and Cross-Linking Drives Contraction of Random Actomyosin Arrays.

    PubMed

    Oelz, Dietmar B; Rubinstein, Boris Y; Mogilner, Alex

    2015-11-01

    We investigate computationally the self-organization and contraction of an initially random actomyosin ring. In the framework of a detailed physical model for a ring of cross-linked actin filaments and myosin-II clusters, we derive the force balance equations and solve them numerically. We find that to contract, actin filaments have to treadmill and to be sufficiently cross linked, and myosin has to be processive. The simulations reveal how contraction scales with mechanochemical parameters. For example, they show that the ring made of longer filaments generates greater force but contracts slower. The model predicts that the ring contracts with a constant rate proportional to the initial ring radius if either myosin is released from the ring during contraction and actin filaments shorten, or if myosin is retained in the ring, while the actin filament number decreases. We demonstrate that a balance of actin nucleation and compression-dependent disassembly can also sustain contraction. Finally, the model demonstrates that with time pattern formation takes place in the ring, worsening the contractile process. The more random the actin dynamics are, the higher the contractility will be. PMID:26536259

  8. Intrastrand cross-linked actin between Gln-41 and Cys-374. I. Mapping of sites cross-linked in F-actin by N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl) putrescine.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, G; Mák, M; Kim, E; Elzinga, M; Muhlrad, A; Reisler, E

    1998-12-22

    A new heterobifunctional photo-cross-linking reagent, N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)-putrescine (ANP), was synthesized and covalently bound to Gln-41 of rabbit skeletal muscle actin by a bacterial transglutaminase-mediated reaction. Up to 1.0 mol of the reagent was incorporated per mole of G-actin; at least 90% of it was bound to Gln-41 while a minor fraction (about 8%) was attached to Gln-59. The labeled G-actin was polymerized, and the resulting F-actin was intermolecularly cross-linked by irradiation with UV light. The labeled and cross-linked peptides were isolated from either a complete or limited tryptic digest of cross-linked actin. In the limited digest the tryptic cleavage was restricted to arginine by succinylation of the lysyl residues. N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry indicated that the cross-linked peptides contained residues 40-50 (or 40-62 in the arginine limited digest) and residues 373-375, and that the actual cross-linking took place between Gln-41 and Cys-374. This latter finding was also supported by the inhibition of Cys-374 labeling with a fluorescent probe in the cross-linked actin. The dynamic length of ANP, between 11.1 and 12.5 A, constrains to that range the distance between the gamma-carboxyl group of Gln-41 in one monomer and the sulfur atom of Cys-374 in an adjacent monomer. This is consistent with the distances between these two residues on adjacent monomers of the same strand in the long-pitch helix in the structural models of F-actin [Holmes, K. C., Popp, D., Gebhard, W., and Kabsch, W. (1990) Nature 347, 44-49 and Lorenz, M., Popp, D., and Holmes, K. C. (1993) J. Mol. Biol. 234, 826-836]. The effect of cross-linking on the function of actin is described in the companion papers. PMID:9922144

  9. Motion in partially and fully cross-linked F-actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Eliza; Ehrlicher, Allen; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Single molecule experiments have measured stall forces and procession rates of molecular motors on isolated cytoskeletal fibers in Newtonian fluids. But in the cell, these motors are transporting cargo through a highly complex cytoskeletal network. To compare these single molecule results to the forces exerted by motors within the cell, an evaluation of the response of the cytoskeletal network is needed. Using magnetic tweezers and fluorescence confocal microscopy we observe and quantify the relationship between bead motion and filament response in F-actin networks both partially and fully cross-linked with filamin We find that when the transition from full to partial cross-linking is brought about by a decrease in cross-linker concentration there is a simultaneous decline in the elasticity of the network, but the response of the bead remains qualitatively similar. However, when the cross-linking is reduced through a shortening of the F-actin filaments the bead response is completely altered. The characteristics of the altered bead response will be discussed here.

  10. Myosin III-mediated cross-linking and stimulation of actin bundling activity of Espin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiyang; Li, Jianchao; Raval, Manmeet H; Yao, Ningning; Deng, Xiaoying; Lu, Qing; Nie, Si; Feng, Wei; Wan, Jun; Yengo, Christopher M; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-01-01

    Class III myosins (Myo3) and actin-bundling protein Espin play critical roles in regulating the development and maintenance of stereocilia in vertebrate hair cells, and their defects cause hereditary hearing impairments. Myo3 interacts with Espin1 through its tail homology I motif (THDI), however it is not clear how Myo3 specifically acts through Espin1 to regulate the actin bundle assembly and stabilization. Here we discover that Myo3 THDI contains a pair of repeat sequences capable of independently and strongly binding to the ankyrin repeats of Espin1, revealing an unexpected Myo3-mediated cross-linking mechanism of Espin1. The structures of Myo3 in complex with Espin1 not only elucidate the mechanism of the binding, but also reveal a Myo3-induced release of Espin1 auto-inhibition mechanism. We also provide evidence that Myo3-mediated cross-linking can further promote actin fiber bundling activity of Espin1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12856.001 PMID:26785147

  11. Prestressed F-actin networks cross-linked by hinged filamins replicate mechanical properties of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardel, M. L.; Nakamura, F.; Hartwig, J. H.; Crocker, J. C.; Stossel, T. P.; Weitz, D. A.

    2006-02-01

    We show that actin filaments, shortened to physiological lengths by gelsolin and cross-linked with recombinant human filamins (FLNs), exhibit dynamic elastic properties similar to those reported for live cells. To achieve elasticity values of comparable magnitude to those of cells, the in vitro network must be subjected to external prestress, which directly controls network elasticity. A molecular requirement for the strain-related behavior at physiological conditionsis a flexible hinge found in FLNa and some FLNb molecules. Basic physical properties of the in vitro filamin-F-actin network replicate the essential mechanical properties of living cells. This physical behavior could accommodate passive deformation and internal organelle trafficking at low strains yet resist externally or internally generated high shear forces. cytoskeleton | cell mechanics | nonlinear rheology

  12. Stress Enhanced Gelation in α-Actinin-4 Cross-linked Actin Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Norman; Broedersz, Chase; Depken, Martin; Becker, Daniel; Pollak, Martin; Mackintosh, Frederick; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    A hallmark of biopolymer networks is their exquisite sensitivity to stress, demonstrated for example, by pronounced nonlinear elastic stiffening. Typically, they also yield under increased static load, providing a mechanism to achieve fluid-like behavior. In this talk, I will demonstrate an unexpected dynamical behavior in biopolymer networks consisting of F-actin cross-linked by a physiological actin binding protein, α-Actinin-4. Applied stress actually enhances gelation of these networks by delaying the onset of structural relaxation and network flow, thereby extending the regime of solid-like behavior to much lower frequencies. By using human kidney disease-associated mutant cross-linkers with varying binding affinities, we propose a molecular origin for this stress-enhanced gelation: It arises from the increased binding affinity of the cross-linker under load, characteristic of catch-bond-like behavior. This property may have important biological implications for intracellular mechanics, representing as it does a qualitatively new class of material behavior.

  13. F-actin cross-linking enhances the stability of force generation in disordered actomyosin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wonyeong; Murrell, Michael P.; Kim, Taeyoon

    2015-12-01

    Myosin molecular motors and actin cross-linking proteins (ACPs) are known to mediate the generation and transmission of mechanical forces within the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton that drive major cellular processes such as cell division and migration. However, how motors and ACPs interact collectively over diverse timescales to modulate the time-dependent mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton remains unclear. In this study, we present a three-dimensional agent-based computational model of the cortical actomyosin network to quantitatively determine the effects of motor activity and the density and kinetics of ACPs on the accumulation and maintenance of mechanical tension within a disordered actomyosin network. We found that motors accumulate large stress quickly by behaving as temporary cross-linkers although this stress is relaxed over time unless there are sufficient passive ACPs to stabilize the network. Stabilization by ACPs helps motors to generate forces up to their maximum potential, leading to significant enhancement of the efficiency and stability of stress generation. Thus, we demonstrated that the force-dependent kinetics of ACP dissociation plays a critical role for the accumulation and sustainment of stress and the structural remodeling of networks.

  14. Cytokines and growth factors cross-link heparan sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Migliorini, Elisa; Thakar, Dhruv; Kühnle, Jens; Sadir, Rabia; Dyer, Douglas P.; Li, Yong; Sun, Changye; Volkman, Brian F.; Handel, Tracy M.; Coche-Guerente, Liliane; Fernig, David G.; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Richter, Ralf P.

    2015-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS), present at the surface of most cells and ubiquitous in extracellular matrix, binds many soluble extracellular signalling molecules such as chemokines and growth factors, and regulates their transport and effector functions. It is, however, unknown whether upon binding HS these proteins can affect the long-range structure of HS. To test this idea, we interrogated a supramolecular model system, in which HS chains grafted to streptavidin-functionalized oligoethylene glycol monolayers or supported lipid bilayers mimic the HS-rich pericellular or extracellular matrix, with the biophysical techniques quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). We were able to control and characterize the supramolecular presentation of HS chains—their local density, orientation, conformation and lateral mobility—and their interaction with proteins. The chemokine CXCL12α (or SDF-1α) rigidified the HS film, and this effect was due to protein-mediated cross-linking of HS chains. Complementary measurements with CXCL12α mutants and the CXCL12γ isoform provided insight into the molecular mechanism underlying cross-linking. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), which has three HS binding sites, was also found to cross-link HS, but FGF-9, which has just one binding site, did not. Based on these data, we propose that the ability to cross-link HS is a generic feature of many cytokines and growth factors, which depends on the architecture of their HS binding sites. The ability to change matrix organization and physico-chemical properties (e.g. permeability and rigidification) implies that the functions of cytokines and growth factors may not simply be confined to the activation of cognate cellular receptors. PMID:26269427

  15. The actinin family of actin cross-linking proteins - a genetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Anita C H; Young, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Actinins are one of the major actin cross-linking proteins found in virtually all cell types and are the ancestral proteins of a larger family that includes spectrin, dystrophin and utrophin. Invertebrates have a single actinin-encoding ACTN gene, while mammals have four. Mutations in all four human genes have now been linked to heritable diseases or traits. ACTN1 mutations cause macrothrombocytopenia, a platelet disorder characterized by excessive bleeding. ACTN2 mutations have been linked to a range of cardiomyopathies, and ACTN4 mutations cause a kidney condition called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Intriguingly, approximately 16 % of people worldwide are homozygous for a nonsense mutation in ACTN3 that abolishes actinin-3 protein expression. This ACTN3 null allele has undergone recent positive selection in specific human populations, which may be linked to improved endurance and adaptation to colder climates. In this review we discuss the human genetics of the ACTN gene family, as well as ACTN gene knockout studies in several model organisms. Observations from both of these areas provide insights into the evolution and cellular functions of actinins. PMID:26312134

  16. Reversible mechano-memory in sheared cross-linked actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Sayantan; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2015-03-01

    Is it possible to control the shear modulus of a material mechanically? We reconstitute a network of actin filaments cross-linked with Filamin A and show that the system has remarkable property to respond under shear in a deformation history dependent manner. When a large shear stress pulse is applied to the system, the system remembers the direction of deformation long after the stress pulse is removed. For the next loading cycle, shear response of the system becomes anisotropic; if the applied pulse direction is same as the previous one, the system behaves like a viscoelastic solid but a transient liquefaction is observed if the pulse direction is reversed. Imaging and normal force measurements under shear suggest that this anisotropic response comes from stretching and bending dominated deformation directions induced by the large shear deformation giving rise to a direction dependent mechano-memory. The long time scale over which the memory effect persists has relevance in various deformations in cellular and multicellular systems. S.M. acknowledges support from a Kadanoff-Rice Post Doctoral fellowship from MRSEC, University of Chicago.

  17. An affine continuum mechanical model for cross-linked F-actin networks with compliant linker proteins.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Unterberger, Michael J; Ogden, Ray W

    2014-10-01

    Cross-linked actin networks are important building blocks of the cytoskeleton. In order to gain deeper insight into the interpretation of experimental data on actin networks, adequate models are required. In this paper we introduce an affine constitutive network model for cross-linked F-actin networks based on nonlinear continuum mechanics, and specialize it in order to reproduce the experimental behavior of in vitro reconstituted model networks. The model is based on the elastic properties of single filaments embedded in an isotropic matrix such that the overall properties of the composite are described by a free-energy function. In particular, we are able to obtain the experimentally determined shear and normal stress responses of cross-linked actin networks typically observed in rheometer tests. In the present study an extensive analysis is performed by applying the proposed model network to a simple shear deformation. The single filament model is then extended by incorporating the compliance of cross-linker proteins and further extended by including viscoelasticity. All that is needed for the finite element implementation is the constitutive model for the filaments, the linkers and the matrix, and the associated elasticity tensor in either the Lagrangian or Eulerian formulation. The model facilitates parameter studies of experimental setups such as micropipette aspiration experiments and we present such studies to illustrate the efficacy of this modeling approach. PMID:25043658

  18. Actin bundles cross-linked with [Formula: see text]-actinin studied by nanobeam X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Töpperwien, M; Priebe, M; Salditt, T

    2016-07-01

    We have performed scanning nano-beam small-angle X-ray scattering (nano-SAXS) experiments on in vitro-formed actin filaments cross-linked with [Formula: see text]-actinin. The experimental method combines a high resolution in reciprocal space with a real space resolution as given by the spot-size of the nano-focused X-ray beam, and opens up new opportunities to study local super-molecular structures of actin filaments. In this first proof-of-concept, we show that the local orientation of actin bundles formed by the cross-linking can be visualized by the X-ray darkfield maps. The filament bundles give rise to highly anisotropic diffraction patterns showing distinct streaks perpendicular to the bundle axes. Interestingly, some diffraction patterns exhibit a fine structure in the form of intensity modulations allowing for a more detailed analysis of the order within the bundles. A first empirical quantification of these modulations is included in the present work. PMID:26715112

  19. Hierarchical Cross-linked F-actin Networks: Understanding Structure and Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Linda; Nguyen, Lam

    2009-11-01

    The protein, F-actin provides us with an interesting system in which to investigate the assembly properties of semi-flexible filaments in the presence of cross-linkers. Recently it was observed that F-actin, in the presence of the cross-linker alpha-actinin at high molar ratios will generate a novel hierarchical network of filament bundles. We investigate this system using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, confocal microscopy and x-ray scattering. We have studied the F-actin/alpha-actinin system in detail with different actin conc. (C) and alpha-actinin/actin molar ratios (gamma). Confocal microscopy and analysis shows that the assembled systems fall into one of 3 phases depending on C and gamma: (1) loosely connected network of F-actin and bundles, (2) loosely connected network of dense domains and (3) uniform network of bundles. This can be explained and replicated using MD simulation. We have also examined different types of cross-linkers to represent the proteins, fascin and filamin. Results show that phase formation is related to the flexibility in binding between F-actin and cross-linkers. This degree of freedom, possible with longer cross-linkers allows the formation of branch points and thus bundle networks.

  20. Passive and active microrheology for cross-linked F-actin networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Ferrer, Jorge M; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Lang, Matthew J; Kamm, Roger D

    2010-04-01

    Actin filament (F-actin) is one of the dominant structural constituents in the cytoskeleton. Orchestrated by various actin-binding proteins (ABPs), F-actin is assembled into higher-order structures such as bundles and networks that provide mechanical support for the cell and play important roles in numerous cellular processes. Although mechanical properties of F-actin networks have been extensively studied, the underlying mechanisms for network elasticity are not fully understood, in part because different measurements probe different length and force scales. Here, we developed both passive and active microrheology techniques using optical tweezers to estimate the mechanical properties of F-actin networks at a length scale comparable to cells. For the passive approach we tracked the motion of a thermally fluctuating colloidal sphere to estimate the frequency-dependent complex shear modulus of the network. In the active approach, we used an optical trap to oscillate an embedded microsphere and monitored the response in order to obtain network viscoelasticity over a physiologically relevant force range. While both active and passive measurements exhibit similar results at low strain, the F-actin network subject to high strain exhibits non-linear behavior which is analogous to the strain-hardening observed in macroscale measurements. Using confocal and total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy, we also characterize the microstructure of reconstituted F-actin networks in terms of filament length, mesh size and degree of bundling. Finally, we propose a model of network connectivity by investigating the effect of filament length on the mechanical properties and structure. PMID:19883801

  1. A chemo-mechanical constitutive model for transiently cross-linked actin networks and a theoretical assessment of their viscoelastic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Fallqvist, B; Kroon, M

    2013-04-01

    Biological materials can undergo large deformations and also show viscoelastic behaviour. One such material is the network of actin filaments found in biological cells, giving the cell much of its mechanical stiffness. A theory for predicting the relaxation behaviour of actin networks cross-linked with the cross-linker α-actinin is proposed. The constitutive model is based on a continuum approach involving a neo-Hookean material model, modified in terms of concentration of chemically activated cross-links. The chemical model builds on work done by Spiros (Doctoral thesis, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 1998) and has been modified to respond to mechanical stress experienced by the network. The deformation is split into a viscous and elastic part, and a thermodynamically motivated rate equation is assigned for the evolution of viscous deformation. The model predictions were evaluated for stress relaxation tests at different levels of strain and found to be in good agreement with experimental results for actin networks cross-linked with α-actinin. PMID:22623110

  2. Force generation and work production by covalently cross-linked actin-myosin cross-bridges in rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Bershitsky, S Y; Tsaturyan, A K

    1995-09-01

    To separate a fraction of the myosin cross-bridges that are attached to the thin filaments and that participate in the mechanical responses, muscle fibers were cross-linked with 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide and then immersed in high-salt relaxing solution (HSRS) of 0.6 M ionic strength for detaching the unlinked myosin heads. The mechanical properties and force-generating ability of the cross-linked cross-bridges were tested with step length changes (L-steps) and temperature jumps (T-jumps) from 6-10 degrees C to 30-40 degrees C. After partial cross-linking, when instantaneous stiffness in HSRS was 25-40% of that in rigor, the mechanical behavior of the fibers was similar to that during active contraction. The kinetics of the T-jump-induced tension transients as well as the rate of the fast phase of tension recovery after length steps were close to those in unlinked fibers during activation. Under feedback force control, the T-jump initiated fiber shortening by up to 4 nm/half-sarcomere. Work produced by a cross-linked myosin head after the T-jump was up to 30 x 10(-21) J. When the extent of cross-linking was increased and fiber stiffness in HSRS approached that in rigor, the fibers lost their viscoelastic properties and ability to generate force with a rise in temperature. PMID:8519956

  3. Probing the solution structure of Factor H using hydroxyl radical protein footprinting and cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Baud, Anna; Gonnet, Florence; Salard, Isabelle; Le Mignon, Maxime; Giuliani, Alexandre; Mercère, Pascal; Sclavi, Bianca; Daniel, Régis

    2016-06-15

    The control protein Factor H (FH) is a crucial regulator of the innate immune complement system, where it is active on host cell membranes and in the fluid phase. Mutations impairing the binding capacity of FH lead to severe autoimmune diseases. Here, we studied the solution structure of full-length FH, in its free state and bound to the C3b complement protein. To do so, we used two powerful techniques, hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF) and chemical cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), to probe the structural rearrangements and to identify protein interfaces. The footprint of C3b on the FH surface matches existing crystal structures of C3b complexed with the N- and C-terminal fragments of FH. In addition, we revealed the position of the central portion of FH in the protein complex. Moreover, cross-linking studies confirmed the involvement of the C-terminus in the dimerization of FH. PMID:27099340

  4. Growth Factors Cross-Linked to Collagen Microcarriers Promote Expansion and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Bertolo, Alessandro; Arcolino, Fanny; Capossela, Simona; Taddei, Anna Rita; Baur, Martin; Pötzel, Tobias; Stoyanov, Jivko

    2015-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a field in progressive expansion and requires constant updates in methods and devices. One of the central fields is the development of biocompatible, biodegradable, and injectable scaffolds, such as collagen microcarriers. To enhance cell attachment and produce a cost-effective cell culture solution with local stimulation of cells, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was covalently immobilized on microcarriers either by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) or riboflavin/UV (RB/UV) light-mediated cross-linking. Collagen microcarriers cross-linked with bFGF or TGF-β1 were used for expansion and chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Evaluation methods included cell viability test, chondrogenic marker expression (aggrecan and collagen type I and type II), histological detection of proteoglycans, and immunohistochemical analysis. Cross-linking strengthened the collagen structure of the microcarriers and reduced collagenase-mediated degradation. MSCs effectively proliferated on microcarriers cross-linked with bFGF, especially by EDC/NHS cross-linking. Chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs was induced by TGF-β1 cross-linked on microcarriers, promoting gene expression and protein accumulation of aggrecan and collagen type I and type II, as well as proteoglycans. Cross-linking by RB/UV enhanced chondrogenesis more than any other group. In addition, cross-linking reduced scaffold shrinkage exerted by MSCs during chondrogenesis, a desirable feature for microcarriers if used as tissue defect filler. In conclusion, cross-linking of bFGF or TGF-β1 to collagen microcarriers supported in vitro proliferation and chondrogenesis, respectively. If translated in vivo and in clinical practice, such approach might lead a step closer to development of a cost-effective and locally acting device for cell-based therapy. PMID:26222829

  5. β1 and β3 Integrins Cooperate to Induce Syndecan-4-Containing Cross-linked Actin Networks in Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Filla, Mark S.; Woods, Anne; Kaufman, Paul L.; Peters, Donna M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the molecular composition of cross-linked actin networks (CLANs) and the regulation of their formation by integrins in normal human trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. CLANs have been observed in steroid-treated and glaucomatous TM cells and have been suggested to contribute to decreased outflow facility by altering the contractility of the TM. Methods Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to identify molecular components of CLANs and quantitate CLAN formation in HTM cells plated on coverslips coated with various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (fibronectin, types I and IV collagen, and vitronectin), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, or activating antibodies against β1, β3, or α2β1 integrins. These integrin antibodies were also used as soluble ligands. Results CLAN vertices contained the actin-binding proteins α-actinin and filamin and the signaling molecules syndecan-4 and PIP2. CLANs lacked Arp3 and cortactin. CLAN formation was dependent on the ECM substrate and was significantly higher on fibronectin and VCAM-1 compared with vitronectin, types I or IV collagen. Adsorbed β1 integrin antibodies also induced CLANs, whereas adsorbed β3 or α2β1 integrin antibodies did not. Soluble β3 integrin antibodies, however, induced CLANs and actually enhanced CLAN formation in cells spread on fibronectin, VCAM-1, type I or type IV collagen, or β1 integrin antibodies. Conclusions CLANs are unique actin-branched networks whose formation can be regulated by β1 and β3 integrin signaling pathways. Thus, integrin-mediated signaling events can modulate the organization of the actin cytoskeleton in TM cells and hence could participate in regulating cytoskeletal events previously demonstrated to be involved in controlling outflow facility. PMID:16639003

  6. Type VI secretion system translocates a phage tail spike-like protein into target cells where it cross-links actin

    PubMed Central

    Pukatzki, Stefan; Ma, Amy T.; Revel, Andrew T.; Sturtevant, Derek; Mekalanos, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Genes encoding type VI secretion systems (T6SS) are widely distributed in pathogenic Gram-negative bacterial species. In Vibrio cholerae, T6SS have been found to secrete three related proteins extracellularly, VgrG-1, VgrG-2, and VgrG-3. VgrG-1 can covalently cross-link actin in vitro, and this activity was used to demonstrate that V. cholerae can translocate VgrG-1 into macrophages by a T6SS-dependent mechanism. Protein structure search algorithms predict that VgrG-related proteins likely assemble into a trimeric complex that is analogous to that formed by the two trimeric proteins gp27 and gp5 that make up the baseplate “tail spike” of Escherichia coli bacteriophage T4. VgrG-1 was shown to interact with itself, VgrG-2, and VgrG-3, suggesting that such a complex does form. Because the phage tail spike protein complex acts as a membrane-penetrating structure as well as a conduit for the passage of DNA into phage-infected cells, we propose that the VgrG components of the T6SS apparatus may assemble a “cell-puncturing device” analogous to phage tail spikes to deliver effector protein domains through membranes of target host cells. PMID:17873062

  7. Role of Transglutaminase 2 in Liver Injury via Cross-linking and Silencing of Transcription Factor Sp1

    PubMed Central

    TATSUKAWA, HIDEKI; FUKAYA, YAYOI; FRAMPTON, GORDON; MARTINEZ–FUENTES, ANTONIO; SUZUKI, KENJI; KUO, TING–FANG; NAGATSUMA, KEISUKE; SHIMOKADO, KENTARO; OKUNO, MASATAKA; WU, JIAN; IISMAA, SIIRI; MATSUURA, TOMOKAZU; TSUKAMOTO, HIDEKAZU; ZERN, MARK A.; GRAHAM, ROBERT M.; KOJIMA, SOICHI

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Despite high morbidity and mortality of alcoholic liver disease worldwide, the molecular mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced liver cell death are not fully understood. Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a cross-linking enzyme implicated in apoptosis. TG2 levels and activity are increased in association with various types of liver injury. However, how TG2 induces hepatic apoptosis is not known. Methods Human hepatic cells or primary hepatocytes from rats or TG2+/+ and TG2−/− mice were treated with ethanol. Mice were administered anti-Fas antibody or alcohol. Liver sections were prepared from patients with alcoholic steatohepatitis. Changes in TG2 levels, Sp1 cross-linking and its activities, expression of hepatocyte growth factor receptor, c-Met, and hepatic apoptosis were measured. Results Ethanol induced apoptosis in hepatic cells, enhanced activity and nuclear accumulation of TG2 as well as accumulation of cross-linked and inactivated Sp1, and reduced expression of the Sp1-responsive gene, c-Met. These effects were rescued by TG2 knockdown, restoration of functional Sp1, or addition of hepatocyte growth factor, whereas apoptosis was reproduced by Sp1 knockdown or TG2 overexpression. Compared with TG2+/+ mice, TG2−/− mice showed markedly reduced hepatocyte apoptosis and Sp1 cross-linking following ethanol or anti-Fas treatment. Treatment of TG2+/+ mice with the TG2 inhibitors putrescine or cystamine blocked anti-Fas–induced hepatic apoptosis and Sp1 silencing. Moreover, enhanced expression of cross-linked Sp1 and TG2 was evident in hepatocyte nuclei of patients with alcoholic steatohepatitis. Conclusions TG2 induces hepatocyte apoptosis via Sp1 cross-linking and inactivation, with resultant inhibition of the expression of c-Met required for hepatic cell viability. PMID:19208340

  8. A Mechanism for Actin Filament Severing by Malaria Parasite Actin Depolymerizing Factor 1 via a Low Affinity Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wilson; Webb, Andrew I.; Olshina, Maya A.; Infusini, Giuseppe; Tan, Yan Hong; Hanssen, Eric; Catimel, Bruno; Suarez, Cristian; Condron, Melanie; Angrisano, Fiona; NebI, Thomas; Kovar, David R.; Baum, Jake

    2014-01-01

    Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilins are essential regulators of actin turnover in eukaryotic cells. These multifunctional proteins facilitate both stabilization and severing of filamentous (F)-actin in a concentration-dependent manner. At high concentrations ADF/cofilins bind stably to F-actin longitudinally between two adjacent actin protomers forming what is called a decorative interaction. Low densities of ADF/cofilins, in contrast, result in the optimal severing of the filament. To date, how these two contrasting modalities are achieved by the same protein remains uncertain. Here, we define the proximate amino acids between the actin filament and the malaria parasite ADF/cofilin, PfADF1 from Plasmodium falciparum. PfADF1 is unique among ADF/cofilins in being able to sever F-actin but do so without stable filament binding. Using chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (XL-MS) combined with structure reconstruction we describe a previously overlooked binding interface on the actin filament targeted by PfADF1. This site is distinct from the known binding site that defines decoration. Furthermore, total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging of single actin filaments confirms that this novel low affinity site is required for F-actin severing. Exploring beyond malaria parasites, selective blocking of the decoration site with human cofilin (HsCOF1) using cytochalasin D increases its severing rate. HsCOF1 may therefore also use a decoration-independent site for filament severing. Thus our data suggest that a second, low affinity actin-binding site may be universally used by ADF/cofilins for actin filament severing. PMID:24371134

  9. The role of transcription initiation factor IIIB subunits in promoter opening probed by photochemical cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Kassavetis, George A; Han, Shulin; Naji, Souad; Geiduschek, E Peter

    2003-05-16

    The core transcription initiation factor (TF) IIIB recruits its conjugate RNA polymerase (pol) III to the promoter and also plays an essential role in promoter opening. TFIIIB assembled with certain deletion mutants of its Brf1 and Bdp1 subunits is competent in pol III recruitment, but the resulting preinitiation complex does not open the promoter. Whether Brf1 and Bdp1 participate in opening the promoter by direct DNA interaction (as sigma subunits of bacterial RNA polymerases do) or indirectly by their action on pol III has been approached by site-specific photochemical protein-DNA cross-linking of TFIIIB-pol III-U6 RNA gene promoter complexes. Brf1, Bdp1, and several pol III subunits can be cross-linked to the nontranscribed strand of the U6 promoter at base pair -9/-8 and +2/+3 (relative to the transcriptional start as +1), respectively the upstream and downstream ends of the DNA segment that opens up into the transcription bubble. Cross-linking of Bdp1 and Brf1 is detected at 0 degrees C in closed preinitiation complexes and at 30 degrees C in complexes that are partly open, but also it is detected in mutant TFIIIB-pol III-DNA complexes that are unable to open the promoter. In contrast, promoter opening-defective TFIIIB mutants generate significant changes of cross-linking of polymerase subunits. The weight of this evidence argues in favor of an indirect mode of action of TFIIIB in promoter opening. PMID:12637540

  10. A syndecan-4 binding peptide derived from laminin 5 uses a novel PKCε pathway to induce cross-linked actin network (CLAN) formation in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells.

    PubMed

    Filla, Mark S; Clark, Ross; Peters, Donna M

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we examined the role(s) of syndecan-4 in regulating the formation of an actin geodesic dome structure called a cross-linked actin network (CLAN) in which syndecan-4 has previously been localized. CLANs have been described in several different cell types, but they have been most widely studied in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells where they may play a key role in controlling intraocular pressure by regulating aqueous humor outflow from the eye. In this study we show that a loss of cell surface synedcan-4 significantly reduces CLAN formation in HTM cells. Analysis of HTM cultures treated with or without dexamethasone shows that laminin 5 deposition within the extracellular matrix is increased by glucocorticoid treatment and that a laminin 5-derived, syndecan-4-binding peptide (PEP75), induces CLAN formation in TM cells. This PEP75-induced CLAN formation was inhibited by heparin and the broad spectrum PKC inhibitor Ro-31-7549. In contrast, the more specific PKCα inhibitor Gö 6976 had no effect, thus excluding PKCα as a downstream effector of syndecan-4 signaling. Analysis of PKC isozyme expression showed that HTM cells also expressed both PKCγ and PKCε. Cells treated with a PKCε agonist formed CLANs while a PKCα/γ agonist had no effect. These data suggest that syndecan-4 is essential for CLAN formation in HTM cells and that a novel PKCε-mediated signaling pathway can regulate formation of this unique actin structure. PMID:25128150

  11. A syndecan-4 binding peptide derived from laminin 5 uses a novel PKCε pathway to induce cross-linked actin network (CLAN) formation in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells

    PubMed Central

    Filla, Mark S.; Clark, Ross; Peters, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the role(s) of syndecan-4 in regulating the formation of an actin geodesic dome structure called a cross-linked actin network (CLAN) in which syndecan-4 has previously been localized. CLANs have been described in several different cell types, but they have been most widely studied in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells where they may play a key role in controlling intraocular pressure by regulating aqueous humor outflow from the eye. In this study we show that a loss of cell surface synedcan-4 significantly reduces CLAN formation in HTM cells. Analysis of HTM cultures treated with or without dexamethasone shows that laminin 5 deposition within the extracellular matrix is increased by glucocorticoid treatment and that a laminin 5-derived, syndecan-4-binding peptide (PEP75), induces CLAN formation in TM cells. This PEP75-induced CLAN formation was inhibited by heparin and the broad spectrum PKC inhibitor Ro-31-7549. In contrast, the more specific PKCα inhibitor Go 6976 had no effect, thus excluding PKCα as a downstream effector of syndecan-4 signaling. Analysis of PKC isozyme expression showed that HTM cells also expressed both PKCγ and PKCε. Cells treated with a PKCε agonist formed CLANs while a PKCα/γ agonist had no effect. These data suggest that syndecan-4 is essential for CLAN formation in HTM cells and that a novel PKCε-mediated signaling pathway can regulate formation of this unique actin structure. PMID:25128150

  12. ELMO recruits actin cross-linking family 7 (ACF7) at the cell membrane for microtubule capture and stabilization of cellular protrusions.

    PubMed

    Margaron, Yoran; Fradet, Nadine; Côté, Jean-François

    2013-01-11

    ELMO and DOCK180 proteins form an evolutionarily conserved module controlling Rac GTPase signaling during cell migration, phagocytosis, and myoblast fusion. Here, we identified the microtubule and actin-binding spectraplakin ACF7 as a novel ELMO-interacting partner. A C-terminal polyproline segment in ELMO and the last spectrin repeat of ACF7 mediate a direct interaction between these proteins. Co-expression of ELMO1 with ACF7 promoted the formation of long membrane protrusions during integrin-mediated cell spreading. Quantification of membrane dynamics established that coupling of ELMO and ACF7 increases the persistence of the protruding activity. Mechanistically, we uncovered a role for ELMO in the recruitment of ACF7 to the membrane to promote microtubule capture and stability. Functionally, these effects of ELMO and ACF7 on cytoskeletal dynamics required the Rac GEF DOCK180. In conclusion, our findings support a role for ELMO in protrusion stability by acting at the interface between the actin cytoskeleton and the microtubule network. PMID:23184944

  13. Actin Interacting Protein1 and Actin Depolymerizing Factor Drive Rapid Actin Dynamics in Physcomitrella patens[W

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Robert C.; Pattavina, Kelli A.; Tüzel, Erkan; Vidali, Luis; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    The remodeling of actin networks is required for a variety of cellular processes in eukaryotes. In plants, several actin binding proteins have been implicated in remodeling cortical actin filaments (F-actin). However, the extent to which these proteins support F-actin dynamics in planta has not been tested. Using reverse genetics, complementation analyses, and cell biological approaches, we assessed the in vivo function of two actin turnover proteins: actin interacting protein1 (AIP1) and actin depolymerizing factor (ADF). We report that AIP1 is a single-copy gene in the moss Physcomitrella patens. AIP1 knockout plants are viable but have reduced expansion of tip-growing cells. AIP1 is diffusely cytosolic and functions in a common genetic pathway with ADF to promote tip growth. Specifically, ADF can partially compensate for loss of AIP1, and AIP1 requires ADF for function. Consistent with a role in actin remodeling, AIP1 knockout lines accumulate F-actin bundles, have fewer dynamic ends, and have reduced severing frequency. Importantly, we demonstrate that AIP1 promotes and ADF is essential for cortical F-actin dynamics. PMID:22003077

  14. Corneal cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Randleman, J Bradley; Khandelwal, Sumitra S; Hafezi, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in the late 1990s, corneal cross-linking has grown from an interesting concept to a primary treatment for corneal ectatic disease worldwide. Using a combination of ultraviolet-A light and a chromophore (vitamin B2, riboflavin), the cornea can be stiffened, usually with a single application, and progressive thinning diseases such as keratoconus arrested. Despite being in clinical use for many years, some of the underlying processes, such as the role of oxygen and the optimal treatment times, are still being worked out. More than a treatment technique, corneal cross-links represent a physiological principle of connective tissue, which may explain the enormous versatility of the method. We highlight the history of corneal cross-linking, the scientific underpinnings of current techniques, evolving clinical treatment parameters, and the use of cross-linking in combination with refractive surgery and for the treatment of infectious keratitis. PMID:25980780

  15. Cross-linked informofers.

    PubMed Central

    Prosvirnin, V V; Ruzidic, S; Samarina, O P

    1979-01-01

    The proteins of 30S RNP particles containing pre-mRNA (hnRNA) were cross-linked with bifunctional reagents (dimethyl-suberimidate and dimethyl-3,3'-dithiobispropionimidate). Further treatment with 1 or 2 M NaCl dissociates all RNA from protein. However, a significant part of protein particles--informofers being cross-linked survived high salt treatment. Their sedimentation coefficients were close to those of original particles. No RNA could be detected in the informofers even after labeling the cells with a precursor for a long period of time. Sodium dodecylsulfate or urea dissociated cross-linked informofers into oligomeric polypeptides. They could be dissociated by beta-mercaptoethanol treatment if a reversible cross-linked reagent had been used. The resulting polypeptides were represented by informatin. RNP particles (30S RNP or poly-particles) were reconstituted upon mixing of cross-linked informofers with pre-mRNA and removal of 2 M NaCl. PMID:503864

  16. Alteration of mineral crystallinity and collagen cross-linking of bones in osteopetrotic toothless (tl/tl) rats and their improvement after treatment with colony stimulating factor-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, A.; Dziedzic-Goclawska, A.; Kaminski, A.; Stachowicz, W.; Wojtowicz, K.; Marks, S. C. Jr; Yamauchi, M.

    1997-01-01

    A common feature of various types of mammalian osteopetroses is a marked increase in bone mass accompanied by spontaneous bone fractures. The toothless (tl/tl) rat osteopetrotic mutation is characterized by drastically reduced bone resorption due to a profound deficiency of osteoclasts and their precursors. An altered bone morphology has also been observed. The mutants cannot be cured by bone marrow transplantation, but skeletal defects are greatly reduced after treatment with colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1). The objectives of this study were to characterize mineral and collagen matrices in cancellous and compact bone isolated from long bones of 6-week-old normal littermates, tl/tl osteopetrotic mutants and mutants (tl/tl) treated with CSF-1. There were no differences in bone mineral content, but a significant decrease in the crystallinity of mineral evaluated by the method based on electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry was observed in all bones of tl/tl mutants as compared to that of controls. Within the collagen matrix, slight decreases in the labile cross-links, but significant increases in the content of the stable cross-links, pyridinoline, and deoxypyridinoline, were observed in both cancellous and compact bone of osteopetrotic mutants. In tl/tl mutants treated with human recombinant CSF-1, the normalization of the crystallinity of bone mineral as well as collagen cross-links was found. Our results indicate that remodeling of bone matrix in tl/tl mutants is highly suppressed, but that after treatment with CSF-1, this activity recovers significantly. Taken together, these data provide further support for the hypothesis that CSF-1 is an essential factor for normal osteoclast differentiation and bone remodelling.

  17. Cross-linking of initiation factor IF3 to Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit by trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II): characterization of two cross-linking sites in 16S rRNA; a possible way of functioning for IF3.

    PubMed Central

    Ehresmann, C; Moine, H; Mougel, M; Dondon, J; Grunberg-Manago, M; Ebel, J P; Ehresmann, B

    1986-01-01

    The initiation factor IF3 is platinated with trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) and cross-linked to Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit. Two cross-linking sites are unambiguously identified on the 16S rRNA: a major one, in the region 819-859 in the central domain, and a minor one, in the region 1506-1529 in the 3'-terminal domain. Specific features of these sequences together with their particular location within the 30S subunit lead us to postulate a role for IF3, that conciliates topographical and functional observations made so far. Images PMID:2425339

  18. Characterization and affinity cross-linking of receptors for human recombinant lymphotoxin (tumor necrosis factor-beta) on a human histiocytic lymphoma cell line, U-937

    SciTech Connect

    Stauber, G.B.; Aggarwal, B.B.

    1989-02-25

    Recombinant human lymphotoxin (rhLT) expressed in a mammalian cell line was purified and used to examine its receptors on the human histiocytic lymphoma cell line U-937. rhLT was radioiodinated by the IODO-GEN method to a specific activity of 60 microCi/micrograms; the labeled protein was biologically active in the cytolytic assay, and displaceable binding to U-937 cells was observed. The specific binding reached a plateau within 10, 60, and 180 min at 37, 23, and 4 degrees C, respectively. Scatchard analysis of the binding data revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity receptors with an apparent Kd of 0.6 nM and a capacity of 33,000 +/- 7,000 binding sites/cell. The binding of 125I-rhLT to U-937 cells could be inhibited by excess unlabeled rhLT or recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rhTNF), suggesting a common receptor for both molecules. As competitive inhibitor of the binding, rhTNF was equal in its potency to rhLT. Bacterial derived rhLT lacking carbohydrate was also found equipotent to cell line-derived rhLT for cell binding, indicating that carbohydrate plays no significant role in receptor interaction. Additionally, 125I-rhLT was covalently attached to the cell surface via a bifunctional cross-linking reagent, ethylene glycol bis(succinimidyl succinate), solubilized, and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The cross-linking of the receptor to rhLT revealed two distinct bands at approximate molecular masses of 100,000 and 120,000 daltons. Both bands were absent when unlabeled rhLT or rhTNF was used for competition, indicating the specificity. Affinity cross-linking of U-937 cells with 125I-rhTNF, however, provided only a single band with a molecular mass of about 100,000 daltons. These results suggest that the manner in which rhLT interacts with its receptor is perhaps somewhat different from that of rhTNF.

  19. Structure of a Longitudinal Actin Dimer Assembled by Tandem W Domains: Implications for Actin Filament Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C.; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-11-20

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  20. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1–actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1–actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson–Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  1. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1-actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1-actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  2. Nonlinear elasticity of cross-linked networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Caillerie, Denis; Peyla, Philippe; Raoult, Annie; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2013-04-01

    Cross-linked semiflexible polymer networks are omnipresent in living cells. Typical examples are actin networks in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, which play an essential role in cell motility, and the spectrin network, a key element in maintaining the integrity of erythrocytes in the blood circulatory system. We introduce a simple mechanical network model at the length scale of the typical mesh size and derive a continuous constitutive law relating the stress to deformation. The continuous constitutive law is found to be generically nonlinear even if the microscopic law at the scale of the mesh size is linear. The nonlinear bulk mechanical properties are in good agreement with the experimental data for semiflexible polymer networks, i.e., the network stiffens and exhibits a negative normal stress in response to a volume-conserving shear deformation, whereby the normal stress is of the same order as the shear stress. Furthermore, it shows a strain localization behavior in response to an uniaxial compression. Within the same model we find a hierarchy of constitutive laws depending on the degree of nonlinearities retained in the final equation. The presented theory provides a basis for the continuum description of polymer networks such as actin or spectrin in complex geometries and it can be easily coupled to growth problems, as they occur, for example, in modeling actin-driven motility.

  3. CASEIN KINASE1-LIKE PROTEIN2 Regulates Actin Filament Stability and Stomatal Closure via Phosphorylation of Actin Depolymerizing Factor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Yuxiang; Zhao, Yang; Huang, Shanjin; Yuan, Ming; Zhao, Yanxiu; Guo, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The opening and closing of stomata are crucial for plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Actin filaments undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal closure, but the underlying mechanism for this cytoskeletal reorganization remains largely unclear. In this study, we identified and characterized Arabidopsis thaliana casein kinase 1-like protein 2 (CKL2), which responds to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment and participates in ABA- and drought-induced stomatal closure. Although CKL2 does not bind to actin filaments directly and has no effect on actin assembly in vitro, it colocalizes with and stabilizes actin filaments in guard cells. Further investigation revealed that CKL2 physically interacts with and phosphorylates actin depolymerizing factor 4 (ADF4) and inhibits its activity in actin filament disassembly. During ABA-induced stomatal closure, deletion of CKL2 in Arabidopsis alters actin reorganization in stomata and renders stomatal closure less sensitive to ABA, whereas deletion of ADF4 impairs the disassembly of actin filaments and causes stomatal closure to be more sensitive to ABA Deletion of ADF4 in the ckl2 mutant partially recues its ABA-insensitive stomatal closure phenotype. Moreover, Arabidopsis ADFs from subclass I are targets of CKL2 in vitro. Thus, our results suggest that CKL2 regulates actin filament reorganization and stomatal closure mainly through phosphorylation of ADF. PMID:27268429

  4. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  5. Photomobile polymer materials: photoresponsive behavior of cross-linked liquid-crystalline polymers with mesomorphic diarylethenes.

    PubMed

    Mamiya, Jun-ichi; Kuriyama, Akito; Yokota, Naoki; Yamada, Munenori; Ikeda, Tomiki

    2015-02-16

    Cross-linked liquid-crystalline (LC) polymers with a mesomorphic diarylethene were prepared to demonstrate a versatile strategy for cross-linked photochromic LC polymers as photomobile materials. Upon exposure to UV light to cause photocyclization of the diarylethene chromophore, the cross-linked polymer films bend toward an actinic light source. By irradiation with visible light to cause a closed-ring to open-ring isomerization, the bent films revert to the initial flat state. Without visible-light irradiation, the bent films remain bent even at 120 °C, indicating high thermal stability of the cross-linked diarylethene LC polymers. PMID:25581255

  6. Electrospinning formaldehyde cross-linked zein solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to develop zein fibers with improved physical properties and solvent resistance, formaldehyde was used as the cross-linking reagent before spinning. The cross-linking reaction was carried out in either acetic acid or ethanolic-HCl where the amount of cross-linking reagent was between 1 and...

  7. mDia1 and formins: screw cap of the actin filament

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Formin homology proteins (formins) are actin nucleation factors which remain bound to the growing barbed end and processively elongate actin filament (F-actin). Recently, we have demonstrated that a mammalian formin mDia1 rotates along the long-pitch helix of F-actin during processive elongation (helical rotation) by single-molecule fluorescence polarization. We have also shown processive depolymerization of mDia1-bound F-actin during which helical rotation was visualized. In the cell where F-actins are highly cross-linked, formins should rotate during filament elongation. Therefore, when formins are tightly anchored to cellular structures, formins may not elongate F-actin. Adversely, helical rotation of formins might affect the twist of F-actin. Formins could thus control actin elongation and regulate stability of cellular actin filaments through helical rotation. On the other hand, ADP-actin elongation at the mDia1-bound barbed end turned out to become decelerated by profilin, in marked contrast to its remarkably positive effect on mDia1-mediated ATP-actin elongation. This deceleration is caused by enhancement of the off-rate of ADP-actin. While mDia1 and profilin enhance the ADP-actin off-rate, they do not apparently increase the ADP-actin on-rate at the barbed end. These results imply that G-actin-bound ATP and its hydrolysis may be part of the acceleration mechanism of formin-mediated actin elongation.

  8. Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Jankov II, Mirko R.; Jovanovic, Vesna; Nikolic, Ljubisa; Lake, Jonathan C.; Kymionis, Georgos; Coskunseven, Efekan

    2010-01-01

    Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) with riboflavin and ultraviolet-A (UVA) is a new technique of corneal tissue strengthening by using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and UVA to increase the formation of intra and interfibrillar covalent bonds by photosensitized oxidation. Keratocyte apoptosis in the anterior segment of the corneal stroma all the way down to a depth of about 300 microns has been described and a demarcation line between the treated and untreated cornea has been clearly shown. It is important to ensure that the cytotoxic threshold for the endothelium has not been exceeded by strictly respecting the minimal corneal thickness. Confocal microscopy studies show that repopulation of keratocytes is already visible 1 month after the treatment, reaching its pre-operative quantity and quality in terms of functional morphology within 6 months after the treatment. The major indication for the use of CXL is to inhibit the progression of corneal ectasias, such as keratoconus and pellucid marginal degeneration. CXL may also be effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of iatrogenic keratectasia, resulting from excessively aggressive photoablation. This treatment has also been used to treat infectious corneal ulcers with apparent favorable results. Combination with other treatments, such as intracorneal ring segment implantation, limited topography-guided photoablation and conductive keratoplasty have been used with different levels of success. PMID:20543933

  9. Isoforms of α-Actinin from Cardiac, Smooth, and Skeletal Muscle Form Polar Arrays of Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kenneth A.; Taylor, Dianne W.; Schachat, Fred

    2000-01-01

    We have used a positively charged lipid monolayer to form two-dimensional bundles of F-actin cross-linked by α-actinin to investigate the relative orientation of the actin filaments within them. This method prevents growth of the bundles perpendicular to the monolayer plane, thereby facilitating interpretation of the electron micrographs. Using α-actinin isoforms isolated from the three types of vertebrate muscle, i.e., cardiac, skeletal, and smooth, we have observed almost exclusively cross-linking between polar arrays of filaments, i.e., actin filaments with their plus ends oriented in the same direction. One type of bundle can be classified as an Archimedian spiral consisting of a single actin filament that spirals inward as the filament grows and the bundle is formed. These spirals have a consistent hand and grow to a limiting internal diameter of 0.4–0.7 μm, where the filaments appear to break and spiral formation ceases. These results, using isoforms usually characterized as cross-linkers of bipolar actin filament bundles, suggest that α-actinin is capable of cross-linking actin filaments in any orientation. Formation of specifically bipolar or polar filament arrays cross-linked by α-actinin may require additional factors that either determine the filament orientation or restrict the cross-linking capabilities of α-actinin. PMID:10791977

  10. Chemical cross-linking of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed Central

    Birkelund, S; Lundemose, A G; Christiansen, G

    1988-01-01

    Purified elementary bodies (EBs) of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 were analyzed by chemical cross-linking with disuccinimidyl selenodipropionate. The effect of the cross-linking was analyzed by immunoblotting sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated components which were reacted with monoclonal antibodies against major outer membrane protein (MOMP) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It was shown that in EBs, MOMP was cross-linked to the LPS component of the outer membrane. Migration analysis of the cross-linked components showed that with extensive cross-linking, most of the MOMP became cross-linked to LPS, changing the migration rate from 40 to 42.5 kilodaltons. A small fraction of MOMP associated with LPS was shown to be present in bands with migration rates of 100 and 110 kilodaltons. No association of MOMP or LPS to other proteins, or to dimer or multimer forms of MOMP without LPS, was observed. A totally different membrane structure must be present in reticulate bodies, since there, MOMP was so heavily cross-linked that it did not enter the polyacrylamide gel and thus became impossible to analyze. Furthermore, the monoclonal antibody, which reacted with LPS associated with MOMP in the cross-linked EBs, did not react with reticulate bodies. Images PMID:2449399

  11. Histone cross-linking by transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Nam, Kang Hoon; Kwon, Oh-Seok; Kim, In Gyu; Bustin, Michael; Choy, Hyon E; Park, Sang Chul

    2002-05-24

    Transglutaminases irreversibly catalyze covalent cross-linking of proteins by forming isopeptide bonds between peptide-bound glutamine and lysine residues. Among several transglutaminases, tissue-type transglutaminase (tTGase) is most ubiquitously found in every type of cells and tissues in animals, but its natural substrate has yet to be identified. In an attempt to identify the natural substrate for tTGase, we examined in vitro if core histones were subject to cross-linking by tTGase. We found core histone subunits, H2A and H2B, were specifically cross-linked by tTGase. The cross-linking was between either one or both glutamines at C-terminal end of H2A (-VTIAQ104 GGVLPNTQ112 SVLLPKKTESSKSK-C' end) and the first and/or third lysine from C-terminal end of H2B (-AVESEGK116 AVTKYTSSK125-C' end). The cross-linking occurred only when these subunits were released from nucleosome but not when these were organized in nucleosome. Most interestingly, in chicken erythrocyte the cross-linked H2A-H2B was present in a significant amount. From these results, it can be proposed that tTGase-mediated cross-linking is an another form of core histone modification and it may play a role of chromatin condensation during erythrocyte differentiation. PMID:12054678

  12. Porous Cross-Linked Polyimide Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Guo, Haiquan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Porous cross-linked polyimide networks are provided. The networks comprise an anhydride end-capped polyamic acid oligomer. The oligomer (i) comprises a repeating unit of a dianhydride and a diamine and terminal anhydride groups, (ii) has an average degree of polymerization of 10 to 50, (iii) has been cross-linked via a cross-linking agent, comprising three or more amine groups, at a balanced stoichiometry of the amine groups to the terminal anhydride groups, and (iv) has been chemically imidized to yield the porous cross-linked polyimide network. Also provided are porous cross-linked polyimide aerogels comprising a cross-linked and imidized anhydride end-capped polyamic acid oligomer, wherein the oligomer comprises a repeating unit of a dianhydride and a diamine, and the aerogel has a density of 0.10 to 0.333 g/cm.sup.3 and a Young's modulus of 1.7 to 102 MPa. Also provided are thin films comprising aerogels, and methods of making porous cross-linked polyimide networks.

  13. Arabidopsis Actin Depolymerizing Factor4 Modulates the Stochastic Dynamic Behavior of Actin Filaments in the Cortical Array of Epidermal Cells[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Henty, Jessica L.; Bledsoe, Samuel W.; Khurana, Parul; Meagher, Richard B.; Day, Brad; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Actin filament arrays are constantly remodeled as the needs of cells change as well as during responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. Previous studies demonstrate that many single actin filaments in the cortical array of living Arabidopsis thaliana epidermal cells undergo stochastic dynamics, a combination of rapid growth balanced by disassembly from prolific severing activity. Filament turnover and dynamics are well understood from in vitro biochemical analyses and simple reconstituted systems. However, the identification in living cells of the molecular players involved in controlling actin dynamics awaits the use of model systems, especially ones where the power of genetics can be combined with imaging of individual actin filaments at high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we test the hypothesis that actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin contributes to stochastic filament severing and facilitates actin turnover. A knockout mutant for Arabidopsis ADF4 has longer hypocotyls and epidermal cells when compared with wild-type seedlings. This correlates with a change in actin filament architecture; cytoskeletal arrays in adf4 cells are significantly more bundled and less dense than in wild-type cells. Several parameters of single actin filament turnover are also altered. Notably, adf4 mutant cells have a 2.5-fold reduced severing frequency as well as significantly increased actin filament lengths and lifetimes. Thus, we provide evidence that ADF4 contributes to the stochastic dynamic turnover of actin filaments in plant cells. PMID:22010035

  14. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOEpatents

    Steckle, Jr., Warren P.; Apen, Paul G.; Mitchell, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

  15. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOEpatents

    Steckle, Jr., Warren P.; Apen, Paul G.; Mitchell, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

  16. Actin dynamics tune the integrated stress response by regulating eukaryotic initiation factor 2α dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Joseph E; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Malzer, Elke; Dominicus, Caia S; Patel, Vruti; Moorhead, Greg; Ron, David; Marciniak, Stefan J

    2015-01-01

    Four stress-sensing kinases phosphorylate the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) to activate the integrated stress response (ISR). In animals, the ISR is antagonised by selective eIF2α phosphatases comprising a catalytic protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) subunit in complex with a PPP1R15-type regulatory subunit. An unbiased search for additional conserved components of the PPP1R15-PP1 phosphatase identified monomeric G-actin. Like PP1, G-actin associated with the functional core of PPP1R15 family members and G-actin depletion, by the marine toxin jasplakinolide, destabilised the endogenous PPP1R15A-PP1 complex. The abundance of the ternary PPP1R15-PP1-G-actin complex was responsive to global changes in the polymeric status of actin, as was its eIF2α-directed phosphatase activity, while localised G-actin depletion at sites enriched for PPP1R15 enhanced eIF2α phosphorylation and the downstream ISR. G-actin's role as a stabilizer of the PPP1R15-containing holophosphatase provides a mechanism for integrating signals regulating actin dynamics with stresses that trigger the ISR. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04872.001 PMID:25774599

  17. Corneal Cross-Linking and Safety Issues

    PubMed Central

    Spoerl, Eberhard; Hoyer, Anne; Pillunat, Lutz E; Raiskup, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compile the safety aspects of the corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) by means of the riboflavin/UVA (370 nm) approach. Materials and Methodology: Analysis of the current treatment protocol with respect to safety during CXL. Results: The currently used UVA dose density of 5.4 J/cm2 and the corresponding irradiance of 3 mW/cm2 are below the known damage thresholds of UVA for the corneal endothelium, lens, and retina. Regarding the photochemical damages due to the free radicals the damage threshold for endothelial cells is 0.35 mW/cm2. In a 400μm thick corneal stroma saturated with riboflavin, the irradiance at the endothelial level is about 0.18 mW/cm2, which is a factor of 2 smaller than the damage threshold. Conclusion: As long as the corneal stroma treated has a minimal thickness of 400 microns (as recommended), neither corneal endothelium nor deeper structures such as lens and retina will suffer any damages. The light source should provide a homogenous irradiance avoiding hot spots. PMID:21399770

  18. Cross-linking Chemistry of Squid Beak*

    PubMed Central

    Miserez, Ali; Rubin, Daniel; Waite, J. Herbert

    2010-01-01

    In stark contrast to most aggressive predators, Dosidicus gigas (jumbo squids) do not use minerals in their powerful mouthparts known as beaks. Their beaks instead consist of a highly sclerotized chitinous composite with incremental hydration from the tip to the base. We previously reported l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-histidine (dopa-His) as an important covalent cross-link providing mechanical strengthening to the beak material. Here, we present a more complete characterization of the sclerotization chemistry and describe additional cross-links from D. gigas beak. All cross-links presented in this report share common building blocks, a family of di-, tri-, and tetra-histidine-catecholic adducts, that were separated by affinity chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and identified by tandem mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). The data provide additional insights into the unusually high cross-link density found in mature beaks. Furthermore, we propose both a low molecular weight catechol, and peptidyl-dopa, to be sclerotization agents of squid beak. This appears to represent a new strategy for forming hard tissue in animals. The interplay between covalent cross-linking and dehydration on the graded properties of the beaks is discussed. PMID:20870720

  19. Cross-linking chemistry of squid beak.

    PubMed

    Miserez, Ali; Rubin, Daniel; Waite, J Herbert

    2010-12-01

    In stark contrast to most aggressive predators, Dosidicus gigas (jumbo squids) do not use minerals in their powerful mouthparts known as beaks. Their beaks instead consist of a highly sclerotized chitinous composite with incremental hydration from the tip to the base. We previously reported l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-histidine (dopa-His) as an important covalent cross-link providing mechanical strengthening to the beak material. Here, we present a more complete characterization of the sclerotization chemistry and describe additional cross-links from D. gigas beak. All cross-links presented in this report share common building blocks, a family of di-, tri-, and tetra-histidine-catecholic adducts, that were separated by affinity chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and identified by tandem mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). The data provide additional insights into the unusually high cross-link density found in mature beaks. Furthermore, we propose both a low molecular weight catechol, and peptidyl-dopa, to be sclerotization agents of squid beak. This appears to represent a new strategy for forming hard tissue in animals. The interplay between covalent cross-linking and dehydration on the graded properties of the beaks is discussed. PMID:20870720

  20. Hybridization triggered cross-linking of deoxyoligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, T R; Matteucci, M D

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports details of the synthesis of oligodeoxynucleotides containing the modified base 5-methyl-N4,N4-ethanocytosine (Ce). The 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl group is used as a protecting group for the exocyclic amines of dA and dC. This group can be removed rapidly under very mild conditions. Oligomers containing the Ce base form a cross-link when hybridized to their complementary deoxyoligonucleotides. Some of the scope and limitations of these cross-link forming oligonucleotides are reported. Images PMID:3774542

  1. Stretching and bending in cross-linked biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heussinger, Claus; Frey, Erwin

    2007-03-01

    The elastic response of cross-linked biopolymer networks is usually interpreted in terms of affine stretching models, adopted from the theory of rubber-elasticity valid for flexible polymer gels. Unlike flexible polymers, however, stiff polymers have a highly anisotropic elastic response, where the low-energy elastic excitations are actually of bending nature. As a consequence, similar to springs connected in series, one would expect the softer bending mode to dominate the elastic energy rather than the stiff stretching mode. We propose a theory that, unlike recent affine models, properly accounts for the soft bending response of stiff polymers. It allows calculating the macroscopic elastic moduli starting from a microscopic characterization of the (non-affine) deformation field. The calculated scaling properties for the shear modulus are in excellent agreement with the results of recent simulations obtained in simple two-dimensional model networks, and can also be applied to rationalize bulk rheological data in reconstituted actin networks.

  2. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Danielle S.; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.; Grafton, Scott T.

    2014-03-01

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks.

  3. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOEpatents

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Apen, P.G.; Mitchell, M.A.

    1998-01-20

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes. 1 fig.

  4. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, Danielle S.; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T.; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2014-03-15

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks.

  5. Analysis of rhodamine and fluorescein-labeled F-actin diffusion in vitro by fluorescence photobleaching recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, J R; Gough, A; Urbanik, E; Wang, F; Lanni, F; Ware, B R; Taylor, D L

    1988-01-01

    Properties of filamentous acetamidofluorescein-labeled actin and acetamidotetramethylrhodamine-labeled actin (AF and ATR-actin, respectively) were examined to resolve discrepancies in the reported translational diffusion coefficients of F-actin measured in vitro by FPR and other techniques. Using falling-ball viscometry and two independent versions of fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR), the present data indicate that several factors are responsible for these discrepancies. Gel filtration chromatography profoundly affects the viscosity of actin solutions and filament diffusion coefficients. ATR-actin and, to a lesser degree, AF-actin show a reduction in viscosity in proportion to the fraction labeled, presumably due to filament shortening. Actin filaments containing AF-actin or ATR-actin are susceptible to photoinduced damage, including a covalent cross-linking of actin protomers within filaments and an apparent cleavage of filaments detected by a decrease of the measured viscosity and an increase in the measured filament diffusion coefficients. Quantum yields of the two photoinduced effects are quite different. Multiple cross-links are produced relative to each photobleaching event, whereas less than 1% filament cleavage occurs. Substantial differences in the filament diffusion coefficients measured by FPR are also the result of differences in illumination geometry and sampling time. However, under controlled conditions, FPR can be used as a quantitative tool for measuring the hydrodynamic properties of actin filaments. Incremented filament shortening caused by photoinduced cleavage or incremental addition of filament capping proteins produces a continuous and approximately linear increase of filament diffusion coefficients, indicating that filaments are not associated in solution. Our results indicate that actin filaments exhibit low mobilities and it is inferred that actin filaments formed in vitro by column-purified actin, under standard conditions, are

  6. Cross-Linking Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pusey, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Tetragonal chicken egg white crystals consist of 4(sub 3) helices running in alternating directions, the helix rows having a two fold symmetry with each other. The unit cell consists of one complete tetrameric turn from each of two adjacent helices (an octamer). PBC analysis indicates that the helix intermolecular bonds are the strongest in the crystal, therefore likely formed first. AFM analysis of the (110) surface shows only complete helices, no half steps or bisected helices being found, while AFM line scans to measure the growth step increments show that they are multiples of the 4(sub 3) helix tetramer dimensions. This supports our thesis that the growth units are in fact multiples of the four molecule 4(sub 3) helix unit, the "average" growth unit size for the (110) face being an octamer (two turns about the helix) and the (101) growth unit averaging about the size of a hexamer. In an effort to better understand the species involved in the crystal nucleation and growth process, we have initiated an experimental program to study the species formed in solution compared to what is found in the crystal through covalent cross-linking studies. These experiments use the heterobifunctional cross-linking agent aminoethyl-4-azidonitroanaline (AEANA). An aliphatic amine at one end is covalently attached to the protein by a carbodiimide-mediated reaction, and a photo reactive group at the other can be used to initiate crosslinking. Modifications to the parent structure can be used to alter the distance between the two reactive groups and thus the cross-linking agents "reach". In practice, the cross-linking agent is first coupled to the asp101 side chain through the amine group. Asp101 lies within the active site cleft, and previous work with fluorescent probes had shown that derivatives at this site still crystallize in the tetragonal space group. This was also found to be the case with the AEANA derivative, which gave red tetragonal crystals. The protein now has a

  7. Ion exchange selectivity for cross-linked polyacrylic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The ion separation factors for 21 common metal ions with cross-linked polyacrylic acid were determined as a function of pH and the percent of the cross-linked polyacrylic acid neutralized. The calcium ion was used as a reference. At a pH of 5 the decreasing order of affinity of the ions for the cross-linked polyacrylic acid was found to be: Hg++, Fe+++, Pb++, Cr+++, Cu++, Cd++, Al+++, Ag+, Zn++, Ni++, Mn++, Co++, Ca++, Sr++, Ba++, Mg++, K+, Rb+, Cs+, Na+, and Li+. Members of a chemical family exhibited similar selectivities. The Hg++ ion appeared to be about a million times more strongly bound than the alkali metal ions. The relative binding of most of the metal ions varied with pH; the very tightly and very weakly bound ions showed the largest variations with pH. The calcium ion-hydrogen ion equilibrium was perturbed very little by the presence of the other ions. The separation factors and selectivity coefficients are discussed in terms of equilibrium and thermodynamic significance.

  8. Arabidopsis FIMBRIN5, an Actin Bundling Factor, Is Required for Pollen Germination and Pollen Tube Growth[W

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Youjun; Yan, Jin; Zhang, Ruihui; Qu, Xiaolu; Ren, Sulin; Chen, Naizhi; Huang, Shanjin

    2010-01-01

    Actin cables in pollen tubes serve as molecular tracks for cytoplasmic streaming and organelle movement and are formed by actin bundling factors like villins and fimbrins. However, the precise mechanisms by which actin cables are generated and maintained remain largely unknown. Fimbrins comprise a family of five members in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we characterized a fimbrin isoform, Arabidopsis FIMBRIN5 (FIM5). Our results show that FIM5 is required for the organization of actin cytoskeleton in pollen grains and pollen tubes, and FIM5 loss-of-function associates with a delay of pollen germination and inhibition of pollen tube growth. FIM5 decorates actin filaments throughout pollen grains and tubes. Actin filaments become redistributed in fim5 pollen grains and disorganized in fim5 pollen tubes. Specifically, actin cables protrude into the extreme tips, and their longitudinal arrangement is disrupted in the shank of fim5 pollen tubes. Consequently, the pattern and velocity of cytoplasmic streaming were altered in fim5 pollen tubes. Additionally, loss of FIM5 function rendered pollen germination and tube growth hypersensitive to the actin-depolymerizing drug latrunculin B. In vitro biochemical analyses indicated that FIM5 exhibits actin bundling activity and stabilizes actin filaments. Thus, we propose that FIM5 regulates actin dynamics and organization during pollen germination and tube growth via stabilizing actin filaments and organizing them into higher-order structures. PMID:21098731

  9. Positive tone cross-linked resists based on photoacid inhibition of cross linking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Richard A.; Chun, Jun Sung; Neisser, Mark; Tolbert, Laren M.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2014-03-01

    A resist imaging design that utilizes photoacid inhibition of cationic polymerization and cross-linking during a postexposure bake step has been studied. The key to the design approach is the use of two different polymerization catalysts/initiators: (1) a photoacid produced from a photoacid generator (PAG) upon exposure of the resist that can result in polymerization and cross-linking of the resist matrix and (2) a thermal cross-linking catalyst (TCC) designed to thermally catalyze epoxide-phenol cross-linking. The TCC can be chosen from a variety of compounds such as triphenylphosphine (TPP) or imidazole. When only one of these catalysts (e.g TPP or photoacid) is present in an epoxide and phenol containing resist matrix, it will individually catalyze cross-linking. When they are present together, they effectively quench one another and little to no cross-linking occurs. This approach can be used to switch the tone of a resist from negative (photoacid catalyzed) to positive (TCC catalyzed and photoacid inhibited). The effect of the ratio of TCC:PAG was examined and the optimal ratio for positive tone behavior was determined. Resist contrast can be modified by optimization of epoxide:phenol ratio in the formulation. Dual tone behavior with positive tone at low dose and negative tone at higher doses can be observed in certain formulation conditions. Initial EUV patterning shows poor results, but the source of the poor imaging is not yet understood.

  10. Magnetic macromolecular cross linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) of glucoamylase.

    PubMed

    Nadar, Shamraja S; Rathod, Virendra K

    2016-02-01

    This work illustrates the preparation of magnetic macromolecular glucoamylase CLEAs using dialdehydic pectin, as a cross linker instead of traditional glutaraldehyde. The effect of precipitators type and amount, cross linker concentration, cross linking time and amount of amino functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (AFMNs) on glucoamylase activity was studied. Glucoamylase magnetic macromolecular CLEAs prepared by precipitation in presence of AFMNs by ammonium sulfate were subsequently cross linked by dialdehydic pectin. After cross-linked by pectin, 95.4% activity recovery was achieved in magnetic macromolecular CLEAs, whereas in case of glutaraldehyde cross linker, 85.3% activity recovery was achieved. Magnetic macromolecular CLEAs showed 2.91 and 1.27 folds higher thermal stability as compared to free and magnetic glutaraldehyde CLEAs. In kinetics study, magnetic macromolecular CLEAs retained same Km values, whereas magnetic glutaraldehyde CLEAs showed higher Km value than free enzyme. The porous structure of magnetic macromolecular CLEAs was not only enhanced mass transfer toward macromolecular substrates, but also showed compression resistance for 5 consecutive cycles which was checked in terms of effectiveness factor. At the end, in reusability study; magnetic macromolecular CLEAs were retained 84% activity after 10(th) cycle without leaching of enzyme which is 22% higher than traditional magnetic CLEAs. PMID:26777253

  11. Identification of Arabidopsis Cyclase-associated Protein 1 as the First Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Plant Actin

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Faisal; Guérin, Christophe; von Witsch, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton powers organelle movements, orchestrates responses to abiotic stresses, and generates an amazing array of cell shapes. Underpinning these diverse functions of the actin cytoskeleton are several dozen accessory proteins that coordinate actin filament dynamics and construct higher-order assemblies. Many actin-binding proteins from the plant kingdom have been characterized and their function is often surprisingly distinct from mammalian and fungal counterparts. The adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) has recently been shown to be an important regulator of actin dynamics in vivo and in vitro. The disruption of actin organization in cap mutant plants indicates defects in actin dynamics or the regulated assembly and disassembly of actin subunits into filaments. Current models for actin dynamics maintain that actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin removes ADP–actin subunits from filament ends and that profilin recharges these monomers with ATP by enhancing nucleotide exchange and delivery of subunits onto filament barbed ends. Plant profilins, however, lack the essential ability to stimulate nucleotide exchange on actin, suggesting that there might be a missing link yet to be discovered from plants. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana CAP1 (AtCAP1) is an abundant cytoplasmic protein; it is present at a 1:3 M ratio with total actin in suspension cells. AtCAP1 has equivalent affinities for ADP– and ATP–monomeric actin (Kd ∼ 1.3 μM). Binding of AtCAP1 to ATP–actin monomers inhibits polymerization, consistent with AtCAP1 being an actin sequestering protein. However, we demonstrate that AtCAP1 is the first plant protein to increase the rate of nucleotide exchange on actin. Even in the presence of ADF/cofilin, AtCAP1 can recharge actin monomers and presumably provide a polymerizable pool of subunits to profilin for addition onto filament ends. In turnover assays, plant profilin, ADF, and CAP act cooperatively to promote flux of

  12. Contraction of cross-linked actomyosin bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko; Marcq, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Cross-linked actomyosin bundles retract when severed in vivo by laser ablation, or when isolated from the cell and micromanipulated in vitro in the presence of ATP. We identify the timescale for contraction as a viscoelastic time τ, where the viscosity is due to (internal) protein friction. We obtain an estimate of the order of magnitude of the contraction time τ ≈ 10-100 s, consistent with available experimental data for circumferential microfilament bundles and stress fibers. Our results are supported by an exactly solvable, hydrodynamic model of a retracting bundle as a cylinder of isotropic, active matter, from which the order of magnitude of the active stress is estimated.

  13. DNA bending and binding factors of the human. beta. -actin promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Takeshi; Makino, Kozo; Orita, Satoshi; Nakata, Atsuo; Kakunaga, Takeo )

    1989-01-25

    Transcription of the {beta}-actin gene is rapidly inducible in response to serum stimulation. To determine the regions responsible for serum inducible and basal level expression, the human {beta}-actin promoter was subjected to mutational analysis. Two distinct elements, the CCAAT homology and the {beta}-actin specific conserved sequences, were found by a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression assay and sequence comparisons, and then analyzed for possible functions. Using a DNA bend assay, it was shown that the conserved sequences included the core of a sequence-directed bend of DNA. Gel mobility shift and DNase I protection assays revealed that the conserved sequences and the CCAAT homology were recognized by binding factors in HeLa cell extracts.

  14. Proteome-wide profiling of protein assemblies by cross-linking mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Post, Harm; Heck, Albert J R

    2015-12-01

    We describe an integrated workflow that robustly identifies cross-links from endogenous protein complexes in human cellular lysates. Our approach is based on the application of mass spectrometry (MS)-cleavable cross-linkers, sequential collision-induced dissociation (CID)-tandem MS (MS/MS) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD)-MS/MS acquisitions, and a dedicated search engine, XlinkX, which allows rapid cross-link identification against a complete human proteome database. This approach allowed us to detect 2,179 unique cross-links (1,665 intraprotein cross-links at a 5% false discovery rate (FDR) and 514 interprotein cross-links at 1% FDR) in HeLa cell lysates. We validated the confidence of our cross-linking results by using a target-decoy strategy and mapping the observed cross-link distances onto existing high-resolution structures. Our data provided new structural information about many protein assemblies and captured dynamic interactions of the ribosome in contact with different elongation factors. PMID:26414014

  15. Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking Outcomes: Review

    PubMed Central

    Jankov II, Mirko R; Jovanovic, Vesna; Delevic, Sladjana; Coskunseven, Efekan

    2011-01-01

    Keratoconus is a condition characterized by biomechanical instability of the cornea, presenting in a progressive, asymmetric and bilateral way. Corneal collagen cross-linking with riboflavin and UVA (CXL) is a new technique of corneal tissue strengthening that combines the use of riboflavin as a photo sensitizer and UVA irradiation. The studies showed that CXL was effective in halting the progression of keratoconus over a period of up to four years. The published studies also revealed a reduction of max K readings by more than 2 D, while the postoperative SEQ was reduced by an average of more than 1 D, and refractive cylinder decreased by about 1 D. No eyes lost any line of BCDVA. Moreover, there was no significant decrease in endothelial cell density. It was also found that CXL treatment was effective with reducing corneal and total wavefront aberrations. Corneal cross-linking has also led to an arrest and/or even a partial reversal of keratectasia in the treatment of iatrogenic ectasia after excimer laser ablation. A primary intervention such as CXL should be considered to potentially increase the biomechanical stability of the corneal tissue and postpone the need of lamellar or penetrating keratoplasty. PMID:21448301

  16. Corneal collagen cross-linking: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Brart, David P S

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to review the published literature on corneal collagen cross-linking. The emphasis was on the seminal publications, systemic reviews, meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials. Where such an evidence did not exist, selective large series cohort studies, case controlled studies and case series with follow-up preferably greater than 12 months were included. Riboflavin/Ultraviolet A (UVA) corneal collagen cross-linking appears to be the first treatment modality to halt the progression of keratoconus and other corneal ectatic disorders with improvement in visual, keratometric and topographic parameters documented by most investigators. Its precise mechanism of action at a molecular level is as yet not fully determined. Follow-up is limited to 4-6 years at present but suggests continued stability and improvement in corneal shape with time. Most published data are with epithelium-off techniques. Epithelium-on studies suggest some efficacy but less than with the epithelium-off procedures and long-term data are not currently available. The use of Riboflavin/UVA CXL for the management of infectious and non-infectious keratitis appears very promising. Its use in the management of bullous keratopathy is equivocal. Investigation of other methodologies for CXL are under investigation. PMID:25000866

  17. Corneal collagen cross-linking: A review

    PubMed Central

    O’Brart, David P.S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to review the published literature on corneal collagen cross-linking. The emphasis was on the seminal publications, systemic reviews, meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials. Where such an evidence did not exist, selective large series cohort studies, case controlled studies and case series with follow-up preferably greater than 12 months were included. Riboflavin/Ultraviolet A (UVA) corneal collagen cross-linking appears to be the first treatment modality to halt the progression of keratoconus and other corneal ectatic disorders with improvement in visual, keratometric and topographic parameters documented by most investigators. Its precise mechanism of action at a molecular level is as yet not fully determined. Follow-up is limited to 4–6 years at present but suggests continued stability and improvement in corneal shape with time. Most published data are with epithelium-off techniques. Epithelium-on studies suggest some efficacy but less than with the epithelium-off procedures and long-term data are not currently available. The use of Riboflavin/UVA CXL for the management of infectious and non-infectious keratitis appears very promising. Its use in the management of bullous keratopathy is equivocal. Investigation of other methodologies for CXL are under investigation. PMID:25000866

  18. To Cross-Link or Not to Cross-Link? Cross-Linking Associated Foreign Body Response of Collagen-Based Devices

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Luis M.; Bayon, Yves; Pandit, Abhay

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-based devices, in various physical conformations, are extensively used for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Given that the natural cross-linking pathway of collagen does not occur in vitro, chemical, physical, and biological cross-linking methods have been assessed over the years to control mechanical stability, degradation rate, and immunogenicity of the device upon implantation. Although in vitro data demonstrate that mechanical properties and degradation rate can be accurately controlled as a function of the cross-linking method utilized, preclinical and clinical data indicate that cross-linking methods employed may have adverse effects on host response, especially when potent cross-linking methods are employed. Experimental data suggest that more suitable cross-linking methods should be developed to achieve a balance between stability and functional remodeling. PMID:25517923

  19. Regulation of water flow by actin-binding protein-induced actin gelatin.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, T; Suzuki, A; Stossel, T P

    1992-01-01

    Actin filaments inhibit osmotically driven water flow (Ito, T., K.S. Zaner, and T.P. Stossel. 1987. Biophys. J. 51: 745-753). Here we show that the actin gelation protein, actin-binding protein (ABP), impedes both osmotic shrinkage and swelling of an actin filament solution and reduces markedly the concentration of actin filaments required for this inhibition. These effects depend on actin filament immobilization, because the ABP concentration that causes initial impairment of water flow by actin filaments corresponds to the gel point measured viscometrically and because gelsolin, which noncovalently severs actin filaments, solates actin gels and restores water flow in a solution of actin cross-linked by ABP. Since ABP gels actin filaments in the periphery of many eukaryotic cells, such actin networks may contribute to physiological cell volume regulation. PMID:1318095

  20. A novel function of the monomeric CCTε subunit connects the serum response factor pathway to chaperone-mediated actin folding

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Kerryn L.; Svanström, Andreas; Spiess, Matthias; Karlsson, Roger; Grantham, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Correct protein folding is fundamental for maintaining protein homeostasis and avoiding the formation of potentially cytotoxic protein aggregates. Although some proteins appear to fold unaided, actin requires assistance from the oligomeric molecular chaperone CCT. Here we report an additional connection between CCT and actin by identifying one of the CCT subunits, CCTε, as a component of the myocardin-related cotranscription factor-A (MRTF-A)/serum response factor (SRF) pathway. The SRF pathway registers changes in G-actin levels, leading to the transcriptional up-regulation of a large number of genes after actin polymerization. These genes encode numerous actin-binding proteins as well as actin. We show that depletion of the CCTε subunit by siRNA enhances SRF signaling in cultured mammalian cells by an actin assembly-independent mechanism. Overexpression of CCTε in its monomeric form revealed that CCTε binds via its substrate-binding domain to the C-terminal region of MRTF-A and that CCTε is able to alter the nuclear accumulation of MRTF-A after stimulation by serum addition. Given that the levels of monomeric CCTε conversely reflect the levels of CCT oligomer, our results suggest that CCTε provides a connection between the actin-folding capacity of the cell and actin expression. PMID:26063733

  1. Actin-Depolymerizing Factor2-Mediated Actin Dynamics Are Essential for Root-Knot Nematode Infection of Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Mathilde; Ketelaar, Tijs; Rodiuc, Natalia; Banora, Mohamed Youssef; Smertenko, Andrei; Engler, Gilbert; Abad, Pierre; Hussey, Patrick J.; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2009-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin and microtubule networks is known to occur in targeted vascular parenchymal root cells upon infection with the nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Here, we show that actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) is upregulated in the giant feeding cells of Arabidopsis thaliana that develop upon nematode infection and that knockdown of a specific ADF isotype inhibits nematode proliferation. Analysis of the levels of transcript and the localization of seven ADF genes shows that five are upregulated in galls that result from the infection and that ADF2 expression is particularly increased between 14 and 21 d after nematode inoculation. Further analysis of ADF2 function in inducible RNA interference lines designed to knock down ADF2 expression reveals that this protein is required for normal cell growth and plant development. The net effect of decreased levels of ADF2 is F-actin stabilization in cells, resulting from decreased F-actin turnover. In nematode-infected plants with reduced levels of ADF2, the galls containing the giant feeding cells and growing nematodes do not develop due to the arrest in growth of the giant multinucleate feeding cells, which in turn is due to an aberrant actin network. PMID:19794115

  2. Kojak: Efficient analysis of chemically cross-linked protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hoopmann, Michael R.; Zelter, Alex; Johnson, Richard S.; Riffle, Michael; MacCoss, Michael J.; Davis, Trisha N.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry enable the analysis of protein-protein interactions and protein topologies, however complicated cross-linked peptide spectra require specialized algorithms to identify interacting sites. The Kojak cross-linking software application is a new, efficient approach to identify cross-linked peptides, enabling large-scale analysis of protein-protein interactions by chemical cross-linking techniques. The algorithm integrates spectral processing and scoring schemes adopted from traditional database search algorithms, and can identify cross-linked peptides using many different chemical cross-linkers, with or without heavy isotope labels. Kojak was used to analyze both novel and existing datasets, and was compared with existing cross-linking algorithms. The algorithm provided increased cross-link identifications over existing algorithms, and equally importantly, the results in a fraction of computational time. The Kojak algorithm is open-source, cross-platform, and freely available. This software provides both existing and new cross-linking researchers alike an effective way to derive additional cross-link identifications from new or existing datasets. For new users, it provides a simple analytical resource resulting in more cross-link identifications than other methods. PMID:25812159

  3. Riboflavin for corneal cross-linking.

    PubMed

    O'Brart, D P S

    2016-06-01

    Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) with riboflavin and ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation is the first therapeutic modality that appears to arrest the progression of keratoconus and other corneal ectasias. Riboflavin is central to the process, acting as a photosensitizer for the production of oxygen singlets and riboflavin triplets. These free radicals drive the CXL process within the proteins of the corneal stroma, altering its biomechanical properties. Riboflavin also absorbs the majority of the UVA radiation, which is potentially cytotoxic and mutagenic, within the anterior stroma, preventing damage to internal ocular structures, such as the corneal endothelium, lens and retina. Clinical studies report cessation of ectatic progression in over 90% of cases and the majority document significant improvements in visual, keratometric and topographic parameters. Clinical follow-up is limited to 5-10 years, but suggests sustained stability and enhancement in corneal shape. Sight-threatening complications are rare. The optimal stromal riboflavin dosage for CXL is as yet undetermined. PMID:27458610

  4. Quinone cross-linked polysaccharide hybrid fiber.

    PubMed

    Kuboe, Yoshiko; Tonegawa, Hitomi; Ohkawa, Kousaku; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    The present article describes the synthesis of the N-(Lys-Gly-Tyr-Gly)-chitosan using the water-soluble active ester method, the preparation of the N-(Lys-Gly-Tyr-Gly)-chitosan-gellan hybrid fibers, and the reinforcement of the hybrid fibers by enzymatic cross-linking between the N-grafted peptides chains of chitosan. The cationic polysaccharide chitosan was treated with Boc-Lys(Z)-Gly-Tyr(Bzl)-Gly (4-hydroxyphenyl)dimethylsulfonium methyl sulfate ester in DMF-0.15 M acetic acid to incorporate the peptides into the side chain amino groups of chitosan followed by the acidic removals of the Z and Bzl groups. The degrees of N substitution were estimated to be 2.0 and 10 molar % by changing the molar ratios of the amino groups of the parent chitosan and the active ester. The resulting cationic N-(Lys-Gly-Tyr-Gly)-chitosan was spun into the hybrid fibers with the anionic polysaccharide gellan in water. The tensile strengths of the N-(Lys-Gly-Tyr-Gly)-chitosan hybrid fibers were superior to those of the original chitosan-gellan fibers. The mechanical strengths of the hybrid fibers further increased upon enzymatic oxidation using tyrosinase. Based on these results, we concluded that the covalent cross-linking due to the enzyme oxidation between the grafted peptides significantly contributed to reinforcement of the polysaccharide hybrid fibers. The present results afford a new methodology for the reinforcement achieved by the polymer modification inspired by a biological process. PMID:15002994

  5. Actin Recruitment to the Chlamydia Inclusion Is Spatiotemporally Regulated by a Mechanism That Requires Host and Bacterial Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Elizabeth; Kirker, Kelly; Zuck, Meghan; James, Garth; Hybiske, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The ability to exit host cells at the end of their developmental growth is a critical step for the intracellular bacterium Chlamydia. One exit strategy, extrusion, is mediated by host signaling pathways involved with actin polymerization. Here, we show that actin is recruited to the chlamydial inclusion as a late event, occurring after 20 hours post-infection (hpi) and only within a subpopulation of cells. This event increases significantly in prevalence and extent from 20 to 68 hpi, and actin coats strongly correlated with extrusions. In contrast to what has been reported for other intracellular pathogens, actin nucleation on Chlamydia inclusions did not ‘flash’, but rather exhibited moderate depolymerization dynamics. By using small molecule agents to selectively disrupt host signaling pathways involved with actin nucleation, modulate actin polymerization dynamics and also to disable the synthesis and secretion of chlamydial proteins, we further show that host and bacterial proteins are required for actin coat formation. Transient disruption of either host or bacterial signaling pathways resulted in rapid loss of coats in all infected cells and a reduction in extrusion formation. Inhibition of Chlamydia type III secretion also resulted in rapid loss of actin association on inclusions, thus implicating chlamydial effector proteins(s) as being central factors for engaging with host actin nucleating factors, such as formins. In conclusion, our data illuminate the host and bacterial driven process by which a dense actin matrix is dynamically nucleated and maintained on the Chlamydia inclusion. This late stage event is not ubiquitous for all infected cells in a population, and escalates in prevalence and extent throughout the developmental cycle of Chlamydia, culminating with their exit from the host cell by extrusion. The initiation of actin recruitment by Chlamydia appears to be novel, and may serve as an upstream determinant of the extrusion mechanism. PMID

  6. TaADF3, an Actin-Depolymerizing Factor, Negatively Modulates Wheat Resistance Against Puccinia striiformis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chunlei; Deng, Lin; Chang, Dan; Chen, Shuntao; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated in plant defense against pathogenic fungi, oomycetes, and bacteria. Actin depolymerizing factors (ADFs) are stimulus responsive actin cytoskeleton modulators. However, there is limited evidence linking ADFs with plant defense against pathogens. In this study, we have isolated and functionally characterized a stress-responsive ADF gene (TaADF3) from wheat, which was detectable in all examined wheat tissues. TaADF3 is a three-copy gene located on chromosomes 5AL, 5BL, and 5DL. A particle bombardment assay in onion epidermal cells revealed the cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of TaADF3. The expression of TaADF3 was inducible by abscisic acid (ABA), as well as various abiotic stresses (drought and cold) and virulent Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) but was down regulated in response to avirulent Pst. Virus-induced silencing of TaADF3 copies enhanced wheat resistance to avirulent Pst, with decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and hypersensitive response (HR). Upon treatment with virulent Pst, TaADF3-knockdown plants exhibited reduced susceptibility, which was accompanied by increased ROS production and HR. Interestingly, the silencing of TaADF3 resulted in hindered pathogen penetration and haustoria formation for both avirulent and virulent Pst. Moreover, the array and distribution of actin filaments was transformed in TaADF3-knockdown epidermal cells, which possibly facilitated attenuating the fungus penetration. Thus, our findings suggest that TaADF3 positively regulates wheat tolerance to abiotic stresses and negatively regulates wheat resistance to Pst in an ROS-dependent manner, possibly underlying the mechanism of impeding fungal penetration dependent on the actin architecture dynamics. PMID:26834758

  7. Food-contact epoxy resin: co-variation between migration and degree of cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Lambert, C; Larroque, M; Lebrun, J C; Gérard, J F

    1997-01-01

    In order to predict the behaviour towards foodstuffs of an epoxy resin composed of bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE), 4,4'-methylenedianiline (MDA) and additives (plasticizers: dibutylphthalate (DBP), dioctylphthalate (DOP); accelerator: salicylic acid; inorganic fillers), a co-variation was established between the parameters evaluating the degree of cross-linking of the three-dimensional network and the migration of constituent molecules into various food simulants (distilled water, distilled water/ethanol/acetic acid, distilled water/ethanol). Varied degrees of cross-linking were obtained by subjecting the resin to different curing temperatures: respectively, 5 degrees C, 20 degrees C, 50 degrees C and 90 degrees C for 7 days. Irrespective of the food stimulant tested, specific migrations (DBP, DOP, salicylic acid, primary aromatic amines) diminished greatly as the curing temperature increased. At the same time, the degree of cross-linking increased with curing temperature, as indicated by the increase in glass transition temperature, the decrease in residual reaction exotherms and increased stability of the rubber storage modulus E'rub (increase in cross-link nodes), the fall in relaxation enthalpies (reduction in physical ageing) and the decreased amplitude of the loss-factor, tan delta (reduction in chain mobility). Maximum cross-linking was obtained in the resin cured at 90 degrees C (temperature above Tg infinity). In contrast to the degree of cross-linking, evaporation contributed little to the reduction of migration due to the elevation of curing temperature. PMID:9102353

  8. Static and dynamic properties of model elastomer with various cross-linking densities: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Cao, Dapeng; Zhang, Liqun

    2009-07-01

    The effects of the cross-linking density on the static and dynamic properties of polymer networks are examined by using a molecular dynamics simulation based on a simple elastomer model. Simulation results indicate that the introduced cross-linking junctions show almost no effect on the static structure factor. The glass transition temperature Tg increases slightly with the cross-linking density. By analyzing the mean square displacement of the monomers, the chain diffusion, and the incoherent intermediate dynamic structure factor ϕqs(t) at the chain and segmental length scales, it is found that the mobilities of the monomers and chains are retarded and the relaxation behavior is hindered by the cross linking of polymers. Furthermore, the spatial localization of the monomers is also observed at a long time period for a highly cross-linked system. For the cross-linked system, the time-temperature superposition principle is valid at the segmental length scale but breaks down at the chain length scale. The effect of the cross-linking density on the terminal relaxation is investigated by the end-to-end vector correlation, which is well fitted to the Kohlrauch-William-Watts (KWW) or modified KWW functions. The characteristic relaxation time shows an approximately linear relationship with the cross-linking density. It is demonstrated that the relaxation behavior tends to broaden, attributed to the stronger intermolecular coupling or cooperativity induced by the cross linking, suggesting that the system with a higher cross-linking degree becomes more fragile. For the dynamic properties, the bond orientation and the end-to-end distance along the deformed direction, which is an indicator of the entropic change, and the nonbonded energy are examined during the deformation and relaxation processes, respectively. The results explore the molecular mechanism accounting for the residual stress in the stress relaxation of cross-linked elastomer networks.

  9. Static and dynamic properties of model elastomer with various cross-linking densities: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Cao, Dapeng; Zhang, Liqun

    2009-07-21

    The effects of the cross-linking density on the static and dynamic properties of polymer networks are examined by using a molecular dynamics simulation based on a simple elastomer model. Simulation results indicate that the introduced cross-linking junctions show almost no effect on the static structure factor. The glass transition temperature T(g) increases slightly with the cross-linking density. By analyzing the mean square displacement of the monomers, the chain diffusion, and the incoherent intermediate dynamic structure factor phi(q)(s)(t) at the chain and segmental length scales, it is found that the mobilities of the monomers and chains are retarded and the relaxation behavior is hindered by the cross linking of polymers. Furthermore, the spatial localization of the monomers is also observed at a long time period for a highly cross-linked system. For the cross-linked system, the time-temperature superposition principle is valid at the segmental length scale but breaks down at the chain length scale. The effect of the cross-linking density on the terminal relaxation is investigated by the end-to-end vector correlation, which is well fitted to the Kohlrauch-William-Watts (KWW) or modified KWW functions. The characteristic relaxation time shows an approximately linear relationship with the cross-linking density. It is demonstrated that the relaxation behavior tends to broaden, attributed to the stronger intermolecular coupling or cooperativity induced by the cross linking, suggesting that the system with a higher cross-linking degree becomes more fragile. For the dynamic properties, the bond orientation and the end-to-end distance along the deformed direction, which is an indicator of the entropic change, and the nonbonded energy are examined during the deformation and relaxation processes, respectively. The results explore the molecular mechanism accounting for the residual stress in the stress relaxation of cross-linked elastomer networks. PMID:19624229

  10. Collagen cross-linking and resorption: effect of glutaraldehyde concentration.

    PubMed

    Roe, S C; Milthorpe, B K; Schindhelm, K

    1990-12-01

    Cross-linked collagen bioprostheses usually are designed to be inert and nonresorbable, resulting in fatigue and wear failure in high-stress environments. Eventual replacement of the implant, although minimizing strength loss during resorption, would result in a graft with reparative ability. Kangaroo tail tendon (KTT) partially cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GA) was evaluated in vitro for resistance to bacterial collagenase digestion and in vivo for biocompatibility and resorbability in an intramuscular implant assay. Cross-linking was quantified by thermal denaturation studies. Incomplete cross-linking was achieved with concentrations of GA less than 0.1% (w/v). KTT cross-linked in greater than or equal to 0.05% GA were collagenase resistant being incompletely digested after 240 h. Cross-linking of KTT with low concentrations of GA resulted in partial collagenase resistance and slowed resorption. PMID:2126427

  11. G-actin provides substrate-specificity to eukaryotic initiation factor 2α holophosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruming; Rato, Cláudia; Yan, Yahui; Crespillo-Casado, Ana; Clarke, Hanna J; Harding, Heather P; Marciniak, Stefan J; Read, Randy J; Ron, David

    2015-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2a (eIF2a) restores protein synthesis at the waning of stress responses and requires a PP1 catalytic subunit and a regulatory subunit, PPP1R15A/GADD34 or PPP1R15B/CReP. Surprisingly, PPP1R15-PP1 binary complexes reconstituted in vitro lacked substrate selectivity. However, selectivity was restored by crude cell lysate or purified G-actin, which joined PPP1R15-PP1 to form a stable ternary complex. In crystal structures of the non-selective PPP1R15B-PP1G complex, the functional core of PPP1R15 made multiple surface contacts with PP1G, but at a distance from the active site, whereas in the substrate-selective ternary complex, actin contributes to one face of a platform encompassing the active site. Computational docking of the N-terminal lobe of eIF2a at this platform placed phosphorylated serine 51 near the active site. Mutagenesis of predicted surface-contacting residues enfeebled dephosphorylation, suggesting that avidity for the substrate plays an important role in imparting specificity on the PPP1R15B-PP1G-actin ternary complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04871.001 PMID:25774600

  12. Isolation and characterization of a regulated form of actin depolymerizing factor.

    PubMed

    Morgan, T E; Lockerbie, R O; Minamide, L S; Browning, M D; Bamburg, J R

    1993-08-01

    Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) is an 18.5-kD protein with pH-dependent reciprocal F-actin binding and severing/depolymerizing activities. We previously showed developing muscle down-regulates ADF (J. R. Bamburg and D. Bray. 1987. J. Cell Biol. 105: 2817-2825). To further study this process, we examined ADF expression in chick myocytes cultured in vitro. Surprisingly, ADF immunoreactivity increases during the first 7-10 d in culture. This increase is due to the presence of a new ADF species with higher relative molecular weight which reacts identically to brain ADF with antisera raised against either brain ADF or recombinant ADF. We have purified both ADF isoforms from myocytes and have shown by peptide mapping and partial sequence analysis that the new isoform is structurally related to ADF. Immunoprecipitation of both isoforms from extracts of cells prelabeled with [32P]orthophosphate showed that the new isoform is radiolabeled, predominantly on a serine residue, and hence is called pADF. pADF can be converted into a form which comigrates with ADF on 1-D and 2-D gels by treatment with alkaline phosphatase. pADF has been quantified in a number of cells and tissues where it is present from approximately 18% to 150% of the amount of unphosphorylated ADF. pADF, unlike ADF, does not bind to G-actin, or affect the rate or extent of actin assembly. Four ubiquitous protein kinases failed to phosphorylate ADF in vitro suggesting that ADF phosphorylation in vivo is catalyzed by a more specific kinase. We conclude that the ability to regulate ADF activity is important to muscle development since myocytes have both pre- and posttranslational mechanisms for regulating ADF activity. The latter mechanism is apparently a general one for cell regulation of ADF activity. PMID:7687605

  13. A photolithographic approach to spatially resolved cross-linked nanolayers.

    PubMed

    Fuchise, Keita; Lindemann, Peter; Heißler, Stefan; Gliemann, Hartmut; Trouillet, Vanessa; Welle, Alexander; Berson, Jonathan; Walheim, Stefan; Schimmel, Thomas; Meier, Michael A R; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-03-17

    The preparation of cross-linked nanosheets with 1-2 nm thickness and predefined shape was achieved by lithographic immobilization of trimethacryloyl thioalkanoates onto the surface of Si wafers, which were functionalized with 2-(phenacylthio)acetamido groups via a photoinduced reaction. Subsequent cross-linking via free radical polymerization as well as a phototriggered Diels-Alder reaction under mild conditions on the surface led to the desired nanosheets. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), as well as infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) confirmed the success of individual surface-modification and cross-linking reactions. The thickness and lateral size of the cross-linked structures were determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) for samples prepared on Si wafers functionalized with a self-assembled monolayer of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl groups bearing circular pores obtained via a polymer blend lithographic approach, which led to the cross-linking reactions occurring in circular nanoareas (diameter of 50-640 nm) yielding an average thickness of 1.2 nm (radical cross-linking), 1.8 nm (radical cross-linking in the presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate as a comonomer), and 1.1 nm (photochemical cross-linking) of the nanosheets. PMID:25705846

  14. Multi-Scale Modeling of Cross-Linked Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Odegard, G. M.; Herzog, M. N.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of cross-linking single-walled carbon nanotubes on the Young's modulus of a nanotube-reinforced composite is modeled with a multi-scale method. The Young's modulus is predicted as a function of nanotube volume fraction and cross-link density. In this method, the constitutive properties of molecular representative volume elements are determined using molecular dynamics simulation and equivalent-continuum modeling. The Young's modulus is subsequently calculated for cross-linked nanotubes in a matrix which consists of the unreacted cross-linking agent. Two different cross-linking agents are used in this study, one that is short and rigid (Molecule A), and one that is long and flexible (Molecule B). Direct comparisons between the predicted elastic constants are made for the models in which the nanotubes are either covalently bonded or not chemically bonded to the cross-linking agent. At a nanotube volume fraction of 10%, the Young's modulus of Material A is not affected by nanotube crosslinking, while the Young's modulus of Material B is reduced by 64% when the nanotubes are cross-linked relative to the non-cross-linked material with the same matrix.

  15. Pharmacologic Alternatives to Riboflavin Photochemical Corneal Cross-Linking: A Comparison Study of Cell Toxicity Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, MiJung; Takaoka, Anna; Hoang, Quan V.; Trokel, Stephen L.; Paik, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The efficacy of therapeutic cross-linking of the cornea using riboflavin photochemistry (commonly abbreviated as CXL) has caused its use to become widespread. Because there are known chemical agents that cross-link collagenous tissues, it may be possible to cross-link tissue pharmacologically. The present study was undertaken to compare the cell toxicity of such agents. Methods. Nine topical cross-linking agents (five nitroalcohols, glyceraldehyde [GLYC], genipin [GP], paraformaldehyde [FA], and glutaraldehyde [GLUT]) were tested with four different cell lines (immortalized human corneal epithelial cells, human skin fibroblasts, primary bovine corneal endothelial cells, and immortalized human retinal pigment epithelial cells [ARPE-19]). The cells were grown in planar culture and exposed to each agent in a range of concentrations (0.001 mM to 10 mM) for 24 hours followed by a 48-hour recovery phase. Toxicity thresholds were determined by using the trypan blue exclusion method. Results. A semiquantitative analysis using five categories of toxicity/fixation was carried out, based on plate attachment, uptake of trypan blue stain, and cellular fixation. The toxicity levels varied by a factor of 103 with the least toxic being mononitroalcohols and GLYC, intermediate toxicity for a nitrodiol and nitrotriol, and the most toxic being GLUT, FA, GP, and bronopol, a brominated nitrodiol. When comparing toxicity between different cell lines, the levels were generally in agreement. Conclusions. There are significant differences in cell toxicity among potential topical cross-linking compounds. The balance between cross-linking of tissue and cell toxicity should be borne in mind as compounds and strategies to improve mechanical tissue properties through therapeutic tissue cross-linking continue to develop. PMID:24722697

  16. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol and method of making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C.; Sheibley, D. W.; Philipp, W. H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A film-forming polyvinyl alcohol polymer is mixed with a polyaldehyde-polysaccharide cross-linking agent having at least two monosaccharide units and a plurality of aldehyde groups per molecule, perferably an average of at least one aldehyde group per monosaccharide units. The cross-linking agent, such as a polydialdehyde starch, is used in an amount of about 2.5 to 20% of the theoretical amount required to cross-link all of the available hydroxyl groups of the polyvinyl alcohol polymer. Reaction between the polymer and cross-linking agent is effected in aqueous acidic solution to produce the cross-linked polymer. The polymer product has low electrical resistivity and other properties rendering it suitable for making separators for alkaline batteries.

  17. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol films as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1982-01-01

    Cross-linking methods were investigated to determine their effect on the performance of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films as alkaline battery separators. The following types of cross-linked PVA films are discussed: (1) PVA-dialdehyde blends post-treated with an acid or acid periodate solution (two-step method) and (2) PVA-dialdehyde blends cross-linked during film formation (drying) by using a reagent with both aldehyde and acid functionality (one-step method). Laboratory samples of each cross-linked type of film were prepared and evaluated in standard separator screening tests. The pilot-plant batches of films were prepared and compared to measure differences due to the cross-linking method. The pilot-plant materials were then tested in nickel oxide - zinc cells to compare the two methods with respect to performance characteristics and cycle life. Cell test results are compared with those from tests with Celgard.

  18. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol films as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1983-01-01

    Cross-linking methods have been investigated to determine their effect on the performance of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films as alkaline battery separators. The following types of cross-linked PVA films are discussed: (1) PVA-dialdehyde blends post-treated with an acid or acid periodate solution (two-step method) and (2) PVA-dialdehyde blends cross-linked during film formation (drying) by using a reagent with both aldehyde and acid functionality (one-step method). Laboratory samples of each cross-linked type of film were prepared and evaluated in standard separator screening tests. Then pilot-plant batches of films were prepared and compared to measure differences due to the cross-linking method. The pilot-plant materials were then tested in nickel oxide-zinc cells to compare the two methods with respect to performance characteristics and cycle life. Cell test results are compared with those from tests with Celgard.

  19. Effective-medium approach for stiff polymer networks with flexible cross-links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broedersz, C. P.; Storm, C.; Mackintosh, F. C.

    2009-06-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that the nonlinear elasticity of in vitro networks of the biopolymer actin is dramatically altered in the presence of a flexible cross-linker such as the abundant cytoskeletal protein filamin. The basic principles of such networks remain poorly understood. Here we describe an effective-medium theory of flexibly cross-linked stiff polymer networks. We argue that the response of the cross-links can be fully attributed to entropic stiffening, while softening due to domain unfolding can be ignored. The network is modeled as a collection of randomly oriented rods connected by flexible cross-links to an elastic continuum. This effective medium is treated in a linear elastic limit as well as in a more general framework, in which the medium self-consistently represents the nonlinear network behavior. This model predicts that the nonlinear elastic response sets in at strains proportional to cross-linker length and inversely proportional to filament length. Furthermore, we find that the differential modulus scales linearly with the stress in the stiffening regime. These results are in excellent agreement with bulk rheology data.

  20. Synthesis of surface protein-imprinted nanoparticles endowed with reversible physical cross-links.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chongchong; Yan, Xianming; Guo, Hao; Fu, Guoqi

    2016-01-15

    Researches on protein molecularly imprinted polymers have been challenged by the difficulties in facilitating biomacromolecular transfer, in particular upon the template removal step, and enhancing their recognition performance. Addressing these issues, herein we report synthesis of core–shell structured surface protein-imprinted nanoparticles with reversible physical cross-links formed in the imprinted nanoshells. The imprinted layers over nanoparticle supports are fabricated via aqueous precipitation polymerization (PP) of di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (MEO2MA), a thermo-responsive monomer bearing no strong H-bond donor, and other functional and cross-linking monomers. During polymerization, physical cross-links together with chemical cross-links are in site produced within the imprinted shells based on hydrophobic association among the PMEO2MA, favoring formation of high-quality imprints. While cooled appropriately below the polymerization temperature, these physical cross-links can be dissociated rapidly, thus facilitating removal of the embedded template. For proof of this concept, lysozyme-imprinted nanoparticles were synthesized at 37 °C over the nanoparticles functionalized with carboxylic and vinyl groups. The template removal from the imprinted nanoparticles was readily achieved by washing with a dilute acidic detergent solution at 4 °C. As-prepared imprinted nanoparticles showed greatly higher imprinting factor and specific rebinding than obtained with the same recipe but by solution polymerization (SP). Moreover, such imprinted nanomaterials exhibited satisfactory rebinding selectivity, kinetics and reusability. PMID:26313422

  1. Comparison of cross-linked polyethylene materials for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Collier, John P; Currier, Barbara H; Kennedy, Francis E; Currier, John H; Timmins, Graham S; Jackson, Simon K; Brewer, Robin L

    2003-09-01

    Cross-linked polyethylenes are being marketed by orthopaedic manufacturers to address the problem of osteolysis caused by polyethylene particulate wear debris. Wear testing of these cross-linked polyethylenes in hip simulators has shown dramatic reduction in wear rate compared with standard ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene, either gamma irradiated in air or nitrogen - or ethylene oxide-sterilized. However, this reduction in wear rate is not without cost. The cross-linking processes can result in materials with lower mechanical properties than standard ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene. To evaluate the effect of the various cross-linking processes on physical and mechanical properties of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene, commercially available cross-linked polyethylenes from six orthopaedic manufacturers were tested. This study was the culmination of collaboration with these manufacturers, who provided cross-linked polyethylene for this study, wear characteristics of the material they provided, and review of the physical and mechanical properties measure for their polyethylene. Cross-linked materials were evaluated as received and after an accelerated aging protocol. Free radical identity and concentration, oxidation, crystallinity, melt temperature, ultimate tensile strength, elongation at break, tensile stress at yield, and toughness are reported for each material. By comparing these physical and mechanical properties, surgeons can evaluate the trade-off that results from developing materials with substantially lower wear rates. PMID:12966304

  2. Solution processed organic light-emitting diodes using the plasma cross-linking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kongduo; Liu, Yang; Gong, Junyi; Zeng, Pan; Kong, Xun; Yang, Xilu; Yang, Cheng; Yu, Yan; Liang, Rongqing; Ou, Qiongrong

    2016-09-01

    Solution processed multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) present challenges, especially regarding dissolution of the first layer during deposition of a second layer. In this work, we first demonstrated a plasma cross-linking technology to produce a solution processed OLED. The surfaces of organic films can be cross-linked after mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment for several tens of seconds and resist corrosion of organic solvent. The film thickness and surface morphology of emissive layers (EMLs) with plasma treatment and subsequently spin-rinsed with chlorobenzene are nearly unchanged. The solution processed triple-layer OLED is successfully fabricated and the current efficiency increases 50% than that of the double-layer OLED. Fluorescent characteristics of EMLs are also observed to investigate factors influencing the efficiency of the triple-layer OLED. Plasma cross-linking technology may open up a new pathway towards fabrication of all-solution processed multilayer OLEDs and other soft electronic devices.

  3. Redox-Responsive, Core Cross-Linked Polyester Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhonghai; Yin, Lichen; Tu, Chunlai; Song, Ziyuan; Zhang, Yanfeng; Xu, Yunxiang; Tong, Rong; Zhou, Qin; Ren, Jie; Cheng, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(Tyr(alkynyl)-OCA), a biodegradable amphiphilic block copolymer, was synthesized by means of ring-opening polymerization of 5-(4-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)benzyl)-1,3-dioxolane-2,4-dione (Tyr(alkynyl)-OCA) and used to prepare core cross-linked polyester micelles via click chemistry. Core cross-linking not only improved the structural stability of the micelles but also allowed controlled release of cargo molecules in response to the reducing reagent. This new class of core cross-linked micelles can potentially be used in controlled release and drug delivery applications. PMID:23536920

  4. Chemical Cross-linking of Neighboring Thylakoid Membrane Polypeptides 12

    PubMed Central

    Novak-Hofer, Ilse; Siegenthaler, Paul-Andre

    1978-01-01

    Cross-linking between protein components of whole spinach (Spinacia oleracea var. Nobel) thylakoids and of photosystem I- and II-enriched thylakoid fractions has been produced by reaction with the bifunctional imidoester dimethyl-3,3′-dithiobispropionimidate dihydrochloride as well as by the oxidation of intrinsic sulfydryl groups with an orthophenanthrolinecupric ion complex. The mixture of membrane proteins and their cross-linked products has been analyzed by two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis, with a reductive cleavage step of the cross-linkages before the second dimension. Cross-linked aggregates up to a molecular weight of about 130 kilodaltons (kD) were analyzed, and it was inferred that the polypeptides appearing together in the same aggregates were neighbors within the membrane. In thylakoids as well as in isolated photosystem fractions, oligomers were formed by cross-linking polypeptides of the 60 to 90 kD range, among them the polypeptides of the chlorophyll-protein complex I. Polypeptides of 46, 19, and 12 kD were cross-linked to these complexes. Polypeptides of 25 and 22 kD, which are related to the chlorophyll-protein complex II, were cross-linked in thylakoids as well as in photosystem II fractions, suggesting that in the membrane these molecules are close together. In photosystem II fractions an oligomer having a molecular weight of about 60 kD was formed by cross-linking several polypeptides of different molecular weights: 40, 25, and 22 kD. Our cross-linking experiments show that protein interactions in the thylakoid membrane occurred mainly among the polypeptides of the two chlorophyll-protein complexes, thus suggesting an oligomeric nature of these apoproteins. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:16660519

  5. Large Scale Chemical Cross-linking Mass Spectrometry Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zybailov, Boris L.; Glazko, Galina V.; Jaiswal, Mihir; Raney, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    The spectacular heterogeneity of a complex protein mixture from biological samples becomes even more difficult to tackle when one’s attention is shifted towards different protein complex topologies, transient interactions, or localization of PPIs. Meticulous protein-by-protein affinity pull-downs and yeast-two-hybrid screens are the two approaches currently used to decipher proteome-wide interaction networks. Another method is to employ chemical cross-linking, which gives not only identities of interactors, but could also provide information on the sites of interactions and interaction interfaces. Despite significant advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation over the last decade, mapping Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) using chemical cross-linking remains time consuming and requires substantial expertise, even in the simplest of systems. While robust methodologies and software exist for the analysis of binary PPIs and also for the single protein structure refinement using cross-linking-derived constraints, undertaking a proteome-wide cross-linking study is highly complex. Difficulties include i) identifying cross-linkers of the right length and selectivity that could capture interactions of interest; ii) enrichment of the cross-linked species; iii) identification and validation of the cross-linked peptides and cross-linked sites. In this review we examine existing literature aimed at the large-scale protein cross-linking and discuss possible paths for improvement. We also discuss short-length cross-linkers of broad specificity such as formaldehyde and diazirine-based photo-cross-linkers. These cross-linkers could potentially capture many types of interactions, without strict requirement for a particular amino-acid to be present at a given protein-protein interface. How these shortlength, broad specificity cross-linkers be applied to proteome-wide studies? We will suggest specific advances in methodology, instrumentation and software that are needed to

  6. Photocontrolled Cargo Release from Dual Cross-Linked Polymer Particles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shereen; Cui, Jiwei; Fu, Qiang; Nam, Eunhyung; Ladewig, Katharina; Ren, Jing M; Wong, Edgar H H; Caruso, Frank; Blencowe, Anton; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-03-01

    Burst release of a payload from polymeric particles upon photoirradiation was engineered by altering the cross-linking density. This was achieved via a dual cross-linking concept whereby noncovalent cross-linking was provided by cyclodextrin host-guest interactions, and irreversible covalent cross-linking was mediated by continuous assembly of polymers (CAP). The dual cross-linked particles (DCPs) were efficiently infiltrated (∼80-93%) by the biomacromolecule dextran (molecular weight up to 500 kDa) to provide high loadings (70-75%). Upon short exposure (5 s) to UV light, the noncovalent cross-links were disrupted resulting in increased permeability and burst release of the cargo (50 mol % within 1 s) as visualized by time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. As sunlight contains UV light at low intensities, the particles can potentially be incorporated into systems used in agriculture, environmental control, and food packaging, whereby sunlight could control the release of nutrients and antimicrobial agents. PMID:26862769

  7. Cross-linking and the molecular packing of corneal collagen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Chandler, G. S.; Tanzawa, H.; Katz, E. P.

    1996-01-01

    We have quantitatively characterized, for the first time, the cross-linking in bovine cornea collagen as a function of age. The major iminium reducible cross-links were dehydro-hydroxylysinonorleucine (deH-HLNL) and dehydro-histidinohydroxymerodesmosine (deH-HHMD). The former rapidly diminished after birth; however, the latter persisted in mature animals at a level of 0.3 - 0.4 moles/mole of collagen. A nonreducible cross-link, histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL), previously found only in skin, was also found to be a major mature cross-link in cornea. The presence of HHL indicates that cornea fibrils have a molecular packing similar to skin collagen. However, like deH-HHMD, the HHL content in corneal fibrils only reaches a maximum value with time about half that of skin. These data suggest that the corneal fibrils are comprised of discrete filaments that are internally stabilized by HHL and deH-HHMD cross-links. This pattern of intermolecular cross-linking would facilitate the special collagen swelling property required for corneal transparency.

  8. An Integrated Chemical Cross-linking and Mass Spectrometry Approach to Study Protein Complex Architecture and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Fishburn, James; Hahn, Steven; Ranish, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of protein structures and protein-protein interactions is essential for understanding biological processes. Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry is an attractive approach for studying protein-protein interactions and protein structure, but to date its use has been limited largely by low yields of informative cross-links (because of inefficient cross-linking reactions) and by the difficulty of confidently identifying the sequences of cross-linked peptide pairs from their fragmentation spectra. Here we present an approach based on a new MS labile cross-linking reagent, BDRG (biotin-aspartate-Rink-glycine), which addresses these issues. BDRG incorporates a biotin handle (for enrichment of cross-linked peptides prior to MS analysis), two pentafluorophenyl ester groups that react with peptide amines, and a labile Rink-based bond between the pentafluorophenyl groups that allows cross-linked peptides to be separated during MS and confidently identified by database searching of their fragmentation spectra. We developed a protocol for the identification of BDRG cross-linked peptides derived from purified or partially purified protein complexes, including software to aid in the identification of different classes of cross-linker-modified peptides. Importantly, our approach permits the use of high accuracy precursor mass measurements to verify the database search results. We demonstrate the utility of the approach by applying it to purified yeast TFIIE, a heterodimeric transcription factor complex, and to a single-step affinity-purified preparation of the 12-subunit RNA polymerase II complex. The results show that the method is effective at identifying cross-linked peptides derived from purified and partially purified protein complexes and provides complementary information to that from other structural approaches. As such, it is an attractive approach to study the topology of protein complexes. PMID:22067100

  9. Wear, debris, and biologic activity of cross-linked polyethylene in the knee: benefits and potential concerns.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John; McEwen, Hannah M J; Tipper, Joanne L; Galvin, Alison L; Ingram, Jo; Kamali, Amir; Stone, Martin H; Ingham, Eileen

    2004-11-01

    Cross-linked polyethylene currently is being introduced in knee prostheses. The wear rates, wear debris, and biologic reactivity of non cross-linked, moderately cross-linked, and highly cross-linked polyethylene have been compared in multidirectional wear tests and knee simulators. Multidirectional pin-on-plate wear studies of noncross-linked, moderately cross-linked (5 Mrad), and highly cross-linked (10 Mrad) polyethylene showed a 75% reduction in wear with the highly cross-linked material under kinematics found in the hip, but only a 33% reduction under wear in kinematics representative of the knee. In knee simulator studies, with the fixed-bearing press-fit, condylar Sigma cruciate-retaining knee under high kinematic input conditions, the wear of 5 Mrad moderately cross-linked polyethylene was 13 +/- 4 mm per 1 million cycles, which was lower (p < 0.05) than the wear of clinically used, gamma vacuum foil GUR 1020 polyethylene (23 +/- 6 mm/1 million cycles). For the low-contact stress mobile-bearing knee, the wear of moderately cross-linked polyethylene was 2 +/- 1 mm per 1 million cycles, which was lower (p < 0.05) than GVF GUR 1020 polyethylene (5 +/- 2 mm/1 million cycles). The wear debris isolated from the fixed-bearing knees showed the moderately cross-linked material had a larger percentage volume of particles smaller than 1 mum in size, compared with GVF GUR 1020 polyethylene. Direct cell culture studies of wear debris generated in sterile wear simulators using multidirectional motion showed a increase (p < 0.05) in tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels and reactivity for GUR 1050 cross-linked polyethylene debris compared with an equivalent volume of noncross-linked GUR 1050 polyethylene. The use of cross-linked polyethylene in the knee reduces the volumetric wear rate. However, the clinical significance of reduced fracture toughness, elevated wear in abrasive conditions, and the elevated tumor necrosis factor-alpha release from smaller more reactive

  10. Actinic Keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Actinic Keratosis (Solar Keratosis) Information for adults A A A Actinic ... the touch. Overview Actinic keratoses, also known as solar keratoses, are small rough or scaly areas of ...

  11. Cross-linking of histone proteins to DNA by UV illumination of chromatin stained with Hoechst 33342.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sara K; Bardeen, Christopher J

    2003-06-01

    The photochemical effects of near-UV light on chromatin labeled with the vital DNA dye Hoechst 33342 (H33342) are studied. Several types of experiments demonstrate that illumination at both 365 and 410 nm results in significant cross-linking of proteins with the DNA. Fluorescence microscopy of dye-stained Xenopus XTC-2 nuclei shows that UV illumination has effects similar to chemical fixation by formaldehyde. At 365 nm a dose of approximately 70 J/cm2 results in 50% of the DNA being cross-linked, as measured by chloroform-sodium dodecyl sulfate extraction. At 410 nm the efficiency of cross-linking was smaller by a factor of 3. Gel electrophoresis of the cross-linked proteins shows them to be predominantly core histones. The implications of these results for experiments on live cells stained with H33342, for example, fluorescence microscopy of nuclear dynamics or cell sorting, are discussed. PMID:12870855

  12. The Interplay between Viscoelastic and Thermodynamic Properties Determines the Birefringence of F-Actin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Helfer, Emmanuèle; Panine, Pierre; Carlier, Marie-France; Davidson, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    F-actin gels of increasing concentrations (25–300 μM) display in vitro a progressive onset of birefringence due to orientational ordering of actin filaments. At F-actin concentrations <100 μM, this birefringence can be erased and restored at will by sonication and gentle flow, respectively. Hence, the orientational ordering does not result from a thermodynamic transition to a nematic phase but instead is due to mechanical stresses stored in the gels. In contrast, at F-actin concentrations ≥100 μM, gels display spontaneous birefringence recovery, at rest, which is the sign of true nematic ordering, in good agreement with statistical physics models of the isotropic/nematic transition. Well-aligned samples of F-actin gels could be produced and their small-angle x-ray scattering patterns are quite anisotropic. These patterns show no sign of filament positional short-range order and could be modeled by averaging the form factor with the Maier-Saupe nematic distribution function. The derived nematic order parameter S of the gels ranged from S = 0.7 at 300 μM to S = 0.4 at 25 μM. Both birefringence and small-angle x-ray scattering data indicate that, even in absence of cross-linking proteins, spontaneous cooperative alignment of actin filaments may arise in motile regions of living cells where F-actin concentrations can reach values of a few 100 μM. PMID:15863487

  13. Three cotton genes preferentially expressed in flower tissues encode actin-depolymerizing factors which are involved in F-actin dynamics in cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Bao; Xu, Dan; Wang, Xiu-Lan; Huang, Geng-Qing; Luo, Juan; Li, Deng-Di; Zhang, Ze-Ting; Xu, Wen-Liang

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether the high expression levels of actin-depolymerizing factor genes are related to pollen development, three GhADF genes (cDNAs) were isolated and characterized in cotton. Among them, GhADF6 and GhADF8 were preferentially expressed in petals, whereas GhADF7 displayed the highest level of expression in anthers, revealing its anther specificity. The GhADF7 transcripts in anthers reached its peak value at flowering, suggesting that its expression is developmentally-regulated in anthers. The GhADF7 gene including the promoter region was isolated from the cotton genome. To demonstrate the specificity of the GhADF7 promoter, the 5′-flanking region, including the promoter and 5′-untranslated region, was fused with the GUS gene. Histochemical assays demonstrated that the GhADF7:GUS gene was specifically expressed in pollen grains. When pollen grains germinated, very strong GUS staining was detected in the elongating pollen tube. Furthermore, overexpression of GhADF7 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana reduced the viable pollen grains and, consequently, transgenic plants were partially male-sterile. Overexpression of GhADF7 in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) altered the balance of actin depolymerization and polymerization, leading to the defective cytokinesis and multinucleate formation in the cells. Given all the above results together, it is proposed that the GhADF7 gene may play an important role in pollen development and germination. PMID:19861654

  14. Collagen/elastin hydrogels cross-linked by squaric acid.

    PubMed

    Skopinska-Wisniewska, J; Kuderko, J; Bajek, A; Maj, M; Sionkowska, A; Ziegler-Borowska, M

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogels based on collagen and elastin are very valuable materials for medicine and tissue engineering. They are biocompatible; however their mechanical properties and resistance for enzymatic degradation need to be improved by cross-linking. Up to this point many reagents have been tested but more secure reactants are still sought. Squaric acid (SqAc), 3,4-dihydroxy 3-cyclobutene 1,2-dione, is a strong, cyclic acid, which reacts easily with amine groups. The properties of hydrogels based on collagen/elastin mixtures (95/5, 90/10) containing 5%, 10% and 20% of SqAc and neutralized via dialysis against deionized water were tested. Cross-linked, 3-D, transparent hydrogels were created. The cross-linked materials are stiffer and more resistant to enzymatic degradation than those that are unmodified. The pore size, swelling ability and surface polarity are reduced due to 5% and 10% of SqAc addition. At the same time, the cellular response is not significantly affected by the cross-linking. Therefore, squaric acid would be regarded as a safe, effective cross-linking agent. PMID:26706512

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of collagen cross-links in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschalis, E. P.; Verdelis, K.; Doty, S. B.; Boskey, A. L.; Mendelsohn, R.; Yamauchi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein of the organic matrix in mineralizing tissues. One of its most critical properties is its cross-linking pattern. The intermolecular cross-linking provides the fibrillar matrices with mechanical properties such as tensile strength and viscoelasticity. In this study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and FTIR imaging (FTIRI) analyses were performed in a series of biochemically characterized samples including purified collagen cross-linked peptides, demineralized bovine bone collagen from animals of different ages, collagen from vitamin B6-deficient chick homogenized bone and their age- and sex-matched controls, and histologically stained thin sections from normal human iliac crest biopsy specimens. One region of the FTIR spectrum of particular interest (the amide I spectral region) was resolved into its underlying components. Of these components, the relative percent area ratio of two subbands at approximately 1660 cm(-1) and approximately 1690 cm(-1) was related to collagen cross-links that are abundant in mineralized tissues (i.e., pyridinoline [Pyr] and dehydrodihydroxylysinonorleucine [deH-DHLNL]). This study shows that it is feasible to monitor Pyr and DHLNL collagen cross-links spatial distribution in mineralized tissues. The spectroscopic parameter established in this study may be used in FTIRI analyses, thus enabling the calculation of relative Pyr/DHLNL amounts in thin (approximately 5 microm) calcified tissue sections with a spatial resolution of approximately 7 microm.

  16. Base excision repair enzymes protect abasic sites in duplex DNA from interstrand cross-links.

    PubMed

    Admiraal, Suzanne J; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-03-10

    Hydrolysis of the N-glycosyl bond between a nucleobase and deoxyribose leaves an abasic site within duplex DNA. The abasic site can react with exocyclic amines of nucleobases on the complementary strand to form interstrand DNA-DNA cross-links (ICLs). We find that several enzymes from the base excision repair (BER) pathway protect an abasic site on one strand of a DNA duplex from cross-linking with an amine on the opposing strand. Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) and Escherichia coli 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II (AlkA) accomplish this by binding tightly to the abasic site and sequestering it. AAG protects an abasic site opposite T, the product of its canonical glycosylase reaction, by a factor of ∼10-fold, as estimated from its inhibition of the reaction of an exogenous amine with the damaged DNA. Human apurinic/apyrimidinic site endonuclease 1 and E. coli endonuclease III both decrease the amount of ICL at equilibrium by generating a single-strand DNA nick at the abasic position as it is liberated from the cross-link. The reversibility of the reaction between amines and abasic sites allows BER enzymes to counter the potentially disruptive effects of this type of cross-link on DNA transactions. PMID:25679877

  17. DNA-binding site for two skeletal actin promoter factors is important for expression in muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, K.; Schimmel, P.

    1988-04-01

    Two nuclear factors bind to the same site in the chicken skeletal actin promoter. Mutations in the footprint sequence which eliminate detectable binding decrease expression in transfected skeletal muscle cells by a factor of 25 to 50 and do not elevate the flow expression in nonmuscle cells. These results show that the factor-binding site contributes to the activation of expression in muscle cells and that it alone does not contribute significantly to repress expression in nonmuscle cells.

  18. Mixed-Isotope Labeling with LC-IMS-MS for Characterization of Protein–Protein Interactions by Chemical Cross-Linking

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Baker, Erin S.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Orton, Daniel J.; Taverner, Thomas; Ansong, Charles; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Burnet, Meagan C.; Cort, John R.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-02-20

    Chemical cross-linking of proteins followed by proteolysis and mass spectrometric analysis of the resulting cross-linked peptides can provide insights into protein structure and protein-protein interactions. However, cross-linked peptides are by necessity of low stoichometry and have different physicochemical properties than linear peptides, routine unambiguous identification of the cross-linked peptides has remained difficult. To address this challenge, we demonstrated the use of liquid chromatography and ion mobility separations coupled with mass spectrometry in combination with a heavy-isotope labeling method. The combination of mixed-isotope cross-linking and ion mobility provided unique and easily interpretable spectral multiplet features for the intermolecular cross-linked peptides. Application of the method to two different homodimeric proteins - SrfN, a virulence factor from Salmonella Typhimurium and SO_2176, a protein of unknown function from Shewanella oneidensis- revealed several cross-linked peptides from both proteins that were identified with a low false discovery rate (estimated using a decoy approach). A greater number of cross-linked peptides were identified using ion mobility drift time information in the analysis than when the data were summed across the drift time dimension before analysis. The identified cross-linked peptides migrated more quickly in the ion mobility drift tube than the unmodified peptides.

  19. Cross-Linked Nanotube Materials with Variable Stiffness Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Odegard, Gregory M.; Herzog, Matthew N.; Gates, Thomas S.; Fay, Catherine C.

    2004-01-01

    The constitutive properties of a cross-linked single-walled carbon nanotube material are predicted with a multi-scale model. The material is modeled as a transversely isotropic solid using concepts from equivalent-continuum modeling. The elastic constants are determined using molecular dynamics simulation. Some parameters of the molecular force field are determined specifically for the cross-linker from ab initio calculations. A demonstration of how the cross-linked nanotubes may affect the properties of a nanotube/polyimide composite is included using a micromechanical analysis.

  20. Comparison of the properties of collagen-chitosan scaffolds after γ-ray irradiation and carbodiimide cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zihao; Du, Tianming; Tang, Xiangyu; Liu, Changjun; Li, Ruixin; Xu, Cheng; Tian, Feng; Du, Zhenjie; Wu, Jimin

    2016-07-01

    The property of collagen-chitosan porous scaffold varies according to cross-linking density and scaffold composition. This study was designed to compare the properties of collagen-chitosan porous scaffolds cross-linked with γ-irradiation and carbodiimide (CAR) for the first time. Eleven sets of collagen-chitosan scaffolds containing different concentrations of chitosan at a 5% increasing gradient were fabricated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was performed to confirm the success of cross-linking in the scaffolds. The scaffold morphology was evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM revealed that chitosan was an indispensable material for the fabrication of γ-ray irradiation scaffold. The microstructure of γ-ray irradiation scaffold was less stable than those of alternative scaffolds. Based upon swelling ratio, porosity factor, and collagenase degradation, γ-ray irradiation scaffold was less stable than CAR and 25% proportion of chitosan scaffolds. Mechanical property determines the orientation in γ-irradiation and CAR scaffold. In vitro degradation test indicated that γ-irradiation and CAR cross-linking can elevate the scaffold biocompatibility. Compared with γ-ray irradiation, CAR cross-linked scaffold containing 25% chitosan can more significantly enhance the bio-stability and biocompatibility of collagen-chitosan scaffolds. CAR cross-linked scaffold may be the best choice for future tissue engineering. PMID:27122297

  1. Nanoscale segregation of actin nucleation and elongation factors determines dendritic spine protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Chazeau, Anaël; Mehidi, Amine; Nair, Deepak; Gautier, Jérémie J; Leduc, Cécile; Chamma, Ingrid; Kage, Frieda; Kechkar, Adel; Thoumine, Olivier; Rottner, Klemens; Choquet, Daniel; Gautreau, Alexis; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Giannone, Grégory

    2014-01-01

    Actin dynamics drive morphological remodeling of neuronal dendritic spines and changes in synaptic transmission. Yet, the spatiotemporal coordination of actin regulators in spines is unknown. Using single protein tracking and super-resolution imaging, we revealed the nanoscale organization and dynamics of branched F-actin regulators in spines. Branched F-actin nucleation occurs at the PSD vicinity, while elongation occurs at the tip of finger-like protrusions. This spatial segregation differs from lamellipodia where both branched F-actin nucleation and elongation occur at protrusion tips. The PSD is a persistent confinement zone for IRSp53 and the WAVE complex, an activator of the Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, filament elongators like VASP and formin-like protein-2 move outwards from the PSD with protrusion tips. Accordingly, Arp2/3 complexes associated with F-actin are immobile and surround the PSD. Arp2/3 and Rac1 GTPase converge to the PSD, respectively, by cytosolic and free-diffusion on the membrane. Enhanced Rac1 activation and Shank3 over-expression, both associated with spine enlargement, induce delocalization of the WAVE complex from the PSD. Thus, the specific localization of branched F-actin regulators in spines might be reorganized during spine morphological remodeling often associated with synaptic plasticity. PMID:25293574

  2. Transglutaminases: Widespread Cross-linking Enzymes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Del Duca, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Background Transglutaminases have been studied in plants since 1987 in investigations aimed at interpreting some of the molecular mechanisms by which polyamines affect growth and differentiation. Transglutaminases are a widely distributed enzyme family catalysing a myriad of biological reactions in animals. In plants, the post-translational modification of proteins by polyamines forming inter- or intra-molecular cross-links has been the main transglutaminase reaction studied. Characteristics of Plant Transglutaminases The few plant transglutaminases sequenced so far have little sequence homology with the best-known animal enzymes, except for the catalytic triad; however, they share a possible structural homology. Proofs of their catalytic activity are: (a) their ability to produce glutamyl-polyamine derivatives; (b) their recognition by animal transglutaminase antibodies; and (c) biochemical features such as calcium-dependency, etc. However, many of their fundamental biochemical and physiological properties still remain elusive. Transglutaminase Activity is Ubiquitous It has been detected in algae and in angiosperms in different organs and sub-cellular compartments, chloroplasts being the best-studied organelles. Possible Roles Possible roles concern the structural modification of specific protein substrates. In chloroplasts, transglutaminases appear to stabilize the photosynthetic complexes and Rubisco, being regulated by light and other factors, and possibly exerting a positive effect on photosynthesis and photo-protection. In the cytosol, they modify cytoskeletal proteins. Preliminary reports suggest an involvement in the cell wall construction/organization. Other roles appear to be related to fertilization, abiotic and biotic stresses, senescence and programmed cell death, including the hypersensitive reaction. Conclusions The widespread occurrence of transglutaminases activity in all organs and cell compartments studied suggests a relevance for their still

  3. Load transfer mechanisms in cross-linked DWNT fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filleter, T.; Naraghi, M.; Moravsky, A.; Bernal, R.; Loutfy, R. O.; Espinosa, H. D.

    2011-03-01

    The application of carbon nanotubes (CNT) to macroscopic composite fibers has been limited by weak shear interfaces between adjacent CNT shells and composite matrix elements. A fundamental understanding of load transfer at multiple length-scales is needed to identify how the exceptional mechanical properties of CNTs can be scaled to produce high-performance fibers. Through in-situ electron microscopy tensile testing we have elucidated load transfer mechanisms across multiple scales of cross-linked double-walled nanotube (DWNT) fibers. A low density of polymer cross-links is found to increase the total energy dissipated at failure and ductility of fibers by 5 and 10X, respectively, without reducing strength. This mutiscale approach has identified a need to enhance shear interactions between individual DWNTs within the hierarchical DWNT fiber structures. Through in-situ TEM electron irradiation studies we have shown that load can be effectively transferred to inner DWNTs within bundles by covalently cross-linking the interfaces of adjacent DWNTs and shells. We have observed order of magnitude increases in strength and modulus and identified their dependence on irradiation dose. In future a combined approach of irradiation induced covalent and polymer cross-linking may lead to high-performance DWNT-based fibers and composites with tunable mechanical properties.

  4. Glutaraldehyde-cross-linked meniscal allografts: mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Wisnewski, P J; Powers, D L; Kennedy, J M

    1988-01-01

    Removal of a severely damaged medial meniscus has been shown to lead to degradation of the articular cartilage and formation of degenerative arthritis. To counter this degenerative effect, meniscal prostheses, including glutaraldehyde-cross-linked allografts, have been evaluated in dogs. The purpose of this research was to quantify the mechanical properties of both fresh and glutaraldehyde-cross-linked canine medial menisci. Mechanical properties quantified were tensile strength, tensile modulus, and compressive stiffness. In addition, water content of compressive test samples was measured. Analysis of variance showed significantly lower tensile strength and tensile modulus and significantly higher compressive stiffness for the glutaraldehyde-cross-linked menisci, as compared to fresh specimens. Measurement of the weight percentage of water in fresh and cross-linked samples revealed no significant differences in water content. When implanted into a joint, the increased compressive stiffness could increase the peripheral tensile load. Due to the decreased tensile strength in this region, the prosthetic meniscus could be susceptible to peripheral tears. PMID:3155295

  5. Molecular mechanisms in deformation of cross-linked hydrogel nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Mathesan, Santhosh; Rath, Amrita; Ghosh, Pijush

    2016-02-01

    The self-folding behavior in response to external stimuli observed in hydrogels is potentially used in biomedical applications. However, the use of hydrogels is limited because of its reduced mechanical properties. These properties are enhanced when the hydrogels are cross-linked and reinforced with nanoparticles. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is applied to perform uniaxial tension and pull out tests to understand the mechanism contributing towards the enhanced mechanical properties. Also, nanomechanical characterization is performed using quasi static nanoindentation experiments to determine the Young's modulus of hydrogels in the presence of nanoparticles. The stress-strain responses for chitosan (CS), chitosan reinforced with hydroxyapatite (HAP) and cross-linked chitosan are obtained from uniaxial tension test. It is observed that the Young's modulus and maximum stress increase as the HAP content increases and also with cross-linking process. Load displacement plot from pullout test is compared for uncross-linked and cross-linked chitosan chains on hydroxyapatite surface. MD simulation reveals that the variation in the dihedral conformation of chitosan chains and the evolution of internal structural variables are associated with mechanical properties. Additional results reveal that the formation of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions is responsible for the above variations in different systems. PMID:26652360

  6. 21 CFR 177.1211 - Cross-linked polyacrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... weight of aqueous sodium chloride solution at 20 °C for 24 hours. The low molecular weight extractives... applied mass). The solvent used shall be at least 60 milliliters aqueous sodium chloride solution per gram... polyacrylate copolymers consist of: (1) The grafted copolymer of cross-linked sodium polyacrylate identified...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1211 - Cross-linked polyacrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... weight of aqueous sodium chloride solution at 20 °C for 24 hours. The low molecular weight extractives... applied mass). The solvent used shall be at least 60 milliliters aqueous sodium chloride solution per gram... polyacrylate copolymers consist of: (1) The grafted copolymer of cross-linked sodium polyacrylate identified...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1211 - Cross-linked polyacrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... weight of aqueous sodium chloride solution at 20 °C for 24 hours. The low molecular weight extractives... applied mass). The solvent used shall be at least 60 milliliters aqueous sodium chloride solution per gram... polyacrylate copolymers consist of: (1) The grafted copolymer of cross-linked sodium polyacrylate identified...

  9. 21 CFR 177.1211 - Cross-linked polyacrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...). The solvent used shall be at least 60 milliliters aqueous sodium chloride solution per gram of... grafted copolymer of cross-linked sodium polyacrylate identified as 2-propenoic acid, polymers with N,N-di-2-propenyl-2-propen-1-amine and hydrolyzed polyvinyl acetate, sodium salts, graft (CAS Reg....

  10. 21 CFR 177.1211 - Cross-linked polyacrylate copolymers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... weight of aqueous sodium chloride solution at 20 °C for 24 hours. The low molecular weight extractives... applied mass). The solvent used shall be at least 60 milliliters aqueous sodium chloride solution per gram... polyacrylate copolymers consist of: (1) The grafted copolymer of cross-linked sodium polyacrylate identified...

  11. Femtosecond laser collagen cross-linking without traditional photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yizang; Wang, Chao; Celi, Nicola; Vukelic, Sinisa

    2015-03-01

    Collagen cross-linking in cornea has the capability of enhancing its mechanical properties and thereby providing an alternative treatment for eye diseases such as keratoconus. Currently, riboflavin assisted UVA light irradiation is a method of choice for cross-link induction in eyes. However, ultrafast pulsed laser interactions may be a powerful alternative enabling in-depth treatment while simultaneously diminishing harmful side effects such as, keratocyte apoptosis. In this study, femtosecond laser is utilized for treatment of bovine cornea slices. It is hypothesized that nonlinear absorption of femtosecond laser pulses plays a major role in the maturation of immature cross-links and the promotion of their growth. Targeted irradiation with tightly focused laser pulses allows for the absence of a photosensitizing agent. Inflation test was conducted on half treated porcine cornea to identify the changes of mechanical properties due to laser treatment. Raman spectroscopy was utilized to study subtle changes in the chemical composition of treated cornea. The effects of treatment are analyzed by observing shifts in Amide I and Amide III bands, which suggest deformation of the collagen structure in cornea due to presence of newly formed cross-links.

  12. 21 CFR 177.2420 - Polyester resins, cross-linked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyester resins, cross-linked. 177.2420 Section 177.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for...

  13. 21 CFR 177.2420 - Polyester resins, cross-linked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyester resins, cross-linked. 177.2420 Section 177.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for...

  14. 21 CFR 177.2420 - Polyester resins, cross-linked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyester resins, cross-linked. 177.2420 Section 177.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2420 Polyester...

  15. Viscoelastic Nanomechanics of Ionically Cross-linked Polyelectrolyte Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Biao; Lee, Daeyeon; Han, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanics of ionic polyelectrolyte networks is critical for applications where nm-to-um mechanics is the key to success. This study aims to reveal the roles of ionic cross-links and fixed charges in the viscoelasticity of layer-by-layer poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(acrylic acid) microfilms, PAH/PAA, a complex held by pH-sensitive amine-carboxyl links. AFM-nanoindentation and force relaxation (tip R =12.5um) was performed at ionic strength(IS) =0.01-1.0M, pH =5.5-2.0 (pKa of PAA =2.3). When pH changes from 5.5 to 2.0, the films swell for 4x from densely linked, net neutral state to loosely linked, positively charged one. A >100x reduction in indentation modulus was observed at all IS, suggesting the dominance of decrease in cross-link density. In most states, more than 90% force relaxation was observed, where cross-link breaking/reformation likely dominates viscoelasticity. However, at pH =2.5 and IS =0.01M, when electrical double layer repulsion is important (Debye length =3nm), relaxation was about 60%, highlighting the contribution of fixed charges. In summary, this study revealed unique viscoelastic behaviors of PAH/PAA due to the pH- and IS-dependent cross-link and charge densities.

  16. Polyimide Aerogels with Three-Dimensional Cross-Linked Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for creating a three dimensional cross-linked polyimide structure includes dissolving a diamine, a dianhydride, and a triamine in a solvent, imidizing a polyamic acid gel by heating the gel, extracting the gel in a second solvent, supercritically drying the gel, and removing the solvent to create a polyimide aerogel.

  17. Specific covalent immobilization of proteins through dityrosine cross-links.

    PubMed

    Endrizzi, Betsy J; Huang, Gang; Kiser, Patrick F; Stewart, Russell J

    2006-12-19

    Dityrosine cross-links are widely observed in nature in structural proteins such as elastin and silk. Natural oxidative cross-linking between tyrosine residues is catalyzed by a diverse group of metalloenzymes. Dityrosine formation is also catalyzed in vitro by metal-peptide complexes such as Gly-Gly-His-Ni(II). On the basis of these observations, a system was developed to specifically and covalently surface immobilize proteins through dityrosine cross-links. Methacrylate monomers of the catalytic peptide Gly-Gly-His-Tyr-OH (GGHY) and the Ni(II)-chelating group nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) were copolymerized with acrylamide into microbeads. Green fluorescent protein (GFP), as a model protein, was genetically tagged with a tyrosine-modified His6 peptide on its carboxy terminus. GFP-YGH6, specifically associated with the NTA-Ni(II) groups, was covalently coupled to the bead surface through dityrosine bond formation catalyzed by the colocalized GGHY-Ni(II) complex. After extensive washing with EDTA to disrupt metal coordination bonds, we observed that up to 75% of the initially bound GFP-YGH6 remained covalently bound to the bead while retaining its structure and activity. Dityrosine cross-linking was confirmed by quenching the reaction with free tyrosine. The method may find particular utility in the construction and optimization of protein microarrays. PMID:17154619

  18. Porous Cross-Linked Polyimide-Urea Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Nguyen, Baochau N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Porous cross-linked polyimide-urea networks are provided. The networks comprise a subunit comprising two anhydride end-capped polyamic acid oligomers in direct connection via a urea linkage. The oligomers (a) each comprise a repeating unit of a dianhydride and a diamine and a terminal anhydride group and (b) are formulated with 2 to 15 of the repeating units. The subunit was formed by reaction of the diamine and a diisocyanate to form a diamine-urea linkage-diamine group, followed by reaction of the diamine-urea linkage-diamine group with the dianhydride and the diamine to form the subunit. The subunit has been cross-linked via a cross-linking agent, comprising three or more amine groups, at a balanced stoichiometry of the amine groups to the terminal anhydride groups. The subunit has been chemically imidized to yield the porous cross-linked polyimide-urea network. Also provided are wet gels, aerogels, and thin films comprising the networks, and methods of making the networks.

  19. Spectral Library Searching To Identify Cross-Linked Peptides.

    PubMed

    Schweppe, Devin K; Chavez, Juan D; Navare, Arti T; Wu, Xia; Ruiz, Bianca; Eng, Jimmy K; Lam, Henry; Bruce, James E

    2016-05-01

    Methods harnessing protein cross-linking and mass spectrometry (XL-MS) offer high-throughput means to identify protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and structural interfaces of protein complexes. Yet, specialized data dependent methods and search algorithms are often required to confidently assign peptide identifications to spectra. To improve the efficiency of matching high confidence spectra, we developed a spectral library based approach to search cross-linked peptide data derived from Protein Interaction Reporter (PIR) methods using the spectral library search algorithm, SpectraST. Spectral library matching of cross-linked peptide data from query spectra increased the absolute number of confident peptide relationships matched to spectra and thereby the number of PPIs identified. By matching library spectra from bona fide, previously established PIR-cross-linked peptide relationships, spectral library searching reduces the need for continued, complex mass spectrometric methods to identify peptide relationships, increases coverage of relationship identifications, and improves the accessibility of XL-MS technologies. PMID:27089058

  20. Nuclear alpha spectrin: Critical roles in DNA interstrand cross-link repair and genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Muriel W

    2016-09-01

    Non-erythroid alpha spectrin (αIISp) is a structural protein which we have shown is present in the nucleus of human cells. It interacts with a number of nuclear proteins such as actin, lamin, emerin, chromatin remodeling factors, and DNA repair proteins. αIISp's interaction with DNA repair proteins has been extensively studied. We have demonstrated that nuclear αIISp is critical in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair in S phase, in both genomic (non-telomeric) and telomeric DNA, and in maintenance of genomic stability following ICL damage to DNA. We have proposed that αIISp acts as a scaffold aiding to recruit repair proteins to sites of damage. This involvement of αIISp in ICL repair and telomere maintenance after ICL damage represents new and critical functions for αIISp. These studies have led to development of a model for the role of αIISp in DNA ICL repair. They have been aided by examination of cells from patients with Fanconi anemia (FA), a repair-deficient genetic disorder in which a deficiency in αIISp leads to defective ICL repair in genomic and telomeric DNA, telomere dysfunction, and chromosome instability following DNA ICL damage. We have shown that loss of αIISp in FA cells is due to increased breakdown by the protease, µ-calpain. Importantly, we have demonstrated that this deficiency can be corrected by knockdown of µ-calpain and restoring αIISp levels to normal. This corrects a number of the phenotypic deficiencies in FA after ICL damage. These studies suggest a new and unexplored direction for therapeutically restoring genomic stability in FA cells and for correcting numerous phenotypic deficiencies occurring after ICL damage. Developing a more in-depth understanding of the importance of the interaction of αIISp with other nuclear proteins could significantly enhance our knowledge of the consequences of loss of αIISp on critical nuclear processes. PMID:27480253

  1. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 23 gene transcription depends on actin cytoskeleton reorganization.

    PubMed

    Fajol, Abul; Honisch, Sabina; Zhang, Bingbing; Schmidt, Sebastian; Alkahtani, Saad; Alarifi, Saud; Lang, Florian; Stournaras, Christos; Föller, Michael

    2016-03-01

    FGF23 regulates renal phosphate and vitamin D metabolism. Loss of FGF23 results in massive calcification and rapid aging. FGF23 production is stimulated by 1,25(OH)2 D3 and NFκB signaling. Here, we report that treatment of UMR106 osteoblast-like cells with 1,25(OH)2 D3 , inducing Fgf23 transcription, resulted in actin polymerization which was blocked by NFκB inhibitor wogonin. Interestingly, 1,25(OH)2 D3 -induced Fgf23 gene transcription was abolished by the actin microfilament-disrupting agent cytochalasin B, as well as by the inhibition of actin-regulating Rac1/PAK1 signaling. Our results provide strong evidence that actin redistribution regulated by the Rac1/PAK1 pathway participates in 1,25(OH)2 D3 -induced Fgf23 gene transcription. PMID:26878191

  2. Processing of targeted psoralen cross-links in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, D J; Faruqi, A F; Glazer, P M; Carroll, D

    1997-01-01

    Psoralen cross-links have been shown to be both mutagenic and recombinagenic in bacterial, yeast, and mammalian cells. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) have been implicated as intermediates in the removal of psoralen cross-links. Recent work has suggested that site-specific mutagenesis and recombination might be achieved through the use of targeted psoralen adducts. The fate of plasmids containing psoralen adducts was evaluated in Xenopus oocytes, an experimental system that has well-characterized recombination capabilities and advantages in the analysis of intermediates in DNA metabolism. Psoralen adducts were delivered to a specific site by a triplex-forming oligonucleotide. These lesions are clearly recognized and processed in oocytes, since mutagenesis was observed at the target site. The spectrum of induced mutations was compared with that found in similar studies in mammalian cells. Plasmids carrying multiple random adducts were preferentially degraded, perhaps due to the introduction of DSBs. However, when DNAs carrying site-specific adducts were examined, no plasmid loss was observed and removal of cross-links was found to be very slow. Sensitive assays for DSB-dependent homologous recombination were performed with substrates with one or two cross-link sites. No adduct-stimulated recombination was observed with a single lesion, and only very low levels were observed with paired lesions, even when a large proportion of the cross-links was removed by the oocytes. We conclude that DSBs or other recombinagenic structures are not efficiently formed at psoralen adducts in Xenopus oocytes. While psoralen is not a promising reagent for stimulating site-specific recombination, it is effective in inducing targeted mutations. PMID:9343428

  3. Disassembly activity of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) is associated with distinct cellular processes in apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Silvia; Zimmermann, Dennis; Olshina, Maya A.; Wilkinson, Mark; Fisher, Fabio; Tan, Yan Hong; Stewart, Rebecca J.; Tonkin, Christopher J.; Wong, Wilson; Kovar, David R.; Baum, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin family have been shown to be crucial for the motility and survival of apicomplexan parasites. However, the mechanisms by which ADF proteins fulfill their function remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the comparative activities of ADF proteins from Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, using a conditional T. gondii ADF-knockout line complemented with ADF variants from either species. We show that P. falciparum ADF1 can fully restore native TgADF activity, demonstrating functional conservation between parasites. Strikingly, mutation of a key basic residue (Lys-72), previously implicated in disassembly in PfADF1, had no detectable phenotypic effect on parasite growth, motility, or development. In contrast, organelle segregation was severely impaired when complementing with a TgADF mutant lacking the corresponding residue (Lys-68). Biochemical analyses of each ADF protein confirmed the reduced ability of lysine mutants to mediate actin depolymerization via filament disassembly although not severing, in contrast to previous reports. These data suggest that actin filament disassembly is essential for apicomplexan parasite development but not for motility, as well as pointing to genus-specific coevolution between ADF proteins and their native actin. PMID:26157165

  4. Disassembly activity of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) is associated with distinct cellular processes in apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Haase, Silvia; Zimmermann, Dennis; Olshina, Maya A; Wilkinson, Mark; Fisher, Fabio; Tan, Yan Hong; Stewart, Rebecca J; Tonkin, Christopher J; Wong, Wilson; Kovar, David R; Baum, Jake

    2015-09-01

    Proteins of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin family have been shown to be crucial for the motility and survival of apicomplexan parasites. However, the mechanisms by which ADF proteins fulfill their function remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the comparative activities of ADF proteins from Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, using a conditional T. gondii ADF-knockout line complemented with ADF variants from either species. We show that P. falciparum ADF1 can fully restore native TgADF activity, demonstrating functional conservation between parasites. Strikingly, mutation of a key basic residue (Lys-72), previously implicated in disassembly in PfADF1, had no detectable phenotypic effect on parasite growth, motility, or development. In contrast, organelle segregation was severely impaired when complementing with a TgADF mutant lacking the corresponding residue (Lys-68). Biochemical analyses of each ADF protein confirmed the reduced ability of lysine mutants to mediate actin depolymerization via filament disassembly although not severing, in contrast to previous reports. These data suggest that actin filament disassembly is essential for apicomplexan parasite development but not for motility, as well as pointing to genus-specific coevolution between ADF proteins and their native actin. PMID:26157165

  5. Photo-induced cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP) applied to amyloidogenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Farid; Maiti, Panchanan; Bitan, Gal

    2009-01-01

    -order oligomers. Advantages of PICUP relative to other photo- or chemical cross-linking methods(3,4) include short (cross-linking. In addition, PICUP enables cross-linking of proteins within wide pH and temperature ranges, including physiologic parameters. Here, we demonstrate application of PICUP to cross-linking of three amyloidogenic proteins the 40- and 42-residue amyloid beta-protein variants (Abeta40 and Abeta42), and calcitonin, and a control protein, growth-hormone releasing factor (GRF). PMID:19229175

  6. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    Solar keratosis; Sun-induced skin changes - keratosis; Keratosis - actinic (solar) ... Some actinic keratoses become squamous cell skin cancer . Have your health care provider look at all skin growths as soon as you find them. Your provider will ...

  7. Analysis of the effective dose of ultraviolet light in corneal cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Kuan-Chen; Chang, Chao-Kai; Lin, Jui-Teng

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the efficacy of ultraviolet (UV) light initiating corneal cross-linking (CXL). METHODS The time-dependent absorption of UV light due to the depletion of the initiator (riboflavin) was calculated. The effective dose of CXL with corneal surface covered by a thin layer of riboflavin was derived analytically. The cross linking time was calculated by the depletion level of the riboflavin concentration. A comprehensive method was used to derive analytic formulas. RESULTS The effective dose of CXL was reduced by a factor (R) which was proportional to the thickness (d) and concentrations (C0) of the riboflavin surface layer. Our calculations showed that the conventional dose of 5.4 J/cm2 had a reduced effective dose of 4.3 and 3.45 J/cm2, for d was 100 and 200 µm, respectively, and C0=0.1%. The surface cross linking time was calculated to be T*=10.75s, for a depletion level of 0.135 and UV initial intensity of 30 mW/cm2. The volume T* was exponentially increasing and proportional to exp (bdC0), with b being the steady state absorption coefficient. CONCLUSION The effective dose of CXL is reduced by a factor proportional to the thickness and concentrations of the riboflavin surface layer. The wasted dose should be avoided by washing out the extra riboflavin surface layer prior to the UV light exposure. PMID:27588260

  8. Cross-linking Measurements of In Vivo Protein Complex Topologies*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunxiang; Yang, Li; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Tang, Xiaoting; Weisbrod, Chad R.; Bruce, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Identification and measurement of in vivo protein interactions pose critical challenges in the goal to understand biological systems. The measurement of structures and topologies of proteins and protein complexes as they exist in cells is particularly challenging, yet critically important to improve understanding of biological function because proteins exert their intended function only through the structures and interactions they exhibit in vivo. In the present study, protein interactions in E. coli cells were identified in our unbiased cross-linking approach, yielding the first in vivo topological data on many interactions and the largest set of identified in vivo cross-linked peptides produced to date. These data show excellent agreement with protein and complex crystal structures where available. Furthermore, our unbiased data provide novel in vivo topological information that can impact understanding of biological function, even for cases where high resolution structures are not yet available. PMID:21697552

  9. Hydration and swelling of amorphous cross-linked starch microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wojtasz, Joanna; Carlstedt, Jonas; Fyhr, Peter; Kocherbitov, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Hydration of cross-linked starch microspheres, commercially available as a medical device, was investigated using a multi-method approach. We found that the uptake of water is accompanied by substantial swelling and changes of the polymer structure. Sorption calorimetry provided information about thermodynamics of water sorption, revealed presence of isothermal glass transition and absence of hydration-induced crystallization, observed in non-cross linked starch material. The changes in the surface and bulk properties of microspheres at different water-starch concentrations were investigated using synchrotron radiation X-ray scattering and analyzed using concept of fractals. The obtained information, combined with the results of differential scanning calorimetry, was used to construct a phase diagram of the studied material. Finally, hydration induced evolution of polymer structure revealed by the X-ray scattering was linked to the changes observed during swelling with optical microscopy. PMID:26453872

  10. Cross-Linked Fiber Network Embedded in Elastic Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L.; Lake, S.P.; Barocas, V.H.; Shephard, M.S.; Picu, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a three-dimensional cross-linked fiber network embedded in matrix is studied in this work. The network is composed from linear elastic fibers which store energy only in the axial deformation mode, while the matrix is also isotropic and linear elastic. Such systems are encountered in a broad range of applications, from tissue to consumer products. As the matrix modulus increases, the network is constrained to deform more affinely. This leads to internal forces acting between the network and the matrix, which produce strong stress concentration at the network cross-links. This interaction increases the apparent modulus of the network and decreases the apparent modulus of the matrix. A model is developed to predict the effective modulus of the composite and its predictions are compared with numerical data for a variety of networks. PMID:24089623

  11. Reversible PH Lability of Cross-Linked Vault Nanocapsules

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M.; Ng, B.C.; Rome, L.H.; Tolbert, S.H.; Monbouquette, H.G.

    2009-05-28

    Vaults are ubiquitous, self-assembled protein nanocapsules with dimension in the sub-100 nm range that are conserved across diverse phyla from worms to humans. Their normal presence in humans at a copy number of over 10 000/cell makes them attractive as potential drug delivery vehicles. Toward this goal, bifunctional amine-reactive reagents are shown to be useful for the reversible cross-linking of recombinant vaults such that they may be closed and opened in a controllable manner.

  12. Optimized Fragmentation Regime for Diazirine Photo-Cross-Linked Peptides.

    PubMed

    Giese, Sven H; Belsom, Adam; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-08-16

    Cross-linking/mass spectrometry has evolved into a robust technology that reveals structural insights into proteins and protein complexes. We leverage a new tribrid instrument with improved fragmentation capacities in a systematic comparison to identify which fragmentation method would be best for the identification of cross-linked peptides. Specifically, we explored three fragmentation methods and two combinations: collision-induced dissociation (CID), beam-type CID (HCD), electron-transfer dissociation (ETD), ETciD, and EThcD. Trypsin-digested, SDA-cross-linked human serum albumin (HSA) served as a test sample, yielding over all methods and in triplicate analysis in total 2602 matched PSMs and 1390 linked residue pairs at 5% false discovery rate, as confirmed by the crystal structure. HCD wins in number of matched peptide-spectrum-matches (958 PSMs) and identified links (446). CID is most complementary, increasing the number of identified links by 13% (58 links). HCD wins together with EThcD in cross-link site calling precision, with approximately 62% of sites having adjacent backbone cleavages that unambiguously locate the link in both peptides, without assuming any cross-linker preference for amino acids. Overall quality of spectra, as judged by sequence coverage of both peptides, is best for EThcD for the majority of peptides. Sequence coverage might be of particular importance for complex samples, for which we propose a data dependent decision tree, else HCD is the method of choice. The mass spectrometric raw data has been deposited in PRIDE (PXD003737). PMID:27454319

  13. Physicochemical properties of collagen solutions cross-linked by glutaraldehyde.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhenhua; Li, Conghu; Duan, Lian; Li, Guoying

    2014-06-01

    The physicochemical properties of collagen solutions (5 mg/ml) cross-linked by various amounts of glutaraldehyde (GTA) [GTA/collagen (w/w) = 0-0.5] under acidic condition (pH 4.00) were examined. Based on the results of the determination of residual amino group content, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, dynamic rheological measurements, differential scanning calorimetry and atomic force microscopy (AFM), it was proved that the collagen solutions possessed strikingly different physicochemical properties depending on the amount of GTA. At low GTA amounts [GTA/collagen (w/w) ≤ 0.1], the residual amino group contents of the cross-linked collagens decreased largely from 100% to 32.76%, accompanied by an increase in the molecular weight. Additionally, increases of the fiber diameter and the values of G', G″ and η* were measured, while the thermal denaturation temperature (Td) did not change visibly and the fluidity of collagen samples was still retained with increasing the GTA amount. When the ratio of GTA to collagen exceeded 0.1, although the residual amino group content only decreased by ~8.2%, the cross-linked collagen solution [GTA/collagen (w/w) = 0.3] displayed a clear loss of flow and a sudden rise (~2.0 °C) of the Td value compared to the uncross-linked collagen solution, probably illustrating that the collagen solution was converted into a gel with mature network structure-containing nuclei observed in AFM image. It was conjectured that the physicochemical properties of the collagen solutions might be in connection with the cross-linking between collagen molecules from the same aggregate or different aggregates. PMID:24564765

  14. Estimating the Degree of Cross-Linking in Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Degree of cross-linking or network chain concentration of rubber estimated with aid of new method. Quantity is needed in studies of mechanical behavior of rubber. New method is based on finding rubber follows different stress/ strain relationships in extension and retraction. When rubber specimen is stretched to given extension ration and released. Stress-vs-strain curve follows two paths: one for extension and other for retraction.

  15. Fiber optic immunosensor for cross-linked fibrin concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, Samuel E.

    2000-08-01

    Working with calcium ions in the blood, platelets produce thromboplastin which transforms prothrombin into thrombin. Removing peptides, thrombin changes fibrinogen into fibrin. Cross-linked insoluble fibrin polymers are solubilized by enzyme plasmin found in blood plasma. Resulting D-dimers are elevated in patients with intravascular coagulation, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, multiple trauma, cancer, impaired renal and liver functions, and sepsis. Consisting principally of a NIR 780 nm GaAlAs laser diode and a 800 nm avalanche photodiode (APD), the fiber-optic immunosensor can determined D-dimer concentration to levels <0.1 ng/ml. A capture monoclonal antibody to the antigen soluble cross-linked fibrin is employed. Immobilized at the tip of an optical fiber by avidin-biotin, the captured antigen is detected by a second antibody which is labeled with NN 382 fluorescent dye. An evanescent wave traveling on an excitation optical fiber excites the antibody-antigen fluorophore complex. Concentration of cross-linked fibrin is directly proportional to the APD measured intensity of fluorescence. NIR fluorescence has advantages of low background interference, short fluorescence lifetime, and large difference between excitation and emission peaks. Competitive ELISA test for D-dimer concentration requires trained personnel performing a time consuming operation.

  16. Supersaturated lysozyme solution structure studied by chemical cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Hall, Clayton L; Clemens, John R; Brown, Amanda M; Wilson, Lori J

    2005-06-01

    Glutaraldehyde cross-linking followed by separation has been used to detect aggregates of chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) in supersaturated solutions. In solutions of varying NaCl content, the number of aggregates was found to be related to the ionic strength of the solution. Separation by SDS-PAGE showed that percentage of dimer in solution ranged from 25.3% for no NaCl to 27.1% at 15% NaCl, and the aggregates larger than dimer increased from 1.9% for no NaCl to 36.8% at 15% NaCl. Conversely, the percentage of monomers decreased from 72.8% without NaCl to 36.1% at 15% NaCl. Molecular weights by capillary electrophoresis (SDS-CE) were found to be multiples of the monomer molecular weights, with the exception of trimer, which indicates a very compact structure. Native separation was accomplished using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and gave a lower monomer concentration and higher aggregate concentration than SDS-CE, which is a denaturing separation method. Most noticeably, trimers were absent in the SEC separation. The number of aggregates did not change with increased time between addition of NaCl and addition of cross-linking agent when separated by gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The results suggest that high ionic strength CEWL solutions are highly aggregated and that denaturing separation methods disrupt cross-linked products. PMID:15930646

  17. Homogeneous UVA system for corneal cross-linking treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres Pereira, Fernando R.; Stefani, Mario A.; Otoboni, José A.; Richter, Eduardo H.; Ventura, Liliane

    2010-02-01

    The treatment of keratoconus and corneal ulcers by collagen cross-linking using ultraviolet type A irradiation, combined with photo-sensitizer Riboflavin (vitamin B2), is a promising technique. The standard protocol suggests instilling Riboflavin in the pre-scratched cornea every 5min for 30min, during the UVA irradiation of the cornea at 3mW/cm2 for 30 min. This process leads to an increase of the biomechanical strength of the cornea, stopping the progression, or sometimes, even reversing Keratoconus. The collagen cross-linking can be achieved by many methods, but the utilization of UVA light, for this purpose, is ideal because of its possibility of a homogeneous treatment leading to an equal result along the treated area. We have developed a system, to be clinically used for treatment of unhealthy corneas using the cross-linking technique, which consists of an UVA emitting delivery device controlled by a closed loop system with high homogeneity. The system is tunable and delivers 3-5 mW/cm2, at 365nm, for three spots (6mm, 8mm and 10mm in diameter). The electronics close loop presents 1% of precision, leading to an overall error, after the calibration, of less than 10% and approximately 96% of homogeneity.

  18. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-capillary gel electrophoresis of proteins using non-cross-linked polyacrylamide.

    PubMed

    Wu, D; Regnier, F E

    1992-09-11

    Proteins with relative molecular masses of 14,000 to 205,000 were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-capillary gel electrophoresis (SDS-CGE) using non-cross-linked linear polyacrylamide gels on both coated and uncoated fused-silica capillaries. It was determined that viscosity of the acrylamide solution was a major factor affecting column stability with linear acrylamide gels. When the viscosity of the acrylamide solution reaches 100 cP, electro-osmotically driven displacement of the gels is insignificant. Uncoated capillaries provided better resolution, stability, and reproducibility than surface coated capillaries when the concentration of linear polyacrylamide was greater than 4%. At lower gel concentrations, non-cross-linked polyacrylamide is easily displaced from the columns. A calibration plot of log molecular mass vs. mobility with non-linear polyacrylamide was linear, which indicated that resolution was equivalent to that obtained with cross-linked acrylamide. Separations with model proteins indicated that baseline resolution between protein species that vary 10% in molecular mass can be achieved. PMID:1430034

  19. Drug-Triggered and Cross-Linked Self-Assembling Nanofibrous Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek A.; Shi, Siyu; Wang, Benjamin K.; Li, I-Che; Jalan, Abhishek A.; Sarkar, Biplab; Wickremasinghe, Navindee C.; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of multidomain peptides (MDP) can be tailored to carry payloads that modulate the extracellular environment. Controlled release of growth factors, cytokines, and small-molecule drugs allows for unique control of in vitro and in vivo responses. In this study, we demonstrate this process of ionic cross-linking of peptides using multivalent drugs to create hydrogels for sustained long-term delivery of drugs. Using phosphate, heparin, clodronate, trypan, and suramin, we demonstrate the utility of this strategy. Although all multivalent anions result in good hydrogel formation, demonstrating the generality of this approach, suramin led to the formation of the best hydrogels per unit concentration and was studied in greater detail. Suramin ionically cross-linked MDP into a fibrous meshwork as determined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We measured material storage and loss modulus using rheometry and showed a distinct increase in G′ and G″ as a function of suramin concentration. Release of suramin from scaffolds was determined using UV spectroscopy and showed prolonged release over a 30 day period. Suramin bioavailability and function were demonstrated by attenuated M1 polarization of THP-1 cells compared to positive control. Overall, this design strategy has allowed for the development of a novel class of polymeric delivery vehicles with generally long-term release and, in the case of suramin, cross-linked hydrogels that can modulate cellular phenotype. PMID:25831137

  20. Fracture Mechanics of Collagen Fibrils: Influence of Natural Cross-Links

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Rene B.; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko; Magnusson, S. Peter

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH4 reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human collagen fibrils. There was an initial rise in modulus followed by a plateau with reduced modulus, which was finally followed by an even greater increase in stress and modulus before failure. The RTTs also displayed the initial increase and plateau phase, but the third region was virtually absent and the plateau continued until failure. The importance of cross-link lability was investigated by NaBH4 reduction of the rat-tail fibrils, which did not alter their behavior. These findings shed light on the function of cross-links at the fibril level, but further studies will be required to establish the underlying mechanisms. PMID:23746520

  1. Corneal Cross-Linking: Evaluating the Potential for a Lower Power, Shorter Duration Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Ciro; Barbaro, Gaetano; Tronino, Diana; Ostacolo, Carmine; Sacchi, Antonia; Pacente, Luigi; Del Prete, Antonio; Sala, Marina; Troisi, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the cross-linking effect of a riboflavin ultraviolet-A (UV-A) corneal cross-linking treatment that is both shorter and has lower energy than the Dresden protocol. Methods: In a first experiment, 12 human corneas were presoaked with riboflavin and then irradiated with UV-A at 3 mW/cm2 after clearing the surface of riboflavin, with no added riboflavin during irradiation. Percent UV-A transmission through the corneas was measured at intervals up to 30 minutes. A second experiment involved 24 porcine corneas. Eight were de-epithelialized, presoaked in riboflavin for 30 minutes, and irradiated at 1.5 mW/cm2 for 10 minutes. An additional 8 were riboflavin treated and similarly irradiated, but with epithelium intact and a final 8 corneas were not treated. Young modulus was measured in all 24 corneas at the end of the experiment. Results: The first experiment showed essentially complete riboflavin oxidation after only 10 minutes. Based on these results, a shortened UV-A exposure cross-linking experiment was designed using a reduced UV-A fluence of 1.5 mW/cm2, an endothelial exposure within safety limits in humans. With this protocol Young modulus was the same in the irradiated porcine corneas but with epithelium intact as in the untreated corneas. In contrast, Young modulus increased by a factor of 1.99 in the UV-A cross-linked corneas at 1.5 mW/cm2 for 10 minutes with the epithelium removed. Conclusions: A shorter, lower energy protocol than the Dresden protocol seems to provide a significant increase in Young modulus, similar to published results with higher energy, longer exposure protocols. PMID:26989958

  2. Cross linking molecular systems to form ultrathin dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Danqin

    Dehydrogenation leads to cross linking of polymer or polymer like formation in very different systems: self-assembled monolayers and in closo -carboranes leading to the formation of semiconducting and dielectric boron carbide. We find evidence of intermolecular interactions for a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed from a large molecular adsorbate, [1,1';4',1"-terphenyl]-4,4"-dimethanethiol, from the dispersion of the molecular orbitals with changing the wave vector k and from the changes with temperature. With the formation self assembled molecular (SAM) layer, the molecular orbitals hybridize to electronic bands, with indications of significant band dispersion of the unoccupied molecular orbitals. Although organic adsorbates and thin films are generally regarded as "soft" materials, the effective Debye temperature, indicative of the dynamic motion of the lattice normal to the surface, can be very high, e.g. in the multilayer film formed from [1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-dimethanethiol (BPDMT). Depending on molecular orientation, the effective Debye temperature can be comparable to that of graphite due to the 'stiffness' of the benzene rings, but follows the expected Debye-Waller behavior for the core level photoemission intensities with temperature. This is not always the case. We find that a monomolecular film formed from [1,1';4',1"-terphenyl]-4,4"-dimethanethiol deviates from Debye-Waller temperature behavior and is likely caused by temperature dependent changes in molecular orientation. We also find evidence for the increase in dielectric character with polymerization (cross-linking) in spite of the decrease in the HOMO-LUMO gap upon irradiation of TPDMT. The changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, with cross-linking, are roughly consistent with the band dispersion. The decomposition and cross-linking processes are also accompanied by changes in molecular orientation. The energetics of the three isomeric carborane cage compounds [ closo-1,2-orthocarborane, closo-1

  3. Probing actin incorporation into myofibrils using Asp11 and His73 actin mutants.

    PubMed

    Xia, D; Peng, B; Sesok, D A; Peng, I

    1993-01-01

    We used a cell free system Bouché et al.: J. Cell Biol. 107:587-596, 1988] to study the incorporation of actin into myofibrils. We used alpha-skeletal muscle actin and actins with substitutions of either His73 [Solomon and Rubenstein: J. Biol.Chem. 262:11382, 1987], or Asp11 [Solomon et al.: J. Biol. Chem. 263:19662, 1988]. Actins were translated in reticulocyte lysate and incubated with myofibrils. The incorporated wild type actin could be cross-linked into dimers using N,N'-1,4-phenylenebismaleimide (PBM), indicating that the incorporated actin is actually inserted into the thin filaments of the myofibril. The His73 mutants incorporated to the same extent as wild type actin and was also cross-linked with PBM. Although some of the Asp11 mutants co-assembled with carrier actin, only 1-3% of the Asp11 mutant actins incorporated after 2 min and did not increase after 2 hr. Roughly 17% of wild type actin incorporated after 2 min and 31% after 2 hr. ATP increased the release of wild type actin from myofibrils, but did not increase the release of Asp11 mutants. We suggest that (1) the incorporation of wild type and His73 mutant actins was due to a physiological process whereas association of Asp11 mutants with myofibrils was non-specific, (2) the incorporation of wild type actin involved a rapid initial phase, followed by a slower phase, and (3) since some of the Asp11 mutants can co-assemble with wild type actin, the ability to self-assemble was not sufficient for incorporation into myofibrils. Thus, incorporation probably includes interaction between actin and a thin filament associated protein. We also showed that incorporation occurred at actin concentrations which would cause disassembly of F-actin. Since the myofibrils did not show large scale disassembly but incorporated actin, filament stability and monomer incorporation are likely to be mediated by actin associated proteins of the myofibril. PMID:8287497

  4. Activation of exocytosis by cross-linking of the IgE receptor is dependent on ADP-ribosylation factor 1-regulated phospholipase D in RBL-2H3 mast cells: evidence that the mechanism of activation is via regulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Way, G; O'luanaigh, N; Cockcroft, S

    2000-01-01

    The physiological stimulus to exocytosis in mast cells is the cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcepsilonR1, with antigen. We demonstrate a novel function for ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) in the regulation of antigen-stimulated secretion using cytosol-depleted RBL-2H3 mast cells for reconstitution of secretory responses. When antigen is used as the stimulus, ARF1 also reconstitutes phospholipase D activation. Using ethanol to divert the phosphatidic acid (the product of phospholipase D activity) to phosphatidylethanol causes inhibition of ARF1-reconstituted secretion. In addition. ARF1 causes an increase in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) levels at the expense of phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate. The requirement for PIP(2) in exocytosis was confirmed by using phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITPalpha) to increase PIP(2) levels. Exocytosis, restored by either ARF1 or PITPalpha, was inhibited when PIP(2) levels were depleted by phospholipase Cdelta1. We conclude that the function of ARF1 and PITPalpha is to increase the local synthesis of PIP(2), the function of which in exocytosis is likely to be linked to lipid-protein interactions, whereby recruitment of key components of the exocytotic machinery are targeted to the appropriate membrane compartment. PMID:10657240

  5. CRP2, a new invadopodia actin bundling factor critically promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dieterle, Monika; Moreau, Flora; Al Absi, Antoun; Steinmetz, André; Oudin, Anaïs; Berchem, Guy; Janji, Bassam; Thomas, Clément

    2016-01-01

    A critical process underlying cancer metastasis is the acquisition by tumor cells of an invasive phenotype. At the subcellular level, invasion is facilitated by actin-rich protrusions termed invadopodia, which direct extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Here, we report the identification of a new cytoskeletal component of breast cancer cell invadopodia, namely cysteine-rich protein 2 (CRP2). We found that CRP2 was not or only weakly expressed in epithelial breast cancer cells whereas it was up-regulated in mesenchymal/invasive breast cancer cells. In addition, high expression of the CRP2 encoding gene CSRP2 was associated with significantly increased risk of metastasis in basal-like breast cancer patients. CRP2 knockdown significantly reduced the invasive potential of aggressive breast cancer cells, whereas it did not impair 2D cell migration. In keeping with this, CRP2-depleted breast cancer cells exhibited a reduced capacity to promote ECM degradation, and to secrete and express MMP-9, a matrix metalloproteinase repeatedly associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In turn, ectopic expression of CRP2 in weakly invasive cells was sufficient to stimulate cell invasion. Both GFP-fused and endogenous CRP2 localized to the extended actin core of invadopodia, a structure primarily made of actin bundles. Purified recombinant CRP2 autonomously crosslinked actin filaments into thick bundles, suggesting that CRP2 contributes to the formation/maintenance of the actin core. Finally, CRP2 depletion significantly reduced the incidence of lung metastatic lesions in two xenograft mouse models of breast cancer. Collectively, our data identify CRP2 as a new cytoskeletal component of invadopodia that critically promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:26883198

  6. In vivo imaging of cell behaviors and F-actin reveals LIM-HD transcription factor regulation of peripheral versus central sensory axon development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Development of specific neuronal morphology requires precise control over cell motility processes, including axon formation, outgrowth and branching. Dynamic remodeling of the filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton is critical for these processes; however, little is known about the mechanisms controlling motile axon behaviors and F-actin dynamics in vivo. Neuronal structure is specified in part by intrinsic transcription factor activity, yet the molecular and cellular steps between transcription and axon behavior are not well understood. Zebrafish Rohon-Beard (RB) sensory neurons have a unique morphology, with central axons that extend in the spinal cord and a peripheral axon that innervates the skin. LIM homeodomain (LIM-HD) transcription factor activity is required for formation of peripheral RB axons. To understand how neuronal morphogenesis is controlled in vivo and how LIM-HD transcription factor activity differentially regulates peripheral versus central axons, we used live imaging of axon behavior and F-actin distribution in vivo. Results We used an F-actin biosensor containing the actin-binding domain of utrophin to characterize actin rearrangements during specific developmental processes in vivo, including axon initiation, consolidation and branching. We found that peripheral axons initiate from a specific cellular compartment and that F-actin accumulation and protrusive activity precede peripheral axon initiation. Moreover, disruption of LIM-HD transcriptional activity has different effects on the motility of peripheral versus central axons; it inhibits peripheral axon initiation, growth and branching, while increasing the growth rate of central axons. Our imaging revealed that LIM-HD transcription factor activity is not required for F-actin based protrusive activity or F-actin accumulation during peripheral axon initiation, but can affect positioning of F-actin accumulation and axon formation. Conclusion Our ability to image the dynamics of

  7. Characterization of the Raptor/4E-BP1 Interaction by Chemical Cross-linking Coupled with Mass Spectrometry Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, Kimberly; Yang, Bing; Lu, Jie; Tetlow, Ashley L.; Pelliccio, Emelia; Lu, Shan; Guo, Da-Chuan; Tang, Chun; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko

    2014-01-01

    mTORC1 plays critical roles in the regulation of protein synthesis, growth, and proliferation in response to nutrients, growth factors, and energy conditions. One of the substrates of mTORC1 is 4E-BP1, whose phosphorylation by mTORC1 reverses its inhibitory action on eIF4E, resulting in the promotion of protein synthesis. Raptor in mTOR complex 1 is believed to recruit 4E-BP1, facilitating phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 by the kinase mTOR. We applied chemical cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry analysis to gain insight into interactions between mTORC1 and 4E-BP1. Using the cross-linking reagent bis[sulfosuccinimidyl] suberate, we showed that Raptor can be cross-linked with 4E-BP1. Mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked Raptor-4E-BP1 led to the identification of several cross-linked peptide pairs. Compilation of these peptides revealed that the most N-terminal Raptor N-terminal conserved domain (in particular residues from 89 to 180) of Raptor is the major site of interaction with 4E-BP1. On 4E-BP1, we found that cross-links with Raptor were clustered in the central region (amino acid residues 56–72) we call RCR (Raptor cross-linking region). Intramolecular cross-links of Raptor suggest the presence of two structured regions of Raptor: one in the N-terminal region and the other in the C-terminal region. In support of the idea that the Raptor N-terminal conserved domain and the 4E-BP1 central region are closely located, we found that peptides that encompass the RCR of 4E-BP1 inhibit cross-linking and interaction of 4E-BP1 with Raptor. Furthermore, mutations of residues in the RCR decrease the ability of 4E-BP1 to serve as a substrate for mTORC1 in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24403073

  8. Actin-binding proteins: the long road to understanding the dynamic landscape of cellular actin networks.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Pekka

    2016-08-15

    The actin cytoskeleton supports a vast number of cellular processes in nonmuscle cells. It is well established that the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are controlled by a large array of actin-binding proteins. However, it was only 40 years ago that the first nonmuscle actin-binding protein, filamin, was identified and characterized. Filamin was shown to bind and cross-link actin filaments into higher-order structures and contribute to phagocytosis in macrophages. Subsequently many other nonmuscle actin-binding proteins were identified and characterized. These proteins regulate almost all steps of the actin filament assembly and disassembly cycles, as well as the arrangement of actin filaments into diverse three-dimensional structures. Although the individual biochemical activities of most actin-regulatory proteins are relatively well understood, knowledge of how these proteins function together in a common cytoplasm to control actin dynamics and architecture is only beginning to emerge. Furthermore, understanding how signaling pathways and mechanical cues control the activities of various actin-binding proteins in different cellular, developmental, and pathological processes will keep researchers busy for decades. PMID:27528696

  9. Physicochemical, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic characteristics of a chitosan film cross-linked by a naturally occurring cross-linking agent, aglycone geniposidic acid.

    PubMed

    Mi, Fwu-Long; Huang, Chin-Tsung; Liang, Hsiang-Fa; Chen, Mei-Chin; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Chun-Hung; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of a chitosan film cross-linked by a naturally occurring compound, aglycone geniposidic acid (aGSA). This newly developed aGSA-cross-linked chitosan film may be used as an edible film. The chitosan film without cross-linking (fresh) and the glutaraldehyde-cross-linked chitosan film were used as controls. The characteristics of test chitosan films evaluated were their degree of cross-linking, swelling ratio, mechanical properties, water vapor permeability, antimicrobial capability, cytotoxicity, and enzymatic degradability. It was found that cross-linking of chitosan films by aGSA (at a concentration up to 0.8 mM) significantly increased its ultimate tensile strength but reduced its strain at fracture and swelling ratio. There was no significant difference in the antimicrobial capability between the cross-linked chitosan films and their fresh counterpart. However, the aGSA-cross-linked chitosan film had a lower cytotoxicity, a slower degradation rate, and a relatively lower water vapor permeability as compared to the glutaraldehyde-cross-linked film. These results suggested that the aGSA-cross-linked chitosan film may be a promising material as an edible film. PMID:16637687

  10. Phylogenetic Patterns of Codon Evolution in the ACTIN-DEPOLYMERIZING FACTOR/COFILIN (ADF/CFL) Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Zokan, Eileen M.; Dyer, Kelly A.; Meagher, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin (ADF/CFL) gene family encodes a diverse group of relatively small proteins. Once known strictly as modulators of actin filament dynamics, recent research has demonstrated that these proteins are involved in a variety of cellular processes, from signal transduction to the cytonuclear trafficking of actin. In both plant and animal lineages, expression patterns of paralogs in the ADF/CFL gene family vary among tissue types and developmental stages. In this study we use computational approaches to investigate the evolutionary forces responsible for the diversification of the ADF/CFL gene family. Estimating the rate of non-synonymous to synonymous mutations (dN/dS) across phylogenetic lineages revealed that the majority of ADF/CFL codon positions were under strong purifying selection, with rare episodic events of accelerated protein evolution. In both plants and animals these instances of accelerated evolution were ADF/CFL subclass specific, and all of the sites under selection were located in regions of the protein that could serve in new functional roles. We suggest these sites may have been important in the functional diversification of ADF/CFL proteins. PMID:26717562

  11. Viability, Apoptosis, Proliferation, Activation, and Cytokine Secretion of Human Keratoconus Keratocytes after Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Stachon, Tanja; Wang, Jiong; Seitz, Berthold; Szentmáry, Nóra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of cross-linking (CXL) on viability, apoptosis, proliferation, activation, and cytokine secretion of human keratoconus (KC) keratocytes, in vitro. Methods. Primary KC keratocytes were cultured in DMEM/Ham's F12 medium supplemented with 10% FCS and underwent UVA illumination (370 nm, 2 J/cm2) during exposure to 0.1% riboflavin and 20% Dextran in PBS. Twenty-four hours after CXL, viability was assessed using Alamar blue assay; apoptosis using APO-DIRECT Kit; proliferation using ELISA-BrdU kit; and CD34 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression using flow cytometry. Five and 24 hours after CXL, FGFb, HGF, TGFβ1, VEGF, KGF, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion was measured using enzyme-linked-immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). Results. Following CXL, cell viability and proliferation decreased (P < 0.05; P = 0.009), the percentage of apoptotic keratocytes increased (P < 0.05) significantly, and CD34 and α-SMA expression remained unchanged (P > 0.06). Five hours after CXL, FGFb secretion increased significantly (P = 0.037); however no other cytokine secretion differed significantly from controls after 5 or 24 hours (P > 0.12). Conclusions. Cross-linking decreases viability, triggers apoptosis, and inhibits proliferation, without an impact on multipotent hematopoietic stem cell transformation and myofibroblastic transformation of KC keratocytes. CXL triggers FGFb secretion of KC keratocytes transiently (5 hours), normalizing after 24 hours. PMID:25699261

  12. Polyimide Aerogels with Three-Dimensional Cross-Linked Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels with three-dimensional cross-linked structure are made using linear oligomeric segments of polyimide, and linked with one of the following into a 3D structure: trifunctional aliphatic or aromatic amines, latent reactive end caps such as nadic anhydride or phenylethynylphenyl amine, and silica or silsesquioxane cage structures decorated with amine. Drying the gels supercritically maintains the solid structure of the gel, creating a polyimide aerogel with improved mechanical properties over linear polyimide aerogels. Lightweight, low-density structures are desired for acoustic and thermal insulation for aerospace structures, habitats, astronaut equipment, and aeronautic applications. Aerogels are a unique material for providing such properties because of their extremely low density and small pore sizes. However, plain silica aerogels are brittle. Reinforcing the aerogel structure with a polymer (X-Aerogel) provides vast improvements in strength while maintaining low density and pore structure. However, degradation of polymers used in cross-linking tends to limit use temperatures to below 150 C. Organic aerogels made from linear polyimide have been demonstrated, but gels shrink substantially during supercritical fluid extraction and may have lower use temperature due to lower glass transition temperatures. The purpose of this innovation is to raise the glass transition temperature of all organic polyimide aerogel by use of tri-, tetra-, or poly-functional units in the structure to create a 3D covalently bonded network. Such cross-linked polyimides typically have higher glass transition temperatures in excess of 300 400 C. In addition, the reinforcement provided by a 3D network should improve mechanical stability, and prevent shrinkage on supercritical fluid extraction. The use of tri-functional aromatic or aliphatic amine groups in the polyimide backbone will provide such a 3D structure.

  13. Homologous Recombination Assay for Interstrand Cross-Link Repair

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Koji; Cavallo, Francesca; Brunet, Erika; Jasin, Maria

    2012-01-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) covalently link both strands of the DNA duplex, impeding cellular processes like DNA replication. Homologous recombination (HR) is considered to be a major pathway for the repair of ICLs in mammalian cells as mutants for HR components are highly sensitive to DNA-damaging agents that cause ICLs. This chapter describes GFP assays to measure HR following site-specific ICL formation with psoralen through DNA triplex technology. This approach can be used to determine the genetic requirements for ICL-induced HR in relation to those involved in HR repair of other DNA lesions such as double-strand breaks. PMID:21660700

  14. LET dependence of DNA-protein cross-links

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Bjornstad, K.A.

    1995-08-01

    We have preliminary data indicating a fluence-dependent yield of particle-induced protein cross-links (DPC`s) with a dependency on LET and particle residual energy. Our data indicate that the DPC yield for hamster fibroblasts in vitro irradiated at 32 keV/{mu}m is similar to that reported for hamster cells irradiated with cobalt-60 gamma rays. At 100-120 keV/{mu}m there is some evidence for an enhanced DPC yield with increasing particle fluence, but there are differences in the yields that are dependent on particle track structure.

  15. [Actinic Keratosis].

    PubMed

    Dejaco, D; Hauser, U; Zelger, B; Riechelmann, H

    2015-07-01

    Actinic keratosis is a cutaneous lesion characterized by proliferation of atypical epidermal keratinocytes due to prolonged exposure to exogenous factors such as ultraviolet radiation. AKs are in-situ-squamous cell carcinomas (PEC) of the skin. AK typically presents as erythematous, scaly patch or papule (classic AK), occasionally as thick, adherent scale on an erythematous base. Mostly fair-skinned adults are affected. AKs typically occur in areas of frequent sun exposure (balding scalp, face, "H-region", lateral neck, décolleté, dorsum of the hand and lower extremities). Actinic Cheilitis is the term used for AKs appearing on the lips. The diagnosis of AK is based on clinical examination including inspection and palpation. The typical palpable rough surface of AK often precedes a visible lesion. Dermoscopy may provide additional information. If diagnosis is uncertain and invasion suspected, biopsy and histopathologic evaluation should be performed. The potential for progression to invasive PECs mandates therapeutic intervention. Treatment options include topical and systemic therapies. Topical therapies are classified into physical, medical and combined physical-chemical approaches and a sequential combination of treatment modalities is possible. Topical-physical cryotherapy is the treatment of choice for isolated, non-hypertrophic AK. Topical-medical treatment, e. g. 5-fluoruracil (5FU) cream or Imiquomod or Ingenolmebutat application is used for multiple, non-hypertrophic AKs. For hypertrophic AKs, a dehorning pretreatment with salicinated vaseline is recommended. Isolated hypertrophic AKs often need cryotherapy with prolonged freezing time or several consecutive applications. Sequentially combined approaches are recommended for multiple, hypertrophic AKs. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as example for a combined physical-chemical approach is an established treatment for multiple, non-hypertrophic and hypertrophic AKs. Prevention includes avoidance of sun and

  16. Furan oxidation based cross-linking: a new approach for the study and targeting of nucleic acid and protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Carrette, L L G; Gyssels, E; De Laet, N; Madder, A

    2016-01-28

    Furan mediated nucleic acid cross-linking, initially developed for DNA interstrand duplex cross-linking, has matured into a versatile tool for the study of protein and nucleic acid interactions, ready to face its applications. The methodology was initially developed for easy and clean chemical generation of DNA interstrand cross-linked duplexes, but has been further expanded for use with other probes, targets and triggers, now allowing mild biologically significant cross-linking with potential therapeutic benefit. It was shown that the methodology could be repurposed for RNA interstrand cross-linking, which is very relevant in today's antisense approaches or miRNA target identification endeavors. This further illustrates the furan oxidation method's generality and mildness, especially when using red light for oxidation. A complementary antigene approach has been explored through duplex targeting with furan modified triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and DNA binding proteins. Also targeting of peptides and proteins by furan-modified DNA and peptides has been explored. Thorough methodology examination exploring variable reaction conditions in combination with a series of different furan-modified building blocks and application of different activation signals resulted in a detailed understanding of the mechanisms involved and factors influencing the yield and selectivity of the reaction. In order to draw the bigger picture of the scope and limitations of furan-oxidation cross-linking, we here provide a unique side by side comparison and discussion of our published data, supplemented with unpublished results, providing a clear performance report of the currently established furan toolbox and its application potential in various biomacromolecular complexes. PMID:26679922

  17. Troponin T cross-linking in human apoptotic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gorza, L.; Menabó, R.; Di Lisa, F.; Vitadello, M.

    1997-01-01

    Intracellular calcium overload of guinea pig cardiomyocytes is accompanied by troponin T cross-linking, which is revealed by changes in immunoreactivity of anti-troponin T antibodies. We presently investigated whether the same process is detectable in the human heart. Immunohistochemistry shows myofibrillar staining with BN-59 anti-troponin T antibody with rare cardiomyocytes in samples obtained at surgery, whereas approximately 50% of myocytes are labeled in heart samples taken at autopsy within 3 hours of death, and every cardiomyocyte is stained after exposure of biopsy sections to 10 mmol/L calcium. Western blot analysis shows reactive polypeptides of approximately 70 and 85 to 90 kd in addition to troponin T in both treated and autopsy heart sections. Neither reactivity in immunohistochemistry nor additional reactive polypeptides in Western blot are detectable when calpain or transglutaminase is inhibited during exposure of sections to high calcium. Troponin T crosslinking occurs also in isolated myofibrils, which show staining with BN-59 at either sarcomeric A or I bands. Labeling with TdT-mediated dUTP nick and labeling (TUNEL) to demonstrate apoptosis reveals DNA fragmentation in BN-59-positive myocytes. Thus, troponin T cross-linking occurs in human cardiac myocytes concomitantly with apoptosis and autopsy autolysis, suggesting that similar cytosolic alterations can be produced by different types of myocyte death. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9176400

  18. Collagen Cross-Linking: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Hovakimyan, Marine; Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Stachs, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Collagen cross-linking (CXL) using UVA light and riboflavin (vitamin B2) was introduced as a clinical application to stabilize the cornea by inducing cross-links within and between collagen fibers. CXL has been investigated extensively and has been shown clinically to arrest the progression of keratoconic or post-LASIK ectasia. With its minimal cost, simplicity, and proven positive clinical outcome, CXL can be regarded as a useful approach to reduce the number of penetrating keratoplasties performed. Small case series have also indicated that CXL is beneficial in corneal edema by reducing stromal swelling behavior and in keratitis by inhibiting pathogen growth. Despite these encouraging results, CXL remains a relatively new method that is potentially associated with complications. Aspects such as side effects and recurrence rates have still to be elucidated. In light of the growing interest in CXL, our paper summarizes present knowledge about this promising approach. We have intentionally endeavored to include the more relevant studies from the recent literature to provide an overview of the current status of CXL. PMID:22288005

  19. Polyimide aerogels cross-linked through amine functionalized polyoligomeric silsesquioxane.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haiquan; Meador, Mary Ann B; McCorkle, Linda; Quade, Derek J; Guo, Jiao; Hamilton, Bart; Cakmak, Miko; Sprowl, Guilherme

    2011-02-01

    We report the first synthesis of polyimide aerogels cross-linked through a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane, octa(aminophenyl)silsesquioxane (OAPS). Gels formed from polyamic acid solutions of 3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (BPDA), bisaniline-p-xylidene (BAX) and OAPS were chemically imidized and dried using supercritical CO(2) extraction to give aerogels having density around 0.1 g/cm(3). The aerogels are greater than 90 % porous, have high surface areas (230 to 280 m(2)/g) and low thermal conductivity (14 mW/m-K at room temperature). Notably, the polyimide aerogels cross-linked with OAPS have higher modulus than polymer reinforced silica aerogels of similar density and can be fabricated as both monoliths and thin films. Thin films of the aerogel are flexible and foldable making them an ideal insulation for space suits, and inflatable structures for habitats or decelerators for planetary re-entry, as well as more down to earth applications. PMID:21294517

  20. Optimization model for UV-Riboflavin corneal cross-linking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, S.; Wernli, J.; Scherrer, S.; Bueehler, M.; Seiler, T.; Mrochen, M.

    2011-03-01

    Nowadays UV-cross-linking is an established method for the treatment of keraectasia. Currently a standardized protocol is used for the cross-linking treatment. We will now present a theoretical model which predicts the number of induced crosslinks in the corneal tissue, in dependence of the Riboflavin concentration, the radiation intensity, the pre-treatment time and the treatment time. The model is developed by merging the difussion equation, the equation for the light distribution in dependence on the absorbers in the tissue and a rate equation for the polymerization process. A higher concentration of Riboflavin solution as well as a higher irradiation intensity will increase the number of induced crosslinks. However, performed stress-strain experiments which support the model showed that higher Riboflavin concentrations (> 0.125%) do not result in a further increase in stability of the corneal tissue. This is caused by the inhomogeneous distribution of induced crosslinks throughout the cornea due to the uneven absorption of the UV-light. The new model offers the possibility to optimize the treatment individually for every patient depending on their corneal thickness in terms of efficiency, saftey and treatment time.

  1. Tea derived galloylated polyphenols cross-link purified gastrointestinal mucins.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, Pantelis; Pudney, Paul D A; Rogers, Sarah; Thornton, David J; Waigh, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols derived from tea are thought to be important for human health. We show using a combination of particle tracking microrheology and small-angle neutron scattering that polyphenols acts as cross-linkers for purified gastrointestinal mucin, derived from the stomach and the duodenum. Both naturally derived purified polyphenols, and green and black tea extracts are shown to act as cross-linkers. The main active cross-linking component is found to be the galloylated forms of catechins. The viscosity, elasticity and relaxation time of the mucin solutions experience an order of magnitude change in value upon addition of the polyphenol cross-linkers. Similarly small-angle neutron scattering experiments demonstrate a sol-gel transition with the addition of polyphenols, with a large increase in the scattering at low angles, which is attributed to the formation of large scale (>10 nm) heterogeneities during gelation. Cross-linking of mucins by polyphenols is thus expected to have an impact on the physicochemical environment of both the stomach and duodenum; polyphenols are expected to modulate the barrier properties of mucus, nutrient absorption through mucus and the viscoelastic microenvironments of intestinal bacteria. PMID:25162539

  2. Thermoset-cross-linked lignocellulose: a moldable plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Karumuri, Sriharsha; Hiziroglu, Salim; Kalkan, A Kaan

    2015-04-01

    The present work demonstrates a high biomass content (i.e., up to 90% by weight) and moldable material by controlled covalent cross-linking of lignocellulosic particles by a thermoset through epoxide-hydroxyl reactions. As an example for lignocellulosic biomass, Eastern redcedar was employed. Using scanning fluorescence microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy, macroscopic to molecular scale interactions of the thermoset with the lignocellulose have been revealed. Impregnation of the polymer resin into the biomass cellular network by capillary action as well as applied pressure results in a self-organizing structure in the form of thermoset microrods in a matrix of lignocellulose. We also infer permeation of the thermoset into the cell walls from the reaction of epoxides with the hydroxyls of the lignin. Compression tests reveal, at 30% thermoset content, thermoset-cross-linked lignocellulose has superior mechanical properties over a commercial wood plastic composite while comparable stiffness and strength to bulk epoxy and wood, respectively. The failure mechanism is understood to be crack propagation along the particle-thermoset interface and/or interparticle thermoset network. PMID:25734539

  3. One-step electrospinning of cross-linked chitosan fibers.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Jessica D; Schauer, Caroline L

    2007-09-01

    Chitin is a nitrogen-rich polysaccharide that is abundant in crustaceans, mollusks, insects, and fungi and is the second most abundant organic material found in nature next to cellulose. Chitosan, the N-deacetylated derivative of chitin, is environmentally friendly, nontoxic, biodegradable, and antibacterial. Fibrous mats are typically used in industries for filter media, catalysis, and sensors. Decreasing fiber diameters within these mats causes many beneficial effects such as increased specific surface area to volume ratios. When the intrinsically beneficial effects of chitosan are combined with the enhanced properties of nanofibrous mats, applications arise in a wide range of fields, including medical, packaging, agricultural, and automotive. This is particularly important as innovative technologies that focus around bio-based materials are currently of high urgency, as they can decrease dependencies on fossil fuels. We have demonstrated that Schiff base cross-linked chitosan fibrous mats can be produced utilizing a one-step electrospinning process that is 25 times faster and, therefore, more economical than a previously reported two-step vapor-cross-linking method. These fibrous mats are insoluble in acidic, basic, and aqueous solutions for 72 h. Additionally, this improved production method results in a decreased average fiber diameter, which measures 128 +/- 40 nm. Chemical and structural analyses were conducted utilizing Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solubility studies, and scanning electron microscopy. PMID:17696400

  4. Supermacroporous chemically cross-linked poly(aspartic acid) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Gyarmati, Benjámin; Mészár, E Zsuzsanna; Kiss, Lóránd; Deli, Mária A; László, Krisztina; Szilágyi, András

    2015-08-01

    Chemically cross-linked poly(aspartic acid) (PASP) gels were prepared by a solid-liquid phase separation technique, cryogelation, to achieve a supermacroporous interconnected pore structure. The precursor polymer of PASP, polysuccinimide (PSI) was cross-linked below the freezing point of the solvent and the forming crystals acted as templates for the pores. Dimethyl sulfoxide was chosen as solvent instead of the more commonly used water. Thus larger temperatures could be utilized for the preparation and the drawback of increase in specific volume of water upon freezing could be eliminated. The morphology of the hydrogels was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and interconnectivity of the pores was proven by the small flow resistance of the gels. Compression tests also confirmed the interconnected porous structure and the complete re-swelling and shape recovery of the supermacroporous PASP hydrogels. The prepared hydrogels are of interest for several biomedical applications as scaffolding materials because of their cytocompatibility, controllable morphology and pH-responsive character. PMID:25922304

  5. Effects of processing conditions on the reliability of cross-linked polyethylene cable insulation. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P.J.

    1981-03-01

    Crystallization and morphology were investigated in cross-linked PE. /sup 13/C NMR was used to quantify the cross-links. Production of cable is being studied. Dielectric constant and loss of cross-linked PE are being measured. (DLC)

  6. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-07-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  7. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  8. Structural dynamics of an actin spring.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, L; Riera, C S; Shin, Jennifer H

    2011-02-16

    Actin-based motility in cells is usually associated with either polymerization/depolymerization in the presence of cross-linkers or contractility in the presence of myosin motors. Here, we focus on a third distinct mechanism involving actin in motility, seen in the dynamics of an active actin spring that powers the acrosomal reaction of the horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) sperm. During this process, a 60-μm bent and twisted bundle of cross-linked actin uncoils and becomes straight in a few seconds in the presence of Ca(2+). This straightening, which occurs at a constant velocity, allows the acrosome to forcefully penetrate the egg. Synthesizing ultrastructural information with the kinetics, energetics, and imaging of calcium binding allows us to construct a dynamical theory for this mechanochemical engine consistent with our experimental observations. It also illuminates the general mechanism by which energy may be stored in conformational changes and released cooperatively in ordered macromolecular assemblies. PMID:21320427

  9. Evaluation of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) cross-linked collagen membranes and concerns on osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chenyu; Deng, Jia; Xiang, Lin; Wu, Yingying; Wei, Xiawei; Qu, Yili; Man, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Collagen membranes have ideal biological and mechanical properties for supporting infiltration and proliferation of osteoblasts and play a vital role in guided bone regeneration (GBR). However, pure collagen can lead to inflammation, resulting in progressive bone resorption. Therefore, a method for regulating the level of inflammatory cytokines at surgical sites is paramount for the healing process. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a component extracted from green tea with numerous biological activities including an anti-inflammatory effect. Herein, we present a novel cross-linked collagen membrane containing different concentrations of EGCG (0.0064%, 0.064%, and 0.64%) to regulate the level of inflammatory factors secreted by pre-osteoblast cells; improve cell proliferation; and increase the tensile strength, wettability, and thermal stability of collagen membranes. Scanning electron microscope images show that the surfaces of collagen membranes became smoother and the collagen fiber diameters became larger with EGCG treatment. Measurement of the water contact angle demonstrated that introducing EGCG improved membrane wettability. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses indicated that the backbone of collagen was intact, and the thermal stability was significant improved in differential scanning calorimetry. The mechanical properties of 0.064% and 0.64% EGCG-treated collagen membranes were 1.5-fold greater than those of the control. The extent of cross-linking was significantly increased, as determined by a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid solution assay. The Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and live/dead assays revealed that collagen membrane cross-linked by 0.0064% EGCG induced greater cell proliferation than pure collagen membranes. Additionally, real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that EGCG significantly affected the production of inflammatory factors secreted by MC3T3-E1 cells. Taken together, our

  10. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B (LigB) Binds to Both the C-Terminal 23 Amino Acids of Fibrinogen αC Domain and Factor XIII: Insight into the Mechanism of LigB-Mediated Blockage of Fibrinogen α Chain Cross-Linking.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Chang, Eric; Tseng, Andrew; Ptak, Christopher; Wu, Li-Chen; Su, Chun-Li; McDonough, Sean P; Lin, Yi-Pin; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2016-09-01

    The coagulation system provides a primitive but effective defense against hemorrhage. Soluble fibrinogen (Fg) monomers, composed of α, β and γ chains, are recruited to provide structural support for the formation of a hemostatic plug. Fg binds to platelets and is processed into a cross-linked fibrin polymer by the enzymatic clotting factors, thrombin and Factor XIII (FXIII). The newly formed fibrin-platelet clot can act as barrier to protect against pathogens from entering the bloodstream. Further, injuries caused by bacterial infections can be confined to the initial wound site. Many pathogenic bacteria have Fg-binding adhesins that can circumvent the coagulation pathway and allow the bacteria to sidestep containment. Fg expression is upregulated during lung infection providing an attachment surface for bacteria with the ability to produce Fg-binding adhesins. Fg binding by leptospira might play a crucial factor in Leptospira-associated pulmonary hemorrhage, the main factor contributing to lethality in severe cases of leptospirosis. The 12th domain of Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB12), a leptospiral adhesin, interacts with the C-terminus of FgαC (FgαCC). In this study, the binding site for LigB12 was mapped to the final 23 amino acids at the C-terminal end of FgαCC (FgαCC8). The association of FgαCC8 with LigB12 (ELISA, KD = 0.76 μM; SPR, KD = 0.96 μM) was reduced by mutations of both charged residues (R608, R611 and H614 from FgαCC8; D1061 from LigB12) and hydrophobic residues (I613 from FgαCC8; F1054 and A1065 from LigB12). Additionally, LigB12 bound strongly to FXIII and also inhibited fibrin formation, suggesting that LigB can disrupt coagulation by suppressing FXIII activity. Here, the detailed binding mechanism of a leptospiral adhesin to a host hemostatic factor is characterized for the first time and should provide better insight into the pathogenesis of leptospirosis. PMID:27622634

  11. Studies on N-vinylformamide cross-linked copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świder, Joanna; Tąta, Agnieszka; Sokołowska, Katarzyna; Witek, Ewa; Proniewicz, Edyta

    2015-12-01

    Copolymers of N-vinylformamide (NVF) cross-linked with three multifunctional monomers, including divinylbenzene (DVB), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), and N,N‧-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) were synthetized by a three-dimensional free radical polymerization in inverse suspension using 2,2‧-azobis(2-methylpropionamide) dihydrochloride (AIBA) as an initiator. Methyl silicon oil was used as the continuous phase during the polymerization processes. Fourier-transform adsorption infrared (FT-IR) spectra revealed the presence of silicone oil traces and suggested that silicone oil strongly interacted with the copolymers surface. Purification procedure allowed to completely remove the silicon oil traces from P(NVF-co-DVB) only. The morphology and the structure of the investigated copolymers were examined by optical microscopy, FT-IR, and FT-Raman (Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy) methods.

  12. Conventional Versus Cross-Linked Polyethylene for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Monestier, Luca; Vulcano, Ettore; Harwin, Steven F; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The clinical and radiographic outcomes of 88 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with either conventional polyethylene or cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) from the same manufacturer were compared. There were no significant differences between the 2 subpopulations regarding average age, gender, side affected, or prosthetic stem and cup size. The average follow-up was 104 months (range, 55 to 131 months). To the authors' knowledge, this is the longest follow-up for this particular insert. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results showed that XLPE has a significantly greater wear reduction than that of standard polyethylene in primary total hip arthroplasty. At the longest available follow-up for these specific inserts, XLPE proved to be effective in reducing wear. PMID:26375527

  13. [Cross-links of collagen and bone quality].

    PubMed

    Banse, X

    2010-01-01

    Bone tissue is a marvellous material. Basic bone function is to be structurally stiff and strong. Stiffness allows vertebrates to maintain their shape, to protect the organs and to move. Being strong, bone only breaks in exceptional circumstances. Osteoporosis is a disease where fractures happen too often, because of abnormal bone fragility. In this situation, bone--especially cancellous bone--does not take up its first duty. Trabeculae are scarce and thin, leading to very low tissue density. Biomechanical tests and clinical evidence have shown that some subjects have, with equal bone density, stronger or weaker bone tissue. This led to the concept of bone quality. Even if other hypotheses have been systematically explored, it seems that bone collagen chemical nature, especially its cross-link profile, significantly influences human bone quality. PMID:21513097

  14. Protein cross-linking tools for the construction of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Domeradzka, Natalia E; Werten, Marc Wt; Wolf, Frits A de; de Vries, Renko

    2016-06-01

    Across bioengineering there is a need to couple proteins to other proteins, or to peptides. Although traditional chemical conjugations have dominated in the past, more and more highly specific coupling strategies are becoming available that are based on protein engineering. Here we review the use of protein modification approaches such as enzymatic and autocatalytic protein-protein coupling, as well as the use of hetero-dimerizing (or hetero-oligomerizing) modules, applied to the specific case of linking together de novo designed recombinant polypeptides into precisely structured nanomaterials. Such polypeptides are increasingly being investigated for biomedical and other applications. In this review, we describe the protein-engineering based cross-linking strategies that dramatically expand the repertoire of possible molecular structures and, hence, the range of materials that can be produced from them. PMID:26871735

  15. The Effect of Crosslinking on the Microscale Stress Response and Molecular Deformations in Actin Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurmessa, Bekele; Fitzpatrick, Robert; Valdivia, Jonathon; Anderson, Rae M. R.

    Actin, the most abundant protein in eukaryotic cells, is a semi-flexible biopolymer in the cytoskeleton that plays a crucial structural and mechanical role in cell stability, motion and replication, as well as muscle contraction. Most of these mechanically driven structural changes in cells stem from the complex viscoelastic nature of entangled actin networks and the presence of a myriad of proteins that cross-link actin filaments. Despite their importance, the mechanical response of actin networks is not yet well understood, particularly at the molecular level. Here, we use optical trapping - coupled with fluorescence microscopy - to characterize the microscale stress response and induced filament deformations in entangled and cross-linked actin networks subject to localized mechanical perturbations. In particular, we actively drive a microsphere 10 microns through an entangled or cross- linked actin network at a constant speed and measure the resistive force that the deformed actin filaments exert on the bead during and following strain. We simultaneously visualize and track individual sparsely-labeled actin filaments to directly link force response to molecular deformations, and map the propagation of the initially localized perturbation field throughout the rest of the network (~100 um). By varying the concentration of actin and cross-linkers we directly determine the role of crosslinking and entanglements on the length and time scales of stress propagation, molecular deformation and relaxation mechanisms in actin networks.

  16. Cross-linked polyethylenimine-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xianzhang; Shen, Sujing; Zhang, Zhanfeng; Zhuang, Junhua

    2014-01-01

    The high transfection efficiency of polyethylenimine (PEI) makes it an attractive potential nonviral genetic vector for gene delivery and therapy. However, the highly positive charge of PEI leads to cytotoxicity and limits its application. To reduce the cytotoxicity of PEI, we prepared anion-enriched nanoparticles that combined PEI with tripolyphosphate (TPP). We then characterized the PEI-TPP nanoparticles in terms of size, zeta potential, and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, and assessed their transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity, and ability to resist deoxyribonuclease (DNase) I digestion. The cellular uptake of PEI-TPP with phosphorylated internal ribosome entry site-enhanced green fluorescent protein C1 or FAM (fluorouracil, Adriamycin [doxorubicin] and mitomycin)-labeled small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs) was monitored by fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser microscopy. The efficiency of transfected delivery of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and siRNA in vitro was 1.11- to 4.20-fold higher with the PEI-TPP particles (7.6% cross-linked) than with the PEI, at all N:P ratios (nitrogen in PEI to phosphorus in DNA) tested. The cell viability of different cell lines was more than 90% at the chosen N:P ratios of PEI-TPP/DNA complexes. Moreover, PEI-TPP nanoparticles resisted digestion by DNase I for more than 2 hours. The time-dependent absorption experiment showed that 7.6% of cross-linked PEI-TPP particles were internalized by 293T cells within 1 hour. In summary, PEI-TPP nanoparticles effectively transfected cells while conferring little or no toxicity, and thus have potential application in gene delivery. PMID:25342902

  17. Peptidoglycan cross-linking in glycopeptide-resistant Actinomycetales.

    PubMed

    Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Haddache, Nabila; Veckerlé, Carole; Dubost, Lionel; Marie, Arul; Shikura, Noriyasu; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Rice, Louis B; Arthur, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors ending in D-lactate (D-Lac) is thought to be responsible for glycopeptide resistance in members of the order Actinomycetales that produce these drugs and in related soil bacteria. More recently, the peptidoglycan of several members of the order Actinomycetales was shown to be cross-linked by L,D-transpeptidases that use tetrapeptide acyl donors devoid of the target of glycopeptides. To evaluate the contribution of these resistance mechanisms, we have determined the peptidoglycan structure of Streptomyces coelicolor A(3)2, which harbors a vanHAX gene cluster for the production of precursors ending in D-Lac, and Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727, which is devoid of vanHAX and produces the glycopeptide A40296. Vancomycin retained residual activity against S. coelicolor A(3)2 despite efficient incorporation of D-Lac into cytoplasmic precursors. This was due to a D,D-transpeptidase-catalyzed reaction that generated a stem pentapeptide recognized by glycopeptides by the exchange of D-Lac for D-Ala and Gly. The contribution of L,D-transpeptidases to resistance was limited by the supply of tetrapeptide acyl donors, which are essential for the formation of peptidoglycan cross-links by these enzymes. In the absence of a cytoplasmic metallo-D,D-carboxypeptidase, the tetrapeptide substrate was generated by hydrolysis of the C-terminal D-Lac residue of the stem pentadepsipeptide in the periplasm in competition with the exchange reaction catalyzed by D,D-transpeptidases. In Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727, the contribution of L,D-transpeptidases to glycopeptide resistance was limited by the incomplete conversion of pentapeptides into tetrapeptides despite the production of a cytoplasmic metallo-D,D-carboxypeptidase. Since the level of drug production exceeds the level of resistance, we propose that L,D-transpeptidases merely act as a tolerance mechanism in this bacterium. PMID:24395229

  18. Enzymatically cross-linked injectable alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogels for neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Devolder, Ross; Antoniadou, Eleni; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2013-11-28

    Microparticles capable of releasing protein drugs are often incorporated into injectable hydrogels to minimize their displacement at an implantation site, reduce initial drug burst, and further control drug release rates over a broader range. However, there is still a need to develop methods for releasing drug molecules over extended periods of time, in order to sustain the bioactivity of drug molecules at an implantation site. In this study, we hypothesized that a hydrogel formed through the cross-linking of pyrrole units linked to a hydrophilic polymer would release protein drugs in a more sustained manner, because of an enhanced association between cross-linked pyrrole groups and the drug molecules. To examine this hypothesis, we prepared hydrogels of alginate substituted with pyrrole groups, alginate-g-pyrrole, through a horse-radish peroxidase (HRP)-activated cross-linking of the pyrrole groups. The hydrogels were encapsulated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles loaded with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The resulting hydrogel system released VEGF in a more sustained manner than Ca(2+) alginate or Ca(2+) alginate-g-pyrrole gel systems. Finally, implantations of the VEGF-releasing HRP-activated alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system on chicken chorioallantoic membranes resulted in the formation of blood vessels in higher densities and with larger diameters, compared to other control conditions. Overall, the drug releasing system developed in this study will be broadly useful for regulating release rates of a wide array of protein drugs, and further enhance the quality of protein drug-based therapies. PMID:23886705

  19. Collagen Cross-Linking Using Rose Bengal and Green Light to Increase Corneal Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Cherfan, Daniel; Verter, E. Eri; Melki, Samir; Gisel, Thomas E.; Doyle, Francis J.; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun; Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Photochemical cross-linking of corneal collagen is an evolving treatment for keratoconus and other ectatic disorders. We evaluated collagen cross-linking by rose bengal plus green light (RGX) in rabbit eyes and investigated factors important for clinical application. Methods. Rose bengal (RB, 0.1%) was applied to deepithelialized corneas of enucleated rabbit eyes for 2 minutes. The diffusion distance of RB into the stroma was measured by fluorescence microscopy on frozen sections. RB-stained corneas were exposed to green (532-nm) light for 3.3 to 9.9 minutes (50–150 J/cm2). Changes in the absorption spectrum during the irradiation were recorded. Corneal stiffness was measured by uniaxial tensiometry. The spatial distribution of the stromal elastic modulus was assessed by Brillouin microscopy. Viable keratocytes were counted on H&E-stained sections 24 hours posttreatment. Results. RB penetrated approximately 100 μm into the corneal stroma and absorbed >90% of the incident green light. RGX (150 J/cm2) increased stromal stiffness by 3.8-fold. The elastic modulus increased in the anterior approximately 120 μm of stroma. RB was partially photobleached during the 2-minute irradiation, but reapplication of RB blocked light transmission by >70%. Spectral measurements suggested that RGX initiated cross-linking by an oxygen-dependent mechanism. RGX did not decrease keratocyte viability. Conclusions. RGX significantly increases cornea stiffness in a rapid treatment (≅12 minutes total time), does not cause toxicity to keratocytes and may be used to stiffen corneas thinner than 400 μm. Thus, RGX may provide an attractive approach to inhibit progression of keratoconus and other ectatic disorders. PMID:23599326

  20. Emergence of large chiroptical responses by ligand exchange cross-linking of monolayer-protected gold clusters with chiral dithiol.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hiroshi; Yaomura, Shota

    2013-05-28

    We here present a study of cross-linking chemistry of optically inactive monothiol-protected gold clusters by chiral bidentate dithiol with two stereogenic centers, (2R,3R)-1,4-dimercapto-2,3-butanediol (L-dithiothreitol; L-DTT), and explore the impacts of the cross-linking on their chiroptical responses. The pristine protective ligand is racemic penicillamine (rac-Pen), and the products of the ligand exchange reactions include clusters containing both rac-Pen and L-DTT (partial exchange). Electrophoresis using polyacrylamide gel with a very low gel concentration (3%) can make the products separable into two components, each of which has the similar mean core diameter of 0.78 and 0.83 nm, so the difference in the relative mobility is mainly ascribed to the size of the cluster assembly. In addition, very large optical activity with the maximum anisotropy factors of about 1.0 × 10(-3) is found for the assemblies. In comparison with chiral 1,3-dithiol protection incapable of cross-linking between gold clusters, we propose that the observed optical activity is due to surface intrinsic handedness caused by a cyclic cross-linking with at least two L-DTT molecules. PMID:23635318

  1. Cross-linked network development in compatibilized alkyd/acrylic hybrid latex films for the creation of hard coatings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; de las Heras Alarcón, Carolina; Goikoetxea, Monika; Beristain, Itxaso; Paulis, Maria; Barandiaran, Maria J; Asua, José M; Keddie, Joseph L

    2010-09-01

    Hybrids made from an alkyd resin and an acrylic copolymer can potentially combine the desired properties of each component. Alkyd/acrylic hybrid latex particles were synthesized via miniemulsion polymerization and used to create films at room temperature. Comparisons of the alkyd auto-oxidative cross-linking rates and the associated network development are made between two alkyd resins (with differing levels of hydrophilicity as measured by their acid numbers). The effects of increasing the compatibilization between the alkyd and the acrylic phase via functionalization with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) are investigated. Magnetic resonance profiling and microindentation measurements reveal that film hardening occurs much faster in a GMA-functionalized alkyd hybrid than in the standard hybrid. The film's hardness increases by a factor of 4 over a 5-day period. The rate of cross-linking is significantly slower in nonfunctionalized alkyd hybrid films and when the more hydrophilic alkyd resin is used. Tensile deformation of the hybrid latex films reveals the effects of GMA functionalization and drier concentration in creating a denser cross-linked network. Modeling of the tensile deformation behavior of the hybrid films used a combination of the upper convected Maxwell model (to describe the viscoelastic component) and the Gent model (to describe the elastic component). The modeling provides a correlation between the cross-linked network formation and the resulting mechanical properties. PMID:20704338

  2. ARF6 promotes the formation of Rac1 and WAVE-dependent ventral F-actin rosettes in breast cancer cells in response to epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Marchesin, Valentina; Montagnac, Guillaume; Chavrier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Coordination between actin cytoskeleton assembly and localized polarization of intracellular trafficking routes is crucial for cancer cell migration. ARF6 has been implicated in the endocytic recycling of surface receptors and membrane components and in actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Here we show that overexpression of an ARF6 fast-cycling mutant in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer-derived cells to mimick ARF6 hyperactivation observed in invasive breast tumors induced a striking rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton at the ventral cell surface. This phenotype consisted in the formation of dynamic actin-based podosome rosette-like structures expanding outward as wave positive for F-actin and actin cytoskeleton regulatory components including cortactin, Arp2/3 and SCAR/WAVE complexes and upstream Rac1 regulator. Ventral rosette-like structures were similarly induced in MDA-MB-231 cells in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation and to Rac1 hyperactivation. In addition, interference with ARF6 expression attenuated activation and plasma membrane targeting of Rac1 in response to EGF treatment. Our data suggest a role for ARF6 in linking EGF-receptor signaling to Rac1 recruitment and activation at the plasma membrane to promote breast cancer cell directed migration. PMID:25799492

  3. Cervical Softening During Pregnancy: Regulated Changes in Collagen Cross-Linking and Composition of Matricellular Proteins in the Mouse1

    PubMed Central

    Akins, Meredith L.; Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Bank, Ruud A.; Mahendroo, Mala

    2011-01-01

    A greater understanding of the parturition process is essential in the prevention of preterm birth, which occurs in 12.7% of infants born in the United States annually. Cervical remodeling is a critical component of this process. Beginning early in pregnancy, remodeling requires cumulative, progressive changes in the cervical extracellular matrix (ECM) that result in reorganization of collagen fibril structure with a gradual loss of tensile strength. In the current study, we undertook a detailed biochemical analysis of factors in the cervix that modulate collagen structure during early mouse pregnancy, including expression of proteins involved in processing of procollagen, assembly of collagen fibrils, cross-link formation, and deposition of collagen in the ECM. Changes in these factors correlated with changes in the types of collagen cross-links formed and packing of collagen fibrils as measured by electron microscopy. Early in pregnancy there is a decline in expression of two matricellular proteins, thrombospondin 2 and tenascin C, as well as a decline in expression of lysyl hydroxylase, which is involved in cross-link formation. These changes are accompanied by a decline in both HP and LP cross-links by gestation Days 12 and 14, respectively, as well as a progressive increase in collagen fibril diameter. In contrast, collagen abundance remains constant over the course of pregnancy. We conclude that early changes in tensile strength during cervical softening result in part from changes in the number and type of collagen cross-links and are associated with a decline in expression of two matricellular proteins thrombospondin 2 and tenascin C. PMID:21248285

  4. BRCA1 functions independently of homologous recombination in DNA interstrand cross-link repair

    PubMed Central

    Bunting, Samuel F; Callen, Elsa; Kozak, Marina L; Kim, Jung-Min; Wong, Nancy; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Ludwig, Thomas; Baer, Richard; Faryabi, Robert B; Malhowski, Amy; Chen, Hua-Tang; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; D’Andrea, Alan; Nussenzweig, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Brca1 is required for DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and normal embryonic development. Here we report that deletion of the DNA damage response factor 53BP1 overcomes embryonic lethality in Brca1-nullizygous mice, and rescues HR deficiency, as measured by hypersensitivity to PARP (polyADP-ribose polymerase) inhibition. However, Brca1,53BP1 double-deficient cells are hypersensitive to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs), indicating that BRCA1 has an additional role in DNA cross-link repair that is distinct from HR. Disruption of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) factor, Ku, promotes DNA repair in Brca1-deficient cells; however deletion of either Ku or 53BP1 exacerbates genomic instability in cells lacking FANCD2, a mediator of the Fanconi Anemia pathway for ICL repair. BRCA1 therefore has two separate roles in ICL repair, whereas FANCD2 provides a key activity that can not be bypassed by ablation of 53BP1 or Ku. PMID:22445484

  5. Contributions of DNA interstrand cross-links to aging of cells and organisms

    PubMed Central

    Grillari, Johannes; Katinger, Hermann; Voglauer, Regina

    2007-01-01

    Impaired DNA damage repair, especially deficient transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair, leads to segmental progeroid syndromes in human patients as well as in rodent models. Furthermore, DNA double-strand break signalling has been pinpointed as a key inducer of cellular senescence. Several recent findings suggest that another DNA repair pathway, interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair, might also contribute to cell and organism aging. Therefore, we summarize and discuss here that (i) systemic administration of anti-cancer chemotherapeutics, in many cases DNA cross-linking drugs, induces premature progeroid frailty in long-term survivors; (ii) that ICL-inducing 8-methoxy-psoralen/UVA phototherapy leads to signs of premature skin aging as prominent long-term side effect and (iii) that mutated factors involved in ICL repair like ERCC1/XPF, the Fanconi anaemia proteins, WRN and SNEV lead to reduced replicative life span in vitro and segmental progeroid syndromes in vivo. However, since ICL-inducing drugs cause damage different from ICL and since all currently known ICL repair factors work in more than one pathway, further work will be needed to dissect the actual contribution of ICL damage to aging. PMID:18083760

  6. Isolation of a strawberry gene fragment encoding an actin depolymerizing factor-like protein from genotypes resistant to Colletotrichum acutatum.

    PubMed

    Ontivero, Marta; Zamora, Gustavo Martínez; Salazar, Sergio; Ricci, Juan Carlos Díaz; Castagnaro, Atilio Pedro

    2011-12-01

    Actin depolymerizing factors (ADFs) have been recently implicated in plant defense against pathogenic fungi, associated with the cytoskeletal rearrangements that contribute to establish an effective barrier against fungal ingress. In this work, we identified a DNA fragment corresponding to a part of a gene predicted to encode an ADF-like protein in genotypes of Fragaria ananassa resistant to the fungus Colletotrichum acutatum. Bulked segregant analysis combined with AFLP was used to identify polymorphisms linked to resistance in hybrids derived from the cross between the resistant cultivar 'Sweet Charlie' and the susceptible cultivar 'Pájaro'. The sequence of one out of three polymorphic bands detected showed significant BLASTX hits to ADF proteins from other plants. Two possible exons were identified and bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of the ADF homology domain with two actin-binding sites, an N-terminal phosphorylation site, and a nuclear localization signal. In addition to its possible application in strawberry breeding programs, these finding may contribute to investigate the role of ADFs in plant resistance against fungi. PMID:22107362

  7. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... example, if you work outdoors) Had many severe sunburns early in life Are older Symptoms Actinic keratosis ... and tanning salons. Other things to know about sun exposure: Sun exposure is stronger in or near surfaces ...

  8. Actinic Cheilitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a precancerous condition related to cumulative lifetime sun exposure. The lower lip is most often affected. Individuals ... Wearing barrier clothing (eg, wide-brimmed hats) and sunscreen-containing lip balms can aid in preventing actinic ...

  9. Standard versus trans-epithelial collagen cross-linking in keratoconus patients suitable for standard collagen cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, S; Orrico, A; Santamaria, C; Romano, V; De Rosa, L; Simonelli, F; De Rosa, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Evaluating the clinical results of trans-epithelial collagen cross-linking (CXL) and standard CXL in patients with progressive keratoconus. Methods This prospective study comprised 20 eyes of 20 patients with progressive keratoconus. Ten eyes were treated by standard CXL and ten by trans-epithelial cross-linking (TE-CXL, epithelium on) with 1 year of follow-up. All patients underwent complete ophthalmologic testing that included pre- and postoperative uncorrected visual acuity, corrected visual acuity, spherical error, spherical equivalent, corneal astigmatism, simulated maximum, minimum, and average keratometry, coma and spherical aberration, optical pachymetry, and endothelial cell density. Intra-and postoperative complications were recorded. The solution used for standard CXL comprised riboflavin 0.1% and dextran 20.0% (Ricrolin), while the solution for TE-CXL (Ricrolin, TE) comprised riboflavin 0.1%, dextran 15.0%, trometamol (Tris), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Ultraviolet-A treatment was performed with UV-X System at 3 mW/cm2. Results In both the standard CXL group (ten patients, ten eyes; mean age, 30.4±7.3 years) and the TE-CXL group (ten patients, ten eyes; mean age, 28±3.8 years), uncorrected visual acuity and corrected visual acuity improved significantly after treatment. Furthermore, a significant improvement in topographic outcomes, spherical error, and spherical equivalent was observed in both groups at month 12 posttreatment. No significant variations were recorded in other parameters. No complications were noted. Conclusion A 1-year follow-up showed stability of clinical and refractive outcomes after standard CXL and TE-CXL. PMID:25834386

  10. Ocular biocompatibility of carbodiimide cross-linked hyaluronic acid hydrogels for cell sheet delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jui-Yang; Ma, David Hui-Kang; Cheng, Hsiao-Yun; Sun, Chi-Chin; Huang, Shu-Jung; Li, Ya-Ting; Hsiue, Ging-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Due to its innocuous nature, hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the most commonly used biopolymers for ophthalmic applications. We recently developed a cell sheet delivery system using carbodiimide cross-linked HA carriers. Chemical cross-linking provides an improvement in stability of polymer gels, but probably causes toxic side-effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the ocular biocompatibility of HA hydrogels cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). HA discs without cross-linking and glutaraldehyde (GTA) cross-linked HA samples were used for comparison. The disc implants were inserted in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes for 24 weeks and characterized by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, histology and scanning electron microscopy. The ophthalmic parameters obtained from biomicroscopic examinations were also scored to provide a quantitative grading system. Results of this study showed that the HA discs cross-linked with EDC had better ocular biocompatibility than those with GTA. The continued residence of GTA cross-linked HA implants in the intraocular cavity elicited severe tissue responses and significant foreign body reactions, whereas no adverse inflammatory reaction was observed after contact with non-cross-linked HA or EDC cross-linked HA samples. It is concluded that the cross-linking agent type gives influence on ocular biocompatibility of cell carriers and the EDC-HA hydrogel is an ideal candidate for use as an implantable material in cell sheet delivery applications. PMID:20178691

  11. Tuning nanoscale viscoelasticity of polyelectrolyte complexes with multiple types of cross-links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tianzhu; Han, Biao; Lee, Daeyeon; Han, Lin

    Mechanical properties of hydrogels are manifestation of cross-link type and density, fixed charges and water-polymer interactions. In this study, we revealed how different types of cross-links regulate the nanoscale viscoelasticity of polyelectrolyte networks. Ionically cross-linked PAH/PAA layer-by-layer complexes were modified to include covalent cross-links using EDC. AFM-nanoindentation and force relaxation were performed at various ionic strength (0.01-1M) and pH (1.5-5.5). As-assembled networks, held only by ionic cross-links, underwent >95% relaxation, dominated by cross-link breaking and re-formation. Addition of covalent cross-links increased the instantaneous modulus by 1.6-fold and attenuated relaxation to ~80% of net neutral states (pH >=3.5), as covalent cross-links provide additional elastic components. The network remained stabilized when all ionic cross-links were dissociated at pH <=1.5, whereby further attenuation to 31% in relaxation could be due to viscoelastic polymer conformational changes and fluid flow-induced poroelasticity. Taken together, this study demonstrates the potential of using multiple cross-linking types to tune the viscoelastic mechanisms in polyelectrolyte complexes.

  12. Physicochemical properties and bioactivity of nisin-containing cross-linked hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films.

    PubMed

    Sebti, Issam; Delves-Broughton, John; Coma, Véronique

    2003-10-22

    Cross-linked hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) cast films with citric acid as polycarboxylic cross-linker were elaborated to study the effect of cross-linking level on various properties. Increased amounts of cross-linking agent were not connected to statistically different tensile strength and Young's modulus. Whatever the cross-linking level of the film was, the ultimate elongation parameter decreased by approximately 60% compared to the HMPC control film. Moisture sorption isotherms and water contact angle meter showed that the effect of cross-linking degree tends to reduce the hygroscopic and hydrophilic characteristics of films. In addition, to control bacteria growth on food surfaces, the antimicrobial activity of both 98% cross-linked HPMC-nisin and control HPMC-nisin films was tested on Micrococcus luteus. Despite the incorporation of a significant content of nisin, cross-linked HPMC-nisin films were completely inactive on the microbial strain compared to the HPMC-nisin control films. Cross-linking conditions likely either denatured the nisin or irreversibly bound nisin to the cross-linked HPMC. However, nisin adsorbed into films made from previously cross-linked HPMC maintained its activity. PMID:14558764

  13. Gel-based chemical cross-linking analysis of 20S proteasome subunit-subunit interactions in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai; Xiong, Hua; Che, Jing; Xi, Qing-Song; Huang, Liu; Xiong, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Peng

    2016-08-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a pivotal role in breast tumorigenesis by controlling transcription factors, thus promoting cell cycle growth, and degradation of tumor suppressor proteins. However, breast cancer patients have failed to benefit from proteasome inhibitor treatment partially due to proteasome heterogeneity, which is poorly understood in malignant breast neoplasm. Chemical crosslinking is an increasingly important tool for mapping protein three-dimensional structures and proteinprotein interactions. In the present study, two cross-linkers, bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS(3)) and its water-insoluble analog disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS), were used to map the subunit-subunit interactions in 20S proteasome core particle (CP) from MDA-MB-231 cells. Different types of gel electrophoresis technologies were used. In combination with chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry, we applied these gel electrophoresis technologies to the study of the noncovalent interactions among 20S proteasome subunits. Firstly, the CP subunit isoforms were profiled. Subsequently, using native/SDSPAGE, it was observed that 0.5 mmol/L BS(3) was a relatively optimal cross-linking concentration for CP subunit-subunit interaction study. 2-DE analysis of the cross-linked CP revealed that α1 might preinteract with α2, and α3 might pre-interact with α4. Moreover, there were different subtypes of α1α2 and α3α4 due to proteasome heterogeneity. There was no significant difference in cross-linking pattern for CP subunits between BS(3) and DSS. Taken together, the gel-based characterization in combination with chemical cross-linking could serve as a tool for the study of subunit interactions within a multi-subunit protein complex. The heterogeneity of 20S proteasome subunit observed in breast cancer cells may provide some key information for proteasome inhibition strategy. PMID:27465334

  14. Development of a Novel Cross-linking Strategy for Fast and Accurate Identification of Cross-linked Peptides of Protein Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Athit; Chiu, Chi-li; Vellucci, Danielle; Yang, Yingying; Patel, Vishal R.; Guan, Shenheng; Randall, Arlo; Baldi, Pierre; Rychnovsky, Scott D.; Huang, Lan

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of elaborate structures of protein complexes is fundamental for understanding their functions and regulations. Although cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) has been presented as a feasible strategy for structural elucidation of large multisubunit protein complexes, this method has proven challenging because of technical difficulties in unambiguous identification of cross-linked peptides and determination of cross-linked sites by MS analysis. In this work, we developed a novel cross-linking strategy using a newly designed MS-cleavable cross-linker, disuccinimidyl sulfoxide (DSSO). DSSO contains two symmetric collision-induced dissociation (CID)-cleavable sites that allow effective identification of DSSO-cross-linked peptides based on their distinct fragmentation patterns unique to cross-linking types (i.e. interlink, intralink, and dead end). The CID-induced separation of interlinked peptides in MS/MS permits MS3 analysis of single peptide chain fragment ions with defined modifications (due to DSSO remnants) for easy interpretation and unambiguous identification using existing database searching tools. Integration of data analyses from three generated data sets (MS, MS/MS, and MS3) allows high confidence identification of DSSO cross-linked peptides. The efficacy of the newly developed DSSO-based cross-linking strategy was demonstrated using model peptides and proteins. In addition, this method was successfully used for structural characterization of the yeast 20 S proteasome complex. In total, 13 non-redundant interlinked peptides of the 20 S proteasome were identified, representing the first application of an MS-cleavable cross-linker for the characterization of a multisubunit protein complex. Given its effectiveness and simplicity, this cross-linking strategy can find a broad range of applications in elucidating the structural topology of proteins and protein complexes. PMID:20736410

  15. In vivo protein complex topologies: Sights through a cross-linking lens

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are a remarkable class of molecules that exhibit wide diversity of shapes or topological features that underpin protein interactions and give rise to biological function. In addition to quantitation of abundance levels of proteins in biological systems under a variety of conditions, the field of proteome research has as a primary mission the assignment of function for proteins and if possible, illumination of factors that enable function. For many years, chemical cross-linking methods have been used to provide structural data on single purified proteins and purified protein complexes. However, these methods also offer the alluring possibility to extend capabilities to complex biological samples such as cell lysates or intact living cells where proteins may exhibit native topological features that do not exist in purified form. Recent efforts are beginning to provide glimpses of protein complexes and topologies in cells that suggest continued development will yield novel capabilities to view functional topological features of many protein and complexes as they exist in cells, tissues or other complex samples. This review will describe rationale, challenges and a few success stories along the path of development of cross-linking technologies for measurement of in vivo protein interaction topologies. PMID:22610688

  16. Enzymatically Cross-Linked Bovine Lactoferrin as Injectable Hydrogel for Cell Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Ashley A.; Kan, Ho-Man; Cui, Zhanwu; Maye, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF), a 78 kDa glycoprotein, has recently been recognized as an effector molecule in the skeleton due to its ability to decrease osteoclastogenesis and increase osteoblast proliferation, survival, and differentiation. The objective of the study is to investigate the feasibility of developing an injectable hydrogel from bovine lactoferrin (bLF) as a cell delivery vehicle. The study demonstrated the feasibility of cross-linking tyramine substituted bLF in the presence of horse radish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The gel presented a mild environment to maintain mouse bone marrow-derived stromal cell (mBMSC) viability and proliferation. Stromal cells derived from multiple gene reporter transgenic mouse (Ibsp-Topaz/Dmp1-mCherry) line showed the ability of the cells to undergo osteogenic differentiation in the hydrogel when cultured in mineralization media. The cross-linked gel supported protein phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation in the encapsulated MC3T3-E1 cells. bLF and bLF gel also showed the ability to modulate growth factor production in mBMSCs. PMID:24802947

  17. Hydrodynamic characteristics of porcine aortic valves cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and polyepoxy compounds.

    PubMed

    Soda, Aiko; Tanaka, Ryou; Saida, Yuuto; Takashima, Kazuaki; Hirayama, Tomohiro; Umezu, Mitsuo; Yamane, Yoshihisa

    2009-01-01

    Porcine aortic valve (AoF) tissues cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and epoxy compounds were reported to have high anticalcification properties, but their hydrodynamic characteristics have not been evaluated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hydrodynamic differences between porcine AoFs, cross-linked with concomitant use of an epoxy compound and glutaraldehyde, at different fixation periods. The valves were mounted on a pulsatile flow circulation mimicking a left heart. The left atrial and left ventricular pressures and mitral and aortic flows were measured at every 0.002 seconds, and the hydrodynamic factor of the valves mounted on the mitral position was estimated. Effective orifice area and the regurgitation volume, which are used as indicators of valve efficiency, failed to detect significant differences due to glutaraldehyde fixation time. In addition, the pressure gradient across the bioprosthetic valve and the variation of mitral flow also had no significant differences. The flow circuit model of the present study was mimicking of a left heart. The evaluation of the mitral valvular function with different glutaraldehyde fixation times was accomplished by relating the pressure with the flow, and by estimating the time lag between valve motion and transvalvular flow. PMID:19092670

  18. Enzymatically cross-linked bovine lactoferrin as injectable hydrogel for cell delivery.

    PubMed

    Amini, Ashley A; Kan, Ho-Man; Cui, Zhanwu; Maye, Peter; Nair, Lakshmi S

    2014-11-01

    Lactoferrin (LF), a 78 kDa glycoprotein, has recently been recognized as an effector molecule in the skeleton due to its ability to decrease osteoclastogenesis and increase osteoblast proliferation, survival, and differentiation. The objective of the study is to investigate the feasibility of developing an injectable hydrogel from bovine lactoferrin (bLF) as a cell delivery vehicle. The study demonstrated the feasibility of cross-linking tyramine substituted bLF in the presence of horse radish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The gel presented a mild environment to maintain mouse bone marrow-derived stromal cell (mBMSC) viability and proliferation. Stromal cells derived from multiple gene reporter transgenic mouse (Ibsp-Topaz/Dmp1-mCherry) line showed the ability of the cells to undergo osteogenic differentiation in the hydrogel when cultured in mineralization media. The cross-linked gel supported protein phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation in the encapsulated MC3T3-E1 cells. bLF and bLF gel also showed the ability to modulate growth factor production in mBMSCs. PMID:24802947

  19. Interdomain conformational changes in Akt activation revealed by chemical cross-linking and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bill X; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2006-06-01

    Akt, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a critical role in cell survival. Upon growth factor receptor stimulation, cytosolic Akt is recruited to the plasma membrane by phospholipid binding and activated through phosphorylation at Thr(308) and Ser(473). Although crystal structures for the parts of Akt have been reported, neither the three-dimensional structure of the whole molecule nor sequential conformational changes during activation have been demonstrated. In this study, we demonstrated that Akt undergoes dramatic interdomain conformational changes during activation processes by probing the three-dimensional structure of full-length Akt in solution using chemical cross-linking and tandem mass spectrometry. The cross-linking results not only provided new structural information but also revealed distinctive spatial arrangements of individual domains in the Akt molecule in resting, membrane-interacted, phosphorylated, and substrate-bound states. Our data allowed a new model for stepwise interdomain conformational changes in Akt activation sequence, setting a stage for the further investigation on Akt-membrane, Akt-protein, and/or Akt-drug interactions in solution to understand molecular mechanisms involved in physiological and pathophysiological processes of cell survival. PMID:16531397

  20. Application of photochemical cross-linking to the study of oligomerization of amyloidogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Dahabada H J; Sinha, Sharmistha; Rosensweig, Clark; Bitan, Gal

    2012-01-01

    Assembly of amyloidogenic proteins into toxic oligomers and fibrils is an important pathogenic feature of over 30 amyloid-related diseases. Understanding the structures and mechanisms involved in the assembly process is necessary for rational approaches geared at inhibiting formation of these toxic species. Here, we review the application of photo-induced cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP) to two disease-related amyloidogenic proteins (1) islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), whose toxic oligomers are thought to cause the demise of pancreatic β-cells in type-2 diabetes mellitus and (2) α-synuclein, which aggregates into toxic oligomers and precipitates in Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease. PICUP is an effective method allowing chemical "freezing" of dynamically changing oligomers and subsequent study of the oligomer size distribution that existed before cross-linking. The method has provided insights into the factors controlling early oligomerization, which could not be obtained by other means. We discuss sample preparation, experimental details, optimization of parameters, and troubleshooting. PMID:22528080

  1. Translation elongation factor 1A mutants with altered actin bundling activity show reduced aminoacyl-tRNA binding and alter initiation via eIF2α phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Winder B; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2014-07-25

    Apart from its canonical function in translation elongation, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) has been shown to interact with the actin cytoskeleton. Amino acid substitutions in eEF1A that reduce its ability to bind and bundle actin in vitro cause improper actin organization in vivo and reduce total translation. Initial in vivo analysis indicated the reduced translation was through initiation. The mutant strains exhibit increased levels of phosphorylated initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) dependent on the presence of the general control non-derepressible 2 (Gcn2p) protein kinase. Gcn2p causes downregulation of total protein synthesis at initiation in response to increases in deacylated tRNA levels in the cell. Increased levels of eIF2α phosphorylation are not due to a general reduction in translation elongation as eEF2 and eEF3 mutants do not exhibit this effect. Deletion of GCN2 from the eEF1A actin bundling mutant strains revealed a second defect in translation. The eEF1A actin-bundling proteins exhibit changes in their elongation activity at the level of aminoacyl-tRNA binding in vitro. These findings implicate eEF1A in a feedback mechanism for regulating translation at initiation. PMID:24936063

  2. Effect of glucose content on thermally cross-linked fibrous gelatin scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Siimon, Kaido; Reemann, Paula; Põder, Annika; Pook, Martin; Kangur, Triin; Kingo, Külli; Jaks, Viljar; Mäeorg, Uno; Järvekülg, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Thermally cross-linked glucose-containing electrospun gelatin meshes were studied as possible cell substrate materials. FTIR analysis was used to study the effect of glucose on cross-linking reactions. It was found that the presence of glucose increases the extent of cross-linking of fibrous gelatin scaffolds, which in return determines scaffold properties and their usability in tissue engineering applications. Easy to handle fabric-like scaffolds were obtained from blends containing up to 15% glucose. Maximum extent of cross-linking was reached at nearly 20% glucose content. Cross-linking effectively resulted in decreased solubility and increased resistance to enzymatic degradation. Preliminary short-term cell culture experiments indicate that such thermally cross-linked gelatin-glucose scaffolds are suitable for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25063151

  3. Energy harvesting from vibration with cross-linked polypropylene piezoelectrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wu, Liming; Sessler, Gerhard M.

    2015-07-01

    Piezoelectret films are prepared by modification of the microstructure of polypropylene foam sheets cross-linked by electronic irradiation (IXPP), followed by proper corona charging. Young's modulus, relative permittivity, and electromechanical coupling coefficient of the fabricated films, determined by dielectric resonance spectra, are about 0.7 MPa, 1.6, and 0.08, respectively. Dynamic piezoelectric d33 coefficients up to 650 pC/N at 200 Hz are achieved. The figure of merit (FOM, d33 ṡ g33) for a more typical d33 value of 400 pC/N is about 11.2 GPa-1. Vibration-based energy harvesting with one-layer and two-layer stacks of these films is investigated at various frequencies and load resistances. At an optimum load resistance of 9 MΩ and a resonance frequency of 800 Hz, a maximum output power of 120 μW, referred to the acceleration g due to gravity, is obtained for an energy harvester consisting of a one-layer IXPP film with an area of 3.14 cm2 and a seismic mass of 33.7 g. The output power can be further improved by using two-layer stacks of IXPP films in electric series. IXPP energy harvesters could be used to energize low-power electronic devices, such as wireless sensors and LED lights.

  4. Mechanical characterization of cross-linked serum albumin microcapsules.

    PubMed

    de Loubens, Clément; Deschamps, Julien; Georgelin, Marc; Charrier, Anne; Edwards-Levy, Florence; Leonetti, Marc

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the deformation of microcapsules and capsules is essential in numerous biomedical applications. The mechanical properties of the membrane of microcapsules made of cross-linked human serum albumin (HSA) are revealed by two complementary experiments in the linear elastic regime. The first provides the surfacic shear elastic modulus Gs by the study of small deformations of a single capsule trapped in an elongational flow: Gs varies from 0.002 to 5 N m(-1). The second gives the volumic Young's modulus E of the membrane by shallow and local indentations of the membrane with an AFM probe: E varies from 20 kPa to 1 MPa. The surfacic and volumic elastic moduli increase with the size of the capsule up to three orders of magnitude and with the protein concentration of the membrane. The membrane thickness is evaluated from these two membrane mechanical characteristics and increases with the size and the initial HSA concentration from 2 to 20 μm. PMID:24817568

  5. Energy harvesting from vibration with cross-linked polypropylene piezoelectrets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wu, Liming; Sessler, Gerhard M.

    2015-07-15

    Piezoelectret films are prepared by modification of the microstructure of polypropylene foam sheets cross-linked by electronic irradiation (IXPP), followed by proper corona charging. Young’s modulus, relative permittivity, and electromechanical coupling coefficient of the fabricated films, determined by dielectric resonance spectra, are about 0.7 MPa, 1.6, and 0.08, respectively. Dynamic piezoelectric d{sub 33} coefficients up to 650 pC/N at 200 Hz are achieved. The figure of merit (FOM, d{sub 33} ⋅ g{sub 33}) for a more typical d{sub 33} value of 400 pC/N is about 11.2 GPa{sup −1}. Vibration-based energy harvesting with one-layer and two-layer stacks of these films is investigated at various frequencies and load resistances. At an optimum load resistance of 9 MΩ and a resonance frequency of 800 Hz, a maximum output power of 120 μW, referred to the acceleration g due to gravity, is obtained for an energy harvester consisting of a one-layer IXPP film with an area of 3.14 cm{sup 2} and a seismic mass of 33.7 g. The output power can be further improved by using two-layer stacks of IXPP films in electric series. IXPP energy harvesters could be used to energize low-power electronic devices, such as wireless sensors and LED lights.

  6. Zinc cross-linked hydroxamated alginates for pulsed drug release

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Neha S; Deshmukh, Prasad R; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Alginates can be tailored chemically to improve solubility, physicochemical, and biological properties and its complexation with metal ion is useful for controlling the drug release. Materials And Methods: Synthesized N,O-dimethyl, N-methyl, or N-Benzyl hydroxylamine derivatives of sodium alginate were subsequently complexed with zinc to form beads. Hydroxamation of sodium alginate was confirmed by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results: The synthesized polymeric material exhibited reduced aqueous, HCl and NaOH solubility. The hydroxamated derivatives demonstrated pulsed release where change in pH of the dissolution medium stimulated the atenolol release. Conclusion: Atenolol loaded Zn cross-linked polymeric beads demonstrated the sustained the plasma drug levels with increased half-life. Although the synthesized derivatives greatly altered the aqueous solubility of sodium alginate, no significant differences in in vitro and in vivo atenolol release behavior amongst the N,O-dimethyl, N-methyl, or N-Benzyl hydroxylamine derivatives of sodium alginate were observed. PMID:24350039

  7. Synthesis and Properties of Cross-Linked Polyamide Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jarrod C.; Meador, Mary Ann; McCorkle, Linda

    2015-01-01

    We report the first synthesis of cross-linked polyamide aerogels through step growth polymerization using a combination of diamines, diacid chloride and triacid chloride. Polyamide oligomers endcapped with amines are prepared as stable solutions in N-methylpyrrolidinone from several different diamine precursors and 1,3-benzenedicarbonyl dichloride. Addition of 1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl trichloride yields gels which form in under five minutes according to the scheme shown. Solvent exchange of the gels into ethanol, followed by drying using supercritical CO2 extraction gives colorless aerogels with densities around 0.1 to 0.2 gcm3. Thicker monolithes of the polyamide aerogels are stiff and strong, while thin films of certain formulations are highly flexible, durable, and even translucent. These materials may have use as insulation for deployable space structures, rovers, habitats or extravehicular activity suits as well as in many terrestrial applications. Strucure property relationships of the aerogels, including surface area, mechanical properties, and thermal conductivity will be discussed.

  8. Cross-linking of polytetrafluoroethylene during room-temperature irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pugmire, David L; Wetteland, Chris J; Duncan, Wanda S; Lakis, Rollin E; Schwartz, Daniel S

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to {alpha}-radiation was investigated to detennine the physical and chemical effects, as well as to compare and contrast the damage mechanisms with other radiation types ({beta}, {gamma}, or thermal neutron). A number of techniques were used to investigate the chemical and physical changes in PTFE after exposure to {alpha}-radiation. These techniques include: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. Similar to other radiation types at low doses, the primary damage mechanism for the exposure of PTFE to {alpha}-radiation appears to be chain scission. Increased doses result in a change-over of the damage mechanism to cross-linking. This result is not observed for any radiation type other than {alpha} when irradiation is performed at room temperature. Finally, at high doses, PTFE undergoes mass-loss (via smallfluorocarbon species evolution) and defluorination. The amount and type of damage versus sample depth was also investigated. Other types of radiation yield damage at depths on the order of mm to cm into PTFE due to low linear energy transfer (LET) and the correspondingly large penetration depths. By contrast, the {alpha}-radiation employed in this study was shown to only induce damage to a depth of approximately 26 {mu}m, except at very high doses.

  9. Pyridinium cross-links in heritable disorders of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquali, M.; Still, M.J.; Dembure, P.P.

    1995-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of collagen that is characterized by skin fragility, skin hyperextensibility, and joint hypermobility. EDS type VI is caused by impaired collagen lysyl hydroxylase (procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase; E.C.1.14.11.4), the ascorbate-dependent enzyme that hydroxylates lysyl residues on collagen neopeptides. Different alterations in the gene for collagen lysyl hydroxylase have been reported in families with EDS type VI. In EDS type VI, impairment of collagen lysyl hydroxylase results in a low hydroxylysine content in mature collagen. Hydroxylysine is a precursor of the stable, covalent, intermolecular cross-links of collagen, pyridinoline (Pyr), and deoxypyridinoline (Dpyr). Elsewhere we reported in preliminary form that patients with EDS type VI had a distinctive alteration in the urinary excretion of Pyr and Dpyr. In the present study, we confirm that the increased Dpyr/Pyr ratio is specific for EDS type VI and is not observed in other inherited or acquired collagen disorders. In addition, we find that skin from patients with EDS type VI has reduced Pyr and increased Dpyr, which could account for the organ pathology. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  10. An overview of corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL).

    PubMed

    Kymionis, George D; Mikropoulos, Dimitrios G; Portaliou, Dimitra M; Voudouragkaki, Irini C; Kozobolis, Vassilios P; Konstas, Anastasios G P

    2013-10-01

    Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) was first described over a decade ago and is now considered to be one of the most important surgical innovations of modern ophthalmology. Prior to its introduction, no interventions were available to arrest, or slow down ectatic disease progression, with corneal transplantation required in the majority of cases. Unlike earlier treatments of corneal ectasias that attempted to only improve the consequences of the disease, CXL aims to address the corneal biomechanical weakening itself. The long-term safety and efficacy of CXL have been established in several studies that have documented significant improvements in all outcome measures (visual acuity, spherical equivalent, astigmatism, and keratometric findings). The emerging combination of CXL with other interventions (termed 'CXL plus') optimizes the visual and topographic outcomes. This, along with the expansion of the techniques' indications for other clinical conditions, such as microbial keratitis, highlights the continuous improvement of the initial technique and confirms its wide acceptance. Overall, CXL has already demonstrated much promise and has several clinical indications, representing a clear example of recent advances in ocular therapy. PMID:24170589

  11. Enzymatic cross-linking of carboxymethylpullulan grafted with ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Dulong, Virginie; Hadrich, Ahdi; Picton, Luc; Le Cerf, Didier

    2016-10-20

    Carboxymethylpullulan (CMP) has been modified in a two-step grafting reaction of ferulic acid (FA). Acid adipic dihydrazyde (ADH) was first reacted with FA activated with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC). Then the product of this first reaction was reacted with CMP (activated with EDC). Grafted polysaccharides structure was confirmed by FTIR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Analyses by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupling on-line with a multi-angle light scattering detector (MALS), a viscometer and a differential refractive index detector (DRI) (SEC/MALS/DRI/Visco) showed that associations between FA moieties occurred due to hydrophobic interactions. The grafting rates of FA were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method and were found between 1.0% and 11.2% (mol/mol anhydroglucose unit). The CMP-FA were then enzymatically cross-linked with laccase from Pleurotus ostreatus. The crosslinking reactions were followed by rheological measurements, demonstrating the influence of laccase concentration on kinetics. Elastic modulus and swelling rates of hydrogels depends on FA content only for low values. PMID:27474545

  12. Cortactin involvement in the keratinocyte growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 10 promotion of migration and cortical actin assembly in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli, Simona; Cardinali, Giorgia; Aspite, Nicaela; Picardo, Mauro; Marchese, Cinzia; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Mancini, Patrizia . E-mail: patrizia.mancini@uniroma1.it

    2007-05-15

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF/FGF7) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10/KGF2) regulate keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by binding to the tyrosine kinase KGF receptor (KGFR). KGF induces keratinocyte motility and cytoskeletal rearrangement, whereas a direct role of FGF10 on keratinocyte migration is not clearly established. Here we analyzed the motogenic activity of FGF10 and KGF on human keratinocytes. Migration assays and immunofluorescence of actin cytoskeleton revealed that FGF10 is less efficient than KGF in promoting migration and exerts a delayed effect in inducing lamellipodia and ruffles formation. Both growth factors promoted phosphorylation and subsequent membrane translocation of cortactin, an F-actin binding protein involved in cell migration; however, FGF10-induced cortactin phosphorylation was reduced, more transient and delayed with respect to that promoted by KGF. Cortactin phosphorylation induced by both growth factors was Src-dependent, while its membrane translocation and cell migration were blocked by either Src and PI3K inhibitors, suggesting that both pathways are involved in KGF- and FGF10-dependent motility. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated downregulation of cortactin inhibited KGF- and FGF10-induced migration. These results indicate that cortactin is involved in keratinocyte migration promoted by both KGF and FGF10.

  13. Peroxidase induced oligo-tyrosine cross-links during polymerization of α-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Dhayal, Surender Kumar; Sforza, Stefano; Wierenga, Peter A; Gruppen, Harry

    2015-12-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) induced cross-linking of proteins has been reported to proceed through formation of di-tyrosine cross-links. In the case of low molar mass phenolic substrates, the enzymatic oxidation is reported to lead to polymerization of the phenols. The aim of this work was to investigate if during oxidative cross-linking of proteins oligo-tyrosine cross-links are formed in addition to dityrosine. To this end, α-lactalbumin (α-LA) was cross-linked using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). The reaction products were acid hydrolysed, after which the cross-linked amino acids were investigated by LC-MS and MALDI-MS. To test the effect of the size of the substrate, the cross-linking reaction was also performed with L-tyrosine, N-acetyl L-tyrosinamide and angiotensin. These products were analyzed by LC-MS directly, as well as after acid hydrolysis. In the acid hydrolysates of all samples oligo-tyrosine (Yn, n=3-8) was found in addition to di-tyrosine (Y2). Two stages of cross-linking of α-LA were identified: a) 1-2 cross-links were formed per monomer until the monomers were converted into oligomers, and b) subsequent cross-linking of oligomers formed in the first stage to form nanoparticles containing 3-4 cross-links per monomer. The transition from first stage to the second stage coincided with the point where di-tyrosine started to decrease and more oligo-tyrosines were formed. In conclusion, extensive polymerization of α-LA using HRP via oligo-tyrosine cross-links is possible, as is the case for low molar mass tyrosine containing substrates. PMID:26282909

  14. UV cross-linking identifies four polypeptides that require the TATA box to bind to the Drosophila hsp70 promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, D.S.; Dietz, T.J.; Elgin, S.C. )

    1990-08-01

    A protein fraction that requires the TATA sequence to bind to the hsp70 promoter has been partially purified from nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos. This TATA factor produces a large DNase I footprint that extends from -44 to +35 on the promoter. A mutation that changes TATA to TATG interferes both with the binding of this complex and with the transcription of the hsp70 promoter in vitro, indicating that this interaction is important for transcriptional activity. Using a highly specific protein-DNA cross-linking assay, we have identified four polypeptides that require the TATA sequence to bind to the hsp70 promoter. Polypeptides of 26 and 42 kilodaltons are in intimate contact with the TATA sequence. Polypeptides of 150 and 60 kilodaltons interact within the region from +24 to +47 in a TATA-dependent manner. Both the extended footprint and the polypeptides identified by UV cross-linking indicate that the Drosophila TATA factor is a multicomponent complex.

  15. Synthesis of Cross-Linked DNA Containing Oxidized Abasic Site Analogues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links are an important family of DNA damage that block replication and transcription. Recently, it was discovered that oxidized abasic sites react with the opposing strand of DNA to produce interstrand cross-links. Some of the cross-links between 2′-deoxyadenosine and the oxidized abasic sites, 5′-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) (DOB) and the C4-hydroxylated abasic site (C4-AP), are formed reversibly. Chemical instability hinders biochemical, structural, and physicochemical characterization of these cross-linked duplexes. To overcome these limitations, we developed methods for preparing stabilized analogues of DOB and C4-AP cross-links via solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis. Oligonucleotides of any sequence are attainable by synthesizing phosphoramidites in which the hydroxyl groups of the cross-linked product were orthogonally protected using photochemically labile and hydrazine labile groups. Selective unmasking of a single hydroxyl group precedes solid-phase synthesis of one arm of the cross-linked DNA. The method is compatible with commercially available phosphoramidites and other oligonucleotide synthesis reagents. Cross-linked duplexes containing as many as 54 nt were synthesized on solid-phase supports. Subsequent enzyme ligation of one cross-link product provided a 60 bp duplex, which is suitable for nucleotide excision repair studies. PMID:24949656

  16. Controlled sparse and percolating cross-linking in waterborne soft adhesives.

    PubMed

    Deplace, F; Carelli, C; Langenfeld, A; Rabjohns, M A; Foster, A B; Lovell, P A; Creton, C

    2009-09-01

    The effect of low levels of cross-linking on the adhesive and mechanical properties of waterborne pressure-sensitive adhesives was investigated. We have taken advantage of a core-shell latex particle morphology obtained by emulsion polymerization to create a heterogeneous structure of cross-links without major modification of the monomer composition. The latex particles comprise a shell containing cross-linkable diacetone acrylamide (DAAM) repeat units localized on the periphery of a slightly softer core copolymer of very similar composition. Adipic acid dihydrazide was added to the latex prior to film formation to react with DAAM repeat units and affect interfacial cross-linking between particles in the adhesive films. The honeycomb-like structure obtained after drying of the latex results in a good balance between the dissipative properties required for adhesion and the resistance to creep. The characterization of the mechanical properties of the films shows that the chosen cross-linking method creates a percolating lightly cross-linked network, swollen with a nearly un-cross-linked component. With this cross-linking method, the linear viscoelastic properties of the soft films are nearly unaffected by the cross-linking while the nonlinear tensile properties are greatly modified. As a result, the long-term shear resistance of the adhesive film improves very significantly while the peel force remains nearly the same. A simple rheological model is used to interpret qualitatively the changes in the material parameters induced by cross-linking. PMID:20355828

  17. Biologically relevant oxidants cause bound proteins to readily oxidatively cross-link at Guanine.

    PubMed

    Solivio, Morwena J; Nemera, Dessalegn B; Sallans, Larry; Merino, Edward J

    2012-02-20

    Oxidative DNA-protein cross-links have received less attention than other types of DNA damage and remain as one of the least understood types of oxidative lesion. A model system using ribonuclease A and a 27-nucleotide DNA was used to determine the propensity of oxidative cross-linking to occur in the presence of oxidants. Cross-link formation was examined using four different oxidation systems that generate singlet oxygen, superoxide, and metal-based Fenton reactions. It is shown that oxidative cross-linking occurs in yields ranging from 14% to a maximal yield of 61% in all oxidative systems when equivalent concentrations of DNA and protein are present. Because singlet oxygen is the most efficient oxidation system in generating DNA-protein cross-links, it was chosen for further analyses. Cross-linking occurred with single-stranded DNA binding protein and not with bovine serum albumin. Addition of salt lowered nonspecific binding affinity and lowered cross-link yield by up to 59%. The yield of cross-linking increased with increased ratios of protein compared with DNA. Cross-linking was highly dependent on the number of guanines in a DNA sequence. Loss of guanine content on the 27-nucleotide DNA led to nearly complete loss in cross-linking, while primer extension studies showed cross-links to predominantly occur at guanine base on a 100-nucleotide DNA. The chemical species generated were examined using two peptides derived from the ribonuclease A sequence, N-acetyl-AAAKF and N-acetyl-AYKTT, which were cross-linked to 2'-deoxyguanosine. The cross-link products were spiroiminodihydantoin, guanidinohydantoin, and tyrosyl-based adducts. Formation of tyrosine-based adducts may be competitive with the more well-studied lysine-based cross-links. We conclude that oxidative cross-links may be present at high levels in cells since the propensity to oxidatively cross-link is high and so much of the genomic DNA is coated with protein. PMID:22216745

  18. Covalent cross-links in polyampholytic chitosan fibers enhances bone regeneration in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Paulomi; Rameshbabu, Arun Prabhu; Das, Dipankar; Francis, Nimmy K; Pawar, Harpreet Singh; Subramanian, Bhuvaneshwaran; Pal, Sagar; Dhara, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan fibers were prepared in citric acid bath, pH 7.4 and NaOH solution at pH 13, to form ionotropically cross-linked and uncross-linked fibers, respectively. The fibers formed in citric acid bath were further cross-linked via carbodiimide chemistry; wherein the pendant carboxyl moieties of citric acid were used for new amide bond formation. Moreover, upon covalent cross-linking in the ionically gelled citrate-chitosan fibers, incomplete conversion of the ion pairs to amide linkages took place resulting in the formation of a dual network structure. The dual cross-linked fibers displayed improved mechanical property, higher stability against enzymatic degradation, hydrophobicity and superior bio-mineralization compared to the uncross-linked and native citrate cross-linked fibers. Additionally, upon cyclic loading, the ion pairs in the dual cross-linked fibers dissociated by dissipating energy and reformed during the relaxation period. The twin property of elasticity and energy dissipation mechanism makes the dual cross-linked fiber unique under dynamic mechanical conditions. The differences in the physico-chemical characteristics were reflected in protein adsorption, which in turn influenced the cellular activities on the fibers. Compared to the uncross-linked and ionotropically cross-linked fibers, the dual cross-linked fibers demonstrated higher proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of the MSCs in vitro as well as better osseous tissue regeneration in a rabbit model. PMID:25483844

  19. Alkaline battery containing a separator of a cross-linked copolymer of vinyl alcohol and unsaturated carboxylic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C.; Philipp, W. H.; Sheibley, D. W.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A battery separator for an alkaline battery is described. The separator comprises a cross linked copolymer of vinyl alcohol units and unsaturated carboxylic acid units. The cross linked copolymer is insoluble in water, has excellent zincate diffusion and oxygen gas barrier properties and a low electrical resistivity. Cross linking with a polyaldehyde cross linking agent is preferred.

  20. Simulation of the effect of confinement in actin ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeli Koudehi, Maral; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Haosu Tang Team; Dimitrios Vavylonis Team

    Actin filaments are vital for different network structures in living cells. During cytokinesis, they form a contractile ring containing myosin motor proteins and actin filament cross-linkers to separate one cell into two cells. Recent experimental studies have quantified the bundle, ring, and network structures that form when actin filaments polymerize in confined environments in vitro, in the presence of varying concentrations of cross-linkers. In this study, we performed numerical simulations to investigate the effect of actin spherical confinement and cross-linking in ring formation. We used a spring-bead model and Brownian dynamics to simulate semiflexible actin filaments that polymerize in a confining sphere with a rate proportional to the monomer concentration. Applying the model for different size of the confining spheres shows that the probability of ring formation decreases by increasing the radius (at fixed initial monomer concentration), in agreement with prior experimental data. We describe the effect of persistence length, orientation-dependent cross-linking, and initial actin monomer concentration. Simulations show that equilibrium configurations can be reached through zipping and unzipping of actin filaments in bundles and transient ring formation.

  1. Actinic reticuloid

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.L.; Vale, M.; Dermer, P.; Ragaz, A.; Michaelides, P.; Gladstein, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    A 58-year-old man has his condition diagnosed as actinic reticuloid on the basis of clinical and histologic findings and phototesting data. He had clinical features resembling mycosis fungoides in light-exposed areas. Histologic findings disclosed a bandlike infiltrate with atypical mononuclear cells in the dermis and scattered atypical cells in the epidermis. Electron microscopy disclosed mononuclear cells with bizarre, convoluted nuclei, resembling cerebriform cells of Lutzner. Phototesting disclosed a diminished minimal erythemal threshold to UV-B and UV-A. Microscopic changes resembling actinic reticuloid were reproduced in this patient 24 and 72 hours after exposure to 15 minimal erythemal doses of UV-B.

  2. Improved muscle-derived expression of human coagulation factor IX from a skeletal actin/CMV hybrid enhancer/promoter.

    PubMed

    Hagstrom, J N; Couto, L B; Scallan, C; Burton, M; McCleland, M L; Fields, P A; Arruda, V R; Herzog, R W; High, K A

    2000-04-15

    Hemophilia B is caused by the absence of functional coagulation factor IX (F.IX) and represents an important model for treatment of genetic diseases by gene therapy. Recent studies have shown that intramuscular injection of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector into mice and hemophilia B dogs results in vector dose-dependent, long-term expression of biologically active F.IX at therapeutic levels. In this study, we demonstrate that levels of expression of approximately 300 ng/mL (6% of normal human F.IX levels) can be reached by intramuscular injection of mice using a 2- to 4-fold lower vector dose (1 x 10(11) vector genomes/mouse, injected into 4 intramuscular sites) than previously described. This was accomplished through the use of an improved expression cassette that uses the cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate early enhancer/promoter in combination with a 1.2-kilobase portion of human skeletal actin promoter. These results correlated with enhanced levels of F.IX transcript and secreted F.IX protein in transduced murine C2C12 myotubes. Systemic F.IX expression from constructs containing the CMV enhancer/promoter alone was 120 to 200 ng/mL in mice injected with 1 x 10(11) vector genomes. Muscle-specific promoters performed poorly for F.IX transgene expression in vitro and in vivo. However, the incorporation of a sequence from the alpha-skeletal actin promoter containing at least 1 muscle-specific enhancer and 1 enhancer-like element further improved muscle-derived expression of F.IX from a CMV enhancer/promoter-driven expression cassette over previously published results. These findings will allow the design of a clinical protocol for therapeutic levels of F.IX expression with lower vector doses, thus enhancing efficacy and safety of the protocol. (Blood. 2000;95:2536-2542) PMID:10753832

  3. Synthesis of borate cross-linked rhamnogalacturonan II

    PubMed Central

    Funakawa, Hiroya; Miwa, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    In the present review, we describe current knowledge about synthesis of borate crosslinked rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) and it physiological roles. RG-II is a portion of pectic polysaccharide with high complexity, present in primary cell wall. It is composed of homogalacturonan backbone and four distinct side chains (A–D). Borate forms ester bonds with the apiosyl residues of side chain A of two RG-II monomers to generate borate dimerized RG-II, contributing for the formation of networks of pectic polysaccharides. In plant cell walls, more than 90% of RG-II are dimerized by borate under boron (B) sufficient conditions. Borate crosslinking of RG-II in primary cell walls, to our knowledge, is the only experimentally proven molecular function of B, an essential trace-element. Although abundance of RG-II and B is quite small in cell wall polysaccharides, increasing evidence supports that RG-II and its borate crosslinking are critical for plant growth and development. Significant advancement was made recently on the location and the mechanisms of RG-II synthesis and borate cross-linking. Molecular genetic studies have successfully identified key enzymes for RG-II synthesis and regulators including B transporters required for efficient formation of RG-II crosslinking and consequent normal plant growth. The present article focuses recent advances on (i) RG-II polysaccharide synthesis, (ii) occurrence of borate crosslinking and (iii) B transport for borate supply to RG-II. Molecular mechanisms underlying formation of borate RG-II crosslinking and the physiological impacts are discussed. PMID:25954281

  4. Encapsulation of volatiles by homogenized partially-cross linked alginates.

    PubMed

    Inguva, Pavan K; Ooi, Shing Ming; Desai, Parind M; Heng, Paul W S

    2015-12-30

    Cross-linked calcium alginate gels are too viscous to be efficaciously incorporated into spray dried formulations. Thus, viscosity reduction is essential to ensure the processability of calcium alginate gels to be sprayed. Viscosity reduction by high pressure homogenization can open new formulation possibilities. Presently, testing of microcapsule integrity is also limited because either single particle tests neglect collective particle behaviours in bulk or bulk testing methods are often associated with single compressions which may not fully characterize individual particle strengths. The aim of this study was sub-divided into three objectives. First objective was to evaluate the impact of high pressure homogenization on gel viscosity. Second objective was to explore the use of the homogenized gels with modified starch for microencapsulation by spray drying. The final objective was to develop a stamping system as microcapsule strength tester that can assess microcapsules in bulk and evaluate the impact of multiple compressions. Collectively, this study would lead towards developing a pressure-activated patch of microcapsules with encapsulated volatiles and the method to assess the patch efficacy. The alginate gels largely experienced an exponential decay in viscosity when homogenized. Furthermore, the homogenized gels were successfully incorporated in spray drying formulations for microencapsulation. The custom-designed microcapsule strength tester was successfully used and shown to possess the required sensitivity to discern batches of microcapsules containing volatiles to have different release profiles. Addition of homogenized gels strengthened the microcapsules only at high wall to core ratios with low mass-load alginate gels. High mass-load gels weaken the microcapsules, exhibiting a higher release at low stamping pressures and wrinkling on the microcapsules surface. PMID:26581772

  5. Corneal cross-linking in 9 horses with ulcerative keratitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Corneal ulcers are one of the most common eye problems in the horse and can cause varying degrees of visual impairment. Secondary infection and protease activity causing melting of the corneal stroma are always concerns in patients with corneal ulcers. Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL), induced by illumination of the corneal stroma with ultraviolet light (UVA) after instillation of riboflavin (vitamin B2) eye drops, introduces crosslinks which stabilize melting corneas, and has been used to successfully treat infectious ulcerative keratitis in human patients. Therefore we decided to study if CXL can be performed in sedated, standing horses with ulcerative keratitis with or without stromal melting. Results Nine horses, aged 1 month to 16 years (median 5 years) were treated with a combination of CXL and medical therapy. Two horses were diagnosed with mycotic, 5 with bacterial and 2 with aseptic ulcerative keratitis. A modified Dresden-protocol for CXL could readily be performed in all 9 horses after sedation. Stromal melting, diagnosed in 4 horses, stopped within 24 h. Eight of nine eyes became fluorescein negative in 13.5 days (median time; range 4–26 days) days after CXL. One horse developed a bacterial conjunctivitis the day after CXL, which was successfully treated with topical antibiotics. One horse with fungal ulcerative keratitis and severe uveitis was enucleated 4 days after treatment due to panophthalmitis. Conclusions CXL can be performed in standing, sedated horses. We did not observe any deleterious effects attributed to riboflavin or UVA irradiation per se during the follow-up, neither in horses with infectious nor aseptic ulcerative keratitis. These data support that CXL can be performed in the standing horse, but further studies are required to compare CXL to conventional medical treatment in equine keratitis and to optimize the CXL protocol in this species. PMID:23803176

  6. Integrated Cryogenic Satellite Communications Cross-Link Receiver Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Bhasin, K. B.; Downey, A. N.; Jackson, C. J.; Silver, A. H.; Javadi, H. H. S.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment has been devised which will validate, in space, a miniature, high-performance receiver. The receiver blends three complementary technologies; high temperature superconductivity (HTS), pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (PHEMT) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), and a miniature pulse tube cryogenic cooler. Specifically, an HTS band pass filter, InP MMIC low noise amplifier, HTS-sapphire resonator stabilized local oscillator (LO), and a miniature pulse tube cooler will be integrated into a complete 20 GHz receiver downconverter. This cooled downconverter will be interfaced with customized signal processing electronics and integrated onto the space shuttle's 'HitchHiker' carrier. A pseudorandom data sequence will be transmitted to the receiver, which is in low Earth orbit (LEO), via the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) on a 20 GHz carrier. The modulation format is QPSK and the data rate is 2.048 Mbps. The bit error rate (BER) will be measured in situ. The receiver is also equipped with a radiometer mode so that experiment success is not totally contingent upon the BER measurement. In this mode, the receiver uses the Earth and deep space as a hot and cold calibration source, respectively. The experiment closely simulates an actual cross-link scenario. Since the receiver performance depends on channel conditions, its true characteristics would be masked in a terrestrial measurement by atmospheric absorption and background radiation. Furthermore, the receiver's performance depends on its physical temperature, which is a sensitive function of platform environment, thermal design, and cryocooler performance. This empirical data is important for building confidence in the technology.

  7. Gelation of Covalently Cross-Linked PEG–Heparin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Kelly M.; Baldwin, Aaron D.; Kiick, Kristi L.; Furst, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    We study PEG–heparin hydrogels to identify compositions that lead to gel formation and measure the corresponding gelation kinetics. The material consists of a maleimide-functionalized high molecular weight heparin (HMWH) backbone covalently cross-linked with bis-thiol poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Using multiple particle tracking microrheology, we investigate a broad composition space, defined by the number of maleimide functional sites per HMWH (f = 3.9–11.8), the molecular weight of the PEG cross-linker (Mn = 2000, 5000, and 10 000), and the concentrations of the heparin and PEG polymers. Gelation kinetics are characterized by time–cure superposition, yielding the gel time, tc, and the critical relaxation exponent, n. Gelation times range from 5 < tc ≤ 45 min, with the fastest kinetics occurring for the highest HMWH maleimide functionalities. tc depends nonmonotonically on the PEG cross-linker molecular weight, suggesting that gelation is affected by the length of the cross-linker relative to intermolecular interactions between heparin molecules. The critical relaxation exponent decreases from n = 0.52 for PEG 2000 to n = 0.39 for PEG 10 000. Finally, 219 equilibrated samples taken over the entire composition space are identified as liquid or solid, defining the “gelation envelope”. The boundaries of this empirical gelation envelope are in good agreement with Flory–Stockmayer theory. In all, microrheological measurements enable characterization over a large parameter space and provide crucial insight into the gelation of complex, multifunctional hydrogelators used in therapeutic applications. PMID:21494422

  8. Tandem Gramicidin Channels Cross-linked by Streptavidin

    PubMed Central

    Rokitskaya, Tatyana I.; Kotova, Elena A.; Antonenko, Yuri N.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of biotin-binding proteins with biotinylated gramicidin (gA5XB) was studied by monitoring single-channel activity and sensitized photoinactivation kinetics. It was discovered that the addition of streptavidin or avidin to the bathing solutions of a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) with incorporated gA5XB induced the opening of a channel characterized by approximately doubled single-channel conductance and extremely long open-state duration. We believe that the deceleration of the photoinactivation kinetics observed here with streptavidin and previously (Rokitskaya, T.I., Y.N. Antonenko, E.A. Kotova, A. Anastasiadis, and F. Separovic. 2000. Biochemistry. 39:13053–13058) with avidin reflects the formation of long-lived channels of this type. Both opening and closing of the double-conductance channels occurred via a transient sub-state of the conductance coinciding with that of the usual single-channel transition. The appearance of the double-conductance channels after the addition of streptavidin was preceded by bursts of fast fluctuations of the current with the open state duration of the individual events of 60 ms. The streptavidin-induced double-conductance channels appeared to be inherent only to the gramicidin analogue with a biotin group linked to the COOH terminus through a long linker arm. Including biotinylated phosphatidylethanolamine into the BLM prevented the formation of the double-conductance channels even with the excess streptavidin. In view of the results obtained here, it is suggested that the double-conductance channel represents a tandem of two neighboring gA5XB channels with their COOH termini being cross-linked by the bound streptavidin at both sides of the BLM. The finding that streptavidin induces the formation of the tandem gramicidin channel comprising two channels functioning in concert is considered to be relevant to the physiologically important phenomenon of ligand-induced receptor oligomerization. PMID:12719486

  9. Transepithelial corneal collagen cross-linking in ultrathin keratoconic corneas

    PubMed Central

    Spadea, Leopoldo; Mencucci, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper was to report the results of transepithelial corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) with modified riboflavin and ultraviolet A irradiation in patients affected by keratoconus, each with thinnest pachymetry values of less than 400 μm (with epithelium) and not treatable using standard de-epithelialization techniques. Methods Sixteen patients affected by progressive keratoconus with thinnest pachymetry values ranging from 331 μm to 389 μm underwent transepithelial CXL in one eye using a riboflavin 0.1% solution in 15% Dextran T500 containing ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid 0.01% and trometamol to enhance epithelial penetration. The patients underwent complete ophthalmological examination, including endothelial cell density measurements and computerized videokeratography, before CXL and at one day, one week, and one, 6, and 12 months thereafter. Results Epithelial healing was complete in all patients after one day of use of a soft bandage contact lens. No side effects or damage to the limbal region was observed during the follow-up period. All patients showed slightly improved uncorrected and spectacle-corrected visual acuity; keratometric astigmatism showed reductions (up to 5.3 D) and apical ectasia power decreased (Kmax values reduced up to 4.3 D). Endothelial cell density was unchanged. Conclusion Application of transepithelial CXL using riboflavin with substances added to enhance epithelial permeability was safe, seemed to be moderately effective in keratoconic eyes with ultrathin corneas, and applications of the procedure could be extended to patients with advanced keratoconus. PMID:23152657

  10. Order-Disorder Transitions in Cross-Linked Block Copolymer Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Das, J.

    2005-01-12

    With a view toward creating solid block copolymers wherein the order-disorder transition can be accessed many times they investigated the nature of order-disorder transitions in cross-linked diblock copolymer melts using synergistic theory and experiment. A mean-field theory based on a coarse grained free-energy and the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) is developed for the system of interest. The quenched distribution of cross-links is averaged using the replica method. The phase behavior of a particular A-B block copolymer melt with a randomly cross-linked B-Block is determined as a function of the Florry-Huggins interaction parameter ({chi}) and the average number of cross-links per chain N{sub c}. They find for a cross-link density greater than N*{sub c} the B monomers are localized within a region of size {zeta} {approx} (N{sub c} - N*{sub c}){sup -1/2}. The cross-links strongly oppose ordering in the system as {zeta} becomes comparable to the radius of gyration of the block copolymer chain. As such the order-disorder transition temperature T{sub ODT} decreases precipitously when N{sub c} > N*{sub c}. When N{sub c} < N*{sub c}, T{sub ODT} increases weakly with N{sub c}. Experiments were conducted on cross-linked polystyrene-block-polyisoprene copolymer samples wherein the polyisoprene block was selectively cross-linked at a temperature well above the order-disorder transition temperature of the pure block copolymer. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and birefringence measurements on the cross-linked samples are consistent with the theoretical prediction. T{sub ODT} decreases rapidly when the cross-linking density exceeds the critical cross-linking density.

  11. Matching Cross-linked Peptide Spectra: Only as Good as the Worse Identification*

    PubMed Central

    Trnka, Michael J.; Baker, Peter R.; Robinson, Philip J. J.; Burlingame, A. L.; Chalkley, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry identifies interacting surfaces within a protein assembly through labeling with bifunctional reagents and identifying the covalently modified peptides. These yield distance constraints that provide a powerful means to model the three-dimensional structure of the assembly. Bioinformatic analysis of cross-linked data resulting from large protein assemblies is challenging because each cross-linked product contains two covalently linked peptides, each of which must be correctly identified from a complex matrix of potential confounders. Protein Prospector addresses these issues through a complementary mass modification strategy in which each peptide is searched and identified separately. We demonstrate this strategy with an analysis of RNA polymerase II. False discovery rates (FDRs) are assessed via comparison of cross-linking data to crystal structure, as well as by using a decoy database strategy. Parameters that are most useful for positive identification of cross-linked spectra are explored. We find that fragmentation spectra generally contain more product ions from one of the two peptides constituting the cross-link. Hence, metrics reflecting the quality of the spectral match to the less confident peptide provide the most discriminatory power between correct and incorrect matches. A support vector machine model was built to further improve classification of cross-linked peptide hits. Furthermore, the frequency with which peptides cross-linked via common acylating reagents fragment to produce diagnostic, cross-linker-specific ions is assessed. The threshold for successful identification of the cross-linked peptide product depends upon the complexity of the sample under investigation. Protein Prospector, by focusing the reliability assessment on the least confident peptide, is better able to control the FDR for results as larger complexes and databases are analyzed. In addition, when FDR thresholds are calculated separately

  12. A supracellular system of actin-lined canals controls biogenesis and release of virulence factors in parasitoid venom glands.

    PubMed

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Morales, Jorge; Fimiarz, Daniel; Webb, Bruce A; Govind, Shubha

    2009-07-01

    Parasitoid wasps produce virulence factors that bear significant resemblance to viruses and have the ability to block host defense responses. The function of these virulence factors, produced predominantly in wasp venom glands, and the ways in which they interfere with host development and physiology remain mysterious. Here, we report the discovery of a specialized system of canals in venom glands of five parasitoid wasps that differ in their infection strategies. This supracellular canal system is made up of individual secretory units, one per secretory cell. Individual units merge into the canal lumen. The membrane surface of the proximal end of each canal within the secretory cell assumes brush border morphology, lined with bundles of F-actin. Systemic administration of cytochalasin D compromises the integrity of the secretory unit. We show a dynamic and continuous association of p40, a protein of virus-like particles from a Drosophila parasitoid, L. heterotoma, with the canal and venom gland lumen. Similar structures in three Leptopilina species and Ganaspis xanthopoda, parasitoids of Drosophila spp., and Campoletis sonorenesis, a parasitoid of Heliothis virescens, suggest that this novel supracellular canal system is likely to be a common trait of parasitoid venom glands that is essential for efficient biogenesis and delivery of virulence factors. PMID:19561216

  13. A supracellular system of actin-lined canals controls biogenesis and release of virulence factors in parasitoid venom glands

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Morales, Jorge; Fimiarz, Daniel; Webb, Bruce A.; Govind, Shubha

    2009-01-01

    Summary Parasitoid wasps produce virulence factors that bear significant resemblance to viruses and have the ability to block host defense responses. The function of these virulence factors, produced predominantly in wasp venom glands, and the ways in which they interfere with host development and physiology remain mysterious. Here, we report the discovery of a specialized system of canals in venom glands of five parasitoid wasps that differ in their infection strategies. This supracellular canal system is made up of individual secretory units, one per secretory cell. Individual units merge into the canal lumen. The membrane surface of the proximal end of each canal within the secretory cell assumes brush border morphology, lined with bundles of F-actin. Systemic administration of cytochalasin D compromises the integrity of the secretory unit. We show a dynamic and continuous association of p40, a protein of virus-like particles from a Drosophila parasitoid, L. heterotoma, with the canal and venom gland lumen. Similar structures in three Leptopilina species and Ganaspis xanthopoda, parasitoids of Drosophila spp., and Campoletis sonorenesis, a parasitoid of Heliothis virescens, suggest that this novel supracellular canal system is likely to be a common trait of parasitoid venom glands that is essential for efficient biogenesis and delivery of virulence factors. PMID:19561216

  14. Collagen Cross-Linking Using Riboflavin and Ultraviolet-A for Corneal Thinning Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pron, G; Ieraci, L; Kaulback, K

    2011-01-01

    , watching television or reading, difficult to perform. Keratoconus is the most common form of corneal thinning disorder and involves a noninflammatory chronic disease process of progressive corneal thinning. Although the specific cause for the biomechanical alterations in the corneal stroma is unknown, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that genetic factors may play an important role. Keratoconus is a rare disease (< 0.05% of the population) and is unique among chronic eye diseases because it has an early onset, with a median age of 25 years. Disease management for this condition follows a step-wise approach depending on disease severity. Contact lenses are the primary treatment of choice when there is irregular astigmatism associated with the disease. Patients are referred for corneal transplants as a last option when they can no longer tolerate contact lenses or when lenses no longer provide adequate vision. Keratoconus is one of the leading indications for corneal transplants and has been so for the last 3 decades. Despite the high success rate of corneal transplants (up to 20 years) there are reasons to defer it as long as possible. Patients with keratoconus are generally young and a longer-term graft survival of at least 30 or 40 years may be necessary. The surgery itself involves lengthy time off work and postsurgery, while potential complications include long-term steroid use, secondary cataracts, and glaucoma. After a corneal transplant, keratoconus may recur resulting in a need for subsequent interventions. Residual refractive errors and astigmatism can remain challenges after transplantation, and high refractive surgery and regraft rates in KC patients have been reported. Visual rehabilitation or recovery of visual acuity after transplant may be slow and/or unsatisfactory to patients. Description of Technology/Therapy Corneal cross-linking involves the use of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and ultraviolet-A (UVA) radiation. A UVA irradiation device known as

  15. Acute Corneal Hydrops 3 Years after Intra-corneal Ring Segments and Corneal Collagen Cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Antonios, Rafic; Dirani, Ali; Fadlallah, Ali; Chelala, Elias; Hamadeh, Adib; Jarade, Elias

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a 15-year-old male with allergic conjunctivitis and keratoconus, who underwent uneventful intra-corneal ring segment (ICRS) implantation and corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) in the right eye. During the follow-up periods, the patient was noted to have several episodes of allergic conjunctivitis that were treated accordingly. At the 2 years postoperatively, he presented with another episode of allergic conjunctivitis and progression of keratoconus was suspected on topography. However, the patient was lost to follow-up, until he presented with acute hydrops at 3 years postoperatively. There are no reported cases of acute corneal hydrops in cross-linked corneas. We suspect the young age, allergic conjunctivitis and eye rubbing may be a risk factors associated with possible progression of keratoconus after CXL. Prolonged follow-up and aggressive control of the allergy might be necessary in similar cases. PMID:26957859

  16. Constrained peptides with target-adapted cross-links as inhibitors of a pathogenic protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Glas, Adrian; Bier, David; Hahne, Gernot; Rademacher, Christoph; Ottmann, Christian; Grossmann, Tom N

    2014-02-24

    Bioactive conformations of peptides can be stabilized by macrocyclization, resulting in increased target affinity and activity. Such macrocyclic peptides proved useful as modulators of biological functions, in particular as inhibitors of protein-protein interactions (PPI). However, most peptide-derived PPI inhibitors involve stabilized α-helices, leaving a large number of secondary structures unaddressed. Herein, we present a rational approach towards stabilization of an irregular peptide structure, using hydrophobic cross-links that replace residues crucially involved in target binding. The molecular basis of this interaction was elucidated by X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry. The resulting cross-linked peptides inhibit the interaction between human adaptor protein 14-3-3 and virulence factor exoenzyme S. Taking into consideration that irregular peptide structures participate widely in PPIs, this approach provides access to novel peptide-derived inhibitors. PMID:24504455

  17. Demonstration of prominent actin filaments in the root columella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collings, D. A.; Zsuppan, G.; Allen, N. S.; Blancaflor, E. B.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of actin filaments within the gravity-sensing columella cells of plant roots remains poorly understood, with studies over numerous years providing inconsistent descriptions of actin organization in these cells. This uncertainty in actin organization, and thus in actin's role in graviperception and gravisignaling, has led us to investigate actin arrangements in the columella cells of Zea mays L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn., Linum usitatissiilium L. and Nicotianla benthamiana Domin. Actin organization was examined using a combination of optimized immunofluorescence techniques, and an improved fluorochrome-conjugated phalloidin labeling method reliant on 3-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide ester (MBS) cross-linking combined with glycerol permeabilization. Confocal microscopy of root sections labeled with anti-actin antibodies revealed patterns suggestive of actin throughout the columella region. These patterns included short and fragmented actin bundles, fluorescent rings around amyloplasts and intense fluorescence originating from the nucleus. Additionally, confocal microscopy of MBS-stabilized and Alexa Fluor-phalloidin-labeled root sections revealed a previously undetected state of actin organization in the columella. Discrete actin structures surrounded the amyloplasts and prominent actin cables radiated from the nuclear surface toward the cell periphery. Furthermore, the cortex of the columella cells contained fine actin bundles (or single filaments) that had a predominant transverse orientation. We also used confocal microscopy of plant roots expressing endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted green fluorescent protein to demonstrate rapid ER movements within the columella cells, suggesting that the imaged actin network is functional. The successful identification of discrete actin structures in the root columella cells forms the perception and signaling.

  18. Steady-state nuclear actin levels are determined by export competent actin pool.

    PubMed

    Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Huet, Guillaume; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2013-10-01

    A number of studies in the last decade have irrevocably promoted actin into a fully fledged member of the nuclear compartment, where it, among other crucial tasks, facilitates transcription and chromatin remodeling. Changes in nuclear actin levels have been linked to different cellular processes: decreased nuclear actin to quiescence and increased nuclear actin to differentiation. Importin 9 and exportin 6 transport factors are responsible for the continuous nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of actin, but the mechanisms, which result in modulated actin levels, have not been characterized. We find that in cells growing under normal growth conditions, the levels of nuclear actin vary considerably from cell to cell. To understand the basis for this, we have extensively quantified several cellular parameters while at the same time recording the import and export rates of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged actin. Surprisingly, our dataset shows that the ratio of nuclear to cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity, but not nuclear shape, size, cytoplasm size, or their ratio, correlates negatively with both import and export rate of actin. This suggests that high-nuclear actin content is maintained by both diminished import and export. The high nuclear actin containing cells still show high mobility of actin, but it is not export competent, suggesting increased binding of actin to nuclear complexes. Creation of such export incompetent actin pool would ensure enough actin is retained in the nucleus and make it available for the various nuclear functions described for actin. PMID:23749625

  19. Characterization of Aziridinylbenzoquinone DNA Cross-links by LC-IRMPD-MS

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Sarah E.; Guziec, Lynn J.; Guziec, Frank S.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    DNA cross-linking was evaluated by LC-MS/MS to determine the relative cross-linking abilities of two aziridinylbenzoquinones. Reactivities of RH1 (2,5-diaziridinyl-3-[hydroxymethyl]-6-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone), a clinically studied anti-tumor cross-linking agent, and an analog containing a phenyl group (PhRH1) rather than a methyl group was compared. The bulky phenyl substituent was added to determine the impact of steric hindrance on the formation of cross-links within a double helical structure. Cross-links formed by RH1 and PhRH1 (2,5-diaziridinyl-3-[hydroxymethyl]-6-phenyl-1,4-benzoquinone) were observed at 5’-dGNC sites as well as 5’-dGAAC/dGTTC sites. RH1 was more effective at forming cross-links than PhRH1 for a variety of duplexes. Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) results confirmed the presence and the location of the cross-links within the duplexes, and IRMPD was used to identify the dissociation pathways of the cross-linked duplexes. PMID:20369834

  20. NOVEL METALLIC AND BIMETALLIC CROSS-LINKED POLY (VINYL ALCOHOL) NANOCOMPOSITES PREPARED UNDER MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A facile microwave irradiation approach that results in a cross-linking reaction of poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with metallic and bimetallic systems is described. Nanocomposites of PVA cross-linked metallic systems such as Pt, Cu, and In and bimetallic systems such as Pt-In, Ag-P...

  1. Cross-Linking Electrochemical Mass Spectrometry for Probing Protein Three-Dimensional Structures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is powerful to provide protein three-dimensional structure information but difficulties in identifying cross-linked peptides and elucidating their structures limit its usefulness. To tackle these challenges, this study presents a novel cross-linking MS in conjunction with electrochemistry using disulfide-bond-containing dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate] (DSP) as the cross-linker. In our approach, electrolysis of DSP-bridged protein/peptide products, as online monitored by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is highly informative. First, as disulfide bonds are electrochemically reducible, the cross-links are subject to pronounced intensity decrease upon electrolytic reduction, suggesting a new way to identify cross-links. Also, mass shift before and after electrolysis suggests the linkage pattern of cross-links. Electrochemical reduction removes disulfide bond constraints, possibly increasing sequence coverage for tandem MS analysis and yielding linear peptides whose structures are more easily determined than their cross-linked precursor peptides. Furthermore, this cross-linking electrochemical MS method is rapid, due to the fast nature of electrochemical conversion (much faster than traditional chemical reduction) and no need for chromatographic separation, which would be of high value for structural proteomics research. PMID:25141260

  2. Lamb and Cow Performance when Fed Corn Silage that has Reduced Ferulate Cross Linking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulate-mediated lignin/hemicellulose cross linking in grasses reduces in vitro NDF digestibility (IVNDFD). Impact of ferulate cross linking on animal performance was examined in lamb digestibility and dairy cow performance trials using the seedling ferulate ester (sfe) corn mutant that reduces cro...

  3. Electrospun zein fibers using glutaraldehyde as the cross-linking reagent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutaraldehyde was used as a cross-linking reagent for zein (corn protein) to provide fibers with improved physical properties and solvent resistance. Glutaraldehyde was used at levels between 2 - 8%. The cross-linking reaction was carried out in acetic acid for twenty hours at room temperature. ...

  4. Electrospun zein fibers using glyoxal or formaldehyde as the cross-linking reagent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyoxal or formaldehyde was used as a cross-linking reagent for zein (corn protein) to provide electrospun fibers with improved physical properties and solvent resistance. These reagents were used between 2 and 6%. The cross-linking reaction was carried out in acetic acid for various lengths of ti...

  5. Chemistry and Physical Properties of Melt Processed- and Solution- Cross Linked Corn Zein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn zein was cross linked with the glutaraldehyde (GDA) using glacial acetic acid (HAc) as catalyst. The objectives are to enhance the mechanical properties of poured films and to compare them with compression molded tensile bars from melt processed zein. Chemistry of the cross linking reaction w...

  6. Computer-assisted mass spectrometric analysis of naturally occurring and artificially introduced cross-links in proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Leo J; Kasper, Piotr T; Back, Jaap Willem; Nessen, Merel A; Vanrobaeys, Frank; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Gherardi, Ermanno; de Koster, Chris G; de Jong, Luitzen

    2006-01-01

    A versatile software tool, VIRTUALMSLAB, is presented that can perform advanced complex virtual proteomic experiments with mass spectrometric analyses to assist in the characterization of proteins. The virtual experimental results allow rapid, flexible and convenient exploration of sample preparation strategies and are used to generate MS reference databases that can be matched with the real MS data obtained from the equivalent real experiments. Matches between virtual and acquired data reveal the identity and nature of reaction products that may lead to characterization of post-translational modification patterns, disulfide bond structures, and cross-linking in proteins or protein complexes. The most important unique feature of this program is the ability to perform multistage experiments in any user-defined order, thus allowing the researcher to vary experimental approaches that can be conducted in the laboratory. Several features of VIRTUALMSLAB are demonstrated by mapping both disulfide bonds and artificially introduced protein cross-links. It is shown that chemical cleavage at aspartate residues in the protease resistant RNase A, followed by tryptic digestion can be optimized so that the rigid protein breaks up into MALDI-MS detectable fragments, leaving the disulfide bonds intact. We also show the mapping of a number of chemically introduced cross-links in the NK1 domain of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The VIRTUALMSLAB program was used to explore the limitation and potential of mass spectrometry for cross-link studies of more complex biological assemblies, showing the value of high performance instruments such as a Fourier transform mass spectrometer. The program is freely available upon request. PMID:16403016

  7. Persulfate initiated ultra-low cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgels possess an unusual inverted cross-linking structure.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, O L J; Mourran, A; Pinard, P T; Richtering, W

    2016-05-01

    Cross-linking density and distribution are decisive for the mechanical and other properties of stimuli-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgels. Here we investigate the structure of ultra-low cross-linked microgels by static light scattering and scanning force microscopy, and show that they have an inverted cross-linking structure with respect to conventional microgels, contrary to what has been assumed previously. The conventional microgels have the largest polymer volume fraction in the core from where the particle density decays radially outwards, whereas ultra-low cross-linked particles have the highest polymer volume fraction close to the surface. On a solid substrate these particles form buckled shapes at high surface coverage, as shown by scanning force micrographs. The special structure of ultra-low cross-linked microgels is attributed to cross-linking of the particle surface, which is exposed to hydrogen abstraction by radicals generated from persulfate initiators during and after polymerization. The particle core, which is less accessible to the diffusion of radicals, has consequently a lower polymer volume fraction in the swollen state. By systematic variation of the cross-linker concentration it is shown that the cross-linking contribution from peroxide under typical synthesis conditions is weaker than that from the use of 1 mol% N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide. Soft deformable hydrogel particles are of interest because they emulate biological tissues, and understanding the underlying synthesis principle enables tailoring the microgel structure for biomimetic applications. Deformability of microgels is usually controlled by the amount of added cross-linker; here we however highlight an alternative approach through structural softness. PMID:27033731

  8. Investigation of anisotropic thermal transport in cross-linked polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simavilla, David Nieto

    Thermal transport in lightly cross-linked polyisoprene and polybutadine subjected to uniaxial elongation is investigated experimentally. We employ two experimental techniques to assess the effect that deformation has on this class of materials. The first technique, which is based on Forced Rayleigh Scattering (FRS), allows us to measure the two independent components of the thermal diffusivity tensor as a function of deformation. These measurements along with independent measurements of the tensile stress and birefringence are used to evaluate the stress-thermal and stress-optic rules. The stress-thermal rule is found to be valid for the entire range of elongations applied. In contrast, the stress-optic rule fails for moderate to large stretch ratios. This suggests that the degree of anisotropy in thermal conductivity depends on both orientation and tension in polymer chain segments. The second technique, which is based on infrared thermography (IRT), allows us to measure anisotropy in thermal conductivity and strain induced changes in heat capacity. We validate this method measurements of anisotropic thermal conductivity by comparing them with those obtained using FRS. We find excellent agreement between the two techniques. Uncertainty in the infrared thermography method measurements is estimated to be about 2-5 %. The accuracy of the method and its potential application to non-transparent materials makes it a good alternative to extend current research on anisotropic thermal transport in polymeric materials. A second IRT application allows us to investigate the dependence of heat capacity on deformation. We find that heat capacity increases with stretch ratio in polyisoprene specimens under uniaxial extension. The deviation from the equilibrium value of heat capacity is consistent with an independent set of experiments comparing anisotropy in thermal diffusivity and conductivity employing FRS and IRT techniques. We identify finite extensibility and strain

  9. Chemically cross-linked silk fibroin hydrogel with enhanced elastic properties, biodegradability, and biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Hee; Park, Won Ho

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the synthesis of silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel via chemical cross-linking reactions of SF due to gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation was investigated, as were the resultant hydrogel’s properties. Two different hydrogels were investigated: physically cross-linked SF hydrogel and chemically cross-linked SF hydrogel irradiated at different doses of γ-rays. The effects of the irradiation dose and SF concentration on the hydrogelation of SF were examined. The chemically cross-linked SF hydrogel was compared with the physically cross-linked one with regard to secondary structure and gel strength. Furthermore, the swelling behavior, crystallinity, and biodegradation of the SF hydrogels were characterized. To assay cell proliferation, the cell viability of human mesenchymal stem cells on the lyophilized SF hydrogel scaffolds was evaluated, and no significant cytotoxicity against human mesenchymal stem cells was observed. PMID:27382283

  10. Cross-Linking the Surface of Cured Polydimethylsiloxane via Hyperthemal Hydrogen Projectile Bombardment.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chao; Xu, Ke-Qin; Tang, Chang-Yu; Lau, Woon-ming; Yin, Cong-Bin; Zhu, Yan; Mei, Jun; Lee, Jonathan; Hui, David; Nie, Heng-Yong; Liu, Yu

    2015-04-29

    Cross-linking of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is increasingly important with recent focus on its top surface stiffness. In this paper, we demonstrate that hyperthermal hydrogen projectile bombardment, a surface sensitive cross-linking technology, is superior in enhancing the mechanical properties of a cured PDMS surface without significantly degrading its hydrophobicity. Both water contact angle measurements and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry are used to investigate the variations in surface chemistry and structure upon cross-linking. Using nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy, we confirm that the thickness of the cross-linked PDMS is controllable by the bombardment time, which opens opportunities for tuning cross-linking degree in compliance with arising requirements from the practice. PMID:25849306

  11. Collagen cross-linking of skin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    Collagen cross-links of skin tissue (left upper arm) from 11 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 9 age-matched control subjects were quantified. It was found that patients with ALS had a significant reduction in the content of an age-related, stable cross-link, histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine, that was negatively correlated with the duration of illness. The contents of sodium borohydride-reducible labile cross-links, dehydro-hydroxylysinonorleucine and dehydro-histidinohydroxymerodesmosine, were significantly increased and were positively associated with the duration of illness (r = 0.703, p less than 0.05 and r = 0.684, p less than 0.05, respectively). The results clearly indicate that during the course of ALS, the cross-linking pathway of skin collagen runs counter to its normal aging, resulting in a "rejuvenation" phenomenon of skin collagen. Thus, cross-linking of skin collagen is affected in ALS.

  12. Photoinduced DNA Interstrand Cross-Link Formation by Naphthalene Boronates via a Carbocation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibin; Lin, Zechao; Fan, Heli; Peng, Xiaohua

    2016-07-18

    Most photoinduced DNA cross-link formation by a bifunctional aryl derivative is through a bisquinone methide. DNA cross-linking via a bisarylcarbocation remains a less explored area. We designed and synthesized a series of naphthalene boronates that produce DNA interstrand cross-links via a carbocation upon UV irradiation. A free radical was generated from the naphthalene boronates with 350 nm irradiation and further converted to a carbocation by electron transfer. The activation mechanism was determined using the orthogonal traps, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPO) and methoxyamine that react with either the free radical or the carbocation but not both. This represents a novel example of photoinduced DNA cross-link formation via carbocations generated from a bisaryl derivative. This work provides information useful for the design of novel photoactivated DNA cross-linking agents. PMID:27189512

  13. Carbodiimide cross-linking of amniotic membranes in the presence of amino acid bridges.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jui-Yang

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the carbodiimide cross-linking of amniotic membrane (AM) in the presence of amino acid bridges. The biological tissues were treated with glycine, lysine, or glutamic acid and chemically cross-linked to examine the role of amino acid types in collagenous biomaterial processing. Results of zeta potential measurements showed that the use of uncharged, positively and negatively charged amino acids dictates the charge state of membrane surface. Tensile strength and water content measurements demonstrated that the addition of lysine molecules to the cross-linking system can increase the cross-linking efficiency and dehydration degree while the introduction of glutamic acid in the AM samples decreases the number of cross-links per unit mass of chemically modified tissue collagen. The differences in the cross-linking density further determined the thermal and biological stability by differential scanning calorimetry and in vitro degradation tests. As demonstrated in matrix permeability studies, the improved formation of covalent cross-linkages imposed by lysine facilitated construction of stronger cross-linking structures. In contrast, the added glycine molecules were insufficient to enhance the resistances of the proteinaceous matrices to thermal denaturation and enzymatic degradation. The cytocompatibility of these biological tissue membranes was evaluated by using human corneal epithelial cell cultures. Results of cell viability, metabolic activity, and pro-inflammatory gene expression level showed that the AM materials cross-linked with carbodiimide in the presence of different types of amino acids are well tolerated without evidence of detrimental effect on cell growth. In addition, the amino acid treated and carbodiimide cross-linked AM implants had good biocompatibility in the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye model. Our findings suggest that amino acid type is a very important engineering parameter to mediate

  14. Identification of glucose-derived cross-linking sites in ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhenyu; Wang, Benlian; Sun, Gang; Fan, Xingjun; Anderson, Vernon E; Monnier, Vincent M

    2008-07-01

    The accumulation of glycation derived cross-links has been widely implicated in extracellular matrix damage in aging and diabetes, yet little information is available on the cross-linking sites in proteins and the intra- versus intermolecular character of cross-linking. Recently, glucosepane, a 7-membered heterocycle formed between lysine and arginine residues, has been found to be the single major cross-link known so far to accumulate during aging. As an approach toward identification of glucose derived cross-linking sites, we have preglycated ribonuclease A first for for 14 days with 500 mM glucose, followed by a 4-week incubation in absence of glucose. MALDI-TOF analysis of tryptic digests revealed the presence of Amadori products (Delta m/ z = 162) at K1, K7, K37 and K41, in accordance with previous studies. In addition, K66, K98 and K104 were also modified by Amadori products. Intramolecular glucosepane cross-links were observed at K41-R39 and K98-R85. Surprisingly, the only intermolecular cross-link observed was the 3-deoxyglucosone-derived DODIC at K1-R39. The identity of cross-linked peptides was confirmed by sequencing with tandem mass spectrometry. Recombinant ribonuclease A mutants R39A, R85A, and K91A were produced, purified, and glycated to further confirm the importance of these sites on protein cross-linking. These data provide the first documentation that both intramolecular and intermolecular cross-links form in glucose-incubated proteins. PMID:18500835

  15. Identification of Glucose-Derived Cross-Linking Sites in Ribonuclease A

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhenyu; Wang, Benlian; Sun, Gang; Fan, Xingjun; Anderson, Vernon E.; Monnier, Vincent M.

    2008-01-01

    The accumulation of glycation derived cross-links has been widely implicated in extracellular matrix damage in aging and diabetes, yet little information is available on the cross-linking sites in proteins and the intra- versus intermolecular character of cross-linking. Recently, glucosepane, a 7-membered heterocycle formed between lysine and arginine residues, has been found to be the single major cross-link known so far to accumulate during aging. As an approach toward identification of glucose derived cross-linking sites, we have preglycated ribonuclease A first for for 14 days with 500 mM glucose, followed by a 4-week incubation in absence of glucose. MALDI-TOF analysis of tryptic digests revealed the presence of Amadori products (Δm/z = 162) at K1, K7, K37 and K41, in accordance with previous studies. In addition, K66, K98 and K104 were also modified by Amadori products. Intramolecular glucosepane cross-links were observed at K41-R39 and K98-R85. Surprisingly, the only intermolecular cross-link observed was the 3-deoxyglucosone-derived DODIC at K1-R39. The identity of cross-linked peptides was confirmed by sequencing with tandem mass spectrometry. Recombinant ribonuclease A mutants R39A, R85A, and K91A were produced, purified, and glycated to further confirm the importance of these sites on protein cross-linking. These data provide the first documentation that both intramolecular and intermolecular cross-links form in glucose-incubated proteins. PMID:18500835

  16. A Study into the Collision-induced Dissociation (CID) Behavior of Cross-Linked Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Sven H.; Fischer, Lutz; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking/mass spectrometry resolves protein–protein interactions or protein folds by help of distance constraints. Cross-linkers with specific properties such as isotope-labeled or collision-induced dissociation (CID)-cleavable cross-linkers are in frequent use to simplify the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here, we analyzed the mass spectrometric behavior of 910 unique cross-linked peptides in high-resolution MS1 and MS2 from published data and validate the observation by a ninefold larger set from currently unpublished data to explore if detailed understanding of their fragmentation behavior would allow computational delivery of information that otherwise would be obtained via isotope labels or CID cleavage of cross-linkers. Isotope-labeled cross-linkers reveal cross-linked and linear fragments in fragmentation spectra. We show that fragment mass and charge alone provide this information, alleviating the need for isotope-labeling for this purpose. Isotope-labeled cross-linkers also indicate cross-linker-containing, albeit not specifically cross-linked, peptides in MS1. We observed that acquisition can be guided to better than twofold enrich cross-linked peptides with minimal losses based on peptide mass and charge alone. By help of CID-cleavable cross-linkers, individual spectra with only linear fragments can be recorded for each peptide in a cross-link. We show that cross-linked fragments of ordinary cross-linked peptides can be linearized computationally and that a simplified subspectrum can be extracted that is enriched in information on one of the two linked peptides. This allows identifying candidates for this peptide in a simplified database search as we propose in a search strategy here. We conclude that the specific behavior of cross-linked peptides in mass spectrometers can be exploited to relax the requirements on cross-linkers. PMID:26719564

  17. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Ocular Infection after Corneal Cross-Linking for Keratoconus: Potential Association with Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Fasciani, Romina; Agresta, Antonio; Caristia, Alice; Mosca, Luigi; Scupola, Andrea; Caporossi, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ocular infection after UVA-riboflavin corneal collagen cross-linking in a patient with atopic dermatitis. Methods. A 22-year-old man, with bilateral evolutive keratoconus and atopic dermatitis, underwent UVA-riboflavin corneal cross-linking and presented with rapidly progressive corneal abscesses and cyclitis in the treated eye five days after surgery. The patient was admitted to the hospital and treated with broad-spectrum antimicrobic therapy. Results. The patient had positive cultures for MRSA, exhibiting a strong resistance to antibiotics. Antibiotic therapy was modified and targeted accordingly. The intravitreal reaction is extinguished, but severe damage of ocular structures was unavoidable. Conclusion. Riboflavin/UVA corneal cross-linking is considered a safe procedure and is extremely effective in halting keratoconus' progression. However, this procedure is not devoid of infectious complications, due to known risk factors and/or poor patients' hygiene compliance in the postoperative period. Atopic dermatitis is a common disease among patients with keratoconus and Staphylococcus aureus colonization is commonly found in patients with atopic dermatitis. Therefore, comorbidity with atopic dermatitis should be thoroughly assessed through clinical history before surgery. A clinical evaluation within three days after surgery and the imposition of strict personal hygiene rules are strongly recommended. PMID:25866692

  18. Determination of protein conformation by isotopically labelled cross-linking and dedicated software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Tina; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Larsen, Nanna; Jørgensen, Flemming S.; Houen, Gunnar; Højrup, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Chemical cross-linking in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS) can be used for sensitive and rapid investigation of the three-dimensional structure of proteins at low resolution. However, the resulting data are very complex, and on the bioinformatic side, there still exists an urgent need for improving computer software for (semi-) automated cross-linking data analysis. In this study, we have developed dedicated software for rapid and confident identification and validation of cross-linked species using an isotopic labelled cross-linker approach in combination with MS. Deuterated (+4 Da) and non-deuterated (+0 Da) bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate, BS3, was used as homobifunctional cross-linker to tag the cross-linked regions. Peptides generated from proteolysis were separated using high performance liquid chromatography, and peptide mass fingerprinting was obtained for the individual fractions using matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI TOF) MS. The resulting peptide mass lists were combined and transferred to the program, ProteinXXX, which generated the theoretical mass values of all combinations of cross-linked peptides and dead-end cross-links and compared this to the obtained mass lists. In addition, screening for 4 Da-separated signals aided the identification of potential cross-linked species. Sequence information of these candidates was then obtained using MALDI TOF TOF. The cross-linked peptides could then be validated based on the match of the fragmentation pattern and the theoretical values produced by ProteinXXX. This semi-automated interpretation provided a high analysis speed of cross-linking data, with efficient and confident identification of cross-linked species. Four experiments using different conditions showed a high degree of reproducibility as only 1 and 2 cross-links out of 36 identified was not observed in two experiments. The method was tested using human placenta calreticulin (CRT). Based on the identified cross-links

  19. Electrospun gelatin nanofibers: a facile cross-linking approach using oxidized sucrose.

    PubMed

    Jalaja, K; James, Nirmala R

    2015-02-01

    Gelatin nanofibers were fabricated via electrospinning with minimal toxicity from solvents and cross-linking agents. Electrospinning was carried out using a solvent system based on water and acetic acid (8:2, v/v). Acetic acid concentration was kept as minimum as possible to reduce the toxic effects. Electrospun gelatin nanofibers were cross-linked with oxidized sucrose. Sucrose was oxidized by periodate oxidation to introduce aldehyde functionality. Cross-linking with oxidized sucrose could be achieved without compromising the nanofibrous architecture. Cross-linked gelatin nanofibers maintained the fibrous morphology even after keeping in contact with aqueous medium. The morphology of the cross-linked nanofibrous mats was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Oxidized sucrose cross-linked gelatin nanofibers exhibited improved thermal and mechanical properties. The nanofibrous mats were evaluated for cytotoxicity and cell viability using L-929 fibroblast cells. The results confirmed that oxidized sucrose cross-linked gelatin nanofibers were non-cytotoxic towards L-929 cells with good cell viability. PMID:25478965

  20. Controlled degradation of hydrogels using multi-functional cross-linking molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Bouhadir, Kamal H; Mooney, David J

    2004-06-01

    Hydrogels, chemically cross-linked or physically entangled, have found a number of applications as novel delivery vehicles of drugs and cells. However, the narrow ranges of degradation rates and mechanical strength currently available from many hydrogels limits their applications. We have hypothesized that utilization of multi-functional cross-linking molecules to form hydrogels could provide a wider range and tighter control over the degradation rates and mechanical stiffness of gels than bi-functional cross-linking molecules. To address the possibility, we isolated alpha-L-guluronate residues of sodium alginate, and oxidized them to prepare poly(aldehyde guluronate) (PAG). Hydrogels were formed with either poly(acrylamide-co-hydrazide) (PAH) as a multi-functional cross-linking molecule or adipic acid dihydrazide (AAD) as a bi-functional cross-linking molecule. The initial properties and degradation behavior of both PAG gel types were monitored. PAG/PAH hydrogels showed higher mechanical stiffness before degradation and degraded more slowly than PAG/AAD gels, at the same concentration of cross-linking functional groups. The enhanced mechanical stiffness and prolonged degradation behavior could be attributed to the multiple attachment points of PAH in the gel at the same concentration of functional groups. This approach to regulating gel properties with multifunctional cross-linking molecules could be broadly used in hydrogels. PMID:14751730

  1. Lysyl hydroxylase 2 induces a collagen cross-link switch in tumor stroma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Terajima, Masahiko; Yang, Yanan; Sun, Li; Ahn, Young-Ho; Pankova, Daniela; Puperi, Daniel S.; Watanabe, Takeshi; Kim, Min P.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Rodriguez, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Minelli, Rosalba; Scott, Kenneth L.; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Guilak, Farshid; Pati, Debananda; Thilaganathan, Nishan; Burns, Alan R.; Creighton, Chad J.; Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Zal, Tomasz; Grande-Allen, K. Jane; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tumor metastasis is preceded by an accumulation of collagen cross-links that heighten stromal stiffness and stimulate the invasive properties of tumor cells. However, the biochemical nature of collagen cross-links in cancer is still unclear. Here, we postulated that epithelial tumorigenesis is accompanied by changes in the biochemical type of collagen cross-links. Utilizing resected human lung cancer tissues and a p21CIP1/WAF1-deficient, K-rasG12D-expressing murine metastatic lung cancer model, we showed that, relative to normal lung tissues, tumor stroma contains higher levels of hydroxylysine aldehyde–derived collagen cross-links (HLCCs) and lower levels of lysine aldehyde–derived cross-links (LCCs), which are the predominant types of collagen cross-links in skeletal tissues and soft tissues, respectively. Gain- and loss-of-function studies in tumor cells showed that lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2), which hydroxylates telopeptidyl lysine residues on collagen, shifted the tumor stroma toward a high-HLCC, low-LCC state, increased tumor stiffness, and enhanced tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Together, our data indicate that LH2 enhances the metastatic properties of tumor cells and functions as a regulatory switch that controls the relative abundance of biochemically distinct types of collagen cross-links in the tumor stroma. PMID:25664850

  2. XLSearch: a Probabilistic Database Search Algorithm for Identifying Cross-Linked Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chao; Li, Sujun; Reilly, James P; Radivojac, Predrag; Tang, Haixu

    2016-06-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometric analysis has become an important technique for probing protein three-dimensional structure and protein-protein interactions. A key step in this process is the accurate identification and validation of cross-linked peptides from tandem mass spectra. The identification of cross-linked peptides, however, presents challenges related to the expanded nature of the search space (all pairs of peptides in a sequence database) and the fact that some peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) contain one correct and one incorrect peptide but often receive scores that are comparable to those in which both peptides are correctly identified. To address these problems and improve detection of cross-linked peptides, we propose a new database search algorithm, XLSearch, for identifying cross-linked peptides. Our approach is based on a data-driven scoring scheme that independently estimates the probability of correctly identifying each individual peptide in the cross-link given knowledge of the correct or incorrect identification of the other peptide. These conditional probabilities are subsequently used to estimate the joint posterior probability that both peptides are correctly identified. Using the data from two previous cross-link studies, we show the effectiveness of this scoring scheme, particularly in distinguishing between true identifications and those containing one incorrect peptide. We also provide evidence that XLSearch achieves more identifications than two alternative methods at the same false discovery rate (availability: https://github.com/COL-IU/XLSearch ). PMID:27068484

  3. Arabinosylation Plays a Crucial Role in Extensin Cross-linking In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuning; Dong, Wen; Tan, Li; Held, Michael A; Kieliszewski, Marcia J

    2015-01-01

    Extensins (EXTs) are hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) that are structural components of the plant primary cell wall. They are basic proteins and are highly glycosylated with carbohydrate accounting for >50% of their dry weight. Carbohydrate occurs as monogalactosyl serine and arabinosyl hydroxyproline, with arabinosides ranging in size from ~1 to 4 or 5 residues. Proposed functions of EXT arabinosylation include stabilizing the polyproline II helix structure and facilitating EXT cross-linking. Here, the involvement of arabinosylation in EXT cross-linking was investigated by assaying the initial cross-linking rate and degree of cross-linking of partially or fully de-arabinosylated EXTs using an in vitro cross-linking assay followed by gel permeation chromatography. Our results indicate that EXT arabinosylation is required for EXT cross-linking in vitro and the fourth arabinosyl residue in the tetraarabinoside chain, which is uniquely α-linked, may determine the initial cross-linking rate. Our results also confirm the conserved structure of the oligoarabinosides across species, indicating an evolutionary significance for EXT arabinosylation. PMID:26568683

  4. Chemistry and physical properties of melt-processed and solution-cross-linked corn zein.

    PubMed

    Sessa, David J; Mohamed, Abdellatif; Byars, Jeffrey A

    2008-08-27

    Corn zein was cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GDA) using glacial acetic acid (HAc) as catalyst. The objectives are to evaluate the swelling characteristics of GDA cross-linked zein gels in water, ethanol, and their combinations. Similar formulations, upon solvent evaporation, form films. The mechanical properties of the films are compared to compression molded tensile bars from GDA melt-processed zein as a second objective. Chemistry of the cross-linking reaction was based on the aldehyde binding characteristics defined by use of fluorescence spectroscopy; sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to demonstrate the cross-linking reaction; FTIR to observe absorption differences of the cross-linked product; differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis and thermogravimetric analysis to assess thermal properties; and the use of Instron Universal Testing Machine to evaluate mechanical properties. A reaction mechanism for acid catalyzed GDA cross-linking of zein is proposed. Thermal and mechanical properties of tensile bars cut from either film or formed by compression molding were similar, where both showed increased tensile strengths, ductility and stiffness when compared with unmodified controls. Samples that were reacted with 8% GDA by weight based on weight of zein from either process retained their integrity when tensile bars from each were subjected to boiling water for 10 min or soaking in either water or HAc for 24 h. The melt-processed, cross-linked zein is a more environmentally friendly method that would eliminate the need for HAc recovery. PMID:18636736

  5. Sulfhydryl site-specific cross-linking and labeling of monoclonal antibodies by a fluorescent equilibrium transfer alkylation cross-link reagent.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, R B; Wahl, R L; Brocchini, S J; Lawton, R G; Smith, R H

    1990-01-01

    The site-specific intramolecular cross-linking of sulfhydryls of monoclonal antibodies via a new class of "equilibrium transfer alkylation cross-link (ETAC) reagents" is described. Following complete or partial reduction of interchain disulfides with dithiothreitol (DTT), two murine IgG2a monoclonal antibodies, 225.28S and 5G6.4, were reacted with alpha,alpha-bis[(p-tolylsulfonyl)methyl]-m-aminoacetophenone (ETAC 1a) and a fluorescent conjugated derivative, sulforhodamine B m-(alpha,alpha-bis(p-tolysulfonylmethyl)acetyl)anilide derivative (ETAC 1b). Reducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the products from 1b indicated the formation of S-ETAC-S interchain heavy and light chain cross-links (approximately 23-34% overall yield by video-camera densitometry) which do not undergo disulfide-thiol exchange with DTT at 100 degrees C. In contrast, no interchain cross-links were observed upon reaction of unreduced or reduced antibody wherein the thiols have been previously alkylated with iodoacetamide. These results indicated site-specific cross-linking of interchain sulfhydryls and places their distance within 3-4 A. Flow cytometry of the ETAC 1b 5G6.4 cross-linked product using 77 IP3 human ovarian carcinoma target cells showed positive binding and retention of immunoreactivity. The in vivo biodistributions of 131I-labeled intact 5G6.4 and 125I-labeled reduced 5G6.4 + ETAC 1a product in rats were essentially identical over a period of 24 h. The present study illustrates the potential applications of labelable ETAC reagents as thiol-specific probes for a wide variety of immunological studies. PMID:2128870

  6. Cross-linked Bioreducible Layer-by-layer Films for Increased Cell Adhesion and Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Blacklock, Jenifer; Sievers, Torsten K.; Handa, Hitesh; You, Ye-Zi; Oupický, David; Mao, Guangzhao; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2010-01-01

    The effect of cross-linking layer-by-layer (LbL) films consisting of bioreducible poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (rPDMAEMA) and DNA is examined with regards to rigidity, biodegradability, cell adhesion, and transfection activity using 1,5-diiodopentane (DIP) cross-linker. DIP chemically reacts with the tertiary amines of rPDMAEMA, altering the chemical composition of these LbL films. The result is a change in surface morphology, film swelling behavior and film rigidity, measured with AFM and ellipsometry. It is found that the apparent Young’s modulus is increased more than four times its original value upon cross-linking. Cross-linking mass is additionally confirmed with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Comprehensive analyses of these experimental values were investigated to calculate the degree of cross-linking using the rubber elasticity theory and the Flory-Rehner theory. Additionally, the Flory-Huggins parameter, χ, was calculated. Good agreement in the two methods yields a cross-linking density of ~0.82 mmol/cm3. The Flory-Huggins parameter increased upon cross-linking from 1.07 to 1.2, indicating increased hydrophobicity of the network and formation of bulk water droplets within the films. In addition, the effects of cross-linking on film disassembly by 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT) is found to be insignificant despite the alteration in film rigidity. Mouse fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells are used to study the effect of cross-linking on cell adhesion and cell transfection activity. In vitro transfection activity up to seven days is quantified using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) DNA. Film cross-linking is found to enhance cell adhesion and prolong the duration of cellular transfection. These results contribute to the development of bioreducible polymer coatings for localized gene delivery. PMID:20369813

  7. Helical buckling of actin inside filopodia generates traction

    PubMed Central

    Leijnse, Natascha; Oddershede, Lene B.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells can interact with their surroundings via filopodia, which are membrane protrusions that extend beyond the cell body. Filopodia are essential during dynamic cellular processes like motility, invasion, and cell–cell communication. Filopodia contain cross-linked actin filaments, attached to the surrounding cell membrane via protein linkers such as integrins. These actin filaments are thought to play a pivotal role in force transduction, bending, and rotation. We investigated whether, and how, actin within filopodia is responsible for filopodia dynamics by conducting simultaneous force spectroscopy and confocal imaging of F-actin in membrane protrusions. The actin shaft was observed to periodically undergo helical coiling and rotational motion, which occurred simultaneously with retrograde movement of actin inside the filopodium. The cells were found to retract beads attached to the filopodial tip, and retraction was found to correlate with rotation and coiling of the actin shaft. These results suggest a previously unidentified mechanism by which a cell can use rotation of the filopodial actin shaft to induce coiling and hence axial shortening of the filopodial actin bundle. PMID:25535347

  8. A single charge in the actin binding domain of fascin can independently tune the linear and non-linear response of an actin bundle network.

    PubMed

    Maier, M; Müller, K W; Heussinger, C; Köhler, S; Wall, W A; Bausch, A R; Lieleg, O

    2015-05-01

    Actin binding proteins (ABPs) not only set the structure of actin filament assemblies but also mediate the frequency-dependent viscoelastic moduli of cross-linked and bundled actin networks. Point mutations in the actin binding domain of those ABPs can tune the association and dissociation dynamics of the actin/ABP bond and thus modulate the network mechanics both in the linear and non-linear response regime. We here demonstrate how the exchange of a single charged amino acid in the actin binding domain of the ABP fascin triggers such a modulation of the network rheology. Whereas the overall structure of the bundle networks is conserved, the transition point from strain-hardening to strain-weakening sensitively depends on the cross-linker off-rate and the applied shear rate. Our experimental results are consistent both with numerical simulations of a cross-linked bundle network and a theoretical description of the bundle network mechanics which is based on non-affine bending deformations and force-dependent cross-link dynamics. PMID:26004635

  9. Radiation cross-linking in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene for orthopaedic applications

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2007-01-01

    The motivation for radiation cross-linking of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is to increase its wear resistance to be used as bearing surfaces for total joint arthroplasty. However, radiation also leaves behind long-lived residual free radicals in this polymer, the reactions of which can detrimentally affect mechanical properties. In this review, we focus on the radiation cross-linking and oxidative stability of first and second generation highly cross-linked UHMWPEs developed in our laboratory. PMID:19050735

  10. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced actin glutathionylation controls actin dynamics in neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Jiro; Li, Jingyu; Subramanian, Kulandayan K.; Mondal, Subhanjan; Bajrami, Besnik; Hattori, Hidenori; Jia, Yonghui; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Zhong, Jia; Ye, Keqiang; Chang, Christopher J; Ho, Ye-Shih; Zhou, Jun; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The regulation of actin dynamics is pivotal for cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, and phagocytosis, and thus is crucial for neutrophils to fulfill their roles in innate immunity. Many factors have been implicated in signal-induced actin polymerization, however the essential nature of the potential negative modulators are still poorly understood. Here we report that NADPH oxidase-dependent physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) negatively regulate actin polymerization in stimulated neutrophils via driving reversible actin glutathionylation. Disruption of glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1), an enzyme that catalyzes actin deglutathionylation, increased actin glutathionylation, attenuated actin polymerization, and consequently impaired neutrophil polarization, chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Consistently, Grx1-deficient murine neutrophils showed impaired in vivo recruitment to sites of inflammation and reduced bactericidal capability. Together, these results present a physiological role for glutaredoxin and ROS- induced reversible actin glutathionylation in regulation of actin dynamics in neutrophils. PMID:23159440

  11. Akt1 Mediates α-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression and Myofibroblast Differentiation via Myocardin and Serum Response Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Maha; Goc, Anna; Segar, Lakshman; Somanath, Payaningal R.

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblast (MF) differentiation, marked by the de novo expression of smooth muscle α-actin (αSMA) stress fibers, plays a central role in wound healing and its persistence is a hallmark of fibrotic diseases. We have previously shown that Akt1 is necessary for wound healing through matrix regulation. However, the role of Akt1 in regulating MF differentiation with implications in fibrosis remains poorly defined. Here, we show that sustained activation of Akt1 was associated with a 6-fold increase in αSMA expression and assembly; an effect that is blunted in cells expressing inactive Akt1 despite TGFβ stimulation. Mechanistically, Akt1 mediated TGFβ-induced αSMA synthesis through the contractile gene transcription factors myocardin and serum response factor (SRF), independent of mammalian target of rapamycin in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and fibroblasts overexpressing active Akt1. Akt1 deficiency was associated with decreased myocardin, SRF, and αSMA expressions in vivo. Furthermore, sustained Akt1-induced αSMA synthesis markedly decreased upon RNA silencing of SRF and myocardin. In addition to its integral role in αSMA synthesis, we also show that Akt1 mediates fibronectin splice variant expression, which is required for MF differentiation, as well as total fibronectin, which generates the contractile force that promotes MF differentiation. In summary, our results constitute evidence that sustained Akt1 activation is crucial for TGFβ-induced MF formation and persistent differentiation. These findings highlight Akt1 as a novel potential therapeutic target for fibrotic diseases. PMID:24106278

  12. Visible-Light Photocatalyzed Cross-Linking of Diacetylene Ligands by Quantum Dots to Improve Their Aqueous Colloidal Stability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ligand cross-linking is known to improve the colloidal stability of nanoparticles, particularly in aqueous solutions. However, most cross-linking is performed chemically, in which it is difficult to limit interparticle cross-linking, unless performed at low concentrations. Photochemical cross-linking is a promising approach but usually requires ultraviolet (UV) light to initiate. Using such high-energy photons can be harmful to systems in which the ligand–nanoparticle bond is fairly weak, as is the case for the commonly used semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Here, we introduce a novel approach to cross-link thiolated ligands on QDs by utilizing the photocatalytic activity of QDs upon absorbing visible light. We show that using visible light leads to better ligand cross-linking by avoiding the problem of ligand dissociation that occurs upon UV light exposure. Once cross-linked, the ligands significantly enhance the colloidal stability of those same QDs that facilitated cross-linking. PMID:25036275

  13. Cross-Linked Conjugated Polymer Fibrils: Robust Nanowires from Functional Polythiophene Diblock Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, Brenton A. G.; Bokel, Felicia A.; Hayward, Ryan C.; Emrick, Todd

    2011-09-27

    A series of poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT)-based diblock copolymers were prepared and examined in solution for their assembly into fibrils, and post-assembly cross-linking into robust nanowire structures. P3HT-b-poly(3-methanol thiophene) (P3MT), and P3HT-b-poly(3-aminopropyloxymethyl thiophene) (P3AmT) diblock copolymers were synthesized using Grignard metathesis (GRIM) polymerization. Fibrils formed from solution assembly of these copolymers are thus decorated with hydroxyl and amine functionality, and cross-linking is achieved by reaction of diisocyanates with the hydroxyl and amine groups. A variety of cross-linked structures, characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), were produced by this method, including dense fibrillar sheets, fibril bundles, or predominately individual fibrils, depending on the chosen reaction conditions. In solution, the cross-linked fibrils maintained their characteristic vibronic structure in solvents that would normally disrupt (dissolve) the structures.

  14. Determination of the cross-linking effect of adipic acid dihydrazide on glycoconjugate preparation.

    PubMed

    Bystrický, S; Machová, E; Malovíková, A; Kogan, G

    1999-11-01

    The cross-linking effect of adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) on polysaccharide derivatization can be evaluated by applying combination of elemental analysis and colorimetric assay. Elemental analysis is used for estimation of total ADH bound to polysaccharide and a colorimetric trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid assay is used to determine the part of ADH not involved in cross-linking. The difference of values expressed as molar ratios (per repeating unit) provides information on the amount of ADH involved in cross-linking the polysaccharides. Carboxymethylated polysaccharides were derivatized with different amounts of ADH to test the procedure. Analytical results showed that excess of ADH in the reaction only slightly decreased the cross-linking. The number of carboxyl groups remained unmodified even at high excess of ADH and high concentration of carbodiimide (EDC) coupling reagent. PMID:11003553

  15. Effect of cross-link density on carbon dioxide separation in polydimtheylsiloxane-norbornene membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; Gmernicki, Kevin R.; Cheng, Shiwang; Fan, Fei; Johnson, Joseph C.; Hong, Eunice K.; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Jiang, De-en; et al

    2015-10-01

    Here, the development of high-performance materials for carbon dioxide separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. Herein, (bicycloheptenyl)ethylterminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability ≈ 6800 Barrer; CO2/N2 selectivity ≈ 14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in situ cross-linking method for difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes. By combining positron annihilationmore » lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and gas solubility measurements, key parameters necessary for achieving excellent performance have been elucidated.« less

  16. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, N.M.; Chen, J.

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme. No Drawings

  17. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, Nenad M.; Chen, Jian

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme.

  18. Vapor deposition of cross-linked fluoropolymer barrier coatings onto pre-assembled microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Riche, Carson T; Marin, Brandon C; Malmstadt, Noah; Gupta, Malancha

    2011-09-21

    The interior surfaces of pre-assembled poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices were modified with a cross-linked fluoropolymer barrier coating that significantly increased the chemical compatibility of the devices. PMID:21850298

  19. Microfabrication of Photo-Cross-Linked Hyaluronan Hydrogels by Single- and Two-Photon Tyramine Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Loebel, Claudia; Broguiere, Nicolas; Alini, Mauro; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Eglin, David

    2015-09-14

    Photo-cross-linking of tyramine-substituted hyaluronan (HA-Tyr) hydrogels is demonstrated for the first time. HA-Tyr hydrogels are fabricated via a rapid photosensitized process using visible light illumination. Nontoxic conditions offer photoencapsulation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) with high viability. Macroscopic gels can be formed in less than 10 s, and one- and two-photon photopatterning enable 2D and 3D microfabrication. Different degrees of cross-linking induce different swelling/shrinking, allowing for light-induced microactuation. These new tools are complementary to the previously reported horseradish peroxidase/hydrogen peroxide cross-linking and allow sequential cross-linking of HA-Tyr matrices. PMID:26222128

  20. Collagen type IX from human cartilage: a structural profile of intermolecular cross-linking sites.

    PubMed Central

    Diab, M; Wu, J J; Eyre, D R

    1996-01-01

    Type IX collagen, a quantitatively minor collagenous component of cartilage, is known to be associated with and covalently cross-linked to type II collagen fibrils in chick and bovine cartilage. Type IX collagen molecules have also been shown to form covalent cross-links with each other in bovine cartilage. In the present study we demonstrate by structural analysis and location of cross-linking sites that, in human cartilage, type IX collagen is covalently cross-linked to type II collagen and to other molecules of type IX collagen. We also present evidence that, if the proteoglycan form of type IX collagen is present in human cartilage, it can only be a minor component of the matrix, similar to findings with bovine cartilage. PMID:8660302

  1. Effect of cross-link density on carbon dioxide separation in polydimtheylsiloxane-norbornene membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; Gmernicki, Kevin R.; Cheng, Shiwang; Fan, Fei; Johnson, Joseph C.; Hong, Eunice K.; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Jiang, De-en; Long, Brian K.; Mays, Jimmy; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Here, the development of high-performance materials for carbon dioxide separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. Herein, (bicycloheptenyl)ethylterminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability ≈ 6800 Barrer; CO2/N2 selectivity ≈ 14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in situ cross-linking method for difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes. By combining positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and gas solubility measurements, key parameters necessary for achieving excellent performance have been elucidated.

  2. Characteristics, formation, and pathophysiology of glucosepane: a major protein cross-link.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Johan Svantesson; Bulterijs, Sven

    2009-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products are the results of a series of chemical reactions collectively known as the Maillard reaction, or nonenzymatic glycation, and sometimes cross-link proteins, thereby impairing their normal function. Glucosepane is the most abundant protein cross-link found in vivo so far and mainly has been shown to accumulate in the extracellular matrix, where it cross-links collagen. Levels of glucosepane increase with aging. By increasing collagen stiffness, glucosepane cross-links may have significant implications in several age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Although the formation pathways for glucosepane are relatively well researched, much is still unknown about the accumulation and pathophysiology of glucosepane. PMID:19415980

  3. Effect of cross-link density on carbon dioxide separation in polydimethylsiloxane-norbornene membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; Gmernicki, Kevin; Cheng, Shiwang; Fan, Fei; Johnson, J. Casey; Hong, Eunice; Mahurin, Shannon; Jiang, De -en; et al

    2015-01-01

    The development of high performance materials for CO2 separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. In this work, (bicycloheptenyl) ethyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability ~ 6800 Barrer and CO2/N2 selectivity ~ 14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in-situ cross-linking method of the difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes.more » By combining positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy and gas solubility measurements, we have elucidated the key parameters necessary for achieving their excellent performance.« less

  4. Effect of cross-link density on carbon dioxide separation in polydimtheylsiloxane-norbornene membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; Gmernicki, Kevin R.; Cheng, Shiwang; Fan, Fei; Johnson, Joseph C.; Hong, Eunice K.; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Jiang, De-en; Long, Brian K.; Mays, Jimmy; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-10-01

    Here, the development of high-performance materials for carbon dioxide separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. Herein, (bicycloheptenyl)ethylterminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability ≈ 6800 Barrer; CO2/N2 selectivity ≈ 14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in situ cross-linking method for difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes. By combining positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and gas solubility measurements, key parameters necessary for achieving excellent performance have been elucidated.

  5. Effect of cross-link density on carbon dioxide separation in polydimethylsiloxane-norbornene membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tao; Niu, Zhenbin; Hu, Xunxiang; Gmernicki, Kevin; Cheng, Shiwang; Fan, Fei; Johnson, J. Casey; Hong, Eunice; Mahurin, Shannon; Jiang, De -en; Long, Brian; Mays, Jimmy; Sokolov, Alexei; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    The development of high performance materials for CO2 separation and capture will significantly contribute to a solution for climate change. In this work, (bicycloheptenyl) ethyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMSPNB) membranes with varied cross-link densities were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The developed polymer membranes show higher permeability and better selectivity than those of conventional cross-linked PDMS membrane. The achieved performance (CO2 permeability ~ 6800 Barrer and CO2/N2 selectivity ~ 14) is very promising for practical applications. The key to achieving this high performance is the use of an in-situ cross-linking method of the difunctional PDMS macromonomers, which provides lightly cross-linked membranes. By combining positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, broadband dielectric spectroscopy and gas solubility measurements, we have elucidated the key parameters necessary for achieving their excellent performance.

  6. Inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cell with cross-linked hole-blocking layer

    PubMed Central

    Udum, Yasemin; Denk, Patrick; Adam, Getachew; Apaydin, Dogukan H.; Nevosad, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; S. White, Matthew.; S. Sariciftci, Niyazi.; Scharber, Markus C.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a hole-blocking layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on cross-linked polyethylenimine (PEI). We tested five different ether-based cross-linkers and found that all of them give comparable solar cell efficiencies. The initial idea that a cross-linked layer is more solvent resistant compared to a pristine PEI layer could not be confirmed. With and without cross-linking, the PEI layer sticks very well to the surface of the indium–tin–oxide electrode and cannot be removed by solvents used to process PEI or common organic semiconductors. The cross-linked PEI hole-blocking layer functions for multiple donor–acceptor blends. We found that using cross-linkers improves the reproducibility of the device fabrication process. PMID:24817837

  7. Inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cell with cross-linked hole-blocking layer.

    PubMed

    Udum, Yasemin; Denk, Patrick; Adam, Getachew; Apaydin, Dogukan H; Nevosad, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; S White, Matthew; S Sariciftci, Niyazi; Scharber, Markus C

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a hole-blocking layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on cross-linked polyethylenimine (PEI). We tested five different ether-based cross-linkers and found that all of them give comparable solar cell efficiencies. The initial idea that a cross-linked layer is more solvent resistant compared to a pristine PEI layer could not be confirmed. With and without cross-linking, the PEI layer sticks very well to the surface of the indium-tin-oxide electrode and cannot be removed by solvents used to process PEI or common organic semiconductors. The cross-linked PEI hole-blocking layer functions for multiple donor-acceptor blends. We found that using cross-linkers improves the reproducibility of the device fabrication process. PMID:24817837

  8. A Review of Collagen Cross-Linking in Cornea and Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao; Tao, Xiang-chen; Zhang, Jian; Li, Zhi-wei; Xu, Yan-yun; Wang, Yu-meng; Zhang, Chun-xiao; Mu, Guo-ying

    2015-01-01

    Riboflavin/UVA cross-linking is a technique introduced in the past decades for the treatment of keratoconus, keratectasia, and infectious keratitis. Its efficacy and safety have been investigated with clinical and laboratory studies since its first clinical application by Wollensak for the treatment of keratoconus. Although its complications are encountered during clinical practice, such as infection inducing risk, minimal invasion merits a further investigation on its future application in clinical practice. Recently, collagen cross-linking in sclera shows a promising prospect. In present study, we summarized the representative studies describing the clinical and laboratory application of collagen cross-linking published in past decades and provided our opinion on the positive and negative results of cross-linking in the treatment of ophthalmic disorders. PMID:25922758

  9. In Vivo Oxidative Stability Changes of Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene Bearings: An Ex Vivo Investigation.

    PubMed

    Rowell, Shannon L; Reyes, Christopher R; Malchau, Henrik; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2015-10-01

    The development of highly cross-linked UHMWPEs focused on stabilizing radiation-induced free radicals as the sole precursor to oxidative degradation. However, secondary in vivo oxidation mechanisms have been discovered. After a preliminary post-operative analysis, we subjected highly cross-linked retrievals with 1-4 years in vivo durations and never-implanted controls to accelerated aging to predict the extent to which their oxidative stability was compromised in vivo. Lipid absorption, oxidation, and hydroperoxides were measured using infrared spectroscopy. Gravimetric swelling was used to measure cross-link density. After aging, all retrievals, except vitamin E-stabilized components, regardless of initial lipid levels or oxidation, showed significant oxidative degradation, demonstrated by subsurface oxidative peaks, increased hydroperoxides and decreased cross-link density, compared to their post-operative material properties and never-implanted counterparts, confirming oxidative stability changes. PMID:26048729

  10. Streamlined discovery of cross-linked chromatin complexes and associated histone modifications by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zee, Barry M; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; McElroy, Kyle A; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2016-02-16

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) are key contributors to chromatin function. The ability to comprehensively link specific histone PTMs with specific chromatin factors would be an important advance in understanding the functions and genomic targeting mechanisms of those factors. We recently introduced a cross-linked affinity technique, BioTAP-XL, to identify chromatin-bound protein interactions that can be difficult to capture with native affinity techniques. However, BioTAP-XL was not strictly compatible with similarly comprehensive analyses of associated histone PTMs. Here we advance BioTAP-XL by demonstrating the ability to quantify histone PTMs linked to specific chromatin factors in parallel with the ability to identify nonhistone binding partners. Furthermore we demonstrate that the initially published quantity of starting material can be scaled down orders of magnitude without loss in proteomic sensitivity. We also integrate hydrophilic interaction chromatography to mitigate detergent carryover and improve liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric performance. In summary, we greatly extend the practicality of BioTAP-XL to enable comprehensive identification of protein complexes and their local chromatin environment. PMID:26831069

  11. Streamlined discovery of cross-linked chromatin complexes and associated histone modifications by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Barry M.; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; McElroy, Kyle A.; Kuroda, Mitzi I.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) are key contributors to chromatin function. The ability to comprehensively link specific histone PTMs with specific chromatin factors would be an important advance in understanding the functions and genomic targeting mechanisms of those factors. We recently introduced a cross-linked affinity technique, BioTAP-XL, to identify chromatin-bound protein interactions that can be difficult to capture with native affinity techniques. However, BioTAP-XL was not strictly compatible with similarly comprehensive analyses of associated histone PTMs. Here we advance BioTAP-XL by demonstrating the ability to quantify histone PTMs linked to specific chromatin factors in parallel with the ability to identify nonhistone binding partners. Furthermore we demonstrate that the initially published quantity of starting material can be scaled down orders of magnitude without loss in proteomic sensitivity. We also integrate hydrophilic interaction chromatography to mitigate detergent carryover and improve liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric performance. In summary, we greatly extend the practicality of BioTAP-XL to enable comprehensive identification of protein complexes and their local chromatin environment. PMID:26831069

  12. Anomalous cross-linking by mechlorethamine of DNA duplexes containing C-C mismatch pairs.

    PubMed

    Romero, R M; Mitas, M; Haworth, I S

    1999-03-23

    Nitrogen mustards such as mechlorethamine have previously been shown to covalently cross-link DNA through the N7 position of the two guanine bases of a d[GXC].d[GYC] duplex sequence, a so-called 1,3 G-G-cross-link, when X-Y = C-G or T-A. Here, we report the formation of a new mechlorethamine cross-link with the d[GXC].d[GYC] fragment when X-Y is a C-C mismatch pair. Mechlorethamine cross-links this fragment preferentially between the two mismatched cytosine bases, rather than between the guanine bases. The cross-link also forms when one or both of the guanine bases of the d[GCC].d[GCC] fragment are replaced by N7-deazaguanine, and, more generally, forms with any C-C mismatch, regardless of the flanking base pairs. Piperidine cleavage of the cross-link species containing the d[GCC].d[GCC] sequence gives DNA fragments consistent with alkylation at the mismatched cytosine bases. We also provide evidence that the cross-link reaction occurs between the N3 atoms of the two cytosine bases by showing that the formation of the C-C cross-link is pH dependent for both mechlorethamine and chlorambucil. Dimethyl sulfate (DMS) probing of the cross-linked d[GCC].d[GCC] fragment showed that the major groove of the guanine adjacent to the C-C mismatch is still accessible to DMS. In contrast, the known minor groove binder Hoechst 33258 inhibits the cross-link formation with a C-C mismatch pair flanked by A-T base pairs. These results suggest that the C-C mismatch is cross-linked by mechlorethamine in the minor groove. Since C-C pairs may be involved in unusual secondary structures formed by the trinucleotide repeat sequence d[CCG]n, and associated with triplet repeat expansion diseases, mechlorethamine may serve as a useful probe for these structures. PMID:10090751

  13. Intra-molecular cross-linking of acidic residues for protein structure studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruppa, Gary Hermann; Young, Malin M.; Novak, Petr; Schoeniger, Joseph S.

    2005-03-01

    Intra-molecular cross-linking has been suggested as a method of obtaining distance constraints that would be useful in developing structural models of proteins. Recent work published on intra-molecular cross-linking for protein structural studies has employed commercially available primary amine selective reagents that can cross-link lysine residues to other lysine residues or the amino terminus. Previous work using these cross-linkers has shown that for several proteins of known structure, the number of cross-links that can be obtained experimentally may be small compared to what would be expected from the known structure, due to the relative reactivity, distribution, and solvent accessibility of the lysines in the protein sequence. To overcome these limitations we have investigated the use of cross-linking reagents that can react with other reactive sidechains in proteins. We used 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) to activate the carboxylic acid containing residues, aspartic acid (D), glutamic acid (E), and the carboxy terminus (O), for cross-linking reactions. Once activated, the DEO sidechains can react to form 'zero-length' cross-links with nearby primary amine containing resides, lysines (K) and the amino terminus (X), via the formation of a new amide bond. We also show that the EDC-activated DEO sidechains can be cross-linked to each other using dihydrazides, two hydrazide moieties connected by an alkyl cross-linker ann of variable length. Using these reagents, we have found three new 'zero-length' cross-links in ubiquitin consistent with its known structure (M1-E16, M1-E18, and K63-E64). Using the dihydrazide cross-linkers, we have identified 2 new cross-links (D21-D32 and E24-D32) unambiguously. Using a library of dihydrazide cross-linkers with varying arm length, we have shown that there is a minimum arm length required for the DEO-DEO cross-links of 5.8 angstroms. These results show that additional structural information

  14. DNA-protein cross-links produced by various chemicals in cultured human lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Costa, M; Zhitkovich, A; Harris, M; Paustenbach, D; Gargas, M

    1997-04-11

    Chemicals such as cis-platinum, formaldehyde, chromate, copper, and certain arsenic compounds have been shown to produce DNA-protein cross-links in human in vitro cell systems at high doses, such as those in the cytotoxic range. Thus far there have only been a limited number of other chemicals evaluated for their ability to produce cross-links. The purpose of the work described here was to evaluate whether select industrial chemicals can form DNA-protein cross-links in human cells in vitro. We evaluated acetaldehyde, acrolein, diepoxybutane, paraformaldehyde, 2-furaldehyde, propionaldehyde, chloroacetaldehyde, sodium arsenite, and a deodorant tablet [Mega Blue; hazardous component listed as tris(hydroxymethyl)nitromethane]. Short- and long-term cytotoxicity was evaluated and used to select appropriate doses for in vitro testing. DNA-protein cross-linking was evaluated at no fewer than three doses and two cell lysate washing temperatures (45 and 65 degrees C) in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) human Burkitt's lymphoma cells. The two washing temperatures were used to assess the heat stability of the DNA-protein cross-link, 2-Furaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and propionaldehyde produced statistically significant increases in DNA-protein cross-links at washing temperatures of 45 degrees C, but not 65 degrees C, and at or above concentrations of 5, 17.5, and 75 mM, respectively. Acrolein, diepoxybutane, paraformaldehyde, and Mega Blue produced statistically significant increases in DNA-protein cross-links washed at 45 and 65 degrees C at or above concentrations of 0.15 mM, 12.5 mM, 0.003%, and 0.1%, respectively. Sodium arsenite and chloroacetaldehyde did not produce significantly increased DNA-protein cross-links at either temperature nor at any dose tested. Excluding paraformaldehyde and 2-furaldehyde treatments, significant increases in DNA-protein cross-links were observed only at doses that resulted in complete cell death within 4 d following dosing. This work demonstrates that

  15. Microtubule Actin Crosslinking Factor 1 Regulates the Balbiani Body and Animal-Vegetal Polarity of the Zebrafish Oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Tripti; Marlow, Florence L.; Ferriola, Deborah; Mackiewicz, Katarzyna; Dapprich, Johannes; Monos, Dimitri; Mullins, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Although of fundamental importance in developmental biology, the genetic basis for the symmetry breaking events that polarize the vertebrate oocyte and egg are largely unknown. In vertebrates, the first morphological asymmetry in the oocyte is the Balbiani body, a highly conserved, transient structure found in vertebrates and invertebrates including Drosophila, Xenopus, human, and mouse. We report the identification of the zebrafish magellan (mgn) mutant, which exhibits a novel enlarged Balbiani body phenotype and a disruption of oocyte polarity. To determine the molecular identity of the mgn gene, we positionally cloned the gene, employing a novel DNA capture method to target region-specific genomic DNA of 600 kb for massively parallel sequencing. Using this technique, we were able to enrich for the genomic region linked to our mutation within one week and then identify the mutation in mgn using massively parallel sequencing. This is one of the first successful uses of genomic DNA enrichment combined with massively parallel sequencing to determine the molecular identity of a gene associated with a mutant phenotype. We anticipate that the combination of these technologies will have wide applicability for the efficient identification of mutant genes in all organisms. We identified the mutation in mgn as a deletion in the coding sequence of the zebrafish microtubule actin crosslinking factor 1 (macf1) gene. macf1 is a member of the highly conserved spectraplakin family of cytoskeletal linker proteins, which play diverse roles in polarized cells such as neurons, muscle cells, and epithelial cells. In mgn mutants, the oocyte nucleus is mislocalized; and the Balbiani body, localized mRNAs, and organelles are absent from the periphery of the oocyte, consistent with a function for macf1 in nuclear anchoring and cortical localization. These data provide the first evidence for a role for spectraplakins in polarization of the vertebrate oocyte and egg. PMID:20808893

  16. Computational exploration of polymer nanocomposite mechanical property modification via cross-linking topology

    SciTech Connect

    Lacevic, N; Gee, R; Saab, A; Maxwell, R

    2008-04-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in order to study the effects of nanoscale filler cross-linking topologies and loading levels on the mechanical properties of a model elastomeric nanocomposite. The model system considered here is constructed from octa-functional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) dispersed in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) matrix. Shear moduli, G, have been computed for pure and for filled and unfilled PDMS as a function of cross-linking density, POSS fill loading level, and polymer network topology. The results reported here show that G increases as the cross-linking (covalent bonds formed between the POSS and the PDMS network) density increases. Further, G is found to have a strong dependence on cross-linking topology. The increase in shear modulus, G, for POSS filled PDMS is significantly higher than that for unfilled PDMS cross-linked with standard molecular species, suggesting an enhanced reinforcement mechanism for POSS. In contrast, in blended systems (POSS/PDMS mixture with no cross-linking) G was not observed to significantly increase with POSS loading. Finally, we find intriguing differences in the structural arrangement of bond strains between the cross-linked and the blended systems. In the unfilled PDMS the distribution of highly strained bonds appears to be random, while in the POSS filled system, the strained bonds form a net-like distribution that spans the network. Such a distribution may form a structural network 'holding' the composite together and resulting in increases in G compared to an unfilled, cross-linked system. These results are of importance for engineering of new POSS-based multifunctional materials with tailor-made mechanical properties.

  17. Study of the effect of mixing approach on cross-linking efficiency of hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel cross-linked with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether.

    PubMed

    Al-Sibani, Mohammed; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2016-08-25

    Regardless of various strategies reported for cross-linking hyaluronic acid (HA) with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE), seeking new strategies that enhance cross-linking efficiency with a low level of cross-linker is essential. In this work, we studied the influence of mixing approach on two cross-linked BDDE-HA hydrogels prepared by two different mixing approaches; the large-batch mixing approach in which the hydrogel quantities were all mixed as a single lump in one container (hydrogel 1), and the small-batches mixing approach in which the hydrogel quantities were divided into smaller batches, mixed separately at various HA/BDDE ratios then combined in one reaction mixture (hydrogel 2). The result showed that the cross-linking reaction was mixing process-dependent. Degradation tests proved that, in relation to hydrogel 1, hydrogel 2 was more stable, and exhibited a higher resistance towards hyaluronidase activity. The swelling ratio of hydrogel 1 was significantly higher than that of hydrogel 2 in distilled water; however, in phosphate buffer saline, both hydrogels showed no significant difference. SEM images demonstrated that hydrogel 2 composite showed a denser network structure and smaller pore-size than hydrogel 1. In comparison to native HA, the occurrence of chemical modification in the cross-linked hydrogels was confirmed by FTIR and NMR distinctive peaks. These peaks also provided evidence that hydrogel 2 exhibited a higher degree of modification than hydrogel 1. In conclusion, the small-batches mixing approach proved to be more effective than large-batch mixing in promoting HA-HA entanglement and increasing the probability of BDDE molecules for binding with HA chains. PMID:27312477

  18. A novel strategy for preparing mechanically robust ionically cross-linked alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Jejurikar, Aparna; Lawrie, Gwen; Martin, Darren; Grøndahl, Lisbeth

    2011-04-01

    The properties of alginate films modified using two cross-linker ions (Ca(2+) and Ba(2+)), comparing two separate cross-linking techniques (the traditional immersion (IM) method and a new strategy in a pressure-assisted diffusion (PD) method), are evaluated. This was achieved through measuring metal ion content, water uptake and film stability in an ionic solution ([Ca(2+)] = 2 mM). Characterization of the internal structure and mechanical properties of hydrated films were established by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy and tensile testing, respectively. It was found that gels formed by the PD technique possessed greater stability and did not exhibit any delamination after 21 day immersion as compared to gels formed by the IM technique. The Ba(2+) cross-linked gels possessed significantly higher cross-linking density as reflected in lower water content, a more dense internal structure and higher Young's modulus compared to Ca(2+) cross-linked gels. For the Ca(2+) cross-linked gels, a large improvement in the mechanical properties was observed in gels produced by the PD technique and this was attributed to thicker pore walls observed within the hydrogel structure. In contrast, for the Ba(2+) cross-linked gels, the PD technique resulted in gels that had lower tensile strength and strain energy density and this was attributed to phase separation and larger macropores in this gel. PMID:21436510

  19. Reversible and irreversible cross-linking of immunoglobulin heavy chains through their carbohydrate residues.

    PubMed Central

    Heimgartner, U; Kozulić, B; Mosbach, K

    1990-01-01

    After periodate oxidation and incubation with a dihydrazide, cross-linking of the two heavy chains of immunoglobulins G from several species proceeds specifically through their oligosaccharides. We have used malonic acid dihydrazide, adipic acid dihydrazide and dithiodipropionic acid dihydrazide. The last compound is introduced in this work as a cleavable-carbohydrate-specific cross-linker. It was found that in rabbit and human immunoglobulins the degree of cross-linking was strongly dependent on the oxidation conditions but only very weakly dependent on the concentration and size of the dihydrazides. Papain cleavage of the cross-linked rabbit IgG indicated that the cross-linking occurred predominantly, if not exclusively, in the Fc region, probably through the two glycans linked to Asn-297 in the CH2 domain of each of the two heavy chains. The immunoglobulins from sheep, pig, goat and guinea pig show a comparable cross-linking pattern, indicating that the sugar chains from these immunoglobulins have a spatial structure closely related to that of rabbit and human IgG. When dithiodipropionic acid dihydrazide was used as the cross-linker, the cross-link could be cleaved by mercaptoethanol. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2111130

  20. Synthesis of a duplex oligonucleotide containing a nitrogen mustard interstrand DNA-DNA cross-link.

    PubMed

    Ojwang, J O; Grueneberg, D A; Loechler, E L

    1989-12-01

    Many cancer chemotherapeutic agents react with DNA and give adducts that block DNA replication, which is thought to result in cytotoxicity, especially in rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells. One class of these agents is bifunctionally reactive (e.g., the nitrogen mustards) and forms DNA-DNA cross-links. It is unknown whether inter- or intrastrand cross-links are more effective at blocking DNA replication. To evaluate this, a DNA shuttle vector is being constructed with an interstrand cross-link at a unique site. In the first step of this project, a duplex oligonucleotide containing an interstrand cross-link is isolated by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from the reaction of nitrogen mustard with two partially complementary oligodeoxynucleotides. The purified oligonucleotide product is characterized and shown to be cross-linked in a 5'-GAC-3' 3'-CTG-5' sequence by a nitrogen mustard moiety that is bound at the N(7)-position of the guanines in the opposing strands; the glycosylic bonds of these guanine adducts are stabilized in their corresponding imidazole ring-opened form. Nitrogen mustard is shown to react with a variety of oligonucleotides and, based upon these results, its preferred targets for interstrand cross-linking are 5'-GXC-3' sequences, where X can be any of the four deoxyribonucleotide bases. PMID:2819709

  1. Current status of corneal collagen cross-linking for keratoconus: a review.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elsie; Snibson, Grant R

    2013-03-01

    Over the past decade, corneal collagen cross-linking has become commonplace as a treatment option for individuals with progressive keratoconus. This is based on laboratory data suggesting that cross-linking using riboflavin and ultraviolet-A irradiation increases collagen diameter and the biomechanical strength of the treated cornea. Case series and limited randomised controlled trials support these findings with data demonstrating that cross-linking slows and possibly halts the progression of keratoconus. In some patients cross-linking results in an improvement in maximum corneal curvature, visual acuity, spherical equivalent and higher-order aberrations. The number of reported complications is small. More recently, variations in the treatment protocol have been described, although they have not yet been subject to comparative studies. While the published data indicate cross-linking is effective in modifying the natural history of keratoconus, the long-term impact of this treatment is still unknown. This paper reviews the theoretical basis, pre-clinical research and clinical results of corneal collagen cross-linking in keratoconus. PMID:23414201

  2. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  3. Synchrotron Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Study of Cross-Linked Polymeric Micelles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Lee, Se Guen; Kim, Eunjoo; Lee, Sung Jun; Jeong, Sang Won; Lee, Seung Woo; Kim, Kwang-Woo

    2016-06-01

    Polymeric micelles of methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide) containing lysine units (mPEG-PLA-Lys4) were cross-linked by reacting of lysine moieties with a bifunctional bis(N-hydroxy-succinimide ester). The micelles were characterized in aqueous solution using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering. The mPEG-PLA-Lys4 was synthesized through the ring-opening polymerization of N6-carbobenzyloxy-L-lysine N-carboxyanhydride with amine-terminated mPEG-PLA and subsequent deprotection. The polymeric micelles showed enhanced micelle stability after cross-linking, which was confirmed by adding sodium dodecyl sulfate as a destabilizing agent. The average diameters measured via dynamic light scattering were 19.1 nm and 29.2 nm for non-cross-linked polymeric micelles (NCPMs) and cross-linked polymeric micelles (CPMs), respectively. The transmission electron microscopy images showed that the size of the polymeric micelles increased slightly due to cross-linking, which was in good agreement with the DLS measurements. The overall structures and internal structural changes of NCPMs and CPMs in aqueous solution were studied in detail using synchrotron X-ray scattering method. According to the structural parameters of X-ray scattering analysis, CPMs with a more densely packed core structure were formed by reacting bifunctional cross-linking agents with lysine amino groups located in the innermost core of the polymeric micelles. PMID:27427731

  4. Exogenous collagen cross-linking recovers tendon functional integrity in an experimental model of partial tear.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Gion; Wernli, Jeremy; Li, Yufei; Gerber, Christian; Snedeker, Jess G

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that exogenous collagen cross-linking can augment intact regions of tendon to mitigate mechanical propagation of partial tears. We first screened the low toxicity collagen cross-linkers genipin, methylglyoxal and ultra-violet (UV) light for their ability to augment tendon stiffness and failure load in rat tail tendon fascicles (RTTF). We then investigated cross-linking effects in load bearing equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT). Data indicated that all three cross-linking agents augmented RTTF mechanical properties but reduced native viscoelasticity. In contrast to effects observed in fascicles, methylglyoxal treatment of SDFT detrimentally affected tendon mechanical integrity, and in the case of UV did not alter tendon mechanics. As in the RTTF experiments, genipin cross-linking of SDFT resulted in increased stiffness, higher failure loads and reduced viscoelasticity. Based on this result we assessed the efficacy of genipin in arresting tendon tear propagation in cyclic loading to failure. Genipin cross-linking secondary to a mid-substance biopsy-punch significantly reduced tissue strains, increased elastic modulus and increased resistance to fatigue failure. We conclude that genipin cross-linking of injured tendons holds potential for arresting tendon tear progression, and that implications of the treatment on matrix remodeling in living tendons should now be investigated. PMID:22102295

  5. Antifouling coatings based on covalently cross-linked agarose film via thermal azide-alkyne cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li Qun; Pranantyo, Dicky; Neoh, Koon-Gee; Kang, En-Tang; Teo, Serena Lay-Ming; Fu, Guo Dong

    2016-05-01

    Coatings based on thin films of agarose-poly(ethylene glycol) (Agr-PEG) cross-linked systems are developed as environmentally-friendly and fouling-resistant marine coatings. The Agr-PEG cross-linked systems were prepared via thermal azide-alkyne cycloaddition (AAC) using azido-functionalized Agr (AgrAz) and activated alkynyl-containing poly(2-propiolamidoethyl methacrylate-co-poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate) P(PEMA-co-PEGMEMA) random copolymers as the precursors. The Agr-PEG cross-linked systems were further deposited onto a SS surface, pre-functionalized with an alkynyl-containing biomimetic anchor, dopamine propiolamide, to form a thin film after thermal treatment. The thin film-coated SS surfaces can effectively reduce the adhesion of marine algae and the settlement of barnacle cyprids. Upon covalent cross-linking, the covalently cross-linked Agr-PEG films coated SS surfaces exhibit good stability in flowing artificial seawater, and enhanced resistance to the settlement of barnacle cyprids, in comparison to that of the surfaces coated with physically cross-linked AgrAz films. PMID:26836479

  6. Optical mechanical refinement of human amniotic membrane by dehydration and cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuji; Kubota, Akira; Yokokura, Shunji; Uematsu, Masafumi; Shi, Dong; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Quantock, Andrew J; Nishida, Kohji

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for refining the optical and mechanical properties of human amniotic membrane (AM) to provide ophthalmic transparent implants for use during severe donor cornea shortages. AM was allowed to gradually dehydrate at 4-8 °C with and without chemical cross-linking. To improve the transparency of AM, a simple dehydration process using a refrigerator at 4-8 °C overnight was examined. For further improvements, dehydrated AM was then cross-linked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxy-succimide before rehydration. Light transmittance and tensile strength of individual specimens were evaluated. Light transmittance of AM improved from 50.9-77.7% at 550 nm by this simple low temperature dehydration process. Its high light transmittance was partially maintained at 70.1%, even after rehydration with normal saline. Interestingly, chemically cross-linked AM showed a significantly greater light transmittance of 81.5% under wet conditions. In addition, tensile strength was significantly increased after cross-linking from 2.32 N/mm(2) (native tissue) to 11.78 N/mm(2) (cross-linked specimens). Light transmittance and tensile strength were successfully improved by these approaches, including low temperature dehydration with and without chemical cross-linking. The use of refined AM could be feasible for use in current and future ophthalmic treatments. PMID:22489071

  7. Curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels with controlled anti-proteolytic and pro-angiogenic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Dharunya, G; Duraipandy, N; Lakra, Rachita; Korapatti, Purna Sai; Jayavel, R; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates the development of a curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogel system with controlled anti-proteolytic activity and pro-angiogenic efficacy. The results of this study showed that in situ cross-linking of curcumin with collagen leads to the development of aerogels with enhanced physical and mechanical properties. The integrity of collagen after cross-linking with curcumin was studied via FTIR spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the cross-linking with curcumin did not induce any structural changes in the collagen. The curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels exhibited potent anti-proteolytic and anti-microbial activity. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopic analysis of curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels showed a 3D microstructure that enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of cells. The highly organized geometry of collagen-curcumin aerogels enhanced the permeability and water-retaining ability required for the diffusion of nutrients that aid cellular growth. The pro-angiogenic properties of collagen-curcumin aerogels were ascribed to the cumulative effect of the nutraceutical and the collagen molecule, which augmented the restoration of damaged tissue. Further, these aerogels exhibited controlled anti-proteolytic activity, which makes them suitable 3D scaffolds for biomedical applications. This study provides scope for the development of biocompatible and bioresorbable collagen aerogel systems that use a nutraceutical as a cross-linker for biomedical applications. PMID:27509047

  8. Dual-Cross-Linked Methacrylated Alginate Sub-Microspheres for Intracellular Chemotherapeutic Delivery.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Spencer L; Miao, Tianxin; Scherrer, Ryan M; Oldinski, Rachael A

    2016-07-20

    Intracellular delivery vehicles comprised of methacrylated alginate (Alg-MA) were developed for the internalization and release of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX). Alg-MA was synthesized via an anhydrous reaction, and a mixture of Alg-MA and DOX was formed into sub-microspheres using a water/oil emulsion. Covalently cross-linked sub-microspheres were formed via exposure to green light, in order to investigate effects of cross-linking on drug release and cell internalization, compared to traditional techniques, such as ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. Cross-linking was performed using light exposure alone or in combination with ionic cross-linking using calcium chloride (CaCl2). Alg-MA sub-microsphere diameters were between 88 and 617 nm, and ζ-potentials were between -20 and -37 mV. Using human lung epithelial carcinoma cells (A549) as a model, cellular internalization was confirmed using flow cytometry; different sub-microsphere formulations varied the efficiency of internalization, with UV-cross-linked sub-microspheres achieving the highest internalization percentages. While blank (nonloaded) Alg-MA submicrospheres were noncytotoxic to A549 cells, DOX-loaded sub-microspheres significantly reduced mitochondrial activity after 5 days of culture. Photo-cross-linked Alg-MA sub-microspheres may be a potential chemotherapeutic delivery system for cancer treatment. PMID:27378419

  9. Triple shape memory effects of cross-linked polyethylene/polypropylene blends with cocontinuous architecture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Chen, Min; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Xiaodong; Wang, Zhenwen; Dang, Zhi-Min; Ma, Lan; Hu, Guo-Hua; Chen, Fenghua

    2013-06-26

    In this paper, the triple shape memory effects (SMEs) observed in chemically cross-linked polyethylene (PE)/polypropylene (PP) blends with cocontinuous architecture are systematically investigated. The cocontinuous window of typical immiscible PE/PP blends is the volume fraction of PE (v(PE)) of ca. 30-70 vol %. This architecture can be stabilized by chemical cross-linking. Different initiators, 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-di(tert-butylperoxy)-hexane (DHBP), dicumylperoxide (DCP) coupled with divinylbenzene (DVB) (DCP-DVB), and their mixture (DHBP/DCP-DVB), are used for the cross-linking. According to the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements and gel fraction calculations, DHBP produces the best cross-linking and DCP-DVB the worst, and the mixture, DHBP/DCP-DVB, is in between. The chemical cross-linking causes lower melting temperature (Tm) and smaller melting enthalpy (ΔHm). The prepared triple shape memory polymers (SMPs) by cocontinuous immiscible PE/PP blends with v(PE) of 50 vol % show pronounced triple SMEs in the dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and visual observation. This new strategy of chemically cross-linked immiscible blends with cocontinuous architecture can be used to design and prepare new SMPs with triple SMEs. PMID:23713446

  10. Characterization of receptors for VIP on pancreatic acinar cell plasma membranes using covalent cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    McArthur, K.E.; Wood, C.L.; O'Dorisio, M.S.; Zhou, Z.C.; Gardner, J.D.; Jensen, R.T.

    1987-03-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors on guinea pig pancreatic acini differ from those on all other tissues in containing a high-affinity VIP receptor and a low-affinity VIP receptor that has a high affinity for secretin. To characterize the molecular components of these receptors, /sup 125/I-VIP was covalently cross-linked to these receptors by four different cross-linking agents: disuccinimidyl suberate, ethylene glycol bis (succinimidyl succinate), dithiobis (succinimidylpropionate), and m-maleimidobenzoyl N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated a single major polypeptide band of M/sub r/ 45,000 and a minor polypeptide band of M/sub r/ 30,000 were cross-linked to /sup 125/I-VIP. Covalent cross-linking only occurred when a cross-linking agent was added, was inhibited by GTP, was inhibited by VIP receptor agonist or antagonists that interact with VIP receptors, and not by other pancreatic secretagogues that interact with difference receptors. Thus the high-affinity VIP receptor on pancreatic acinar cell membranes consists of a single major polypeptide of M/sub r/ 45,000, and this polypeptide is not a subunit of a larger disulfide-linked structure. Furthermore, either the low-affinity VIP/secretin-preferring receptor was not covalently cross-linked under the experimental conditions or it consist of a major polypeptide with the same molecular weight as the high-affinity VIP receptor.

  11. Structural studies on mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase using chemical cross-linking.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, S D; Ragan, C I

    1988-01-01

    The structure of bovine heart mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase was investigated by cross-linking constituent subunits with disuccinimidyl tartrate, (ethylene glycol)yl bis(succinimidyl succinate) and dimethyl suberimidate. Cross-linked products were identified by Western blotting with monospecific antisera to nine subunits of the enzyme. Cross-links between subunits within the flavoprotein, iron-protein and hydrophobic domains of the enzyme were identified. Cross-linking between the 75 kDa iron-protein-domain subunit and the 51 kDa flavoprotein-domain subunit was modulated by the substrate NADH. Cross-linking of subunits of the iron-protein and flavoprotein domains to constituents of the hydrophobic domain was also found. This was further substantiated by photolabelling subunits of the latter region, which were in contact with the membrane lipid, with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine. One such subunit of Mr 19,000 could be cross-linked to components of the iron-protein domain. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3223927

  12. Dynamic OCT measurements of corneal biomechanical properties after UV cross-linking in the rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twa, Michael D.; Li, Jiasong; Manapuram, Ravi K.; Menodiado, Floredes M.; Singh, Manmohan; Aglyamov, Salavat; Emelianov, Stanislav; Larin, Kirill V.

    2013-03-01

    Structural properties of the cornea determine the shape and optical quality of the eye. Keratoconus, a structural degeneration of the cornea, is often treated with UV-induced collagen cross-linking to increase tissue resistance to further deformation and degeneration. Optimal treatments would be customized to the individual and consider preexisting structural properties as well as the effects induced by treatment and this requires the capability to noninvasively measure tissue properties. The purpose of this study is to use novel methods of optical elastography to study the effects of UV-induced corneal collagen cross-linking in the rabbit eye. Low-amplitude (<1μm) elastic flexural waves were generated using focused air-pulse stimulation. Elastic wave propagation was measured over a 10x10mm area using Phase Stabilized Swept Source Optical Coherence Elastography (PhS-SSOCE) with a sensitivity of ~ 10 nm. Wave amplitude and velocity were computed and compared in tissues before and after UV cross-linking. Wave amplitude was decreased by the cross-linking treatment, while wave velocity was greater in cross-linked tissue than it was in the untreated cornea. Decreased wave amplitude and increased wave velocity after cross-linking is consistent with increased tissue stiffness. This was confirmed by conventional mechanical tension testing. These results demonstrate that the combination of the PhS-SSOCE and focused air pulse stimulation is capable of measuring low amplitude tissue motion and quantifying corneal stiffness.

  13. Distribution of Young's Modulus in Porcine Corneas after Riboflavin/UVA-Induced Collagen Cross-Linking as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Sel, Saadettin; Scholz, Michael; Paulsen, Friedrich; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-01-01

    Riboflavin/UVA-induced corneal collagen cross-linking has become an effective clinical application to treat keratoconus and other ectatic disorders of the cornea. Its beneficial effects are attributed to a marked stiffening of the unphysiologically weak stroma. Previous studies located the stiffening effect predominantly within the anterior cornea. In this study, we present an atomic force microscopy-derived analysis of the depth-dependent distribution of the Young's modulus with a depth resolution of 5 µm in 8 cross-linked porcine corneas and 8 contralateral controls. Sagittal cryosections were fabricated from every specimen and subjected to force mapping. The mean stromal depth of the zone with effective cross-linking was found to be 219±67 µm. Within this cross-linked zone, the mean Young's modulus declined from 49±18 kPa at the corneal surface to 46±17 kPa, 33±11 kPa, 17±5 kPa, 10±4 kPa and 10±4 kPa at stromal depth intervals of 0–50 µm, 50–100 µm, 100–150 µm, 150–200 µm and 200–250 µm, respectively. This corresponded to a stiffening by a factor of 8.1 (corneal surface), 7.6 (0–50 µm), 5.4 (50–100 µm), 3.0 (100–150 µm), 1.6 (150–200 µm), and 1.5 (200–250 µm), when compared to the Young's modulus of the posterior 100 µm. The mean Young's modulus within the cross-linked zone was 20±8 kPa (2.9-fold stiffening), while it was 11±4 kPa (1.7-fold stiffening) for the entire stroma. Both values were significantly distinct from the mean Young's modulus obtained from the posterior 100 µm of the cross-linked corneas and from the contralateral controls. In conclusion, we were able to specify the depth-dependent distribution of the stiffening effect elicited by standard collagen cross-linking in porcine corneas. Apart from determining the depth of the zone with effective corneal cross-linking, we also developed a method that allows for atomic force microscopy-based measurements of gradients of Young's modulus in soft tissues in

  14. Actinic Prurigo.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carreón, Alma Angélica; Rodríguez-Lobato, Erika; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Georgina; Cuevas-González, Juan Carlos; Mancheno-Valencia, Alexandra; Solís-Arias, Martha Patricia; Vega-Memije, María Elisa; Hojyo-Tomoka, María Teresa; Domínguez-Soto, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Actinic prurigo is an idiopathic photodermatosis that affects the skin, as well as the labial and conjunctival mucosa in indigenous and mestizo populations of Latin America. It starts predominantly in childhood, has a chronic course, and is exacerbated with solar exposure. Little is known of its pathophysiology, including the known mechanisms of the participation of HLA-DR4 and an abnormal immunologic response with increase of T CD4+ lymphocytes. The presence of IgE, eosinophils, and mast cells suggests that it is a hypersensitivity reaction (likely type IVa or b). The diagnosis is clinical, and the presence of lymphoid follicles in the mucosal histopathologic study of mucosa is pathognomonic. The best available treatment to date is thalidomide, despite its secondary effects. PMID:26861426

  15. Building an artificial actin cortex on microscopic pillar arrays.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, R; Roos, W H

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells obtain their morphology and mechanical strength from the cytoskeleton and in particular from the cross-linked actin network that branches throughout the whole cell. This actin cortex lies like a quasi-two-dimensional (2D) biopolymer network just below the cell membrane, to which it is attached. In the quest for building an artificial cell, one needs to make a biomimetic model of the actin cortex and combine this in a bottom-up approach with other "synthetic" components. Here, we describe a reconstitution method for such an artificial actin cortex, which is freely suspended on top of a regular array of pillars. By this immobilization method, the actin network is only attached to a surface at discrete points and can fluctuate freely in between. By discussing the method to make the micropillars and the way to reconstitute a quasi-2D actin network on top, we show how one can study an isolated, reconstituted part of a cell. This allows the study of fundamental interaction mechanisms of actin networks, providing handles to design a functional actin cortex in an artificial cell. PMID:25997345

  16. Interstrand cross-link formation in duplex and triplex DNA by modified pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaohua; Hong, In Seok; Li, Hong; Seidman, Michael M; Greenberg, Marc M

    2008-08-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links have important biological consequences and are useful biotechnology tools. Phenylselenyl substituted derivatives of thymidine (1) and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5) produce interstrand cross-links in duplex DNA when oxidized by NaIO4. The mechanism involves a [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement of the respective selenoxides to the corresponding methide type intermediates, which ultimately produce the interstrand cross-links. Determination of the rate constants for the selenoxide rearrangements indicates that the rate-determining step for cross-linking is after methide formation. Cross-linking by the thymidine derivative in duplex DNA shows a modest kinetic preference when flanked by pyrimidines as opposed to purines. In contrast, the rate constant for cross-link formation from 5 opposite dG in duplex DNA is strongly dependent upon the flanking sequence and, in general, is at least an order of magnitude slower than that for 1 in an otherwise identical sequence. Introduction of mispairs at the base pairs flanking 5 or substitution of the opposing dG by dI significantly increases the rate constant and yield for cross-linking, indicating that stronger hydrogen bonding between the methide derived from it and dG compared to dA and the respective electrophile derived from 1 limits reaction by increasing the barrier to rotation into the required syn-conformation. Incorporation of 1 or 5 in triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) that utilize Hoogsteen base pairing also yields interstrand cross-links. The dC derivative produces ICLs approximately 10x faster than the thymidine derivative when incorporated at the 5'-termini of the TFOs and higher yields when incorporated at internal sites. The slower, less efficient ICL formation emanating from 1 is attributed to reaction at N1-dA, which requires local melting of the duplex. In contrast, 5 produces cross-links by reacting with N7-dG. The cross-linking reactions of 1 and 5 illustrate the versatility and

  17. Intra-molecular cross-linking of acidic residues for protein structure studies.

    PubMed

    Novak, Petr; Kruppa, Gary H

    2008-01-01

    Intra-molecular cross-linking has been suggested as a method of obtaining distance constraints that would help to develop structural models of proteins. Recent work published on intra-molecular cross-linking for protein structural studies has employed commercially available primary amine (lysine, the amino terminus) selective reagents. Previous work using these cross-linkers has shown that for several proteins of known structure, the number of cross-links that can be obtained experimentally may be small compared to what would be expected from the known structure, due to the relative reactivity, distribution and solvent accessibility of the lysines in the protein sequence. To overcome these limitations, we have investigated the use of cross-linking reagents that can react with other reactive side chains in proteins. We used 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) to activate the carboxylic acid containing residues, aspartic acid (D), glutamic acid (E) and the carboxy terminus (O), for cross-linking reactions. Once activated, the DEO side chains can react to form "zero-length" cross-links with nearby primary amine containing residues, lysines (K) and the amino terminus (X), via the formation of a new amide bond. We also show that the EDC-activated DEO side chains can be cross-linked to each other using dihydrazides, two hydrazide moieties connected by an alkyl cross-linker arm of variable length. Using these reagents, we have found three new "zero-length" cross-links in ubiquitin consistent with its known structure (M1-E16, M1-E18 and K63-E64). Using the dihydrazide cross-linkers, we have identified two new cross-links (D21-D32 and E24-D32) unambiguously. Using a library of dihydrazide cross-linkers with varying arm length, we have shown that there is a minimum arm length required for the DEO-DEO cross-links of 5.8 A. These results show that additional structural information can be obtained by exploiting new cross-linker chemistry

  18. Vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in the Octopus vulgaris brain: a regulatory factor of actin polymerization dynamic.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Anna; Natale, Emiliana; Rotondo, Sergio; Di Cosmo, Anna; Faraone-Mennella, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Our previous behavioural, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses conducted in selected regions (supra/sub oesophageal masses) of the Octopus vulgaris brain detected a cytoplasmic poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (more than 90% of total enzyme activity). The protein was identified as the vault-free form of vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. The present research extends and integrates the biochemical characterization of poly-ADP-ribosylation system, namely, reaction product, i.e., poly-ADP-ribose, and acceptor proteins, in the O. vulgaris brain. Immunochemical analyses evidenced that the sole poly-ADP-ribose acceptor was the octopus cytoskeleton 50-kDa actin. It was present in both free, endogenously poly-ADP-ribosylated form (70kDa) and in complex with V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase and poly-ADP-ribose (260kDa). The components of this complex, alkali and high salt sensitive, were purified and characterized. The kind and the length of poly-ADP-ribose corresponded to linear chains of 30-35 ADP-ribose units, in accordance with the features of the polymer synthesized by the known vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. In vitro experiments showed that V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase activity of brain cytoplasmic fraction containing endogenous actin increased upon the addition of commercial actin and was highly reduced by ATP. Anti-actin immunoblot of the mixture in the presence and absence of ATP showed that the poly-ADP-ribosylation of octopus actin is a dynamic process balanced by the ATP-dependent polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein, a fundamental mechanism for synaptic plasticity. PMID:23831359

  19. Quantifying actin wave modulation on periodic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parker, Joshua; Fourkas, John; Carlsson, Anders; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Actin is the essential builder of the cell cytoskeleton, whose dynamics are responsible for generating the necessary forces for the formation of protrusions. By exposing amoeboid cells to periodic topographical cues, we show that actin can be directionally guided via inducing preferential polymerization waves. To quantify the dynamics of these actin waves and their interaction with the substrate, we modify a technique from computer vision called ``optical flow.'' We obtain vectors that represent the apparent actin flow and cluster these vectors to obtain patches of newly polymerized actin, which represent actin waves. Using this technique, we compare experimental results, including speed distribution of waves and distance from the wave centroid to the closest ridge, with actin polymerization simulations. We hypothesize the modulation of the activity of nucleation promotion factors on ridges (elevated regions of the surface) as a potential mechanism for the wave-substrate coupling. Funded by NIH grant R01GM085574.

  20. Mass spectrometry evidence for cisplatin as a protein cross-linking reagent

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huilin; Zhao, Yao; Phillips, Hazel I. A.; Qi, Yulin; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Sadler, Peter J.; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Cisplatin is a potent anti-cancer drug, which functions by cross-linking adjacent DNA guanine residues. However within one day of injection, 65~98% of the platinum in the blood plasma is protein-bound. It is generally accepted that cisplatin binds to methionine and histidine residues, but what is often underappreciated is that platinum from cisplatin has a 2+ charge and can form up to four bonds. Thus, it has the potential to function as a cross-linker. In this report, the cross-linking ability of cisplatin is demonstrated by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry (MS) with the use of standard peptides, the 16.8 kDa protein calmodulin (CaM), but was unsuccessful for the 64 kDa protein hemoglobin. The high resolution and mass accuracy of FTICR MS along with the high degree of fragmentation of large peptides afforded by collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) are shown to be a valuable means of characterizing cross-linking sites. Cisplatin is different from current cross-linking reagents by targeting new functional groups, thioethers, and imidazoles groups, which provides complementarity with existing cross-linkers. In addition, platinum(II) inherently has two positive charges which enhance the detection of cross-linked products. Higher charge states not only promote the detection of cross-linking products with less purification, but result in more comprehensive MS/MS fragmentation and can assist the assignment of modification sites. Moreover, the unique isotopic pattern of platinum flags cross-linking products and modification sites by mass spectrometry. PMID:21591778

  1. Mesoscopic simulations of hydrophilic cross-linked polycarbonate polyurethane networks: structure and morphology.

    PubMed

    Iype, E; Esteves, A C C; de With, G

    2016-06-14

    Polyurethane (PU) cross-linked networks are frequently used in biomedical and marine applications, e.g., as hydrophilic polymer coatings with antifouling or low-friction properties and have been reported to exhibit characteristic phase separation between soft and hard segments. Understanding this phase-separation behavior is critical to design novel hydrophilic polymer coatings. However, most of the studies on the structure and morphology of cross-linked coatings are experimental, which only assess the phase separation via indirect methods. Herein we present a mesoscopic simulation study of the network characteristics of model hydrophilic polymer networks, consisting of PU with and without methyl-polyethylene glycol (mPEG) dangling chains. The systems are analyzed using a number of tools, such as the radial distribution function, the cross-link point density distribution and the Voronoi volume distribution (of the cross-linking points). The combined results show that the cross-linked networks without dangling chains are rather homogeneous but contain a small amount of clustering of cross-linker molecules. A clear phase separation is observed when introducing the dangling chains. In spite of that, the amount of cross-linker molecules connected to dangling chains only, i.e., not connected to the main network, is relatively small, leading to about 3 wt% extractables. Thus, these cross-linked polymers consist of a phase-separated, yet highly connected network. This study provides valuable guidelines towards new self-healing hydrophilic coatings based on the molecular design of cross-linked networks in direct contact with water or aqueous fluids, e.g., as anti-fouling self-repairing coatings for marine applications. PMID:27174657

  2. Click Cross-Linking-Improved Waterborne Polymers for Environment-Friendly Coatings and Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianqing; Peng, Kaimei; Guo, Jinshan; Shan, Dingying; Kim, Gloria B; Li, Qiyao; Gerhard, Ethan; Zhu, Liang; Tu, Weiping; Lv, Weizhong; Hickner, Michael A; Yang, Jian

    2016-07-13

    Waterborne polymers, including waterborne polyurethanes (WPU), polyester dispersions (PED), and polyacrylate emulsions (PAE), are employed as environmentally friendly water-based coatings and adhesives. An efficient, fast, stable, and safe cross-linking strategy is always desirable to impart waterborne polymers with improved mechanical properties and water/solvent/thermal and abrasion resistance. For the first time, click chemistry was introduced into waterborne polymer systems as a cross-linking strategy. Click cross-linking rendered waterborne polymer films with significantly improved tensile strength, hardness, adhesion strength, and water/solvent resistance compared to traditional waterborne polymer films. For example, click cross-linked WPU (WPU-click) has dramatically improved the mechanical strength (tensile strength increased from 0.43 to 6.47 MPa, and Young's modulus increased from 3 to 40 MPa), hardness (increased from 59 to 73.1 MPa), and water resistance (water absorption percentage dropped from 200% to less than 20%); click cross-linked PED (PED-click) film also possessed more than 3 times higher tensile strength (∼28 MPa) than that of normal PED (∼8 MPa). The adhesion strength of click cross-linked PAE (PAE-click) to polypropylene (PP) was also improved (from 3 to 5.5 MPa). In addition, extra click groups can be preserved after click cross-linking for further functionalization of the waterborne polymeric coatings/adhesives. In this work, we have demonstrated that click modification could serve as a convenient and powerful approach to significantly improve the performance of a variety of traditional coatings and adhesives. PMID:27326894

  3. Conformational Transitions of the Cross-linking Domains of Elastin during Self-assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Reichheld, Sean E.; Muiznieks, Lisa D.; Stahl, Richard; Simonetti, Karen; Sharpe, Simon; Keeley, Fred W.

    2014-01-01

    Elastin is the intrinsically disordered polymeric protein imparting the exceptional properties of extension and elastic recoil to the extracellular matrix of most vertebrates. The monomeric precursor of elastin, tropoelastin, as well as polypeptides containing smaller subsets of the tropoelastin sequence, can self-assemble through a colloidal phase separation process called coacervation. Present understanding suggests that self-assembly is promoted by association of hydrophobic domains contained within the tropoelastin sequence, whereas polymerization is achieved by covalent joining of lysine side chains within distinct alanine-rich, α-helical cross-linking domains. In this study, model elastin polypeptides were used to determine the structure of cross-linking domains during the assembly process and the effect of sequence alterations in these domains on assembly and structure. CD temperature melts indicated that partial α-helical structure in cross-linking domains at lower temperatures was absent at physiological temperature. Solid-state NMR demonstrated that β-strand structure of the cross-linking domains dominated in the coacervate state, although α-helix was predominant after subsequent cross-linking of lysine side chains with genipin. Mutation of lysine residues to hydrophobic amino acids, tyrosine or alanine, leads to increased propensity for β-structure and the formation of amyloid-like fibrils, characterized by thioflavin-T binding and transmission electron microscopy. These findings indicate that cross-linking domains are structurally labile during assembly, adapting to changes in their environment and aggregated state. Furthermore, the sequence of cross-linking domains has a dramatic effect on self-assembly properties of elastin-like polypeptides, and the presence of lysine residues in these domains may serve to prevent inappropriate ordered aggregation. PMID:24550393

  4. Immune Focusing and Enhanced Neutralization Induced by HIV-1 gp140 Chemical Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Schiffner, T.; Kong, L.; Duncan, C. J. A.; Back, J. W.; Benschop, J. J.; Shen, X.; Huang, P. S.; Stewart-Jones, G. B.; DeStefano, J.; Seaman, M. S.; Tomaras, G. D.; Montefiori, D. C.; Schief, W. R.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental vaccine antigens based upon the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env) have failed to induce neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against the majority of circulating viral strains as a result of antibody evasion mechanisms, including amino acid variability and conformational instability. A potential vaccine design strategy is to stabilize Env, thereby focusing antibody responses on constitutively exposed, conserved surfaces, such as the CD4 binding site (CD4bs). Here, we show that a largely trimeric form of soluble Env can be stably cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GLA) without global modification of antigenicity. Cross-linking largely conserved binding of all potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) tested, including CD4bs-specific VRC01 and HJ16, but reduced binding of several non- or weakly neutralizing antibodies and soluble CD4 (sCD4). Adjuvanted administration of cross-linked or unmodified gp140 to rabbits generated indistinguishable total gp140-specific serum IgG binding titers. However, sera from animals receiving cross-linked gp140 showed significantly increased CD4bs-specific antibody binding compared to animals receiving unmodified gp140. Moreover, peptide mapping of sera from animals receiving cross-linked gp140 revealed increased binding to gp120 C1 and V1V2 regions. Finally, neutralization titers were significantly elevated in sera from animals receiving cross-linked gp140 rather than unmodified gp140. We conclude that cross-linking favors antigen stability, imparts antigenic modifications that selectively refocus antibody specificity and improves induction of NAbs, and might be a useful strategy for future vaccine design. PMID:23843636

  5. Genipin-cross-linked collagen/chitosan biomimetic scaffolds for articular cartilage tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Le-Ping; Wang, Ying-Jun; Ren, Li; Wu, Gang; Caridade, Sofia G; Fan, Jia-Bing; Wang, Ling-Yun; Ji, Pei-Hong; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Oliveira, João T; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L

    2010-11-01

    In this study, genipin-cross-linked collagen/chitosan biodegradable porous scaffolds were prepared for articular cartilage regeneration. The influence of chitosan amount and genipin concentration on the scaffolds physicochemical properties was evaluated. The morphologies of the scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and cross-linking degree was investigated by ninhydrin assay. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were assessed under dynamic compression. To study the swelling ratio and the biostability of the collagen/chitosan scaffold, in vitro tests were also carried out by immersion of the scaffolds in PBS solution or digestion in collagenase, respectively. The results showed that the morphologies of the scaffolds underwent a fiber-like to a sheet-like structural transition by increasing chitosan amount. Genipin cross-linking remarkably changed the morphologies and pore sizes of the scaffolds when chitosan amount was less than 25%. Either by increasing the chitosan ratio or performing cross-linking treatment, the swelling ratio of the scaffolds can be tailored. The ninhydrin assay demonstrated that the addition of chitosan could obviously increase the cross-linking efficiency. The degradation studies indicated that genipin cross-linking can effectively enhance the biostability of the scaffolds. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was evaluated by culturing rabbit chondrocytes in vitro. This study demonstrated that a good viability of the chondrocytes seeded on the scaffold was achieved. The SEM analysis has revealed that the chondrocytes adhered well to the surface of the scaffolds and contacted each other. These results suggest that the genipin-cross-linked collagen/chitosan matrix may be a promising formulation for articular cartilage scaffolding. PMID:20648541

  6. Cross-linked A alpha.gamma chain hybrids serve as unique markers for fibrinogen polymerized by tissue transglutaminase.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, S N; Lorand, L

    1990-01-01

    Notwithstanding the high degree of amino acid sequence homologies between human factor XIIIa on the one hand and intracellular transglutaminases (protein-glutamine:amine gamma-glutamyltransferase, EC 2.3.2.13) from guinea pig liver or human erythrocytes on the other, we find that the two sets of enzymes differ remarkably in the mode of cross-linking the same protein substrate--i.e., human fibrinogen. In the program of polymerization with factor XIIIa, production of the known gamma-gamma' homologous chain pairs is the dominant feature, whereas with either intracellular transglutaminase, a series of hitherto unidentified A alpha.gamma hybrid chain combinations, designated A alpha p gamma q (p and q = 1, 2, 3...), is generated and practically no gamma-gamma' dimers are formed. Two-dimensional electrophoresis is particularly useful for demonstrating the production of A alpha p gamma q structures by protein staining as well as by immunoblotting against specific antibodies to the A alpha and gamma chains of fibrinogen. These findings should aid in deciding whether the direct cross-linking of fibrinogen by transglutaminase might contribute to thrombotic processes in addition to the thrombin- and factor XIIIa-dependent pathway of clot formation. Images PMID:1979874

  7. Biomimetic hydration lubrication with various polyelectrolyte layers on cross-linked polyethylene orthopedic bearing materials.

    PubMed

    Kyomoto, Masayuki; Moro, Toru; Saiga, Kenichi; Hashimoto, Masami; Ito, Hideya; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Takatori, Yoshio; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2012-06-01

    Natural joints rely on fluid thin-film lubrication by the hydrated polyelectrolyte layer of cartilage. However, current artificial joints with polyethylene (PE) surfaces have considerably less efficient lubrication and thus much greater wear, leading to osteolysis and aseptic loosening. This is considered a common factor limiting prosthetic longevity in total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, such wear could be mitigated by surface modification to mimic the role of cartilage. Here we report the development of nanometer-scale hydrophilic layers with varying charge (nonionic, cationic, anionic, or zwitterionic) on cross-linked PE (CLPE) surfaces, which could fully mimic the hydrophilicity and lubricity of the natural joint surface. We present evidence to support two lubrication mechanisms: the primary mechanism is due to the high level of hydration in the grafted layer, where water molecules act as very efficient lubricants; and the secondary mechanism is repulsion of protein molecules and positively charged inorganic ions by the grafted polyelectrolyte layer. Thus, such nanometer-scaled hydrophilic polymers or polyelectrolyte layers on the CLPE surface of acetabular cup bearings could confer high durability to THA prosthetics. PMID:22465336

  8. The use of collagen cross-linking agents to enhance dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ammar, Aiman; Drummond, James L; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina B.

    2009-01-01

    Type I collagen is a major component of the hybrid layer, and improvement of its mechanical properties may be advantageous during bonding procedures. Objective To investigate the effect of three different cross-linking agents (Glutaraldehyde [GD], Grape seed extract [GSE], and Genipin [GE]) on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin-dentin bonds. Materials and Methods Sixty-four sound human molars were collected and their occlusal surfaces were ground flat to expose dentin. Dentin surfaces were etched using a phosphoric acid and then teeth were randomly divided according to the dentin treatment: Control group (no treatment), 5% GD, 6.5% GSE or 0.5% GE. Teeth were restored either with One Step Plus or Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive systems and resin composite. After 24 hours, teeth were sectioned to produce a cross-sectional surface area of 1.0 mm2 and tested for tensile bond strength. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (p< 0.05). There was a statistically significant interaction between factors (treatment and adhesive p<0.001). Treatment affected TBS (p< 0.0001), while no differences were observed between the adhesive systems (p = 0.6961). Conclusion Chemical modification to the dentin matrix promoted by GD and GSE, but not GE, resulted in increased bond strength. The application of selective collagen cross-linkers during adhesive restorative procedures may be a new approach to improve dentin bond strength properties. PMID:19507140

  9. Optimization of β-cyclodextrin cross-linked polymer for monitoring of quercetin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiashi; Ping, Wenhui

    2014-11-01

    A novel method for the separation/analysis of quercetin was described, which was based on the investigation of the inclusion interactions of β-cyclodextrin cross-linked polymer (β-CDCP) with quercetin (Qu) and the adsorption behavior of Qu on β-CDCP. The inclusion interaction of β-CDCP with Qu was studied through FTIR, TGA and 13C NMR. Under the optimum conditions, the preconcentration factor of the proposed method was approximately 8.8, the β-CDCP could be used repeatedly for 30 times and offered better recovery. The linear range, limit of detection (LOD) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 0.10-12.0 μg mL-1, 4.6 ng mL-1 and 3.10% (n = 3, c = 2.0 μg mL-1) respectively. This technique had been successfully applied to the determination of Qu in real samples.

  10. Novel enzymatically cross-linked hyaluronan hydrogels support the formation of 3D neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Broguiere, Nicolas; Isenmann, Luca; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2016-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an essential component of the central nervous system's extracellular matrix and its high molecular weight (MW) form has anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties relevant for regenerative medicine. Here, we introduce a new hydrogel based on high MW HA which is cross-linked using the transglutaminase (TG) activity of the activated blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIIIa). These HA-TG gels have significant advantages for neural tissue engineering compared to previous HA gels. Due to their chemical inertness in the absence of FXIIIa, the material can be stored long-term, is stable in solution, and shows no cytotoxicity. The gelation is completely cell-friendly due to the specificity of the enzyme and the gelation rate can be tuned from seconds to hours at physiological pH and independently of stiffness. The gels are injectable, and attach covalently to fibrinogen and fibrin, two common bioactive components in in vitro tissue engineering, as well as proteins present in vivo, allowing the gels to covalently bind to brain or spinal cord defects. These optimal chemical and bioactive properties of HA-TG gels enabled the formation of 3D neuronal cultures of unprecedented performance, showing fast neurite outgrowth, axonal and dendritic speciation, strong synaptic connectivity in 3D networks, and rapidly-occurring and long-lasting coordinated electrical activity. PMID:27209262

  11. Preparation and characterization of resistant starch type IV nanoparticles through ultrasonication and miniemulsion cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongbo; Zheng, Jiong; Xia, Xuejuan; Ren, Tingyuan; Kan, Jianquan

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the properties of resistant starch type IV (chemically modified starch, RS4) prepared from a new and convenient synthesis route by using ultrasonication combined with water-in-oil miniemulsion cross-linking technique. A three-factor Box-Behnken design and optimization was used to minimize particle size through the developed RS4 nanoparticles. The predicted minimized Z-Avel (576.1nm) under the optimum conditions of the process variables (ultrasonic power, 214.57W; sonication time, 114.73min; and oil/water ratio, 10.54:1) was very close to the experimental value (651.0nm) determined in a batch experiment. After preparing the RS4 nanoparticles, morphological, physical, chemical, and functional properties were assessed. Results revealed that RS4 nanoparticle size reached about 600nm. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that ultrasonication induced notches and grooves on the surface. Under polarized light, the polarized cross was impaired. X-ray diffraction results revealed that the crystalline structure was disrupted. Smaller or no endotherms were exhibited in DSC analysis. In the FTIR graph, new peaks at 1532.91 and 1451.50cm(-1) were observed, and pasting properties were reduced. Amylose content, solubility, and SP increased, but RS content decreased. Anti-digestibility remained after ultrasonication. The prepared RS4 nanoparticles could be extensively used in biomedical applications and in the development of new medical materials. PMID:26877007

  12. Disulphide cross linked pullulan based cationic polymer for improved gene delivery and efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    S, Priya S; R, Rekha M

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug resistance is a hurdle to successful cancer chemotherapy. Over expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a prime contributing factor for drug resistance. In this study, a disulphide cross-linked pullulan-based cationic polymer (PPSS) was synthesized to act simultaneously as gene delivery vehicle and efflux pump inhibitor. The PPSS nanoplexes were of size <200nm with the zeta potential of +15 to +20mV. The cytotoxicity studies using C6 and L929 cells showed that PPSS polymers are non-toxic even at high polymer concentrations. The PPSS/pDNA nanoplex showed superior uptake in confocal microscopy with 97% uptake by flow cytometry. The efficacy of efflux pump inhibition by the PPSS nanoplex was established by the enhanced intracellular retention of DOX. The enhanced cell death by p53/PPSS/DOX nanoplexes was attributed to the synergistic effect of P-gp inhibition and p53 transfection efficiency. Therefore, this multifunctional polymeric system may have significant promise for therapeutic application against cancer drug resistance. PMID:27459414

  13. Cross-linker dynamics determine the mechanical properties of actin gels.

    PubMed Central

    Wachsstock, D H; Schwarz, W H; Pollard, T D

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the contributions of cross-linker dynamics and polymer deformation to the frequency-dependent stiffness of actin filament gels, we compared the rheological properties of actin gels with three types of cross-linkers: a weak one, Acanthamoeba alpha-actinin (dissociation rate constant 5.2 s-1, association rate constant 1.1 x 10(6) M-1 s-1); a strong one, chicken smooth muscle alpha-actinin (dissociation rate constant 0.66 s-1, association rate constant 1.20 x 10(6) M-1 s-1); and an extremely strong one, biotin/avidin (dissociation rate constant approximately zero). The biotin/avidin cross-linked gel, whose behavior is determined by polymer bending alone, behaves like a solid and shows no frequency dependence. The amoeba alpha-actinin cross-linked gel behaves like a viscoelastic fluid, and the frequency dependence of the stiffness can be explained by a mathematical model for dynamically cross-linked gels. The stiffness of the chicken alpha-actinin cross-linked gel is independent of frequency, and has viscoelastic properties intermediate between the two. The two alpha-actinins have similar association rate constants for binding to actin filaments, consistent with a diffusion-limited reaction. Rigid cross-links make the gel stiff, but make it elastic without the ability to deform permanently. Dynamically cross-linked actin filaments should allow the cell to react passively to various outside forces without any sort of signaling. Slower, signal-mediated pathways, such as severing filaments or changing the affinity of cross-linkers, could alter the nature of these passive reactions. PMID:8011912

  14. Curvature and torsion in growing actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2008-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Rickettsia rickettsii move within a host cell by polymerizing a comet-tail of actin fibers that ultimately pushes the cell forward. This dense network of cross-linked actin polymers typically exhibits a striking curvature that causes bacteria to move in gently looping paths. Theoretically, tail curvature has been linked to details of motility by considering force and torque balances from a finite number of polymerizing filaments. Here we track beads coated with a prokaryotic activator of actin polymerization in three dimensions to directly quantify the curvature and torsion of bead motility paths. We find that bead paths are more likely to have low rather than high curvature at any given time. Furthermore, path curvature changes very slowly in time, with an autocorrelation decay time of 200 s. Paths with a small radius of curvature, therefore, remain so for an extended period resulting in loops when confined to two dimensions. When allowed to explore a three-dimensional (3D) space, path loops are less evident. Finally, we quantify the torsion in the bead paths and show that beads do not exhibit a significant left- or right-handed bias to their motion in 3D. These results suggest that paths of actin-propelled objects may be attributed to slow changes in curvature, possibly associated with filament debranching, rather than a fixed torque.

  15. Vitamin E-diffused highly cross-linked UHMWPE particles induce less osteolysis compared to highly cross-linked virgin UHMWPE particles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bichara, David A; Malchau, Erik; Sillesen, Nanna H; Cakmak, Selami; Nielsen, G Petur; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2014-09-01

    Recent in vitro findings suggest that UHMWPE wear particles containing vitamin E (VE) may have reduced biologic activity and decreased osteolytic potential. We hypothesized that particles from VE-stabilized, radiation cross-linked UHMWPE would cause less osteolysis in a murine calvarial bone model when compared to virgin gamma irradiated cross-linked UHMWPE. Groups received equal amount of particulate debris overlaying the calvarium for 10 days. Calvarial bone was examined using high resolution micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses. There was a statistically significant difference between virgin (12.2%±8%) and VE-UHMWPE (3%±1.4%) groups in regards to bone resorption (P=0.005) and inflammatory fibrous tissue overlaying the calvaria (0.48 vs. 0.20, P<0.0001). These results suggest that VE-UHMWPE particles have reduced osteolytic potential in vivo when compared to virgin UHMWPE. PMID:24998319

  16. Investigation of the role of aromatic carboxylic acids in cross-linking processes in low-rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Eskay, T.P.; Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III

    1997-03-01

    In the pyrolysis and liquefaction of low-rank coals, low-temperature cross-linking reactions have been correlated with the loss of carboxyl groups and the evolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. It is not clearly understood how decarboxylation leads to cross-linking beyond the suggestion that decarboxylation could be a radical process that involves radical recombination or radical addition reactions. We have recently conducted a study of the pyrolysis of 1,2-(3,3{prime}-dicarboxyphenyl)ethane (1) and 1,2-(4,4{prime}-dicarboxyphenyl)ethane (2) and found that decarboxylation occurs readily between 350-425 {degrees}C with no evidence of coupling products or products representative of cross-links. We proposed that decarboxylation occurred primarily by an acid-promoted cationic pathway, and the source of acid was a second carboxylic acid. The decarboxylation of 1 and 2 was investigated in diphenyl ether and naphthalene as inert diluents. In each solvent, the rate of decarboxylation dropped by roughly a factor of 2 upon dilution from the neat liquid to ca. 0.4 mole fraction of acid, but further dilution had no effect on the rate. This could be a consequence of hydrogen bonding or an intramolecular protonation. Molecular mechanics calculations indicated that 1 and 2 can adopt an appropriate conformation for internal proton transfer from a carboxy group on one ring to the second aryl ring without a significant energy penalty. In addition, the dicarboxylic acid could internally hydrogen bond, which may further complicate the reaction mechanism. Therefore, we have conducted a study of the pyrolysis of a monocarboxybibenzyl, 1-(3-carboxyphenyl)-2-(4-biphenyl)ethane (3), to determine if decarboxylation occurs by an ionic pathway in the absence of intramolecular pathways.

  17. In vivo distribution and elimination of hemoglobin modified by intramolecular cross-linking with 2-nor-2-formylpyridoxal 5'-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Bleeker, W.K.; van der Plas, J.; Feitsma, R.I.; Agterberg, J.; Rigter, G.; de Vries-van Rossen, A.; Pauwels, E.K.; Bakker, J.C.

    1989-02-01

    Modified hemoglobin solutions have potential application as plasma expanders with oxygen-transporting capacity. In a previous study it was found that modification of hemoglobin by intramolecular cross-linking with 2-nor-2-formylpyridoxal 5'-phosphate (NFPLP) improves the vascular retention time by a factor of three, and it also improves the oxygen-transporting properties. In the present study we investigated in rats how, after exchange transfusion of a clinically relevant dose, the modified hemoglobin (HbNFPLP) was distributed in the body compared with how the unmodified hemoglobin was distributed. By using a new technetium 99m labeling technique, we found in a scintigraphic study that accumulation of hemoglobin in the kidneys was greatly diminished by the intramolecular cross-linking with NFPLP. These findings were confirmed by light-microscopic observations after diaminobenzidine staining. It was concluded that the impairment of kidney function caused by blockade of the tubuli is not to be expected from HbNFPLP. In the liver and spleen, where the free HbNFPLP is possibly eliminated, some accumulation of 99mTc label was observed, but the major part of the extravascular label was diffusely spread throughout the body. This led to the conclusion that important accumulation of undegraded HbNFPLP does not occur in the liver and spleen. Rapid appearance of both hemoglobin and HbNFPLP in the lymph showed that cross-linking with NFPLP does not prevent the distribution of hemoglobin over the interstitial space in the first hours after administration. However, pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that transcapillary transfer contributes only to a limited extent to the disappearance from the circulation. During 24-hour infusions of HbNFPLP, a steady state with a constant plasma concentration was easily reached.

  18. Fabrication of homogeneously cross-linked, functional alginate microcapsules validated by NMR-, CLSM- and AFM-imaging.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, H; Hillgärtner, M; Manz, B; Feilen, P; Brunnenmeier, F; Leinfelder, U; Weber, M; Cramer, H; Schneider, S; Hendrich, C; Volke, F; Zimmermann, U

    2003-05-01

    Cross-linked alginate microcapsules of sufficient mechanical strength can immunoisolate cells for the long-term treatment of hormone and other deficiency diseases in human beings. However, gelation of alginate by external Ba(2+) (or other divalent cations) produces non-homogeneous cross-linking of the polymeric mannuronic (M) and guluronic (G) acid chains. The stability of such microcapsules is rather limited. Here, we show that homogeneous cross-linking can be achieved by injecting BaCl(2) crystals into alginate droplets before they come into contact with external BaCl(2). The high effectiveness of this crystal gun method is demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy and by advanced nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Both techniques gave clear-cut evidence that homogeneous cross-linkage throughout the microcapsule is only obtained with simultaneous internal and external gelation. Atomic force microscopy showed a very smooth surface topography for microcapsules made by the crystal gun method, provided that excess Ba(2+) ions were removed immediately after gelation. In vitro experiments showed greatly suppressed swelling for crystal gun microcapsules. Even alginate extracted from Lessonia nigrescens (highly biocompatible) yielded microcapsules with long-term mechanical stability not hitherto possible. Encapsulation of rat islets, human monoclonal antibodies secreting hybridoma cells and murine mesenchymal stem cells transfected with cDNA encoding for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-4) revealed that injection of BaCl(2) crystals has no adverse side effects on cell viability and function. However, the release of low-molecular weight factors (such as insulin) may be delayed when using alginate concentrations in the usual range. PMID:12628829

  19. [Cross-linking and neurodermitis: prolonged re-epithelisation with severe corneal vascularisation after cross-linking in a patient with neurodermitis and keratoconus].

    PubMed

    Görsch, I C; Steinberg, J; Richard, G; Katz, T; Linke, S

    2014-06-01

    This case report describes a patient with keratoconus and neurodermitis suffering from a significantly prolonged postoperative time interval to re-epithelisation after corneal cross-linking. The development of corneal calcifications and vascularisations additionally inhibited proper re-epithelisation. Therefore the patient received four subsequent subconjunctival injections of Bevacizumab and an additional keratectomy to remove the calcifications. This therapeutic scheme led to a significant reduction of corneal vascularisation and finally a full rehabilitation of the epithelium. PMID:24788604

  20. The effects of different crossing-linking conditions of genipin on type I collagen scaffolds: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujie; Chen, Xueying; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Naili; Dong, Li; Ma, Shaoying; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Mo; Li, Baoxing

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the properties of fabricating rat tail type I collagen scaffolds cross-linked with genipin under different conditions. The porous genipin cross-linked scaffolds are obtained through a two step freeze-drying process. To find out the optimal cross-link condition, we used different genipin concentrations and various cross-linked temperatures to prepare the scaffolds in this study. The morphologies of the scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscope, and the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were evaluated under dynamic compression. Additionally, the cross-linking degree was assessed by ninhydrin assay. To investigate the swelling ratio and the in vitro degradation of the collagen scaffold, the tests were also carried out by immersion of the scaffolds in a PBS solution or digestion in a type I collagenase respectively. The morphologies of the non-cross-linked scaffolds presented a lattice-like structure while the cross-linked ones displayed a sheet-like framework. The morphology of the genipin cross-linked scaffolds could be significantly changed by either increasing genipin concentration or the temperature. The swelling ratio of each cross-linked scaffold was much lower than that of the control (non-cross-linked).The ninhydrin assay demonstrated that the higher temperature and genipin concentration could obviously increase the cross-linking efficiency. The in vitro degradation studies indicated that genipin cross-linking can effectively elevate the biostability of the scaffolds. The biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of the scaffolds was evaluated by culturing rat chondrocytes on the scaffold in vitro and by MTT. The results of MTT and the fact that the chondrocytes adhered well to the scaffolds demonstrated that genipin cross-linked scaffolds possessed an excellent biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. Based on these results, 0.3 % genipin concentrations and 37 °C cross-linked temperatures are

  1. Molecular dynamics study on the tensile deformation of cross-linking epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Xin, Dong R; Han, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Various epoxy resins are used in the electronic industry as encapsulants, adhesive, printed wiring boards, electronic packagings, and so on. In this study, molecular dynamics method is employed to simulate the tensile deformation of the typical electronic epoxy resin. An efficient cross-linking procedure is developed to build the molecular model. Based on the cross-linking algorithm, the effects of moisture content, cross-linking conversion, strain rate, and temperature on the mechanical properties of epoxy resins are investigated. The stress-strain curves are plotted. Also the Young's modulus and Poisson ratio are calculated. The simulation results are compared with existing experimental data. Good agreements are observed. The results show that mechanical properties of epoxy resin decrease obviously with increasing moisture content and temperature. However the high cross-linking conversion and strain rate enhance the mechanical properties of resin. This study is significant to understanding the mechanical properties of cross-linking epoxies in high temperature and high humidity. PMID:25605604

  2. Glycation Cross-Linking Induced Mechanical-Enzymatic Cleavage of Microscale Tendon Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Jonathan W.; Lippell, Jared M.; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent molecular modeling data using collagen peptides predicted that mechanical force transmitted through intermolecular cross-links resulted in collagen triple helix unwinding. These simulations further predicted that this unwinding, referred to as triple helical microunfolding, occurred at forces well below canonical collagen damage mechanisms. Based in large part on these data, we hypothesized that mechanical loading of glycation cross-linked tendon microfibers would result in accelerated collagenolytic enzyme damage. This hypothesis is in stark contrast to reports in literature that indicated that individually mechanical loading or cross-linking each retards enzymatic degradation of collagen substrates. Using our Collagen Enzyme Mechano-Kinetic Automated Testing (CEMKAT) System we mechanically loaded collagen-rich tendon microfibers that had been chemically cross-linked with sugar and tested for degrading enzyme susceptibility. Our results indicated that cross-linked fibers were >5 times more resistant to enzymatic degradation while unloaded but became highly susceptible to enzyme cleavage when they were stretched by an applied mechanical deformation. PMID:24316373

  3. Biodegradable chitosan-based ambroxol hydrochloride microspheres: effect of cross-linking agents.

    PubMed

    Gangurde, Hh; Chavan, Nv; Mundada, As; Derle, Dv; Tamizharasi, S

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of type of cross-linking method used on the properties of ambroxol hydrochloride microspheres such as encapsulation efficiency, particle size, and drug release. Microspheres were prepared by solvent evaporation technique using chitosan as a matrix-forming agent and cross-linked using formaldehyde and heat treatment. Morphological and physicochemical properties of microspheres were then investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. The cross-linking of chitosan takes place at the free amino group because of formation of imine bond as evidenced by FTIR. The DSC, XRD, and FTIR analysis showed that chitosan microspheres cross linked by heating were superior in properties and performance as compared to the microspheres cross-linked using formaldehyde. SEM results revealed that heat-treated microspheres were spherical, discrete having smooth, and porous structure. The particle size and encapsulation efficiencies of the prepared chitosan microspheres ranged between 10.83-24.11 μm and 39.73μ80.56%, respectively. The drug release was extended up to 12 h, and the kinetics of the drug release was obeying Higuchi kinetic proving diffusion-controlled drug release. PMID:21607049

  4. Cross-Linking Poly(lactic acid) Film Surface by Neutral Hyperthermal Hydrogen Molecule Bombardment.

    PubMed

    Du, Wangli; Shao, Hong; He, Zhoukun; Tang, Changyu; Liu, Yu; Shen, Tao; Zhu, Yan; Lau, Woon-ming; Hui, David

    2015-12-16

    Constructing a dense cross-linking layer on a polymer film surface is a good way to improve the water resistance of poly(lactic acid) (PLA). However, conventional plasma treatments have failed to achieve the aim as a result of the unavoidable surface damage arising from the charged species caused by the uncontrolled high energy coming from colliding ions and electrons. In this work, we report a modified plasma method called hyperthermal hydrogen-induced cross-linking (HHIC) technology to construct a dense cross-linking layer on PLA film surfaces. This method produces energy-controlled neutral hyperthermal hydrogen, which selectively cleaves C-H bonds by molecule collision from the PLA film without breaking other bonds (e.g., C-C bonds in the polymer backbone), and results in subsequent cross-linking of the carbon radicals generated from the organic molecules. The formation of a dense cross-linking layer can serve as a barrier layer to significantly improve both the hydrophobicity and water vapor barrier property of the PLA film. Because of the advantage of selective cleavage of C-H bonds by HHIC treatment, the original physical properties (e.g., mechanical strength and light transmittance) of the PLA films are well-preserved. PMID:26594874

  5. Effects of partial hydrolysis and subsequent cross-linking on wheat gluten physicochemical properties and structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaiqiang; Luo, Shuizhong; Cai, Jing; Sun, Qiaoqiao; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhong, Xiyang; Jiang, Shaotong; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-04-15

    The rheological behavior and thermal properties of wheat gluten following partial hydrolysis using Alcalase and subsequent microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) cross-linking were investigated. The wheat gluten storage modulus (G') and thermal denaturation temperature (Tg) were significantly increased from 2.26 kPa and 54.43°C to 7.76 kPa and 57.69°C, respectively, by the combined action of partial hydrolysis (DH 0.187%) and cross-linking. The free SH content, surface hydrophobicity, and secondary structure analysis suggested that an appropriate degree of Alcalase-based hydrolysis allowed the compact wheat gluten structure to unfold, increasing the β-sheet content and surface hydrophobicity. This improved its molecular flexibility and exposed additional glutamine sites for MTGase cross-linking. SEM images showed that a compact 3D network formed, while SDS-PAGE profiles revealed that excessive hydrolysis resulted in high-molecular-weight subunits degrading to smaller peptides, unsuitable for cross-linking. It was also demonstrated that the combination of Alcalase-based partial hydrolysis with MTGase cross-linking might be an effective method for modifying wheat gluten rheological behavior and thermal properties. PMID:26616937

  6. Cross-linking connectivity in bone collagen fibrils: the COOH-terminal locus of free aldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otsubo, K.; Katz, E. P.; Mechanic, G. L.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative analyses of the chemical state of the 16c residue of the alpha 1 chain of bone collagen were performed on samples from fetal (4-6-month embryo) and mature (2-3 year old) bovine animals. All of this residue could be accounted for in terms of three chemical states, in relative amounts which depended upon the age of the animal. Most of the residue was incorporated into either bifunctional or trifunctional cross-links. Some of it, however, was present as free aldehyde, and the content increased with maturation. This was established by isolating and characterizing the aldehyde-containing peptides generated by tryptic digestion of NaB3H4-reduced mature bone collagen. We have concluded that the connectivity of COOH-terminal cross-linking in bone collagen fibrils changes with maturation in the following way: at first, each 16c residue in each of the two alpha 1 chains of the collagen molecule is incorporated into a sheet-like pattern of intermolecular iminium cross-links, which stabilizes the young, nonmineralized fibril as a whole. In time, some of these labile cross-links maturate into pyridinoline while others dissociate back to their precursor form. The latter is likely due to changes in the molecular packing brought about by the mineralization of the collagen fibrils. The resultant reduction in cross-linking connectivity may provide a mechanism for enhancing certain mechanical characteristics of the skeleton of a mature animal.

  7. Nanoparticle cross-linked collagen shields for sustained delivery of pilocarpine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Agban, Yosra; Lian, Jiaxin; Prabakar, Sujay; Seyfoddin, Ali; Rupenthal, Ilva D

    2016-03-30

    Glaucoma is a common progressive eye disorder which remains the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. Current therapy involves frequent administration of eye drops which often results in poor patient adherence and therapeutic outcomes. The aim of this study was to overcome these limitations by developing a novel nanoparticle cross-linked collagen shield for sustained delivery of pilocarpine hydrochloride (PHCl). Three metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs); titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) capped zinc oxide (ZnO/PVP), were evaluated for their cytotoxicity as well as shield transparency before selecting ZnO/PVP NPs as the ideal candidate. Cross-linked collagen shields were then characterized for their mechanical strength, swelling capacity and bioadhesive properties, with ZnO/PVP NP cross-linked shields showing the most favorable characteristics compared to plain films. The shield with the best properties was then loaded with PHCl and in vitro release of zinc ions as well as PHCl was measured without and with further cross-linking by ultraviolet irradiation. The concentration of zinc ions released was well below the IC50 rendering them safe for ocular use. Moreover, collagen shields cross-linked with ZnO/PVP NPs released PHCl over a period of 14 days offering a promising sustained release treatment option for glaucoma. PMID:26828672

  8. Physical properties of pectin-high amylose starch mixtures cross-linked with sodium trimetaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M; de Castro, Ana Dóris; Cury, Beatriz S F; Magalhães, Alviclér; Evangelista, Raul C

    2012-02-28

    Pectin-high amylose starch mixtures (1:4; 1:1; 4:1) were cross-linked at different degrees and characterized by rheological, thermal, X-ray diffraction and NMR analyses. For comparison, samples without cross-linker addition were also prepared and characterized. Although all samples behaved as gels, the results evidenced that the phosphorylation reaction promotes the network strengthening, resulting in covalent gels (highest critical stress, G' and recovery %). Likewise, cross-linked samples presented the highest thermal stability. However, alkaline treatment without cross-linker allowed a structural reorganization of samples, as they also behaved as covalent gels, but weaker than those gels from cross-linked samples, and presented higher thermal stability than the physical mixtures. X-ray diffractograms also evidenced the occurrence of physical and chemical modifications due to the cross-linking process and indicated that samples without cross-linker underwent some structural reorganization, resulting in a decrease of crystallinity. The chemical shift of resonance signals corroborates the occurrence of structural modifications by both alkaline treatment and cross-linking reaction. PMID:22178896

  9. Orientation birefringence of cross-linked rubber containing low-mass compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyama, Ayumi; Nobukawa, Shogo; Yamauchi, Masayuki

    2015-05-01

    Molecular orientation of low-mass compounds (LMCs) in a cross-linked rubber is studied in order to obtain the basic information on the dynamics of LMC molecules in a polymer beyond the glass transition temperature. A small amount of LMCs such as 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), tricresylphosphate (TCP), and styrene-based tackifier (TF) is added into polybutadiene rubber (BR). After cross-linking reaction, the sheet samples are used to evaluate the orientation birefringence during stretching and stress relaxation. The rectangular films, cut out from the cross-linked sheets, are set in a uniaxial stretching machine equipped with an optical system to measure both birefringence and tensile stress simultaneously. It is confirmed that orientation birefringence is proportional to the stress for not only pure cross-linked BR, but also cross-linked BR containing an LMC in a wide range of strain. Even after stretching, the birefringence does not change as far as the sample is kept at a constant strain. The results suggest that the LMC molecules are forced to orient with polymer chains by the strong intermolecular orientation correlation. Because of the LMC orientation, the stress-optical coefficient CR is enhanced by the addition of 5CB and TCP, but depressed by TF. Therefore, the LMC doping can be used to control the birefringence of a retardation film.

  10. Preparation and characterization of cross-linked collagen-phospholipid polymer hybrid gels.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kwangwoo; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kishida, Akio

    2007-01-01

    2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-immobilized collagen gel was developed. Using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl)-1-carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS), we cross-linked a collagen film in 2-morpholinoethane sulfonic acid (MES) buffer (EN gel). EN gel was prepared under both pH 4.5 and pH 9.0 in order to observe changes in cross-linking ability. To cross-link MPC to collagen gel, poly(MPC-co-methacrylic acid) (PMA) having a carboxyl group side chain was chosen. E/N gel was added to the MES buffer having pre-NHS activated PMA to make MPC-immobilized collagen gel (MiC gel). MiC gel was prepared under both acidic and alkaline conditions to observe the changes in the cross-linking ability of PMA. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the PMA was cross-linked with collagen under both acidic and alkaline conditions. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results showed that the shrinkage temperature increased for the MiC gels and that the increase would be greater for the MiC gel prepared under alkaline conditions. The data showed that swelling would be less when the MiC gel was prepared under alkaline conditions. The biodegradation caused by collagenase was suppressed for the MiC gel prepared under alkaline conditions due to stable inter- and intrahelical networks. PMID:16959313

  11. Availability of fluorescence spectroscopic in the accompaniment of formation of corneal cross-linking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M. M.; Kurachi, C.; Bagnato, V. S.; Faria e Sousa, S. J.; Ventura, L.

    2010-02-01

    The corneal cross-linking is a method that associates riboflavin and ultraviolet light to induce a larger mechanical resistance at cornea. This method has been used for the treatment of Keratoconus. Since cross-linking is recent as treatment, there is a need to verify the effectiveness of the method. Therefore, the viability of the fluorescence spectroscopy technique to follow the cross-linking formation at cornea was studied. Corneas were divided in two measuring procedures: M1 (cornea + riboflavin), and M2 (cornea + riboflavina + light irradiation, 365nm). For fluorescence measurements, a spectrofluorimeter was used, where several wavelengths were selected (between 320nm and 370nm) for cornea excitation. Several fluorescence spectra were collected, at 10 min-interval, during 60 min. Spectra allowed one to observe two very well defined bands of fluorescence: the first one at 400nm (collagen), and the second one at 520nm (riboflavin). After spectra analyses, a decrease of collagen fluorescence was observed for both groups. For riboflavin, on the other hand, there was a fluorescence increase for M1, and a decrease for M2. Thus, it is possible to conclude that it this technique is sensitive for the detection of tissue structural changes during cross-linking treatment, encouraging subsequent studies on quantification of cross-linking promotion in tissue.

  12. Usage of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography for investigation of collagen cross-linking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Myeong Jin; Tang, Shuo

    2015-04-01

    To investigate morphological alternation in corneal stroma induced by collagen cross-linking (CXL) treatment, polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) capable of providing scattering, phase retardation, and degree of polarization uniformity (DOPU) images were employed on fresh bovine cornea. Significant corneal thickness reduction was observed after the CXL procedure, and its variation was quantitatively analyzed. From the scattering contrast, a hyperscattering region was observed in the anterior of the cornea immediately after the CXL procedure and its range increased with time. Within the scattering region, a slow increase was observed in the phase retardation image, and a discriminable characteristic was found in the DOPU image. A global threshold value was empirically determined from the averaged DOPU depth profile in order to locate the effective cross-linking depth. In addition to the standard protocol, an accelerated CXL procedure shortening the treatment time with higher intensity of ultraviolet-A (UV-)A power was also performed. From the measurement results after the two different CXL protocols, different cross-linking aspects were found and their difference was discussed in terms of the effectiveness of cross-linking. Based on this study, we believe that PS-OCT could be a promising optical imaging modality to evaluate the progression and effectiveness of the riboflavin/UV-A induced corneal collagen cross-linking.

  13. Novel Technique of Transepithelial Corneal Cross-Linking Using Iontophoresis in Progressive Keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Raffa, Paolo; Rosati, Marianna; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the authors presented the techniques and the preliminary results at 6 months of a randomized controlled trial (NCT02117999) comparing a novel transepithelial corneal cross-linking protocol using iontophoresis with the Dresden protocol for the treatment of progressive keratoconus. At 6 months, there was a significant average improvement with an average flattening of the maximum simulated keratometry reading of 0.72 ± 1.20 D (P = 0.01); in addition, corrected distance visual acuity improved significantly (P = 0.08) and spherical equivalent refraction was significantly less myopic (P = 0.02) 6 months after transepithelial corneal cross-linking with iontophoresis. The novel protocol using iontophoresis showed comparable results with standard corneal cross-linking to halt progression of keratoconus during 6-month follow-up. Investigation of the long-term RCT outcomes are ongoing to verify the efficacy of this transepithelial corneal cross-linking protocol and to determine if it may be comparable with standard corneal cross-linking in the management of progressive keratoconus. PMID:27597895

  14. Novel Technique of Transepithelial Corneal Cross-Linking Using Iontophoresis in Progressive Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Paolo; Rosati, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the authors presented the techniques and the preliminary results at 6 months of a randomized controlled trial (NCT02117999) comparing a novel transepithelial corneal cross-linking protocol using iontophoresis with the Dresden protocol for the treatment of progressive keratoconus. At 6 months, there was a significant average improvement with an average flattening of the maximum simulated keratometry reading of 0.72 ± 1.20 D (P = 0.01); in addition, corrected distance visual acuity improved significantly (P = 0.08) and spherical equivalent refraction was significantly less myopic (P = 0.02) 6 months after transepithelial corneal cross-linking with iontophoresis. The novel protocol using iontophoresis showed comparable results with standard corneal cross-linking to halt progression of keratoconus during 6-month follow-up. Investigation of the long-term RCT outcomes are ongoing to verify the efficacy of this transepithelial corneal cross-linking protocol and to determine if it may be comparable with standard corneal cross-linking in the management of progressive keratoconus. PMID:27597895

  15. Structure and pasting properties of alkaline-treated phosphorylated cross-linked waxy maize starches.

    PubMed

    Shukri, Radhiah; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the stability of cross-linked bonds of starch at different pH values and their effects on the pasting property of waxy maize starch cross-linked by 0.05% and 3% sodium trimetaphosphate/sodium tripolyphosphate. The cross-linked waxy maize starch (CLWMS) was slurried (40%, w/w) and subjected to alkali treatments of pH 9, 10, 11, and 12 at 40°C for 4h. The phosphorus in 3% CLWMS decreased with increasing pH and remained unchanged in 0.05% CLWMS for all pH treatments. Decreased settling volumes indicated the reduction of swelling power for the alkali-treated CLWMS at pH 11 and 12. The (31)P NMR spectra of 3% CLWMS at pH 12 showed decreased cyclic monostarch phosphate, monostarch monophosphate, and monostarch diphosphate, but significantly increased distarch monophosphate. Alkali treatments of phosphorylated cross-linked starches offer a way to manipulate the rheological properties of cross-linked starch for desired food applications. PMID:27507452

  16. Lignin cross-links with cysteine- and tyrosine-containing peptides under biomimetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Brett G; Brown, Nicole R

    2014-10-22

    The work presented here investigates the cross-linking of various nucleophilic amino acids with lignin under aqueous conditions, thus providing insight as to which amino acids might cross-link with lignin in planta. Lignin dehydrogenation polymer (DHP) was prepared in aqueous solutions that contained tripeptides with the general structure XGG, where X represents an amino acid with a nucleophilic side chain. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that peptides containing cysteine and tyrosine were incorporated into the DHP to form DHP-CGG and DHP-YGG adducts, whereas peptides containing other nucleophilic amino acids were not incorporated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the physical morphology of DHP was altered by the presence of peptides in the aqueous solution, regardless of peptide incorporation into the DHP. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy showed that cysteine-containing peptide cross-linked with lignin at the lignin α-position, whereas in the case of the lignin-tyrosine adduct the exact cross-linking pathway could not be determined. This is the first study to use NMR to confirm cross-linking between lignin and peptides under biomimetic conditions. The results of this study may indicate the potential for lignin-protein linkage formation in planta, particularly between lignin and cysteine- and/or tyrosine-rich proteins. PMID:25275918

  17. Genipin cross-linked decellularized tracheal tubular matrix for tracheal tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; Jiang, Yuan; Xu, Yanfei; Shi, Hongcan; Zhang, Siquan; Liu, Xingchen; Pan, Shu; Ye, Gang; Zhang, Weidong; Zhang, Fangbiao; Zhong, Chonghao

    2016-01-01

    Decellularization techniques have been widely used as an alternative strategy for organ reconstruction. This study investigated the mechanical, pro-angiogenic and in vivo biocompatibility properties of decellularized airway matrices cross-linked with genipin. New Zealand rabbit tracheae were decellularized and cross-linked with genipin, a naturally derived agent. The results demonstrated that, a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the secant modulus was computed for the cross-linked tracheae, compared to the decellularized samples. Angiogenic assays demonstrated that decellularized tracheal scaffolds and cross-linked tracheae treated with 1% genipin induce strong in vivo angiogenic responses (CAM analysis). Seven, 15 and 30 days after implantation, decreased (p < 0.01) inflammatory reactions were observed in the xenograft models for the genipin cross-linked tracheae matrices compared with control tracheae, and no increase in the IgM or IgG content was observed in rats. In conclusion, treatment with genipin improves the mechanical properties of decellularized airway matrices without altering the pro-angiogenic properties or eliciting an in vivo inflammatory response. PMID:27080716

  18. Bcr is a substrate for Transglutaminase 2 cross-linking activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Breakpoint cluster region (Bcr) is a multi-domain protein that contains a C-terminal GTPase activating protein (GAP) domain for Rac. Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) regulates Bcr by direct binding to its GAP domain. Since TG2 has transglutaminase activity that has been implicated in the response to extreme stress, we investigated if Bcr can also act as a substrate for TG2. Results We here report that activation of TG2 by calcium caused the formation of covalently cross-linked Bcr. Abr, a protein related to Bcr but lacking its N-terminal oligomerization domain, was not cross-linked by TG2 even though it forms a complex with it. A Bcr mutant missing the first 62 amino acid residues remained monomeric in the presence of activated TG2, showing that this specific domain is necessary for the cross-linking reaction. Calcium influx induced by a calcium ionophore in primary human endothelial cells caused cross-linking of endogenous Bcr, which was inhibited by the TG2 inhibitor cystamine. Treatment of cells with cobalt chloride, a hypoxia-mimetic that causes cellular stress, also generated high molecular weight Bcr complexes. Cross-linked Bcr protein appeared in the TritonX-100-insoluble cell fraction and further accumulated in cells treated with a proteasome inhibitor. Conclusions Bcr thus represents both an interacting partner under non-stressed conditions and a target of transglutaminase activity for TG2 during extreme stress. PMID:21310073

  19. Organization of photosystem I polypeptides examined by chemical cross-linking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armbrust, T. S.; Chitnis, P. R.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Photosystem I from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was examined using the chemical cross-linkers glutaraldehyde and N-ethyl-1-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide to investigate the organization of the polypeptide subunits. Thylakoid membranes and photosystem I, which was isolated by Triton X-100 fractionation, were treated with cross-linking reagents and were resolved using a Tricine/urea low-molecular-weight resolution gel system. Subunit-specific antibodies and western blotting analysis were used to identify the components of cross-linked species. These analyses identified glutaraldehyde-dependent cross-linking products composed of small amounts of PsaD and PsaC, PsaC and PsaE, and PsaE and PsaF. The novel cross-link between PsaE and PsaF was also observed following treatment with N-ethyl-1-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide. These cross-linking results suggest a structural interaction between PsaE and PsaF and predict a transmembrane topology for PsaF.

  20. Biodegradable Chitosan-Based Ambroxol Hydrochloride Microspheres: Effect of Cross-Linking Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gangurde, HH; Chavan, NV; Mundada, AS; Derle, DV; Tamizharasi, S

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of type of cross-linking method used on the properties of ambroxol hydrochloride microspheres such as encapsulation efficiency, particle size, and drug release. Microspheres were prepared by solvent evaporation technique using chitosan as a matrix-forming agent and cross-linked using formaldehyde and heat treatment. Morphological and physicochemical properties of microspheres were then investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. The cross-linking of chitosan takes place at the free amino group because of formation of imine bond as evidenced by FTIR. The DSC, XRD, and FTIR analysis showed that chitosan microspheres cross linked by heating were superior in properties and performance as compared to the microspheres cross-linked using formaldehyde. SEM results revealed that heat-treated microspheres were spherical, discrete having smooth, and porous structure. The particle size and encapsulation efficiencies of the prepared chitosan microspheres ranged between 10.83–24.11 μm and 39.73μ80.56%, respectively. The drug release was extended up to 12 h, and the kinetics of the drug release was obeying Higuchi kinetic proving diffusion-controlled drug release. PMID:21607049

  1. Lipid Cross-Linking of Nanolipoprotein Particles Substantially Enhances Serum Stability and Cellular Uptake.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Sean F; Blanchette, Craig D; Scharadin, Tiffany M; Hura, Greg L; Rasley, Amy; Corzett, Michele; Pan, Chong-Xian; Fischer, Nicholas O; Henderson, Paul T

    2016-08-17

    Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) consist of a discoidal phospholipid lipid bilayer confined by an apolipoprotein belt. NLPs are a promising platform for a variety of biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility, size, definable composition, and amphipathic characteristics. However, poor serum stability hampers the use of NLPs for in vivo applications such as drug formulation. In this study, NLP stability was enhanced upon the incorporation and subsequent UV-mediated intermolecular cross-linking of photoactive DiynePC phospholipids in the lipid bilayer, forming cross-linked nanoparticles (X-NLPs). Both the concentration of DiynePC in the bilayer and UV exposure time significantly affected the resulting X-NLP stability in 100% serum, as assessed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of fluorescently labeled particles. Cross-linking did not significantly impact the size of X-NLPs as determined by dynamic light scattering and SEC. X-NLPs had essentially no degradation over 48 h in 100% serum, which is a drastic improvement compared to non-cross-linked NLPs (50% degradation by ∼10 min). X-NLPs had greater uptake into the human ATCC 5637 bladder cancer cell line compared to non-cross-linked particles, indicating their potential utility for targeted drug delivery. X-NLPs also exhibited enhanced stability following intravenous administration in mice. These results collectively support the potential utility of X-NLPs for a variety of in vivo applications. PMID:27411034

  2. Modification mechanism of sesbania gum, and preparation, property, adsorption of dialdehyde cross-linked sesbania gum.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongbo; Gao, Shiqi; Li, Yanping; Dong, Siqing

    2016-09-20

    This paper studied the modification mechanism of Sesbania gum (SG) by means of the variations in the numbers of surface hydroxyl groups on the granules, Schiff's agent coloration of aldehyde groups, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), etc., and also examined the preparation, property and adsorption of dialdehyde cross-linked sesbania gum (DCLSG). The results showed that the surface hydroxyl numbers of cross-linked sesbania gum (CLSG) decreased with increasing the cross-linking degree. The distribution of the aldehyde groups on the DCLSG particles was nonuniform because most of aldehyde groups mainly located on the edge of particles. The cross-linking occurred only on the surface of SG particles. The oxidization occurred not only on the surface of SG particles, but also in the interior of particles. The cross-linking or oxidization changed the thermal properties, and reduced the swelling power, viscosity, alkali and acid resistance of SG. PMID:27261740

  3. Synthesis, Characterization, and Antibacterial Activity of Cross-Linked Chitosan-Glutaraldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Shan, Chang-Lin; Zhou, Qing; Fang, Yuan; Wang, Yang-Li; Xu, Fei; Han, Li-Rong; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Guo, Long-Biao; Xie, Guan-Lin; Sun, Guo-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This present study deals with synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of cross-linked chitosan-glutaraldehyde. Results from this study indicated that cross-linked chitosan-glutaraldehyde markedly inhibited the growth of antibiotic-resistant Burkholderia cepacia complex regardless of bacterial species and incubation time while bacterial growth was unaffected by solid chitosan. Furthermore, high temperature treated cross-linked chitosan-glutaraldehyde showed strong antibacterial activity against the selected strain 0901 although the inhibitory effects varied with different temperatures. In addition, physical-chemical and structural characterization revealed that the cross-linking of chitosan with glutaraldehyde resulted in a rougher surface morphology, a characteristic Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) band at 1559 cm−1, a specific X-ray diffraction peak centered at 2θ = 15°, a lower contents of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen, and a higher stability of glucose units compared to chitosan based on scanning electron microscopic observation, FTIR spectra, X-ray diffraction pattern, as well as elemental and thermo gravimetric analysis. Overall, this study indicated that cross-linked chitosan-glutaraldehyde is promising to be developed as a new antibacterial drug. PMID:23670533

  4. State-dependent diffusion of actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin underlies the enlargement and shrinkage of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Jun; Hayama, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Yagishita, Sho; Takahashi, Noriko; Kasai, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic sites of most excitatory synapses in the brain, and spine enlargement and shrinkage give rise to long-term potentiation and depression of synapses, respectively. Because spine structural plasticity is accompanied by remodeling of actin scaffolds, we hypothesized that the filamentous actin regulatory protein cofilin plays a crucial role in this process. Here we investigated the diffusional properties of cofilin, the actin-severing and depolymerizing actions of which are activated by dephosphorylation. Cofilin diffusion was measured using fluorescently labeled cofilin fusion proteins and two-photon imaging. We show that cofilins are highly diffusible along dendrites in the resting state. However, during spine enlargement, wild-type cofilin and a phosphomimetic cofilin mutant remain confined to the stimulated spine, whereas a nonphosphorylatable mutant does not. Moreover, inhibition of cofilin phosphorylation with a competitive peptide disables spine enlargement, suggesting that phosphorylated-cofilin accumulation is a key regulator of enlargement, which is localized to individual spines. Conversely, spine shrinkage spreads to neighboring spines, even though triggered by weaker stimuli than enlargement. Diffusion of exogenous cofilin injected into a pyramidal neuron soma causes spine shrinkage and reduced PSD95 in spines, suggesting that diffusion of dephosphorylated endogenous cofilin underlies the spreading of spine shrinkage and long-term depression. PMID:27595610

  5. State-dependent diffusion of actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin underlies the enlargement and shrinkage of dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Jun; Hayama, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Yagishita, Sho; Takahashi, Noriko; Kasai, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic sites of most excitatory synapses in the brain, and spine enlargement and shrinkage give rise to long-term potentiation and depression of synapses, respectively. Because spine structural plasticity is accompanied by remodeling of actin scaffolds, we hypothesized that the filamentous actin regulatory protein cofilin plays a crucial role in this process. Here we investigated the diffusional properties of cofilin, the actin-severing and depolymerizing actions of which are activated by dephosphorylation. Cofilin diffusion was measured using fluorescently labeled cofilin fusion proteins and two-photon imaging. We show that cofilins are highly diffusible along dendrites in the resting state. However, during spine enlargement, wild-type cofilin and a phosphomimetic cofilin mutant remain confined to the stimulated spine, whereas a nonphosphorylatable mutant does not. Moreover, inhibition of cofilin phosphorylation with a competitive peptide disables spine enlargement, suggesting that phosphorylated-cofilin accumulation is a key regulator of enlargement, which is localized to individual spines. Conversely, spine shrinkage spreads to neighboring spines, even though triggered by weaker stimuli than enlargement. Diffusion of exogenous cofilin injected into a pyramidal neuron soma causes spine shrinkage and reduced PSD95 in spines, suggesting that diffusion of dephosphorylated endogenous cofilin underlies the spreading of spine shrinkage and long-term depression. PMID:27595610

  6. Cryo-imaging and modeling of the super molecular structure of cross-linked gelatin and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmorat, Clement; Arinstein, Arkadi; Koifman, Naama; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Zussman, Eyal; Rafailovich, Miriam

    The need for naturally derived materials to synthetize bio-compatible scaffolds is growing. In its natural state, gelatin derives its properties from a network of structured, intertwined, triple helical chains. The mechanical properties can be further controlled by additional enzymatic cross-linking. But, in contrast to simple polymer systems, the response to an imposed deformation is then determined by two competing factors, the establishment of the cross-linked mesh vs. the self-assembly of the fibrils into larger and therefore stronger hierarchical structures. Properties deduced from the response functions to measurements; such as rheology or swelling, are then a combination of these two very different factors, hence impossible to model unless more precise knowledge is available regarding the internal structure. We applied cryogenic-temperature scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) to image the networks. Based on these images, a theoretical model was developed, for which we obtained excellent agreement for the mesh size of both networks, and their mechanical properties. We then used these controlled scaffolds, embedding them with fluorescent beads, to image live cells traction forces at stake during cell migration.

  7. Mechanical properties of tough hydrogels synthesized with a facile simultaneous radiation polymerization and cross-linking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fangzhi; Wang, Xuezhen; He, Changcheng; Saricilar, Sureyya; Wang, Huiliang

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced polymerization and cross-linking method has been applied to hydrogel preparations for decades, but less attention has been paid to the mechanical properties of the hydrogels. In this work, we provide a systematic study on the mechanical properties of hydrogels synthesized with the simultaneous radiation polymerization and cross-linking method. The prepared polyacrylamide (PAAm) had very good mechanical properties, namely high compressive strengths (several to more than 10 MPa), high tensile strengths (up to 260 kPa), high fracture strains (up to 12) and high fracture energies (10-160 J/m2). Absorbed dose and monomer concentration were the two important factors affecting the mechanical properties of the gels. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the gels increased with increasing absorbed dose and monomer concentration, while the tensile strength, fracture strain and fracture energy of the gels decreased with increasing absorbed dose. The gels also showed excellent elastic recovery property, as indicated by the low stress-strain hysteresis ratios in cyclic tensile tests as well as the small loss factors measured with dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA).

  8. Nuclear Function of Subclass I Actin-Depolymerizing Factor Contributes to Susceptibility in Arabidopsis to an Adapted Powdery Mildew Fungus1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Noriko; Higaki, Takumi; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Actin-depolymerizing factors (ADFs) are conserved proteins that function in regulating the structure and dynamics of actin microfilaments in eukaryotes. In this study, we present evidence that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) subclass I ADFs, particularly ADF4, functions as a susceptibility factor for an adapted powdery mildew fungus. The null mutant of ADF4 significantly increased resistance against the adapted powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces orontii. The degree of resistance was further enhanced in transgenic plants in which the expression of all subclass I ADFs (i.e. ADF1–ADF4) was suppressed. Microscopic observations revealed that the enhanced resistance of adf4 and ADF1-4 knockdown plants (ADF1-4Ri) was associated with the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and cell death specific to G. orontii-infected cells. The increased resistance and accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in ADF1-4Ri were suppressed by the introduction of mutations in the salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-signaling pathways but not by a mutation in the ethylene-signaling pathway. Quantification by microscopic images detected an increase in the level of actin microfilament bundling in ADF1-4Ri but not in adf4 at early G. orontii infection time points. Interestingly, complementation analysis revealed that nuclear localization of ADF4 was crucial for susceptibility to G. orontii. Based on its G. orontii-infected-cell-specific phenotype, we suggest that subclass I ADFs are susceptibility factors that function in a direct interaction between the host plant and the powdery mildew fungus. PMID:26747284

  9. Preparation of cross-linked maize (Zea mays L.) starch in different reaction media.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung Sun; Gomand, Sara V; Delcour, Jan A

    2015-06-25

    Granular normal maize starch was reacted with sodium trimetaphosphate in deionized water ( [Formula: see text] ), aqueous sodium sulfate solution ( [Formula: see text] ), aqueous ethanol (MSethanol) or aqueous acetone (MSacetone) under otherwise identical reaction conditions. Analysis of the resultant starches by Rapid Visco Analysis (RVA) showed that the starch was cross-linked to a higher degree in aqueous ethanol or aqueous acetone than in water or sodium sulfate solution, and with minimal starch leaching. While MSacetone and MSethanol had incorporated similar levels of phosphorous, RVA analysis and microscopic analysis showed that MSacetone granules were more effectively stabilized by cross-linking than MSethanol granules. Cross-linking in aqueous acetone is believed to either contain the greater numbers of distarch monophosphate (versus monostarch monophosphate), or occur more intensively at the granule outer layers than that in aqueous ethanol and, at the same time, to account for the greater granular strength of MSethanol than that of MSacetone. PMID:25839824

  10. A genetic anomaly of oriented collagen biosynthesis and cross-linking: Keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Bourges, J L; Robert, A M; Robert, L

    2015-02-01

    Oriented collagen biosynthesis is one of the major mechanisms involved in tissue and organ formation during development. Corneal biogenesis is one example. Defects in this process lead to anomalies in tissue structure and function. The transparency of cornea and its achievement are a good example as well as its pathological modifications. Keratoconus is one example of this type of pathologies, involving also inappropriate cross-linking of collagen fibers. Among the tentatives to correct this anomaly, the riboflavin-potentiated UV-cross-linking (CXL) of keratoconus corneas appears clinically satisfactory, although none of the experiments and clinical results published prove effective cross-linking. The published results are reviewed in this article. PMID:25468492

  11. Optimizing end-group cross-linking polymer electrolytes for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Lee, Kwan Soo; Jeong, Myung - Hwan; Lee, Jae - Suk

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the optimization of proton conductivity and water uptake for cross-linkable polymer electrolytes through synthesis and characterization of end-group cross-linkable sulfonated poly(arylene ether) copolymers (ESF-BPs). The extent of reaction of cross-linking was controlled by reaction time resulting in a series of polymers with two, independent tunable parameters, degree of sulfonation (DS) and degree of cross-linking (DC). For the polymers presented, cross-linking improved proton conductivity while reducing water uptake, an uncommon trend in polymer electrolytes where water is critical for proton conduction. Other trends relating to changes are reported and the results yield insight into the role of DS and DC and how to optimize electrochemical properties and performance of polymer electrolytes through these tunable parameters. Select polymer electrolytes were tested in fuel cells where performance and durability with accelerated relative humidity cycling were compared with Nafion{reg_sign}.

  12. In vitro degradation of covalently cross-linked arabinoxylan hydrogels by bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, Ana L; Carvajal-Millan, Elizabeth; Micard, Valérie; Rascón-Chu, Agustín; Brown-Bojorquez, Francisco; Sotelo-Cruz, Norberto; López-Franco, Yolanda L; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime

    2016-06-25

    Arabinoxylan gels with different cross-linking densities, swelling ratios, and rheological properties were obtained by increasing the concentration of arabinoxylan from 4 to 6% (w/v) during oxidative gelation by laccase. The degradation of these covalently cross-linked gels by a mixture of two Bifidobacterium strains (Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium adolescentis) was investigated. The kinetics of the evolution of structural morphology of the arabinoxylan gel, the carbohydrate utilization profiles and the bacterial production of short-acid fatty acid (SCFA) were measured. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the degraded gels showed multiple cavity structures resulting from the bacterial action. The total SCFA decreased when the degree of cross-linking increased in the gels. A slower fermentation of arabinoxylan chains was obtained for arabinoxylan gels with more dense network structures. These results suggest that the differences in the structural features and properties studied in this work affect the degradation time of the arabinoxylan gels. PMID:27083795

  13. Amphiphilic polyphosphazenes as membrane materials: influence of side group on radiation cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Allcock, H R; Gebura, M; Kwon, S; Neenan, T X

    1988-11-01

    The amphiphilic mixed-substituent polyphosphazenes, [NP(OCH2CF3)x (NHCH3)y)]n and [NP(OC6H5)x (NHCH3)y]n, have been prepared by the sequential replacement of chlorine in [NPCI2]n by trifluorethoxide or phenoxide and methylamine. Thin films of these species were cross-linked by exposure to gamma radiation and the semipermeability of the resultant membranes was monitored. The radiation-induced cross-linking and membrane-forming properties of these polymers were compared with those of the single substituent polymers, [NP(OCH2CF3)2]n, [NP(OC6H5)2]n, and [NP(NHCH3)2]n. The radiation-cross-linking and appeared to involve free radical reactions at the methyl groups of the methylamino substituents. The possible utility of these materials in biomedical research is discussed. PMID:3224137

  14. Three-dimensional multimodal microscopy of rabbit cornea after cross-linking treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, A.; Hovakimyan, M.; Ramírez, D. F.; Lorbeer, R.-A.; Kröger, M.; Stachs, O.; Wree, A.; Guthoff, R. F.; Lubatschowski, H.; Heisterkamp, A.

    2010-02-01

    Cross-linking of stromal collagen with Riboflavin and UVA radiation is an alternative treatment of keratoconus. After the cross-linking a wound healing process starts with the regeneration of the abraded epithelial layer and the stromal keratocyte-network. To clarify possible side effects by visualization we established an imaging platform for the multimodal three-dimensional imaging of the cornea and looked for differences between normal and cross-linked rabbit corneae. The microscopy system utilizes femtosecond laser light for two photon excitation of autofluorescent metabolic compounds, second harmonic imaging in forward and backward direction for the study of stromal collagen-I structure and confocal detection of the backscattered femtosecond laser light for cell detection. Preliminary results show signatures of treatment 5 weeks after the intervention in all imaging modalities.

  15. Pinpointing RNA-Protein Cross-Links with Site-Specific Stable Isotope-Labeled Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High affinity RNA-protein interactions are critical to cellular function, but directly identifying the determinants of binding within these complexes is often difficult. Here, we introduce a stable isotope mass labeling technique to assign specific interacting nucleotides in an oligonucleotide-protein complex by photo-cross-linking. The method relies on generating site-specific oxygen-18-labeled phosphodiester linkages in oligonucleotides, such that covalent peptide-oligonucleotide cross-link sites arising from ultraviolet irradiation can be assigned to specific sequence positions in both RNA and protein simultaneously by mass spectrometry. Using Lin28A and a let-7 pre-element RNA, we demonstrate that mass labeling permits unambiguous identification of the cross-linked sequence positions in the RNA-protein complex. PMID:26583201

  16. Tuning of cross-linking and mechanical properties of laser-deposited poly (methyl methacrylate) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süske, Erik; Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Panchenko, Elena; Junkers, Thomas; Egorov, Mark; Buback, Michael; Kijewski, Harald

    2005-03-01

    The chemical composition, amount of cross-linking and its influence on the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at a wavelength of 248nm under ultrahigh vacuum were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, thermogravimetric analysis, and nanoindentation experiments. The films consist of two components, one fraction with a molecular weight well below that of the target material and a second fraction, which is cross-linked. Compared to bulk material, the Young's modulus of the film is increased. The amount of cross-linking in the film can be tuned by the applied laser fluence leading to changes of the mechanical properties.

  17. Spray assembled, cross-linked polyelectrolyte multilayer membranes for salt removal.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwun Lun; Lomas, Hannah; Hill, Anita J; Caruso, Frank; Kentish, Sandra E

    2014-07-29

    The present study reports the synthesis of spray-coated cross-linked polyelectrolyte multilayer membranes. Membrane cross-linking was performed using alkyne-azide "click" chemistry, where alkyne and azide functional groups were used to modify the poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and the poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH) polyelectrolytes. The results demonstrate that deposition at lower ionic strength produced smoother and denser membrane structures. Pore size analysis using neutral poly(ethylene glycol) revealed a decrease in the membrane pore size as the degree of cross-linking was increased, resulting in the membrane rejecting divalent CaCl2 at levels of up to 80%, and 50% rejection of monovalent NaCl. When poly(sodium-4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) was combined with small amounts of cross-linkable PAA, significant flux increases were observed in the multilayer membranes with no observable reduction in ion rejection. PMID:25036367

  18. Tuning of cross-linking and mechanical properties of laser-deposited poly (methyl methacrylate) films

    SciTech Connect

    Sueske, Erik; Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Panchenko, Elena; Junkers, Thomas; Egorov, Mark; Buback, Michael; Kijewski, Harald

    2005-03-15

    The chemical composition, amount of cross-linking and its influence on the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at a wavelength of 248 nm under ultrahigh vacuum were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, thermogravimetric analysis, and nanoindentation experiments. The films consist of two components, one fraction with a molecular weight well below that of the target material and a second fraction, which is cross-linked. Compared to bulk material, the Young's modulus of the film is increased. The amount of cross-linking in the film can be tuned by the applied laser fluence leading to changes of the mechanical properties.

  19. Cheese whey protein recovery by ultrafiltration through transglutaminase (TG) catalysis whey protein cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Wen-Qiong, Wang; Lan-Wei, Zhang; Xue, Han; Yi, Lu

    2017-01-15

    In whey ultrafiltration (UF) production, two main problems are whey protein recovery and membrane fouling. In this study, membrane coupling protein transglutaminase (TG) catalysis protein cross-linking was investigated under different conditions to find out the best treatment. We found that the optimal conditions for protein recovery involved catalyzing whey protein cross-linking with TG (40U/g whey proteins) at 40°C for 60min at pH 5.0. Under these conditions, the recovery rate was increased 15-20%, lactose rejection rate was decreased by 10%, and relative permeate flux was increase 30-40% compared to the sample without enzyme treatment (control). It was noticeable that the total resistance and cake resistance were decreased after enzyme catalysis. This was mainly due to the increased particle size and decreased zeta potential. Therefore, membrane coupling enzyme catalysis protein cross-linking is a potential means for further use. PMID:27542447

  20. Carbon Nanofiber Incorporated Silica Based Aerogels with Di-Isocyanate Cross-Linking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivod, Stephanie L.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Capadona, Lynn A.; Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Clark, Nicholas; McCorkle, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Lightweight materials with excellent thermal insulating properties are highly sought after for a variety of aerospace and aeronautic applications. (1) Silica based aerogels with their high surface area and low relative densities are ideal for applications in extreme environments such as insulators for the Mars Rover battery. (2) However, the fragile nature of aerogel monoliths prevents their widespread use in more down to earth applications. We have shown that the fragile aerogel network can be cross-linked with a di-isocyanate via amine decorated surfaces to form a conformal coating. (3) This coating reinforces the neck regions between secondary silica particles and significantly strengthens the aerogels with only a small effect on density or porosity. Scheme 1 depicts the cross-linking reaction with the di-isocyanate and exhibits the stages that result in polymer cross-linked aerogel monoliths.

  1. Chemical cross-linking of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase from bovine heart.

    PubMed Central

    Cleeter, M W; Banister, S H; Ragan, C I

    1985-01-01

    The structure of bovine heart mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase was investigated by using two cleavable cross-linking agents, disuccinimidyl tartrate and (ethylene glycol)yl bis-(succinimidyl succinate). Cross-linking was analysed primarily by immunoblotting to detect products containing subunits of the iron-protein fraction from chaotropic resolution of the enzyme, namely those of 75, 49, 30 and 13 kDa. By using both the isolated iron-protein fraction and the intact dehydrogenase, cross-links were identified between these four subunits, from these subunits to the largest subunit of the flavoprotein fraction, which contains the active site for NADH, and from these subunits to polypeptides in the hydrophobic shell, which surrounds the hydrophilic iron-protein and flavoprotein fractions. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:4004775

  2. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  3. Efficient Gene Transfection into Mammalian Cells Mediated by Cross-linked Polyethylenimine

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Li, Shufeng; Jin, Guanghui; Sun, Qiming; Ma, Dingyuan; Hua, Zichun

    2007-01-01

    25 kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI) has successfully been used for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery approaches, but it is cytotoxic. Smaller PEIs are usually non-cytotoxic but less efficient. In order to enhance the gene delivery efficiency and minimize cytotoxicity of PEI, we explored to synthesize cross-linked PEIs with degradable bonds by reacting amines of small branched 2000 Da PEI with small diacrylate (1,4-butanediol diacrylate or ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) for 2–6 hours. The efficiency of the cross-linked PEIs during in vitro delivering plasmid containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene reporter and their cytotoxicity were assessed in melanoma B16F10 cell and other cell lines. In vivo gene delivery efficiency was evaluated by direct injection delivery of the EGFP plasmid/cross-linked PEI complexes into mice and by estimating the EGFP expression in animal muscles. Compared to commercially available 25-kDa branched PEI, the cross-linked PEIs reported here could mediate more efficient expression of reporter gene than the 25-kDa PEI control, 19-fold more efficiently in B16F10 cells, 17-fold in 293T cells, 2.3-fold in 3T3 cells, and they exhibited essentially nontoxic at their optimized condition for gene delivery. Furthermore the transfection activity of polyplexs was preserved in the presence of serum proteins. The muscle transfected with the cross-linked PEI prepared here exhibited normal morphology and excellent gene expression. The cross-linked PEIs reported here were evidently more efficient than the commercial 25-kD PEI control and had less cytotoxicity in gene delivery in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Steric Effects Induce Geometric Remodeling of Actin Bundles in Filopodia.

    PubMed

    Dobramysl, Ulrich; Papoian, Garegin A; Erban, Radek

    2016-05-10

    Filopodia are ubiquitous fingerlike protrusions, spawned by many eukaryotic cells, to probe and interact with their environments. Polymerization dynamics of actin filaments, comprising the structural core of filopodia, largely determine their instantaneous lengths and overall lifetimes. The polymerization reactions at the filopodial tip require transport of G-actin, which enter the filopodial tube from the filopodial base and diffuse toward the filament barbed ends near the tip. Actin filaments are mechanically coupled into a tight bundle by cross-linker proteins. Interestingly, many of these proteins are relatively short, restricting the free diffusion of cytosolic G-actin throughout the bundle and, in particular, its penetration into the bundle core. To investigate the effect of steric restrictions on G-actin diffusion by the porous structure of filopodial actin filament bundle, we used a particle-based stochastic simulation approach. We discovered that excluded volume interactions result in partial and then full collapse of central filaments in the bundle, leading to a hollowed-out structure. The latter may further collapse radially due to the activity of cross-linking proteins, hence producing conical-shaped filament bundles. Interestingly, electron microscopy experiments on mature filopodia indeed frequently reveal actin bundles that are narrow at the tip and wider at the base. Overall, our work demonstrates that excluded volume effects in the context of reaction-diffusion processes in porous networks may lead to unexpected geometric growth patterns and complicated, history-dependent dynamics of intermediate metastable configurations. PMID:27166814

  5. Chemical and structural characterization of interstrand cross-links formed between abasic sites and adenine residues in duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Price, Nathan E.; Catalano, Michael J.; Liu, Shuo; Wang, Yinsheng; Gates, Kent S.

    2015-01-01

    A new type of interstrand DNA–DNA cross-link between abasic (Ap) sites and 2′-deoxyadenosine (dA) residues was recently reported, but the chemical structure and properties of this lesion were not rigorously established. Here we characterized the nucleoside cross-link remnant released by enzymatic digestion of duplex DNA containing the dA-Ap cross-link. A synthetic standard was prepared for the putative nucleoside cross-link remnant 6 in which the anomeric carbon of the 2-deoxyribose residue was connected to the exocyclic N6-amino group of dA. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis showed that the synthetic material 6 matched the authentic cross-link remnant released by enzymatic digestion of cross-linked DNA. These findings establish the chemical structure of the dA-Ap cross-link released from duplex DNA and may provide methods for the detection of this lesion in cellular DNA. Both the nucleoside cross-link remnant 6 and the cross-link in duplex DNA were quite stable at pH 7 and 37°C, suggesting that the dA-Ap cross-link could be a persistent lesion with the potential to block the action of various DNA processing enzymes. PMID:25779045

  6. Increasing Thermal Stability of Gelatin by UV-Induced Cross-Linking with Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Masutani, Evan M.; Kinoshita, Christopher K.; Tanaka, Travis T.; Ellison, Andrew K. D.; Yoza, Brandon A.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet (254 nm) radiation on a hydrated gelatin-glucose matrix were investigated for the development of a physiologically thermostable substrate for potential use in cell scaffold production. Experiments conducted with a differential scanning calorimeter indicate that ultraviolet irradiation of gelatin-glucose hydrogels dramatically increases thermal stability such that no melting is observed at temperatures of at least 90°C. The addition of glucose significantly increases the yield of cross-linked product, suggesting that glucose has a role in cross-link formation. Comparisons of lyophilized samples using scanning electron microscopy show that irradiated materials have visibly different densities. PMID:24963297

  7. Immunogenic Display of Purified Chemically Cross-Linked HIV-1 Spikes

    PubMed Central

    Leaman, Daniel P.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) spikes are prime vaccine candidates, at least in principle, but suffer from instability, molecular heterogeneity and a low copy number on virions. We anticipated that chemical cross-linking of HIV-1 would allow purification and molecular characterization of trimeric Env spikes, as well as high copy number immunization. Broadly neutralizing antibodies bound tightly to all major quaternary epitopes on cross-linked spikes. Covalent cross-linking of the trimer also stabilized broadly neutralizing epitopes, although surprisingly some individual epitopes were still somewhat sensitive to heat or reducing agent. Immunodepletion using non-neutralizing antibodies to gp120 and gp41 was an effective method for removing non-native-like Env. Cross-linked spikes, purified via an engineered C-terminal tag, were shown by negative stain EM to have well-ordered, trilobed structure. An immunization was performed comparing a boost with Env spikes on virions to spikes cross-linked and captured onto nanoparticles, each following a gp160 DNA prime. Although differences in neutralization did not reach statistical significance, cross-linked Env spikes elicited a more diverse and sporadically neutralizing antibody response against Tier 1b and 2 isolates when displayed on nanoparticles, despite attenuated binding titers to gp120 and V3 crown peptides. Our study demonstrates display of cross-linked trimeric Env spikes on nanoparticles, while showing a level of control over antigenicity, purity and density of virion-associated Env, which may have relevance for Env based vaccine strategies for HIV-1. IMPORTANCE The envelope spike (Env) is the target of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies, which a successful vaccine will need to elicit. However, native Env on virions is innately labile, as well as heterogeneously and sparsely displayed. We therefore stabilized Env spikes using a chemical cross-linker and removed non-native Env by immunodepletion with non

  8. Interplay of olefin metathesis and multiple hydrogen bonding interactions: covalently cross-linked zippers.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jisen; Wang, Wei; Deng, Pengchi; Feng, Wen; Zhou, Jingjing; Yang, Yuanyou; Yuan, Lihua; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Gong, Bing

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogen-bonded zippers bearing terminal alkene groups were treated with Grubbs' catalyst, leading to covalently cross-linked zippers without violating H-bonding sequence specificity. The yield of a cross-linked zipper depended on the stability of its H-bonded precursor, with a weakly associating pair giving reasonable yields only at high concentrations while strongly associating pairs showed nearly quantitative yields. The integration of thermodynamic (H-bonding) and kinetic (irreversible C═C bond formation) processes suggests the possibility of developing many different covalent association units for constructing molecular structures based on a self-assembling way. PMID:21699249

  9. Method of Cross-Linking Aerogels Using a One-Pot Reaction Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Ann B.; Capadona, Lynn A.

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses a new, simplified method for cross-linking silica and other oxide aerogels, with a polymeric material to increase strength of such materials without adversely affecting porosity or low density. This innovation introduces the polymer precursor into the sol before gelation either as an agent, which co-reacts with the oxide gel, or as soluble polymer precursors, which do not interact with the oxide gel in any way. Subsequent exposure to heat, light, catalyst or other method of promoting polymerization causes cross-linking without any additional infiltration steps.

  10. Cross-linking and modification of cytochrome c with redox-active metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukes, A.

    1991-05-02

    This thesis consists of two parts. The first part shows that a redox-active trinuclear metal cluster may be used as a cross-linking reagent for proteins. Electron transfer is observed in the protein oligomers. The second part involves labelling the cysteine residue of baker's yeast cytochrome c with chloromercuriferrocene. Chloromercuriferrocene reacts with cytochrome c in two interesting ways. Symmetrization produces two products; two proteins cross-linked with mercury and diferrocenylmercury. Simple substitution of FeHgCl onto the protein followed by the addition of a proton by electrophilic substitution affords ferrocene and the mercuric chloride modified protein. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Photoinduced intermolecular cross-linking of gas phase triacylglycerol lipid ions.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuai; Pham, Huong T; Blanksby, Stephen J; Reid, Gavin E

    2015-01-01

    Complex mixtures of plant derived triglycerol (TG) lipids are commonly used as feedstock components for the production of industrial polymers. However, there remains a need for the development of analytical strategies to investigate the intrinsic intermolecular cross-linking reactivity of individual TG molecules within these mixtures as a function of their structures and physicochemical properties, and for the characterization of the resultant products. Here, to address this need, we describe a novel multistage tandem mass spectrometry based method for intermolecular cross-linking and subsequent structural characterization of TG lipid ions in the gas phase. Cross-linking reactions were initiated using 266 nm ultraviolet photodissociation tandem mass spectrometry (UVPD-MS/MS) of saturated or unsaturated TG dimers introduced via electrospray ionization into a linear ion trap mass spectrometer as noncovalent complexes with protonated 3,4-, 2,4- or 3,5- diiodoaniline (diIA). UVPD resulted in the initial formation of an anilinyl biradical via the sequential loss of two iodine radicals, which underwent further reaction to yield multiple cross-linked TG products along with competing noncross-linking processes. These chemistries are proposed to occur via sequential combinations of hydrogen abstraction (H-abstraction), radical addition and radical recombination. Multistage collision induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS(n)) was used to obtain evidence for the structures and mechanisms of formation for these products, as a function of both the TG lipid and diIA ion structures. The efficiency of the UVPD reaction was shown to be dependent on the number of unsaturation sites present within the TG lipids. However, when unsaturation sites were present, formation of the cross-linked and noncross-linked product ions via H-abstraction and radical addition mechanisms was found to be competitive. Finally, the identity of the anilinyl biradical (e.g., 3,4- versus 2

  12. Durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dion, Neil T; Bragdon, Charles; Muratoglu, Orhun; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the history of the development of highly cross-linked polyethylene and provides an in-depth review of the clinical results regarding the durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The use of polyethylene as a bearing surface has contributed to the success of THA and TKA; however, polyethylene wear and osteolysis can lead to failure. Ongoing clinical and retrieval studies are required to analyze outcomes at longer-term follow-up. PMID:26043046

  13. Protein cluster formation during enzymatic cross-linking of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Saricay, Yunus; Dhayal, Surender Kumar; Wierenga, Peter Alexander; de Vries, Renko

    2012-01-01

    Work on enzymatic cross-linking of globular food proteins has mainly focused on food functional effects such as improvements of gelation and enhanced stabilization of emulsions and foams, and on the detailed biochemical characterization of the cross-linking chemistry. What is still lacking is a physical characterization of cluster formation and gelation, as has been done for example, for cluster formation and gelation during heat-induced protein aggregation. Here we present preliminary results along these lines. We propose that enzymatic cross-linking of apo-alpha-lactalbumin is a good model system for studying the problem of cluster formation and gelation during enzymatic cross-linking of globular proteins. We present initial results on cluster sizes produced when crosslinking dilute solutions of apo-alpha-lactalbumin with a range of cross-linking enzymes: microbial transglutaminase, horseradish peroxidase, and mushroom tyrosinase. These results are used to highlight similarities and differences between different enzymes, when acting on the same substrate. Next we consider cluster growth and gelation in somewhat more detail for the specific case of cross-linking by horseradish peroxidase, under the periodic addition of H2O2. Upon increasing the initial concentration of apo-alpha-lactalbumin, at a fixed enzyme-to-substrate ratio and fixed reaction time, the size of the clusters at the end of the reaction increases rapidly, and above a critical concentration, gelation occurs. For the conditions that we have used, gelation occurred at very low initial apo-alpha-lactalbumin concentrations of 34% (w/v), indicating a very dilute cross-linked protein network, with a low average number of cross-links per protein. It is found that reactive protein monomers are first rapidly (1-2 h) incorporated into small covalent clusters. This is followed by a much slower phase (up to about 12 h) in which the small clusters are coupled together to form much larger covalent protein

  14. Dynamically vulcanized biobased polylactide/natural rubber blend material with continuous cross-linked rubber phase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Yuan, Daosheng; Xu, Chuanhui

    2014-03-26

    We prepared a biobased material, dynamically vulcanized polylactide (PLA)/natural rubber (NR) blend in which the cross-linked NR phase owned a continuous network-like dispersion. This finding breaks the traditional concept of a sea-island morphology formed after dynamic vulcanization of the blends. The scan electron microscopy and dissolution/swell experiments provided the direct proof of the continuous cross-linked NR phase. This new biobased PLA/NR blend material with the novel structure is reported for the first time in the field of dynamic vulcanization and shows promise for development for various functional applications. PMID:24621374

  15. Trapping of a Cross-link Formed by a Major Purine Adduct of a Metabolite of the Carcinogen N-Nitrosomorpholine by Inorganic and Biological Reductants

    PubMed Central

    Koissi, Niangoran; Fishbein, James C.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroperoxy-N-nitrosomorpholine in buffered aqueous media in the presence of calf thymus DNA was treated with a phosphine reductant to generate the transient α-hydroxynitrosamine and subsequent diazonium ion that alkylated the DNA, as previously reported. Subsequent addition of hydride donors, for 30 min, followed by acid hydrolysis of the mixture allowed detection and quantification of 6-(2-(2-((9H-purin-6-yl)amino)ethoxy)ethoxy)-9H-purin-2-amine, the reduced cross-link formed from deposition, via the diazonium ion, of a 3-oxa-pentanal fragment on O6-Gua, and condensation with N6-Ade, presumably in the vicinity. Decreasing temperature of the reactions and decreasing pH modestly increased the yields of trapped crosslink. Among three borohydride reductants, NaNCBH3 is superior, being ∼4 times more effective on a molar basis, as opposed to a hydride equivalent basis, than NaBH4 or Na(AcO)3BH. For trapping with NaNCBH3, it is deduced that the reaction likely occurs with the iminium ion that is in protonic equilibrium with its conjugate base imine. In an experiment in which the hydroperoxide was decomposed and NaNCBH3 was introduced after various times, the amount of cross-link was observed to increase, nearly linearly, by about four-fold over one week. These data indicate that there are a minimum of 2 populations of cross-links, one that forms rapidly, in minutes, and another that grows in with time, over days. Reduced nicotinamide co-factors and ascorbate are observed to effect reduction (over 3 days) of the cross-links confirming the possibility that otherwise reversible cross-links might be immortalized under biological conditions. PMID:23587048

  16. Downregulation of the DNA repair enzyme apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 stimulates transforming growth factor-β1 production and promotes actin rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Yasui, Hironobu; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-05-22

    The DNA repair enzyme apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) plays a central role in base excision repair and functions as a reductive activator of various transcription factors. Multiple other functionalities have been ascribed to APE1 in addition to these major functions. A recent study showed that APE1 knockdown upregulated the expression of a set of genes related to extracellular matrix (ECM) production, indicating an additional novel biological role for this enzyme. Based on this finding, we have investigated the effect of APE1 downregulation on ECM-related gene expression and its biological consequences. Endogenous APE1 expression was downregulated in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells and human lung carcinoma A549 cells using siRNA. When the expression of six ECM-related genes (TGFB1, LAMC1, FN1, COL1A1, COL3A1, and COL4A1) was evaluated, we found that APE1 knockdown upregulated the expression of TGFB1 in both cell lines. APE1 downregulation promoted actin rearrangement, inducing F-actin accumulation in HeLa cells and the dissipation of stress fibers in A549 cells. We also discovered that APE1 knockdown enhanced cellular motility in A549 cells, which was suppressed by the inhibition of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signaling. These results suggested that APE1 controls the organization of actin cytoskeleton through the regulation of TGF-β1 expression, providing novel insights into the biological significance of APE1. PMID:25858321

  17. 'Strengthening the fungal cell wall through chitin-glucan cross-links: effects on morphogenesis and cell integrity'.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Javier; Farkaš, Vladimír; Sanz, Ana Belén; Cabib, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The cross-linking of polysaccharides to assemble new cell wall in fungi requires transglycosylation mechanisms by which preexisting glycosidic linkages are broken and new linkages are created between the polysaccharides. The molecular mechanisms for these processes, which are essential for fungal cell biology, are only now beginning to be elucidated. Recent development of in vivo and in vitro biochemical approaches has allowed characterization of important aspects about the formation of chitin-glucan covalent cell wall cross-links by cell wall transglycosylases of the CRH family and their biological function. Covalent linkages between chitin and glucan mediated by Crh proteins control morphogenesis and also play important roles in the remodeling of the fungal cell wall as part of the compensatory responses necessary to counterbalance cell wall stress. These enzymes are encoded by multigene families of redundant proteins very well conserved in fungal genomes but absent in mammalian cells. Understanding the molecular basis of fungal adaptation to cell wall stress through these and other cell wall remodeling enzymatic activities offers an opportunity to explore novel antifungal treatments and to identify potential fungal virulence factors. PMID:27185288

  18. Study of the influence of actin-binding proteins using linear analyses of cell deformability.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Gustavo R; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Mirzaei, Zahra; Simmons, Craig A

    2015-07-21

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in the deformability of the cell and in mechanosensing. Here we analyze the contributions of three major actin cross-linking proteins, myosin II, α-actinin and filamin, to cell deformability, by using micropipette aspiration of Dictyostelium cells. We examine the applicability of three simple mechanical models: for small deformation, linear viscoelasticity and drop of liquid with a tense cortex; and for large deformation, a Newtonian viscous fluid. For these models, we have derived linearized equations and we provide a novel, straightforward methodology to analyze the experiments. This methodology allowed us to differentiate the effects of the cross-linking proteins in the different regimes of deformation. Our results confirm some previous observations and suggest important relations between the molecular characteristics of the actin-binding proteins and the cell behavior: the effect of myosin is explained in terms of the relation between the lifetime of the bond to actin and the resistive force; the presence of α-actinin obstructs the deformation of the cytoskeleton, presumably mainly due to the higher molecular stiffness and to the lower dissociation rate constants; and filamin contributes critically to the global connectivity of the network, possibly by rapidly turning over cross-links during the remodeling of the cytoskeletal network, thanks to the higher rate constants, flexibility and larger size. The results suggest a sophisticated relationship between the expression levels of actin-binding proteins, deformability and mechanosensing. PMID:26059185

  19. IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS

    SciTech Connect

    de O Buanafina, Marcia Maria

    2013-10-16

    DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This proposal focuses on cell wall feruloylation and our long term goal is to identify and isolate novel genes controlling feruloylation and to characterize the phenotype of mutants in this pathway, with a spotlight on cell wall properties. Currently, the genes underlying AX feruloylation have not been identified and the isolation of such genes could be of great importance in manipulating ferulates accretion to the wall. Mutation of the feruloyl transferase gene(s) should lead to less ferulates secreted to the cell wall and reduced ferulate cross-linking. Our current research is based on the hypothesis that controlling the level of total feruloylation will have a direct impact on the level of cross-linking and in turn impact biomass utility for forage and biofuel production. Our results/accomplishments for this project so far include: 1. Mutagenised Brachypodium population. We have developed EMS mutagenized populations of model grass species Brachypodium distachyon. EMS populations have been developed from over 28,000 mutagenized seeds generating 5,184 M2 families. A total of 20,793 plants have been screened and 1,233 were originally selected. 2. Selected Brachypodium mutants: Potential mutants on their levels of cell wall ferulates and cell wall AX ? have been selected from 708 M2 families. A total of 303 back-crosses to no-mutagenized parental stock have been done, followed by selfing selected genotypes in order to confirm heritability of traits and to remove extraneous mutations generated by EMS mutagenesis. We are currently growing 12 F5 and F6 populations in order to assess CW composition. If low level of ferulates are confirmed in the candidate lines selected the mutation could be altered in different in one or several kinds of genes such as genes encoding an AX feruloyl transferase; genes encoding the arabinosyl transferase; genes encoding the synthesis of the xylan backbone; genes encoding enzymes of the monolignol pathway affecting FA

  20. A microstructurally informed model for the mechanical response of three-dimensional actin networks

    PubMed Central

    KWON, R.Y.; LEW, A.J.; JACOBS, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a class of microstructurally informed models for the linear elastic mechanical behavior of cross-linked polymer networks such as the actin cytoskeleton. Salient features of the models include the possibility to represent anisotropic mechanical behavior resulting from anisotropic filament distributions, and a power-law scaling of the mechanical properties with the filament density. Mechanical models within the class are parameterized by seven different constants. We demonstrate a procedure for determining these constants using finite element models of three-dimensional actin networks. Actin filaments and cross-links were modeled as elastic rods, and the networks were constructed at physiological volume fractions and at the scale of an image voxel. We show the performance of the model in estimating the mechanical behavior of the networks over a wide range of filament densities and degrees of anisotropy. PMID:18568835

  1. Use of Proteinase K Nonspecific Digestion for Selective and Comprehensive Identification of Interpeptide Cross-links: Application to Prion Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Serpa, Jason J.; Hardie, Darryl B.; Berjanskii, Mark; Suriyamongkol, Bow P.; Wishart, David S.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry is a rapidly developing technique for structural proteomics. Cross-linked proteins are usually digested with trypsin to generate cross-linked peptides, which are then analyzed by mass spectrometry. The most informative cross-links, the interpeptide cross-links, are often large in size, because they consist of two peptides that are connected by a cross-linker. In addition, trypsin targets the same residues as amino-reactive cross-linkers, and cleavage will not occur at these cross-linker-modified residues. This produces high molecular weight cross-linked peptides, which complicates their mass spectrometric analysis and identification. In this paper, we examine a nonspecific protease, proteinase K, as an alternative to trypsin for cross-linking studies. Initial tests on a model peptide that was digested by proteinase K resulted in a “family” of related cross-linked peptides, all of which contained the same cross-linking sites, thus providing additional verification of the cross-linking results, as was previously noted for other post-translational modification studies. The procedure was next applied to the native (PrPC) and oligomeric form of prion protein (PrPβ). Using proteinase K, the affinity-purifiable CID-cleavable and isotopically coded cross-linker cyanurbiotindipropionylsuccinimide and MALDI-MS cross-links were found for all of the possible cross-linking sites. After digestion with proteinase K, we obtained a mass distribution of the cross-linked peptides that is very suitable for MALDI-MS analysis. Using this new method, we were able to detect over 60 interpeptide cross-links in the native PrPC and PrPβ prion protein. The set of cross-links for the native form was used as distance constraints in developing a model of the native prion protein structure, which includes the 90–124-amino acid N-terminal portion of the protein. Several cross-links were unique to each form of the prion protein

  2. Use of proteinase K nonspecific digestion for selective and comprehensive identification of interpeptide cross-links: application to prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Serpa, Jason J; Hardie, Darryl B; Berjanskii, Mark; Suriyamongkol, Bow P; Wishart, David S; Borchers, Christoph H

    2012-07-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry is a rapidly developing technique for structural proteomics. Cross-linked proteins are usually digested with trypsin to generate cross-linked peptides, which are then analyzed by mass spectrometry. The most informative cross-links, the interpeptide cross-links, are often large in size, because they consist of two peptides that are connected by a cross-linker. In addition, trypsin targets the same residues as amino-reactive cross-linkers, and cleavage will not occur at these cross-linker-modified residues. This produces high molecular weight cross-linked peptides, which complicates their mass spectrometric analysis and identification. In this paper, we examine a nonspecific protease, proteinase K, as an alternative to trypsin for cross-linking studies. Initial tests on a model peptide that was digested by proteinase K resulted in a "family" of related cross-linked peptides, all of which contained the same cross-linking sites, thus providing additional verification of the cross-linking results, as was previously noted for other post-translational modification studies. The procedure was next applied to the native (PrP(C)) and oligomeric form of prion protein (PrPβ). Using proteinase K, the affinity-purifiable CID-cleavable and isotopically coded cross-linker cyanurbiotindipropionylsuccinimide and MALDI-MS cross-links were found for all of the possible cross-linking sites. After digestion with proteinase K, we obtained a mass distribution of the cross-linked peptides that is very suitable for MALDI-MS analysis. Using this new method, we were able to detect over 60 interpeptide cross-links in the native PrP(C) and PrPβ prion protein. The set of cross-links for the native form was used as distance constraints in developing a model of the native prion protein structure, which includes the 90-124-amino acid N-terminal portion of the protein. Several cross-links were unique to each form of the prion protein, including

  3. Coactosin-like protein, a human F-actin-binding protein: critical role of lysine-75.

    PubMed Central

    Provost, P; Doucet, J; Stock, A; Gerisch, G; Samuelsson, B; Rådmark, O

    2001-01-01

    Coactosin-like protein (CLP) was recently identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen using 5-lipoxygenase as bait. In the present study, we report the functional characterization of CLP as a human filamentous actin (F-actin)-binding protein. CLP mRNA shows a wide tissue distribution and is predominantly expressed in placenta, lung, kidney and peripheral-blood leucocytes. Endogenous CLP is localized in the cytosol of myeloid cells. Using a two-hybrid approach, actin was identified as a CLP-interacting protein. Binding experiments indicated that CLP associates with F-actin, but does not form a stable complex with globular actin. In transfected mammalian cells, CLP co-localized with actin stress fibres. CLP bound to actin filaments with a stoichiometry of 1:2 (CLP: actin subunits), but could be cross-linked to only one subunit of actin. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed the involvement of Lys(75) of CLP in actin binding, a residue highly conserved in related proteins and supposed to be exposed on the surface of the CLP protein. Our results identify CLP as a new human protein that binds F-actin in vitro and in vivo, and indicate that Lys(75) is essential for this interaction. PMID:11583571

  4. Inter-α-inhibitor Impairs TSG-6-induced Hyaluronan Cross-linking*

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, Natalia S.; Foulcer, Simon J.; Briggs, David C.; Tilakaratna, Viranga; Enghild, Jan J.; Milner, Caroline M.; Day, Anthony J.; Richter, Ralf P.

    2013-01-01

    Under inflammatory conditions and in the matrix of the cumulus-oocyte complex, the polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) becomes decorated covalently with heavy chains (HCs) of the serum glycoprotein inter-α-inhibitor (IαI). This alters the functional properties of the HA as well as its structural role within extracellular matrices. The covalent transfer of HCs from IαI to HA is catalyzed by TSG-6 (tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6), but TSG-6 is also known as a HA cross-linker that induces condensation of the HA matrix. Here, we investigate the interplay of these two distinct functions of TSG-6 by studying the ternary interactions of IαI and TSG-6 with well defined films of end-grafted HA chains. We demonstrate that TSG-6-mediated cross-linking of HA films is impaired in the presence of IαI and that this effect suppresses the TSG-6-mediated enhancement of HA binding to CD44-positive cells. Furthermore, we find that the interaction of TSG-6 and IαI in the presence of HA gives rise to two types of complexes that independently promote the covalent transfer of heavy chains to HA. One type of complex interacts very weakly with HA and is likely to correspond to the previously reported covalent HC·TSG-6 complexes. The other type of complex is novel and binds stably but noncovalently to HA. Prolonged incubation with TSG-6 and IαI leads to HA films that contain, in addition to covalently HA-bound HCs, several tightly but noncovalently bound molecular species. These findings have important implications for understanding how the biological activities of TSG-6 are regulated, such that the presence or absence of IαI will dictate its function. PMID:24005673

  5. Chitosan cross-linked docetaxel loaded EGF receptor targeted nanoparticles for lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maya, S; Sarmento, Bruno; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar; Menon, Deepthy; Seabra, Vitor; Jayakumar, R

    2014-08-01

    Lung cancer, associated with the up-regulated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to the development of EGFR targeted anticancer therapeutics. The biopolymeric nanoparticles form an outstanding system for the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. The present work evaluated the in vitro effects of chitosan cross-linked γ-poly(glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) nanoparticles (Nps) loaded with docetaxel (DTXL) and decorated with Cetuximab (CET), targeted to EGFR over-expressing non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC) cells (A549). CET-DTXL-γ-PGA Nps was prepared by ionic gelation and CET conjugation via EDC/NHS chemistry. EGFR specificity of targeted Nps was confirmed by the higher uptake rates of EGFR +ve A549 cells compared to that of EGFR -ve cells (NIH3T3). The cytotoxicity of Nps quantified using cell based (MTT/LDH) and flowcytometry (Cell-cycle analysis, Annexin V/PI and JC-1) assays showed superior antiproliferative activity of CET-DTXL-γ-PGA Nps over DTXL-γ-PGA Nps. The A549 cells treated with CET-DTXL-γ-PGA NPs underwent a G2/M phase cell cycle arrest followed by reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential of A549 cells, inducing apoptosis and necrosis resulting in enhanced cancer cell death. CET-DTXL-γ-PGA Nps exhibited enhanced cellular internalization and therapeutic activity, by actively targeting EGFR on NSCLC cells and hence could be an effective alternative to non-specific, conventional chemotherapy by increasing its efficiency by many folds. PMID:24950310

  6. Elastin content, cross-links, and mRNA in normal and aneurysmal human aorta.

    PubMed

    Baxter, B T; McGee, G S; Shively, V P; Drummond, I A; Dixit, S N; Yamauchi, M; Pearce, W H

    1992-08-01

    Although elastin depletion is thought to be an etiologic factor in abdominal aortic aneurysm, little is known about its transcription and posttranslational modification in normal and diseased human aorta. Our objectives were to quantify total elastin and elastin cross-links (desmosine/isodesmosine [DID]) and to determine if elastin mRNA was detectable in the disease-prone infrarenal aorta from patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and a comparative group with no aneurysmal diseases. After preliminary extraction and thermolysin digestion, content of DID and the elastin tetrapeptide, valine-alanine-proline-glycine (VAPG), were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Tissue mRNA was studied by Northern blot analysis. Mean values (+/- SE) were compared by Student's t test. The proportion of insoluble elastin was markedly decreased in abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue (1.3% +/- 0.04% vs 12% +/- -2.8%; p less than 0.001). There was no difference in the small percentage of elastin solubilized during extraction in abdominal aortic aneurysm (5.3% +/- 1%) and no aneurysmal disease (6.0% +/- 1.2%; p = 0.71) tissues. The DID concentration of insoluble elastin was not different for abdominal aortic aneurysm and no aneurysmal disease tissue (0.18% +/- 0.07 vs 0.18 +/- 0.05 nm DID/nm VAPG; p = 0.97). On the basis of VAPG content, only 26% +/- 4% of the sodium hydroxide insoluble residue from abdominal aortic aneurysm was elastin; the predominate protein(s) was high in polar amino acids. Elastin mRNA was detectable in all tissues.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1495142

  7. Protein cross-linking and oligomerization through dityrosine formation upon exposure to ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fobang; Kampf, Christopher; Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Berkemeier, Thomas; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Air pollution is a potential factor for the increasing prevalence of allergic diseases. Airborne allergenic proteins can be directly exposed to air pollution promoting post-translational modifications, which can enhance the allergenic potential of proteins. The formation of dimers or oligomers of allergenic proteins has been reported to result in an enhanced allergenicity. However, the oligomerization process for proteins at atmospherically relevant concentration of O3 is still largely unknown. In this study, the kinetics and reaction mechanism of protein oligomerization upon ozone exposure were studied at atmospherically relevant ozone concentrations and relative humidity (RH) in coated-wall flow tube experiments. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein. Protein ozone exposure was studied for different protein phase-states, i.e. amorphous solid (45% RH experiments), semi-solid (96% RH experiments) and liquid (bulk solution experiments) to account for the differences of phase in atmospheric particulates, e.g., aerosol particles and cloud droplets. Product analysis was performed using a size exclusion chromatography-high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (SEC-HPLC-DAD). We demonstrate that protein cross-linking upon ozone exposure can be attributed to the formation of covalent intermolecular dityrosine species by gel electrophoretic and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The exposure experiments indicate that in addition to ozone concentration, the oligomerization process was depending on the phase-state of protein. In liquid-phase experiments, dimer formation was significantly enhanced, thus indicating a potential relevance of in-cloud processes for protein oligomerization. The reactive turnover is higher at 96% RH compared to 45% RH, indicating a higher bulk diffusion coefficient at high RH, which is explicitly resolved by kinetic modeling. Further, the reactive turnover showed a strong correlation to particle surface

  8. Vascular peroxidase-1 is rapidly secreted, circulates in plasma, and supports dityrosine cross-linking reactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guangjie; Li, Hong; Cao, Zehong; Qiu, Xiaoyun; McCormick, Sally; Thannickal, Victor J; Nauseef, William M

    2011-10-01

    Members of the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily catalyze biochemical reactions essential to a broad spectrum of biological processes, including host defense, thyroid hormone biosynthesis, and modification of extracellular matrix, as well as contributing to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. We recently identified a novel member of this family, vascular peroxidase-1 (VPO1), that is highly expressed in the human cardiovascular system. Its biosynthesis and enzymatic properties are largely unknown. Here, we report that VPO1 was rapidly and efficiently secreted into the extracellular space when the gene was stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Secreted VPO1 is a monomer with complex N-linked oligosaccharides and exhibits peroxidase activity. Biosynthesis of endogenous VPO1 by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) shares features exhibited by heterologous expression of recombinant VPO1 (rVPO1) in HEK cells. The proinflammatory agents lipopolysaccharide and tumor necrosis factor-α induce expression of VPO1 mRNA and protein in HUVECs. Furthermore, murine and bovine sera and human plasma contain enzymatically active VPO1. rVPO1 exhibits spectral and enzymatic properties characteristic of the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase family, except with regard to its heat stability. rVPO1 catalyzes tyrosyl radical formation and promotes dityrosine cross-linking. Taken together, these data demonstrate that VPO1 is a glycosylated heme peroxidase that is actively secreted into circulating plasma by vascular endothelial cells and shares several features with other members of the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase family, including the catalysis of dityrosine formation. PMID:21798344

  9. Inter-α-inhibitor impairs TSG-6-induced hyaluronan cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Baranova, Natalia S; Foulcer, Simon J; Briggs, David C; Tilakaratna, Viranga; Enghild, Jan J; Milner, Caroline M; Day, Anthony J; Richter, Ralf P

    2013-10-11

    Under inflammatory conditions and in the matrix of the cumulus-oocyte complex, the polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) becomes decorated covalently with heavy chains (HCs) of the serum glycoprotein inter-α-inhibitor (IαI). This alters the functional properties of the HA as well as its structural role within extracellular matrices. The covalent transfer of HCs from IαI to HA is catalyzed by TSG-6 (tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6), but TSG-6 is also known as a HA cross-linker that induces condensation of the HA matrix. Here, we investigate the interplay of these two distinct functions of TSG-6 by studying the ternary interactions of IαI and TSG-6 with well defined films of end-grafted HA chains. We demonstrate that TSG-6-mediated cross-linking of HA films is impaired in the presence of IαI and that this effect suppresses the TSG-6-mediated enhancement of HA binding to CD44-positive cells. Furthermore, we find that the interaction of TSG-6 and IαI in the presence of HA gives rise to two types of complexes that independently promote the covalent transfer of heavy chains to HA. One type of complex interacts very weakly with HA and is likely to correspond to the previously reported covalent HC·TSG-6 complexes. The other type of complex is novel and binds stably but noncovalently to HA. Prolonged incubation with TSG-6 and IαI leads to HA films that contain, in addition to covalently HA-bound HCs, several tightly but noncovalently bound molecular species. These findings have important implications for understanding how the biological activities of TSG-6 are regulated, such that the presence or absence of IαI will dictate its function. PMID:24005673

  10. Endogenous and enhanced oxidative cross-linking in wheat flour mill streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The oxidative cross-linking of arabinoxylan and protein polymers is partially responsible for variation in end-use quality of wheat flour; specifically, differences in batter viscosity as well as variation in bread and cookie quality. A better understanding of the variation in oxidative cross-linkin...

  11. Phase diagram of selectively cross-linked block copolymers shows chemically microstructured gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Heydt, Alice; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-02-01

    We study analytically the intricate phase behavior of cross-linked AB diblock copolymer melts, which can undergo two main phase transitions due to quenched random constraints. Gelation, i.e., spatially random localisation of polymers forming a system-spanning cluster, is driven by increasing the number parameter μ of irreversible, type-selective cross-links between random pairs of A blocks. Self-assembly into a periodic pattern of A/B-rich microdomains (microphase separation) is controlled by the AB incompatibility χ inversely proportional to temperature. Our model aims to capture the system's essential microscopic features, including an ensemble of random networks that reflects spatial correlations at the instant of cross-linking. We identify suitable order parameters and derive a free-energy functional in the spirit of Landau theory that allows us to trace a phase diagram in the plane of μ and χ. Selective cross-links promote microphase separation at higher critical temperatures than in uncross-linked diblock copolymer melts. Microphase separation in the liquid state facilitates gelation, giving rise to a novel gel state whose chemical composition density mirrors the periodic AB pattern.

  12. Preparation and characterization of IPN hydrogels composed of chitosan and gelatin cross-linked by genipin.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li; Jia, Junfang; Guo, Yi; Liu, Yun; Zhu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The interpenetrating polymer networks (IPN) hydrogels based on chitosan and gelatin using genipin as the cross-linker were prepared and characterized. The IPN formation of the genipin-cross-linked chitosan/gelatin hydrogel was confirmed by means of the instrinsic viscosity measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the ninhydrin assays. The instrinsic viscosity measurement, FT-IR and SEM suggested that chitosan and gelatin were miscible in the molecular level. The miscibility leads to the formation of IPN after cross-linking. FT-IR also examined the cross-linking mechanism of genipin with primary amino groups. The degree of cross-linking increased with increase genipin concentration. Swelling results revealed that the IPN hydrogels are pH-sensitive, exhibiting reversibility and rather rapidly response in swelling to pH changes. It is expected this IPN hydrogel has potential as controlled drug delivery system or as alternative sorbents for biomedical and environmental use as pH altered. PMID:24274476

  13. Preparation and characterization of electrospun in-situ cross-linked gelatin-graphite oxide nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jianchao; Morsi, Yosry; Ei-Hamshary, Hany; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Mo, Xiumei

    2016-04-01

    Electrospun gelatin(Gel) nanofibers scaffold has such defects as poor mechanical property and quick degradation due to high solubility. In this study, the in situ cross-linked electrospinning technique was used for the production of gelatin nanofibers. Deionized water was chosen as the spinning solvent and graphite oxide (GO) was chosen as the enhancer. The morphological structure, porosity, thermal property, moisture absorption, and moisture retention performance, hydrolysis resistance, mechanical property, and biocompatibility of the produced nanofibers were investigated. Compared with in situ cross-linked gelatin nanofibers scaffold, in situ cross-linked Gel-GO nanofibers scaffold has the following features: (1) the hydrophilicity, moisture absorption, and moisture retention performance slightly reduce, while the hydrolysis resistance is improved; (2) the breaking strength, breaking elongation, and Young's modulus are significantly improved; (3) the porosity slightly reduces while the biocompatibility considerably increases. The in situ cross-linked Gel-GO nanofibers scaffold is likely to be applied in such fields as drug delivery and scaffold for skin tissue engineering. PMID:26733331

  14. Hierarchically porous polymers from hyper-cross-linked block polymer precursors.

    PubMed

    Seo, Myungeun; Kim, Soobin; Oh, Jaehoon; Kim, Sun-Jung; Hillmyer, Marc A

    2015-01-21

    We report synthesis of hierarchically porous polymers (HPPs) consisting of micropores and well-defined 3D continuous mesopores by combination of hyper-cross-linking and block polymer self-assembly. Copolymerization of 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (VBzCl) with divinylbenzene (DVB) in the presence of polylactide (PLA) macro-chain-transfer agent produced a cross-linked block polymer precursor PLA-b-P(VBzCl-co-DVB) via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. A nanoscopic bicontinuous morphology containing PLA and P(VBzCl-co-DVB) microdomains was obtained as a result of polymerization-induced microphase separation. While a basic treatment of the precursor selectively removed PLA to yield a reticulated mesoporous polymer, hyper-cross-linking of the precursor by FeCl3 generated micropores in the P(VBzCl-co-DVB) microdomain via Friedel-Crafts alkylation and simultaneously degraded PLA to produce the HPP containing micropores in the mesoporous framework. The mesopore size of the HPP could be precisely controlled from 6 to 15 nm by controlling the molar mass of PLA. We demonstrate acceleration in adsorption rate in the HPP compared to a hyper-cross-linked microporous polymer. PMID:25551291

  15. Identification of disulfide cross-linked tau dimer responsible for tau propagation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohee; Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md. Mamunul; Ryoo, Nayeon; Hong, Hyun Seok; Rhim, Hyewhon; Lee, Dong-Eun; Chang, Young-Tae; Lee, Jun-Seok; Cheong, Eunji; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that tau aggregates are not only neurotoxic, but also propagate in neurons acting as a seed for native tau aggregation. Prion-like tau transmission is now considered as an important pathogenic mechanism driving the progression of tau pathology in the brain. However, prion-like tau species have not been clearly characterized. To identify infectious tau conformers, here we prepared diverse tau aggregates and evaluated the effect on inducing intracellular tau-aggregation. Among tested, tau dimer containing P301L-mutation is identified as the most infectious form to induce tau pathology. Biochemical analysis reveals that P301L-tau dimer is covalently cross-linked with a disulfide bond. The relatively small and covalently cross-linked tau dimer induced tau pathology efficiently in primary neurons and also in tau-transgenic mice. So far, the importance of tau disulfide cross-linking has been overlooked in the study of tau pathology. Here our results suggested that tau disulfide cross-linking might play critical role in tau propagation by producing structurally stable and small tau conformers. PMID:26470054

  16. Identification of disulfide cross-linked tau dimer responsible for tau propagation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohee; Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md Mamunul; Ryoo, Nayeon; Hong, Hyun Seok; Rhim, Hyewhon; Lee, Dong-Eun; Chang, Young-Tae; Lee, Jun-Seok; Cheong, Eunji; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that tau aggregates are not only neurotoxic, but also propagate in neurons acting as a seed for native tau aggregation. Prion-like tau transmission is now considered as an important pathogenic mechanism driving the progression of tau pathology in the brain. However, prion-like tau species have not been clearly characterized. To identify infectious tau conformers, here we prepared diverse tau aggregates and evaluated the effect on inducing intracellular tau-aggregation. Among tested, tau dimer containing P301L-mutation is identified as the most infectious form to induce tau pathology. Biochemical analysis reveals that P301L-tau dimer is covalently cross-linked with a disulfide bond. The relatively small and covalently cross-linked tau dimer induced tau pathology efficiently in primary neurons and also in tau-transgenic mice. So far, the importance of tau disulfide cross-linking has been overlooked in the study of tau pathology. Here our results suggested that tau disulfide cross-linking might play critical role in tau propagation by producing structurally stable and small tau conformers. PMID:26470054

  17. In-vitro fermentability of cell walls as influenced by lignin composition and cross-linking.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed how diverse modifications in lignin composition and reductions in ferulate-lignin cross-linking influence the degradability of cell walls. Cell walls from nonlignified maize cell suspensions were artificially lignified with varying ratios of normal monolignols (coniferyl and sinapyl alco...

  18. Cross-linking oppositely charged oil-in-water emulsions to enhance heteroaggregate stability.

    PubMed

    Maier, Christiane; Oechsle, Anja M; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    The formation and subsequent enzymatic and chemical cross-linking of heteroaggregates from oppositely charged oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions was investigated. For this purpose, 10% (w/w) oil-in-water emulsions (d43<1 μm) were prepared at pH 4 using a positively charged emulsifier (Nα-lauroyl-L-arginine ethyl ester (LAE), cold water fish gelatin, or whey protein isolate) or a negatively charged one (sugar beet pectin or Quillaja saponins). The oppositely charged emulsions were then combined at a volume ratio of 1:1 and treated with laccase or glutaraldehyde in order to further stabilize the electrostatically attached aggregates by covalently cross-linking the oppositely charged membranes. Emulsions and heteroaggregates were characterized by their rheological properties, their surface charge, particle size distribution, and microstructure using dynamic and static light scattering as well as confocal laser scanning microscopy. Prior to cross-linking, the emulsifiers' stabilization mechanism were found to greatly influence the formation of heteroaggregates. Laccase treatment (1.34 mU/mL) increased aggregate expansion by ca. 30% for the combined emulsions stabilized by Quillaja saponins/whey protein isolate, while combined Quillaja saponins/fish gelatin stabilized emulsions remained unaffected. When combined emulsions were treated with 50mM glutaraldehyde, aggregate size significantly increased 2- and 3-fold, respectively. Thus, our study provides novel insights into the enzymatic and chemical cross-linking of heteroaggregates composed of oppositely charged O/W emulsions. PMID:26298085

  19. Cross-Linked Nanoporous Materials from Reactive and Multifunctional Block Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Myungeun; Amendt, Mark A.; Hillmyer, Marc A.

    2012-10-10

    Polylactide-b-poly(styrene-co-2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (PLA-b-P(S-co-HEMA)) and polylactide-b-poly(styrene-co-2-hydroxyethylacrylate) (PLA-b-P(S-co-HEA)) were synthesized by combination of ring-opening polymerization and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography data indicated that the polymerizations were controlled and that hydroxyl groups were successfully incorporated into the block polymers. The polymers were reacted with 4,4{prime}-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI) to form the corresponding cross-linked materials. The materials were annealed at 150 C to complete the coupling reaction. Robust nanoporous materials were obtained from the cross-linked polymers by treatment with aqueous base to hydrolyze the PLA phase. Small-angle X-ray scattering study combined with scanning electron microscopy showed that MDI-cross-linked PLA-b-P(S-co-HEMA)/PLA-b-P(S-co-HEA) can adopt lamellar, hexagonally perforated lamellar, and hexagonally packed cylindrical morphologies after annealing. In particular, the HPL morphology was found to evolve from lamellae due to increase in volume fraction of PS phase as MDI reacted with hydroxyl groups. The reaction also kinetically trapped the morphology by cross-linking. Bicontinuous morphologies were also observed when dibutyltin dilaurate was added to accelerate reaction between the polymer and MDI.

  20. Ultraweak chemiluminescence arising for glutaraldehyde-induced cross-linking reactions of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Chwirot, B W

    1997-01-01

    Chemiluminescence arising from cross-linking reactions of glutaraldehyde was examined. Our findings indicate that: (i) new reactions not yet described in the literature may be responsible for a part of the observed emissions; and (ii) this chemiluminescence may offer a new way of optimizing procedures of fixing biological materials prepared for microscopic examinations. PMID:9509330

  1. Inhibiting Hexamer Disassembly of Human UDP-Glucose Dehydrogenase by Photoactivated Amino Acid Cross-Linking.

    PubMed

    Grady, George; Thelen, Ashley; Albers, Jaleen; Ju, Tong; Guo, Jiantao; Barycki, Joseph J; Simpson, Melanie A

    2016-06-01

    The enzyme UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes the reaction of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronate through two successive NAD(+)-dependent oxidation steps. Human UGDH apoprotein is purified as a mixture of dimeric and hexameric species. Addition of substrate and cofactor stabilizes the oligomeric state to primarily the hexameric form. To determine if the dynamic conformations of hUGDH are required for catalytic activity, we used site-specific unnatural amino acid incorporation to facilitate cross-linking of monomeric subunits into predominantly obligate oligomeric species. Optimal cross-linking was achieved by encoding p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine at position 458, normally a glutamine located within the dimer-dimer interface, and exposing the enzyme to long wavelength ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the presence of substrate and cofactor. Hexameric complexes were purified by gel filtration chromatography and found to contain significant fractions of dimer and trimer (approximately 50%) along with another 10% higher-molecular mass species. The activity of the cross-linked enzyme was reduced by almost 60% relative to that of the un-cross-linked UGDH mutant, and UV exposure had no effect on the activity of the wild-type enzyme. These results support a model for catalysis in which the ability to dissociate the dimer-dimer interface is as important for maximal enzyme function as has been previously shown for the formation of the hexamer. PMID:27198584

  2. Effect of dual modification with hydroxypropylation and cross-linking on physicochemical properties of taro starch.

    PubMed

    Hazarika, Bidyut Jyoti; Sit, Nandan

    2016-04-20

    Dual modification of taro starch by hydroxypropylation and cross-linking was carried out and the properties of the modified starches were investigated. Two different levels of hydroxypropylation (5 and 10%) and cross-linking (0.05 and 0.10%) were used in different sequences. The amylose contents of the starch decreased due to single and dual modification. For the dual-modified starches, the swelling, solubility and clarity was found to increase with level of hydroxypropylation and decrease with level of cross-linking. The freeze-thaw stability of the dual-modified starches was also affected by the sequence of modification. The viscosities of the cross-linked and dual-modified starches were more than native and hydroxypropylated starches. The firmness of the dual-modified starches was also higher than native and single modified starches. The dual-modified starches have benefits of both type of modifications and could be used for specific purposes e.g. food products requiring high viscosity as well as freeze-thaw stability. PMID:26876854

  3. Computational modeling of mechanical response of dual cross-linked polymer grafted nanoparticle networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v S, Balaji; Yashin, Victor; Salib, Isaac; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Matyjaszewski, Krzystof; Balazs, Anna; Anna Balazs Collaboration; Krzystof Matyjaszewski Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    We develop a hybrid computational model for the behavior of a network of cross-linked polymer-grafted nanoparticles (PGNs). The individual nanoparticles are composed of a rigid core and a corona of grafted polymers that encompass reactive end groups. With the overlap of the coronas on adjacent particles, the reactive end groups can form permanent or labile bonds, which lead to the formation of a ``dual cross-linked'' network. To capture these multi-scale interactions, our approach integrates the essential structural features of the polymer grafted nanoparticles, the interactions between the overlapping coronas, and the kinetics of bond formation and rupture between the reactive groups on the chain ends. We investigate the mechanical response of the dual-cross linked network to an applied tensile deformation. We find that the response depends on the bond energies of the labile bonds, the fraction of permanent bonds in the network, and thickness of the corona. This model provides a powerful tool for the computational design of dual cross-linked PGN's by predicting how the structural features of the system affect the mechanical performance.

  4. Is dialdehyde starch a valuable cross-linking agent for collagen/elastin based materials?

    PubMed

    Skopinska-Wisniewska, J; Wegrzynowska-Drzymalska, K; Bajek, A; Maj, M; Sionkowska, A

    2016-04-01

    Collagen and elastin are the main structural proteins in mammal bodies. They provide mechanical support, strength, and elasticity to various organs and tissues, e.g. skin, tendons, arteries, and bones. They are readily available, biodegradable, biocompatible and they stimulate cell growth. The physicochemical properties of collagen and elastin-based materials can be modified by cross-linking. Glutaraldehyde is one of the most efficient cross-linking agents. However, the unreacted molecules can be released from the material and cause cytotoxic reactions. Thus, the aim of our work was to investigate the influence of a safer, macromolecular cross-linking agent-dialdehyde starch (DAS). The properties of hydrogels based on collagen/elastin mixtures (95/5, 90/10) containing 5 and 10 % of DAS and neutralized via dialysis against deionized water were tested. The homogenous, transparent, stiff hydrogels were obtained. The DAS addition causes the formation of intermolecular cross-linking bonds but does not affect the secondary structure of the proteins. As a result, the thermal stability, mechanical strength, and, surprisingly, swelling ability increased. At the same time, the surface properties test and in vitro study show that the materials are attractive for 3T3 cells. Moreover, the materials containing 10 % of DAS are more resistant to enzymatic degradation. PMID:26886815

  5. Vitamin C hinders radiation cross-linking in aqueous poly(vinyl alcohol) solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oral, Ebru; Bodugoz-Senturk, Hatice; Macias, Celia; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2007-12-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) is a promising semi-crystalline material for biomedical applications. It is soluble in water and can be formed into hydrogels by freezing and thawing or crystallizing from an aqueous theta solution such as that of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Radiation cross-linking caused by sterilization or high dose irradiation of concentrated PVA solutions could compromise some properties of these hydrogels. Therefore, we hypothesized that radiation cross-linking of PVA solutions and PVA-PEG theta gels could be prevented by using the antioxidant vitamin C as an anticross-linking agent. Our hypothesis tested positive. Vitamin C concentrations of 0.75 and 4.5 mol/mol of PVA repeating unit could prevent cross-linking in 17.5 wt/v% PVA solutions made with PVA molecular weight of 115,000 g/mol irradiated to 25 and 100 kGy, respectively. Vitamin C also prevented cross-linking in 25 kGy irradiated PVA-PEG theta gels containing up to 5 wt% PEG and decreased the viscosity of those up to 39 wt%.

  6. Genipin-cross-linked layer-by-layer assemblies: biocompatible microenvironments to direct bone cell fate.

    PubMed

    Gaudière, Fabien; Morin-Grognet, Sandrine; Bidault, Laurent; Lembré, Pierre; Pauthe, Emmanuel; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Atmani, Hassan; Ladam, Guy; Labat, Béatrice

    2014-05-12

    The design of biomimetic coatings capable of improving the osseointegration of bone biomaterials is a current challenge in the field of bone repair. Toward this end, layer-by-layer (LbL) films composed of natural components are suitable candidates. Chondroitin sulfate A (CSA), a natural glycosaminoglycan (GAG), was used as the polyanionic component because it promotes osteoblast maturation in vivo. In their native state, GAG-containing LbL films are generally cytophobic because of their low stiffness. To stiffen our CSA-based LbL films, genipin (GnP) was used as a natural cross-linking agent, which is much less cytotoxic than conventional chemical cross-linkers. GnP-cross-linked films display an original combination of microscale topography and tunable mechanical properties. Structural characterization was partly based on a novel donor/acceptor Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) couple, namely, FITC/GnP, which is a promising approach for further inspection of any GnP-cross-linked system. GnP-cross-linked films significantly promote adhesion, proliferation, and early and late differentiation of preosteoblasts. PMID:24666097

  7. 21 CFR 177.2710 - Styrene-divinylbenzene resins, cross-linked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Styrene-divinylbenzene resins, cross-linked. 177.2710 Section 177.2710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS...

  8. 21 CFR 177.2710 - Styrene-divinylbenzene resins, cross-linked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Styrene-divinylbenzene resins, cross-linked. 177.2710 Section 177.2710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS...

  9. Phase diagram of selectively cross-linked block copolymers shows chemically microstructured gel.

    PubMed

    von der Heydt, Alice; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-02-01

    We study analytically the intricate phase behavior of cross-linked AB diblock copolymer melts, which can undergo two main phase transitions due to quenched random constraints. Gelation, i.e., spatially random localisation of polymers forming a system-spanning cluster, is driven by increasing the number parameter μ of irreversible, type-selective cross-links between random pairs of A blocks. Self-assembly into a periodic pattern of A/B-rich microdomains (microphase separation) is controlled by the AB incompatibility χ inversely proportional to temperature. Our model aims to capture the system's essential microscopic features, including an ensemble of random networks that reflects spatial correlations at the instant of cross-linking. We identify suitable order parameters and derive a free-energy functional in the spirit of Landau theory that allows us to trace a phase diagram in the plane of μ and χ. Selective cross-links promote microphase separation at higher critical temperatures than in uncross-linked diblock copolymer melts. Microphase separation in the liquid state facilitates gelation, giving rise to a novel gel state whose chemical composition density mirrors the periodic AB pattern. PMID:25662662

  10. Experimental scleral cross-linking increases glaucoma damage in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Elizabeth C.; Nguyen, Cathy; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Nguyen, Thao D.; Pease, Mary E.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Oveson, Brian C.; Quigley, Harry A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a scleral cross-linking agent on susceptibility to glaucoma damage in a mouse model. CD1 mice underwent 3 subconjunctival injections of 0.5 M glyceraldehyde (GA) in 1 week, then had elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) induced by bead injection. Degree of cross-linking was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), scleral permeability was measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and the mechanical effects of GA exposure were measured by inflation testing. Control mice had buffer injection or no injection in 2 separate glaucoma experiments. IOP was monitored by Tonolab and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss was measured by histological axon counting. To rule out undesirable effects of GA, we performed electroretinography and detailed histology of the retina. GA exposure had no detectable effects on RGC number, retinal structure or function either histologically or electrophysiologically. GA increased cross-linking of sclera by 37% in an ELISA assay, decreased scleral permeability (FRAP, p = 0.001), and produced a steeper pressure—strain behavior by in vitro inflation testing. In two experimental glaucoma experiments, GA-treated eyes had greater RGC axon loss from elevated IOP than either buffer-injected or control eyes, controlling for level of IOP exposure over time (p = 0.01, and 0.049, multivariable regression analyses). This is the first report that experimental alteration of the sclera, by cross-linking, increases susceptibility to RGC damage in mice. PMID:25285424

  11. CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MELT PROCESSED- AND SOLUTION-CROSS LINKED CORN ZEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn zein was cross linked with glutaraldehyde (GDA) and with glacial acetic acid (HAc) as catalyst with the objective to enhance the mechanical properties of poured films which were compared with the physical properties of compression molded tensile bars from melt processed zein with GDA. A reacti...

  12. ROMP-based thermosetting polymers from modified castor oil with various cross-linking agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Rui

    Polymers derived from bio-renewable resources are finding an increase in global demand. In addition, polymers with distinctive functionalities are required in certain advanced fields, such as aerospace and civil engineering. In an attempt to meet both these needs, the goal of this work aims to develop a range of bio-based thermosetting matrix polymers for potential applications in multifunctional composites. Ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), which recently has been explored as a powerful method in polymer chemistry, was employed as a unique pathway to polymerize agricultural oil-based reactants. Specifically, a novel norbornyl-functionalized castor oil alcohol (NCA) was investigated to polymerize different cross-linking agents using ROMP. The effects of incorporating dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and a norbornene-based crosslinker (CL) were systematically evaluated with respect to curing behavior and thermal mechanical properties of the polymers. Isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to investigate the conversion during cure. Dynamic DSC scans at multiple heating rates revealed conversion-dependent activation energy by Ozawa-Flynn-Wall analysis. The glass transition temperature, storage modulus, and loss modulus for NCA/DCPD and NCA/CL copolymers with different cross-linking agent loading were compared using dynamic mechanical analysis. Cross-link density was examined to explain the very different dynamic mechanical behavior. Mechanical stress-strain curves were developed through tensile test, and thermal stability of the cross-linked polymers was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis to further investigate the structure-property relationships in these systems.

  13. Functional cross-linked hemoglobin bis-tetramers: geometry and cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dongxin; Kluger, Ronald

    2008-11-25

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers have been sought as stable, sterile alternatives to red cells in transfusions. Problems in clinical trials using cross-linked tetramers have led to proposals that larger assemblies of tetramers may alleviate some of the problems. A study of such assemblies requires materials with defined structures and physical properties. Evaluation of cross-linked bis-tetramers with inflexible linear links between the tetramers revealed that these have very low cooperativity in oxygen binding and would thus be inefficient as oxygen carriers. New, more flexible reagents were designed to cross-link and connect tetramers in two modes: with angular connectors that permit torsional movement (1-3) and with linear connectors that resemble previously studied systems (4-6). The resulting cross-linked bis-tetramers were produced in high yield and were isolated and characterized. Digest mapping showed that modifications were specifically introduced as expected at amino groups in the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate binding sites within beta subunits. Circular dichroism showed that the secondary structure of the globin chains is maintained while the microenvironment of the hemes is altered. The bis-tetramers derived from 1-3 have oxygen affinity (P(50) = 3.6-4.7) and cooperativity (n(50) = 2.2-2.7) that appear to be suitable for efficient oxygen delivery to hypoxic regions along with increased mass that is expected to minimize extravasation. PMID:18956893

  14. Temperature dependence of creep compliance of highly cross-linked epoxy: A molecular simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Khabaz, Fardin Khare, Ketan S. Khare, Rajesh

    2014-05-15

    We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the effect of temperature on the creep compliance of neat cross-linked epoxy. Experimental studies of mechanical behavior of cross-linked epoxy in literature commonly report creep compliance values, whereas molecular simulations of these systems have primarily focused on the Young’s modulus. In this work, in order to obtain a more direct comparison between experiments and simulations, atomistically detailed models of the cross-linked epoxy are used to study their creep compliance as a function of temperature using MD simulations. The creep tests are performed by applying a constant tensile stress and monitoring the resulting strain in the system. Our results show that simulated values of creep compliance increase with an increase in both time and temperature. We believe that such calculations of the creep compliance, along with the use of time temperature superposition, hold great promise in connecting the molecular insight obtained from molecular simulation at small length- and time-scales with the experimental behavior of such materials. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first reported effort that investigates the creep compliance behavior of cross-linked epoxy using MD simulations.

  15. Can para-aryl-dithiols cross-link two plasmonic noble nanoparticles as monolayer dithiolate spacers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Para-aryl-dithiols (PADTs, HS-(C6H4)n-SH, n = 1, 2, and 3) have been used extensively in molecular electronics, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and quantum electron tunneling between two gold or silver nanoparticles (AuNPs and AgNPs). One popular belief is that these dithiols cross-link ...

  16. Cytotoxicity and internalization of Pluronic micelles stabilized by core cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Arranja, Alexandra; Schroder, André P; Schmutz, Marc; Waton, Gilles; Schosseler, François; Mendes, Eduardo

    2014-12-28

    A UV-cross-linkable agent was incorporated and polymerized in Pluronic micelle core to create an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) of poly(pentaerythritol tetraacrylate). This stabilization prevented micelle disruption below the critical micelle temperature (CMT) and concentration (CMC), while maintaining the integrity of the PEO corona and the hydrophobic properties of the PPO core. The prepared stabilized spherical micelles of Pluronic P94 and F127 presented hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 40 to 50 nm. The stability of cross-linked Pluronic micelles at 37 °C in the presence of serum proteins was studied and no aggregation of the micelles was observed, revealing the colloidal stability of the system. Cytotoxicity experiments in NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts revealed that the presence of the cross-linking agent did not induce any further toxicity in comparison to the respective pure polymer solutions. Furthermore, stabilized micelles of Pluronic P94 were shown to be less toxic than the polymer itself. A hydrophobic fluorescent probe (Nile red) was absorbed in the cross-linked core of pre-stabilized micelles to mimic the incorporation of a poorly water-soluble drug, and the internalization and intracellular localization of Nile red was studied by confocal microscopy at different incubation times. Overall, the results indicate that Pluronic micelles stabilized by core cross-linking are capable of delivering hydrophobic components physically entrapped in the micelles, thus making them a potential candidate as a delivery platform for imaging or therapy of cancer. PMID:25307996

  17. Preferential sites for intramolecular glucosepane cross-link formation in type I collagen: A thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Collier, Thomas A; Nash, Anthony; Birch, Helen L; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2015-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes progressive age-related stiffening and loss of proteolytic digestibility due to an increase in concentration of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The most abundant AGE, glucosepane, accumulates in collagen with concentrations over 100 times greater than all other AGEs. Detrimental collagen stiffening properties are believed to play a significant role in several age-related diseases such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Currently little is known of the potential location of covalently cross-linked glucosepane formation within collagen molecules; neither are there reports on how the respective cross-link sites affect the physical and biochemical properties of collagen. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations (MD) we have identified six sites where the formation of a covalent intra-molecular glucosepane cross-link within a single collagen molecule in a fibrillar environment is energetically favourable. Identification of these favourable sites enables us to align collagen cross-linking with experimentally observed changes to the ECM. For example, formation of glucosepane was found to be energetically favourable within close proximity of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) binding site, which could potentially disrupt collagen degradation. PMID:26049074

  18. Design of phosphated cross-linked microspheres of bael fruit gum as a biodegradable carrier.

    PubMed

    Mahammed, Nawaz; Gowda, D V; Deshpande, Rohan D; Thirumaleshwar, Shailesh

    2015-01-01

    Present work was aimed at designing of phosphated cross-linked microspheres of bael fruit gum (BFG) by emulsification method using sodium-tri-meta phosphate as a cross-linking agent for treatment of colon cancer using 5-fluorouracil as model drug. Stirring speed was found to be 1,000 rpm for about 5 h to be optimal to obtain reproducible microspheres. It was found that there is an increase in particle size as polymer concentration is increased whereas a reduction in particle size was observed as there is increase in stirring speed. Cross-linked BFG microspheres were successfully prepared by emulsification method. Optimum surfactant concentration was found to be 2 % w/w. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed that the drug-loaded microspheres were non-aggregated and in spherical shape. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared-spectroscopy studies showed that drug and excipients are compatible. Release studies showed that drug release was more profound in cecal medium induced with enzymes causing degradation of the cross linked BFG than that of the release showed in simulated intestinal fluid. Stability studies showed that there were no significant changes in the drug content and physical appearance of microspheres. PMID:24668152

  19. Isolation and removal of proteolytic enzymes with magnetic cross-linked erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šafařík, Ivo; Šafaříková, Mirka

    2001-01-01

    New magnetic adsorbents for batch isolation and removal of various proteolytic enzymes were prepared by glutaraldehyde cross-linking of bovine, porcine and human erythrocytes in the presence of fine magnetic particles. Trypsin, chymotrypsin, alkaline bacterial protease and proteases present in various commercial enzyme preparations were efficiently adsorbed on these adsorbents; on the contrary, proteins without proteolytic activity were not adsorbed.

  20. Preferential sites for intramolecular glucosepane cross-link formation in type I collagen: A thermodynamic study

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Thomas A.; Nash, Anthony; Birch, Helen L.; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes progressive age-related stiffening and loss of proteolytic digestibility due to an increase in concentration of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The most abundant AGE, glucosepane, accumulates in collagen with concentrations over 100 times greater than all other AGEs. Detrimental collagen stiffening properties are believed to play a significant role in several age-related diseases such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Currently little is known of the potential location of covalently cross-linked glucosepane formation within collagen molecules; neither are there reports on how the respective cross-link sites affect the physical and biochemical properties of collagen. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations (MD) we have identified six sites where the formation of a covalent intra-molecular glucosepane cross-link within a single collagen molecule in a fibrillar environment is energetically favourable. Identification of these favourable sites enables us to align collagen cross-linking with experimentally observed changes to the ECM. For example, formation of glucosepane was found to be energetically favourable within close proximity of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) binding site, which could potentially disrupt collagen degradation. PMID:26049074

  1. Baking Performance of Phosphorylated Cross-Linked Resistant Starch in Low-Moisture Bakery Goods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorylated cross-linked resistant starch (RS) is a type 4 RS, which can be used for enhancing the benefits of dietary fiber. The baking performance of the RS was explored using wire-cut cookie baking and benchtop chemically-leavened cracker baking methods to produce low-moisture baked goods (coo...

  2. Direct Patterning of Organic Functional Polymers through Conventional Photolithography and Noninvasive Cross-Link Agents.

    PubMed

    Squillaci, Marco A; Qiu, Feng; Aliprandi, Alessandro; Zhang, Fan; Feng, Xinliang; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    A new technique for direct patterning of functional organic polymers using commercial photolithography setups with a minimal loss of the materials' performances is reported. This result is achieved through novel cross-link agents made by boron- and fluorine-containing heterocycles that can react between themselves upon UV- and white-light exposure. PMID:27153351

  3. An unprecedented single platform via cross-linking of zeolite and MOFs.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dae-Woon; Lee, Heeju; Kim, Sungjune; Cho, In Hwa; Yoon, Minyoung; Choi, Yong Nam

    2016-05-21

    The unprecedented ternary nanocomposites have been synthesized as a single platform via cross-linking of two nanoporous materials, MOFs and Pt nanoparticle (NP) loaded zeolite. The heterojunction of the novel nanocomposites is anticipated to work as a chemical platform for size selective catalytic hydrogenation or deuteration of small molecules. PMID:27086901

  4. Photoswitchable formation of a DNA interstrand cross-link by a coumarin-modified nucleotide.

    PubMed

    Haque, Mohammad Mojibul; Sun, Huabing; Liu, Shuo; Wang, Yinsheng; Peng, Xiaohua

    2014-07-01

    A coumarin-modified pyrimidine nucleoside (1) has been synthesized using a Cu(I)-catalyzed click reaction and incorporated into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Interstrand cross-links are produced upon irradiation of ODNs containing 1 at 350 nm. Cross-linking occurs through a [2+2] cycloaddition reaction with the opposing thymidine, 2'-deoxycytidine, or 2'-deoxyadenosine. A much higher reactivity was observed with dT than dC or dA. Irradiation of the dT-1 and dC-1 cross-linked products at 254 nm leads to a reversible ring-opening reaction, while such phenomena were not observed with dA-1 adducts. The reversible reaction is ultrafast and complete within 50-90 s. Consistent photoswitching behavior was observed over 6 cycles of irradiation at 350 nm and 254 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of photoswitchable interstrand cross-linking formation induced by a modified pyrimidine nucleoside. PMID:24840115

  5. Dephosphorylated synapsin I anchors synaptic vesicles to actin cytoskeleton: an analysis by videomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, P E; Grohovaz, F; Benfenati, F; Chieregatti, E; Greengard, P; Valtorta, F

    1995-03-01

    Synapsin I is a synaptic vesicle-associated protein which inhibits neurotransmitter release, an effect which is abolished upon its phosphorylation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II). Based on indirect evidence, it was suggested that this effect on neurotransmitter release may be achieved by the reversible anchoring of synaptic vesicles to the actin cytoskeleton of the nerve terminal. Using video-enhanced microscopy, we have now obtained experimental evidence in support of this model: the presence of dephosphorylated synapsin I is necessary for synaptic vesicles to bind actin; synapsin I is able to promote actin polymerization and bundling of actin filaments in the presence of synaptic vesicles; the ability to cross-link synaptic vesicles and actin is specific for synapsin I and is not shared by other basic proteins; the cross-linking between synaptic vesicles and actin is specific for the membrane of synaptic vesicles and does not reflect either a non-specific binding of membranes to the highly surface active synapsin I molecule or trapping of vesicles within the thick bundles of actin filaments; the formation of the ternary complex is virtually abolished when synapsin I is phosphorylated by CaM kinase II. The data indicate that synapsin I markedly affects synaptic vesicle traffic and cytoskeleton assembly in the nerve terminal and provide a molecular basis for the ability of synapsin I to regulate the availability of synaptic vesicles for exocytosis and thereby the efficiency of neurotransmitter release. PMID:7876313

  6. Monitoring the internal structure of poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) microgels with variable cross-link concentration.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Florian; Balaceanu, Andreea; Feoktystov, Artem; Pipich, Vitaliy; Wu, Yaodong; Allgaier, Jürgen; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Pich, Andrij; Schneider, Gerald J

    2014-12-23

    The combination of a set of complementary techniques allows us to construct an unprecedented and comprehensive picture of the internal structure, temperature dependent swelling behavior, and the dependence of these properties on the cross-linker concentration of microgel particles based on N-vinylcaprolactam (VCL). The microgels were synthesized by precipitation polymerization using different amounts of cross-linking agent. Characterization was performed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) using two complementary neutron instruments to cover a uniquely broad Q-range with one probe. Additionally we used dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Previously obtained nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) results on the same PVCL particles are utilized to round the picture off. Our study shows that both the particle radius and the cross-link density and therefore also the stiffness of the microgels rises with increasing cross-linker content. Hence, more cross-linker reduces the swelling capability distinctly. These findings are supported by SANS and AFM measurements. Independent DLS experiments also found the increase in particle size but suggest an unchanged cross-link density. The reason for the apparent contradiction is the indirect extraction of the parameters via a model in the evaluation of DLS measurements. The more direct approach in AFM by evaluating the cross section profiles of observed microgel particles gives evidence of significantly softer and more deformable particles at lower cross-linker concentrations and therefore verifies the change in cross-link density. DSC data indicate a minor but unexpected shift of the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) to higher temperatures and exposes a more heterogeneous internal structure of the microgels with increasing cross-link density. Moreover, a change in the total energy transfer during the VPT gives evidence that the strength

  7. Cross-linking of glycoprotein oligomers during herpes simplex virus type 1 entry.

    PubMed

    Handler, C G; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J

    1996-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has 10 glycoproteins in its envelope. Glycoprotein B (gB), gC, gD, gH, and gL have been implicated in virus entry. We previously used chemical cross-linking to show that these five glycoproteins were close enough to each other to be cross-linked into homodimeric and hetero-oligomeric forms; hetero-oligomers of gB-gC, gC-gD, gD-gB, gH-gL, gC-gL and gD-gL were found in purified virions. To better understand the roles of these glycoproteins in viral entry, we have modified a standard HSV penetration assay to include cross-linkers. This allowed us to examine changes in associations of viral glycoproteins during the entry process. HSV-1(KOS) was adsorbed at 4 degrees C to human neuroblastoma cells (SY5Y). The temperature was raised to 37 degrees C and cells were treated with cross-linker at various times after the temperature shift. Cytoplasmic extracts were examined by Western blotting (immunoblotting) for viral glycoproteins. We found that (i) as in virus alone, the length and concentration of the cross-linking agent affected the number of specific complexes isolated; (ii) the same glycoprotein patterns found in purified virions were also present after attachment of virions to cells; and (iii) the ability to cross-link HSV glycoproteins changed as virus penetration proceeded, e.g., gB and gD complexes which were present during attachment disappeared with increasing time, and their disappearance paralleled the kinetics of penetration. However, this phenomenon appeared to be selective since it was not observed with gC oligomers. In addition, we examined the cross-linking patterns of gB and gD in null viruses K082 and KOSgD beta. Neither of these mutants, which attach but cannot penetrate, showed changes in glycoprotein cross-linking over time. We speculate that these changes are due to conformational changes which preclude cross-linking or spatial alterations which dissociate the glycoprotein interactions during the penetration events. PMID

  8. Identification of the bombesin receptor on murine and human cells by cross-linking experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kris, R.M.; Hazan, R.; Villines, J.; Moody, T.W.; Schlessinger, J.

    1987-08-15

    The bombesin receptor present on the surface of murine and human cells was identified using /sup 125/I-labeled gastrin-releasing peptide as a probe, the cross-linking agent disuccinimidyl suberate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. A clone of NIH-3T3 cells which possesses approximately 80,000 bombesin receptors/cell with a single binding constant of approximately 1.9 X 10(-9) M was used in these studies. In addition, we used Swiss 3T3 cells and a human glioma cell line which possesses approximately 100,000 and approximately 55,000 bombesin receptors/cell, respectively. Under conditions found optimal for binding, it is demonstrated that /sup 125/I-labeled gastrin-releasing peptide can be cross-linked specifically to a glycoprotein of apparent molecular mass of 65,000 daltons on the surface of the NIH-3T3 cells. Similar results were obtained when the cross-linked product was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing or non-reducing conditions. Moreover, the cross-linking reaction is specific and saturable and the 65,000-dalton polypeptide is not observed when the cross-linking experiments were performed with a NIH-3T3 cell line which is devoid of bombesin receptors. Interestingly, glycoproteins with apparent molecular weights of 75,000 were labeled specifically by /sup 125/I-labeled gastrin-releasing peptide when similar experiments were performed with Swiss 3T3 cells and with human glioma cell line GM-340. These different molecular weights may indicate differential glycosylation as treatment with the enzyme N-glycanase reduced the apparent molecular weight of the cross-linked polypeptide to 45,000. On the basis of these results it is concluded that the cross-linked polypeptides represent the bombesin receptor or the ligand-binding subunit of a putative larger bombesin receptor expressed on the surface of these cells.

  9. Bone fracture toughness and strength correlate with collagen cross-link maturity in a dose-controlled lathyrism mouse model

    PubMed Central

    McNerny, Erin M. B.; Gong, Bo; Morris, Michael D.; Kohn, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen cross-linking is altered in many diseases of bone, and enzymatic collagen cross-links are important to bone quality as evidenced by losses of strength following lysyl oxidase inhibition (lathyrism). We hypothesized that cross-links also contribute directly to bone fracture toughness. A mouse model of lathyrism using subcutaneous injection of up to 500mg/kg β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) was developed and characterized (60 animals across 4 dosage groups). Three weeks of 150 or 350 mg/kg BAPN treatment in young growing mice significantly reduced cortical bone fracture toughness, strength, and pyridinoline cross-link content. Ratios reflecting relative cross-link maturity were positive regressors of fracture toughness (HP/[DHLNL+HLNL] r2=0.208, p<0.05; [HP+LP]/[DHNL+HLNL] r2=0.196, p<0.1), whereas quantities of mature pyridinoline cross-links were significant positive regressors of tissue strength (lysyl pyridinoline r2=0.159, p=0.014; hydroxylysyl pyridinoline r2=0.112, p<0.05). Immature and pyrrole cross-links, which were not significantly reduced by BAPN, did not correlate with mechanical properties. The effect of BAPN treatment on mechanical properties was dose specific, with the greatest impact found at the intermediate (350mg/kg) dose. Calcein labeling was used to define locations of new bone formation, allowing for the identification of regions of normally cross-linked (preexisting) and BAPN treated (newly formed, cross-link-deficient) bone. Raman spectroscopy revealed spatial differences due to relative tissue age and effects of cross-link inhibition. Newly deposited tissues had lower mineral/matrix, carbonate/phosphate and Amide I cross-link (matrix maturity) ratios compared to preexisting tissues. BAPN treatment did not affect mineral measures, but significantly increased the cross-link (matrix maturity) ratio compared to newly formed control tissue. Our study reveals that spatially localized effects of short term BAPN cross-link inhibition can alter

  10. Role of collagen content and cross-linking in large pulmonary arterial stiffening after chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijie; Chesler, Naomi C

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is associated with large pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which is correlated with collagen accumulation. However, the mechanisms by which collagen contributes to PA stiffening remain largely unexplored. Moreover, HPH may alter mechanical properties other than stiffness, such as pulse damping capacity, which also affects ventricular workload but is rarely quantified. We hypothesized that collagen content and cross-linking differentially regulate the stiffness and damping capacity of large PAs during HPH progression. The hypothesis was tested with transgenic mice that synthesize collagen type I resistant to collagenase degradation (Col1a1(R/R)). These mice and littermate controls (Col1a1(+/+)) were exposed to hypoxia for 10 days; some were treated with β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), which prevents new cross-link formation. Isolated PA dynamic mechanical tests were performed, and collagen content and cross-linking were measured. In Col1a1(+/+) mice, HPH increased both collagen content and cross-linking, and BAPN treatment prevented these increases. Similar trends were observed in Col1a1(R/R) mice except that collagen content further increased with BAPN treatment. Mechanical tests showed that in Col1a1(+/+) mice, HPH increased PA stiffness and damping capacity, and these increases were impeded by BAPN treatment. In Col1a1(R/R) mice, HPH led to a smaller but significant increase in PA stiffness and a decrease in damping capacity. These mechanical changes were not affected by BAPN treatment. Vessel-specific correlations for each strain showed that the stiffness and damping capacity were correlated with the total content rather than cross-linking of collagen. Our results suggest that collagen total content is critical to extralobar PA stiffening during HPH. PMID:21538012

  11. Development and evaluation of cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Panda, Niladri Nath; Jonnalagadda, Sriramakamal; Pramanik, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the tissue engineering potential of type I collagen cross-linked in the presence of hydroxyapatite (HAp). Scaffolds were prepared by controlled freezing followed by lyophilization of composite mixtures of collagen and HAp in acetic acid, followed by cross-linking with 0.3% glutaraldehyde. Scaffolds of three ratios were prepared, corresponding to collagen/HAp ratios of 1:2, 1:4, and 1:6. The scaffolds were evaluated for their microstructure, chemical and physical properties, swelling behavior, mechanical strength, biodegradability hemocompatability, cytocompatibility, and histopathology following subcutaneous implantation in Sprague Dawley rats. The collagen/HAp matrices showed a smaller pore size of 10-40 μm compared to 50-100 μm for pure collagen scaffolds. Pure collagen showed a mechanical strength of 0.25 MPa, and the value almost doubled for cross-linked composites with collagen/HAp ratio 1:6. The improvement in mechanical strength corresponded to a decrease in swelling and enzymatic degradation (measured by resistance to collagenases). FTIR spectra results in conjunction with scanning electron micrographs showed that cross-linking in the presence of HAp did not significantly alter the structure of collagen. MTT assay and calcein AM staining revealed prominent and healthy growth of mesenchymal stem cells in both the pure collagen as well as collagen:HAp composites of ratio 1:2. In vivo implantation in Sprague Dawley rats showed an initial acute inflammatory response during days 3 and 7, followed by a chronic, macrophage-mediated inflammatory response on days 14 and 28. Overall, a cross-linked collagen/HAp composite scaffold of ratio 1:2 was identified as having potential for further development in tissue engineering. PMID:23905722

  12. Developing functional musculoskeletal tissues through hypoxia and lysyl oxidase-induced collagen cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Eleftherios A.; Responte, Donald J.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2014-01-01

    The inability to recapitulate native tissue biomechanics, especially tensile properties, hinders progress in regenerative medicine. To address this problem, strategies have focused on enhancing collagen production. However, manipulating collagen cross-links, ubiquitous throughout all tissues and conferring mechanical integrity, has been underinvestigated. A series of studies examined the effects of lysyl oxidase (LOX), the enzyme responsible for the formation of collagen cross-links. Hypoxia-induced endogenous LOX was applied in multiple musculoskeletal tissues (i.e., cartilage, meniscus, tendons, ligaments). Results of these studies showed that both native and engineered tissues are enhanced by invoking a mechanism of hypoxia-induced pyridinoline (PYR) cross-links via intermediaries like LOX. Hypoxia was shown to enhance PYR cross-linking 1.4- to 6.4-fold and, concomitantly, to increase the tensile properties of collagen-rich tissues 1.3- to 2.2-fold. Direct administration of exogenous LOX was applied in native cartilage and neocartilage generated using a scaffold-free, self-assembling process of primary chondrocytes. Exogenous LOX was found to enhance native tissue tensile properties 1.9-fold. LOX concentration- and time-dependent increases in PYR content (∼16-fold compared with controls) and tensile properties (approximately fivefold compared with controls) of neocartilage were also detected, resulting in properties on par with native tissue. Finally, in vivo subcutaneous implantation of LOX-treated neocartilage in nude mice promoted further maturation of the neotissue, enhancing tensile and PYR content approximately threefold and 14-fold, respectively, compared with in vitro controls. Collectively, these results provide the first report, to our knowledge, of endogenous (hypoxia-induced) and exogenous LOX applications for promoting collagen cross-linking and improving the tensile properties of a spectrum of native and engineered tissues both in vitro and in

  13. Glutaraldehyde-cross-linked meniscal allografts: clinical, gross, and histological results.

    PubMed

    Powers, D L; Davenport, M E; Wisnewski, P J

    1988-01-01

    Osteoarthritic changes in the knee are often a late result of total meniscectomy. In cases of total resection, availability of a prosthetic meniscus might limit development of these changes. The objective of this research was to evaluate a glutaraldehyde-cross-linked medial meniscus as a morphologically and biologically compatible prosthesis in a canine model. Medial and lateral menisci were harvested from donor dogs, frozen in saline, and cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Five host animals were selected and matched with donors. Glutaraldehyde-cross-linked medial menisci were implanted bilaterally in the stifle joints and one glutaraldehyde cross-linked lateral meniscus was implanted subcutaneously. Clinical results showed asymptomatic limb and joint usage during the 12 postoperative weeks. Gross and histological evaluations indicated acceptable biocompatibility. The subcutaneous implants were encapsulated with a thin fibrous tissue capsule that was only mildly inflamed. Within the joints, the anterior attachment and periphery were maintained in position by their sutures; however, there was dehiscence of the posterior suture in all cases. The articulating surfaces of the implants were intact. There was an initial loss in the quantity of proteoglycans following glutaraldehyde treatment, with significant recovery after implantation into the joints. There were significant degenerative changes (loss of proteoglycans and fibrillation) in the articular cartilage on the femoral condyle and tibial plateau most likely a result of the posterior attachment failure. It was concluded that glutaraldehyde-cross-linked meniscal allografts showed an acceptable degree of histocompatibility. However, failure of the posterior attachment interfered with testing the efficacy of the prosthesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3155294

  14. Role of collagen content and cross-linking in large pulmonary arterial stiffening after chronic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijie; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is associated with large pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which is correlated with collagen accumulation. However, the mechanisms by which collagen contributes to PA stiffening remain largely unexplored. Moreover, HPH may alter mechanical properties other than stiffness, such as pulse damping capacity, which also affects ventricular workload but is rarely quantified. We hypothesized that collagen content and cross-linking differentially regulate the stiffness and damping capacity of large PAs during HPH progression. The hypothesis was tested with transgenic mice that synthesize collagen type I resistant to collagenase degradation (Col1a1R/R). These mice and littermate controls (Col1a1+/+) were exposed to hypoxia for 10 days; some were treated with β-animopropionitrile (BAPN), which prevents new cross-link formation. Isolated PA dynamic mechanical tests were performed and collagen content and cross-linking were measured. In Col1a1+/+ mice, HPH increased both collagen content and cross-linking and BAPN treatment prevented these increases. Similar trends were observed in Col1a1R/R mice except that collagen content further increased with BAPN treatment. Mechanical tests showed that in Col1a1+/+ mice, HPH increased PA stiffness and damping capacity and these increases were impeded by BAPN treatment. In Col1a1R/R mice, HPH led to a smaller but significant increase in PA stiffness and a decrease in damping capacity. These mechanical changes were not affected by BAPN treatment. Vessel-specific correlations for each strain showed that the stiffness and damping capacity were correlated with the total content rather than cross-linking of collagen. Our results suggest that collagen total content is critical to extralobar PA stiffening during HPH. PMID:21538012

  15. Protein Cross-Linking Capillary Electrophoresis for Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Claire M; Shao, Hao; Rauch, Jennifer N; Dawod, Mohamed; Nordhues, Bryce; Dickey, Chad A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Kennedy, Robert T

    2016-08-16

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been identified as a useful platform for detecting, quantifying, and screening for modulators of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). In this method, one protein binding partner is labeled with a fluorophore, the protein binding partners are mixed, and then, the complex is separated from free protein to allow direct determination of bound to free ratios. Although it possesses many advantages for PPI studies, the method is limited by the need to have separation conditions that both prevent protein adsorption to capillary and maintain protein interactions during the separation. In this work, we use protein cross-linking capillary electrophoresis (PXCE) to overcome this limitation. In PXCE, the proteins are cross-linked under binding conditions and then separated. This approach eliminates the need to maintain noncovalent interactions during electrophoresis and facilitates method development. We report PXCE methods for an antibody-antigen interaction and heterodimer and homodimer heat shock protein complexes. Complexes are cross-linked by short treatments with formaldehyde after reaching binding equilibrium. Cross-linked complexes are separated by electrophoretic mobility using free solution CE or by size using sieving electrophoresis of SDS complexes. The method gives good quantitative results; e.g., a lysozyme-antibody interaction was found to have Kd = 24 ± 3 nM by PXCE and Kd = 17 ± 2 nM using isothermal calorimetry (ITC). Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in complex with bcl2 associated athanogene 3 (Bag3) was found to have Kd = 25 ± 5 nM by PXCE which agrees with Kd values reported without cross-linking. Hsp70-Bag3 binding site mutants and small molecule inhibitors of Hsp70-Bag3 were characterized by PXCE with good agreement to inhibitory constants and IC50 values obtained by a bead-based flow cytometry protein interaction assay (FCPIA). PXCE allows rapid method development for quantitative analysis of PPIs. PMID:27434096

  16. Mitochondrial permeability transition as induced by cross-linking of the adenine nucleotide translocase.

    PubMed

    Zazueta, C; Reyes-Vivas, H; Zafra, G; Sánchez, C A; Vera, G; Chávez, E

    1998-04-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition is caused by the opening of a transmembrane pore whose chemical nature has not been well established yet. The present work was aimed to further contribute to the knowledge of the membrane entity comprised in the formation of the non-specific channel. The increased permeability was established by analyzing the inability of rat kidney mitochondria to take up and accumulate Ca2+, as well as their failure to build up a transmembrane potential, after the cross-linking of membrane proteins by copper plus ortho-phenanthroline. To identify the cross-linked proteins, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed. The results are representative of at least three separate experiments. It is indicated that 30 microM Cu2+ induced the release of 4.3 nmol Ca2+ per mg protein. However, in the presence of 100 microM ortho-phenanthroline only 2 microM Cu2+ was required to attain the total release of the accumulated Ca2+; it should be noted that such a reaction is not inhibited by cyclosporin. The increased permeability corresponds to cross-linking of membrane proteins in which approximately 4 nmol thiol groups per mg protein appear to be involved. Such a linking process is inhibited by carboxyatractyloside. By using the fluorescent probe eosin-5-maleimide the label was found in a cross-linking 60 kDa dimer of two 30 kDa monomers. From the data presented it is concluded that copper-o-phenanthroline induces the intermolecular cross-linking of the adenine nucleotide translocase which in turn is converted to non-specific pore. PMID:9675885

  17. Amino Acid Proximities in Two Sup35 Prion Strains Revealed by Chemical Cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shenq-Huey; King, Chih-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Strains of the yeast prion [PSI] are different folding patterns of the same Sup35 protein, which stacks up periodically to form a prion fiber. Chemical cross-linking is employed here to probe different fiber structures assembled with a mutant Sup35 fragment. The photo-reactive cross-linker, p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine (pBpa), was biosynthetically incorporated into bacterially prepared recombinant Sup(1-61)-GFP, containing the first 61 residues of Sup35, followed by the green fluorescent protein. Four methionine substitutions and two alanine substitutions were introduced at fixed positions in Sup(1-61) to allow cyanogen bromide cleavage to facilitate subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Amyloid fibers of pBpa and Met/Ala-substituted Sup(1-61)-GFP were nucleated from purified yeast prion particles of two different strains, namely VK and VL, and shown to faithfully transmit specific strain characteristics to yeast expressing the wild type Sup35 protein. Intra- and intermolecular cross-linking were distinguished by tandem mass spectrometry analysis on fibers seeded from solutions containing equal amounts of (14)N- and (15)N-labeled protein. Fibers propagating the VL strain type exhibited intra- and intermolecular cross-linking between amino acid residues 3 and 28, as well as intra- and intermolecular linking between 32 and 55. Inter- and intramolecular cross-linking between residues 32 and 55 were detected in fibers propagating the VK strain type. Adjacencies of amino acid residues in space revealed by cross-linking were used to constrain possible chain folds of different [PSI] strains. PMID:26265470

  18. Integration of linear and dendritic actin nucleation in Nck-induced actin comets

    PubMed Central

    Borinskaya, Sofya; Velle, Katrina B.; Campellone, Kenneth G.; Talman, Arthur; Alvarez, Diego; Agaisse, Hervé; Wu, Yi I.; Loew, Leslie M.; Mayer, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    The Nck adaptor protein recruits cytosolic effectors such as N-WASP that induce localized actin polymerization. Experimental aggregation of Nck SH3 domains at the membrane induces actin comet tails—dynamic, elongated filamentous actin structures similar to those that drive the movement of microbial pathogens such as vaccinia virus. Here we show that experimental manipulation of the balance between unbranched/branched nucleation altered the morphology and dynamics of Nck-induced actin comets. Inhibition of linear, formin-based nucleation with the small-molecule inhibitor SMIFH2 or overexpression of the formin FH1 domain resulted in formation of predominantly circular-shaped actin structures with low mobility (actin blobs). These results indicate that formin-based linear actin polymerization is critical for the formation and maintenance of Nck-dependent actin comet tails. Consistent with this, aggregation of an exclusively branched nucleation-promoting factor (the VCA domain of N-WASP), with density and turnover similar to those of N-WASP in Nck comets, did not reconstitute dynamic, elongated actin comets. Furthermore, enhancement of branched Arp2/3-mediated nucleation by N-WASP overexpression caused loss of the typical actin comet tail shape induced by Nck aggregation. Thus the ratio of linear to dendritic nucleation activity may serve to distinguish the properties of actin structures induced by various viral and bacterial pathogens. PMID:26609071

  19. ProXL (Protein Cross-Linking Database): A Platform for Analysis, Visualization, and Sharing of Protein Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ProXL is a Web application and accompanying database designed for sharing, visualizing, and analyzing bottom-up protein cross-linking mass spectrometry data with an emphasis on structural analysis and quality control. ProXL is designed to be independent of any particular software pipeline. The import process is simplified by the use of the ProXL XML data format, which shields developers of data importers from the relative complexity of the relational database schema. The database and Web interfaces function equally well for any software pipeline and allow data from disparate pipelines to be merged and contrasted. ProXL includes robust public and private data sharing capabilities, including a project-based interface designed to ensure security and facilitate collaboration among multiple researchers. ProXL provides multiple interactive and highly dynamic data visualizations that facilitate structural-based analysis of the observed cross-links as well as quality control. ProXL is open-source, well-documented, and freely available at https://github.com/yeastrc/proxl-web-app. PMID:27302480

  20. ProXL (Protein Cross-Linking Database): A Platform for Analysis, Visualization, and Sharing of Protein Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry Data.

    PubMed

    Riffle, Michael; Jaschob, Daniel; Zelter, Alex; Davis, Trisha N

    2016-08-01

    ProXL is a Web application and accompanying database designed for sharing, visualizing, and analyzing bottom-up protein cross-linking mass spectrometry data with an emphasis on structural analysis and quality control. ProXL is designed to be independent of any particular software pipeline. The import process is simplified by the use of the ProXL XML data format, which shields developers of data importers from the relative complexity of the relational database schema. The database and Web interfaces function equally well for any software pipeline and allow data from disparate pipelines to be merged and contrasted. ProXL includes robust public and private data sharing capabilities, including a project-based interface designed to ensure security and facilitate collaboration among multiple researchers. ProXL provides multiple interactive and highly dynamic data visualizations that facilitate structural-based analysis of the observed cross-links as well as quality control. ProXL is open-source, well-documented, and freely available at https://github.com/yeastrc/proxl-web-app . PMID:27302480

  1. Petunia actin-depolymerizing factor is mainly accumulated in vascular tissue and its gene expression is enhanced by the first intron.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, So-Young; Yu, Hee-Ju; Jeong, Young-Min; Shin, Mi-Young; Kim, Hoyeun; Lee, Ilha; Kim, Sang-Gu

    2002-06-12

    Actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) is one of the actin cytoskeleton-modulating proteins. We have characterized the accumulation pattern of petunia ADF proteins. PhADF proteins are accumulated in every petunia organ and their accumulation is differentially regulated by developmental signals. Their cellular localization is vascular tissue-preferential in vegetative organs, whereas somewhat different in reproductive organs. In reproductive organs, PhADFs are present in outer integument, endocarp of ovary wall, transmitting tissue of style, and epidermis and endothecium of young anther. From a petunia genomic library, we have isolated a genomic clone encoding PhADF1. Comparison to complementary DNA sequence revealed that the coding region of PhADF1 gene consists of three exons and two introns. Analysis of chimeric gene expression using beta-glucuronidase as a reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis revealed that PhADF1 was strongly expressed in every vegetative tissue except petal. In addition, expression of the gene was highly enhanced by its first intron. These results suggest that PhADF1 gene of petunia is mainly expressed in vascular tissues and its expression is regulated by intron-mediated enhancement mechanism. PMID:12119118

  2. DNA bending is induced by a transcription factor that interacts with the human c-FOS and alpha-actin promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, T A; Taylor, A; Kedes, L

    1989-01-01

    Conserved sequence elements in the human cardiac and skeletal alpha-actin promoters that contain the CC(A + T-rich)6GG motif have been shown to regulate transcription of these genes. A similar sequence is found in the serum response element of the human c-FOS gene. In this study, we demonstrate that indistinguishable proteins bind to each of five CC(A + T-rich)6GG elements examined in the human cardiac and skeletal alpha-actin promoters and the c-FOS serum response element. Using electrophoretic techniques, we show that these factors induce a stable bend in the DNA upon binding, and the bend center is shown to coincide with the CC(A + T-rich)6GG element. In addition, the ability to bend DNA is retained by a small proteolytic fragment of the protein, suggesting that the DNA-binding domain of the protein is resistant to proteases and is sufficient to bend DNA. Images PMID:2494661

  3. Fine-Tuning of the Actin Cytoskeleton and Cell Adhesion During Drosophila Development by the Unconventional Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Myoblast City and Sponge

    PubMed Central

    Biersmith, Bridget; Wang, Zong-Heng; Geisbrecht, Erika R.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Dock proteins function as unconventional guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Upon binding to engulfment and cell motility (ELMO) proteins, Dock–ELMO complexes activate the Rho family of small GTPases to mediate a diverse array of biological processes, including cell motility, apoptotic cell clearance, and axon guidance. Overlapping expression patterns and functional redundancy among the 11 vertebrate Dock family members, which are subdivided into four families (Dock A, B, C, and D), complicate genetic analysis. In both vertebrate and invertebrate systems, the actin dynamics regulator, Rac, is the target GTPase of the Dock-A subfamily. However, it remains unclear whether Rac or Rap1 are the in vivo downstream GTPases of the Dock-B subfamily. Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent genetic model organism for understanding Dock protein function as its genome encodes one ortholog per subfamily: Myoblast city (Mbc; Dock A) and Sponge (Spg; Dock B). Here we show that the roles of Spg and Mbc are not redundant in the Drosophila somatic muscle or the dorsal vessel. Moreover, we confirm the in vivo role of Mbc upstream of Rac and provide evidence that Spg functions in concert with Rap1, possibly to regulate aspects of cell adhesion. Together these data show that Mbc and Spg can have different downstream GTPase targets. Our findings predict that the ability to regulate downstream GTPases is dependent on cellular context and allows for the fine-tuning of actin cytoskeletal or cell adhesion events in biological processes that undergo cell morphogenesis. PMID:25908317

  4. Stochastic model of profilin-actin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Brandon; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    A driving factor in cell motility and other processes that involve changes of cell shape is the rapid polymerization of actin subunits into long filaments. This process is regulated by profilin, a protein which binds to actin subunits and regulates elongation of actin filaments. Whether profilin stimulates polymerization by coupling to hydrolysis of ATP-bound actin is debated. Previous studies have proposed indirect coupling to ATP hydrolysis using rate equations, but did not include the effects of fluctuations that are important near the critical concentration. We developed stochastic simulations using the Gillespie algorithm to study single filament elongation at the barbed end in the presence of profilin. We used recently measured rate constants and estimated the rate of profilin binding to the barbed end such that detailed balance is satisfied. Fast phosphate release at the tip of the filament was accounted for. The elongation rate and length diffusivity as functions of profilin and actin concentration were calculated and used to extract the critical concentrations of free actin and of total actin. We show under what conditions profilin leads to an increase in the critical concentration of total actin but a decrease in the critical concentration of free actin.

  5. Well-defined, Reversible Disulfide Cross-linked Micelles for On-demand Paclitaxel Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanpei; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Xiao, Wenwu; Lee, Joyce S.; Gonik, Abby M.; Kato, Jason; Dong, Tiffany; Lam, Kit S.

    2011-01-01

    To minimize premature release of drugs from their carriers during circulation in the blood stream, we have recently developed reversible disulfide cross-linked micelles (DCMs) that can be triggered to release drug at the tumor site or in cancer cells. We designed and synthesized thiolated linear-dendritic polymers (telodendrimers) by introducing cysteines to the dendritic oligo-lysine backbone of our previously reported telodendrimers comprised of linear polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a dendritic cluster of cholic acids. Reversibly cross-linked micelles were then prepared by the oxidization of thiol groups to disulfide bond in the core of micelles after the self-assembly of thiolated telodendrimers. The DCMs were spherical with a uniform size of 28 nm, and were able to load paclitaxel (PTX) in the core with superior loading capacity up to 35.5% (w/w, drug/micelle). Cross-linking of the micelles within the core reduced their apparent critical micelle concentration and greatly enhanced their stability in non-reductive physiological conditions as well as severe micelle-disrupting conditions. The release of PTX from the DCMs was significantly slower than that from non-cross-linked micelles (NCMs), but can be gradually facilitated by increasing the concentration of reducing agent (glutathione) to an intracellular reductive level. The DCMs demonstrated a longer in vivo blood circulation time, less hemolytic activities, and superior toxicity profiles in nude mice, when compared to NCMs. DCMs were found to be able to preferentially accumulate at the tumor site in nude mice bearing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenograft. We also demonstrated that the disulfide cross-linked micellar formulation of PTX (PTX-DCMs) was more efficacious than both free drug and the non-cross-linked formulation of PTX at equivalent doses of PTX in the ovarian cancer xenograft mouse model. The anti-tumor effect of PTX-DCMs can be further enhanced by triggering the release of PTX on-demand by the

  6. Chemical Cross-Linking Stabilizes Native-Like HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimer Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Schiffner, Torben; de Val, Natalia; Russell, Rebecca A.; de Taeye, Steven W.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Kim, Helen J.; Nieusma, Travis; Brod, Florian; Cupo, Albert; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Major neutralizing antibody immune evasion strategies of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer include conformational and structural instability. Stabilized soluble trimers such as BG505 SOSIP.664 mimic the structure of virion-associated Env but nevertheless sample different conformational states. Here we demonstrate that treating BG505 SOSIP.664 trimers with glutaraldehyde or a heterobifunctional cross-linker introduces additional stability with relatively modest effects on antigenicity. Thus, most broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) epitopes were preserved after cross-linking, whereas the binding of most weakly or nonneutralizing antibodies (non-NAb) was reduced. Cross-linking stabilized all Env conformers present within a mixed population, and individual conformers could be isolated by bNAb affinity chromatography. Both positive selection of cross-linked conformers using the quaternary epitope-specific bNAbs PGT145, PGT151, and 3BC315 and negative selection with non-NAbs against the V3 region enriched for trimer populations with improved antigenicity for bNAbs. Similar results were obtained using the clade B B41 SOSIP.664 trimer. The cross-linking method may, therefore, be useful for countering the natural conformational heterogeneity of some HIV-1 Env proteins and, by extrapolation, also vaccine immunogens from other pathogens. IMPORTANCE The development of a vaccine to induce protective antibodies against HIV-1 is of primary public health importance. Recent advances in immunogen design have provided soluble recombinant envelope glycoprotein trimers with near-native morphology and antigenicity. However, these trimers are conformationally flexible, potentially reducing B-cell recognition of neutralizing antibody epitopes. Here we show that chemical cross-linking increases trimer stability, reducing binding of nonneutralizing antibodies while largely maintaining neutralizing antibody binding. Cross-linking followed by positive or negative

  7. Aliphatic β-Nitroalcohols for Therapeutic Corneoscleral Cross-linking: Chemical Mechanisms and Higher Order Nitroalcohols

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Marissa R.; Wen, Quan; Turro, Nicholas J.; Trokel, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The recent tissue cross-linking studies indicate that aliphatic β-nitroalcohols (BNAs) may be useful as pharmacologic corneoscleral cross-linking agents. The present study was performed to identify the specific chemistry involved under physiologic conditions, with the intent of identifying more effective agents. Methods. The mechanism of chemical cross-linking at pH 7.4 and 37°C was studied using three techniques. The colorimetric Griess assay was used to follow the release of nitrite from three mono-nitroalcohols (2-nitroethanol [2ne], 2-nitro-1-propanol [2nprop]), and 3-nitro-2-pentanol [3n2pent]). Second, the evolution of 2nprop in 0.2 M NaH2PO4/Na2HPO4/D2O was studied using 1H-NMR. Third, thermal shrinkage temperature analysis (Ts), a measure of tissue cross-linking, was used to support information from 1the H-NMR studies. Results. A time-dependent release of nitrite was observed for all three mono-nitroalcohols studied. The maximum levels were comparable using either 2ne or 2nprop (∼30%). However, much less (∼10%) was observed from 3n2pent. Using 1H-NMR, 2nprop evolved into a unique splitting pattern. No match was observed with reference spectra from three possible products of denitration. In contrast, 2-methyl-2-nitro-1,3-propanediol (MNPD), a nitro-diol, was identified, implying the formation of formaldehyde from a retro-nitroaldol (i.e., reverse Henry) reaction. In support of this mechanism, Ts shifts induced by the nitro-triol 2-hydroxymethyl-2-nitro-1,3-propanediol (HNPD) were superior to the nitro-diol MNPD which were superior to the mono nitroalcohol 2nprop. Conclusions. BNAs function as both formaldehyde and nitrite donors under physiologic conditions to cross-link collagenous tissue. Higher order BNAs are more effective than mono nitroalcohols, raising the possibility of using these agents for therapeutic corneoscleral cross-linking. PMID:19797229

  8. Corneal Cross-Linking (with a Partial Deepithelization) in Keratoconus with Five Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, Virgilio; Tello, Alejandro; Carreño, Néstor I.; Ortiz, Alvaro I.; Barrera, Rodrigo; Rodriguez, Carlos Julián; Ochoa, Miguel E.

    2016-01-01

    We performed a retrospective interventional case series including 80 eyes of 48 patients with keratoconus (KC) who were treated with modified corneal cross-linking (CXL) for KC (with a partial deepithelization in a pattern of stripes). The average follow-up was 5.8 years (with a minimum of 5 years). At the last follow-up visit, compared with preoperative values, there were no significant changes in spherical equivalent, average keratometry, corneal thickness, corneal hysteresis, or corneal resistance factor. The distance-corrected visual acuity was 20/39 preoperatively and 20/36 postoperatively (P = 0.3). The endothelial cell count decreased by 4.7% (P < 0.005). These findings suggest that this modified corneal CXL technique is a safe and effective alternative to halt the progression of KC up to five years after the procedure. However, some concerns remain as to whether this technique can affect in some degree the corneal endothelial cells. PMID:27199574

  9. Expanding the Chemical Cross-Linking Toolbox by the Use of Multiple Proteases and Enrichment by Size Exclusion Chromatography*

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Reischl, Roland; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Herzog, Franz; Bohn, Stefan; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2012-01-01

    Chemical cross-linking in combination with mass spectrometric analysis offers the potential to obtain low-resolution structural information from proteins and protein complexes. Identification of peptides connected by a cross-link provides direct evidence for the physical interaction of amino acid side chains, information that can be used for computational